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Sample records for macromolecular nanofiber network

  1. Effects of macromolecular crowding on genetic networks.

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    Morelli, Marco J; Allen, Rosalind J; Wolde, Pieter Rein ten

    2011-12-21

    The intracellular environment is crowded with proteins, DNA, and other macromolecules. Under physiological conditions, macromolecular crowding can alter both molecular diffusion and the equilibria of bimolecular reactions and therefore is likely to have a significant effect on the function of biochemical networks. We propose a simple way to model the effects of macromolecular crowding on biochemical networks via an appropriate scaling of bimolecular association and dissociation rates. We use this approach, in combination with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, to analyze the effects of crowding on a constitutively expressed gene, a repressed gene, and a model for the bacteriophage λ genetic switch, in the presence and absence of nonspecific binding of transcription factors to genomic DNA. Our results show that the effects of crowding are mainly caused by the shift of association-dissociation equilibria rather than the slowing down of protein diffusion, and that macromolecular crowding can have relevant and counterintuitive effects on biochemical network performance.

  2. Macromolecular networks and intelligence in microorganisms

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    Hans V Westerhoff

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms persist by virtue of complex interactions among many components organized into dynamic, environment-responsive networks that span multiple scales and dimensions. Biological networks constitute a type of Information and Communication Technology (ICT: they receive information from the outside and inside of cells, integrate and interpret this information, and then activate a response. Biological networks enable molecules within cells, and even cells themselves, to communicate with each other and their environment. We have become accustomed to associating brain activity – particularly activity of the human brain – with a phenomenon we call intelligence. Yet, four billion years of evolution could have selected networks with topologies and dynamics that confer traits analogous to this intelligence, even though they were outside the intercellular networks of the brain. Here, we explore how macromolecular networks in microbes confer intelligent characteristics, such as memory, anticipation, adaptation and reflection and we review current understanding of how network organization reflects the type of intelligence required for the environments in which they were selected. We propose that, if we were to leave terms such as human and brain out of the defining features of intelligence, all forms of life – from microbes to humans – exhibit some or all characteristics consistent with intelligence. We then review advances in genome-wide data production and analysis, especially in microbes, that provide a lens into microbial intelligence and propose how the insights derived from quantitatively characterizing biomolecular networks may enable synthetic biologists to create intelligent molecular networks for biotechnology, possibly generating new forms of intelligence, first in silico and then in vivo.

  3. Macromolecular networks and intelligence in microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhoff, Hans V.; Brooks, Aaron N.; Simeonidis, Evangelos; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; He, Fei; Boogerd, Fred C.; Jackson, Victoria J.; Goncharuk, Valeri; Kolodkin, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    Living organisms persist by virtue of complex interactions among many components organized into dynamic, environment-responsive networks that span multiple scales and dimensions. Biological networks constitute a type of information and communication technology (ICT): they receive information from the outside and inside of cells, integrate and interpret this information, and then activate a response. Biological networks enable molecules within cells, and even cells themselves, to communicate with each other and their environment. We have become accustomed to associating brain activity – particularly activity of the human brain – with a phenomenon we call “intelligence.” Yet, four billion years of evolution could have selected networks with topologies and dynamics that confer traits analogous to this intelligence, even though they were outside the intercellular networks of the brain. Here, we explore how macromolecular networks in microbes confer intelligent characteristics, such as memory, anticipation, adaptation and reflection and we review current understanding of how network organization reflects the type of intelligence required for the environments in which they were selected. We propose that, if we were to leave terms such as “human” and “brain” out of the defining features of “intelligence,” all forms of life – from microbes to humans – exhibit some or all characteristics consistent with “intelligence.” We then review advances in genome-wide data production and analysis, especially in microbes, that provide a lens into microbial intelligence and propose how the insights derived from quantitatively characterizing biomolecular networks may enable synthetic biologists to create intelligent molecular networks for biotechnology, possibly generating new forms of intelligence, first in silico and then in vivo. PMID:25101076

  4. Composites incorporated a conductive polymer nanofiber network

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    Pozzo, Lilo Danielle; Newbloom, Gregory

    2017-04-11

    Methods of forming composites that incorporate networks of conductive polymer nanofibers are provided. Networks of less-than conductive polymers are first formed and then doped with a chemical dopant to provide networks of conductive polymers. The networks of conductive polymers are then incorporated into a matrix in order to improve the conductivity of the matrix. The formed composites are useful as conductive coatings for applications including electromagnetic energy management on exterior surfaces of vehicles.

  5. Controlled architecture for improved macromolecular memory within polymer networks.

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    DiPasquale, Stephen A; Byrne, Mark E

    2016-08-01

    This brief review analyzes recent developments in the field of living/controlled polymerization and the potential of this technique for creating imprinted polymers with highly structured architecture with macromolecular memory. As a result, it is possible to engineer polymers at the molecular level with increased homogeneity relating to enhanced template binding and transport. Only recently has living/controlled polymerization been exploited to decrease heterogeneity and substantially improve the efficiency of the imprinting process for both highly and weakly crosslinked imprinted polymers. Living polymerization can be utilized to create imprinted networks that are vastly more efficient than similar polymers produced using conventional free radical polymerization, and these improvements increase the role that macromolecular memory can play in the design and engineering of new drug delivery and sensing platforms.

  6. Transparent Conductive Films of Copper Nanofiber Network Fabricated by Electrospinning

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    Sungyeoul Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu nanofiber networks can be a good alternative of the Ag nanowire of high electrical conductivity while having the advantage of low price. An electrospinning method was developed to fabricate copper nanofiber network for use as a transparent conductive film on glass substrate. The effects of liquid diluents for electrospinning processability were examined in relation to the subsequent Cu nanofiber formation processes. Electrospinning solutions of copper acetate/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA and copper nitrate trihydrate/polyvinyl butyral (PVB were investigated. The polymer mixing solutions influenced the subsequent annealing temperatures for removal of the polymers and reduction of the formed CuO nanofibers to Cu metal nanofibers. The morphology and structures of the formed nanofiber networks were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and so forth. The mixture with PVB provided lower annealing temperatures suitable for application to flexible substrates.

  7. Phase diagram of hopping conduction mechanisms in polymer nanofiber network

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    Li, Jeng-Ting; Lu, Yu-Cheng; Jiang, Shiau-Bin; Zhong, Yuan-Liang, E-mail: ylzhong@cycu.edu.tw [Department of Physics and Center for Nanotechnology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Jui-Ming [Department of Chemistry and Center for Nanotechnology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China)

    2015-12-07

    Network formation by nanofiber crosslinking is usually in polymer materials as application in organic semiconductor devices. Electron hopping transport mechanisms depend on polymer morphology in network. Conducting polymers morphology in a random network structure is modeled by a quasi-one-dimensional system coupled of chains or fibers. We observe the varying hopping conduction mechanisms in the polyaniline nanofibers of the random network structure. The average diameter d of the nanofibers is varied from approximately 10 to 100 nm. The different dominant hopping mechanisms including Efros-Shklovskii variable-range hopping (VRH), Mott VRH, and nearest-neighbor hopping are dependent on temperature range and d in crossover changes. The result of this study is first presented in a phase diagram of hopping conduction mechanisms based on the theories of the random network model. The hopping conduction mechanism is unlike in normal semiconductor materials.

  8. Interfacial engineering of carbon nanofiber-graphene-carbon nanofiber heterojunctions in flexible lightweight electromagnetic shielding networks.

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    Song, Wei-Li; Wang, Jia; Fan, Li-Zhen; Li, Yong; Wang, Chan-Yuan; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2014-07-09

    Lightweight carbon materials of effective electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding have attracted increasing interest because of rapid development of smart communication devices. To meet the requirement in portable electronic devices, flexible shielding materials with ultrathin characteristic have been pursued for this purpose. In this work, we demonstrated a facile strategy for scalable fabrication of flexible all-carbon networks, where the insulting polymeric frames and interfaces have been well eliminated. Microscopically, a novel carbon nanofiber-graphene nanosheet-carbon nanofiber (CNF-GN-CNF) heterojunction, which plays the dominant role as the interfacial modifier, has been observed in the as-fabricated networks. With the presence of CNF-GN-CNF heterojunctions, the all-carbon networks exhibit much increased electrical properties, resulting in the great enhancement of EMI shielding performance. The related mechanism for engineering the CNF interfaces based on the CNF-GN-CNF heterojunctions has been discussed. Implication of the results suggests that the lightweight all-carbon networks, whose thickness and density are much smaller than other graphene/polymer composites, present more promising potential as thin shielding materials in flexible portable electronics.

  9. Integration of macromolecular diffraction data using radial basis function networks.

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    Pokrić, B; Allinson, N M; Helliwell, J R

    2000-11-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for intensity calculation of X-ray diffraction spots based on a two-stage radial basis function (RBF) network. The first stage uses pre-determined reference profiles from a database as basis functions in order to locate the diffraction spots and identify any overlapping regions. The second-stage RBF network employs narrow basis functions capable of local modifications of the reference profiles leading to a more accurate observed diffraction spot approximation and therefore accurate determination of spot positions and integrated intensities.

  10. Deformable elastic network refinement for low-resolution macromolecular crystallography.

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    Schröder, Gunnar F; Levitt, Michael; Brunger, Axel T

    2014-09-01

    Crystals of membrane proteins and protein complexes often diffract to low resolution owing to their intrinsic molecular flexibility, heterogeneity or the mosaic spread of micro-domains. At low resolution, the building and refinement of atomic models is a more challenging task. The deformable elastic network (DEN) refinement method developed previously has been instrumental in the determinion of several structures at low resolution. Here, DEN refinement is reviewed, recommendations for its optimal usage are provided and its limitations are discussed. Representative examples of the application of DEN refinement to challenging cases of refinement at low resolution are presented. These cases include soluble as well as membrane proteins determined at limiting resolutions ranging from 3 to 7 Å. Potential extensions of the DEN refinement technique and future perspectives for the interpretation of low-resolution crystal structures are also discussed.

  11. Transition modes in Ising networks: an approximate theory for macromolecular recognition.

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    Keating, S; Di Cera, E

    1993-07-01

    For a statistical lattice, or Ising network, composed of N identical units existing in two possible states, 0 and 1, and interacting according to a given geometry, a set of values can be found for the mean free energy of the 0-->1 transition of a single unit. Each value defines a transition mode in an ensemble of nu N = 3N - 2N possible values and reflects the role played by intermediate states in shaping the energetics of the system as a whole. The distribution of transition modes has a number of intriguing properties. Some of them apply quite generally to any Ising network, regardless of its dimension, while others are specific for each interaction geometry and dimensional embedding and bear on fundamental aspects of analytical number theory. The landscape of transition modes encapsulates all of the important thermodynamic properties of the network. The free energy terms defining the partition function of the system can be derived from the modes by simple transformations. Classical mean-field expressions can be obtained from consideration of the properties of transition modes in a rather straightforward way. The results obtained in the analysis of the transition mode distributions have been used to develop an approximate treatment of the problem of macromolecular recognition. This phenomenon is modeled as a cooperative process that involves a number of recognition subsites across an interface generated by the binding of two macromolecular components. The distribution of allowed binding free energies for the system is shown to be a superposition of Gaussian terms with mean and variance determined a priori by the theory. Application to the analysis of the biologically interaction of thrombin with hirudin has provided some useful information on basic aspects of the interaction, such as the number of recognition subsites involved and the energy balance for binding and cooperative coupling among them. Our results agree quite well with information derived independently

  12. Silicon-Encapsulated Hollow Carbon Nanofiber Networks as Binder-Free Anodes for Lithium Ion Battery

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    Ding Nan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon-encapsulated hollow carbon nanofiber networks with ample space around the Si nanoparticles (hollow Si/C composites were successfully synthesized by dip-coating phenolic resin onto the surface of electrospun Si/PVA nanofibers along with the subsequent solidification and carbonization. More importantly, the structure and Si content of hollow Si/C composite nanofibers can be effectively tuned by merely varying the concentration of dip solution. As-synthesized hollow Si/C composites show excellent electrochemical performance when they are used as binder-free anodes for Li-ion batteries (LIBs. In particular, when the concentration of resol/ethanol solution is 3.0%, the product exhibits a large capacity of 841 mAh g−1 in the first cycle, prominent cycling stability, and good rate capability. The discharge capacity retention of it was ~90%, with 745 mAh g−1 after 50 cycles. The results demonstrate that the hollow Si/C composites are very promising as alternative anode candidates for high-performance LIBs.

  13. Engineering anisotropic biphasic Janus-type polymer nanofiber scaffold networks via centrifugal jet spinning.

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    Khang, Alex; Ravishankar, Prashanth; Krishnaswamy, Aditya; Anderson, Patrick K; Cone, Stephanie G; Liu, Zizhao; Qian, Xianghong; Balachandran, Kartik

    2017-11-01

    Biphasic materials, comprised of an ordered arrangement of two different material phases within a material, have the potential for a wide variety of applications including filtration, protective clothing and tissue engineering. This study reports for the first time, a process for engineering biphasic Janus-type polymeric nanofiber (BJPNF) networks via the centrifugal jet spinning technique. BJPNF alignment and fiber diameter was dependent on fabrication rotational speed as well as solution composition. The biphasic character of these BJPNFs, which was controlled via the rotational speed of fabrication, was confirmed at the individual nanofiber scale using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and at the bulk, macro-scale using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Biphasic character was also demonstrated at the functional level via differing affinities on either side of the BJPNF for cell attachment. Our work thus presents a method for fabricating BJPNF scaffold networks where there might be a need for different properties on either side of a material. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2455-2464, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Free-Standing Porous Carbon Nanofiber Networks from Electrospinning Polyimide for Supercapacitors

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    Bo Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Free-standing porous carbon nanofiber networks (CFNs were synthesized by electrospinning method and carbonization procedure. We study the implementation of porous CFNs as supercapacitor electrodes and electrochemical measurements demonstrated that porous CFNs exhibit a specific capacitance (205 F/g at the scan rate of 5 mV/s with high flexibility and good rate capability performance (more than 70% of its initial capacitance from 5 mV/s to 200 mV/s. Furthermore, porous CFNs exhibited an excellent cycling stability (just 12% capacitance loss after 10,000 cycles. These results suggest that porous CFNs are very promising candidates as flexible supercapacitor electrodes.

  15. Improved lithium-ion battery anode capacity with a network of easily fabricated spindle-like carbon nanofibers.

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    Liu, Mengting; Xie, Wenhe; Gu, Lili; Qin, Tianfeng; Hou, Xiaoyi; He, Deyan

    2016-01-01

    A novel network of spindle-like carbon nanofibers was fabricated via a simplified synthesis involving electrospinning followed by preoxidation in air and postcarbonization in Ar. Not only was the as-obtained carbon network comprised of beads of spindle-like nanofibers but the cubic MnO phase and N elements were successfully anchored into the amorphous carbon matrix. When directly used as a binder-free anode for lithium-ion batteries, the network showed excellent electrochemical performance with high capacity, good rate capacity and reliable cycling stability. Under a current density of 0.2 A g(-1), it delivered a high reversible capacity of 875.5 mAh g(-1) after 200 cycles and 1005.5 mAh g(-1) after 250 cycles with a significant coulombic efficiency of 99.5%.

  16. Processing and Structure of Carbon Nanofiber Paper

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    Zhongfu Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique concept of making nanocomposites from carbon nanofiber paper was explored in this study. The essential element of this method was to design and manufacture carbon nanofiber paper with well-controlled and optimized network structure of carbon nanofibers. In this study, carbon nanofiber paper was prepared under various processing conditions, including different types of carbon nanofibers, solvents, dispersants, and acid treatment. The morphologies of carbon nanofibers within the nanofiber paper were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. In addition, the bulk densities of carbon nanofiber papers were measured. It was found that the densities and network structures of carbon nanofiber paper correlated to the dispersion quality of carbon nanofibers within the paper, which was significantly affected by papermaking process conditions.

  17. Electrospun carbon nanofibers reinforced 3D porous carbon polyhedra network derived from metal-organic frameworks for capacitive deionization

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    Liu, Yong; Ma, Jiaqi; Lu, Ting; Pan, Likun

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers reinforced 3D porous carbon polyhedra network (e-CNF-PCP) was prepared through electrospinning and subsequent thermal treatment. The morphology, structure and electrochemical performance of the e-CNF-PCP were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectra, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and their electrosorption performance in NaCl solution was studied. The results show that the e-CNF-PCP exhibits a high electrosorption capacity of 16.98 mg g−1 at 1.2 V in 500 mg l−1 NaCl solution, which shows great improvement compared with those of electrospun carbon nanofibers and porous carbon polyhedra. The e-CNF-PCP should be a very promising candidate as electrode material for CDI applications. PMID:27608826

  18. Isolation of Cellulose Nanofibers: Effect of Biotreatment on Hydrogen Bonding Network in Wood Fibers

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    Sreekumar Janardhnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of cellulose nanofibres as high-strength reinforcement in nano-biocomposites is very enthusiastically being explored due to their biodegradability, renewability, and high specific strength properties. Cellulose, through a regular network of inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonds, is organized into perfect stereoregular configuration called microfibrils which further aggregate to different levels to form the fibre. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding at various levels, especially at the elementary level, is the major binding force that one need to overcome to reverse engineer these fibres into their microfibrillar level. This paper briefly describes a novel enzymatic fibre pretreatment developed to facilitate the isolation of cellulose microfibrils and explores effectiveness of biotreatment on the intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the fiber. Bleached Kraft Softwood Pulp was treated with a fungus (OS1 isolated from elm tree infected with Dutch elm disease. Cellulose microfibrils were isolated from these treated fibers by high-shear refining. The % yield of nanofibres and their diameter distribution (<50 nm isolated from the bio-treated fibers indicated a substantial increase compared to those isolated from untreated fibers. FT-IR spectral analysis indicated a reduction in the density of intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding within the fiber. X-ray spectrometry indicated a reduction in the crystallinity. Hydrogen bond-specific enzyme and its application in the isolation of new generation cellulose nano-fibers can be a huge leap forward in the field of nano-biocomposites.

  19. A three-dimensionally chitin nanofiber/carbon nanotube hydrogel network for foldable conductive paper.

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    Chen, Chuchu; Yang, Chuang; Li, Suiyi; Li, Dagang

    2015-12-10

    We reported a highly conductive nanocomposite made with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and chitin nanofibers (ChNFs). The MWCNTs were dispersed into ChNFs by the simple process of vacuum-filtration, forming a three-dimensional network structure. In this approach, MWCNT acted as a filler to introduce electron channel paths throughout the ChNF skeleton. And then, a hybrid hydrogel system (20 wt.% NaOH, -18 °C) was applied to prepare the ChNF/MWCNT gel-film followed with drying process. It is found that the resultant ChNF/MWCNT gel-film exposed much more MWCNT areas forming denser structure due to the shrinking of ChNFs after the gelation treatment. Compared with ChNF/MWCNT film, the one treated under hydrogel system (ChNF/MWCNT gel-film) exhibited almost twice higher conductivity (9.3S/cm for 50 wt.% MWCNTs in gel-film; whereas 4.7S/cm for 50 wt.% MWCNTs in film). Moreover, the facile and low-cost of this conductive paper may have great potential in development of foldable electronic devices.

  20. Effects of Sn doping on the morphology, structure, and electrical property of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofiber networks

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    Wu, Xu; Wang, Yihua [Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, College of Materials and Textiles, Hangzhou (China); Yang, Bin [Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology, College of Materials and Textiles, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, College of Materials and Textiles, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-11-15

    This paper studies the effect of Sn doping on the morphological, structural, and electrical properties of the Sn-doping In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofiber networks. In{sub 2}O{sub 3}-based nanofibers with various relative concentration of Sn precursor (0-20 mol%) were fabricated through the electrospinning method. Scanning electron microscopy observations show that, depending on the relative concentration of SnCl{sub 4} in the starting materials, the doped nanofibers with different morphologies, from smooth to corn-like and then to accidented, are fabricated. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that the Sn dopants influence the growth direction of seeds, resulting in doped nanoparticles having diverse shapes and sizes, which are critical for the formation of doped nanofiber with different morphology. From these nanofiber networks, we fabricated several thin sheets to characterize the effect of Sn concentration on the electrical resistivity. The resistivity of thin sheets decreased significantly before the doping concentration up to 12.5 mol%, and then increased slightly at a larger addition. This work will assist further understanding the formation of Sn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanofibers and is expected to be extended to other transparent conductive oxides. (orig.)

  1. Acid-doped polymer nanofiber framework: Three-dimensional proton conductive network for high-performance fuel cells

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    Tanaka, Manabu; Takeda, Yasushi; Wakiya, Takeru; Wakamoto, Yuta; Harigaya, Kaori; Ito, Tatsunori; Tarao, Takashi; Kawakami, Hiroyoshi

    2017-02-01

    High-performance polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) with excellent proton conductivity, gas barrier property, and membrane stability are desired for future fuel cells. Here we report the development of PEMs based on our proposed new concept "Nanofiber Framework (NfF)." The NfF composite membranes composed of phytic acid-doped polybenzimidazole nanofibers (PBINf) and Nafion matrix show higher proton conductivity than the recast-Nafion membrane without nanofibers. A series of analyses reveal the formation of three-dimensional network nanostructures to conduct protons and water effectively through acid-condensed layers at the interface of PBINf and Nafion matrix. In addition, the NfF composite membrane achieves high gas barrier property and distinguished membrane stability. The fuel cell performance by the NfF composite membrane, which enables ultra-thin membranes with their thickness less than 5 μm, is superior to that by the recast-Nafion membrane, especially at low relative humidity. Such NfF-based high-performance PEM will be accomplished not only by the Nafion matrix used in this study but also by other polymer electrolyte matrices for future PEFCs.

  2. One-step synthesis and characterization of polyaniline nanofiber/silver nanoparticle composite networks as antibacterial agents.

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    Poyraz, Selcuk; Cerkez, Idris; Huang, Tung Shi; Liu, Zhen; Kang, Litao; Luo, Jujie; Zhang, Xinyu

    2014-11-26

    Through a facile and effective seeding polymerization reaction via a one-step redox/complexation process, which took place in aqueous medium at ambient temperature, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) embedded polyaniline nanofiber (PANI NF) networks were synthesized as antibacterial agents. During the reaction, not only NF morphology formation of the resulting conducting polymers (CPs) but also amplification of the aqueous silver nitrate (AgNO3) solutions' oxidative potentials were managed by vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) sol-gel nanofibers, which acted as well-known nanofibrous seeding agents and the auxiliary oxidative agent at the same time. The PANI/Ag nanocomposites were proven to exhibit excellent antibacterial property against both Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. Antibacterial property performance and average life span of the nanocomposite network were optimized through the homogeneous distribution/embedment of Ag NPs within one-dimensional (1-D) PANI NF matrix. The antibacterial efficacy tests and nanocomposite material characterization results further indicated that the sole components of PANI/Ag have a synergistic effect to each other in terms of antibacterial property. Thus, this well-known catalytic seeding approach via a one-step oxidative polymerization reaction can be considered as a general methodology and a substantial fabrication tool to synthesize Ag NP decorated nanofibrillar PANI networks as advanced antibacterial agents.

  3. Morphology, transport characteristics and viscoelastic polymer chain confinement in nanocomposites based on thermoplastic potato starch and cellulose nanofibers from pineapple leaf.

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    Balakrishnan, Preetha; Sreekala, M S; Kunaver, Matjaž; Huskić, Miroslav; Thomas, Sabu

    2017-08-01

    Eco-friendly "green" nano composites were fabricated from potato starch and cellulose nanofibers from pineapple leaf. Nanocomposites of starch/cellulose nanofibers were prepared by solution mixing followed by casting. The investigation of the viscoelastic properties confirms starch macromolecular chain confinement around the nano scale cellulose surface, superior dispersion and very good interaction between thermoplastic starch and cellulose nanofibers. The degree of chain confinement was quantified. The chain confinement was associated with the immobilization of the starch macromolecular chains in the network formed by the nano-scale cellulose fibers as a result of hydrogen boding interactions. From the results, it was assumed that the starch glycerol system exhibits a heterogenous nature and cellulose nanofibers tend to move towards glycerol rich starch phase. Barrier properties also improved with the addition of nanofiller up to 3wt.% but further addition depreciated properties due to possible fiber agglomeration. The kinetics of diffusion was investigated and typical kinetic parameters were determined and found that the nanocomposites follow pseudo fickian behaviour. The outcome of the work confirms that the prepared nanocomposites films can be used as a swap for packaging applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cellulose nanofiber-templated three-dimension TiO2 hierarchical nanowire network for photoelectrochemical photoanode

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    Li, Zhaodong; Yao, Chunhua; Wang, Fei; Cai, Zhiyong; Wang, Xudong

    2014-12-01

    Three dimensional (3D) nanostructures with extremely large porosity possess a great promise for the development of high-performance energy harvesting and storage devices. In this paper, we developed a high-density 3D TiO2 fiber-nanorod (NR) heterostructure for efficient photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. The hierarchical structure was synthesized on a ZnO-coated cellulose nanofiber (CNF) template using atomic layer deposition (ALD)-based thin film and NR growth procedures. The tubular structure evolution was in good agreement with the recently discovered vapor-phase Kirkendall effect in high-temperature ALD processes. The NR morphology was formed via the surface-reaction-limited pulsed chemical vapor deposition (SPCVD) mechanism. Under Xenon lamp illumination without and with an AM 1.5G filter or a UV cut off filter, the PEC efficiencies of a 3D TiO2 fiber-NR heterostructure were found to be 22-249% higher than those of the TiO2-ZnO bilayer tubular nanofibers and TiO2 nanotube networks that were synthesized as reference samples. Such a 3D TiO2 fiber-NR heterostructure offers a new route for a cellulose-based nanomanufacturing technique, which can be used for large-area, low-cost, and green fabrication of nanomaterials as well as their utilizations for efficient solar energy harvesting and conversion.

  5. Roll-to-Roll Production of Transparent Silver-Nanofiber-Network Electrodes for Flexible Electrochromic Smart Windows.

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    Lin, Sen; Bai, Xiaopeng; Wang, Haiyang; Wang, Haolun; Song, Jianan; Huang, Kai; Wang, Chang; Wang, Ning; Li, Bo; Lei, Ming; Wu, Hui

    2017-09-11

    Electrochromic smart windows (ECSWs) are considered as the most promising alternative to traditional dimming devices. However, the electrode technology in ECSWs remains stagnant, wherein inflexible indium tin oxide and fluorine-doped tin oxide are the main materials being used. Although various complicated production methods, such as high-temperature calcination and sputtering, have been reported, the mass production of flexible and transparent electrodes remains challenging. Here, a nonheated roll-to-roll process is developed for the continuous production of flexible, extralarge, and transparent silver nanofiber (AgNF) network electrodes. The optical and mechanical properties, as well as the electrical conductivity of these products (i.e., 12 Ω sq(-1) at 95% transmittance) are comparable with those AgNF networks produced via high-temperature sintering. Moreover, the as-prepared AgNF network is successfully assembled into an A4-sized ECSW with short switching time, good coloration efficiency, and flexibility. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Chitin nanofibers: preparations, modifications, and applications

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    Ifuku, Shinsuke; Saimoto, Hiroyuki

    2012-05-01

    Chitin nanofibers are prepared from the exoskeletons of crabs and prawns by a simple mechanical treatment after the removal of proteins and minerals. The obtained nanofibers have fine nanofiber networks with a uniform width of approximately 10-20 nm and a high aspect ratio. The method used for chitin-nanofiber isolation is also successfully applied to the cell walls of mushrooms. They form a complex with glucans on the fiber surface. A grinder, a Star Burst atomization system, and a high speed blender are all used in the mechanical treatment to convert chitin to nanofibers. Mechanical treatment under acidic conditions is the key to facilitate fibrillation. At pH 3-4, the cationization of amino groups on the fiber surface assists nano-fibrillation by electrostatic repulsive force. By applying this finding, we also prepared chitin nanofibers from dry chitin powder. Chitin nanofibers are acetylated to modify their surfaces. The acetyl DS can be controlled from 1 to 3 by changing the reaction time. An acetyl group is introduced heterogeneously from the surface to the core. Nanofiber morphology is maintained even in the case of high acetyl DS. Optically transparent chitin nanofiber composites are prepared with 11 different types of acrylic resins. Due to the nano-sized structure, all of the composites are highly transparent. Chitin nanofibers significantly increase the Young's moduli and the tensile strengths and decrease the thermal expansion of all acrylic resins due to the reinforcement effect of chitin nanofibers. Chitin nanofibers show chiral separation ability. The chitin nanofiber membrane transports the d-isomer of glutamic acid, phenylalanine, and lysine from the corresponding racemic amino acid mixtures faster than the corresponding l-isomer. The chitin nanofibers improve clinical symptoms and suppress ulcerative colitis in a DSS-induced mouse model of acute ulcerative colitis. Moreover, chitin nanofibers suppress myeloperoxidase activation in the colon and

  7. Preparation and electrochemical performance of hyper-networked Li4Ti5O12/carbon hybrid nanofiber sheets for a battery-supercapacitor hybrid system.

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    Choi, Hong Soo; Kim, TaeHoon; Im, Ji Hyuk; Park, Chong Rae

    2011-10-07

    Hyper-networked Li(4)Ti(5)O(12)/carbon hybrid nanofiber sheets that contain both a faradaically rechargeable battery-type component, namely Li(4)Ti(5)O(12), and a non-faradaically rechargeable supercapacitor-type component, namely N-enriched carbon, are prepared by electrospinning and their dual function as a negative electrode of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and a capacitor is tested for a new class of hybrid energy storage (denoted BatCap). An aqueous solution composed of polyvinylpyrrolidone, lithium hydroxide, titanium(IV) bis(ammonium-lactato)dihydroxide and ammonium persulfate is electrospun to obtain hyper-networked nanofiber sheets. Next, the sheets are exposed to pyrrole monomer vapor to prepare the polypyrrole-coated nanofiber sheets (PPy-HNS). The hyper-networked Li(4)Ti(5)O(12)/N-enriched carbon hybrid nanofiber sheets (LTO/C-HNS) are then obtained by a stepwise heat treatment of the PPy-HNS. The LTO/C-HNS deliver a specific capacity of 135 mAh g(-1) at 4000 mA g(-1) as a negative electrode for LIBs. In addition, potentiodynamic experiments are performed using a full cell with activated carbon (AC) as the positive electrode and LTO/C-HNS as the negative electrode to estimate the capacitance properties. This new asymmetric electrode system exhibits a high energy density of 91 W kg(-1) and 22 W kg(-1) at power densities of 50 W kg(-1) and 4000 W kg(-1), respectively, which are superior to the values observed for the AC [symbol: see text] AC symmetric electrode system.

  8. Preparation and electrochemical performance of hyper-networked Li4Ti5O12/carbon hybrid nanofiber sheets for a battery-supercapacitor hybrid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hong Soo; Kim, TaeHoon; Im, Ji Hyuk; Park, Chong Rae

    2011-10-01

    Hyper-networked Li4Ti5O12/carbon hybrid nanofiber sheets that contain both a faradaically rechargeable battery-type component, namely Li4Ti5O12, and a non-faradaically rechargeable supercapacitor-type component, namely N-enriched carbon, are prepared by electrospinning and their dual function as a negative electrode of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and a capacitor is tested for a new class of hybrid energy storage (denoted BatCap). An aqueous solution composed of polyvinylpyrrolidone, lithium hydroxide, titanium(IV) bis(ammonium-lactato)dihydroxide and ammonium persulfate is electrospun to obtain hyper-networked nanofiber sheets. Next, the sheets are exposed to pyrrole monomer vapor to prepare the polypyrrole-coated nanofiber sheets (PPy-HNS). The hyper-networked Li4Ti5O12/N-enriched carbon hybrid nanofiber sheets (LTO/C-HNS) are then obtained by a stepwise heat treatment of the PPy-HNS. The LTO/C-HNS deliver a specific capacity of 135 mAh g - 1 at 4000 mA g - 1 as a negative electrode for LIBs. In addition, potentiodynamic experiments are performed using a full cell with activated carbon (AC) as the positive electrode and LTO/C-HNS as the negative electrode to estimate the capacitance properties. This new asymmetric electrode system exhibits a high energy density of 91 W kg - 1 and 22 W kg - 1 at power densities of 50 W kg - 1 and 4000 W kg - 1, respectively, which are superior to the values observed for the {AC} \\parallel {AC} symmetric electrode system.

  9. Integrated fast assembly of free-standing lithium titanate/carbon nanotube/cellulose nanofiber hybrid network film as flexible paper-electrode for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shaomei; Feng, Xin; Song, Yuanyuan; Xue, Xin; Liu, Hongjiang; Miao, Miao; Fang, Jianhui; Shi, Liyi

    2015-05-27

    A free-standing lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12)/carbon nanotube/cellulose nanofiber hybrid network film is successfully assembled by using a pressure-controlled aqueous extrusion process, which is highly efficient and easily to scale up from the perspective of disposable and recyclable device production. This hybrid network film used as a lithium-ion battery (LIB) electrode has a dual-layer structure consisting of Li4Ti5O12/carbon nanotube/cellulose nanofiber composites (hereinafter referred to as LTO/CNT/CNF), and carbon nanotube/cellulose nanofiber composites (hereinafter referred to as CNT/CNF). In the heterogeneous fibrous network of the hybrid film, CNF serves simultaneously as building skeleton and a biosourced binder, which substitutes traditional toxic solvents and synthetic polymer binders. Of importance here is that the CNT/CNF layer is used as a lightweight current collector to replace traditional heavy metal foils, which therefore reduces the total mass of the electrode while keeping the same areal loading of active materials. The free-standing network film with high flexibility is easy to handle, and has extremely good conductivity, up to 15.0 S cm(-1). The flexible paper-electrode for LIBs shows very good high rate cycling performance, and the specific charge/discharge capacity values are up to 142 mAh g(-1) even at a current rate of 10 C. On the basis of the mild condition and fast assembly process, a CNF template fulfills multiple functions in the fabrication of paper-electrode for LIBs, which would offer an ever increasing potential for high energy density, low cost, and environmentally friendly flexible electronics.

  10. Macromolecular Prodrugs of Ribavirin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Camilla Frich; Hinton, Tracey M; Gajda, Paulina

    2017-01-01

    The requirement for new antiviral therapeutics is an ever present need. Particularly lacking are broad spectrum antivirals that have low toxicity. We develop such agents based on macromolecular prodrugs whereby both the polymer chain and the drug released from the polymer upon cell entry have ant...

  11. Macromolecular Crystallization in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Edward H.; Helliwell, John R.

    2004-01-01

    The key concepts that attracted crystal growers, macromolecular or solid state, to microgravity research is that density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of the growing crystals are greatly reduced. Thus, defects and flaws in the crystals can be reduced, even eliminated, and crystal volume can be increased. Macromolecular crystallography differs from the field of crystalline semiconductors. For the latter, crystals are harnessed for their electrical behaviors. A crystal of a biological macromolecule is used instead for diffraction experiments (X-ray or neutron) to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal of a biological macromolecule then the more molecular structure detail that can be extracted. This structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry, and mathematics meet to enable insight to the basic fundamentals of life. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment, and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyze the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural

  12. Macromolecular crystallization in microgravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, Edward H [Biophysics Group, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Code XD42, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Helliwell, John R [Department of Chemistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    Density difference fluid flows and sedimentation of growing crystals are greatly reduced when crystallization takes place in a reduced gravity environment. In the case of macromolecular crystallography a crystal of a biological macromolecule is used for diffraction experiments (x-ray or neutron) so as to determine the three-dimensional structure of the macromolecule. The better the internal order of the crystal then the greater the molecular structure detail that can be extracted. It is this structural information that enables an understanding of how the molecule functions. This knowledge is changing the biological and chemical sciences, with major potential in understanding disease pathologies. In this review, we examine the use of microgravity as an environment to grow macromolecular crystals. We describe the crystallization procedures used on the ground, how the resulting crystals are studied and the knowledge obtained from those crystals. We address the features desired in an ordered crystal and the techniques used to evaluate those features in detail. We then introduce the microgravity environment, the techniques to access that environment and the theory and evidence behind the use of microgravity for crystallization experiments. We describe how ground-based laboratory techniques have been adapted to microgravity flights and look at some of the methods used to analyse the resulting data. Several case studies illustrate the physical crystal quality improvements and the macromolecular structural advances. Finally, limitations and alternatives to microgravity and future directions for this research are covered. Macromolecular structural crystallography in general is a remarkable field where physics, biology, chemistry and mathematics meet to enable insight to the fundamentals of life. As the reader will see, there is a great deal of physics involved when the microgravity environment is applied to crystallization, some of it known, and undoubtedly much yet to

  13. Bacterial-cellulose-derived interconnected meso-microporous carbon nanofiber networks as binder-free electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaodong; Wang, Jie; Ding, Bing; Wang, Ya; Chang, Zhi; Dou, Hui; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2017-06-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC), a typical biomass prepared from the microbial fermentation process, has been proved that it can be an ideal platform for design of three-dimensional (3D) multifunctional nanomaterials in energy storage and conversion field. Here we developed a simple and general silica-assisted strategy for fabrication of interconnected 3D meso-microporous carbon nanofiber networks by confine nanospace pyrolysis of sustainable BC, which can be used as binder-free electrodes for high-performance supercapacitors. The synthesized carbon nanofibers exhibited the features of interconnected 3D networks architecture, large surface area (624 m2 g-1), mesopores-dominated hierarchical porosity, and high graphitization degree. The as-prepared electrode (CN-BC) displayed a maximum specific capacitance of 302 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1, high-rate capability and good cyclicity in 6 M KOH electrolyte. This work, together with cost-effective preparation strategy to make high-value utilization of cheap biomass, should have significant implications in the green and mass-producible energy storage.

  14. A Co2+-selective and chirality-sensitive supermolecular metallohydrogel with a nanofiber network skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojuan; He, Ting; Yang, Lan; Wu, Huiqiong; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Zhenzhu; Shen, Rujuan; Xiang, Juan; Zhang, Yi; Wei, Chuanwan

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces a new metallohydrogel precursor that offers a peculiar gelation response to Co2+ at pH 7-8. It is notable that the stability of this metallohydrogel is significantly dependent on its enantiomeric purity. In addition to the expected multi-stimuli responsive properties, including thixotropy, as well as re-assembly properties on adding HCl, this metallohydrogel possesses excellent self-healing behavior, which is uncommon in low-molecular-weight gelators. Electron microscopy (EM) studies revealed that the cryodried remains of this gel presented as well an organized three dimensional (3D) network of fibrils. This interesting metallohydrogel shows potential for developing new soft materials with drug delivery and catalysis properties.This paper introduces a new metallohydrogel precursor that offers a peculiar gelation response to Co2+ at pH 7-8. It is notable that the stability of this metallohydrogel is significantly dependent on its enantiomeric purity. In addition to the expected multi-stimuli responsive properties, including thixotropy, as well as re-assembly properties on adding HCl, this metallohydrogel possesses excellent self-healing behavior, which is uncommon in low-molecular-weight gelators. Electron microscopy (EM) studies revealed that the cryodried remains of this gel presented as well an organized three dimensional (3D) network of fibrils. This interesting metallohydrogel shows potential for developing new soft materials with drug delivery and catalysis properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00822d

  15. Microgravity and Macromolecular Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrot, Craig E.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.; Snell, Edward H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Macromolecular crystal growth has been seen as an ideal experiment to make use of the reduced acceleration environment provided by an orbiting spacecraft. The experiments are small, simply operated and have a high potential scientific and economic impact. In this review we examine the theoretical reasons why microgravity should be a beneficial environment for crystal growth and survey the history of experiments on the Space Shuttle Orbiter, on unmanned spacecraft, and on the Mir space station. Finally we outline the direction for optimizing the future use of orbiting platforms.

  16. Elastic Carbon Aerogels Reconstructed from Electrospun Nanofibers and Graphene as Three-Dimensional Networked Matrix for Efficient Energy Storage/Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunpeng; Lai, Feili; Zhang, Longsheng; Lu, Hengyi; Miao, Yue-E; Liu, Tianxi

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) all-carbon nanofibrous aerogels with good structural stability and elasticity are highly desirable in flexible energy storage/conversion devices. Hence, an efficient surface-induced co-assembly strategy is reported for the novel design and reconstruction of electrospun nanofibers into graphene/carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite aerogels (GCA) with hierarchical structures utilizing graphene flakes as cross-linkers. The as-obtained GCA monoliths possess interconnected macropores and integrated conductive networks, which exhibit high elasticity and great structural robustness. Benefitting from the largely increased surface area and charge-transfer efficiency derived from the multi-form firm interconnections (including pillaring, bridging and jointing) between graphene flakes and CNF ribs, GCA not only reveals prominent capacitive performance as supercapacitor electrode, but also shows excellent hydrogen evolution reaction activity in both acidic and alkaline solutions as a 3D template for decoration of few-layered MoSe2 nanosheets, holding great potentials for energy-related applications. PMID:27511271

  17. Elastic Carbon Aerogels Reconstructed from Electrospun Nanofibers and Graphene as Three-Dimensional Networked Matrix for Efficient Energy Storage/Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunpeng; Lai, Feili; Zhang, Longsheng; Lu, Hengyi; Miao, Yue-E.; Liu, Tianxi

    2016-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) all-carbon nanofibrous aerogels with good structural stability and elasticity are highly desirable in flexible energy storage/conversion devices. Hence, an efficient surface-induced co-assembly strategy is reported for the novel design and reconstruction of electrospun nanofibers into graphene/carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite aerogels (GCA) with hierarchical structures utilizing graphene flakes as cross-linkers. The as-obtained GCA monoliths possess interconnected macropores and integrated conductive networks, which exhibit high elasticity and great structural robustness. Benefitting from the largely increased surface area and charge-transfer efficiency derived from the multi-form firm interconnections (including pillaring, bridging and jointing) between graphene flakes and CNF ribs, GCA not only reveals prominent capacitive performance as supercapacitor electrode, but also shows excellent hydrogen evolution reaction activity in both acidic and alkaline solutions as a 3D template for decoration of few-layered MoSe2 nanosheets, holding great potentials for energy-related applications.

  18. Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Md. Iftekhar; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Doubly curved nanofiber-reinforced optically transparent composites with low thermal expansion of 15 ppm/k are prepared by hot pressing vacuum-filtered Pickering emulsions of hydrophobic acrylic resin monomer, hydrophilic chitin nanofibers and water. The coalescence of acrylic monomer droplets in the emulsion is prevented by the chitin nanofibers network. This transparent composite has 3D shape moldability, making it attractive for optical precision parts.

  19. Biomass-Derived Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber Network: A Facile Template for Decoration of Ultrathin Nickel-Cobalt Layered Double Hydroxide Nanosheets as High-Performance Asymmetric Supercapacitor Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Feili; Miao, Yue-E; Zuo, Lizeng; Lu, Hengyi; Huang, Yunpeng; Liu, Tianxi

    2016-06-01

    The development of biomass-based energy storage devices is an emerging trend to reduce the ever-increasing consumption of non-renewable resources. Here, nitrogen-doped carbonized bacterial cellulose (CBC-N) nanofibers are obtained by one-step carbonization of polyaniline coated bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers, which not only display excellent capacitive performance as the supercapacitor electrode, but also act as 3D bio-template for further deposition of ultrathin nickel-cobalt layered double hydroxide (Ni-Co LDH) nanosheets. The as-obtained CBC-N@LDH composite electrodes exhibit significantly enhanced specific capacitance (1949.5 F g(-1) at a discharge current density of 1 A g(-1) , based on active materials), high capacitance retention of 54.7% even at a high discharge current density of 10 A g(-1) and excellent cycling stability of 74.4% retention after 5000 cycles. Furthermore, asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) are constructed using CBC-N@LDH composites as positive electrode materials and CBC-N nanofibers as negative electrode materials. By virtue of the intrinsic pseudocapacitive characteristics of CBC-N@LDH composites and 3D nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber networks, the developed ASC exhibits high energy density of 36.3 Wh kg(-1) at the power density of 800.2 W kg(-1) . Therefore, this work presents a novel protocol for the large-scale production of biomass-derived high-performance electrode materials in practical supercapacitor applications.

  20. A hybrid biomimetic scaffold composed of electrospun polycaprolactone nanofibers and self-assembled peptide amphiphile nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tambralli, Ajay; Blakeney, Bryan; Anderson, Joel; Kushwaha, Meenakshi; Andukuri, Adinarayana; Jun, Ho-Wook [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 801 Shelby Building, 1825 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Dean, Derrick [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham, BEC 254, 1150 10th Ave South, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States)], E-mail: hwjun@uab.edu

    2009-06-01

    Nanofibrous electrospun poly ({epsilon}-caprolactone) (ePCL) scaffolds have inherent structural advantages, but lack of bioactivity has limited their usefulness in biomedical applications. Thus, here we report the development of a hybrid, nanostructured, extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking scaffold by a combination of ePCL nanofibers and self-assembled peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers. The PAs have ECM mimicking characteristics including a cell adhesive ligand (RGDS) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) mediated degradable sites. Transmission electron microscope imaging verified successful PA self-assembly into nanofibers (diameters of 8-10 nm) using a solvent evaporation method. This evaporation method was then used to successfully coat PAs onto ePCL nanofibers (diameters of 300-400 nm), to develop hybrid, bioactive scaffolds. Scanning electron microscope characterization showed that the PA coatings did not interfere with the porous ePCL nanofiber network. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were seeded onto the hybrid scaffolds to evaluate their bioactivity. Significantly greater attachment and spreading of hMSCs were observed on ePCL nanofibers coated with PA-RGDS as compared to ePCL nanofibers coated with PA-S (no cell adhesive ligand) and uncoated ePCL nanofibers. Overall, this novel strategy presents a new solution to overcome the current bioactivity challenges of electrospun scaffolds and combines the unique characteristics of ePCL nanofibers and self-assembled PA nanofibers to provide an ECM mimicking environment. This has great potential to be applied to many different electrospun scaffolds for various biomedical applications.

  1. Preparation and electrochemical performance of hyper-networked Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/carbon hybrid nanofiber sheets for a battery-supercapacitor hybrid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Soo; Kim, TaeHoon; Im, Ji Hyuk; Park, Chong Rae, E-mail: crpark@snu.ac.kr [Carbon Nanomaterials Design Laboratory, Global Research Laboratory, Research Institute of Advanced Materials, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-07

    Hyper-networked Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/carbon hybrid nanofiber sheets that contain both a faradaically rechargeable battery-type component, namely Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}, and a non-faradaically rechargeable supercapacitor-type component, namely N-enriched carbon, are prepared by electrospinning and their dual function as a negative electrode of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and a capacitor is tested for a new class of hybrid energy storage (denoted BatCap). An aqueous solution composed of polyvinylpyrrolidone, lithium hydroxide, titanium(IV) bis(ammonium-lactato)dihydroxide and ammonium persulfate is electrospun to obtain hyper-networked nanofiber sheets. Next, the sheets are exposed to pyrrole monomer vapor to prepare the polypyrrole-coated nanofiber sheets (PPy-HNS). The hyper-networked Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}/N-enriched carbon hybrid nanofiber sheets (LTO/C-HNS) are then obtained by a stepwise heat treatment of the PPy-HNS. The LTO/C-HNS deliver a specific capacity of 135 mAh g{sup -1} at 4000 mA g{sup -1} as a negative electrode for LIBs. In addition, potentiodynamic experiments are performed using a full cell with activated carbon (AC) as the positive electrode and LTO/C-HNS as the negative electrode to estimate the capacitance properties. This new asymmetric electrode system exhibits a high energy density of 91 W kg{sup -1} and 22 W kg{sup -1} at power densities of 50 W kg{sup -1} and 4000 W kg{sup -1}, respectively, which are superior to the values observed for the AC||AC symmetric electrode system.

  2. Honeycomb-like nanofiber based triboelectric nanogenerator using self-assembled electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Shin; Kim, Hyounjin; Kim, Yeongjun; Kang, Byung Ju; Oh, Je Hoon

    2016-04-01

    In this study, a honeycomb-like nanofiber based triboelectric nanogenerator (HN-TENG) is presented. In order to fabricate the honeycomb-like nanofiber, we utilized self-assembly of electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) nanofibers. The honeycomb-like P(VDF-TrFE) nanofiber network was directly produced via electrospinning without any additional processing. The HN-TENG showed a maximum voltage, current, and power density of 160 V, 17 μA, and 1.6 W/m2, respectively. The power density was enhanced more than twofold as compared with a typical flat nanofiber network based TENG due to the large surface area and high surface roughness of the honeycomb structure. Finally, we verified that HN-TENG has the potential to be used for practical applications by driving 100 light emitting diodes and charging capacitors.

  3. Synthesis of chitin nanofibers, MWCNTs and MnO2 nanoflakes 3D porous network flexible gel-film for high supercapacitive performance electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shengnan; Li, Dagang

    2017-03-01

    As the porous structure and conductivity result in improvement of electrochemical properties, the chitin nanofibers (ChNFs), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and MnO2 (manganese dioxide) nanoflakes 3D porous network core-shell structure gel-film was fabricated for flexible free-standing supercapacitor electrodes. The electrodes were characterized by various techniques and the results demonstrate that the as-synthesized ChNFs/MWCNTs/MnO2 gel-film electrodes exhibits excellent supercapacitive behaviours. The ChNFs/MWCNTs/MnO2 gel-film electrode shows a high capacitance of 295.2 mF/cm2 at 0.1 mA/cm2 in 1 M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolyte because of its 3D porous structure. Furthermore, the electrodes also showed surprising cycling stability for 5000 cycles with retention rate up to 157.14% at 1 mA/cm2. The data presents great promise in the application of high-performance flexible supercapacitors with the low cost, light-weight and excellent cycling ability.

  4. Modulating the forces between self-assembling molecules to control the shape of vesicles and the mechanics and alignment of nanofiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Megan Ann

    One of the great challenges in supramolecular chemistry is the design of molecules that can self-assemble into functional aggregates with well-defined three-dimensional structures and bulk material properties. Since the self-assembly of nanostructures is greatly influenced by both the nature of the self-assembling components and the environmental conditions in which the components assemble, this work explores how changes in the molecular design and the environment affect the properties of self-assembled structures. We first explore how to control the mechanical properties of self-assembled fibrillar networks by changing environmental conditions. We report here on how changing pH, screening ions, and solution temperature affect the gelation, stiffness, and response to deformation of peptide amphiphile gels. Although the morphology of PA gels formed by charge neutralization and salt-mediated charge screening are similar by electron microscopy, rheological measurements indicate that the calcium-mediated ionic bridges in CaCl2-PA gels form stronger intra- and inter-fiber crosslinks than the hydrogen bonds formed by the protonated carboxylic acid residues in HCl-PA gels. In contrast, the structure of PA gels changes drastically when the PA solution is annealed prior to gel formation. Annealed PA solutions are birefringent and can form viscoelastic strings of aligned nanofibers when manually dragged across a thin film of CaCl2. These aligned arrays of PA nanofibers hold great promise in controlling the orientation of cells in three-dimensions. Separately, we applied the principles of molecular design to create buckled membrane nanostructures that mimic the shape of viruses. When oppositely charged amphiphilic molecules are mixed they can form vesicles with a periodic two-dimensional ionic lattice that opposes the membrane's natural curvature and can result in vesicle buckling. Our results demonstrate that a large +3 to -1 charge imbalance between the cationic and anionic

  5. Electrospun Perovskite Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongsheng; Zhu, Yanyan

    2017-02-01

    CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite nanofibers were synthesized by versatile electrospinning techniques. The synthetic CH3NH3PbI3 nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and photoluminescence. As counter electrodes, the synthesized nanofibers increased the performance of the dye-sensitized solar cells from 1.58 to 2.09%. This improvement was attributed to the enhanced smoothness and efficiency of the electron transport path. Thus, CH3NH3PbI3 perovskites nanofibers are potential alternative to platinum counter electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells.

  6. Nanofiber of ultra-structured aluminum and zirconium oxide hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2006-02-01

    An internally ultrastructured Al- and Zr-oxide hybrid was developed into a nanofiber. As a precursor for the generation of nanofiber, a hybridized sol was prepared using the Pechini-type sol-gel process, whereby the Al- and Zr-metallic ions were to be efficiently distributed and stabilized within the polymeric network. The hybridized sol was subsequently electrospun and heat treated to a nanofiber with diameters of tens to hundreds of nanometers. The internal structure of the nanofiber was organized at the molecular level, with the Al- and Zr-oxide regions being interspaced at distances of less than ten nanometers. This ultrastructured Al- and Zr-oxide hybrid nanofiber is considered to be potentially applicable in numerous fields.

  7. NANOFIBER PRODUCTION [REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KESKIN Reyhan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanofibers are very thin fibers having diameters lower than 100 nm and their lengths might be as long as possible within production limits. The large surface area of nanofibers gives opportunity to functionalize them. Nanofibers have several applications including both applications for industrial production in many sectors and for research studies. Nanofibers find applications in energy devices such as solar cells, fuel cells and nanogenarators; in filtration applications (such as water/oil filtration, fine particle filtration, aerosol filtration, air filtration, nanoparticle filtration and in several medical applications including antibacterial efficacy, wound healing, drug delivery and scaffolds for tissue engineering. There are several methods to produce nanofibers: Electrospinning, self assembly, phase separation, bacterial cellulose, templating, drawing, extraction, vapor-phase polymerization, kinetically controlled solution synthesis, conventional chemical polymerization for anyline. Electrospinning is the most widely used method to produce nanofibers.In electrospinning, a high electric field, which is in kilovolts, is applied to a polymer solution. The polymer solution is drawn from a syringe to a collector surface.Electrospinning requires usage of appropriate solvent, removal of evaporating solvent, an adequate power supply to overcome the viscosity and surface tension of the polymer solution; while, jet instability and jet control remain as challenges in electrospinning. Nanofiber production methods possess some disadvantages as: higher cost compared to conventional fiber production methods, health hazards such as inhale risk of nanofibers during production and keeping the environment safe from evaporating solvents used during nanofiber production. Up to date, many researches have been conducted on nanofibers and electrospinning; still, more controllable, more cost effective, more environmentally friendly and safer methods are of

  8. Cold plasma welding of polyaniline nanofibers with enhanced electrical and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dong; Yu, Yao; Liu, Lin; Lu, Xinpei; Wu, Yue

    2015-12-01

    Joining conducting polymer (CP) nanofibers into an interconnected porous network can result in good mechanical and electrical contacts between nanofibers that can be beneficial for the high performance of CP-based devices. Here, we demonstrate the cold welding of polyaniline (PAni) nanofiber loose ends with cold plasma. The room-temperature and atmospheric-pressure helium micro-plasma jet launches highly charged ion bullets at a PAni nanofiber target with high precision and the highly charged ion bullet selectively induces field emission at the sharp nanofiber loose ends. This technique joins nanofiber tips without altering the morphology of the film and protonation thus leading to significantly enhanced electrical and mechanical properties. In addition, this technique has high spatial resolution and is able to selectively weld and dope regions of nanofiber film with promising novel device applications.

  9. Antioxidant activity of polyaniline nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Well-confined uniform polyaniline (PANT) nanofibers were synthesized by using photo-assisted chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of different dopant acids, and the radical scavenging ability of the produced PANI nanofibers was determined by the DPPH assay. It was found that the antioxidant activity of PANI nanofibers was higher than conventional PANI,and increased with decreasing of averaged diameter of the nanofibers. The enhanced antioxidant activity was concerned with increased surface area of PANI nanofibers.

  10. Collection of Electrospun Polymer Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataphinan, Woraphon; Reneker, Darrell H.

    2000-03-01

    The dry nanofibers produced in a typical electrospinning process are electrically charged. The nanofibers were directed by an electrical field, a tensile force along the axis of the fiber, and by the viscous drag force of moving air. The looping and spiraling path of the nanofibers, which resulted from bending and other kinds of instabilities that occurred as the fiber was formed, also complicated the collection process. Non-woven sheets of nanofibers were made by attracting the nanofibers to a conducting sheet or screen. The sheet or screen was flat and stationary, or wrapped around a rotating drum. Nanofibers were also collected in a liquid. The liquid removed charge or solvent. Nanofibers were collected on the surface of a non-wetting liquid, so that the patterns formed by the arriving nanofibers were observed directly. Streams of air, and air vortices were also used. These methods are being combined with robotic manipulators to collect nanofibers in many useful forms.

  11. Control of mechanical properties of chitin nanofiber film using glycerol without losing its characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifuku, Shinsuke; Ikuta, Akiko; Izawa, Hironori; Morimoto, Minoru; Saimoto, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-30

    Surface-deacetylated chitin nanofiber films plasticized with glycerol were prepared to control mechanical properties. Nanofiber networks were able to retain excessive glycerol content up to 70% to obtain self-standing film. All films were flexible and highly transparent independent of glycerol content. Glycerol significantly decreased the Young's moduli and tensile strengths, and increased the fracture strain due to its plasticizing effect. At the same time, glycerol did not change the high transparency or the low thermal expansion of the nanofiber film.

  12. Cavity QED on a nanofiber using a composite photonic crystal cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Yalla, Ramachandrarao; Nayak, Kali P; Hakuta, Kohzo

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate cavity QED conditions in the Purcell regime for single quantum emitters on the surface of an optical nanofiber. The cavity is formed by combining an optical nanofiber and a nanofabricated grating to create a composite photonic crystal cavity. Using this technique, significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into the nanofiber guided modes is observed for single quantum dots. Our results pave the way for enhanced on-fiber light-matter interfaces with clear applications to quantum networks.

  13. Cavity quantum electrodynamics on a nanofiber using a composite photonic crystal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalla, Ramachandrarao; Sadgrove, Mark; Nayak, Kali P; Hakuta, Kohzo

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate cavity QED conditions in the Purcell regime for single quantum emitters on the surface of an optical nanofiber. The cavity is formed by combining an optical nanofiber and a nanofabricated grating to create a composite photonic crystal cavity. By using this technique, significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into the nanofiber guided modes is observed for single quantum dots. Our results pave the way for enhanced on-fiber light-matter interfaces with clear applications to quantum networks.

  14. Macromolecular architectures for organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popere, Bhooshan C; Della Pelle, Andrea M; Poe, Ambata; Thayumanavan, S

    2012-03-28

    Research in the field of organic photovoltaics has gained considerable momentum in the last two decades owing to the need for developing low-cost and efficient energy harvesting systems. Elegant molecular architectures have been designed, synthesized and employed as active materials for photovoltaic devices thereby leading to a better molecular structure-device property relationship understanding. In this perspective, we outline new macromolecular scaffolds that have been designed within the purview of each of the three fundamental processes involving light harvesting, charge separation and charge transport.

  15. Well-dispersed sulfur anchored on interconnected polypyrrole nanofiber network as high performance cathode for lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fuxing; Liu, Xinyi; Zhang, Yongguang; Zhao, Yan; Menbayeva, Almagul; Bakenov, Zhumabay; Wang, Xin

    2017-04-01

    Preparation of novel sulfur/polypyrrole (S/PPy) composite consisting well-dispersed sulfur particles anchored on interconnected PPy nanowire network was demonstrated. In such hybrid structure, the as-prepared PPy clearly displays a three-dimensionally cross-linked and hierarchical porous structure, which was utilized in the composite cathode as a conductive network trapping soluble polysulfide intermediates and enhancing the overall electrochemical performance of the system. Benefiting from this unique structure, the S/PPy composite demonstrated excellent cycling stability, resulting in a discharge capacity of 931 mAh g-1 at the second cycle and retained about 54% of this value over 100 cycles at 0.1 C. Furthermore, the S/PPy composite cathode exhibits a good rate capability with a discharge capacity of 584 mAh g-1 at 1 C.

  16. Emergent Property in Macromolecular Motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴嘉麟

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the model of inverse cascade fractal super-blocks along one direction (in the positive or negative) in the 3-dimensional space is developed to describe the self-similar motion in macromolecular system. Microscopically the cohesive and dispersed states of the motion blocks are co-existent states with vastly different probability of occurrence.Experimental results and theoretical analysis show that the microscopic cohesive state energy and dispersed state energy of each motion block are respectively equal to the macroscopic glassy state energy kT8 and molten state energy kTm of the system. This singularity unveils topologically the nonintegrability, mathematically the anholonomy, and macroscopically the emergent property. This singularity also reveals that the glass, viscoelastic and melt states are three distinct emergent properties of macromolecular motion from a macroscopic viewpoint. The fractal concept of excluded volume is introduced to depict the random motion at various scales in the system. The Hausdorff dimensions of the excluded volune and the motion blocks are both found equal to 3/2.

  17. Data Mining of Macromolecular Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beusekom, Bart; Perrakis, Anastassis; Joosten, Robbie P

    2016-01-01

    The use of macromolecular structures is widespread for a variety of applications, from teaching protein structure principles all the way to ligand optimization in drug development. Applying data mining techniques on these experimentally determined structures requires a highly uniform, standardized structural data source. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) has evolved over the years toward becoming the standard resource for macromolecular structures. However, the process selecting the data most suitable for specific applications is still very much based on personal preferences and understanding of the experimental techniques used to obtain these models. In this chapter, we will first explain the challenges with data standardization, annotation, and uniformity in the PDB entries determined by X-ray crystallography. We then discuss the specific effect that crystallographic data quality and model optimization methods have on structural models and how validation tools can be used to make informed choices. We also discuss specific advantages of using the PDB_REDO databank as a resource for structural data. Finally, we will provide guidelines on how to select the most suitable protein structure models for detailed analysis and how to select a set of structure models suitable for data mining.

  18. Macromolecular mimicry of nucleic acid and protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nautrup Pedersen, Gitte; Nyborg, Jens; Clark, Brian F

    1999-01-01

    of the concept of macromolecular mimicry. Macromolecular mimicry has further been proposed among initiation and release factors, thereby adding a new element to the description of protein synthesis in bacteria. Such mimicry has also been observed in other biological processes such as autoimmunity, DNA repair......, and gene regulation, at both transcriptional and translational levels. Udgivelsesdato: 1999-Jul...

  19. Liver-targeting macromolecular MRI contrast agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Macromolecular ligands with liver-targeting group (pyridoxamine, PM) PHEA-DTPA-PM and PAEA-DTPA-PM were prepared by the incorporation of different amount of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid monopyridoxamine group (DTPA-PM) into poly-a, b-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-L- aspartamide] (PHEA) and poly-a, b-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-L-aspartamide] (PAEA). The macromolecular ligands thus obtained were further complexed with gadolinium chloride to give macromolecular MRI contrast agents with different Gd(Ⅲ) contents. These macromolecular ligands and their gadolinium complexes were characterized by 1H NMR, IR, UV and elementary analysis. Relaxivity studies showed that these polyaspartamide gadolinium complexes possess higher relaxation effectiveness than that of the clinically used Gd-DTPA. Magnetic resonance imaging of the liver in rats and experimental data of biodistribution in mice indicate that these macromolecular MRI contrast agents containing pyridoxamine exhibit liver-targeting property.

  20. Fabrication of electrospun nanofibers bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Junjun; Sun, Daoheng

    2007-12-01

    Aligned nanofibers, filament bundle composed of large number of nanofibers have potential applications such as bio-material, composite material etc. A series of electrospinning experiments have been conducted to investigate the electrospinning process,in which some parameters such as polymer solution concentration, bias voltage, distance between spinneret and collector, solution flow rate etc have been setup to do the experiment of nanofibers bundles construction. This work firstly reports electrospun nanofiber bundle through non-uniform electrical field, and nanofibers distributed in different density on electrodes from that between them. Thinner nanofibers bundle with a few numbers of nanofiber is collected for 3 seconds; therefore it's also possible that the addressable single nanofiber could be collected to bridge two electrodes.

  1. Porous block nanofiber composite filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginley, David S.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Weiss, Alan J.; Paddock, Arnold

    2016-08-09

    Porous block nano-fiber composite (110), a filtration system (10) and methods of using the same are disclosed. An exemplary porous block nano-fiber composite (110) includes a porous block (100) having one or more pores (200). The porous block nano-fiber composite (110) also includes a plurality of inorganic nano-fibers (211) formed within at least one of the pores (200).

  2. Flexible, solid-state, ion-conducting membrane with 3D garnet nanofiber networks for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Kelvin; Gong, Yunhui; Dai, Jiaqi; Gong, Amy; Han, Xiaogang; Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Chengwei; Wang, Yibo; Chen, Yanan; Yan, Chaoyi; Li, Yiju; Wachsman, Eric D.; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-06-01

    Beyond state-of-the-art lithium-ion battery (LIB) technology with metallic lithium anodes to replace conventional ion intercalation anode materials is highly desirable because of lithium's highest specific capacity (3,860 mA/g) and lowest negative electrochemical potential (˜3.040 V vs. the standard hydrogen electrode). In this work, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, a 3D lithium-ion-conducting ceramic network based on garnet-type Li6.4La3Zr2Al0.2O12 (LLZO) lithium-ion conductor to provide continuous Li+ transfer channels in a polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based composite. This composite structure further provides structural reinforcement to enhance the mechanical properties of the polymer matrix. The flexible solid-state electrolyte composite membrane exhibited an ionic conductivity of 2.5 × 10-4 S/cm at room temperature. The membrane can effectively block dendrites in a symmetric Li | electrolyte | Li cell during repeated lithium stripping/plating at room temperature, with a current density of 0.2 mA/cm2 for around 500 h and a current density of 0.5 mA/cm2 for over 300 h. These results provide an all solid ion-conducting membrane that can be applied to flexible LIBs and other electrochemical energy storage systems, such as lithium-sulfur batteries.

  3. Three-dimensional skeleton networks of graphene wrapped polyaniline nanofibers: an excellent structure for high-performance flexible solid-state supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Nantao; Zhang, Liling; Yang, Chao; Zhao, Jian; Yang, Zhi; Wei, Hao; Liao, Hanbin; FENG Zhenxing; Fisher, Adrian; Zhang, Yafei; Zhichuan J. Xu

    2016-01-01

    Thin, robust, lightweight, and flexible supercapacitors (SCs) have aroused growing attentions nowadays due to the rapid development of flexible electronics. Graphene-polyaniline (PANI) hybrids are attractive candidates for high performance SCs. In order to utilize them in real devices, it is necessary to improve the capacitance and the structure stability of PANI. Here we report a hierarchical three-dimensional structure, in which all of PANI nanofibers (NFs) are tightly wrapped inside reduce...

  4. Low Reflectivity and High Flexibility of Tin-Doped Indium Oxide Nanofiber Transparent Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Hui

    2011-01-12

    Tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) has found widespread use in solar cells, displays, and touch screens as a transparent electrode; however, two major problems with ITO remain: high reflectivity (up to 10%) and insufficient flexibility. Together, these problems severely limit the applications of ITO films for future optoelectronic devices. In this communication, we report the fabrication of ITO nanofiber network transparent electrodes. The nanofiber networks show optical reflectivity as low as 5% and high flexibility; the nanofiber networks can be bent to a radius of 2 mm with negligible changes in the sheet resistance. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. Analysis of Tagish Lake macromolecular organic material

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmour, I; Pearson, V. K.; Sephton, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    Macromolecular material is, by far, the major organic component of meteorites. Flash pyrolysis GCMS has been used to investigate this organic component in Tagish Lake. It is more condensed, less susbtituted than Murchson.

  6. Automated data collection for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Graeme; McAuley, Katherine E

    2011-09-01

    An overview, together with some practical advice, is presented of the current status of the automation of macromolecular crystallography (MX) data collection, with a focus on MX beamlines at Diamond Light Source, UK.

  7. Optics of Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, Vladimir

    During the last decade, fabrication and investigation of submicron-sized optical fibers have been received growing attention. Such nanofibers or nanowires can be grown from both inorganic and organic semiconductor materials being arranged in mutually parallel nanoaggregates. Also, selected...... nanofibers can be placed on a substrate or immersed in a liquid that allows one to study them individually. It has been demonstated that such structures possess promising waveguiding and photoluminescence properties. Under pumping conditions, they operate as a nanolaser. This remarkable progress dictates...

  8. Macromolecular crowding: Macromolecules friend or foe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Shruti; Chowhan, Rimpy Kaur; Singh, Laishram Rajendrakumar

    2015-09-01

    Cellular interior is known to be densely crowded due to the presence of soluble and insoluble macromolecules, which altogether occupy ~40% of the total cellular volume. This results in altered biological properties of macromolecules. Macromolecular crowding is observed to have both positive and negative effects on protein folding, structure, stability and function. Significant data has been accumulated so far on both the aspects. However, most of the review articles so far have focused on the positive aspect of macromolecular crowding and not much attention has been paid on the deleterious aspect of crowding on macromolecules. In order to have a complete knowledge of the effect of macromolecular crowding on proteins and enzymes, it is important to look into both the aspects of crowding to determine its precise role under physiological conditions. To fill the gap in the understanding of the effect of macromolecular crowding on proteins and enzymes, this review article focuses on the deleterious influence of crowding on macromolecules. Macromolecular crowding is not always good but also has several deleterious effects on various macromolecular properties. Taken together, the properties of biological macromolecules in vivo appears to be finely regulated by the nature and level of the intracellular crowdedness in order to perform their biological functions appropriately. The information provided here gives an understanding of the role played by the nature and level of cellular crowdedness in intensifying and/or alleviating the burden of various proteopathies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Energy transfer in macromolecular arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, David L.; Jenkins, Robert D.

    2003-11-01

    Macromolecular systems comprised of many light-sensitive centres (the photosynthetic unit, dendrimers, and other highly symmetric multichromophore arrays) are important structures offering challenges to theoreticians and synthetic chemists alike. Here we outline novel photophysical interactions predicted and observed in such arrays. Using the tools of molecular quantum electrodynamics (QED) we present quantum amplitudes for a variety of higher-order resonance energy transfer (RET) schemes associated with well-known nonlinear optical effects such as two- and three-photon absorption. The initial analysis is extended to account for situations where the participant donor species are identical and exist in a highly symmetric environment, leading to the possible formation of excitons. It emerges from the QED theory that such excitons are closely associated with the higher-order RET processes. General results are interpreted by analyzing particular molecular architectures which offer interesting features such as rate enhancement or limitation and exciton pathway quenching. Applications in the areas of photosynthesis, molecular logic gates and low-intensity fluorescence energy transfer are predicted.

  10. Dispersion of cellulose nanofibers in biopolymer based nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bei

    The focus of this work was to understand the fundamental dispersion mechanism of cellulose based nanofibers in bionanocomposites. The cellulose nanofibers were extracted from soybean pod and hemp fibers by chemo-mechanical treatments. These are bundles of cellulose nanofibers with a diameter ranging between 50 to 100 nm and lengths of thousands of nanometers which results in very high aspect ratio. In combination with a suitable matrix polymer, cellulose nanofiber networks show considerable potential as an effective reinforcement for high quality specialty applications of bio-based nanocomposites. Cellulose fibrils have a high density of --OH groups on the surface, which have a tendency to form hydrogen bonds with adjacent fibrils, reducing interaction with the surrounding matrix. The use of nanofibers has been mostly restricted to water soluble polymers. This thesis is focused on synthesizing the nanocomposite using a solid phase matrix polypropylene (PP) or polyethylene (PE) by hot compression and poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in an aqueous phase by film casting. The mechanical properties of nanofiber reinforced PVA film demonstrated a 4-5 fold increase in tensile strength, as compared to the untreated fiber-blend-PVA film. It is necessary to reduce the entanglement of the fibrils and improve their dispersion in the matrix by surface modification of fibers without deteriorating their reinforcing capability. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) was used to explore how various surface treatments would change the dispersion component of surface energy and acid-base character of cellulose nanofibers and the effect of the incorporation of these modified nanofibers into a biopolymer matrix on the properties of their nano-composites. Poly (lactic acid) (PLA) and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) based nanocomposites using cellulose nanofibers were prepared by extrusion, injection molding and hot compression. The IGC results indicated that styrene maleic anhydride coated and ethylene

  11. Templates for integrated nanofiber growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina de

    Para-hexaphenylene (p6P) molecules have the ability to self-assemble into organic nanofibers. These nanofibers hold unique optoelectronic properties, which make them interesting candidates as elements in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Typically these nanofibers are grown on specific single......, high-volume integration. Besides such single-crystalline templates, the nanofibers can also be grown on non-crystalline gold surfaces, on which the orientation of the nanofibers can be manipulated by structuring the gold surface prior to p6P deposition. In this work, a novel method for in-situ growth...... of p6P nanofibers on nano-structured gold surfaces is presented. The substrates are prepared by conventional nanofabrication techniques such as e-beam lithography and metal deposition, which increase their potential as device platforms. Some of the results presented here demonstrate, that both...

  12. Ultrasonic dyeing of cellulose nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Khatri, Zeeshan; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-07-01

    Textile dyeing assisted by ultrasonic energy has attained a greater interest in recent years. We report ultrasonic dyeing of nanofibers for the very first time. We chose cellulose nanofibers and dyed with two reactive dyes, CI reactive black 5 and CI reactive red 195. The cellulose nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation. The FTIR results confirmed complete conversion of CA into cellulose nanofibers. Dyeing parameters optimized were dyeing temperature, dyeing time and dye concentrations for each class of the dye used. Results revealed that the ultrasonic dyeing produced higher color yield (K/S values) than the conventional dyeing. The color fastness test results depicted good dye fixation. SEM analysis evidenced that ultrasonic energy during dyeing do not affect surface morphology of nanofibers. The results conclude successful dyeing of cellulose nanofibers using ultrasonic energy with better color yield and color fastness results than conventional dyeing.

  13. DOMMINO 2.0: integrating structurally resolved protein-, RNA-, and DNA-mediated macromolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xingyan; Dhroso, Andi; Han, Jing Ginger; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Korkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are formed between proteins, DNA and RNA molecules. Being a principle building block in macromolecular assemblies and pathways, the interactions underlie most of cellular functions. Malfunctioning of macromolecular interactions is also linked to a number of diseases. Structural knowledge of the macromolecular interaction allows one to understand the interaction's mechanism, determine its functional implications and characterize the effects of genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, on the interaction. Unfortunately, until now the interactions mediated by different types of macromolecules, e.g. protein-protein interactions or protein-DNA interactions, are collected into individual and unrelated structural databases. This presents a significant obstacle in the analysis of macromolecular interactions. For instance, the homogeneous structural interaction databases prevent scientists from studying structural interactions of different types but occurring in the same macromolecular complex. Here, we introduce DOMMINO 2.0, a structural Database Of Macro-Molecular INteractiOns. Compared to DOMMINO 1.0, a comprehensive database on protein-protein interactions, DOMMINO 2.0 includes the interactions between all three basic types of macromolecules extracted from PDB files. DOMMINO 2.0 is automatically updated on a weekly basis. It currently includes ∼1,040,000 interactions between two polypeptide subunits (e.g. domains, peptides, termini and interdomain linkers), ∼43,000 RNA-mediated interactions, and ∼12,000 DNA-mediated interactions. All protein structures in the database are annotated using SCOP and SUPERFAMILY family annotation. As a result, protein-mediated interactions involving protein domains, interdomain linkers, C- and N- termini, and peptides are identified. Our database provides an intuitive web interface, allowing one to investigate interactions at three different resolution levels: whole subunit network

  14. Investigation of electrochemical actuation by polyaniline nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehraeen, Shayan; Alkan Gürsel, Selmiye; Papila, Melih; Çakmak Cebeci, Fevzi

    2017-09-01

    Polyaniline nanofibers have shown promising electrical and electrochemical properties which make them prominent candidates in the development of smart systems employing sensors and actuators. Their electrochemical actuation potential is demonstrated in this study. A trilayer composite actuator based on polyaniline nanofibers was designed and fabricated. Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol was sandwiched between two polyaniline nanofibrous electrodes as ion-containing electrolyte gel. First, electrochemical behavior of a single electrode was studied, showing reversible redox peak pairs in 1 M HCl using a cyclic voltammetry technique. High aspect ratio polyaniline nanofibers create a porous network which facilitates ion diffusion and thus accelerates redox reactions. Bending displacement of the prepared trilayer actuator was then tested and reported under an AC potential stimulation as low as 0.5 V in a variety of frequencies from 50 to 1000 mHz, both inside 1 M HCl solution and in air. Decay of performance of the composite actuator in air is investigated and it is reported that tip displacement in a solution was stable and repeatable for 1000 s in all selected frequencies.

  15. Macromolecular mimicry of nucleic acid and protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nautrup Pedersen, Gitte; Nyborg, Jens; Clark, Brian F

    1999-01-01

    of the concept of macromolecular mimicry. Macromolecular mimicry has further been proposed among initiation and release factors, thereby adding a new element to the description of protein synthesis in bacteria. Such mimicry has also been observed in other biological processes such as autoimmunity, DNA repair......Although proteins and nucleic acids consist of different chemical components, proteins can mimic structures and possibly also functions of nucleic acids. Recently, structural mimicry was observed between two elongation factors in bacterial protein biosynthesis leading to the introduction...

  16. An optical nanofiber-based interface for single molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Skoff, Sarah M; Schauffert, Hardy; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Optical interfaces for quantum emitters are a prerequisite for implementing quantum networks. Here, we couple single molecules to the guided modes of an optical nanofiber. The molecules are embedded within a crystal that provides photostability and due to its inhomogeneous environment, a means to spectrally address single molecules. Single molecules are excited and detected solely via the nanofiber interface without the requirement of additional optical access. In this way, we realize a fully fiber-integrated system that is scalable and may become a versatile constituent for quantum hybrid systems.

  17. Electrospun La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 nanofibers for a high-temperature electrochemical carbon monoxide sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Mingjia; Koneru, Anveeksh; Yang, Feng; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Li, Jing; Wu, Nianqiang

    2012-08-01

    Lanthanum strontium manganite (La0.8Sr0.2MnO3, LSM) nanofibers have been synthesized by the electrospinning method. The electrospun nanofibers are intact without morphological and structural changes after annealing at 1050 °C. The LSM nanofibers are employed as the sensing electrode of an electrochemical sensor with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte for carbon monoxide detection at high temperatures over 500 °C. The electrospun nanofibers form a porous network electrode, which provides a continuous pathway for charge transport. In addition, the nanofibers possess a higher specific surface area than conventional micron-sized powders. As a result, the nanofiber electrode exhibits a higher electromotive force and better electro-catalytic activity toward CO oxidation. Therefore, the sensor with the nanofiber electrode shows a higher sensitivity, lower limit of detection and faster response to CO than a sensor with a powder electrode.

  18. Low voltage operating field effect transistors with composite In2O3-ZnO-ZnGa2O4 nanofiber network as active channel layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung-Hoon; Jang, Bong-Hoon; Park, Jin-Seong; Demadrille, Renaud; Tuller, Harry L; Kim, Il-Doo

    2014-03-25

    Field effect transistors (FETs), incorporating metal-oxide nanofibers as the active conductive channel, have the potential for driving the widespread application of nanowire or nanofiber FETs-based electronics. Here we report on low voltage FETs with integrated electrospun In2O3-ZnO-ZnGa2O4 composite fiber channel layers and high-K dielectric (MgO)0.3-(Bi1.5Zn1.0Nb1.5O7)0.7 gate insulator and compare their performance against FETs utilizing conductive single phase, polycrystalline ZnO or In2O3 channel layers. The polycrystalline In2O3-ZnO-ZnGa2O4 composite fibers provide superior performance with high field effect mobility (∼7.04 cm2 V(-1) s(-1)), low subthreshold swing (390 mV/dec), and low threshold voltage (1.0 V) combined with excellent saturation, likely resulting from the effective blocking of high current-flow through the In2O3 and ZnO nanocrystallites by the insulating spinel ZnGa2O4 phase. The microstructural evolution of the individual In2O3, ZnO, and ZnGa2O4 phases in composite fibers is clearly observed by high resolution TEM. A systematic examination of channel area coverage, ranging from single fiber to over 90% coverage, demonstrates that low coverage results in relatively low current outputs and reduced reproducibility which we attribute to the difficulty in positioning fibers and fiber length control. On the other hand, those with ∼80% coverage exhibited high field effect mobility, high on/off current ratios (>10(5)), and negligible hysteresis following 15 sweep voltage cycles. A special feature of this work is the application of the FETs to modulate the properties of complex polycrystalline nanocomposite channels.

  19. Syringeless Electrospinning toward Versatile Fabrication of Nanofiber Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seongjun; Gil, Manjae; Lee, Kyung Jin

    2017-01-01

    Although electrospinning is considered a powerful and generic tool for the preparation of nanofiber webs, several issues still need to be overcome for real-world applications. Most of these issues stem from the use of a syringe-based system, where the key factor influencing successful electrospinning is the maintenance of several subtle balances such as those of between the mass and the electrical state. It is extremely difficult to maintain these balances throughout the spinning process until all the polymeric solution in the syringe has been consumed. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a syringeless electrospinning technique as an alternative and efficient means of preparing a nanofiber web. This new technique uses a helically probed rotating cylinder. This technique can not only cover conventional methods, but also provides several advantages over syringe-based and needless electrospinning in terms of productivity (6 times higher) and processibility. For example, we can produce nanofibers with highly crystalline polymers and nanofiber-webs comprising networks of several different polymers, which is sometimes difficult in conventional electrospinning. In addition, this method provides several benefits for colloidal electrospinning as well. This method should help expand the range of applications for electrospun nanofiber webs in the near future.

  20. Syringeless Electrospinning toward Versatile Fabrication of Nanofiber Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seongjun; Gil, Manjae; Lee, Kyung Jin

    2017-01-01

    Although electrospinning is considered a powerful and generic tool for the preparation of nanofiber webs, several issues still need to be overcome for real-world applications. Most of these issues stem from the use of a syringe-based system, where the key factor influencing successful electrospinning is the maintenance of several subtle balances such as those of between the mass and the electrical state. It is extremely difficult to maintain these balances throughout the spinning process until all the polymeric solution in the syringe has been consumed. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a syringeless electrospinning technique as an alternative and efficient means of preparing a nanofiber web. This new technique uses a helically probed rotating cylinder. This technique can not only cover conventional methods, but also provides several advantages over syringe-based and needless electrospinning in terms of productivity (6 times higher) and processibility. For example, we can produce nanofibers with highly crystalline polymers and nanofiber-webs comprising networks of several different polymers, which is sometimes difficult in conventional electrospinning. In addition, this method provides several benefits for colloidal electrospinning as well. This method should help expand the range of applications for electrospun nanofiber webs in the near future. PMID:28120916

  1. Method for production of polymer and carbon nanofibers from water-soluble polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spender, Jonathan; Demers, Alexander L; Xie, Xinfeng; Cline, Amos E; Earle, M Alden; Ellis, Lucas D; Neivandt, David J

    2012-07-11

    Nanometer scale carbon fibers (carbon nanofibers) are of great interest to scientists and engineers in fields such as materials science, composite production, and energy storage due to their unique chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. Precursors currently used for production of carbon nanofibers are primarily from nonrenewable resources. Lignin is a renewable natural polymer existing in all high-level plants that is a byproduct of the papermaking process and a potential feedstock for carbon nanofiber production. The work presented here demonstrates a process involving the rapid freezing of an aqueous lignin solution, followed by sublimation of the resultant ice, to form a uniform network comprised of individual interconnected lignin nanofibers. Carbonization of the lignin nanofibers yields a similarly structured carbon nanofiber network. The methodology is not specific to lignin; nanofibers of other water-soluble polymers have been successfully produced. This nanoscale fibrous morphology has not been observed in traditional cryogel processes, due to the relatively slower freezing rates employed compared to those achieved in this study.

  2. Poly(hydroxybutyrate)/cellulose acetate blend nanofiber scaffolds: Preparation, characterization and cytocompatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhijiang, Cai, E-mail: caizhijiang@hotmail.com [School of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China); State Key Laboratory of Hollow Fiber Membrane Material and Processes, No 399 BingShuiXi Street, XiQing District, Tianjin, China, 300387 (China); Yi, Xu; Haizheng, Yang; Jia, Jianru; Liu, Yuanpei [School of Textiles, Tianjin Polytechnic University, Tianjin 300387 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB)/cellulose acetate (CA) blend nanofiber scaffolds were fabricated by electrospinning using the blends of chloroform and DMF as solvent. The blend nanofiber scaffolds were characterized by SEM, FTIR, XRD, DSC, contact angle and tensile test. The blend nanofibers exhibited cylindrical, uniform, bead-free and random orientation with the diameter ranged from 80–680 nm. The scaffolds had very well interconnected porous fibrous network structure and large aspect surface areas. It was found that the presence of CA affected the crystallization of PHB due to formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which restricted the preferential orientation of PHB molecules. The DSC result showed that the PHB and CA were miscible in the blend nanofiber. An increase in the glass transition temperature was observed with increasing CA content. Additionally, the mechanical properties of blend nanofiber scaffolds were largely influenced by the weight ratio of PHB/CA. The tensile strength, yield strength and elongation at break of the blend nanofiber scaffolds increased from 3.3 ± 0.35 MPa, 2.8 ± 0.26 MPa, and 8 ± 0.77% to 5.05 ± 0.52 MPa, 4.6 ± 0.82 MPa, and 17.6 ± 1.24% by increasing PHB content from 60% to 90%, respectively. The water contact angle of blend nanofiber scaffolds decreased about 50% from 112 ± 2.1° to 60 ± 0.75°. The biodegradability was evaluated by in vitro degradation test and the results revealed that the blend nanofiber scaffolds showed much higher degradation rates than the neat PHB. The cytocompatibility of the blend nanofiber scaffolds was preliminarily evaluated by cell adhesion studies. The cells incubated with PHB/CA blend nanofiber scaffold for 48 h were capable of forming cell adhesion and proliferation. It showed much better biocompatibility than pure PHB film. Thus, the prepared PHB/CA blend nanofiber scaffolds are bioactive and may be more suitable for cell proliferation suggesting that these scaffolds can be used for

  3. Mechanism of nanofiber crimp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Rou-Xi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication of crimped fibers has been caught much attention recently due to remarkable improvement surface-to-volume ratio. The precise mechanism of the fiber crimp is, however, rare and preliminary. This paper finds that pulsation of fibers is the key factor for fiber crimp, and its configuration (wave formation corresponds to its nature frequency after solidification. Crimping performance can be improved by temperature control of the uncrimped fibers. In the paper, polylactide/ dimethylfomamide solution is fabricated into crimped nanofibers by the bubble electrospinning, an approximate period- amplitude relationship of the wave formation is obtained.

  4. Three-dimensional skeleton networks of graphene wrapped polyaniline nanofibers: an excellent structure for high-performance flexible solid-state supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Nantao; Zhang, Liling; Yang, Chao; Zhao, Jian; Yang, Zhi; Wei, Hao; Liao, Hanbin; Feng, Zhenxing; Fisher, Adrian; Zhang, Yafei; Xu, Zhichuan J.

    2016-01-01

    Thin, robust, lightweight, and flexible supercapacitors (SCs) have aroused growing attentions nowadays due to the rapid development of flexible electronics. Graphene-polyaniline (PANI) hybrids are attractive candidates for high performance SCs. In order to utilize them in real devices, it is necessary to improve the capacitance and the structure stability of PANI. Here we report a hierarchical three-dimensional structure, in which all of PANI nanofibers (NFs) are tightly wrapped inside reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheet skeletons, for high-performance flexible SCs. The as-fabricated film electrodes with this unique structure showed a highest gravimetric specific capacitance of 921 F/g and volumetric capacitance of 391 F/cm3. The assembled solid-state SCs gave a high specific capacitance of 211 F/g (1 A/g), a high area capacitance of 0.9 F/cm2, and a competitive volumetric capacitance of 25.6 F/cm3. The SCs also exhibited outstanding rate capability (~75% retention at 20 A/g) as well as excellent cycling stability (100% retention at 10 A/g for 2000 cycles). Additionally, no structural failure and loss of performance were observed under the bending state. This structure design paves a new avenue for engineering rGO/PANI or other similar hybrids for high performance flexible energy storage devices.

  5. Reinforcement of polymeric nanofibers by ferritin nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Sun I.; Kim, Seon Jeong; Kim, Sung-Kyoung; Lee, Haiwon

    2006-05-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers containing bimolecular ferritin nanoparticles exhibited the enhancement of elastic modulus as compared to pure PVA nanofibers due to chemical interactions between the ferritin and the PVA matrix. The elastic modulus of the nanofibers was measured using a three-point bending test employing an atomic force microscope (AFM). To improve the reliability of the AFM measurements, uniform nanofibers were oriented linearly on an AFM calibration grating by introducing parallel subelectrodes in an electrospinning system. The length to diameter ratio of the measured nanofibers was >16. The PVA nanofibers reinforced by ferritin are applicable as artificial muscles and actuators.

  6. Identification of macromolecular complexes in cryoelectron tomograms of phantom cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangakis, Achilleas S.; Böhm, Jochen; Förster, Friedrich; Nickell, Stephan; Nicastro, Daniela; Typke, Dieter; Hegerl, Reiner; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Electron tomograms of intact frozen-hydrated cells are essentially three-dimensional images of the entire proteome of the cell, and they depict the whole network of macromolecular interactions. However, this information is not easily accessible because of the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the tomograms and the crowded nature of the cytoplasm. Here, we describe a template matching algorithm that is capable of detecting and identifying macromolecules in tomographic volumes in a fully automated manner. The algorithm is based on nonlinear cross correlation and incorporates elements of multivariate statistical analysis. Phantom cells, i.e., lipid vesicles filled with macromolecules, provide a realistic experimental scenario for an assessment of the fidelity of this approach. At the current resolution of ≈4 nm, macromolecules in the size range of 0.5–1 MDa can be identified with good fidelity. PMID:12391313

  7. Statistics of Multiscale Fluctuations in Macromolecular Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yukalov, V I

    2012-01-01

    An approach is suggested for treating multiscale fluctuations in macromolecular systems. The emphasis is on the statistical properties of such fluctuations. The approach is illustrated by a macromolecular system with mesoscopic fluctuations between the states of atomic orbitals. Strong-orbital and weak-orbital couplings fluctuationally arise, being multiscale in space and time. Statistical properties of the system are obtained by averaging over the multiscale fluctuations. The existence of such multiscale fluctuations causes phase transitions between strong-coupling and weak-coupling states. These transitions are connected with structure and size transformations of macromolecules. An approach for treating density and size multiscale fluctuations by means of classical statistical mechanics is also advanced.

  8. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W; Robinson, James I; Nettleship, Joanne E; Owens, Raymond J; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E; Grimes, Jonathan M; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S; Stuart, David I; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-05-01

    Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams.

  9. Growth and dissolution of macromolecular Markov chains

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of free living copolymerization are studied for processes with rates depending on k monomeric units of the macromolecular chain behind the unit that is attached or detached. In this case, the sequence of monomeric units in the growing copolymer is a kth-order Markov chain. In the regime of steady growth, the statistical properties of the sequence are determined analytically in terms of the attachment and detachment rates. In this way, the mean growth velocity as well as the thermodynamic entropy production and the sequence disorder can be calculated systematically. These different properties are also investigated in the regime of depolymerization where the macromolecular chain is dissolved by the surrounding solution. In this regime, the entropy production is shown to satisfy Landauer's principle.

  10. Growth and Dissolution of Macromolecular Markov Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of free living copolymerization are studied for processes with rates depending on k monomeric units of the macromolecular chain behind the unit that is attached or detached. In this case, the sequence of monomeric units in the growing copolymer is a kth-order Markov chain. In the regime of steady growth, the statistical properties of the sequence are determined analytically in terms of the attachment and detachment rates. In this way, the mean growth velocity as well as the thermodynamic entropy production and the sequence disorder can be calculated systematically. These different properties are also investigated in the regime of depolymerization where the macromolecular chain is dissolved by the surrounding solution. In this regime, the entropy production is shown to satisfy Landauer's principle.

  11. Ultrahigh Transmission Optical Nanofibers

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, J E; Grover, J A; Solano, P; Kordell, P R; Wong-Campos, J D; Orozco, L A; Rolston, S L

    2014-01-01

    We present a procedure for reproducibly fabricating ultrahigh transmission optical nanofibers (530 nm diameter and 84 mm stretch) with single-mode transmissions of 99.95 $ \\pm$ 0.02%, which represents a loss from tapering of 2.6 $\\,\\times \\,$ 10$^{-5}$ dB/mm when normalized to the entire stretch. When controllably launching the next family of higher-order modes on a fiber with 195 mm stretch, we achieve a transmission of 97.8 $\\pm$ 2.8%, which has a loss from tapering of 5.0 $\\,\\times \\,$ 10$^{-4}$ dB/mm when normalized to the entire stretch. Our pulling and transfer procedures allow us to fabricate optical nanofibers that transmit more than 400 mW in high vacuum conditions. These results, published as parameters in our previous work, present an improvement of two orders of magnitude less loss for the fundamental mode and an increase in transmission of more than 300% for higher-order modes, when following the protocols detailed in this paper. We extract from the transmission during the pull, the only reported...

  12. Dextran: A promising macromolecular drug carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaneshwar Suneela

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades intensive efforts have been made to design novel systems able to deliver the drug more effectively to the target site. The ongoing intense search for novel and innovative drug delivery systems is predominantly a consequence of the well-established fact that the conventional dosage forms are not sufficiently effective in conveying the drug compound to its site of action and once in the target area, in releasing the active agent over a desired period of time. The potential use of macromolecular prodrugs as a means of achieving targeted drug delivery has attracted considerable interest in recent years. Macromolecules such as antibodies, lipoproteins, lectins, proteins, polypeptides, polysaccharides, natural as well as synthetic polymers offer potential applicabilities as high molecular weight carriers for various therapeutically active compounds. Dextrans serve as one of the most promising macromolecular carrier candidates for a wide variety of therapeutic agents due to their excellent physico-chemical properties and physiological acceptance. The present contribution attempts to review various features of the dextran carrier like its source, structural and physico-chemical characteristics, pharmacokinetic fate and its applications as macromolecular carrier with special emphasis on dextran prodrugs.

  13. Mechanical properties of organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Hansen, Ole; Rubahn, H.R.

    2006-01-01

    Intrinsic elastic and inelastic mechanical Properties of individual, self-assembled, quasi-single-crystalline para-hexaphenylene nanofibers supported on substrates with different hydrophobicities are investigated as well as the interplay between the fibers and the underlying substrates. We find f...... on a silicon substrate with a low-adhesion coating, whereas such motion on a noncoated substrate is limited to very short (sub-micrometer) nanofiber pieces due to strong adhesive forces....

  14. Touch- and Brush-Spinning of Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarev, Alexander; Asheghali, Darya; Griffiths, Ian M; Trotsenko, Oleksandr; Gruzd, Alexey; Lin, Xin; Stone, Howard A; Minko, Sergiy

    2015-11-01

    Robust, simple, and scalable touch- and brush-spinning methods for the drawing of nanofibers, core-shell nanofibers, and their aligned 2D and 3D meshes using polymer solutions and melts are discussed.

  15. Electrospun Metal Nanofiber Webs as High-Performance Transparent Electrode

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Hui

    2010-10-13

    Transparent electrodes, indespensible in displays and solar cells, are currently dominated by indium tin oxide (ITO) films although the high price of indium, brittleness of films, and high vacuum deposition are limiting their applications. Recently, solution-processed networks of nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, and silver nanowires have attracted great attention as replacements. A low junction resistance between nanostructures is important for decreasing the sheet resistance. However, the junction resistances between CNTs and boundry resistances between graphene nanostructures are too high. The aspect ratios of silver nanowires are limited to ∼100, and silver is relatively expensive. Here, we show high-performance transparent electrodes with copper nanofiber networks by a low-cost and scalable electrospinning process. Copper nanofibers have ultrahigh aspect ratios of up to 100000 and fused crossing points with ultralow junction resistances, which result in high transmitance at low sheet resistance, e.g., 90% at 50 Ω/sq. The copper nanofiber networks also show great flexibility and stretchabilty. Organic solar cells using copper nanowire networks as transparent electrodes have a power efficiency of 3.0%, comparable to devices made with ITO electrodes. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  16. Characterization and Biocompatibility of Biopolyester Nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Tang Hui Ying; Tetsuji Yamaoka; Tadahisa Iwata; Daisuke Ishii

    2009-01-01

    Biodegradable nanofibers are expected to be promising scaffold materials for biomedical engineering, however, biomedical applications require control of the degradation behavior and tissue response of nanofiber scaffolds in vivo. For this purpose, electrospun nanofibers of poly(hydroxyalkanoate)s (PHAs) and poly(lactide)s (PLAs) were subjected to degradation tests in vitro and in vivo. In this review, characterization and biocompatibility of nanofibers derived from PHAs and PLAs are described...

  17. Bubbfil electrospinning of PA66/Cu nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Different PA66/Cu nanofibers were prepared under various electrospinning parameters through bubbfil electrospinning. The process parameters were determined. Cuprum particles with different size were added to PA66 solution to produce PA6/66-Cu composite nanofibers. The influence of cuprum nanoparticle size on the PA66 nanofibers was analyzed.

  18. Preparation and Characterization of Soluble Eggshell Membrane Protein/PLGA Electrospun Nanofibers for Guided Tissue Regeneration Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Guided tissue regeneration (GTR is a widely used method in periodontal therapy, which involves the placement of a barrier membrane to exclude migration of epithelium and ensure repopulation of periodontal ligament cells. The objective of this study is to prepare and evaluate a new type of soluble eggshell membrane protein (SEP/poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanofibers using electrospinning method for GTR membrane application. SEP/PLGA nanofibers were successfully prepared with various blending ratios. The morphology, chemical composition, surface wettability, and mechanical properties of the nanofibers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, contact angle measurement, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and a universal testing machine. L-929 fibroblast cells were used to evaluate the biocompatibility of SEP/PLGA nanofibers and investigate the interaction between cells and nanofibers. Results showed that the SEP/PLGA electrospun membrane was composed of uniform, bead-free nanofibers, which formed an interconnected porous network structure. Mechanical property of SEP has been greatly improved by the addition of PLGA. The biological study results showed that SEP/PLGA nanofibers could enhance cell attachment, spreading, and proliferation. The study indicated the potential of SEP/PLGA nanofibers for GTR application and provided a basis for future optimization.

  19. Aligned Nanofibers for Regenerating Arteries, Nerves, and Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClendon, Mark Trosper

    Cells are the fundamental unit of the human body, and therefore the ability to control cell behavior is the most important challenge in regenerative medicine. Peptides are the language of biology which is why synthetic peptide amphiphile (PA) molecules hold great potential as a biomaterial. The work presented in this dissertation explores a variety of liquid crystalline PA nanofibers as a means for directing cell growth. Shaping the alignment of these nanofiber networks requires a deep understanding of their rheological properties which presents a difficult challenge as they exist in complex solid and liquid environments. Using PA molecules that self-assemble into high aspect ratio nanofibers and liquid crystalline solutions, this work investigates the influence of shear flow on macroscopic and microscopic nanofiber alignment. To this end, a shear force applied to PA solutions was systematically varied while the alignment was probed using small angle x-ray scattering. Nanofibers were found to respond to shear flow by aligning parallel to the flow direction. By changing pH and PA chemical sequence it was observed that increasing the interfiber electrostatic repulsive interactions resulted in a greater dependence on shear rate. Nanofiber solutions having greater repulsion did not drastically increase in alignment when the applied strain was increased by two orders of magnitude (1 s -1 to 100 s-1), while solutions with nanofibers having less repulsion increased there alignment four fold with the same strain increase. say exactly what you mean by resulted in greater dependence: did it result in fibers aligning under lower shear rates or higher rates--give the results Anionic PA solutions typically used to encapsulate living cells at neutral pH were found to require minimal shear rates, Histological and behavioral observations confirmed that PA implants sustained regeneration rates comparable to autologous grafts and significantly better than empty biopolymer grafts

  20. Smoothing techniques for macromolecular global optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, J.J.; Wu, Zhijun

    1995-09-01

    We study global optimization problems that arise in macromolecular modeling, and the solution of these problems via continuation and smoothing. Our results unify and extend the theory associated with the use of the Gaussian transform for smoothing. We show that the, Gaussian transform can be viewed as a special case of a generalized transform and that these generalized transforms share many of the properties of the Gaussian transform. We also show that the smoothing behavior of the generalized transform can be studied in terms of the Fourier transform and that these results indicate that the Gaussian transform has superior smoothing properties.

  1. Celebrating macromolecular crystallography: A personal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abad-Zapatero, Celerino

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The twentieth century has seen an enormous advance in the knowledge of the atomic structures that surround us. The discovery of the first crystal structures of simple inorganic salts by the Braggs in 1914, using the diffraction of X-rays by crystals, provided the critical elements to unveil the atomic structure of matter. Subsequent developments in the field leading to macromolecular crystallography are presented with a personal perspective, related to the cultural milieu of Spain in the late 1950’s. The journey of discovery of the author, as he developed professionally, is interwoven with the expansion of macromolecular crystallography from the first proteins (myoglobin, hemoglobin to the ‘coming of age’ of the field in 1971 and the discoveries that followed, culminating in the determination of the structure of the ribosomes at the turn of the century. A perspective is presented exploring the future of the field and also a reflection about the future generations of Spanish scientists.El siglo XX ha sido testigo del increíble avance que ha experimentado el conocimiento de la estructura atómica de la materia que nos rodea. El descubrimiento de las primeras estructuras atómicas de sales inorgánicas por los Bragg en 1914, empleando difracción de rayos X con cristales, proporcionó los elementos clave para alcanzar tal conocimiento. Posteriores desarrollos en este campo, que condujeron a la cristalografía macromolecular, se presentan aquí desde una perspectiva personal, relacionada con el contexto cultural de la España de la década de los 50. La experiencia del descubrimiento científico, durante mi desarrollo profesional, se integra en el desarrollo de la cristalografía macromolecular, desde las primeras proteínas (míoglobina y hemoglobina, hasta su madurez en 1971 que, con los posteriores descubrimientos, culmina con la determinación del la estructura del ribosoma. Asimismo, se explora el futuro de esta disciplina y se

  2. Electrospinning of Nanofibers for Energy Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guiru; Sun, Liqun; Xie, Haiming; Liu, Jia

    2016-07-02

    With global concerns about the shortage of fossil fuels and environmental issues, the development of efficient and clean energy storage devices has been drastically accelerated. Nanofibers are used widely for energy storage devices due to their high surface areas and porosities. Electrospinning is a versatile and efficient fabrication method for nanofibers. In this review, we mainly focus on the application of electrospun nanofibers on energy storage, such as lithium batteries, fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells and supercapacitors. The structure and properties of nanofibers are also summarized systematically. The special morphology of nanofibers prepared by electrospinning is significant to the functional materials for energy storage.

  3. Aligned Layers of Silver Nano-Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii B. Golovin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new dichroic polarizers made by ordering silver nano-fibers to aligned layers. The aligned layers consist of nano-fibers and self-assembled molecular aggregates of lyotropic liquid crystals. Unidirectional alignment of the layers is achieved by means of mechanical shearing. Aligned layers of silver nano-fibers are partially transparent to a linearly polarized electromagnetic radiation. The unidirectional alignment and density of the silver nano-fibers determine degree of polarization of transmitted light. The aligned layers of silver nano-fibers might be used in optics, microwave applications, and organic electronics.

  4. Preparation of chitosan nanofiber tube by electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Kagata, Go; Kino, Rikako; Tanaka, Junzo

    2007-03-01

    Water-insoluble chitosan nanofiber sheets and tubes coated with chitosan-cast film were prepared by electrospinning. When as-spun chitosan nanofiber sheets and tubes were immersed in 28% ammonium aqueous solution, they became insoluble in water and showed nanofiber structures confirmed by SEM micrography. Mechanical properties of chitosan nanofiber sheets and tubes were improved by coating with chitosan-cast film, which gave them a compressive strength higher than that of crab-tendon chitosan, demonstrating that chitosan nanofiber tubes coated with chitosan-cast film are usable as nerve-regenerative guide tubes.

  5. Electrospinning of Nanofibers for Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiru Sun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With global concerns about the shortage of fossil fuels and environmental issues, the development of efficient and clean energy storage devices has been drastically accelerated. Nanofibers are used widely for energy storage devices due to their high surface areas and porosities. Electrospinning is a versatile and efficient fabrication method for nanofibers. In this review, we mainly focus on the application of electrospun nanofibers on energy storage, such as lithium batteries, fuel cells, dye-sensitized solar cells and supercapacitors. The structure and properties of nanofibers are also summarized systematically. The special morphology of nanofibers prepared by electrospinning is significant to the functional materials for energy storage.

  6. Oriented nanofibers embedded in a polymer matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Enrique V. (Inventor); Rodriguez-Macias, Fernando J. (Inventor); Lozano, Karen (Inventor); Chibante, Luis Paulo Felipe (Inventor); Stewart, David Harris (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of forming a composite of embedded nanofibers in a polymer matrix is disclosed. The method includes incorporating nanofibers in a plastic matrix forming agglomerates, and uniformly distributing the nanofibers by exposing the agglomerates to hydrodynamic stresses. The hydrodynamic said stresses force the agglomerates to break apart. In combination or additionally elongational flow is used to achieve small diameters and alignment. A nanofiber reinforced polymer composite system is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of nanofibers that are embedded in polymer matrices in micron size fibers. A method for producing nanotube continuous fibers is disclosed. Nanofibers are fibrils with diameters of 100 nm, multiwall nanotubes, single wall nanotubes and their various functionalized and derivatized forms. The method includes mixing a nanofiber in a polymer; and inducing an orientation of the nanofibers that enables the nanofibers to be used to enhance mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Orientation is induced by high shear mixing and elongational flow, singly or in combination. The polymer may be removed from said nanofibers, leaving micron size fibers of aligned nanofibers.

  7. Multiscale macromolecular simulation: role of evolving ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singharoy, A; Joshi, H; Ortoleva, P J

    2012-10-22

    Multiscale analysis provides an algorithm for the efficient simulation of macromolecular assemblies. This algorithm involves the coevolution of a quasiequilibrium probability density of atomic configurations and the Langevin dynamics of spatial coarse-grained variables denoted order parameters (OPs) characterizing nanoscale system features. In practice, implementation of the probability density involves the generation of constant OP ensembles of atomic configurations. Such ensembles are used to construct thermal forces and diffusion factors that mediate the stochastic OP dynamics. Generation of all-atom ensembles at every Langevin time step is computationally expensive. Here, multiscale computation for macromolecular systems is made more efficient by a method that self-consistently folds in ensembles of all-atom configurations constructed in an earlier step, history, of the Langevin evolution. This procedure accounts for the temporal evolution of these ensembles, accurately providing thermal forces and diffusions. It is shown that efficiency and accuracy of the OP-based simulations is increased via the integration of this historical information. Accuracy improves with the square root of the number of historical timesteps included in the calculation. As a result, CPU usage can be decreased by a factor of 3-8 without loss of accuracy. The algorithm is implemented into our existing force-field based multiscale simulation platform and demonstrated via the structural dynamics of viral capsomers.

  8. Macromolecular recognition in the Protein Data Bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janin, Joël, E-mail: joel.janin@ibbmc.u-psud.fr [Laboratoire d’Enzymologie et de Biochimie Structurales, UPR9063, CNRS, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Institut de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, UMR8619, Bâtiment 430, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Rodier, Francis [Laboratoire d’Enzymologie et de Biochimie Structurales, UPR9063, CNRS, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chakrabarti, Pinak [Department of Biochemistry, Bose Institute, P-1/12 CIT Scheme VIIM, Calcutta 700 054 (India); Bahadur, Ranjit P. [Institut de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, UMR8619, Bâtiment 430, Université Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay (France); Department of Biochemistry, Bose Institute, P-1/12 CIT Scheme VIIM, Calcutta 700 054 (India); Laboratoire d’Enzymologie et de Biochimie Structurales, UPR9063, CNRS, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2007-01-01

    X-ray structures in the PDB illustrate both the specific recognition of two polypeptide chains in protein–protein complexes and dimeric proteins and their nonspecific interaction at crystal contacts. Crystal structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank illustrate the diversity of biological macromolecular recognition: transient interactions in protein–protein and protein–DNA complexes and permanent assemblies in homodimeric proteins. The geometric and physical chemical properties of the macromolecular interfaces that may govern the stability and specificity of recognition are explored in complexes and homodimers compared with crystal-packing interactions. It is found that crystal-packing interfaces are usually much smaller; they bury fewer atoms and are less tightly packed than in specific assemblies. Standard-size interfaces burying 1200–2000 Å{sup 2} of protein surface occur in protease–inhibitor and antigen–antibody complexes that assemble with little or no conformation changes. Short-lived electron-transfer complexes have small interfaces; the larger size of the interfaces observed in complexes involved in signal transduction and homodimers correlates with the presence of conformation changes, often implicated in biological function. Results of the CAPRI (critical assessment of predicted interactions) blind prediction experiment show that docking algorithms efficiently and accurately predict the mode of assembly of proteins that do not change conformation when they associate. They perform less well in the presence of large conformation changes and the experiment stimulates the development of novel procedures that can handle such changes.

  9. Rotation-Induced Macromolecular Spooling of DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler N. Shendruk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic information is stored in a linear sequence of base pairs; however, thermal fluctuations and complex DNA conformations such as folds and loops make it challenging to order genomic material for in vitro analysis. In this work, we discover that rotation-induced macromolecular spooling of DNA around a rotating microwire can monotonically order genomic bases, overcoming this challenge. We use single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to directly visualize long DNA strands deforming and elongating in shear flow near a rotating microwire, in agreement with numerical simulations. While untethered DNA is observed to elongate substantially, in agreement with our theory and numerical simulations, strong extension of DNA becomes possible by introducing tethering. For the case of tethered polymers, we show that increasing the rotation rate can deterministically spool a substantial portion of the chain into a fully stretched, single-file conformation. When applied to DNA, the fraction of genetic information sequentially ordered on the microwire surface will increase with the contour length, despite the increased entropy. This ability to handle long strands of DNA is in contrast to modern DNA sample preparation technologies for sequencing and mapping, which are typically restricted to comparatively short strands, resulting in challenges in reconstructing the genome. Thus, in addition to discovering new rotation-induced macromolecular dynamics, this work inspires new approaches to handling genomic-length DNA strands.

  10. Rotation-Induced Macromolecular Spooling of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Sean, David; Berard, Daniel J.; Wolf, Julian; Dragoman, Justin; Battat, Sophie; Slater, Gary W.; Leslie, Sabrina R.

    2017-07-01

    Genetic information is stored in a linear sequence of base pairs; however, thermal fluctuations and complex DNA conformations such as folds and loops make it challenging to order genomic material for in vitro analysis. In this work, we discover that rotation-induced macromolecular spooling of DNA around a rotating microwire can monotonically order genomic bases, overcoming this challenge. We use single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to directly visualize long DNA strands deforming and elongating in shear flow near a rotating microwire, in agreement with numerical simulations. While untethered DNA is observed to elongate substantially, in agreement with our theory and numerical simulations, strong extension of DNA becomes possible by introducing tethering. For the case of tethered polymers, we show that increasing the rotation rate can deterministically spool a substantial portion of the chain into a fully stretched, single-file conformation. When applied to DNA, the fraction of genetic information sequentially ordered on the microwire surface will increase with the contour length, despite the increased entropy. This ability to handle long strands of DNA is in contrast to modern DNA sample preparation technologies for sequencing and mapping, which are typically restricted to comparatively short strands, resulting in challenges in reconstructing the genome. Thus, in addition to discovering new rotation-induced macromolecular dynamics, this work inspires new approaches to handling genomic-length DNA strands.

  11. The role of macromolecular stability in desiccation tolerance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolkers, W.F.

    1998-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis concerns a study on the molecular interactions that play a role in the macromolecular stability of desiccation-tolerant higher plant organs. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy was used as the main experimental technique to assess macromolecular st

  12. The role of macromolecular stability in desiccation tolerance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolkers, W.

    1998-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis concerns a study on the molecular interactions that play a role in the macromolecular stability of desiccation-tolerant higher plant organs. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy was used as the main experimental technique to assess macromolecular structures

  13. Interaction of laser-cooled $^{87}$Rb atoms with higher order modes of an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Ravi; Maimaiti, Aili; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary C; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    Optical nanofibers can be used to confine light to submicron regions and are very promising for the realization of optical fiber-based quantum networks using cold, neutral atoms. Light propagating in the higher order modes of a nanofiber has a greater evanescent field extension around the waist in comparison with the fundamental mode, leading to a stronger interaction with the surrounding environment. In this work, we report on the integration of a few-mode, optical nanofiber, with a waist diameter of ~700 nm, into a magneto-optical trap for $^{87}$Rb atoms. The nanofiber is fabricated from 80 $\\mu$m diameter fiber using a brushed hydrogen-oxygen flame pulling rig. We show that absorption by laser-cooled atoms around the waist of the nanofiber is stronger when probe light is guided in the higher order modes than in the fundamental mode. As predicted by Masalov and Minogin*, fluorescent light from the atoms coupling in to the nanofiber through the waist has a higher pumping rate (5.8 times) for the higher-orde...

  14. Electrospinning of Biocompatible Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Andrew J.; Queen, Hailey A.; McCullen, Seth D.; Krause, Wendy E.

    2006-03-01

    Artificial scaffolds for growing cells can have a wide range of applications including wound coverings, supports in tissue cultures, drug delivery, and organ and tissue transplantation. Tissue engineering is a promising field which may resolve current problems with transplantation, such as rejection by the immune system and scarcity of donors. One approach to tissue engineering utilizes a biodegradable scaffold onto which cells are seeded and cultured, and ideally develop into functional tissue. The scaffold acts as an artificial extracellular matrix (ECM). Because a typical ECM contains collagen fibers with diameters of 50-500 nm, electrostatic spinning (electrospinning) was used to mimic the size and structure of these fibers. Electrospinning is a novel way of spinning a nonwoven web of fibers on the order of 100 nm, much like the web of collagen in an ECM. We are investigating the ability of several biocompatible polymers (e.g., chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol) to form defect-free nanofiber webs and are studying the influence of the zero shear rate viscosity, molecular weight, entanglement concentration, relaxation time, and solvent on the resulting fiber size and morphology.

  15. Tailoring Supramolecular Nanofibers for Air Filtration Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel; Skrybeck, Dominik; Misslitz, Holger; Nardini, David; Kern, Alexander; Kreger, Klaus; Schmidt, Hans-Werner

    2016-06-15

    The demand of new materials and processes for nanofiber fabrication to enhance the performance of air filters is steadily increasing. Typical approaches to obtain nanofibers are based on top-down processes such as melt blowing, centrifugal spinning, and electrospinning of polymer materials. However, fabrication of polymer nanofibers is limited with respect to either a sufficiently high throughput or the smallest achievable fiber diameter. This study reports comprehensively on a fast and simple bottom-up process to prepare supramolecular nanofibers in situ inside viscose/polyester microfiber nonwovens. Here, selected small molecules of the materials class of 1,3,5-benzenetrisamides are employed. The microfiber-nanofiber composites exhibit a homogeneous nanofiber distribution and morphology throughout the entire nonwoven scaffold. Small changes in molecular structure and processing solvent have a strong influence on the final nanofiber diameter and diameter distribution and, consequently, on the filtration performance. Choosing proper processing conditions, microfiber-nanofiber composites with surprisingly high filtration efficiencies of particulate matter are obtained. In addition, the microfiber-nanofiber composite integrity at elevated temperatures was determined and revealed that the morphology of supramolecular nanofibers is maintained compared to that of the utilized polymer nonwoven.

  16. Coherence properties of nanofiber-trapped cesium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, D; Sayrin, C; Mitsch, R; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2013-06-14

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized ∼ 200 nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time of T(2)(*) = 0.6 ms and an irreversible dephasing time of T(2)(') = 3.7 ms. By modeling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, T(2)(*) and T(2)(') are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  17. Coherence properties of nanofiber-trapped cesium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Reitz, D; Mitsch, R; Schneeweiss, P; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the ground state coherence properties of cesium atoms in a nanofiber-based two-color dipole trap, localized 200 nm away from the fiber surface. Using microwave radiation to coherently drive the clock transition, we record Ramsey fringes as well as spin echo signals and infer a reversible dephasing time $T_2^\\ast=0.6$ ms and an irreversible dephasing time $T_2^\\prime=3.7$ ms. By theoretically modelling the signals, we find that, for our experimental parameters, $T_2^\\ast$ and $T_2^\\prime$ are limited by the finite initial temperature of the atomic ensemble and the heating rate, respectively. Our results represent a fundamental step towards establishing nanofiber-based traps for cold atoms as a building block in an optical fiber quantum network.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of anisotropic nanofiber scaffolds for advanced drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalani G

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ghulam Jalani,* Chan Woo Jung,* Jae Sang Lee, Dong Woo Lim Department of Bionano Engineering, College of Engineering Sciences, Hanyang University, Education Research Industry Cluster at Ansan Campus, Ansan, South Korea*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Stimuli-responsive, polymer-based nanostructures with anisotropic compartments are of great interest as advanced materials because they are capable of switching their shape via environmentally-triggered conformational changes, while maintaining discrete compartments. In this study, a new class of stimuli-responsive, anisotropic nanofiber scaffolds with physically and chemically distinct compartments was prepared via electrohydrodynamic cojetting with side-by-side needle geometry. These nanofibers have a thermally responsive, physically-crosslinked compartment, and a chemically-crosslinked compartment at the nanoscale. The thermally responsive compartment is composed of physically crosslinkable poly(N-isopropylacrylamide poly(NIPAM copolymers, and poly(NIPAM-co-stearyl acrylate poly(NIPAM-co-SA, while the thermally-unresponsive compartment is composed of polyethylene glycol dimethacrylates. The two distinct compartments were physically crosslinked by the hydrophobic interaction of the stearyl chains of poly(NIPAM-co-SA or chemically stabilized via ultraviolet irradiation, and were swollen in physiologically relevant buffers due to their hydrophilic polymer networks. Bicompartmental nanofibers with the physically-crosslinked network of the poly(NIPAM-co-SA compartment showed a thermally-triggered shape change due to thermally-induced aggregation of poly(NIPAM-co-SA. Furthermore, when bovine serum albumin and dexamethasone phosphate were separately loaded into each compartment, the bicompartmental nanofibers with anisotropic actuation exhibited decoupled, controlled release profiles of both drugs in response to a temperature. A new class of multicompartmental nanofibers could be

  19. Multifunctional Nanofibers towards Active Biomedical Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaishri Sharma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional (1-D nanostructures have attracted enormous research interest due to their unique physicochemical properties and wide application potential. These 1-D nanofibers are being increasingly applied to biomedical fields owing to their high surface area-to-volume ratio, high porosity, and the ease of tuning their structures, functionalities, and properties. Many biomedical nanofiber reviews have focused on tissue engineering and drug delivery applications but have very rarely discussed their use as wound dressings. However, nanofibers have enormous potential as wound dressings and other clinical applications that could have wide impacts on the treatment of wounds. Herein, the authors review the main fabrication methods of nanofibers as well as requirements, strategies, and recent applications of nanofibers, and provide perspectives of the challenges and opportunities that face multifunctional nanofibers for active therapeutic applications.

  20. Functional Sub-states by High-pressure Macromolecular Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaussy, Anne-Claire; Girard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    At the molecular level, high-pressure perturbation is of particular interest for biological studies as it allows trapping conformational substates. Moreover, within the context of high-pressure adaptation of deep-sea organisms, it allows to decipher the molecular determinants of piezophily. To provide an accurate description of structural changes produced by pressure in a macromolecular system, developments have been made to adapt macromolecular crystallography to high-pressure studies. The present chapter is an overview of results obtained so far using high-pressure macromolecular techniques, from nucleic acids to virus capsid through monomeric as well as multimeric proteins.

  1. Effect of airflow on nanofiber yarn spinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jian-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a new air-jet spinning method for the preparation of continuous twisted nanofiber yarns. The nozzle-twisting device is designed to create the 3-D rotating airflow to twist nanofiber bundles. The airflow characteristics inside the twisting chamber are studied numerically. The airflow field distribution and its effect on nanofiber yarn spinning at different pressures are also discussed.

  2. Electrical, photoelectrical and morphological properties of ZnO nanofiber networks grown on SiO{sub 2} and on Si nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Nadia Celeste; Comedi, David [Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (FACET/UNT), (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologia. Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Fisica del Solido; Audebert, Fernando [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Tirado, Monica, E-mail: mtirado@herrera.unt.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (FACET/UNT), (Argentina). Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologia. Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Nanomateriales y de Propiedades Dielectricas; Rodriguez, Andres; Rodriguez, Tomas [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (ETSIT/UPM), Madrid (Spain). Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros de Telecomucacion. Tecnologia Electronica; Hughes, Gareth M.; Grovenor, Chris R.M. [University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials

    2013-11-01

    ZnO nanofibre networks (NFNs) were grown by vapour transport method on Si-based substrates. One type of substrate was SiO{sub 2} thermally grown on Si and another consisted of a Si wafer onto which Si nanowires (NWs) had been grown having Au nanoparticles catalysts. The ZnO-NFN morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy on samples grown at 600 Degree-Sign C and 720 Degree-Sign C substrate temperature, while an focused ion beam was used to study the ZnO NFN/Si NWs/Si and ZnO NFN/SiO{sub 2} interfaces. Photoluminescence, electrical conductance and photo conductance of ZnO-NFN was studied for the sample grown on SiO{sub 2}. The photoluminescence spectra show strong peaks due to exciton recombination and lattice defects. The ZnO-NFN presents quasi-persistent photoconductivity effects and ohmic I-V characteristics which become nonlinear and hysteretic as the applied voltage is increased. The electrical conductance as a function of temperature can be described by a modified three dimensional variable hopping model with nanometer-ranged typical hopping distances. (author)

  3. Electrical, photoelectrical and morphological properties of ZnO nanofiber networks grown on SiO2 and on Si nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Celeste Vega

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ZnO nanofibre networks (NFNs were grown by vapour transport method on Si-based substrates. One type of substrate was SiO2 thermally grown on Si and another consisted of a Si wafer onto which Si nanowires (NWs had been grown having Au nanoparticles catalysts. The ZnO-NFN morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy on samples grown at 600 °C and 720 °C substrate temperature, while an focused ion beam was used to study the ZnO NFN/Si NWs/Si and ZnO NFN/SiO2 interfaces. Photoluminescence, electrical conductance and photoconductance of ZnO-NFN was studied for the sample grown on SiO2. The photoluminescence spectra show strong peaks due to exciton recombination and lattice defects. The ZnO-NFN presents quasi-persistent photoconductivity effects and ohmic I-V characteristics which become nonlinear and hysteretic as the applied voltage is increased. The electrical conductance as a function of temperature can be described by a modified three dimensional variable hopping model with nanometer-ranged typical hopping distances.

  4. Macromolecular crowding for tailoring tissue-derived fibrillated matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magno, Valentina; Friedrichs, Jens; Weber, Heather M; Prewitz, Marina C; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Werner, Carsten

    2017-06-01

    Tissue-derived fibrillated matrices can be instrumental for the in vitro reconstitution of multiphasic extracellular microenvironments. However, despite of several advantages, the obtained scaffolds so far offer a rather narrow range of materials characteristics only. In this work, we demonstrate how macromolecular crowding (MMC) - the supplementation of matrix reconstitution media with synthetic or natural macromolecules in ways to create excluded volume effects (EVE) - can be employed for tailoring important structural and biophysical characteristics of kidney-derived fibrillated matrices. Porcine kidneys were decellularized, ground and the obtained extracellular matrix (ECM) preparations were reconstituted under varied MMC conditions. We show that MMC strongly influences the fibrillogenesis kinetics and impacts the architecture and the elastic modulus of the reconstituted matrices, with diameters and relative alignment of fibrils increasing at elevated concentrations of the crowding agent Ficoll400, a nonionic synthetic polymer of sucrose. Furthermore, we demonstrate how MMC modulates the distribution of key ECM molecules within the reconstituted matrix scaffolds. As a proof of concept, we compared different variants of kidney-derived fibrillated matrices in cell culture experiments referring to specific requirements of kidney tissue engineering approaches. The results revealed that MMC-tailored matrices support the morphogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) into capillary networks and of murine kidney stem cells (KSCs) into highly branched aggregates. The established methodology is concluded to provide generally applicable new options for tailoring tissue-specific multiphasic matrices in vitro. Tissue-derived fibrillated matrices can be instrumental for the in vitro reconstitution of multiphasic extracellular microenvironments. However, despite of several advantages, the obtained scaffolds so far offer a rather narrow range of materials

  5. Nanofiber filter media for air filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Bharath Kumar

    Nanofibers have higher capture efficiencies in comparison to microfibers in the submicron particle size range of 100-500 nm because of small fiber diameter and increased surface area of the fibers. Pressure drop across the filter increases tremendously with decrease in fiber diameter in the continuum flow regime. Nanofibers with fiber diameter less than 300 nm are in the slip flow regime as a consequence of which steep increase in pressure drop is considerably reduced due to slip effect. The outlet or inlet gases have broad range of particle size distribution varying from few micrometers to nanometers. The economic benefits include capture of a wide range of particle sizes in the gas streams using compact filters composed of nanofibers and microfibers. Electrospinning technique was used to successfully fabricate polymeric and ceramic nanofibers. The nanofibers were long, continuous, and flexible with diameters in the range of 200--300 nm. Nanofibers were added to the filter medium either by mixing microfibers and nanofibers or by directly electrospinning nanofibers as thin layer on the surface of the microfiber filter medium. Experimental results showed that either by mixing Nylon 6 nanofibers with B glass fibers or by electrospinning Nylon 6 nanofibers as a thin layer on the surface of the microfiber medium in the surface area ratio of 1 which is 0.06 g of nanofibers for 2 g of microfibers performed better than microfiber filter media in air filtration tests. This improved performance is consistent with numerical modeling. The particle loading on a microfibrous filter were studied for air filtration tests. The experimental and modeling results showed that both pressure drop and capture efficiency increased with loading time. Nanofiber filter media has potential applications in many filtration applications and one of them being hot gas filtration. Ceramic nanofibers made of alumina and titania nanofibers can withstand in the range of 1000°C. Ceramic nanofibers

  6. Nickel nanofibers synthesized by the electrospinning method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Anhui 230000 (China); Zhang, Xuebin, E-mail: zzhhxxbb@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Anhui 230000 (China); Zhu, Yajun; Li, Bin; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jingcheng; Feng, Yi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Anhui 230000 (China)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► The nickel nanofibers have been obtained by electrospinning method. ► The nickel nanofibers had rough surface which was consisted of mass nanoparticles. ► The average diameter of nickel nanofibers is about 135 nm and high degree of crystallization. ► The Hc, Ms, and Mr were estimated to be 185 Oe, 51.9 and 16.9 emu/g respectively. - Abstract: In this paper, nickel nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning polyvinyl alcohol/nickel nitrate precursor solution followed by high temperature calcination in air and deoxidation in hydrogen atmosphere. The thermal stability of the as-electrospun PVA/Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} composite nanofibers were characterized by TG–DSC. The morphologies and structures of the as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field-emission scanning electronmicroscope (FE-SEM) and field-emission transmission electron microscopy (FE-TEM). The hysteresis loops (M–H loops) were measured by Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS). The results indicate that: the PVA and the nickel nitrate were almost completely decomposed at 460 °C and the products were pure nickel nanofibers with face-centered cubic (fcc) structure. Furthermore, the as-prepared nickel nanofibers had a continuous structure with rough surface and high degree of crystallization. The average diameter of nickel nanofibers was about 135 nm. The nanofibers showed a stronger coercivity of 185 Oe than value of bulk nickel.

  7. Electrospun nanofiber scaffolds: engineering soft tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumbar, S G; Nukavarapu, S P; Laurencin, C T [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia, VA 22908 (United States); James, R [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, VA 22908 (United States)], E-mail: laurencin@virginia.edu

    2008-09-01

    Electrospinning has emerged to be a simple, elegant and scalable technique to fabricate polymeric nanofibers. Pure polymers as well as blends and composites of both natural and synthetics have been successfully electrospun into nanofiber matrices. Physiochemical properties of nanofiber matrices can be controlled by manipulating electrospinning parameters to meet the requirements of a specific application. Such efforts include the fabrication of fiber matrices containing nanofibers, microfibers, combination of nano-microfibers and also different fiber orientation/alignments. Polymeric nanofiber matrices have been extensively investigated for diversified uses such as filtration, barrier fabrics, wipes, personal care, biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. Recently electrospun nanofiber matrices have gained a lot of attention, and are being explored as scaffolds in tissue engineering due to their properties that can modulate cellular behavior. Electrospun nanofiber matrices show morphological similarities to the natural extra-cellular matrix (ECM), characterized by ultrafine continuous fibers, high surface-to-volume ratio, high porosity and variable pore-size distribution. Efforts have been made to modify nanofiber surfaces with several bioactive molecules to provide cells with the necessary chemical cues and a more in vivo like environment. The current paper provides an overlook on such efforts in designing nanofiber matrices as scaffolds in the regeneration of various soft tissues including skin, blood vessel, tendon/ligament, cardiac patch, nerve and skeletal muscle.

  8. Sequential recovery of macromolecular components of the nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Baoyan; Laiho, Marikki

    2015-01-01

    The nucleolus is involved in a number of cellular processes of importance to cell physiology and pathology, including cell stress responses and malignancies. Studies of macromolecular composition of the nucleolus depend critically on the efficient extraction and accurate quantification of all macromolecular components (e.g., DNA, RNA, and protein). We have developed a TRIzol-based method that efficiently and simultaneously isolates these three macromolecular constituents from the same sample of purified nucleoli. The recovered and solubilized protein can be accurately quantified by the bicinchoninic acid assay and assessed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or by mass spectrometry. We have successfully applied this approach to extract and quantify the responses of all three macromolecular components in nucleoli after drug treatments of HeLa cells, and conducted RNA-Seq analysis of the nucleolar RNA.

  9. Cellulose nanowhiskers and nanofibers from biomass for composite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao

    2011-12-01

    Biological nanocomposites such as plant cell wall exhibit high mechanical properties at a light weight. The secret of the rigidity and strength of the cell wall lies in its main structural component -- cellulose. Native cellulose exists as highly-ordered microfibrils, which are just a few nanometers wide and have been found to be stiffer than many synthetic fibers. In the quest for sustainable development around the world, using cellulose microfibrils from plant materials as renewable alternatives to conventional reinforcement materials such as glass fibers and carbon fibers is generating particular interest. In this research, by mechanical disintegration and by controlled chemical hydrolysis, both cellulose nanofibers and nanowhiskers were extracted from the cell wall of an agricultural waste, wheat straw. The reinforcement performances of the two nanofillers were then studied and compared using the water-soluble polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) as a matrix material. It was found that while both of these nanofillers could impart higher stiffness to the polymer, the nanofibers from biomass were more effective in composite reinforcement than the cellulose crystals thanks to their large aspect ratio and their ability to form interconnected network structures through hydrogen bonding. One of the biggest challenges in the development of cellulose nanocomposites is achieving good dispersion. Because of the high density of hydroxyl groups on the surface of cellulose, it remains a difficult task to disperse cellulose nanofibers in many commonly used polymer matrices. The present work addresses this issue by developing a water-based route taking advantage of polymer colloidal suspensions. Combining cellulose nanofibers with one of the most important biopolymers, poly(lactic acid) (PLA), we have prepared nanocomposites with excellent fiber dispersion and improved modulus and strength. The bio-based nanocomposites have a great potential to serve as light-weight structural materials

  10. Magnetic nanofiber composite materials and devices using same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xing; Zhou, Ziyao

    2017-04-11

    A nonreciprocal device is described. It includes a housing, a waveguide layer and at least one layer of magnetic nanofiber composite. The magnetic nanofiber composite layer is made up of a polymer base layer, a dielectric matrix comprising magnetic nanofibers. The nanofibers have a high aspect ratio and wherein said dielectric matrix is embedded in the polymer base layer.

  11. An upper limit for macromolecular crowding effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklos Andrew C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solutions containing high macromolecule concentrations are predicted to affect a number of protein properties compared to those properties in dilute solution. In cells, these macromolecular crowders have a large range of sizes and can occupy 30% or more of the available volume. We chose to study the stability and ps-ns internal dynamics of a globular protein whose radius is ~2 nm when crowded by a synthetic microgel composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid with particle radii of ~300 nm. Results Our studies revealed no change in protein rotational or ps-ns backbone dynamics and only mild (~0.5 kcal/mol at 37°C, pH 5.4 stabilization at a volume occupancy of 70%, which approaches the occupancy of closely packing spheres. The lack of change in rotational dynamics indicates the absence of strong crowder-protein interactions. Conclusions Our observations are explained by the large size discrepancy between the protein and crowders and by the internal structure of the microgels, which provide interstitial spaces and internal pores where the protein can exist in a dilute solution-like environment. In summary, microgels that interact weakly with proteins do not strongly influence protein dynamics or stability because these large microgels constitute an upper size limit on crowding effects.

  12. Macromolecular components of tomato fruit pectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, M L; Gross, K C; Gillespie, D T; Sondey, S M

    1989-10-01

    Chelate and alkaline-soluble pectin extracted from cell walls of pericarp tissue from mature green, turning, and red ripe (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit (cv. Rutgers), were studied by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography. Computer-aided curve fitting of the chromatograms to a series of Gaussian-shaped components revealed that pectin from all fractions was composed of a linear combination of five macromolecular-sized species. The relative sizes of these macromolecules as obtained from their radii of gyration were 1:2:4:8:16. Dialysis against 0.05 M NaCl induced partial dissociation of the biopolymers. Apparently, the weight fraction of smaller sized species increased at the expense of larger ones. Also, the dissociation produced low-molecular-weight fragments. Behavior in the presence of 0.05 M NaCl led to the conclusion that cell wall pectin acted as if it were an aggregated mosaic, held together at least partially through noncovalent interactions.

  13. The solvent component of macromolecular crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weichenberger, Christian X. [European Academy of Bozen/Bolzano (EURAC), Viale Druso 1, Bozen/Bolzano, I-39100 Südtirol/Alto Adige (Italy); Afonine, Pavel V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), 1 Cyclotron Road, Mail Stop 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kantardjieff, Katherine [California State University, San Marcos, CA 92078 (United States); Rupp, Bernhard, E-mail: br@hofkristallamt.org [k.-k. Hofkristallamt, 991 Audrey Place, Vista, CA 92084 (United States); Medical University of Innsbruck, Schöpfstrasse 41, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-04-30

    On average, the mother liquor or solvent and its constituents occupy about 50% of a macromolecular crystal. Ordered as well as disordered solvent components need to be accurately accounted for in modelling and refinement, often with considerable complexity. The mother liquor from which a biomolecular crystal is grown will contain water, buffer molecules, native ligands and cofactors, crystallization precipitants and additives, various metal ions, and often small-molecule ligands or inhibitors. On average, about half the volume of a biomolecular crystal consists of this mother liquor, whose components form the disordered bulk solvent. Its scattering contributions can be exploited in initial phasing and must be included in crystal structure refinement as a bulk-solvent model. Concomitantly, distinct electron density originating from ordered solvent components must be correctly identified and represented as part of the atomic crystal structure model. Herein, are reviewed (i) probabilistic bulk-solvent content estimates, (ii) the use of bulk-solvent density modification in phase improvement, (iii) bulk-solvent models and refinement of bulk-solvent contributions and (iv) modelling and validation of ordered solvent constituents. A brief summary is provided of current tools for bulk-solvent analysis and refinement, as well as of modelling, refinement and analysis of ordered solvent components, including small-molecule ligands.

  14. Fiber-content dependency of the optical transparency and thermal expansion of bacterial nanofiber reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogi, Masaya; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Abe, Kentaro; Handa, Keishin; Nakagaito, Antonio Norio; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2006-03-01

    We produced transparent nanocomposite reinforced with bacterial cellulose having a wide range of fiber contents, from 7.4to66.1wt%, by the combination of heat drying and organic solvent exchange methods. The addition of only 7.4wt% of bacterial cellulose nanofibers, which deteriorated light transmittance by only 2.4%, was able to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion of acrylic resin from 86×10-6to38×10-6K-1. As such, the nanofiber network of bacterial cellulose has an extraordinary potential as a reinforcement to obtain optically transparent and low thermal expansion materials.

  15. Method of manufacturing tin-doped indium oxide nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozcan, Soydan; Naskar, Amit K

    2017-06-06

    A method of making indium tin oxide nanofibers includes the step of mixing indium and tin precursor compounds with a binder polymer to form a nanofiber precursor composition. The nanofiber precursor composition is co-formed with a supporting polymer to form a composite nanofiber having a precursor composition nanofiber completely surrounded by the supporting polymer composition. The supporting polymer composition is removed from the composite nanofiber to expose the precursor composition nanofiber. The precursor composition nanofiber is then heated in the presence of oxygen such as O.sub.2 to form indium tin oxide and to remove the binder polymer to form an indium tin oxide nanofiber. A method of making metal oxide nanofibers is also disclosed.

  16. Alkylated graphene nanosheet composites with polyaniline nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinou, Ali; Yun, Young Soo; Cho, Se Youn; Jin, Hyoung-Joon

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate a simple method to prepare alkylated graphene/polyaniline composites (a-GR/PANI) using solution mixing of exfoliated alkyl Iodododecane treated graphene oxide sheets with polyaniline nanofiber; polyaniline nanofibers (PANI) prepared by using rapid mixing polymerization significantly improve the processibility of polyaniline and its performance in many conventional applications. Also, polyaniline nanofibers exhibit excellent water dispersibility due to their uniform nanofiber morphology. Morphological study using SEM and TEM analysis showed that the fibrous PANI in the composites a-GR/PANI mainly adsorbed onto the surface or intercalated between the graphene sheets, due especially to the good interfacial interaction between the alkylated gaphene and the polyaniline nanofibers. The existence of polyaniline nanofibers on the surface of the garphene and the alkylated graphene sheets was confirmed by using FT-IR, FT-Raman and X-ray diffraction analysis. Due to the good interfacial interaction between the alkylated graphene and the polyanilines nanofibers, the composite (a-GR/PANI) exhibited excellent dispersion stability in DMF compared to the same composite (GR/PANI) without alkylation. The electrical conductivity of the (GR/PANI) composite was 9% higher than that of pure PANI and the same weight percent for the composite after alkylation was 13% higher than that of pure PANI nanofibers.

  17. Fabrication of unsmooth bamboo-like nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of post drawing on morphology of bubbfil-spun polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers was firstly investigated. Bamboo-like nanofibers were observed after drawing. The increase of surface area of the unsmooth fibers has many potential applications in various fields.

  18. Antibacterial properties of laser spinning glass nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echezarreta-López, M M; De Miguel, T; Quintero, F; Pou, J; Landin, M

    2014-12-30

    A laser-spinning technique has been used to produce amorphous, dense and flexible glass nanofibers of two different compositions with potential utility as reinforcement materials in composites, fillers in bone defects or scaffolds (3D structures) for tissue engineering. Morphological and microstructural analyses have been carried out using SEM-EDX, ATR-FTIR and TEM. Bioactivity studies allow the nanofibers with high proportion in SiO2 (S18/12) to be classified as a bioinert glass and the nanofibers with high proportion of calcium (ICIE16) as a bioactive glass. The cell viability tests (MTT) show high biocompatibility of the laser spinning glass nanofibers. Results from the antibacterial activity study carried out using dynamic conditions revealed that the bioactive glass nanofibers show a dose-dependent bactericidal effect on Sthaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) while the bioinert glass nanofibers show a bacteriostatic effect also dose-dependent. The antibacterial activity has been related to the release of alkaline ions, the increase of pH of the medium and also the formation of needle-like aggregates of calcium phosphate at the surface of the bioactive glass nanofibers which act as a physical mechanism against bacteria. The antibacterial properties give an additional value to the laser-spinning glass nanofibers for different biomedical applications, such as treating or preventing surgery-associated infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel Synthesis of Aluminium Oxide Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP012177 TITLE: Novel Synthesis of Aluminium Oxide Nanofibers DISTRIBUTION...ADP012174 thru ADP012259 UNCLASSIFIED Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 703 © 2002 Materials Research Society V1.8 Novel Synthesis of Aluminium Oxide Nanofibers

  20. Electrospun MOF nanofibers as hydrogen storage media

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Zr-MOF and Cr-MOF were chosen as representatives of the developed MOFs in our laboratory and were incorporated into electrospun nanofibers. The obtained MOF nanofibers composites were evaluated as hydrogen storage media. The results...

  1. Synthesis and corrosion protection properties of poly(o-phenylenediamine) nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthirulan, P; Kannan, N; Meenakshisundaram, M

    2013-07-01

    The present study shows a novel method for the synthesis of uniformly-shaped poly(othophenylediamine) (PoPD) nanofibers by chemical oxidative polymerization method for application towards smart corrosion resistance coatings. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) studies confirm morphology of PoPD with three dimensional (3D) networked dendritic superstructures having average diameter of 50-70 nm and several hundred meters of length. UV-vis and FTIR spectral results shows the formation of PoPD nanofibers containing phenazine ring ladder-structure with benzenoid and quinoid imine units. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) of PoPD nanofibers possess good thermal stability. The anti-corrosion behavior of PoPD nanofibers on 316L SS was investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) measurements. The PoPD coated 316L SS exhibits higher corrosion potential when compared to uncoated specimen. EIS studies, clearly ascertain that PoPD nanofiber coatings exhibits excellent potential barrier to protect the 316L SS against corrosion in 3.5% NaCl.

  2. Synthesis and corrosion protection properties of poly(o-phenylenediamine nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Muthirulan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study shows a novel method for the synthesis of uniformly-shaped poly(othophenylediamine (PoPD nanofibers by chemical oxidative polymerization method for application towards smart corrosion resistance coatings. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM studies confirm morphology of PoPD with three dimensional (3D networked dendritic superstructures having average diameter of 50–70 nm and several hundred meters of length. UV–vis and FTIR spectral results shows the formation of PoPD nanofibers containing phenazine ring ladder-structure with benzenoid and quinoid imine units. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA of PoPD nanofibers possess good thermal stability. The anti-corrosion behavior of PoPD nanofibers on 316L SS was investigated in 3.5% NaCl solution using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS measurements. The PoPD coated 316L SS exhibits higher corrosion potential when compared to uncoated specimen. EIS studies, clearly ascertain that PoPD nanofiber coatings exhibits excellent potential barrier to protect the 316L SS against corrosion in 3.5% NaCl.

  3. Growth of Y-shaped Carbon Nanofibers from Ethanol Flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Jin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Y-shaped carbon nanofibers as a multi-branched carbon nanostructure have potential applications in electronic devices. In this article, we report that several types of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers are obtained from ethanol flames. These Y-shaped carbon nanofibers have different morphologies. According to our experimental results, the growth mechanism of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers has been discussed and a possible growth model of Y-shaped carbon nanofibers has been proposed.

  4. A novel method for fabrication of fascinated nanofiber yarns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hong-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Potential applications of nanofibers as a new-generation of material will be realized if suitable nanofiber yarns become available. Electrospinning has been widely accepted as a feasible technique for the fabrication of continuous nanofiber yarns. However its low output limited its industrial applications. This paper presents a new processing approach to fabrication of fascinated nanofiber yarns which possess excellent properties of nanofibers while enhancing its mechanical strength by the core yarn.

  5. Printed second harmonic active organic nanofiber arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    Organic nanofibers from semiconducting conjugated molecules are well suited to meet refined demands for advanced applications in future optoelectronics and nanophotonics. In contrast to their inorganic counterparts, the properties of organic nanowires can be tailored at the molecular level...... investigated nanofibers as grown via organic epitaxy. In the present work we show how chemically changing the functionalizing end groups leads to a huge increase of second order susceptibility, making the nanofibers technologically very interesting as efficient frequency doublers. For that the nanofibers have...... to be transferred either as individual entities or as ordered arrays onto specific target substrates. Here, we study the applicability of contact printing as a possible route to non-destructive nanofiber transfer....

  6. Characterization and Biocompatibility of Biopolyester Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Hui Ying

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable nanofibers are expected to be promising scaffold materials for biomedical engineering, however, biomedical applications require control of the degradation behavior and tissue response of nanofiber scaffolds in vivo. For this purpose, electrospun nanofibers of poly(hydroxyalkanoates (PHAs and poly(lactides (PLAs were subjected to degradation tests in vitro and in vivo. In this review, characterization and biocompatibility of nanofibers derived from PHAs and PLAs are described. In particular, the effects of the crystalline structure of poly[(R-3-hydroxybutyrate], stereocomplex structure of PLA, and monomer composition of PHA on the degradation behaviors are described in detail. These studies show the potential of biodegradable polyester nanofibers as scaffold material, for which suitable degradation rate and regulated interaction with surrounding tissues are required.

  7. Electrospun Nanofibers for Neural and Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Younan

    2009-03-01

    Electrospinning has been exploited for almost one century to process polymers and other materials into nanofibers with controllable compositions, diameters, porosities, and porous structures for a variety of applications. Owing to its small size, high porosity, and large surface area, a nonwoven mat of electrospun nanofibers can serve as an ideal scaffold to mimic the extra cellular matrix for cell attachment and nutrient transportation. The nanofiber itself can also be functionalized through encapsulation or attachment of bioactive species such as extracellular matrix proteins, enzymes, and growth factors. In addition, the nanofibers can be further assembled into a variety of arrays or architectures by manipulating their alignment, stacking, or folding. All these attributes make electrospinning a powerful tool for generating nanostructured materials for a range of biomedical applications that include controlled release, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. This talk will focus on the use of electrospun nanofibers as scaffolds for neural and bone tissue engineering.

  8. CROW for large scale macromolecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodoscek, Milan; Borstnik, Urban; Janezic, Dusanka

    2002-01-01

    CROW (Columns and Rows Of Workstations - http://www.sicmm.org/crow/) is a parallel computer cluster based on the Beowulf (http://www.beowulf.org/) idea, modified to support a larger number of processors. Its architecture is based on point-to-point network architecture, which does not require the use of any network switching equipment in the system. Thus, the cost is lower, and there is no degradation in network performance even for a larger number of processors.

  9. Macromolecular Topography Leaps into the Digital Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, J.; Bellamy, H.; Snell, E. H.; Borgstahl, G.

    2003-01-01

    A low-cost, real-time digital topography system is under development which will replace x-ray film and nuclear emulsion plates. The imaging system is based on an inexpensive surveillance camera that offers a 1000x1000 array of 8 im square pixels, anti-blooming circuitry, and very quick read out. Currently, the system directly converts x-rays to an image with no phosphor. The system is small and light and can be easily adapted to work with other crystallographic equipment. Preliminary images have been acquired of cubic insulin at the NSLS x26c beam line. NSLS x26c was configured for unfocused monochromatic radiation. Six reflections were collected with stills spaced from 0.002 to 0.001 degrees apart across the entire oscillation range that the reflections were in diffracting condition. All of the reflections were rotated to the vertical to reduce Lorentz and beam related effects. This particular CCD is designed for short exposure applications (much less than 1 sec) and so has a relatively high dark current leading to noisy raw images. The images are processed to remove background and other system noise with a multi-step approach including the use of wavelets, histogram, and mean window filtering. After processing, animations were constructed with the corresponding reflection profile to show the diffraction of the crystal volume vs. the oscillation angle as well as composite images showing the parts of the crystal with the strongest diffraction for each reflection. The final goal is to correlate features seen in reflection profiles captured with fine phi slicing to those seen in the topography images. With this development macromolecular topography finally comes into the digital age.

  10. Thermo-mechanical properties of high aspect ratio silica nanofiber filled epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liyun

    The optimization of thermo-mechanical properties of polymer composites at low filler loadings is of great interest in both engineering and scientific fields. There have been several studies on high aspect ratio fillers as novel reinforcement phase for polymeric materials. However, facile synthesis method of high aspect ratio nanofillers is limited. In this study, a scalable synthesis method of high aspect ratio silica nanofibers is going to be presented. I will also demonstrate that the inclusion of high aspect ratio silica nanofibers in epoxy results in a significant improvement of epoxy thermo-mechanical properties at low filler loadings. With silica nanofiber concentration of 2.8% by volume, the Young's modulus, ultimate tensile strength and fracture toughness of epoxy increased ~23, ~28 and ~50%, respectively, compared to unfilled epoxy. At silica nanofiber volume concentration of 8.77%, the thermal expansion coefficient decreased by ˜40% and the thermal conductivity was improved by ˜95% at room temperature. In the current study, the influence of nano-sized silica filler aspect ratio on mechanical and thermal behavior of epoxy nanocomposites were studied by comparing silica nanofibers to spherical silica nanoparticles (with aspect ratio of one) at various filler loadings. The significant reinforcement of composite stiffness is attributed to the variation of the local stress state in epoxy due to the high aspect ratio of the silica nanofiber and the introduction of a tremendous amount of interfacial area between the nanofillers and the epoxy matrix. The fracture mechanisms of silica nanofiber filled epoxy were also investigated. The existence of high aspect ratio silica nanofiber promotes fracture energy dissipation by crack deflection, crack pinning as well as debonding with fiber pull-out leading to enhanced fracture toughness. High aspect ratio fillers also provide significant reduction of photon scattering due to formation of a continuous fiber network

  11. Macromolecular Antioxidants and Dietary Fiber in Edible Seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Pintos, Nerea; Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Buschmann, Alejandro H; Vergara-Salinas, José Rodrigo; Pérez-Correa, José Ricardo; Saura-Calixto, Fulgencio

    2017-02-01

    Seaweeds are rich in different bioactive compounds with potential uses in drugs, cosmetics and the food industry. The objective of this study was to analyze macromolecular antioxidants or nonextractable polyphenols, in several edible seaweed species collected in Chile (Gracilaria chilensis, Callophyllis concepcionensis, Macrocystis pyrifera, Scytosyphon lomentaria, Ulva sp. and Enteromorpha compressa), including their 1st HPLC characterization. Macromolecular antioxidants are commonly ignored in studies of bioactive compounds. They are associated with insoluble dietary fiber and exhibit significant biological activity, with specific features that are different from those of both dietary fiber and extractable polyphenols. We also evaluated extractable polyphenols and dietary fiber, given their relationship with macromolecular antioxidants. Our results show that macromolecular antioxidants are a major polyphenol fraction (averaging 42% to total polyphenol content), with hydroxycinnamic acids, hydroxybenzoic acids and flavonols being the main constituents. This fraction also showed remarkable antioxidant capacity, as determined by 2 complementary assays. The dietary fiber content was over 50% of dry weight, with some samples exhibiting the target proportionality between soluble and insoluble dietary fiber for adequate nutrition. Overall, our data show that seaweed could be an important source of commonly ignored macromolecular antioxidants. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  12. Optical Properties of GaSb Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez-Bergquist Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amorphous GaSb nanofibers were obtained by ion beam irradiation of bulk GaSb single-crystal wafers, resulting in fibers with diameters of ~20 nm. The Raman spectra and photoluminescence (PL of the ion irradiation-induced nanofibers before and after annealing were studied. Results show that the Raman intensity of the GaSb LO phonon mode decreased after ion beam irradiation as a result of the formation of the amorphous nanofibers. A new mode is observed at ~155 cm-1 both from the unannealed and annealed GaSb nanofiber samples related to the A1g mode of Sb–Sb bond vibration. Room temperature PL measurements of the annealed nanofibers present a wide feature band at ~1.4–1.6 eV. The room temperature PL properties of the irradiated samples presents a large blue shift compared to bulk GaSb. Annealed nanofibers and annealed nanofibers with Au nanodots present two different PL peaks (400 and 540 nm, both of which may originate from Ga or O vacancies in GaO. The enhanced PL and new band characteristics in nanostructured GaSb suggest that the nanostructured fibers may have unique applications in optoelectronic devices.

  13. Functional Self-Assembled Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, A.; Wendorff, J. H.

    Electrospinning constitutes a unique technique for the production of nanofibers with diameters down to the range of a few nanometers. In strong contrast to conventional fiber producing techniques, it relies on self-assembly processes driven by the Coulomb interactions between charged elements of the fluids to be spun to nanofibers. The transition from a macroscopic fluid object such as a droplet emerging from a die to solid nanofibers is controlled by a set of complex physical instability processes. They give rise to extremely high extensional deformations and strain rates during fiber formation causing among others a high orientational order in the nanofibers as well as enhanced mechanical properties. Electrospinning is predominantly applied to polymer based materials including natural and synthetic polymers, but, more recently, its use has been extended towards the production of metal, ceramic and glass nanofibers exploiting precursor routes. The nanofibers can be functionalized during electrospinning by introducing pores, fractal surfaces, by incorporating functional elements such as catalysts, quantum dots, drugs, enzymes or even bacteria. The production of individual fibers, random nonwovens, or orientationally highly ordered nonwovens is achieved by an appropriate selection of electrode configurations. Broad areas of application exist in Material and Life Sciences for such nanofibers, including not only optoelectronics, sensorics, catalysis, textiles, high efficiency filters, fiber reinforcement but also tissue engineering, drug delivery, and wound healing. The basic electrospinning process has more recently been extended towards compound co-electrospinning and precision deposition electrospinning to further broaden accessible fiber architectures and potential areas of application.

  14. Perturbation-based Markovian transmission model for probing allosteric dynamics of large macromolecular assembling: a study of GroEL-GroES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Mei Lu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Large macromolecular assemblies are often important for biological processes in cells. Allosteric communications between different parts of these molecular machines play critical roles in cellular signaling. Although studies of the topology and fluctuation dynamics of coarse-grained residue networks can yield important insights, they do not provide characterization of the time-dependent dynamic behavior of these macromolecular assemblies. Here we develop a novel approach called Perturbation-based Markovian Transmission (PMT model to study globally the dynamic responses of the macromolecular assemblies. By monitoring simultaneous responses of all residues (>8,000 across many (>6 decades of time spanning from the initial perturbation until reaching equilibrium using a Krylov subspace projection method, we show that this approach can yield rich information. With criteria based on quantitative measurements of relaxation half-time, flow amplitude change, and oscillation dynamics, this approach can identify pivot residues that are important for macromolecular movement, messenger residues that are key to signal mediating, and anchor residues important for binding interactions. Based on a detailed analysis of the GroEL-GroES chaperone system, we found that our predictions have an accuracy of 71-84% judged by independent experimental studies reported in the literature. This approach is general and can be applied to other large macromolecular machineries such as the virus capsid and ribosomal complex.

  15. Biofunctionalized Nanofibers Using Arthrospira (Spirulina Biomass and Biopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Greque de Morais

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun nanofibers composed of polymers have been extensively researched because of their scientific and technical applications. Commercially available polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB and polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate (PHB-HV copolymers are good choices for such nanofibers. We used a highly integrated method, by adjusting the properties of the spinning solutions, where the cyanophyte Arthrospira (formally Spirulina was the single source for nanofiber biofunctionalization. We investigated nanofibers using PHB extracted from Spirulina and the bacteria Cupriavidus necator and compared the nanofibers to those made from commercially available PHB and PHB-HV. Our study assessed nanofiber formation and their selected thermal, mechanical, and optical properties. We found that nanofibers produced from Spirulina PHB and biofunctionalized with Spirulina biomass exhibited properties which were equal to or better than nanofibers made with commercially available PHB or PHB-HV. Our methodology is highly promising for nanofiber production and biofunctionalization and can be used in many industrial and life science applications.

  16. Biofunctionalized Nanofibers Using Arthrospira (Spirulina) Biomass and Biopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Michele Greque; Stillings, Christopher; Dersch, Roland; Rudisile, Markus; Pranke, Patrícia; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; Wendorff, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers composed of polymers have been extensively researched because of their scientific and technical applications. Commercially available polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate (PHB-HV) copolymers are good choices for such nanofibers. We used a highly integrated method, by adjusting the properties of the spinning solutions, where the cyanophyte Arthrospira (formally Spirulina) was the single source for nanofiber biofunctionalization. We investigated nanofibers using PHB extracted from Spirulina and the bacteria Cupriavidus necator and compared the nanofibers to those made from commercially available PHB and PHB-HV. Our study assessed nanofiber formation and their selected thermal, mechanical, and optical properties. We found that nanofibers produced from Spirulina PHB and biofunctionalized with Spirulina biomass exhibited properties which were equal to or better than nanofibers made with commercially available PHB or PHB-HV. Our methodology is highly promising for nanofiber production and biofunctionalization and can be used in many industrial and life science applications. PMID:25667931

  17. Biofunctionalized nanofibers using Arthrospira (Spirulina) biomass and biopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Michele Greque; Stillings, Christopher; Dersch, Roland; Rudisile, Markus; Pranke, Patrícia; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; Wendorff, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers composed of polymers have been extensively researched because of their scientific and technical applications. Commercially available polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and polyhydroxybutyrate-co-valerate (PHB-HV) copolymers are good choices for such nanofibers. We used a highly integrated method, by adjusting the properties of the spinning solutions, where the cyanophyte Arthrospira (formally Spirulina) was the single source for nanofiber biofunctionalization. We investigated nanofibers using PHB extracted from Spirulina and the bacteria Cupriavidus necator and compared the nanofibers to those made from commercially available PHB and PHB-HV. Our study assessed nanofiber formation and their selected thermal, mechanical, and optical properties. We found that nanofibers produced from Spirulina PHB and biofunctionalized with Spirulina biomass exhibited properties which were equal to or better than nanofibers made with commercially available PHB or PHB-HV. Our methodology is highly promising for nanofiber production and biofunctionalization and can be used in many industrial and life science applications.

  18. Complex Macromolecular Architectures by Living Cationic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Alghamdi, Reem D.

    2015-05-01

    Poly (vinyl ether)-based graft polymers have been synthesized by the combination of living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers with other living or controlled/ living polymerization techniques (anionic and ATRP). The process involves the synthesis of well-defined homopolymers (PnBVE) and co/terpolymers [PnBVE-b-PCEVE-b-PSiDEGVE (ABC type) and PSiDEGVE-b-PnBVE-b-PSiDEGVE (CAC type)] by sequential living cationic polymerization of n-butyl vinyl ether (nBVE), 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (CEVE) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl ethylene glycol vinyl ether (SiDEGVE), using mono-functional {[n-butoxyethyl acetate (nBEA)], [1-(2-chloroethoxy) ethyl acetate (CEEA)], [1-(2-(2-(t-butyldimethylsilyloxy)ethoxy) ethoxy) ethyl acetate (SiDEGEA)]} or di-functional [1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol di(1-ethyl acetate) (cHMDEA), (VEMOA)] initiators. The living cationic polymerizations of those monomers were conducted in hexane at -20 0C using Et3Al2Cl3 (catalyst) in the presence of 1 M AcOEt base.[1] The PCEVE segments of the synthesized block terpolymers were then used to react with living macroanions (PS-DPE-Li; poly styrene diphenyl ethylene lithium) to afford graft polymers. The quantitative desilylation of PSiDEGVE segments by n-Bu4N+F- in THF at 0 °C led to graft co- and terpolymers in which the polyalcohol is the outer block. These co-/terpolymers were subsequently subjected to “grafting-from” reactions by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene to afford more complex macromolecular architectures. The base assisted living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers were also used to synthesize well-defined α-hydroxyl polyvinylether (PnBVE-OH). The resulting polymers were then modified into an ATRP macro-initiator for the synthesis of well-defined block copolymers (PnBVE-b-PS). Bifunctional PnBVE with terminal malonate groups was also synthesized and used as a precursor for more complex architectures such as H-shaped block copolymer by “grafting-from” or

  19. Electrical Impedance Measurements of PZT Nanofiber Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Galos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical impedance measurements of PZT nanofiber sensors were performed using a variety of methods over a frequency spectrum ranging from DC to 1.8 GHz. The nanofibers formed by electrospinning with diameters ranging from 10 to 150 nm were collected and integrated into sensors using microfabrication techniques. Special matching circuits with ultrahigh input impedance were fabricated to produce low noise, measurable sensor outputs. Material properties including resistivity and dielectric constant are derived from the impedance measurements. The resulting material properties are also compared with those of individual nanofibers being tested using conductive AFM and Scanning Conductive Microscopy.

  20. Electrospinning of Cross-Linked Magnetic Chitosan Nanofibers for Protein Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicknejad, Ehsan Tayerani; Ghoreishi, Seyyed Mohammad; Habibi, Neda

    2015-12-01

    A poly(vinylalcohol) (PVA) electrospun/magnetic/chitosan nanocomposite fibrous cross-linked network was fabricated using in situ cross-linking electrospinning technique and used for bovine serum albumin (BSA) loading and release applications. Sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) and glutaraldehyde (GA) were used as cross-linkers which modified magnetic-Fe3O4 chitosan as Fe3O4/CS/TPP and Fe3O4/CS/GA, respectively. BSA was used as a model protein drugs which was encapsulated to form Fe3O4/CS/TPP/BSA and Fe3O4/CS/GA/BSA nanoparticles. The composites were electrospun with PVA to form nanofibers. Nanofibers were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The characterization results suggest that Fe3O4 nanoparticles with average size of 45 nm were successfully bound on the surface of chitosan. The cross-linked nanofibers were found to contain uniformly dispersed Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The size and morphology of the nanofibers network was controlled by varying the cross-linker type. FTIR data show that these two polymers have intermolecular interactions. The sample with TPP cross-linker showed an enhancement of the controlled release properties of BSA during 30-h experimental investigation. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Macromolecular crystallography beamline X25 at the NSLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héroux, Annie; Allaire, Marc; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matthew L; Dvorak, Joseph; Flaks, Leon; Lamarra, Steven; Myers, Stuart F; Orville, Allen M; Robinson, Howard H; Roessler, Christian G; Schneider, Dieter K; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Skinner, John M; Skinner, Michael; Soares, Alexei S; Sweet, Robert M; Berman, Lonny E

    2014-05-01

    Beamline X25 at the NSLS is one of the five beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography operated by the Brookhaven National Laboratory Macromolecular Crystallography Research Resource group. This mini-gap insertion-device beamline has seen constant upgrades for the last seven years in order to achieve mini-beam capability down to 20 µm × 20 µm. All major components beginning with the radiation source, and continuing along the beamline and its experimental hutch, have changed to produce a state-of-the-art facility for the scientific community.

  2. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of cellulose nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lima R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Renata de Lima,1 Leandro Oliveira Feitosa,1 Cintia Rodrigues Maruyama,1 Mariana Abreu Barga,1 Patrícia Cristina Yamawaki,1 Isolda Jesus Vieira,1 Eliangela M Teixeira,2 Ana Carolina Corrêa,2 Luiz Henrique Caparelli Mattoso,2 Leonardo Fernandes Fraceto31Department of Biotechnology, University of Sorocaba, Sorocaba, 2Embrapa Instrumentation (CNPDIA, National Nanotechnology Laboratory for Agriculture (LNNA, São Carlos, 3Department of Environmental Engineering, State University of São Paulo (UNESP, Sorocaba, SP, BrazilBackground: Agricultural products and by products provide the primary materials for a variety of technological applications in diverse industrial sectors. Agro-industrial wastes, such as cotton and curaua fibers, are used to prepare nanofibers for use in thermoplastic films, where they are combined with polymeric matrices, and in biomedical applications such as tissue engineering, amongst other applications. The development of products containing nanofibers offers a promising alternative for the use of agricultural products, adding value to the chains of production. However, the emergence of new nanotechnological products demands that their risks to human health and the environment be evaluated. This has resulted in the creation of the new area of nanotoxicology, which addresses the toxicological aspects of these materials.Purpose and methods: Contributing to these developments, the present work involved a genotoxicological study of different nanofibers, employing chromosomal aberration and comet assays, as well as cytogenetic and molecular analyses, to obtain preliminary information concerning nanofiber safety. The methodology consisted of exposure of Allium cepa roots, and animal cell cultures (lymphocytes and fibroblasts, to different types of nanofibers. Negative controls, without nanofibers present in the medium, were used for comparison.Results: The nanofibers induced different responses according to the cell type used. In

  3. Synthesis and Characterization of Boehmite Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Boehmite nanofibers of high quality were synthesized through a wet-gel conversion process without the use of a surfactant. The long nanofibers of boehmite with clear-cut edges were obtained by steaming the wet-gel precipitate at 170∘C for 2 days. Analytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, infrared emission spectroscopy (IES, as well as Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the products.

  4. Fabrication of Conductive Polypyrrole Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqun Cong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is employed to prepare conductive polypyrrole nanofibers with uniform morphology and good mechanical strength. Soluble PPy was synthesized with NaDEHS as dopant and then applied to electrospinning with or without PEO as carrier. The PEO contents had great influence on the morphology and conductivity of the electrospun material. The results of these experiments will allow us to have a better understanding of PPy electrospun nanofibers and will permit the design of effective electrodes in the BMIs fields.

  5. Generating triangulated macromolecular surfaces by Euclidean Distance Transform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Xu

    Full Text Available Macromolecular surfaces are fundamental representations of their three-dimensional geometric shape. Accurate calculation of protein surfaces is of critical importance in the protein structural and functional studies including ligand-protein docking and virtual screening. In contrast to analytical or parametric representation of macromolecular surfaces, triangulated mesh surfaces have been proved to be easy to describe, visualize and manipulate by computer programs. Here, we develop a new algorithm of EDTSurf for generating three major macromolecular surfaces of van der Waals surface, solvent-accessible surface and molecular surface, using the technique of fast Euclidean Distance Transform (EDT. The triangulated surfaces are constructed directly from volumetric solids by a Vertex-Connected Marching Cube algorithm that forms triangles from grid points. Compared to the analytical result, the relative error of the surface calculations by EDTSurf is <2-4% depending on the grid resolution, which is 1.5-4 times lower than the methods in the literature; and yet, the algorithm is faster and costs less computer memory than the comparative methods. The improvements in both accuracy and speed of the macromolecular surface determination should make EDTSurf a useful tool for the detailed study of protein docking and structure predictions. Both source code and the executable program of EDTSurf are freely available at http://zhang.bioinformatics.ku.edu/EDTSurf.

  6. Two-center-multipole expansion method: application to macromolecular systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.;

    2007-01-01

    We propose a theoretical method for the calculation of the interaction energy between macromolecular systems at large distances. The method provides a linear scaling of the computing time with the system size and is considered as an alternative to the well-known fast multipole method. Its...

  7. Fabrication of Poly(4-vinylpyridine) Nanofiber and Fluorescent Poly(4-vinylpyridine)/Porphyrin Nanofiber by Electrospinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Yan; ZHAN Nai-qian; YU Miao; YANG Qing-biao; ZHANG Chao-qun; WANG Heng-guo; LI Yao-xian

    2008-01-01

    Poly(4-vinylpyridine)(P4-VP) nanofiber and fluoresent poly(4-vinylpyridine)/porphyrin(P4-VP/TPPA) nanofiber were respectively prepared by electrospinning.The effect of the concentration of P4-VP/dimethylformamide (DMF) electrospinning solutions on the morphology of P4-VP nanofiber was investigated and it was found that the average diameter of the nanofiber of P4-VP/DMF increased with the increase of the concentration of the spinning solution.After the addition of TPPA to the P4-VP/DMF spinning solution,the diameter of P4-VP/TPPA nanofiber became even due to the increase of the conductivity of the P4-VP/DMF-TPPA solution.The photoluminescent(PL) spectral analysis indicates that the emission peak position of P4-VP/TPPA nanofiber is almost the same as that of pure TPPA at about 650 nm without peak shift,and when it was stored for 20 days,the emission peak of P4-VP/TPPA nanofiber is also at 650 rim,indicating that the fuorescent property of P4-VP/TPPA nanofiber is stable.Fourier-transform infrared(FTIR) spectrum confirms the chemical composition of the resulting P4-VP/TPPA composite nanoflber.

  8. Can visco-elastic phase separation, macromolecular crowding and colloidal physics explain nuclear organisation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iborra Francisco J

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell nucleus is highly compartmentalized with well-defined domains, it is not well understood how this nuclear order is maintained. Many scientists are fascinated by the different set of structures observed in the nucleus to attribute functions to them. In order to distinguish functional compartments from non-functional aggregates, I believe is important to investigate the biophysical nature of nuclear organisation. Results The various nuclear compartments can be divided broadly as chromatin or protein and/or RNA based, and they have very different dynamic properties. The chromatin compartment displays a slow, constrained diffusional motion. On the other hand, the protein/RNA compartment is very dynamic. Physical systems with dynamical asymmetry go to viscoelastic phase separation. This phase separation phenomenon leads to the formation of a long-lived interaction network of slow components (chromatin scattered within domains rich in fast components (protein/RNA. Moreover, the nucleus is packed with macromolecules in the order of 300 mg/ml. This high concentration of macromolecules produces volume exclusion effects that enhance attractive interactions between macromolecules, known as macromolecular crowding, which favours the formation of compartments. In this paper I hypothesise that nuclear compartmentalization can be explained by viscoelastic phase separation of the dynamically different nuclear components, in combination with macromolecular crowding and the properties of colloidal particles. Conclusion I demonstrate that nuclear structure can satisfy the predictions of this hypothesis. I discuss the functional implications of this phenomenon.

  9. Hydrodynamic Helical Orientations of Nanofibers in a Vortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Tsuda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, I report our recent studies on spectroscopic visualizations of macroscopic helical alignments of nanofibers in vortex flows. Our designed supramolecular nanofibers, formed through self-assemblies of dye molecules, helically align in torsional flows of a vortex generated by mechanical rotary stirring of the sample solutions. The nanofiber, formed through bundling of linear supramolecular polymers, aligns equally in right- and left-handed vortex flows. However, in contrast, a one-handedly twisted nanofiber, formed through helical bundling of the supramolecular polymers, shows unequal helical alignments in these torsional flows. When the helical handedness of the nanofiber matches that of the vortex flow, the nanofiber aligns more efficiently in the flowing fluid. Such phenomena are observed not only with the artificial helical supramolecular nanofibers but also with biological nanofibers such as double-stranded DNA.

  10. Bubbfil spinning for mass-production of nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Rou-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubbfil spinning is a generalized bubble electrospinning, including bubble spinning, blown-bubble spinning, and membrane spinning, for mass production of nanofiber. This paper shows small bubbles in liquid membrane are the best candidate for uniform nanofibers.

  11. Effect of Nanofibers on Spore Penetration and Lunar Dust Filtration

    OpenAIRE

    Phil Gibson, Ph.D.; Heidi Schreuder-Gibson, Ph.D.; Robert Stote; Margaret Roylance, Ph.D.; Cathy Capone; Masami Nakagawa, Ph.D.

    2008-01-01

    The results of two separate studies on biological spore penetration and simulated lunar dust filtration illustrate the use of nanofibers in some nonstandard filtration applications (nanofibers are generally defined as having diameters of less than a micron). In the first study, a variety of microporous liners containing microfibers and nanofibers were combined with cotton-based fabrics in order to filter aerosolized spores. The aerosol penetration resistance of the nanofiber-lined fabrics was...

  12. Preparation and characterization of crosslinked chitosan-based nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Shan Zhou; Dong Zhi Yang; Jun Nie

    2007-01-01

    Crosslinked chitosan-based nanofibers were successfully prepared via electrospinning technique with heat mediated chemical crosslinking followed. The structure, morphology and mechanical property of nanofibers were characterized by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Instron machine, respectively. The results showed that, nanofibers exhibited a smooth surface and regular morphology, and tensile strength of nanofibers improved with increasing of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) content.

  13. Self-assembled nanofiber coatings for controlling cell responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barros, Raquel C.; Gelens, Edith; Bulten, Erna; Tuin, Annemarie; de Jong, Menno R; Kuijer, Roel; van Kooten, Theo G

    Nanofibers are thought to enhance cell adhesion, growth, and function. We demonstrate that the choice of building blocks in self-assembling nanofiber systems can be used to control cell behavior. The use of 2 D-coated, self-assembled nanofibers in controlling lens epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and

  14. Scaling up the Fabrication of Mechanically-Robust Carbon Nanofiber Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Curtin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to identify and address the main challenges associated with fabricating large samples of carbon foams composed of interwoven networks of carbon nanofibers. Solutions to two difficulties related with the process of fabricating carbon foams, maximum foam size and catalyst cost, were developed. First, a simple physical method was invented to scale-up the constrained formation of fibrous nanostructures process (CoFFiN to fabricate relatively large foams. Specifically, a gas deflector system capable of maintaining conditions supportive of carbon nanofiber foam growth throughout a relatively large mold was developed. ANSYS CFX models were used to simulate the gas flow paths with and without deflectors; the data generated proved to be a very useful tool for the deflector design. Second, a simple method for selectively leaching the Pd catalyst material trapped in the foam during growth was successfully tested. Multiple techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, surface area measurements, and mechanical testing, were employed to characterize the foams generated in this study. All results confirmed that the larger foam samples preserve the basic characteristics: their interwoven nanofiber microstructure forms a low-density tridimensional solid with viscoelastic behavior. Fiber growth mechanisms are also discussed. Larger samples of mechanically-robust carbon nanofiber foams will enable the use of these materials as strain sensors, shock absorbers, selective absorbents for environmental remediation and electrodes for energy storage devices, among other applications.

  15. Carbon nanofiber mesoporous films: efficient platforms for bio-hydrogen oxidation in biofuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Poulpiquet, Anne; Marques-Knopf, Helena; Wernert, Véronique; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie Thérèse; Gadiou, Roger; Lojou, Elisabeth

    2014-01-28

    The discovery of oxygen and carbon monoxide tolerant [NiFe] hydrogenases was the first necessary step toward the definition of a novel generation of hydrogen fed biofuel cells. The next important milestone is now to identify and overcome bottlenecks limiting the current densities, hence the power densities. In the present work we report for the first time a comprehensive study of herringbone carbon nanofiber mesoporous films as platforms for enhanced biooxidation of hydrogen. The 3D network allows mediatorless hydrogen oxidation by the membrane-bound hydrogenase from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus. We investigate the key physico-chemical parameters that enhance the catalytic efficiency, including surface chemistry and hierarchical porosity of the biohybrid film. We also emphasize that the catalytic current is limited by mass transport inside the mesoporous carbon nanofiber film. Provided hydrogen is supplied inside the carbon film, the combination of the hierarchical porosity of the carbon nanofiber film with the hydrophobicity of the treated carbon material results in very high efficiency of the bioelectrode. By optimization of the whole procedure, current densities as high as 4.5 mA cm(-2) are reached with a turnover frequency of 48 s(-1). This current density is almost 100 times higher than when hydrogenase is simply adsorbed at a bare graphite electrode, and more than 5 times higher than the average of the previous reported current densities at carbon nanotube modified electrodes, suggesting that carbon nanofibers can be efficiently used in future sustainable H2/O2 biofuel cells.

  16. Collagen-biomorphic porous carbon nanofiber monoliths: Biosilicification-assisted sustainable synthesis and application in Li-S battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen; Shen, Tao; Hou, Hongying; Gan, Guoyou; Zheng, Biju; Li, Fengxian; Yi, Jianhong

    2016-12-01

    Monolithic carbon has been synthesized via a sustainable biomimetic route utilizing intrafibrillar silicified collagen sponge as precursor and morphogenesis template. The mineralized silica in the biohybrid prevents collapse of the carbon during pyrolysis. Upon biosilica removal results show that the carbon monoliths inherit the porous fiber structure of the mother collagen. The carbon nanofiber framework facilitates the construction of a high electrical conductive pathway, while the internal spaces developed among the intertwined fibrillar network and pores within nanofiber walls offer room for sulfur storage. The as-obtained carbon-sulfur cathode exhibits an accessible discharge capacity approaching 800mAh g-1 in Li-S battery.

  17. Fabrication of WS2 nanofibers from WO3 nanofibers prepared by an electrospinning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yajun; Zhang, Xuebin; Ji, Yi; Feng, Yi; Zhang, Jingcheng

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes a procedure of synthesizing long WS2 nanofibers. WO3 nanofibers were prepared as precursors by electrospinning of ammonium meta-tungstate (AMT), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and alcohol solution followed by calcination at 550 degrees C in air. WS2 nanofibers were obtained by sulfurization of the WO3 nanofibres at 800 degrees C in an argon atmosphere, with sulfur powder acting as sulfuration reducer. The nanofibres were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that the final products are pure WS2 nanofibres, which have high aspect ratio. The WS2 nanofibers with rough surface were formed of nanoparticles, while some nanoflakes appeared on the surface of WS2 nanofibres. The diameters of the WS2 nanofibers were between 200 and 300 nm, which is similar to WO3 nanofibers. In addition, the WS2 nanofibers were polycrystalline.

  18. Optical interface created by laser-cooled atoms trapped in the evanescent field surrounding an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Vetsch, E; Sagué, G; Schmidt, R; Dawkins, S T; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2009-01-01

    Trapping and optically interfacing laser-cooled neutral atoms is an essential requirement for their use in advanced quantum technologies. Here we simultaneously realize both of these tasks with cesium atoms interacting with a multi-color evanescent field surrounding an optical nanofiber. The atoms are localized in a one-dimensional optical lattice about 200 nm above the nanofiber surface and can be efficiently interrogated with a resonant light field sent through the nanofiber. Our technique opens the route towards the direct integration of laser-cooled atomic ensembles within fiber networks, an important prerequisite for large scale quantum communication schemes. Moreover, it is ideally suited to the realization of hybrid quantum systems that combine atoms with, e.g., solid state quantum devices.

  19. Direct Blow-Spinning of Nanofibers on a Window Screen for Highly Efficient PM2.5 Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Bilal; Bai, Xiaopeng; Wei, Hehe; Huang, Ya; Wu, Hui; Cui, Yi

    2017-02-08

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution has caused many serious public health issues. Whereas indoor air protection usually relies on expensive and energy-consuming filtering devices, direct PM filtration by window screens has attracted increasing attention. Recently, electrospun polymer nanofiber networks have been developed as transparent filters for highly efficient PM2.5 removal; however, it remains challenging to uniformly coat the nanofibers on window screens on a large scale and with low cost. Here, we report a blow-spinning technique that is fast, efficient, and free of high voltages for the large-scale direct coating of nanofibers onto window screens for indoor PM pollution protection. We have achieved a transparent air filter of 80% optical transparency with >99% standard removal efficiency level for PM2.5. A test on a real window (1 m × 2 m) in Beijing has proven that the nanofiber transparent air filter acquires excellent PM2.5 removal efficiency of 90.6% over 12 h under extremely hazy air conditions (PM2.5 mass concentration > 708 μg/m(3)). Moreover, we show that the nanofibers can be readily coated on the window screen for pollution protection and can be easily removed by wiping the screen after hazardous days.

  20. Phase transitions of macromolecular microsphere composite hydrogels based on the stochastic Cahn–Hilliard equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao, E-mail: lixiao1228@163.com; Ji, Guanghua, E-mail: ghji@bnu.edu.cn; Zhang, Hui, E-mail: hzhang@bnu.edu.cn

    2015-02-15

    We use the stochastic Cahn–Hilliard equation to simulate the phase transitions of the macromolecular microsphere composite (MMC) hydrogels under a random disturbance. Based on the Flory–Huggins lattice model and the Boltzmann entropy theorem, we develop a reticular free energy suit for the network structure of MMC hydrogels. Taking the random factor into account, with the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau (TDGL) mesoscopic simulation method, we set up a stochastic Cahn–Hilliard equation, designated herein as the MMC-TDGL equation. The stochastic term in the equation is constructed appropriately to satisfy the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and is discretized on a spatial grid for the simulation. A semi-implicit difference scheme is adopted to numerically solve the MMC-TDGL equation. Some numerical experiments are performed with different parameters. The results are consistent with the physical phenomenon, which verifies the good simulation of the stochastic term.

  1. Surface structure enhanced second harmonic generation in organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kostiucenko, Oksana;

    Second-harmonic generation upon femto-second laser irradiation of nonlinearly optically active nanofibers grown from nonsymmetrically functionalized para-quarterphenylene (CNHP4) molecules is investigated. Following growth on mica templates, the nanofibers have been transferred onto lithography-d......-defined regular arrays of gold square nanostructures. These nanostructure arrays induce local field enhancement, which significantly lowers the threshold for second harmonic generation in the nanofibers.......Second-harmonic generation upon femto-second laser irradiation of nonlinearly optically active nanofibers grown from nonsymmetrically functionalized para-quarterphenylene (CNHP4) molecules is investigated. Following growth on mica templates, the nanofibers have been transferred onto lithography...

  2. Novel continuous carbon and ceramic nanofibers and nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yongkui

    2004-12-01

    Manufacturing of carbon nanofibers from PAN precursor is described in Chapter 2 of the dissertation. The electrospun nanofibers were continuous, uniform in diameter, and the samples didn't contain impurities, unlike carbon nanotubes or vapor grown carbon fibers. Systematic studies on the electrospinning parameters showed that nanofiber diameter could be varied in a range of 80 to 1800 nm. XRD studies on the carbon nanofibers fired at different temperatures showed that higher temperature resulted in better nanostructure. Fracture-free random carbon nanofiber sheets were produced by stretch-stabilization and carbonization for the first time. Toughening effects of random as-spun PAN, stabilized PAN, and carbon nanofibers on Mode I and Mode II interlaminar fracture of advanced carbon-epoxy composites were examined by DCB and ENF tests respectively in Chapter 3. The results showed that the interlaminar fracture toughness increased the most with carbon nanofiber reinforcement. 200% improvement in Mode I fracture toughness and 60% in Mode II fracture toughness were achieved with a minimum increase of weight. SEM fractographic analysis showed nanofiber pullout and crack bridging as the main nanomechanisms of toughening. Chapter 4 describes manufacturing of aligned carbon nanofibers and nanocomposites by a modified electrospinning technique. Constant-load stretch-stabilization was applied on carbon nanofibers for the first time. Analysis showed that mechanical properties of nanofibers and nanocomposites improved with stretch-stabilization and alignment of carbon nanofibers. Nanofabrication of ceramic 3Al2O3-2SiO2, SiO2-TiO2 nanofibers by a novel combination of sol-gel and electrospinning techniques invented recently at UNL is described in Chapters 5. The 3Al2O3-2SiO2, SiO2-TiO 2 nanofibers were continuous, non circular in cross section and had crystalline structure after high temperature calcination. Effects of the process parameters on their geometry and structure were

  3. Advancement in organic nanofiber based transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Baunegaard With; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Tavares, Luciana

    The focus of this project is to study the light emission from nanofiber based organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs) with the overall aim of developing efficient, nanoscale light sources with different colors integrated on-chip. The research performed here regards the fabrication and characte......The focus of this project is to study the light emission from nanofiber based organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs) with the overall aim of developing efficient, nanoscale light sources with different colors integrated on-chip. The research performed here regards the fabrication...... and characterization of OLETs using the organic semiconductors para-hexaphenylene (p6P), 5,5´-Di-4-biphenyl-2,2´-bithiophene (PPTTPP) and 5,5'-bis(naphth-2-yl)-2,2'-bithiophene (NaT2). These molecules can self-assemble forming molecular crystalline nanofibers. Organic nanofibers can form the basis for light......-emitters for future nanophotonic applications, due to their many interesting optoelectronic properties, such as polarized photo- and electroluminescence, waveguiding and emission color tunability. A simple roll printing technique1 has allowed us to implement these nanofibers in different types of devices. Multicolor...

  4. Stochastic reaction–diffusion algorithms for macromolecular crowding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, Marc

    2016-06-01

    Compartment-based (lattice-based) reaction–diffusion algorithms are often used for studying complex stochastic spatio-temporal processes inside cells. In this paper the influence of macromolecular crowding on stochastic reaction–diffusion simulations is investigated. Reaction–diffusion processes are considered on two different kinds of compartmental lattice, a cubic lattice and a hexagonal close packed lattice, and solved using two different algorithms, the stochastic simulation algorithm and the spatiocyte algorithm (Arjunan and Tomita 2010 Syst. Synth. Biol. 4, 35–53). Obstacles (modelling macromolecular crowding) are shown to have substantial effects on the mean squared displacement and average number of molecules in the domain but the nature of these effects is dependent on the choice of lattice, with the cubic lattice being more susceptible to the effects of the obstacles. Finally, improvements for both algorithms are presented.

  5. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, P.E. [Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  6. Temperature-dependent macromolecular X-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weik, Martin, E-mail: martin.weik@ibs.fr; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe [CEA, IBS, Laboratoire de Biophysique Moléculaire, F-38054 Grenoble (France); CNRS, UMR5075, F-38027 Grenoble (France); Université Joseph Fourier, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2010-04-01

    The dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. X-ray crystallography provides structural details of biological macromolecules. Whereas routine data are collected close to 100 K in order to mitigate radiation damage, more exotic temperature-controlled experiments in a broader temperature range from 15 K to room temperature can provide both dynamical and structural insights. Here, the dynamical behaviour of crystalline macromolecules and their surrounding solvent as a function of cryo-temperature is reviewed. Experimental strategies of kinetic crystallography are discussed that have allowed the generation and trapping of macromolecular intermediate states by combining reaction initiation in the crystalline state with appropriate temperature profiles. A particular focus is on recruiting X-ray-induced changes for reaction initiation, thus unveiling useful aspects of radiation damage, which otherwise has to be minimized in macromolecular crystallography.

  7. Refinement of macromolecular structures against neutron data with SHELXL2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruene, Tim; Hahn, Hinrich W; Luebben, Anna V; Meilleur, Flora; Sheldrick, George M

    2014-02-01

    Some of the improvements in SHELX2013 make SHELXL convenient to use for refinement of macromolecular structures against neutron data without the support of X-ray data. The new NEUT instruction adjusts the behaviour of the SFAC instruction as well as the default bond lengths of the AFIX instructions. This work presents a protocol on how to use SHELXL for refinement of protein structures against neutron data. It includes restraints extending the Engh & Huber [Acta Cryst. (1991), A47, 392-400] restraints to H atoms and discusses several of the features of SHELXL that make the program particularly useful for the investigation of H atoms with neutron diffraction. SHELXL2013 is already adequate for the refinement of small molecules against neutron data, but there is still room for improvement, like the introduction of chain IDs for the refinement of macromolecular structures.

  8. The vibron dressing in α-helicoidal macromolecular chains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.(C)evizovi(c); S.Galovi(c); A.Reshetnyak; Z.Ivi(c)

    2013-01-01

    We present a study of the physical properties of the vibrational excitation in α-helicoidal macromolecular chains,caused by the interaction with acoustical and optical phonon modes.The influence of the temperature and the basic system parameters on the vibron dressing have been analyzed by employing the simple mean-field approach based on the variational extension of the Lang-Firsov unitary transformation.The applied approach predicts a region in system parameter space where one has an abrupt transition from a partially dressed (light and mobile) to a fully dressed (immobile) vibron state.We found that the boundary of this region depends on system temperature and the type of bond among structural elements in the macromolecular chain.

  9. A macromolecular model for the endothelial surface layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, James; Danova-Okpetu, Darina; Grest, Gary

    2006-03-01

    The endothelial surface layer (ESL) is a micron-scale macromolecular lining of the luminal side of blood vessels composed of proteoglycans, glycoproteins, polysaccharides and associated plasma proteins all in dynamic equilibrium. It has numerous physiological roles including the regulation of blood flow and microvascular permeability, and active participation in mechanotransduction and stress regulation, coagulation, cell adhesion, and inflammatory response. The dynamic structure and the mechanical properties of the ESL are crucial for many of its physiological properties. We present a topological model for the ESL composed of three basic macromolecular elements: branched proteoglycans, linear polysaccharide chains, and small plasma proteins. The model was studied using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and compared with scaling theories for associating tethered polymers. We discuss the observed dynamical and mechanical properties of the ESL captured by this model, and the possible physical insight it provides into the physiological behavior of the ESL.

  10. A Strategy for the Development of Macromolecular Nonlinear Optical Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    obsolete. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE STRATEGY FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF MACROMOLECULAR NONLINEAR OPTICAL MATERIALS Braja K. Mandala , Jan-Chan...materials is significantly different from the conventional inorganic NLO materials. The extent of second order (quadratic) NLO effect such as second...is a criterion of paramount importance for a large second order electro-optic effect in organic materials 8 ,9 . The most common approach to obtain

  11. Facilitating structure determination: workshop on robotics andautomation in macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ralston, Corie; Cork, C.W.; McDermott, G.; Earnest, T.N.

    2006-03-28

    As part of the annual Advanced Light Source (ALS) andStanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) Users' Meeting inOctober of this year, the macromolecular crystallography staff at bothsynchrotrons held a joint hands-on workshop to address automation issuesin crystal mounting and data collection at the beamline. This paperdescribes the ALS portion of the workshop, while the accompanying paperreviews the SSRL workshop.

  12. Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy of macromolecular assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Kimberley

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) was used to study the structure of three macromolecular assemblies: the two hemocyanin isoforms from Rapana thomasiana, the Pyrococcus furiosus chaperonin, and the ribosome from Escherichia coli. Hemocyanins are large respiratory proteins in arthropods and molluscs. Most molluscan hemocyanins exist as two distinct isoforms composed of related polypeptides. In most species the two isoforms differ in terms of their oligomeric st...

  13. Graphene oxide decorated electrospun gelatin nanofibers: Fabrication, properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaja, K; Sreehari, V S; Kumar, P R Anil; Nirmala, R James

    2016-07-01

    Gelatin nanofiber fabricated by electrospinning process is found to mimic the complex structural and functional properties of natural extracellular matrix for tissue regeneration. In order to improve the physico-chemical and biological properties of the nanofibers, graphene oxide is incorporated in the gelatin to form graphene oxide decorated gelatin nanofibers. The current research effort is focussed on the fabrication and evaluation of physico-chemical and biological properties of graphene oxide-gelatin composite nanofibers. The presence of graphene oxide in the nanofibers was established by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We report the effect of incorporation of graphene oxide on the mechanical, thermal and biological performance of the gelatin nanofibers. The tensile strength of gelatin nanofibers was increased from 8.29±0.53MPa to 21±2.03MPa after the incorporation of GO. In order to improve the water resistance of nanofibers, natural based cross-linking agent, namely, dextran aldehyde was employed. The cross-linked composite nanofibers showed further increase in the tensile strength up to 56.4±2.03MPa. Graphene oxide incorporated gelatin nanofibers are evaluated for bacterial activity against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and cyto compatibility using mouse fibroblast cells (L-929 cells). The results indicate that the graphene oxide incorporated gelatin nanofibers do not prevent bacterial growth, nevertheless support the L-929 cell adhesion and proliferation.

  14. Fabrication of nanofiber mats from electrospinning of functionalized polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Burcu; Kayaman-Apohan, Nilhan; Erdem-Kuruca, Serap

    2014-08-01

    Electrospinning technique enabled us to prepare nanofibers from synthetic and natural polymers. In this study, it was aimed to fabricate electrospun poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) based nanofibers by reactive electrospinning process. To improve endurance of fiber toward to many solvents, PVA was functionalized with photo-crosslinkable groups before spinning. Afterward PVA was crosslinked by UV radiation during electrospinning process. The nanofiber mats were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that homogenous, uniform and crosslinked PVA nanofibers in diameters of about 200 nm were obtained. Thermal stability of the nanofiber mat was investigated with thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Also the potential use of this nanofiber mats for tissue engineering was examined. Osteosarcoma (Saos) cells were cultured on the nanofiber mats.

  15. Transparent Conductive Nanofiber Paper for Foldable Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogi, Masaya; Karakawa, Makoto; Komoda, Natsuki; Yagyu, Hitomi; Nge, Thi Thi

    2015-11-26

    Optically transparent nanofiber paper containing silver nanowires showed high electrical conductivity and maintained the high transparency, and low weight of the original transparent nanofiber paper. We demonstrated some procedures of optically transparent and electrically conductive cellulose nanofiber paper for lightweight and portable electronic devices. The nanofiber paper enhanced high conductivity without any post treatments such as heating or mechanical pressing, when cellulose nanofiber dispersions were dropped on a silver nanowire thin layer. The transparent conductive nanofiber paper showed high electrical durability in repeated folding tests, due to dual advantages of the hydrophilic affinity between cellulose and silver nanowires, and the entanglement between cellulose nanofibers and silver nanowires. Their optical transparency and electrical conductivity were as high as those of ITO glass. Therefore, using this conductive transparent paper, organic solar cells were produced that achieved a power conversion of 3.2%, which was as high as that of ITO-based solar cells.

  16. Nano-Fiber Reinforced Enhancements in Composite Polymer Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    Nano-fibers are used to reinforce polymer matrices to enhance the matrix dependent properties that are subsequently used in conventional structural composites. A quasi isotropic configuration is used in arranging like nano-fibers through the thickness to ascertain equiaxial enhanced matrix behavior. The nano-fiber volume ratios are used to obtain the enhanced matrix strength properties for 0.01,0.03, and 0.05 nano-fiber volume rates. These enhanced nano-fiber matrices are used with conventional fiber volume ratios of 0.3 and 0.5 to obtain the composite properties. Results show that nano-fiber enhanced matrices of higher than 0.3 nano-fiber volume ratio are degrading the composite properties.

  17. What Macromolecular Crowding Can Do to a Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular environment represents an extremely crowded milieu, with a limited amount of free water and an almost complete lack of unoccupied space. Obviously, slightly salted aqueous solutions containing low concentrations of a biomolecule of interest are too simplistic to mimic the “real life” situation, where the biomolecule of interest scrambles and wades through the tightly packed crowd. In laboratory practice, such macromolecular crowding is typically mimicked by concentrated solutions of various polymers that serve as model “crowding agents”. Studies under these conditions revealed that macromolecular crowding might affect protein structure, folding, shape, conformational stability, binding of small molecules, enzymatic activity, protein-protein interactions, protein-nucleic acid interactions, and pathological aggregation. The goal of this review is to systematically analyze currently available experimental data on the variety of effects of macromolecular crowding on a protein molecule. The review covers more than 320 papers and therefore represents one of the most comprehensive compendia of the current knowledge in this exciting area. PMID:25514413

  18. REFMAC5 for the refinement of macromolecular crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murshudov, Garib N., E-mail: garib@ysbl.york.ac.uk [Structural Biology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Skubák, Pavol [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, PO Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Lebedev, Andrey A. [Structural Biology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Pannu, Navraj S. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, PO Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Steiner, Roberto A. [Randall Division of Cell and Molecular Biophysics, New Hunt’s House, King’s College London, London (United Kingdom); Nicholls, Robert A. [Structural Biology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Winn, Martyn D. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Long, Fei; Vagin, Alexei A. [Structural Biology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-01

    The general principles behind the macromolecular crystal structure refinement program REFMAC5 are described. This paper describes various components of the macromolecular crystallographic refinement program REFMAC5, which is distributed as part of the CCP4 suite. REFMAC5 utilizes different likelihood functions depending on the diffraction data employed (amplitudes or intensities), the presence of twinning and the availability of SAD/SIRAS experimental diffraction data. To ensure chemical and structural integrity of the refined model, REFMAC5 offers several classes of restraints and choices of model parameterization. Reliable models at resolutions at least as low as 4 Å can be achieved thanks to low-resolution refinement tools such as secondary-structure restraints, restraints to known homologous structures, automatic global and local NCS restraints, ‘jelly-body’ restraints and the use of novel long-range restraints on atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) based on the Kullback–Leibler divergence. REFMAC5 additionally offers TLS parameterization and, when high-resolution data are available, fast refinement of anisotropic ADPs. Refinement in the presence of twinning is performed in a fully automated fashion. REFMAC5 is a flexible and highly optimized refinement package that is ideally suited for refinement across the entire resolution spectrum encountered in macromolecular crystallography.

  19. Macromolecular amplification of binding response in superaptamer hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wei; Gariano, Nicholas A; Spivak, David A

    2013-05-08

    It is becoming more important to detect ultralow concentrations of analytes for biomedical, environmental, and national security applications. Equally important is that new methods should be easy to use, inexpensive, portable, and if possible allow detection by the naked eye. By and large, detection of low concentrations of analytes cannot be achieved directly but requires signal amplification by catalysts, macromolecules, metal surfaces, or supramolecular aggregates. The rapidly progressing field of macromolecular signal amplification has been advanced using conjugated polymers, chirality in polymers, solvating polymers, and polymerization/depolymerization strategies. A new type of aptamer-based hydrogel with specific response to target proteins presented in this report demonstrates an additional category of macromolecular signal amplification. This superaptamer assembly provides the first example of using protein-specific aptamers to create volume-changing hydrogels with amplified response to the target protein. A remarkable aspect of these superaptamer hydrogels is that volume shrinking is visible to the naked eye down to femtomolar concentrations of protein. This extraordinary macromolecular amplification is attributed to a complex interplay between protein-aptamer supramolecular cross-links and the consequential reduction of excluded volume in the hydrogel. Specific recognition is even maintained in biological matrices such as urine and tears. Furthermore, the gels can be dried for long-term storage and regenerated for use without loss of activity. In practice, the ease of this biomarker detection method offers an alternative to traditional analytical techniques that require sophisticated instrumentation and highly trained personnel.

  20. Macromolecular Assemblage in the Design of a Synthetic AIDS Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defoort, Jean-Philippe; Nardelli, Bernardetta; Huang, Wolin; Ho, David D.; Tam, James P.

    1992-05-01

    We describe a peptide vaccine model based on the mimicry of surface coat protein of a pathogen. This model used a macromolecular assemblage approach to amplify peptide antigens in liposomes or micelles. The key components of the model consisted of an oligomeric lysine scaffolding to amplify peptide antigens covalently 4-fold and a lipophilic membrane-anchoring group to further amplify noncovalently the antigens many-fold in liposomal or micellar form. A peptide antigen derived from the third variable domain of glycoprotein gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), consisting of neutralizing, T-helper, and T-cytotoxic epitopes, was used in a macromolecular assemblage model (HIV-1 linear peptide amino acid sequence 308-331 in a tetravalent multiple antigen peptide system linked to tripalmitoyl-S-glycerylcysteine). The latter complex, in liposome or micelle, was used to immunize mice and guinea pigs without any adjuvant and found to induce gp120-specific antibodies that neutralize virus infectivity in vitro, elicit cytokine production, and prime CD8^+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes in vivo. Our results show that the macromolecular assemblage approach bears immunological mimicry of the gp120 of HIV virus and may lead to useful vaccines against HIV infection.

  1. Electrospinning nanofibers for controlled drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Indrani

    Electrospinning is the most widely studied technique for the synthesis of nanofibers. Electrospinning is considered as one of the technologies that can produce nanosized drugs incorporated in polymeric nanofibers. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that the release rates of drugs from these nanofiber formulations are enhanced compared to those from original drug substance. This technology has the potential for enhancing the oral delivery of poorly soluble drugs. The electrospun mats were made using Polycaprolactone/PCL, Poly(DL-lactide)/PDL 05 and Poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide)/PLGA. The drugs incorporated in the electrospun fibers were 5-Fluorouracil and Rapamycin. The evidence of the drugs being embedded in the polymers was obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The release of 5-Fluorouracil and Rapamycin were followed by UV-VIS spectroscopy.

  2. High nonlinear optical anisotropy of urea nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, D.; de Matos Gomes, E.; Belsley, M.; Almeida, B.; Martins, A.; Neves, N.; Reis, R.

    2010-07-01

    Nanofibers consisting of the optically nonlinear organic molecule urea embedded in both poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) polymers were produced by the electrospinning technique. The second-harmonic generation produced by aligned fiber mats of these materials displays a strong dependence on the polarization of the incident light. In PVA-urea nanofibers the effectiveness in generating of the second-harmonic light is as high as that of a pure urea powder with an average grain size of 110 μm. The results suggest that single crystalline urea nanofibers were achieved with a long-range crystalline order extending into the range of 2-4 μm with PVA as the host polymer.

  3. Purification process for vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Delziet, Lance; Matthews, Kristopher; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.

    2003-01-01

    Individual, free-standing, vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes or nanofibers are ideal for sensor and electrode applications. Our plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition techniques for producing free-standing and vertically aligned carbon nanofibers use catalyst particles at the tip of the fiber. Here we present a simple purification process for the removal of iron catalyst particles at the tip of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers derived by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The first step involves thermal oxidation in air, at temperatures of 200-400 degrees C, resulting in the physical swelling of the iron particles from the formation of iron oxide. Subsequently, the complete removal of the iron oxide particles is achieved with diluted acid (12% HCl). The purification process appears to be very efficient at removing all of the iron catalyst particles. Electron microscopy images and Raman spectroscopy data indicate that the purification process does not damage the graphitic structure of the nanotubes.

  4. Graphene oxide decorated electrospun gelatin nanofibers: Fabrication, properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalaja, K. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 547 (India); Sreehari, V.S. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Bhopal, Bhauri, Madhya Pradesh 462066 (India); Kumar, P.R. Anil [Tissue culture laboratory, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Poojappura, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 012 (India); Nirmala, R. James, E-mail: nirmala@iist.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 547 (India)

    2016-07-01

    Gelatin nanofiber fabricated by electrospinning process is found to mimic the complex structural and functional properties of natural extracellular matrix for tissue regeneration. In order to improve the physico-chemical and biological properties of the nanofibers, graphene oxide is incorporated in the gelatin to form graphene oxide decorated gelatin nanofibers. The current research effort is focussed on the fabrication and evaluation of physico-chemical and biological properties of graphene oxide-gelatin composite nanofibers. The presence of graphene oxide in the nanofibers was established by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We report the effect of incorporation of graphene oxide on the mechanical, thermal and biological performance of the gelatin nanofibers. The tensile strength of gelatin nanofibers was increased from 8.29 ± 0.53 MPa to 21 ± 2.03 MPa after the incorporation of GO. In order to improve the water resistance of nanofibers, natural based cross-linking agent, namely, dextran aldehyde was employed. The cross-linked composite nanofibers showed further increase in the tensile strength up to 56.4 ± 2.03 MPa. Graphene oxide incorporated gelatin nanofibers are evaluated for bacterial activity against gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and gram negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria and cyto compatibility using mouse fibroblast cells (L-929 cells). The results indicate that the graphene oxide incorporated gelatin nanofibers do not prevent bacterial growth, nevertheless support the L-929 cell adhesion and proliferation. - Highlights: • Graphene oxide nano reinforced gelatin nanofibers are fabricated by electrospinning. • Graphene oxide (0.5%) loading resulted in increased tensile strength. • GO/gelatin nanofibers are cross-linked with dextran aldehyde. • Composite nanofibers favoured adhesion of L-929 cells. • GO/gelatin mats do not prevent bacterial growth.

  5. Budding willow branches shaped Na3V2(PO4)3/C nanofibers synthesized via an electrospinning technique and used as cathode material for sodium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Bai, Ying; Wu, Feng; Li, Yu; Wu, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Budding willow branches shaped Na3V2(PO4)3/C nanofibers were successfully synthesized by a simple electrospinning technique with Poly(vinyl pyrrilidone) (PVP). The Na3V2(PO4)3/C nanoparticles that anchored on the nanofibers surface seemed like the willow buds; the inner core of the nanofibers, which composed Na3V2(PO4)3, looked like willow twig and the uniform carbon layer was same with willow bark. Such special morphology played a vital role in improving cycle stability and rate capability of the electrode due to the conductive network built up by nanofibers. The Na3V2(PO4)3/C nanofibers cathode exhibited an initial specific capacity of 106.8 mAh g-1 at a current density of 0.2C, still stabling at 107.2 mAh g-1 after 125 cycles with excellent cycle stability. Moreover, a capacity retention of 95.7% was obtained when Na3V2(PO4)3/C nanofibers cycled stepwise from 0.2 to 2C. Good electrochemical performance should be ascribed to both the special morphology and preferential growth of the (113) plane. The simple synthesis technique and good electrochemical performance suggests that this material with the special shape of budding willow branches is a promising cathode for sodium ion batteries.

  6. Electrospun Gelatin/β-TCP Composite Nanofibers Enhance Osteogenic Differentiation of BMSCs and In Vivo Bone Formation by Activating Ca (2+) -Sensing Receptor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuehui; Meng, Song; Huang, Ying; Xu, Mingming; He, Ying; Lin, Hong; Han, Jianmin; Chai, Yuan; Wei, Yan; Deng, Xuliang

    2015-01-01

    Calcium phosphate- (CaP-) based composite scaffolds have been used extensively for the bone regeneration in bone tissue engineering. Previously, we developed a biomimetic composite nanofibrous membrane of gelatin/β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and confirmed their biological activity in vitro and bone regeneration in vivo. However, how these composite nanofibers promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) is unknown. Here, gelatin/β-TCP composite nanofibers were fabricated by incorporating 20 wt% β-TCP nanoparticles into electrospun gelatin nanofibers. Electron microscopy showed that the composite β-TCP nanofibers had a nonwoven structure with a porous network and a rough surface. Spectral analyses confirmed the presence and chemical stability of the β-TCP and gelatin components. Compared with pure gelatin nanofibers, gelatin/β-TCP composite nanofibers caused increased cell attachment, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteogenic gene expression in rat BMSCs. Interestingly, the expression level of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) was significantly higher on the composite nanofibrous scaffolds than on pure gelatin. For rat calvarial critical sized defects, more extensive osteogenesis and neovascularization occurred in the composite scaffolds group compared with the gelatin group. Thus, gelatin/β-TCP composite scaffolds promote osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs in vitro and bone regeneration in vivo by activating Ca(2+)-sensing receptor signaling.

  7. Electrospun Gelatin/β-TCP Composite Nanofibers Enhance Osteogenic Differentiation of BMSCs and In Vivo Bone Formation by Activating Ca2+-Sensing Receptor Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate- (CaP- based composite scaffolds have been used extensively for the bone regeneration in bone tissue engineering. Previously, we developed a biomimetic composite nanofibrous membrane of gelatin/β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP and confirmed their biological activity in vitro and bone regeneration in vivo. However, how these composite nanofibers promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs is unknown. Here, gelatin/β-TCP composite nanofibers were fabricated by incorporating 20 wt% β-TCP nanoparticles into electrospun gelatin nanofibers. Electron microscopy showed that the composite β-TCP nanofibers had a nonwoven structure with a porous network and a rough surface. Spectral analyses confirmed the presence and chemical stability of the β-TCP and gelatin components. Compared with pure gelatin nanofibers, gelatin/β-TCP composite nanofibers caused increased cell attachment, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteogenic gene expression in rat BMSCs. Interestingly, the expression level of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR was significantly higher on the composite nanofibrous scaffolds than on pure gelatin. For rat calvarial critical sized defects, more extensive osteogenesis and neovascularization occurred in the composite scaffolds group compared with the gelatin group. Thus, gelatin/β-TCP composite scaffolds promote osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs in vitro and bone regeneration in vivo by activating Ca2+-sensing receptor signaling.

  8. Modified Silica Nanofibers with Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Veverková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on development of functionalized inorganic-organic nanofibrous material with antibacterial activity for wound dressing applications. The nanofibers combining poly(vinyl alcohol and silica were produced by electrospinning from the sol and thermally stabilized. The PVA/silica nanofibers surface was functionalized by silver and copper nanoparticles to ensure antibacterial activity. It was proven that quantity of adsorbed silver and copper nanoparticles depends on process time of adsorption. According to antibacterial tests results, this novel nanofibrous material shows a big potential for wound dressing applications due to its significant antibacterial efficiency.

  9. Biofunctionalizing nanofibers with carbohydrate blood group antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Katie; Kannan, Bhuvaneswari; Korchagina, Elena; Popova, Inna; Ryzhov, Ivan; Henry, Stephen; Bovin, Nicolai

    2016-11-01

    A rapid and simple method of biofunctionalising nylon, cellulose acetate, and polyvinyl butyral electrospun nanofibers with blood group glycans was achieved by preparing function-spacer-lipid constructs and simply contacting them to fibers with a piezo inkjet printer. A series of water dispersible amphipathic glycan-spacer constructs were synthesized representing a range ABO and related blood group antigens. After immediate contact of the amphipathic glycan-spacer constructs with nanofiber surfaces they self-assembled and were detectable by enzyme immunoassays with high sensitivity and specificity.

  10. Controlled Morphology of Porous Polyvinyl Butyral Nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    A simple and effective method for the fabrication of porous nanofibers based on the solvent evaporation methods in one-step electrospinning process from the commercial polyvinyl butyral (PVB) is presented. The obtained nanofibers are prevalently amorphous with diameters ranging from 150 to 4350 nm and specific surface area of approximately 2–20 m2/g. Pore size with irregular shape of the porous PVB fibers ranged approximately from 50 to 200 nm. The effects of polymer solution concentration,...

  11. Hydrogen storage in graphite nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, C.; Tan, C.D.; Hidalgo, R.; Baker, R.T.K.; Rodriguez, N.M. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1998-08-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNF) are a type of material that is produced by the decomposition of carbon containing gases over metal catalyst particles at temperatures around 600 C. These molecularly engineered structures consist of graphene sheets perfectly arranged in a parallel, perpendicular or at angle orientation with respect to the fiber axis. The most important feature of the material is that only edges are exposed. Such an arrangement imparts the material with unique properties for gas adsorption because the evenly separated layers constitute the most ordered set of nanopores that can accommodate an adsorbate in the most efficient manner. In addition, the non-rigid pore walls can also expand so as to accommodate hydrogen in a multilayer conformation. Of the many varieties of structures that can be produced the authors have discovered that when gram quantities of a selected number of GNF are exposed to hydrogen at pressures of {approximately} 2,000 psi, they are capable of adsorbing and storing up to 40 wt% of hydrogen. It is believed that a strong interaction is established between hydrogen and the delocalized p-electrons present in the graphite layers and therefore a new type of chemistry is occurring within these confined structures.

  12. Confined self-assembly approach to produce ultrathin carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weixia; Cui, Jiecheng; Tao, Cheng-An; Lin, Changxu; Wu, Yiguang; Li, Guangtao

    2009-07-21

    A surfactant containing a terminal carbon source moiety was synthesized and used simultaneously as both template molecule and carbon source. On the basis of this special structure-directing agent, an efficient strategy for producing uniform carbon nanowires with diameter below 1 nm was developed using a confined self-assembly approach. Besides the capability of producing ultralong and thin carbon wires inaccessible by the previously reported approaches, the method described here presents many advantages such as the direct use of residue iron complex as catalyst for carbonization and no requirement of conventional tedious infiltration process of carbon source into small channels. Different methods including SEM, TEM, XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and conductivity measurement were employed to characterize the formed ultrathin carbon nanofibers. Additionally, the described strategy is extendable. By designing an appropriate surfactant, it is also possible for the fabrication of the finely structured carbon network and ultrathin graphitic sheets through the construction of the corresponding cubic and lamellar mesostructured templates.

  13. Electrospinning of nanofibers from non-polymeric systems: polymer-free nanofibers from cyclodextrin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebioglu, Asli; Uyar, Tamer

    2012-01-21

    High molecular weight polymers and high polymer concentrations are desirable for the electrospinning of nanofibers since polymer chain entanglements and overlapping are important for uniform fiber formation. Hence, the electrospinning of nanofibers from non-polymeric systems such as cyclodextrins (CDs) is quite a challenge since CDs are cyclic oligosaccharides. Nevertheless, in this study, we have successfully achieved the electrospinning of nanofibers from chemically modified CDs without using a carrier polymer matrix. Polymer-free nanofibers were electrospun from three different CD derivatives, hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), hydroxypropyl-γ-cyclodextrin (HPγCD) and methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) in three different solvent systems, water, dimethylformamide (DMF) and dimethylacetamide (DMAc). We observed that the electrospinning of these CDs is quite similar to polymeric systems in which the solvent type, the solution concentration and the solution conductivity are some of the key factors for obtaining uniform nanofibers. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements indicated that the presence of considerable CD aggregates and the very high solution viscosity were playing a key role for attaining nanofibers from CD derivatives without the use of any polymeric carrier. The electrospinning of CD solutions containing urea yielded no fibers but only beads or splashes since urea caused a notable destruction of the self-associated CD aggregates in their concentrated solutions. The structural, thermal and mechanical characteristics of the CD nanofibers were also investigated. Although the CD derivatives are amorphous small molecules, interestingly, we observed that these electrospun CD nanofibers/nanowebs have shown some mechanical integrity by which they can be easily handled and folded as a free standing material.

  14. Electrospinning of nanofibers from non-polymeric systems: polymer-free nanofibers from cyclodextrin derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebioglu, Asli; Uyar, Tamer

    2012-01-01

    High molecular weight polymers and high polymer concentrations are desirable for the electrospinning of nanofibers since polymer chain entanglements and overlapping are important for uniform fiber formation. Hence, the electrospinning of nanofibers from non-polymeric systems such as cyclodextrins (CDs) is quite a challenge since CDs are cyclic oligosaccharides. Nevertheless, in this study, we have successfully achieved the electrospinning of nanofibers from chemically modified CDs without using a carrier polymer matrix. Polymer-free nanofibers were electrospun from three different CD derivatives, hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), hydroxypropyl-γ-cyclodextrin (HPγCD) and methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) in three different solvent systems, water, dimethylformamide (DMF) and dimethylacetamide (DMAc). We observed that the electrospinning of these CDs is quite similar to polymeric systems in which the solvent type, the solution concentration and the solution conductivity are some of the key factors for obtaining uniform nanofibers. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements indicated that the presence of considerable CD aggregates and the very high solution viscosity were playing a key role for attaining nanofibers from CD derivatives without the use of any polymeric carrier. The electrospinning of CD solutions containing urea yielded no fibers but only beads or splashes since urea caused a notable destruction of the self-associated CD aggregates in their concentrated solutions. The structural, thermal and mechanical characteristics of the CD nanofibers were also investigated. Although the CD derivatives are amorphous small molecules, interestingly, we observed that these electrospun CD nanofibers/nanowebs have shown some mechanical integrity by which they can be easily handled and folded as a free standing material.

  15. UV-responsive polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers prepared by electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatri, Zeeshan, E-mail: zeeshan.khatri@faculty.muet.edu.pk [Department of Textile Engineering, Mehran University of Engineering and Technology, Jamshoro 76062 (Pakistan); Nano Fusion Technology Research Lab, Division of Frontier Fibers, Institute for Fiber Engineering (IFES), Interdisciplinary Cluster for Cutting Edge Research (ICCER), Shinshu University, 3-15-1, Tokida, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567 (Japan); Ali, Shamshad [Department of Textile Engineering, Mehran University of Engineering and Technology, Jamshoro 76062 (Pakistan); Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Khatri, Imran [Department of Entomology, Sindh Agriculture University, Tandojam (Pakistan); Mayakrishnan, Gopiraman [Nano Fusion Technology Research Lab, Division of Frontier Fibers, Institute for Fiber Engineering (IFES), Interdisciplinary Cluster for Cutting Edge Research (ICCER), Shinshu University, 3-15-1, Tokida, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567 (Japan); Kim, Seong Hun [Department of Organic and Nano Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ick-Soo, E-mail: kim@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Nano Fusion Technology Research Lab, Division of Frontier Fibers, Institute for Fiber Engineering (IFES), Interdisciplinary Cluster for Cutting Edge Research (ICCER), Shinshu University, 3-15-1, Tokida, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567 (Japan)

    2015-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • UV responsive PVA nanofibers were prepared via electrospinning. • Quick response codes were recorded multiple times on UV responsive nanofibers. • The rate of photo-coloration was found faster than the rate of photo-reversibility. - Abstract: We report UV-responsive polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers for potential application for recording and erasing quick response (QR) codes. We incorporate 1′-3′-dihydro-8-methoxy-1′,3′,3′-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro [2H-1-benzopyran-2,2′-(2H)-indole] (indole) and,3-dihydro-1,3,3-trimethylspiro [2H-indole-2,3′-[3H] phenanthr [9,10-b] (1,4) oxazine] (oxazine) into PVA polymer matrix via electrospinning technique. The resultant nanofibers were measured for recording–erasing, photo-coloration and thermal reversibility. The rate of photo-coloration of PVA–indole nanofibers was five times higher than the PVA–oxazine nanofibers, whereas the thermal reversibility found to be more than twice as fast as PVA–oxazine nanofibers. Results showed that the resultant nanofibers have very good capability of recording QR codes multiple times. The FTIR spectroscopy and SEM were employed to characterize the electrospun nanofibers. The UV-responsive PVA nanofibers have great potentials as a light-driven nanomaterials incorporated within sensors, sensitive displays and in optical devices such as erasable and rewritable optical storage.

  16. Electrospinning of nickel oxide nanofibers: Process parameters and morphology control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, Abdullah, E-mail: akhalil@masdar.ac.ae; Hashaikeh, Raed, E-mail: rhashaikeh@masdar.ac.ae

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, nickel oxide nanofibers with varying morphology (diameter and roughness) were fabricated via electrospinning technique using a precursor composed of nickel acetate and polyvinyl alcohol. It was found that the diameter and surface roughness of individual nickel oxide nanofibers are strongly dependent upon nickel acetate concentration in the precursor. With increasing nickel acetate concentration, the diameter of nanofibers increased and the roughness decreased. An optimum concentration of nickel acetate in the precursor resulted in the formation of smooth and continuous nickel oxide nanofibers whose diameter can be further controlled via electrospinning voltage. Beyond an optimum concentration of nickel acetate, the resulting nanofibers were found to be ‘flattened’ and ‘wavy’ with occasional cracking across their length. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the obtained nanofibers are polycrystalline in nature. These nickel oxide nanofibers with varying morphology have potential applications in various engineering domains. - Highlights: • Nickel oxide nanofibers were synthesized via electrospinning. • Fiber diameter and roughness depend on nickel acetate concentration used. • With increasing nickel acetate concentration the roughness of nanofibers decreased. • XRD and TEM revealed a polycrystalline structure of the nanofibers.

  17. Large-Scale Spinning of Silver Nanofibers as Flexible and Reliable Conductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya; Bai, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Ming; Liao, Suiyang; Yu, Zongfu; Wang, Yaping; Wu, Hui

    2016-09-14

    Conducting metal nanowires can be assembled into thin films for flexible electronics and optoelectronics applications including transparent electrodes, nanocircuits, and electronic skin, however, the junction resistances and low aspect ratios still limit its performance. Herein we report high-quality silver nanofibers (AgNFs) synthesized by a gas-assistant solution spinning method. Compared with traditional Ag nanowires that usually have lengths below 100 μm, AgNFs are infinitely long and can be easily assembled into large-scale 2D and 3D flexible conductors with fused junctions between nanofibers. The AgNF networks showed high transparency, low sheet resistance (e. g, 6 Ω sq(-1) at ∼97% transparency), and high flexibility as transparent electrodes, whereas the 3D AgNF sponge could be used as a deformable and robust 3D conductor.

  18. Workshop on algorithms for macromolecular modeling. Final project report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leimkuhler, B.; Hermans, J.; Skeel, R.D.

    1995-07-01

    A workshop was held on algorithms and parallel implementations for macromolecular dynamics, protein folding, and structural refinement. This document contains abstracts and brief reports from that workshop.

  19. Hierarchical structure of nanofibers by bubbfil spinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A polymer bubble is easy to be broken under a small external force, various different fragments are formed, which can be produced to different morphologies of products including nanofibers and plate-like strip. Polyvinyl-alcohol/honey solution is used in the experiment to show hierarchical structure by the bubbfil spinning.

  20. Carbon nanofiber growth on thin rhodium layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chinthaginjala, J.K.; Unnikrishnan, S.; Smithers, M.A.; Kip, G.A.M.; Lefferts, L.

    2012-01-01

    A thinlayer of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) was synthesized on a thin polycrystalline rhodium (Rh) metal layer by decomposing ethylene in the presence of hydrogen. Interaction of Rh crystals with carbon results in fragmentation and formation of Rh-nanoparticles, facilitating CNF growth. CNFs are immobil

  1. Functionalized Nanofiber Meshes Enhance Immunosorbent Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersey, Joseph S; Meller, Amit; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional substrates with high surface-to-volume ratios and subsequently large protein binding capacities are of interest for advanced immunosorbent assays utilizing integrated microfluidics and nanosensing elements. A library of bioactive and antifouling electrospun nanofiber substrates, which are composed of high-molecular-weight poly(oxanorbornene) derivatives, is described. Specifically, a set of copolymers are synthesized from three 7-oxanorbornene monomers to create a set of water insoluble copolymers with both biotin (bioactive) and triethylene glycol (TEG) (antifouling) functionality. Porous three-dimensional nanofiber meshes are electrospun from these copolymers with the ability to specifically bind streptavidin while minimizing the nonspecific binding of other proteins. Fluorescently labeled streptavidin is used to quantify the streptavidin binding capacity of each mesh type through confocal microscopy. A simplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is presented to assess the protein binding capabilities and detection limits of these nanofiber meshes under both static conditions (26 h) and flow conditions (1 h) for a model target protein (i.e., mouse IgG) using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) colorimetric assay. Bioactive and antifouling nanofiber meshes outperform traditional streptavidin-coated polystyrene plates under flow, validating their use in future advanced immunosorbent assays and their compatibility with microfluidic-based biosensors.

  2. Controlled Morphology of Porous Polyvinyl Butyral Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lubasova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and effective method for the fabrication of porous nanofibers based on the solvent evaporation methods in one-step electrospinning process from the commercial polyvinyl butyral (PVB is presented. The obtained nanofibers are prevalently amorphous with diameters ranging from 150 to 4350 nm and specific surface area of approximately 2–20 m2/g. Pore size with irregular shape of the porous PVB fibers ranged approximately from 50 to 200 nm. The effects of polymer solution concentration, composition of the solvents mixture, and applied voltage on fiber diameter and morphology were investigated. The theoretical approach for the choice of poor and good solvents for PVB was explained by the application Hansen solubility parameter (HSP and two-dimensional graph. Three basic conditions for the production of porous PVB nanofibers were defined: (i application of good/poor solvent mixture for spinning solution, (ii differences of the evaporation rate between good/poor solvent, and (iii correct ratios of good/poor solvent (v/v. The diameter of prepared porous PVB fibers decreased as the polymer concentration was lowered and with higher applied voltage. These nanofiber sheets with porous PVB fibers could be a good candidate for high-efficiency filter materials in comparison to smooth fibers without pores.

  3. Carbon nanofibers: catalytic synthesis and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de; Geus, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanofibers (diameter range, 3-100 nm; length range, 1.1-1000 µm) have been known for a long time as a nuisance that often merges during catalythic conversion of carbon-containing gases. The recent outburst of interest in these graphitic materials originates from their potential for unique app

  4. Fluorescent Self-Assembled Polyphenylene Dendrimer Nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Daojun; Feyter, Steven De; Cotlet, Mircea; Wiesler, Uwe-Martin; Weil, Tanja; Herrmann, Andreas; Müllen, Klaus; Schryver, Frans C. De

    2003-01-01

    A second-generation polyphenylene dendrimer 1 self-assembles into nanofibers on various substrates such as HOPG, silicon, glass, and mica from different solvents. The investigation with noncontact atomic force microscopy (NCAFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the morphology of the

  5. Bubbfil spinning for fabrication of PVA nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Chun-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubbfil spinning is used to fabricate PVA nanofibers. Multiple polymer bubbles are formed on the spinneret, and an external force is added to burst the bubbles immediately. The ejected jets are accelerated to a high velocity, and fiber diameter is tenable by adjusting the spinning parameters.

  6. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of

  7. Bringing macromolecular machinery to life using 3D animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Janet H

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a rapid rise in the use of three-dimensional (3D) animation to depict molecular and cellular processes. Much of the growth in molecular animation has been in the educational arena, but increasingly, 3D animation software is finding its way into research laboratories. In this review, I will discuss a number of ways in which 3d animation software can play a valuable role in visualizing and communicating macromolecular structures and dynamics. I will also consider the challenges of using animation tools within the research sphere.

  8. BLOOD FLOW AND MACROMOLECULAR TRANSPORT IN CURVED BLOOD VESSELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Lan; WEN Gong-bi; TAN Wen-chang

    2006-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the steady/pulsatile flow and macromolecular (such as LDL and Albumin) transport in curved blood vessels was carried out. The computational results predict that the vortex of the secondary flow is time-dependent in the aortic arch.The concentration of macromolecule concentrates at the region of sharp curve, and the wall concentration at the outer part is higher than that at the inner part. Atherosclerosis and thrombosis are prone to develop in such regions with sharp flow.

  9. Crystallization of Poly(3-hexylthiophene Nanofiber in a Narrow Groove

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kushi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Whisker-type poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl (P3HT nanofibers were aligned by restricting their growth direction using an approximately 100–1000 nm wide narrow groove fabricated by thermal nanoimprinting. In grooves made of an amorphous fluoropolymer (CYTOP™ with widths of less than 1500 nm, the nanofibers oriented uniaxially perpendicular to the groove and their length was limited to the width of the groove. This result indicates that the nucleation of nanofibers tends to be selectively promoted near the interface of CYTOP™ with fluoro-groups, and nanofiber growth perpendicular to the wall is promoted because P3HT molecules are supplied more frequently from the center of the groove. Furthermore, the orientation induced anisotropic conductivity, and the conductivity parallel to the oriented nanofibers was more than an order of magnitude higher than that perpendicular to the oriented nanofibers.

  10. Preparation of photocrosslinkable polystyrene methylene cinnamate nanofibers via electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chuan; Nirmala, R; Navamathavan, R; Li, Xiang-Dan; Kim, Hak-Yong

    2011-10-01

    Nanoscaled photocrosslinkable polystyrene methylene cinnamate (PSMC) nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning. The PSMC was prepared by the modification of polystyrene as a starting material via a two-step reaction process, chloromethylation and esterification. The chemical structure of PSMC was confirmed by 1H NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The photosensitivity of the PSMC was investigated using ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopic methods. Electrospun PSMC nanofiber mat showed excellent solubility in many organic solvents. UV irradiation of the electrospun mats led to photodimerization to resist dissolving in organic solvents. The morphology of the nanofiber was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the result indicated that the average diameter of nanofibers is 350 nm and the crosslinked nanofibers were not collapsed after dipping into organic solvent showing good solvent-stability. This photocrosslinked nanofibers has the potential application in filtration, catalyst carrier and protective coating.

  11. Mechanical characterization of cellulose single nanofiber by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Lindong; Kim, Jeong Woong; Lee, Jiyun; Kim, Jaehwan

    2017-04-01

    Cellulose fibers are strong natural fibers and they are renewable, biodegradable and the most abundant biopolymer in the world. So to develop new cellulose fibers based products, the mechanical properties of cellulose nanofibers would be a key. The atomic microscope is used to measure the mechanical properties of cellulose nanofibers based on 3-points bending of cellulose nanofiber. The cellulose nanofibers were generated for an aqueous counter collision system. The cellulose microfibers were nanosized under 200 MPa high pressure. The cellulose nanofiber suspension was diluted with DI water and sprayed on the silicon groove substrate. By performing a nanoscale 3-points bending test using the atomic force microscopy, a known force was applied on the center of the fiber. The elastic modulus of the single nanofiber is obtained by calculating the fiber deflection and several parameters. The elastic modulus values were obtained from different resources of cellulose such as hardwood, softwood and cotton.

  12. NiO Nanofibers as a Candidate for a Nanophotocathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Macdonald

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available p-type NiO nanofibers have been synthesized from a simple electrospinning and sintering procedure. For the first time, p-type nanofibers have been electrospun onto a conductive fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO surface. The properties of the NiO nanofibers have been directly compared to that of bulk NiO nanopowder. We have observed a p-type photocurrent for a NiO photocathode fabricated on an FTO substrate.

  13. Synthesis and electrochemical properties of polyaniline nanofibers by interfacial polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, James; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Kim, Dul-Sun; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Kim, Ki-Won; Kim, Jae-Kwang; Jacobsson, Per

    2012-04-01

    Polyaniline nanofibers were prepared by interfacial polymerization with different organic solvents such as chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to study the morphological properties of polyaniline nanofibers. Chemical characterization was carried out using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy and surface area was measured using BET isotherm. Polyaniline nanofibers doped with lithium hexafluorophosphate were prepared and their electrochemical properties were evaluated.

  14. Functionalized electrospun nanofibers as bioseparators in microfluidic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlock-Colangelo, Lauren; Cho, Daehwan; Pitner, Christine L; Frey, Margaret W; Baeumner, Antje J

    2012-05-01

    Functionalized electrospun nanofibers were integrated into microfluidic channels to serve as on-chip bioseparators. Specifically, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofiber mats were shown to successfully serve as bioseparators for negatively charged nanoparticles. Nanofibers were electrospun onto gold microelectrodes, which were incorporated into poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic devices using UV-assisted thermal bonding. PVA nanofibers functionalized with poly(hexadimethrine bromide) (polybrene) were positively charged and successfully filtered negatively charged liposomes out of a buffer solution, while negatively charged nanofibers functionalized with Poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic anhydride) (POLY(MVE/MA)) were shown to repel the liposomes. The effect of fiber mat thickness was studied using confocal fluorescence microscopy, determining a quite broad optimal range of thicknesses for specific liposome retention, which simplifies fiber mat production with respect to retention reliability. Finally, it was demonstrated that liposomes bound to positively charged nanofibers could be selectively released using a 4-(2-Hydroxyethyl)piperazine-1-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES)-sucrose-saline (HSS) solution of pH 9, which dramatically changes the nanofiber zeta potential and renders the positively charged nanofibers negatively charged. This is the first demonstration of functional electrospun nanofibers used to enable sample preparation procedures of isolation and concentration in lab-on-a-chip devices. This has far reaching impact on the ability to integrate functional surfaces and materials into microfluidic devices and to significantly expand their ability toward simple lab-on-a-chip devices.

  15. Electrospun PVDF nanofiber web as polymer electrolyte or separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung-Seen Choi [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea). College of Natural Sciences, Department of Applied Chemistry; Young Soo Lee; Chang Whan Joo; Seung Goo Lee [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea). Department of Textile Engineering; Jong Kyoo Park; Kyoo-Seung Han [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea). Department of Fine Chemicals Engineering and Chemistry

    2004-11-30

    Electrospinning is an useful technique to produce nanofiber webs. Since electrospun nanofiber webs have a nanoporous structure, they have a potential application for a polymer electrolyte or a separator. Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) is used as one of polymer electrolyte binders. We studied application of electrospun PVDF nanofiber webs as an electrolyte binder or a separator for a battery. Diameters of the electrospun PVDF nanofibers were 100-800 nm. The electrospun PVDF nanofiber web was thermally treated at 150-160 {sup o}C to improve the physical property and dimensional stability. The tensile strength and elongation at break as well as the tensile modulus were notably improved by the thermal treatment. Level of crystallinity of the electrospun PVDF nanofiber was increased by the thermal treatment. The ion conductivity of the polymer electrolyte formed from the electrospun PVDF nanofiber web and 1 M LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2} electrolyte solution was 1.6-2.0 x 10{sup -3} S/cm. The electrospun PVDF nanofiber mat was treated with ethylene plasma to use as a separator. The ethylene plasma-treated mat showed a role of shutter by melting the polyethylene (PE) layer grafted on the PVDF nanofibers. (author)

  16. Carbon nanofibers as hydrogen adsorbing materials for power sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danilov, M.O.; Kolbasov, G.Ya. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, Prospekt Palladina 32/34, Kyiv 142 (Ukraine); Melezhyk, A.V. [TM Spetsmash Ltd., vul. Viskoznaya 5, build. 23, 02660 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2008-01-21

    Porous carbon nanofibers are synthesized by CVD method from acetylene with use of iron-containing catalysts. Activation of the nanofibers in melted potassium hydroxide results in increasing surface area from initial 300-400 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} to 1700 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. As follows from XRD data, activated nanofibers do not contain regular packages of graphene layers, but retain high electric conductivity. Deposition of copper improves electrochemical hydrogen storing characteristics of carbon nanofibers. Carbon nanomaterials obtained can be used as hydrogen storing materials in batteries instead of hydride forming metals. (author)

  17. Polyurethane nanofibers containing copper nanoparticles as future materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheikh, Faheem A.; Kanjwal, Muzafar Ahmed; Saran, Saurabh

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to represent a novel approach to fabricate polyurethane nanofibers containing copper nanoparticles (NPs) by simple electrospinning process. A simple method, not depending on additional foreign chemicals, has been employed to utilize prepared copper NPs in polyurethane...... nanofibers. Typically, a colloidal gel consisting of copper NPs and polyurethane has been electrospun. SEM-EDX and TEM results confirmed well oriented nanofibers and good dispersion of pure copper NPs. Copper NPs have diameter in the range of 5–10nm. The thermal stability of the synthesized nanofibers...

  18. Damping Augmentation of Nanocomposites Using Carbon Nanofiber Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangbing Song

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM process was used to fabricate the nanocomposites through integrating carbon nanofiber paper into traditional glass fiber reinforced composites. The carbon nanofiber paper had a porous structure with highly entangled carbon nanofibers and short glass fibers. In this study, the carbon nanofiber paper was employed as an interlayer and surface layer of composite laminates to enhance the damping properties. Experiments conducted using the nanocomposite beam indicated up to 200–700% increase of the damping ratios at higher frequencies. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM characterization of the carbon nanofiber paper and the nanocomposites was also conducted to investigate the impregnation of carbon nanofiber paper by the resin during the VARTM process and the mechanics of damping augmentation. The study showed a complete penetration of the resin through the carbon nanofiber paper. The connectivities between carbon nanofibers and short glass fibers within the carbon nanofiber paper were responsible for the significant energy dissipation in the nanocomposites during the damping tests.

  19. Electrospun nickel oxide nanofibers: Microstructure and surface evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Abdullah; Hashaikeh, Raed

    2015-12-01

    Nickel oxide (NiO) nanofibers with controlled microstructure were synthesized through the electrospinning technique using a solution composed of nickel acetate and polyvinyl alcohol. The microstructure of NiO nanofibers was found to be highly dependent on nickel acetate concentration in the solution and the post-heat treatment. As the nickel acetate concentration increases, the crystallinity index of NiO nanofibers increases from nearly 50 percent to 90 percent and the average crystallite size in the nanofibers increases from about 20 nm to 30 nm. Further, it was found that annealing the nanofibers at 1000 °C for 2 h leads to nearly full crystallization of nanofibers with significant increase in the crystallite size to about 50 nm while maintaining the fibrous shape. For low nickel acetate concentration, and because of the small nanofibers size, the surface of the calcined nanofibers showed oxygen deficiency which promises a superior activity of these NiO nanofibers for catalytic and sensing applications.

  20. The synthesis of titanium carbide-reinforced carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pinwen; Hong, Youliang; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian

    2009-06-24

    Tailoring hard materials into nanoscale building blocks can greatly extend the applications of hard materials and, at the same time, also represents a significant challenge in the field of nanoscale science. This work reports a novel process for the preparation of carbon-based one-dimensional hard nanomaterials. The titanium carbide-carbon composite nanofibers with an average diameter of 90 nm are prepared by an electrospinning technique and a high temperature pyrolysis process. A composite solution containing polyacrylonitrile and titanium sources is first electrospun into the composite nanofibers, which are subsequently pyrolyzed to produce the desired products. The x-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy results show that the main phase of the as-synthesized nanofibers is titanium carbide. The Raman analyses show that the composite nanofibers have low graphite clusters in comparison with the pure carbon nanofibers originating from the electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibers. The mechanical property tests demonstrate that the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes have four times higher tensile strength than the carbon nanofiber membranes, and the Young's modulus of the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes increases in direct proportion to the titanium quantity.

  1. Effect of Carbon Nanofiber on Mechanical Behavior of Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Ghaffarpour Jahromi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Uses of fibers to improve material properties have a scientific background in recent years in civil engineering. Use of Nanofiber reinforcement of materials refers to incorporating materials with desired properties within some other materials lacking those properties. Use of fibers for improvement is not a new phenomenon as the technique of fiber-reinforced bitumen began as early as 1950, but using nanofiber is a new idea. In this research the mechanical properties of asphalt mixture that have been modified with carbon nanofiber were investigated using mechanical tests, which can improve the performance of flexible pavements. To evaluate the effect of nanofiber contents on bituminous mixtures, laboratory investigations were carried out on the samples with and without nanofibers. During the course of this study, various tests were undertaken applying the Marshall test, indirect tensile test, resistance to fatigue cracking by using repeated load indirect tensile test and creep test. Carbon nanofiber exhibited consistency in results and it was observed that the addition of nanofiber can change the properties of bituminous mixtures, increase its stability and decrease the flow value. Results indicate that nanofiber have the potential to resist structural distress in the pavement and thus improve fatigue by increasing resistance to cracks or permanent deformation, when growing traffic loads. On the whole, the results show that the addition of carbon nanofiber will improve some of the mechanical properties such as fatigue and deformation in the flexible pavement.

  2. Synthesis of Uniform Polyaniline Nanofibers through Interfacial Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrir Hashim

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to study the preparation of polyaniline nanofibers through simple interfacial polymerization. Ammonium persulfate, hydrochloric acid and chloroform were used as oxidant, dopant and organic solvent respectively. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM, X-ray diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR techniques were used to analyze the product. FESEM results show that polyaniline has nano-fiber morphology. XRD results show the crystalline properties of polyaniline nanofiber, and FTIR results confirmed the formation of polyaniline in different monomer/oxidant molar ratios. This study provides a better understanding on the synthesis of uniform polyaniline nanofibers through interfacial polymerization.

  3. Identifying and visualizing macromolecular flexibility in structural biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Palamini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Structural biology comprises a variety of tools to obtain atomic resolution data for the investigation of macromolecules. Conventional structural methodologies including crystallography, NMR and electron microscopy often do not provide sufficient details concerning flexibility and dynamics, even though these aspects are critical for the physiological functions of the systems under investigation. However, the increasing complexity of the molecules studied by structural biology (including large macromolecular assemblies, integral membrane proteins, intrinsically disordered systems, and folding intermediates continuously demands in-depth analyses of the roles of flexibility and conformational specificity involved in interactions with ligands and inhibitors. The intrinsic difficulties in capturing often subtle but critical molecular motions in biological systems have restrained the investigation of flexible molecules into a small niche of structural biology. Introduction of massive technological developments over the recent years, which include time-resolved studies, solution X-ray scattering, and new detectors for cryo-electron microscopy, have pushed the limits of structural investigation of flexible systems far beyond traditional approaches of NMR analysis. By integrating these modern methods with powerful biophysical and computational approaches such as generation of ensembles of molecular models and selective particle picking in electron microscopy, more feasible investigations of dynamic systems are now possible. Using some prominent examples from recent literature, we review how current structural biology methods can contribute useful data to accurately visualize flexibility in macromolecular structures and understand its important roles in regulation of biological processes.

  4. Enzymes as Green Catalysts for Precision Macromolecular Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Shin-ichiro; Uyama, Hiroshi; Kadokawa, Jun-ichi; Kimura, Shunsaku; Kobayashi, Shiro

    2016-02-24

    The present article comprehensively reviews the macromolecular synthesis using enzymes as catalysts. Among the six main classes of enzymes, the three classes, oxidoreductases, transferases, and hydrolases, have been employed as catalysts for the in vitro macromolecular synthesis and modification reactions. Appropriate design of reaction including monomer and enzyme catalyst produces macromolecules with precisely controlled structure, similarly as in vivo enzymatic reactions. The reaction controls the product structure with respect to substrate selectivity, chemo-selectivity, regio-selectivity, stereoselectivity, and choro-selectivity. Oxidoreductases catalyze various oxidation polymerizations of aromatic compounds as well as vinyl polymerizations. Transferases are effective catalysts for producing polysaccharide having a variety of structure and polyesters. Hydrolases catalyzing the bond-cleaving of macromolecules in vivo, catalyze the reverse reaction for bond forming in vitro to give various polysaccharides and functionalized polyesters. The enzymatic polymerizations allowed the first in vitro synthesis of natural polysaccharides having complicated structures like cellulose, amylose, xylan, chitin, hyaluronan, and chondroitin. These polymerizations are "green" with several respects; nontoxicity of enzyme, high catalyst efficiency, selective reactions under mild conditions using green solvents and renewable starting materials, and producing minimal byproducts. Thus, the enzymatic polymerization is desirable for the environment and contributes to "green polymer chemistry" for maintaining sustainable society.

  5. Critical review and perspective of macromolecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryscio, David R; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2012-02-01

    Molecular recognition is a fundamental and ubiquitous process that is the driving force behind life. Natural recognition elements - including antibodies, enzymes, nucleic acids, and cells - exploit non-covalent interactions to bind to their targets with exceptionally strong affinities. Due to this unparalleled proficiency, scientists have long sought to mimic natural recognition pathways. One promising approach is molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), which are fully synthetic systems formed via the crosslinking of organic polymers in the presence of a template molecule, which results in stereo-specific binding sites for this analyte of interest. Macromolecularly imprinted polymers, those synthesized in the presence of macromolecule templates (>1500 Da), are of particular importance because they open up the field for a whole new set of robust diagnostic tools. Although the specific recognition of small-molecular-weight analytes is now considered routine, extension of these efficacious procedures to the protein regime has, thus far, proved challenging. This paper reviews the main approaches employed, highlights studies of interest with an emphasis on recent work, and offers suggestions for future success in the field of macromolecularly imprinted polymers.

  6. The macromolecular crystallography facility at the advanced light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, Thomas; Padmore, Howard; Cork, Carl; Behrsing, Rolf; Kim, Sung-Hou

    1996-10-01

    Synchrotron radiation offers several advantages over the use of rotating anode sources for biological crystallography, which allow for the collection of higher-resolution data, substantially more rapid data collection, phasing by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) techniques, and time-resolved experiments using polychromatic radiation (Laue diffraction). The use of synchrotron radiation is often necessary to record useful data from crystals which diffract weakly or have very large unit cells. The high brightness and stability characteristics of the advanced light source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, along with the low emittance and long straight sections to accommodate insertion devices present in third generation synchrotrons like the ALS, lead to several advantages in the field of macromolecular crystallography. We are presently constructing a macromolecular crystallography facility at the ALS which is optimized for user-friendliness and high-throughput data collection, with advanced capabilities for MAD and Laue experiments. The X-rays will be directed to three branchlines. A well-equipped support lab will be available for biochemistry, crystal mounting and sample storage, as well as computer hardware and software available, along with staff support, allowing for the complete processing of data on site.

  7. MMDB and VAST+: tracking structural similarities between macromolecular complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madej, Thomas; Lanczycki, Christopher J; Zhang, Dachuan; Thiessen, Paul A; Geer, Renata C; Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Bryant, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    The computational detection of similarities between protein 3D structures has become an indispensable tool for the detection of homologous relationships, the classification of protein families and functional inference. Consequently, numerous algorithms have been developed that facilitate structure comparison, including rapid searches against a steadily growing collection of protein structures. To this end, NCBI's Molecular Modeling Database (MMDB), which is based on the Protein Data Bank (PDB), maintains a comprehensive and up-to-date archive of protein structure similarities computed with the Vector Alignment Search Tool (VAST). These similarities have been recorded on the level of single proteins and protein domains, comprising in excess of 1.5 billion pairwise alignments. Here we present VAST+, an extension to the existing VAST service, which summarizes and presents structural similarity on the level of biological assemblies or macromolecular complexes. VAST+ simplifies structure neighboring results and shows, for macromolecular complexes tracked in MMDB, lists of similar complexes ranked by the extent of similarity. VAST+ replaces the previous VAST service as the default presentation of structure neighboring data in NCBI's Entrez query and retrieval system. MMDB and VAST+ can be accessed via http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure.

  8. Macromolecular Crowding Enhances Thermal Stability of Rabbit Muscle Creatine Kinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jiang; HE Huawei; LI Sen

    2008-01-01

    The effect of dextran on the conformation (or secondary structure) and thermal stability of creatine kinase (CK) was studied using the far-ultraviolet (UV) circular dichroism (CD) spectra.The results showed that lower concentrations of dextran (less than 60 g/L) induced formation of the secondary CK structures.However,the secondary structure content of CK decreased when the dextran concentrations exceeded 60 g/L.Thermally induced transition curves were measured for CK in the presence of different concentrations of dextran by far-UV CD.The thermal transition curves were fitted to a two-state model by a nonlinear,least-squares method to obtain the transition temperature of the unfolding transition.An increase in the tran- sition temperature was observed with the increase of the dextran concentration.These observations qualita-tively accord with predictions of a previously proposed model for the effect of intermolecular excluded volume (macromolecular crowding) on protein stability and conformation.These findings imply that the effects of macromolecular crowding can have an important influence on our understanding of how protein folding oc-curs in vivo.

  9. PRIGo: a new multi-axis goniometer for macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltersperger, Sandro; Olieric, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch; Pradervand, Claude [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Glettig, Wayne [Centre Suisse d’Electronique et Microtechnique SA, Neuchâtel 2002 (Switzerland); Salathe, Marco; Fuchs, Martin R.; Curtin, Adrian; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Ebner, Simon; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Weinert, Tobias [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Schulze-Briese, Clemens [Dectris Ltd, Baden 5400 (Switzerland); Wang, Meitian, E-mail: vincent.olieric@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-05-09

    The design and performance of the new multi-axis goniometer PRIGo developed at the Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute is described. The Parallel Robotics Inspired Goniometer (PRIGo) is a novel compact and high-precision goniometer providing an alternative to (mini-)kappa, traditional three-circle goniometers and Eulerian cradles used for sample reorientation in macromolecular crystallography. Based on a combination of serial and parallel kinematics, PRIGo emulates an arc. It is mounted on an air-bearing stage for rotation around ω and consists of four linear positioners working synchronously to achieve x, y, z translations and χ rotation (0–90°), followed by a ϕ stage (0–360°) for rotation around the sample holder axis. Owing to the use of piezo linear positioners and active correction, PRIGo features spheres of confusion of <1 µm, <7 µm and <10 µm for ω, χ and ϕ, respectively, and is therefore very well suited for micro-crystallography. PRIGo enables optimal strategies for both native and experimental phasing crystallographic data collection. Herein, PRIGo hardware and software, its calibration, as well as applications in macromolecular crystallography are described.

  10. Enhancing Endosomal Escape for Intracellular Delivery of Macromolecular Biologic Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönn, Peter; Kacsinta, Apollo D; Cui, Xian-Shu; Hamil, Alexander S; Kaulich, Manuel; Gogoi, Khirud; Dowdy, Steven F

    2016-09-08

    Bioactive macromolecular peptides and oligonucleotides have significant therapeutic potential. However, due to their size, they have no ability to enter the cytoplasm of cells. Peptide/Protein transduction domains (PTDs), also called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), can promote uptake of macromolecules via endocytosis. However, overcoming the rate-limiting step of endosomal escape into the cytoplasm remains a major challenge. Hydrophobic amino acid R groups are known to play a vital role in viral escape from endosomes. Here we utilize a real-time, quantitative live cell split-GFP fluorescence complementation phenotypic assay to systematically analyze and optimize a series of synthetic endosomal escape domains (EEDs). By conjugating EEDs to a TAT-PTD/CPP spilt-GFP peptide complementation assay, we were able to quantitatively measure endosomal escape into the cytoplasm of live cells via restoration of GFP fluorescence by intracellular molecular complementation. We found that EEDs containing two aromatic indole rings or one indole ring and two aromatic phenyl groups at a fixed distance of six polyethylene glycol (PEG) units from the TAT-PTD-cargo significantly enhanced cytoplasmic delivery in the absence of cytotoxicity. EEDs address the critical rate-limiting step of endosomal escape in delivery of macromolecular biologic peptide, protein and siRNA therapeutics into cells.

  11. Antimicrobial electrospun silver-, copper- and zinc-doped polyvinylpyrrolidone nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirós, Jennifer [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Borges, João P. [CENIMAT/I3N, Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Boltes, Karina [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies of Water (IMDEA Agua), Parque Científico Tecnológico, E-28805, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Rodea-Palomares, Ismael [Departamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Rosal, Roberto [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Alcalá, 28871 Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Madrid Institute for Advanced Studies of Water (IMDEA Agua), Parque Científico Tecnológico, E-28805, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Electrospun polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanofibers containing silver, copper, and zinc. • Antimicrobial effect for the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. • Silver strongly reduced colony forming units and bacterial viability. • Silver, copper, and zinc led to a significant increase of non-viable cells on mats. - Abstract: The use of electrospun polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) nanofibers containing silver, copper, and zinc nanoparticles was studied to prepare antimicrobial mats using silver and copper nitrates and zinc acetate as precursors. Silver became reduced during electrospinning and formed nanoparticles of several tens of nanometers. Silver nanoparticles and the insoluble forms of copper and zinc were dispersed using low molecular weight PVP as capping agent. High molecular weight PVP formed uniform fibers with a narrow distribution of diameters around 500 nm. The fibers were converted into an insoluble network using ultraviolet irradiation crosslinking. The efficiency of metal-loaded mats against the bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus was tested for different metal loadings by measuring the inhibition of colony forming units and the staining with fluorescent probes for metabolic viability and compromised membranes. The assays included the culture in contact with mats and the direct staining of surface attached microorganisms. The results indicated a strong inhibition for silver-loaded fibers and the absence of significant amounts of viable but non-culturable microorganisms. Copper and zinc-loaded mats also decreased the metabolic activity and cell viability, although in a lesser extent. Metal-loaded fibers allowed the slow release of the soluble forms of the three metals.

  12. Jet Shaping Nanofibers and the Collection of Nanofiber Mats in Electrospinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinwei WANG; Jin CAO; Zuming HU; Wanlian PAN; Zhaofeng LIU

    2006-01-01

    Electrospinning is an effective way to produce nanofibers. Theconcentration or the corresponding viscosity of the spin solution is one of the most important variables to control the fiber morphology in electrospinning. Jet shaping nanofibers might be divided in two operating modes for different solution viscosity: split thinning and single thinning. From the analysis of jet single thinning, an equation to calculate the velocity of nanofibers depositing on the collector was educed and it was found that the velocity range was very different from the reported result. For the electrospun mats obtained from low solution concentration, the split is observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. On the other hand, the beads formation in the nanofiber mats can be explained well by jet splitting. The arrangement of nanofibers in the mats is related to the methods of collection, and the cylinder collector gets more ordered mats. This result is proved by so-called break strengths testing and SEM images of the mats obtained from different methods of collection.

  13. Electrospinning of nanofibers from non-polymeric systems: electrospun nanofibers from native cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebioglu, Asli; Uyar, Tamer

    2013-08-15

    Electrospinning of nanofibers from non-polymeric systems is rather challenging, yet in this study, we have successfully performed electrospinning of nanofibers from two of the native cyclodextrins (CDs); α-CD and β-CD. Electrospinning was carried out for highly concentrated solutions of α-CD (120% up to 160%, w/v) and β-CD (120% up to 150%, w/v) in basic aqueous system. At optimal concentration level, the electrospinning of CD solutions yielded bead-free uniform CD nanofibers without using carrier polymeric matrix. Similar to polymeric systems, the electrospinning of CD solutions resulted in different morphologies and average fiber diameters depending on the CD type and CD concentration. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) and rheology measurements were performed in order to examine the electrospinnability of CD solutions. The existence of CD aggregates via hydrogen bonding and very high solution viscosity and viscoelastic solid-like behavior of CD solutions were found to be the key factors for obtaining bead-free nanofibers from CDs. The addition of urea disrupted CD aggregates and lowered the viscosity significantly, and therefore, the urea-added CD solutions yielded beaded fibers and/or beads. Although the as-received CDs in powder form are crystalline, the structural analyses by XRD and HR-TEM indicated that electrospun CD nanofibers have amorphous characteristic without showing any particular orientation or crystalline aggregation of CD molecules.

  14. Formation of inorganic nanofibers by heat-treatment of poly(vinyl alcohol-zirconium compound hybrid nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakane K.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinyl alcohol-zirconium compound hybrid nanofibers (precursors were formed by electrospinning employing water as a solvent for the spinning solution. The precursors were converted into oxide (ZrO2, carbide (ZrC or nitride (ZrN nanofibers by heating them in air, Ar or N2 atmospheres. Monoclinic ZrO2 nanofibers with high-specific surface area were obtained by heat-treatment of the precursors in air. ZrC and ZrN nanofibers could be obtained below theoretical temperatures calculated from thermodynamics data.

  15. Fabrication and Intermolecular Interactions of Silk Fibroin/Hydroxybutyl Chitosan Blended Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Mei Mo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The native extracellular matrix (ECM is composed of a cross-linked porous network of multifibril collagens and glycosaminoglycans. Nanofibrous scaffolds of silk fibroin (SF and hydroxybutyl chitosan (HBC blends were fabricated using 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA as solvents to biomimic the native ECM via electrospinning. Scanning electronic microscope (SEM showed that relatively uniform nanofibers could be obtained when 12% SF was blended with 6% HBC at the weight ratio of 50:50. Meanwhile, the average nanofibrous diameter increased when the content of HBC in SF/HBC blends was raised from 20% to 100%. Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR showed SF and HBC molecules existed in hydrogen bonding interactions but HBC did not induce conformation of SF transforming from random coil form to β-sheet structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD confirmed the different structure of SF/HBC blended nanofibers from both SF and HBC. Thermogravimetry-Differential thermogravimetry (TG-DTG results demonstrated that the thermal stability of SF/HBC blend nanofibrous scaffolds was improved. The results indicated that the rearrangement of HBC and SF molecular chain formed a new structure due to stronger hydrogen bonding between SF and HBC. These electrospun SF/HBC blended nanofibers may provide an ideal tissue engineering scaffold and wound dressing.

  16. Electrospun Nanofibers of Guar Galactomannan for Targeted Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hsiao Mei Annie

    2011-12-01

    Guar galactomannan is a biodegradable polysaccharide used widely in the food industry but also in the cosmetics, pharmaceutical, oil drilling, textile and paper industries. Guar consists of a mannose backbone and galactose side groups that are both susceptible to enzyme degradation, a unique property that can be explored for targeted drug delivery especially since those enzymes are naturally secreted by the microflora in human colon. The present study can be divided into three parts. In the first part, we discuss ways to modify guar to produce nanofibers by electrospinning, a process that involves the application of an electric field to a polymer solution or melt to facilitate production of fibers in the sub-micron range. Nanofibers are currently being explored as the next generation of drug carriers due to its many advantages, none more important than the fact that nanofibers are on a size scale that is a fraction of a hair's width and have large surface-to-volume ratio. The incorporation and controlled release of nano-sized drugs is one way in which nanofibers are being utilized in drug delivery. In the second part of the study, we explore various methods to crosslink guar nanofibers as a means to promote water-resistance in a potential drug carrier. The scope and utility of water-resistant guar nanofibers can only be fully appreciated when subsequent drug release studies are carried out. To that end, the third part of our study focuses on understanding the kinetics and diffusion mechanisms of a model drug, Rhodamine B, through moderately-swelling (crosslinked) hydrogel nanofibers in comparison to rapidly-swelling (non-crosslinked) nanofibers. Along the way, our investigations led us to a novel electrospinning set-up that has a unique collector designed to capture aligned nanofibers. These aligned nanofiber bundles can then be twisted to hold them together like yarn. From a practical standpoint, these yarns are advantageous because they come freely suspended and

  17. Antifouling Electrospun Nanofiber Mats Functionalized with Polymer Zwitterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolewe, Kristopher W; Dobosz, Kerianne M; Rieger, Katrina A; Chang, Chia-Chih; Emrick, Todd; Schiffman, Jessica D

    2016-10-06

    In this study, we exploit the excellent fouling resistance of polymer zwitterions and present electrospun nanofiber mats surface functionalized with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (polyMPC). This zwitterionic polymer coating maximizes the accessibility of the zwitterion to effectively limit biofouling on nanofiber membranes. Two facile, scalable methods yielded a coating on cellulose nanofibers: (i) a two-step sequential deposition featuring dopamine polymerization followed by the physioadsorption of polyMPC, and (ii) a one-step codeposition of polydopamine (PDA) with polyMPC. While the sequential and codeposited nanofiber mat assemblies have an equivalent average fiber diameter, hydrophilic contact angle, surface chemistry, and stability, the topography of nanofibers prepared by codeposition were smoother. Protein and microbial antifouling performance of the zwitterion modified nanofiber mats along with two controls, cellulose (unmodified) and PDA coated nanofiber mats were evaluated by dynamic protein fouling and prolonged bacterial exposure. Following 21 days of exposure to bovine serum albumin, the sequential nanofiber mats significantly resisted protein fouling, as indicated by their 95% flux recovery ratio in a water flux experiment, a 300% improvement over the cellulose nanofiber mats. When challenged with two model microbes Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus for 24 h, both zwitterion modifications demonstrated superior fouling resistance by statistically reducing microbial attachment over the two controls. This study demonstrates that, by decorating the surfaces of chemically and mechanically robust cellulose nanofiber mats with polyMPC, we can generate high performance, free-standing nanofiber mats that hold potential in applications where antifouling materials are imperative, such as tissue engineering scaffolds and water purification technologies.

  18. Mechanically-reinforced electrospun composite silk fibroin nanofibers containing hydroxyapatite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunryung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Che, Lihua; Ha, Yoon [Department of Neurosurgery, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, WonHyoung, E-mail: whryu@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Electrospun silk fibroin (SF) scaffolds provide large surface area, high porosity, and interconnection for cell adhesion and proliferation and they may replace collagen for many tissue engineering applications. Despite such advantages, electrospun SF scaffolds are still limited as bone tissue replacement due to their low mechanical strengths. While enhancement of mechanical strengths by incorporating inorganic ceramics into polymers has been demonstrated, electrospinning of a mixture of SF and inorganic ceramics such as hydroxyapatite is challenging and less studied due to the aggregation of ceramic particles within SF. In this study, we aimed to enhance the mechanical properties of electrospun SF scaffolds by uniformly dispersing hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles within SF nanofibers. HAp nanoaprticles were modified by γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) for uniform dispersion and enhanced interfacial bonding between HAp and SF fibers. Optimal conditions for electrospinning of SF and GPTMS-modified HAp nanoparticles were identified to achieve beadless nanofibers without any aggregation of HAp nanoparticles. The MTT and SEM analysis of the osteoblasts-cultured scaffolds confirmed the biocompatibility of the composite scaffolds. The mechanical properties of the composite scaffolds were analyzed by tensile tests for the scaffolds with varying contents of HAp within SF fibers. The mechanical testing showed the peak strengths at the HAp content of 20 wt.%. The increase of HAp content up to 20 wt.% increased the mechanical properties of the composite scaffolds, while further increase above 20 wt.% disrupted the polymer chain networks within SF nanofibers and weakened the mechanical strengths. - Highlights: • Electrospun composite silk fibroin scaffolds were mechanically-reinforced. • GPTMS enhanced hydroxyapatite distribution in silk fibroin nanofibers. • Mechanical property of composite scaffolds increased up to 20% of hydroxyapatite. • Composite

  19. Electrospinning of Chitosan-Xanthan Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shekarforoush, Elhamalsadat; Mendes, Ana Carina Loureiro; Chronakis, Ioannis S.

    Electrospun chitosan-xanthan gum nanofibers were produced and the correlation between the rheological properties of chitosan-xanthan solutions and electrospinability were investigated at different xanthan gum concentrations. Uniform chitosan-xanthan nanofibers with diameters ranging from 382......+182 to 842+296 nm were developed based on the chitosan-xanthan gum content. Overall chitosan-xanthan gum solutions exhibited shear thinning behavior for all the concentrations tested, which tended to increase with the increase of concentration of xanthan. Furthermore the electrical conductivity...... of the chitosan-xanthan solutions was observed to increase with the increase of xanthan gum concentrations. We can conclude that the optimal electrospinning process is directed by the apparent viscosity properties and the electrical conductivity of the chitosan-xanthan solutions. We are currently investigating...

  20. Temperature responsive hydrogel nanofibers and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruokolainen, Janne

    2011-03-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) is one of the most extensively investigated synthetic temperature-responsive polymers. In this work temperature-responsive PNIPAM based triblock copolymer hydrogels, their self-assembly and phase behavior in bulk, are described. Additionally, recent results from responsive hydrogel nanofibers and hydrogel nanoparticles are shown. It is known that block copolymers form well-organized nano structures in bulk or thin films when annealed thermally or in solvent vapours. However, in the case of nanofibers or nanoparticles, the annealing leads in most cases to aggregation and particle sintering. This work utilizes aerosol-based gas phase method where the preparation and annealing of hydrogel nanoparticles with well-organized, hierarchical inner structures are performed without any particle coagulation or sintering. In the method, the block copolymers assemble within aerosol nanoparticles to form, for instance, lamellar onion-like or gyroid inner structures.

  1. Process Dependence of Cellulose Nanofiber Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Doug; Zhang, Xin; Mao, Yimin; Jang, Soo-Hwan; Hu, Liangbing; Briber, Robert; Wang, Howard

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) are the most abundant natural nanomaterial on earth with potential applications in renewable energy, polymer nanocomposites and flexible electronics. CNF can be produced through TEMPO oxidation which separates the hierarchical structure of cellulose fibers into smaller micro- and nanofibers by altering their surface chemistry, inducing a repulsive electrostatic charge on the fibers. This work will examine the structural evolution of CNF during production. Samples were prepared by removing and quenching aliquots during the TEMPO reaction. The fibers were washed, filtered and re-dispersed into D2O for small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. The SANS data was analyzed to track the changes in the CNF structure as a function of reaction time.

  2. Photopatterned conjugated polymer electrochromic nanofibers on paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A; Asemota, C; Invernale, M; Sotzing, G A [Department of Chemistry and the Polymer Program, 97, N. Eagleville Road, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT-06269-3136 (United States); Padilla, J; Otero, T F [Center for Electrochemistry and Intelligent Materials C/Carlos III s/n, Campus Alfonso XIII, Polytechnic University of Cartagena, 30203 (Spain)], E-mail: sotzing@ims.uconn.edu

    2008-08-15

    Electrochromic nanofibers of conducting polymer (terthiophene) have been deposited over a conventional paper sheet by means of the electrospinning technique, and subsequently photopatterned by means of UV radiation. The synthesis of a processable precursor copolymer with a norbornylene matrix and pendant units of terthiophene makes the electrospinning process available, and allows for chemical or electrochemical crosslinking of the precursor copolymer to obtain a conducting polymer. The inclusion of photocrosslinkable units (methacrylate) in the precursor copolymer also allows for photopatterning of the material. This was applied to obtain patterns on the paper which can be chemically oxidized or reduced resulting in electrochromic characters. SEM images of the conducting polymer nanofibers together with the cellulose fibers show how these materials can be attached to textile fibers, adding new functionalities that are reminiscent of the chameleonic abilities of some living creatures.

  3. General strategy for fabricating thoroughly mesoporous nanofibers

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Huilin

    2014-12-03

    Recently, preparation of mesoporous fibers has attracted extensive attentions because of their unique and broad applications in photocatalysis, optoelectronics, and biomaterials. However, it remains a great challenge to fabricate thoroughly mesoporous nanofibers with high purity and uniformity. Here, we report a general, simple and cost-effective strategy, namely, foaming-assisted electrospinning, for producing mesoporous nanofibers with high purity and enhanced specific surface areas. As a proof of concept, the as-fabricated mesoporous TiO2 fibers exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity and stability than both the conventional solid counterparts and the commercially available P25. The abundant vapors released from the introduced foaming agents are responsible for the creation of pores with uniform spatial distribution in the spun precursor fibers. The present work represents a critically important step in advancing the electrospinning technique for generating mesoporous fibers in a facile and universal manner.

  4. Optical Micro- and Nanofiber Pulling Rig

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, J M; Le, Vu H; Chormaic, S Nic

    2014-01-01

    We review the method of producing adiabatic optical micro- and nanofibers using a hydrogen/oxygen flame brushing technique. The flame is scanned along the fiber, which is being simultaneously stretched by two translation stages. The tapered fiber fabrication is reproducible and yields highly adiabatic tapers with either exponential or linear profiles. Details regarding the setup of the flame brushing rig and the various parameters used are presented. Information available from the literature is compiled and further details that are necessary to have a functioning pulling rig are included. This should enable the reader to fabricate various taper profiles, while achieving adiabatic transmission of ~ 99% for fundamental mode propagation. Using this rig, transmissions greater than 90% for higher order modes in an optical nanofiber have been obtained.

  5. Controlled Angiogenesis in Peptide Nanofiber Composite Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Wickremasinghe, Navindee C.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Shi, Siyu; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Multidomain peptide (MDP) nanofibers create scaffolds that can present bioactive cues to promote biological responses. Orthogonal self-assembly of MDPs and growth-factor-loaded liposomes generate supramolecular composite hydrogels. These composites can act as delivery vehicles with time-controlled release. Here we examine the controlled release of placental growth factor-1 (PlGF-1) for its ability to induce angiogenic responses. PlGF-1 was loaded either in MDP matrices or within liposomes bou...

  6. Carbon nanofibers encapsulated in macropores in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkov, V.; Red' kin, A. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High Purity Materials, RAS, Institutskaya str. 6, Chernogolovka 142432 (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-15

    This work reports on the development of fuel cells electrodes with a porous silicon structure and carbon nanofibers encapsulated in macropores in silicon. It is demonstrated that decomposition of carbon on a Ni catalyst deposited on the pore walls can be used to create a homogeneous carbon nanotube layer that dramatically increases the specific surface area while simultaneously reducing the resistivity of the macroporous silicon layer. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Multifunctional Composite Nanofibers for Smart Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    translated to the composite nanofibrous structures in the form of nonwovens and yarns? (3) Can these functional composite fibers be integrated into...nanoparticles were co- electrospun into nonwoven mat and over meter long yarn. The SEM and TEM image in Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...functional composite nanofiber structures (yarn and nonwoven ) characterized we explored the feasibility of integrating these functional composite fibers into

  8. Carbonized Electrospun Nanofiber Sheets for Thermophones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliev, Ali E; Perananthan, Sahila; Ferraris, John P

    2016-11-16

    Thermoacoustic performance of thin freestanding sheets of carbonized poly(acrylonitrile) and polybenzimidazole nanofibers are studied as promising candidates for thermophones. We analyze thermodynamic properties of sheets using transport parameters of single nanofibers and their aligned and randomly electrospun thin film assemblies. The electrical and thermal conductivities, thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, and infrared blackbody radiation are investigated to extract the heat exchange coefficient and enhance the energy conversion efficiency. Spectral and power dependencies of sound pressure in air are compared with carbon nanotube sheets and theoretical prediction. Despite lower thermoacoustic performance compared to that of CNT sheets, the mechanical strength and cost-effective production technology of thermophones make them very attractive for large-size sound projectors. The advantages of carbonized electrospun polymer nanofiber sheets are in the low frequency domain (<1000 Hz), where the large thermal diffusion length diminishes the thermal inertia of thick (∼200 nm) nonbundled fibers and the high intrinsic thermal conductivity of fibers enhances the heat exchange coefficient. Applications of thermoacoustic projectors for loudspeakers, high power SONAR arrays, and sound cancellation are discussed.

  9. Perspectives: Nanofibers and nanowires for disordered photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Pisignano

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As building blocks of microscopically non-homogeneous materials, semiconductor nanowires and polymer nanofibers are emerging component materials for disordered photonics, with unique properties of light emission and scattering. Effects found in assemblies of nanowires and nanofibers include broadband reflection, significant localization of light, strong and collective multiple scattering, enhanced absorption of incident photons, synergistic effects with plasmonic particles, and random lasing. We highlight recent related discoveries, with a focus on material aspects. The control of spatial correlations in complex assemblies during deposition, the coupling of modes with efficient transmission channels provided by nanofiber waveguides, and the embedment of random architectures into individually coded nanowires will allow the potential of these photonic materials to be fully exploited, unconventional physics to be highlighted, and next-generation optical devices to be achieved. The prospects opened by this technology include enhanced random lasing and mode-locking, multi-directionally guided coupling to sensors and receivers, and low-cost encrypting miniatures for encoders and labels.

  10. Cooperative Switching in Nanofibers of Azobenzene Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christopher; Liebig, Tobias; Gensler, Manuel; Zykov, Anton; Pithan, Linus; Rabe, Jürgen P.; Hecht, Stefan; Bléger, David; Kowarik, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Next-generation molecular devices and machines demand the integration of molecular switches into hierarchical assemblies to amplify the response of the system from the molecular level to the meso- or macro-scale. Here, we demonstrate that multi-azobenzene oligomers can assemble to form robust supramolecular nanofibers in which they can be switched repeatedly between the E- and Z-configuration. While in isolated oligomers the azobenzene units undergo reversible photoisomerization independently, in the nanofibers they are coupled via intermolecular interactions and switch cooperatively as evidenced by unusual thermal and kinetic behavior. We find that the photoisomerization rate from the Z-isomer to the E-isomer depends on the fraction of Z-azobenzene in the nanofibers, and is increased by more than a factor of 4 in Z-rich fibers when compared to E-rich fibers. This demonstrates the great potential of coupling individual photochromic units for increasing their quantum efficiency in the solid state with potential relevance for actuation and sensing.

  11. Nanomembranes and Nanofibers from Biodegradable Conducting Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Puiggalí

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a current status report of the field concerning preparation of fibrous mats based on biodegradable (e.g., aliphatic polyesters such as polylactide or polycaprolactone and conducting polymers (e.g., polyaniline, polypirrole or polythiophenes. These materials have potential biomedical applications (e.g., tissue engineering or drug delivery systems and can be combined to get free-standing nanomembranes and nanofibers that retain the better properties of their corresponding individual components. Systems based on biodegradable and conducting polymers constitute nowadays one of the most promising solutions to develop advanced materials enable to cover aspects like local stimulation of desired tissue, time controlled drug release and stimulation of either the proliferation or differentiation of various cell types. The first sections of the review are focused on a general overview of conducting and biodegradable polymers most usually employed and the explanation of the most suitable techniques for preparing nanofibers and nanomembranes (i.e., electrospinning and spin coating. Following sections are organized according to the base conducting polymer (e.g., Sections 4–6 describe hybrid systems having aniline, pyrrole and thiophene units, respectively. Each one of these sections includes specific subsections dealing with applications in a nanofiber or nanomembrane form. Finally, miscellaneous systems and concluding remarks are given in the two last sections.

  12. Polyurethane nanofibers containing copper nanoparticles as future materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Faheem A.; Kanjwal, Muzafar A.; Saran, Saurabh; Chung, Wook-Jin; Kim, Hern

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to represent a novel approach to fabricate polyurethane nanofibers containing copper nanoparticles (NPs) by simple electrospinning process. A simple method, not depending on additional foreign chemicals, has been employed to utilize prepared copper NPs in polyurethane nanofibers. Typically, a colloidal gel consisting of copper NPs and polyurethane has been electrospun. SEM-EDX and TEM results confirmed well oriented nanofibers and good dispersion of pure copper NPs. Copper NPs have diameter in the range of 5-10 nm. The thermal stability of the synthesized nanofibers was examined for identifying the proper settlement of copper NPs among the nanofibers, according to the concentrations used in original solutions. Furthermore, XRD results well demonstrated crystalline feature of copper NPs. Model microorganisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtillus had been used to check the antimicrobial efficacy of these nanofiber mats. Subsequently, antimicrobial tests have indicated that the prepared nanofibers do posses good bactericidal effect. Accordingly, it is noted that the obtained nanofiber mats can be used as future filter membranes with good antimicrobial activities.

  13. Surface structure enhanced second harmonic generation in organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kostiucenko, Oksana;

    Second-harmonic generation upon femto-second laser irradiation of nonlinearly optically active nanofibers grown from nonsymmetrically functionalized para-quarterphenylene (CNHP4) molecules is investigated. Following growth on mica templates, the nanofibers have been transferred onto lithography-d...

  14. The photophysics of luminescence in multilayered organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Quochi, Francesco; Simbrunner, Clemens

    Multilayered crystalline nanofibers are exemplary model system for the study of exciton dynamics and lasing in organic materials due to their well-defined morphology, high luminescence efficiencies, and color tunability. The multi-layered nanofibers are composed of alternating layers of two...

  15. Blow spinning of food-grade-gelatin nanofibers (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanofibers have been examined for many diverse applications, including catalysis, filtration, controlled release of drugs and active agents, sensor, and tissue engineering and as texturized food ingredients. The primary advantage of nanofibers over larger diameter fibers is the larger surface area t...

  16. Direct fabrication of cerium oxide hollow nanofibers by electrospinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Qizheng; DONG Xiangting; WANG Jinxian; LI Mei

    2008-01-01

    Electrospinning technique was used to fabricate PVP/Ce(NO3)3 composite mierofibers. Different morphological CeO2 nanofibers were obtained by calcination of the PVP/Ce(NO3)3 composite microfibers and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), and (FHR). SEM micrographs indicated that the surface of the composite fibers was smooth and became coarse with the increase of calcination temperatures. The diameters of CeO2 hollow nanofibers (300 nm at 600 ℃ and 600 nm at 800 ℃) were smaller than those of PVP/Ce(NO3)3 composite fibers (1-2 μm). CeO2 hollow nanofibers were obtained at 600 ℃ and CeO2 hollow and porous nanofibers formed by nanoparti-ties were obtained at 800 ℃. The length of the CeO2 hollow nanofibers was greater than 50 μm. XRD analysis revealed that the composite microfibers were amorphous in structure and CeO2 nanofibers were cubic in structure with space groupO5H-FM3m when calcination tem-peratures were 600-800 ℃. TG-DTA and FTIR revealed that the formation of CeO2 nanofibers was largely influenced by the calcination temperatures. Possible formation mechanism of CeO2 hollow nanofibers was proposed.

  17. Myocardial Cell Pattern on Piezoelectric Nanofiber Mats for Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Wang, X.; Zhao, H.; Du, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents in vitro contractile myocardial cell pattern on piezoelectric nanofiber mats with applications in energy harvesting. The cell-based energy harvester consists of myocardial cell sheet and a PDMS substrate with a PVDF nanofiber mat on. Experimentally, cultured on specifically distributed nanofiber mats, neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes are characterized with the related morphology and contraction. Previously, we have come up with the concept of energy harvesting from heart beating using piezoelectric material. A bio-hybrid energy harvester combined living cardiomyocytes, PDMS polymer substrate and piezoelectric PVDF film with the electrical output of peak current 87.5nA and peak voltage 92.3mV. However, the thickness of the cardiomyocyte cultured on a two-dimensional substrate is much less than that of the piezoelectric film. The Micro Contact Printing (μCP) method used in cell pattern on the PDMS thin film has tough requirement for the film surface. As such, in this paper we fabricated nanofiber-constructed PDMS thin film to realize cell pattern due to PVDF nanofibers with better piezoelectricity and microstructures of nanofiber mats guiding cell distribution. Living cardiomyocytes patterned on those distributed piezoelectric nanofibers with the result of the same distribution as the nanofiber pattern.

  18. Fabrication of NiO/zirconium oxide nanofibers by electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundarrajan, Subramanian, E-mail: sundarnus1@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, NUS, 117576 (Singapore); Venkatesan, Arunachalam; Agarwal, Satya R.; Shaik Anwar Ahamed, Nabeela Nasreen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, NUS, 117576 (Singapore); Ramakrishna, Seeram, E-mail: seeram@nus.edu.sg [Department of Mechanical Engineering, NUS, 117576 (Singapore); King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 117602 (Singapore)

    2014-12-01

    The electrospinning technique has been used to fabricate 1D inorganic–organic composite nanofibers from solutions containing poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and suitable aqueous precursors of nickel and zirconium ions. Upon calcination, nickel oxide/zirconia nanofibers retained the original morphological features of as-spun nanofibers. X-ray diffraction was used to identify the crystalline nature of the final product and analytical tools such as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to elucidate the pathway of ceramic phase formation and the systematic evolution of morphological features in the as-spun and calcined fibers. These fibers will find potential applications in biomedical field. - Highlights: • PVA/NiO/zirconia composite nanofibers were synthesized via electrospinning. • Green processing of nanofibers using only water as solvent. • Calcination of composite nanofibers to yield ceramic nanofibers. • High aspect ratio nanofibers with diameters 106 ± 25 nm • The application of these fibers as dental composites and bone tissue engineering.

  19. UV-responsive polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers prepared by electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Zeeshan; Ali, Shamshad; Khatri, Imran; Mayakrishnan, Gopiraman; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Ick-Soo

    2015-07-01

    We report UV-responsive polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers for potential application for recording and erasing quick response (QR) codes. We incorporate 1‧-3‧-dihydro-8-methoxy-1‧,3‧,3‧-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro [2H-1-benzopyran-2,2‧-(2H)-indole] (indole) and,3-dihydro-1,3,3-trimethylspiro [2H-indole-2,3‧-[3H] phenanthr [9,10-b] (1,4) oxazine] (oxazine) into PVA polymer matrix via electrospinning technique. The resultant nanofibers were measured for recording-erasing, photo-coloration and thermal reversibility. The rate of photo-coloration of PVA-indole nanofibers was five times higher than the PVA-oxazine nanofibers, whereas the thermal reversibility found to be more than twice as fast as PVA-oxazine nanofibers. Results showed that the resultant nanofibers have very good capability of recording QR codes multiple times. The FTIR spectroscopy and SEM were employed to characterize the electrospun nanofibers. The UV-responsive PVA nanofibers have great potentials as a light-driven nanomaterials incorporated within sensors, sensitive displays and in optical devices such as erasable and rewritable optical storage.

  20. Development of braided drug-loaded nanofiber sutures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Wen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Huang Zhengming [School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Liu Xiangyang, E-mail: huangzm@tongji.edu.cn [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 (Singapore)

    2010-08-06

    The objectives of this work are twofold. Firstly, while most work on electrospinning is limited to the development of only functional materials, a structural application of electrospun nanofibers is explored. Secondly, a drug-loaded tissue suture is fabricated and its various properties are characterized. Braided drug-loaded nanofiber sutures are obtained by combining an electrospinning process with a braiding technique followed by a coating procedure. Two different electrospinning techniques, i.e. blend and coaxial electrospinning, to incorporate a model drug cefotaxime sodium (CFX-Na) into poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibers have been applied and compared with each other. Properties of the braided drug-loaded sutures are characterized through a variety of methods including SEM, TEM and tensile testing. The results show that the nanofibers had a preferable micromorphology. The drug was incorporated into the polymer nanofibers homogeneously, with no cross-linking. The nanofibers maintained their fibrous structures. An in vitro release study indicates that the drug-loaded nanofibers fabricated by blend electrospinning and coaxial electrospinning had a different drug release behavior. An inhibition zone experiment shows that both sutures obtained from the nanofibers of the different electrospinning techniques had favorable antibacterial properties. The drug-loaded sutures had preferable histological compatibility performance compared with commercial silk sutures in an in vivo comparative study.

  1. PROFESSOR TEJ PAL SINGH: THE LEGEND OF INDIAN MACROMOLECULAR CRYSTALLOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Imtaiyaz Hassan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Professor Tej Pal Singh, an internationally recognized Indian scientist par excellence, is one of the pioneers of Indian macromolecular crystallography. He is a person of significant and enduring accomplishments as a teacher, scientist, administrator and family man. He has developed various methods to crystallize wide varieties of proteins. He has successfully determined crystal structures of lactoferrin, phospholipase A2, lactoperoxidase, peptidoglycan recognition proteins, disintegrin, zinc-α2-glycoprotein and several others including various protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes. He has a remarkably high number of structural entries in protein data bank. He received most of the prestigious awards and honors by Indian Government. This article covers most of his research and other achievements which will be a source of inspiration for young scientific community, motivation for peers and joy for his fellow colleagues and friends.

  2. Detecting stoichiometry of macromolecular complexes in live cells using FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Johny, Manu; Yue, Daniel N.; Yue, David T.

    2016-01-01

    The stoichiometry of macromolecular interactions is fundamental to cellular signalling yet challenging to detect from living cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful phenomenon for characterizing close-range interactions whereby a donor fluorophore transfers energy to a closely juxtaposed acceptor. Recognizing that FRET measured from the acceptor's perspective reports a related but distinct quantity versus the donor, we utilize the ratiometric comparison of the two to obtain the stoichiometry of a complex. Applying this principle to the long-standing controversy of calmodulin binding to ion channels, we find a surprising Ca2+-induced switch in calmodulin stoichiometry with Ca2+ channels—one calmodulin binds at basal cytosolic Ca2+ levels while two calmodulins interact following Ca2+ elevation. This feature is curiously absent for the related Na channels, also potently regulated by calmodulin. Overall, our assay adds to a burgeoning toolkit to pursue quantitative biochemistry of dynamic signalling complexes in living cells. PMID:27922011

  3. An analysis of fractal geometry of macromolecular gelation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左榘; 陈天红; 冉少峰; 何炳林; 董宝中; 生文君; 杨恒林

    1996-01-01

    With fractal geometry theory and based on experiments, an analysis of fractal geometry behavior of gelation of macromolecules was carried out. Using the cross-linking copolymerization of styrene-divinylbenzene (DVB) as an example, through the determinations of the evolution of the molecular weight, size and the dependence of scattering intensity on the angle of macromolecules by employing laser and synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering, respectively, this chemical reaction was described quantitatively, its fractal behavior was analyzed and the fractal dimension was also measured. By avoiding the complex theories on gelation, this approach is based on modern physical techniques and theories to perform the analysis of the behavior of fractal geometry of macromolecular gelation and thus is able to reveal the rules of this kind of complicated gelation more essentially and profoundly.

  4. Revealing the macromolecular targets of complex natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reker, Daniel; Perna, Anna M.; Rodrigues, Tiago; Schneider, Petra; Reutlinger, Michael; Mönch, Bettina; Koeberle, Andreas; Lamers, Christina; Gabler, Matthias; Steinmetz, Heinrich; Müller, Rolf; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Werz, Oliver; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-12-01

    Natural products have long been a source of useful biological activity for the development of new drugs. Their macromolecular targets are, however, largely unknown, which hampers rational drug design and optimization. Here we present the development and experimental validation of a computational method for the discovery of such targets. The technique does not require three-dimensional target models and may be applied to structurally complex natural products. The algorithm dissects the natural products into fragments and infers potential pharmacological targets by comparing the fragments to synthetic reference drugs with known targets. We demonstrate that this approach results in confident predictions. In a prospective validation, we show that fragments of the potent antitumour agent archazolid A, a macrolide from the myxobacterium Archangium gephyra, contain relevant information regarding its polypharmacology. Biochemical and biophysical evaluation confirmed the predictions. The results obtained corroborate the practical applicability of the computational approach to natural product ‘de-orphaning’.

  5. Macromolecularly "Caged" Carbon Nanoparticles for Intracellular Trafficking via Switchable Photoluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Santosh K; Srivastava, Indrajit; Tripathi, Indu; Daza, Enrique; Ostadhossein, Fatemeh; Pan, Dipanjan

    2017-02-08

    Reversible switching of photoluminescence (PL) of carbon nanoparticles (CNP) can be achieved with counterionic macromolecular caging and decaging at the nanoscale. A negatively charged uncoated, "bare" CNP with high luminescence loses its PL when positively charged macromolecules are wrapped around its surface. Prepared caged carbons could regain their emission only through interaction with anionic surfactant molecules, representing anionic amphiphiles of endocytic membranes. This process could be verified by gel electrophoresis, spectroscopically and in vitro confocal imaging studies. Results indicated for the first time that luminescence switchable CNPs can be synthesized for efficient intracellular tracking. This study further supports the origin of photoluminescence in CNP as a surface phenomenon correlated a function of characteristic charged macromolecules.

  6. On macromolecular refinement at subatomic resolution withinteratomic scatterers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonine, Pavel V.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Adams, Paul D.; Lunin, Vladimir Y.; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre

    2007-11-09

    A study of the accurate electron density distribution in molecular crystals at subatomic resolution, better than {approx} 1.0 {angstrom}, requires more detailed models than those based on independent spherical atoms. A tool conventionally used in small-molecule crystallography is the multipolar model. Even at upper resolution limits of 0.8-1.0 {angstrom}, the number of experimental data is insufficient for the full multipolar model refinement. As an alternative, a simpler model composed of conventional independent spherical atoms augmented by additional scatterers to model bonding effects has been proposed. Refinement of these mixed models for several benchmark datasets gave results comparable in quality with results of multipolar refinement and superior of those for conventional models. Applications to several datasets of both small- and macro-molecules are shown. These refinements were performed using the general-purpose macromolecular refinement module phenix.refine of the PHENIX package.

  7. Protein Coevolution and Isoexpression in Yeast Macromolecular Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Ettwiller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that genes encoding subunits of macromolecular complexes have similar evolutionary rates (K and expression levels (E. Besides, it is known that the expression of a gene is a strong predictor of its rate of evolution (i.e., E and K are correlated. Here we show that intracomplex variation of subunit expression correlates with intracomplex variation of their evolutionary rates (using two different measures of dispersion. However, a similar trend was observed for randomized complexes. Therefore, using a mathematical transformation, we created new variables capturing intracomplex variation of both E and K. The values of these new compound variables were smaller for real complexes than for randomized ones. This shows that proteins in complexes tend to have closer expressivities (E and K's simultaneously than in the randomly grouped genes. We speculate about the possible implications of this finding.

  8. [Progress in researches on synthetic antimicrobial macromolecular polymers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gang; Yang, Lihua; Chu, Liangyin

    2010-08-01

    Broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides provide a new way to address the urgent growing problem of bacterial resistance. However, the limited natural resources and the high cost of extraction and purification of natural antimicrobial peptides can not meet the requirements of clinical application. In order to solve this problem, researchers have utilized two basic common structural features (amphiphilic and cationic) for designing and preparing synthetic antimicrobial macromolecular polymers. During the last decade, several kinds of amphiphilic polymers, including arylamide oligomers, phenylene ethynylenes, polymethacrylates, polynorbornenes as well as nylon-3 polymers have been synthesized. In this paper, the structures, antibacterial activities and selectivities of these polymers are reviewed, and the effects of molecular size, polarity and ratio of hydrophobic groups, positive charge density on antibacterial activity and selectivity are also summarized.

  9. Macromolecular Crystallization with Microfluidic Free-Interface Diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segelke, B

    2005-02-24

    Fluidigm released the Topaz 1.96 and 4.96 crystallization chips in the fall of 2004. Topaz 1.96 and 4.96 are the latest evolution of Fluidigm's microfluidics crystallization technologies that enable ultra low volume rapid screening for macromolecular crystallization. Topaz 1.96 and 4.96 are similar to each other but represent a major redesign of the Topaz system and have of substantially improved ease of automation and ease of use, improved efficiency and even further reduced amount of material needed. With the release of the new Topaz system, Fluidigm continues to set the standard in low volume crystallization screening which is having an increasing impact in the field of structural genomics, and structural biology more generally. In to the future we are likely to see further optimization and increased utility of the Topaz crystallization system, but we are also likely to see further innovation and the emergence of competing technologies.

  10. In-vacuum long-wavelength macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Armin; Duman, Ramona; Henderson, Keith; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy

    2016-03-01

    Structure solution based on the weak anomalous signal from native (protein and DNA) crystals is increasingly being attempted as part of synchrotron experiments. Maximizing the measurable anomalous signal by collecting diffraction data at longer wavelengths presents a series of technical challenges caused by the increased absorption of X-rays and larger diffraction angles. A new beamline at Diamond Light Source has been built specifically for collecting data at wavelengths beyond the capability of other synchrotron macromolecular crystallography beamlines. Here, the theoretical considerations in support of the long-wavelength beamline are outlined and the in-vacuum design of the endstation is discussed, as well as other hardware features aimed at enhancing the accuracy of the diffraction data. The first commissioning results, representing the first in-vacuum protein structure solution, demonstrate the promising potential of the beamline.

  11. Extracting trends from two decades of microgravity macromolecular crystallization history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Russell A.; Snell, Edward H.; van der Woerd, Mark J.

    2005-01-01

    Since the 1980s hundreds of macromolecular crystal growth experiments have been performed in the reduced acceleration environment of an orbiting spacecraft. Significant enhancements in structural knowledge have resulted from X-ray diffraction of the crystals grown. Similarly, many samples have shown no improvement or degradation in comparison to those grown on the ground. A complex series of interrelated factors affect these experiments and by building a comprehensive archive of the results it was aimed to identify factors that result in success and those that result in failure. Specifically, it was found that dedicated microgravity missions increase the chance of success when compared with those where crystallization took place as a parasitic aspect of the mission. It was also found that the chance of success could not be predicted based on any discernible property of the macromolecule available to us.

  12. Large-volume protein crystal growth for neutron macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Joseph D; Baird, James K; Coates, Leighton; Garcia-Ruiz, Juan M; Hodge, Teresa A; Huang, Sijay

    2015-04-01

    Neutron macromolecular crystallography (NMC) is the prevailing method for the accurate determination of the positions of H atoms in macromolecules. As neutron sources are becoming more available to general users, finding means to optimize the growth of protein crystals to sizes suitable for NMC is extremely important. Historically, much has been learned about growing crystals for X-ray diffraction. However, owing to new-generation synchrotron X-ray facilities and sensitive detectors, protein crystal sizes as small as in the nano-range have become adequate for structure determination, lessening the necessity to grow large crystals. Here, some of the approaches, techniques and considerations for the growth of crystals to significant dimensions that are now relevant to NMC are revisited. These include experimental strategies utilizing solubility diagrams, ripening effects, classical crystallization techniques, microgravity and theoretical considerations.

  13. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Evolving Methods for Macromolecular Gystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Read, Randy J

    2007-01-01

    X-ray crystallography is the pre-eminent technique for visualizing the structures of macromolecules at atomic resolution. These structures are central to understanding the detailed mechanisms of biological processes, and to discovering novel therapeutics using a structure-based approach. As yet, structures are known for only a small fraction of the proteins encoded by human and pathogenic genomes. To counter the myriad modern threats of disease, there is an urgent need to determine the structures of the thousands of proteins whose structure and function remain unknown. This volume draws on the expertise of leaders in the field of macromolecular crystallography to illuminate the dramatic developments that are accelerating progress in structural biology. Their contributions span the range of techniques from crystallization through data collection, structure solution and analysis, and show how modern high-throughput methods are contributing to a deeper understanding of medical problems.

  14. Macromolecular and dendrimer-based magnetic resonance contrast agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bumb, Ambika; Brechbiel, Martin W. (Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)), e-mail: pchoyke@mail.nih.gov; Choyke, Peter (Molecular Imaging Program, National Cancer Inst., National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    2010-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful imaging modality that can provide an assessment of function or molecular expression in tandem with anatomic detail. Over the last 20-25 years, a number of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents have been developed to enhance signal by altering proton relaxation properties. This review explores a range of these agents from small molecule chelates, such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, to macromolecular structures composed of albumin, polylysine, polysaccharides (dextran, inulin, starch), poly(ethylene glycol), copolymers of cystamine and cystine with GD-DTPA, and various dendritic structures based on polyamidoamine and polylysine (Gadomers). The synthesis, structure, biodistribution, and targeting of dendrimer-based MR contrast agents are also discussed

  15. Radiation damage to nucleoprotein complexes in macromolecular crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Charles; Garman, Elspeth F.; Ginn, Helen Mary [University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU (United Kingdom); Ravelli, Raimond B. G. [Maastricht University, PO Box 616, Maastricht 6200 MD (Netherlands); Carmichael, Ian [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Kneale, Geoff; McGeehan, John E., E-mail: john.mcgeehan@port.ac.uk [University of Portsmouth, King Henry 1st Street, Portsmouth PO1 2DY (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-30

    Quantitative X-ray induced radiation damage studies employing a model protein–DNA complex revealed a striking partition of damage sites. The DNA component was observed to be far more resistant to specific damage compared with the protein. Significant progress has been made in macromolecular crystallography over recent years in both the understanding and mitigation of X-ray induced radiation damage when collecting diffraction data from crystalline proteins. In contrast, despite the large field that is productively engaged in the study of radiation chemistry of nucleic acids, particularly of DNA, there are currently very few X-ray crystallographic studies on radiation damage mechanisms in nucleic acids. Quantitative comparison of damage to protein and DNA crystals separately is challenging, but many of the issues are circumvented by studying pre-formed biological nucleoprotein complexes where direct comparison of each component can be made under the same controlled conditions. Here a model protein–DNA complex C.Esp1396I is employed to investigate specific damage mechanisms for protein and DNA in a biologically relevant complex over a large dose range (2.07–44.63 MGy). In order to allow a quantitative analysis of radiation damage sites from a complex series of macromolecular diffraction data, a computational method has been developed that is generally applicable to the field. Typical specific damage was observed for both the protein on particular amino acids and for the DNA on, for example, the cleavage of base-sugar N{sub 1}—C and sugar-phosphate C—O bonds. Strikingly the DNA component was determined to be far more resistant to specific damage than the protein for the investigated dose range. At low doses the protein was observed to be susceptible to radiation damage while the DNA was far more resistant, damage only being observed at significantly higher doses.

  16. Biologically Active Polycaprolactone/Titanium Hybrid Electrospun Nanofibers for Hard Tissue Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Sheikh, Faheem A.; Al-Deyab, Salem S.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel strategy to improve the bioactivity of polycaprolactone nanofibers is proposed. Incorporation of pure titanium nanoparticles into polycaprolactone nanofibers strongly enhances the precipitation of bone-like apatite materials when the doped nanofibers are soaked in a simulat...... nanofiber mats and the successful incorporation of the titanium nanoparticles make the prepared polycaprolactone nanofiber mat a proper candidate for the hard-tissue engineering applications....

  17. Layered Perovskite Nanofibers via Electrospinning for Overall Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Nils C; Soldat, Julia; Marschall, Roland

    2015-05-06

    The (111)-layered perovskite materials Ba5 Ta4 O15 , Ba5 Ta2 Nb2 O15 and Ba5 Nb4 O15 are prepared with nanofiber morphology via electrospinning for the first time. The nanofibers are built up from small single crystals, with up to several micrometers length even after calcination. The formation mechanism is investigated in detail, revealing an intermediate formation of amorphous barium carbonate strengthening the nanofiber morphology for high temperature treatment. All nanofiber compounds are able to generate hydrogen without any co-catalyst in photocatalytic reformation of methanol. After photodeposition of Rh-Cr2 O3 co-catalysts, the nanofibers show better activity in overall water splitting compared to sol-gel-derived powders.

  18. Preparation of natural brucite nanofibers by the dispersion method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xu; Wen Ni; Wenping Li; Xingde Liu; Hailong Yang; Xiaoguang Yang

    2008-01-01

    The preparation of natural brucite nanofibers through dispersion by the wet process is described. The test results indicate that brucite fibers can be well dispersed by using sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (OT) as the dispersant at a dispersant/fiber mass ratio of 0.15:1, dispersing for 30 min at a water/solid mass ratio of 20:1. The prepared nanofibers were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It is shown that the prepared single brucite nanofiber is around 30 run in diameter and the talus of the nonsingle brucite nanofibers is about 50-150 nm in diameter. Natural brucite mineral fibers were treated by the dispersion method to obtain nanomaterials. These fibers have significant advantages over artificial nanofibers both in yield and in cost.

  19. A Nanofiber-Based Optical Conveyor Belt for Cold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Schneeweiss, Philipp; Mitsch, Rudolf; Reitz, Daniel; Vetsch, Eugen; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate optical transport of cold cesium atoms over millimeter-scale distances along an optical nanofiber. The atoms are trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice formed by a two-color evanescent field surrounding the nanofiber, far red- and blue-detuned with respect to the atomic transition. The blue-detuned field is a propagating nanofiber-guided mode while the red-detuned field is a standing-wave mode which leads to the periodic axial confinement of the atoms. Here, this standing wave is used for transporting the atoms along the nanofiber by mutually detuning the two counter-propagating fields which form the standing wave. The performance and limitations of the nanofiber-based transport are evaluated and possible applications are discussed.

  20. Study on the Electrospun CNTs/Polyacrylonitrile-Based Nanofiber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Qiao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available CNTs/PAN nanofibers were electrospun from PAN-based solution for the preparation of carbon nanofiber composites. The as-spun polyacrylonitrile-based nanofibers were hot-stretched by weighing metal in a temperature controlled oven. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to characterize the morphology of the nanofibers, which indicated that carbon nanotubes were dispersed well in the composites and were completely wrapped by PAN matrix. Because of the strong interfacial interaction between CNTs and PAN, the CNTs/PAN application performance will be enhanced correspondingly, such as the mechanical properties and the electrical conductivity. It was concluded that the hot-stretched CNTs/PAN nanofibers can be used as a potential precursor to produce high-performance carbon composites.

  1. Improved Electrical Conductivity of Carbon/Polyvinyl Alcohol Electrospun Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Shehata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofibers (CNFs gained much interest in the last few years due to their promising electrical, chemical, and mechanical characteristics. This paper investigates a new nanocomposite composed of carbon nanofibers hosted by PVA and both are integrated in one electrospun nanofibers web. This technique shows a simple and cheap way to offer a host for CNFs using traditional deposition techniques. The results show that electrical conductivity of the formed nanofibers has been improved up to 1.63 × 10−4 S/cm for CNFs of weight 2%. The peak temperature of mass loss through TGA measurements has been reduced by 2.3%. SEM images show the homogeneity of the formed PVA and carbon nanofibers in one web, with stretched CNFs after the electrospinning process. The formed nanocomposite can be used in wide variety of applications including nanoelectronics and gas adsorption.

  2. Superresolution measurement of nanofiber diameter by modes beating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, E. F.; Solano, P.; Hoffman, J. E.; Orozco, L. A.; Rolston, S. L.; Fatemi, F. K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanofibers are becoming an important tool in quantum information technologies for coupling photonics systems to atomic systems. Nondestructive techniques for characterizing these nanofibers prior to integration into an apparatus are desirable. In this work, we probe the light propagating in a fused silica optical nanofiber (750-nm-diameter) by coupling it evanescently to a 6- μm-diameter microfiber that is scanned along the nanofiber length. This technique is capable of observing all possible beat lengths among different propagating modes. The beat lengths are strongly dependent on the nanofiber diameter and refractive index of the fiber. The steep dependence has enabled measurements of the fiber diameter with sub-Angstrom sensitivity. The diameter extracted from the beat length measurements agrees with a measurement made using scanning electron microscopy. Work supported by NSF.

  3. Complex film of chitosan and carboxymethyl cellulose nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takuma; Nakaji-Hirabayashi, Tadashi; Masuyama, Kazuhira; Fujita, Satoshi; Kitano, Hiromi

    2016-03-01

    A polymer film composed of a mixture of chitosan (Ch) and carboxymethyl cellulose sodium salt (CMC) nanofibers was deposited on a glass surface. The thin film of the Ch-CMC mixture obtained was stable, and fibroblast adhesion to the film was lowest when the weight ratio of Ch to CMC was 4:6. The ζ-potential and contact angle of the mixture film indicated that a polyion complex of Ch and CMC was formed. The mechanical strength of the film composed of Ch-CMC nanofiber complexes was much higher than that of the film composed of Ch-water-soluble CMC complexes (non-nanofiber), likely because the entanglement of nanofibers was enhanced by electrostatic attractions. These results indicate that the charge-neutralized nanofiber film was highly effective in suppressing cell adhesion and therefore is a promising material for biomedical applications.

  4. Hierarchical interfaces induce high dielectric permittivity in nanocomposites containing TiO2@BaTiO3 nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Chen, Weiwei; Wang, Jianjun; Shen, Yang; Gu, Lin; Lin, Yuanhua; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2014-05-01

    Interface issues are common and crucial in nanocomposites or nanohybrid systems since the interface area is enormous on the nanoscale. In the 0-3 dimensional polymer nanocomposites, in which nano-inclusions (0-dimension) are embedded in a 3-dimensionally connected polymer matrix, enhanced dielectric permittivity could be induced by the interfacial polarization at the interfaces between the nano-inclusions and the polymer matrix. In this contribution, we propose and demonstrate that the topological structure of the interface plays an equally important role as the area of the interface in determining the dielectric polarization of polymer nanocomposites. TiO2 nanofibers embedded with BaTiO3 nanoparticles are prepared via electrospinning and then fused with polyvinyl difluoride (PVDF) into polymer nanocomposite films. Modulation of hierarchical interfaces is thus achieved for these nanocomposites. The confinement of these additional interfaces inside the TiO2 nanofibers leads to percolated networks formed by the interfacial regions. The dielectric permittivity of the polymer nanocomposites is thus enhanced by ~300% over the PVDF matrix at a low filler loading of 11 vol%. A phase-field simulation study indicates that the enhanced dielectric permittivity could be attributed to the increased polarization in the percolated interfacial regions inside the TiO2 nanofibers. The instantaneous electrical breakdown of the TiO2@BaTiO3 nanofibers studied by the in situ transmission electron microscopy method further reveals the striking feature that the breakdown behavior of the nanofibers changes from semiconductive to metallic with the incorporation of insulating BaTiO3 nanoparticles.Interface issues are common and crucial in nanocomposites or nanohybrid systems since the interface area is enormous on the nanoscale. In the 0-3 dimensional polymer nanocomposites, in which nano-inclusions (0-dimension) are embedded in a 3-dimensionally connected polymer matrix, enhanced dielectric

  5. Bioactive thermoresponsive polyblend nanofiber formulations for wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawar, Mahesh D. [Polymer Science and Engineering, National Chemical Laboratory, Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); MAEER' s Maharashtra Institute of Pharmacy S. No. 124, MIT Campus Paud Road, Kothrud, Pune 411 038 (India); Rathna, G.V.N., E-mail: rv.gundloori@ncl.res.in [Polymer Science and Engineering, National Chemical Laboratory, Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Agrawal, Shubhang [Polymer Science and Engineering, National Chemical Laboratory, Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008 (India); Kuchekar, Bhanudas S. [MAEER' s Maharashtra Institute of Pharmacy S. No. 124, MIT Campus Paud Road, Kothrud, Pune 411 038 (India)

    2015-03-01

    The rationale of this work is to develop new bioactive thermoresponsive polyblend nanofiber formulations for wound healing (topical). Various polymer compositions of thermoresponsive, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), egg albumen and poly(ε-caprolactone) blend solutions with and without a drug [gatifloxacin hydrochloride, Gati] were prepared. Non-woven nanofibers of various compositions were fabricated using an electrospinning technique. The morphology of the nanofibers was analyzed by an environmental scanning electron microscope. The morphology was influenced by the concentration of polymer, drug, and polymer blend composition. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed the shift in bands due to hydrogen ion interactions between polymers and drug. Thermogram of PNIPAM/PCL/EA with Gati recorded a shift in lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of PNIPAM. Similarly T{sub g} and melting temperature (T{sub m}) of PCL were shifted. X-ray diffraction patterns recorded a decrease in the crystalline state of PCL nanofibers and transformed crystalline drug to an amorphous state. In vitro release study of nanofibers with Gati showed initial rapid release up to 10 h, followed by slow and controlled release for 696 h (29 days). Nanofiber mats with Gati exhibited antibacterial properties to Staphylococcus aureus, supported suitable controlled drug release with in vitro cell viability and in vivo wound healing. - Highlights: • Thermoresponsive and bioactive nanofiber blends of PNIPAM/EA/PCL were fabricated. • Nanofiber blends favored initial rapid release, followed by controlled release. • In vitro cell viability of pure polymers and nanofiber blends was least toxic. • In vivo studies of drug loaded nanofiber mats recorded faster tissue regeneration.

  6. Production of Nanofibers Containing the Bioactive Compound C-Phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Felipe da Silva; Gettens, Juliana Garcia; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira; de Morais, Michele Greque; Moraes, Caroline Costa; Kalil, Susana Juliano

    2016-01-01

    C-phycocyanin (C-PC) is a water-soluble phycobiliprotein present in light-harvesting antenna system of cyanobacteria. The nanostructures have not been widely evaluated, precluding improvements in stability and application of the C-PC. Electrospun nanofibers have an extremely high specific surface area due to their small diameter, they can be produced from a wide variety of polymers, and they are successfully evaluated to increase the efficacy of antitumor drugs. The incorporation of C-PC into nanofibers would allow investigations of potential uses in alternative cancer treatments and tissue engineering scaffolds. In this paper, C-phycocyanin were incorporated into the polymer polyethylene oxide (PEO) in various concentrations for nanofiber production via an electrospinning process. Nanofibers structures were analyzed using digital optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermogravimetric analysis was performed on the pure starting compounds and the produced nanofibers. At a concentration of 2% (w/w) of PEO, nanofibers were not produced, and concentrations of 4% (w/w) of PEO failed to produce nanofibers of good quality. Solutions with 6% (w/w) PEO, 6% (w/w) PEO plus 1% (w/w) NaCI, and 8% (w/w) PEO promote the formation of bluish, homogeneous and bead-free nanofibers with average diameters varying between 542.1 and 759.9 nm, as evaluated by optical microscopy. SEM analysis showed that nanofibers produced from polymer solutions containing 6% (w/w) PEO, 1% (w/w) NaCl and 3% (w/w) C-PC have an average diameter of 295 nm. Thermogravimetric analysis detected an increase in thermal resistance with the incorporation of C-phycocyanin into nanofibers.

  7. Process optimization and empirical modeling for electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber precursor of carbon nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, S.Y.; Ren, J.; Vancso, G.J.

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafine fibers were spun from polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/N,N-dimethyl formamide (DMF) solution as a precursor of carbon nanofibers using a homemade electrospinning set-up. Fibers with diameter ranging from 200 nm to 1200 nm were obtained. Morphology of fibers and distribution of fiber diameter were i

  8. New applications for cellulose nanofibers: Rheological challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari-Nasrabad, Behzad

    Cellulose nanofibers (CNF) are an exciting new renewable material produced from wood fibers. Even at low solids content, CNF-water suspensions have a complex rheology that includes extreme shear-thinning as well as viscoelastic properties and a yield stress. In the rheology of CNF suspensions, the measurement method may influence the results due to wall-slippage, but it is unclear how the behavior near walls influences the measurement method and what process equipment can manipulate this material. Parallel-plate and vane geometries were utilized to compare yielding and flow of CNF suspensions obtained by steady-state shear and oscillatory rheological measurements. Four different methods were compared as techniques to obtain a yield stress. The results are compared to pressure driven flow in a tube. Cone and plate geometries were found to lead to sample ejection at low shear rates: floc-floc interactions can explain this ejection. The suspensions violated the Cox-Merz rule in a significant manner as a sign of containing weak gel structures and the formation of a water-rich layer near the solid boundaries. For suspensions lower than 3% solids, the yield stress measured with different procedures were within 20% of each other, but for high solids suspensions, differences among the methods could be as large as 100%; the water-rich layer formation likely is the cause of these results. Oscillatory methods are suggested as a technique to obtain yield stress values. The pressure driven flow results were consistent with the power-law line fitted to the parallel-plate geometry data from steady shear. The capability of the extrusion process was investigated for pumping CNF suspensions through different dies. The extrusion process resulted in acceptable pumping rates which was in good agreement with the mathematical model. However, attributable to the extreme shear-thinning behavior of CNF, the pressure counter-flow dominates the drag flow along the screw channel and does not

  9. A graph theoretical approach for assessing bio-macromolecular complex structural stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carpio, Carlos Adriel; Iulian Florea, Mihai; Suzuki, Ai; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Ichiishi, Eiichiro; Miyamoto, Akira

    2009-11-01

    Fast and proper assessment of bio macro-molecular complex structural rigidity as a measure of structural stability can be useful in systematic studies to predict molecular function, and can also enable the design of rapid scoring functions to rank automatically generated bio-molecular complexes. Based on the graph theoretical approach of Jacobs et al. [Jacobs DJ, Rader AJ, Kuhn LA, Thorpe MF (2001) Protein flexibility predictions using graph theory. Proteins: Struct Funct Genet 44:150-165] for expressing molecular flexibility, we propose a new scheme to analyze the structural stability of bio-molecular complexes. This analysis is performed in terms of the identification in interacting subunits of clusters of flappy amino acids (those constituting regions of potential internal motion) that undergo an increase in rigidity at complex formation. Gains in structural rigidity of the interacting subunits upon bio-molecular complex formation can be evaluated by expansion of the network of intra-molecular inter-atomic interactions to include inter-molecular inter-atomic interaction terms. We propose two indices for quantifying this change: one local, which can express localized (at the amino acid level) structural rigidity, the other global to express overall structural stability for the complex. The new system is validated with a series of protein complex structures reported in the protein data bank. Finally, the indices are used as scoring coefficients to rank automatically generated protein complex decoys.

  10. Functional 3-D cardiac co-culture model using bioactive chitosan nanofiber scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Ali; Collins, George; Yip, Derek; Cho, Cheul H

    2013-02-01

    , the cardiomyocyte-fibroblast co-cultures resulted in polarized cardiomyocyte morphology and retained their morphology and function for long-term culture. The Cx43 expression in the fibroblast co-culture was higher than the cardiomyocytes mono-culture and endothelial cells co-culture. In addition, fibroblast co-cultures demonstrated synchronized contractions involving large tissue-like cellular networks. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to test chitosan nanofiber scaffolds as a 3-D cardiac co-culture model. Our results demonstrate that chitosan nanofibers can serve as a potential scaffold that can retain cardiac structure and function. These studies will provide useful information to develop a strategy that allows us to generate engineered 3-D cardiac tissue constructs using biocompatible and biodegradable chitosan nanofiber scaffolds for many tissue engineering applications.

  11. Polysulfone nanofibers prepared by electrospinning and gas/jet-electrospinning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Yongyi; Zhu Puxin; Ye Hai; Niu Anjian; Gao Xushan; Wu Dacheng

    2006-01-01

    Polysulfone nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning.The electrospinning equipment was designed in a new way,wherein the spinneret was combined with a gas jet device.The intrinsic viscosity of the used polysulfone was 0.197 dL/g in dimethyl acetamide,which was also the solvent in electrospinning.The gas used in this gas jet/electrostatic spinning was nitrogen.The relationship between the process parameters and the average diameter of polysulfone nanofibers was investigated.The main process parameters studied in this work were the voltage,the flow rate of the spinning fluid,the distance between the spinneret and the nanofiber collector and the temperature in the spinning chamber.The other important factors determining the nanometer diameter were the spinning fluid properties including its viscosity,surface tension and electrical conductivity.The average diameter and the diameter distribution of electrospinning nanofibers were measured experimentally by using scanning electron microscopy.The diameter of polysnlfone nanofibers prepared by the gas jet/electrostatic spinning was in the range 50-500 nm.It was found that the diameter of nanofibers mainly depended on high voltage,the gap between the spinneret and the collector and the concentration of polymer solutions.It is concluded that the gas-jet/electrospinning is a better method than the conventional electrospinning,in that it makes the nanofibers finer and more uniform and exhibits higher efficiency in the process of electrospinning.

  12. Development of Protective Clothing against Nanoparticle Based on Electrospun Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Faccini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the development of efficient protective clothing against nanoparticulate aerosols is presented. Nanofibrous mats of polyamide 6 (PA6 were deposited onto a nonwoven viscose substrate by electrospinning technique. The influence of electrospinning parameters, including solution concentration, viscosity, and conductivity, was studied for the production of nonwovens with controlled fiber diameter showing a size distribution ranging from 66 to 195 nm. By varying several process parameters, textiles with different thickness of the nanofiber layer and thus air permeability were obtained. A hot-press lamination process using a thermoplastic resin as glue was applied to improve the adhesion of the nanofiber layer onto the textile support. After 1500 cycles of repeated compression and torsion, the nanofiber layer was still firmly attached to the support, while mechanical damage is visible in some areas. The penetration of NaCl particles with diameter ranging from 15 to 300 nm through the electrospun textiles was found to be strongly dependent on nanofiber layer thickness. A really thin nanofiber coating provides up to 80% retention of 20 nm size particles and over 50% retention of 200 nm size nanoparticles. Increasing the thickness of the nanofiber mat, the filtration efficiency was increased to over 99% along the whole nanoparticle range. The results obtained highlight the potential of nanofibers in the development of efficient personal protective equipments against nanoparticles.

  13. Nanofiber Anisotropic Conductive Films (ACF) for Ultra-Fine-Pitch Chip-on-Glass (COG) Interconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Suk, Kyung-Lim; Paik, Kyung-Wook

    2015-11-01

    Nanofiber anisotropic conductive films (ACF) were invented, by adapting nanofiber technology to ACF materials, to overcome the limitations of ultra-fine-pitch interconnection packaging, i.e. shorts and open circuits as a result of the narrow space between bumps and electrodes. For nanofiber ACF, poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) polymers were used as nanofiber polymer materials. For PVDF and PBS nanofiber ACF, conductive particles of diameter 3.5 μm were incorporated into nanofibers by electrospinning. In ultra-fine-pitch chip-on-glass assembly, insulation was significantly improved by using nanofiber ACF, because nanofibers inside the ACF suppressed the mobility of conductive particles, preventing them from flowing out during the bonding process. Capture of conductive particles was increased from 31% (conventional ACF) to 65%, and stable electrical properties and reliability were achieved by use of nanofiber ACF.

  14. Chemistry on electrospun polymeric nanofibers: merely routine chemistry or a real challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Seema; Wendorff, Joachim H; Greiner, Andreas

    2010-08-03

    Nanofiber-based non-wovens can be prepared by electrospinning. The chemical modification of such nanofibers or chemistry using nanofibers opens a multitude of application areas and challenges. A wealth of chemistry has been elaborated in recent years on and with electrospun nanofibers. Known methods as well as new methods have been applied to modify the electrospun nanofibers and thereby generate new materials and new functionalities. This Review summarizes and sorts the chemistry that has been reported in conjunction with electrospun nanofibers. The major focus is on catalysis and nanofibers, enzymes and nanofibers, surface modification for biomedical and specialty applications, coatings of fibers, crosslinking, and bulk modifications. A critical focus is on the question: what could make chemistry on or with nanofibers different from bulk chemistry?

  15. New High-Energy Nanofiber Anode Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiangwu; Fedkiw, Peter; Khan, Saad; Huang, Alex; Fan, Jiang

    2013-11-15

    The overall goal of the proposed work was to use electrospinning technology to integrate dissimilar materials (lithium alloy and carbon) into novel composite nanofiber anodes, which simultaneously had high energy density, reduced cost, and improved abuse tolerance. The nanofiber structure allowed the anodes to withstand repeated cycles of expansion and contraction. These composite nanofibers were electrospun into nonwoven fabrics with thickness of 50 μm or more, and then directly used as anodes in a lithium-ion battery. This eliminated the presence of non-active materials (e.g., conducting carbon black and polymer binder) and resulted in high energy and power densities. The nonwoven anode structure also provided a large electrode-electrolyte interface and, hence, high rate capacity and good lowtemperature performance capability. Following are detailed objectives for three proposed project periods. • During the first six months: Obtain anodes capable of initial specific capacities of 650 mAh/g and achieve ~50 full charge/discharge cycles in small laboratory scale cells (50 to 100 mAh) at the 1C rate with less than 20 percent capacity fade; • In the middle of project period: Assemble, cycle, and evaluate 18650 cells using proposed anode materials, and demonstrate practical and useful cycle life (750 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade) in 18650 cells with at least twice improvement in the specific capacity than that of conventional graphite electrodes; • At the end of project period: Deliver 18650 cells containing proposed anode materials, and achieve specific capacities greater than 1200 mAh/g and cycle life longer than 5000 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade.

  16. Novel dental composites reinforced with zirconia-silica ceramic nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guangqing; Fan, Yuwei; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Hagan, Joseph L; Xu, Xiaoming

    2012-04-01

    To fabricate and characterize dental composites reinforced with various amounts of zirconia-silica (ZS) or zirconia-yttria-silica (ZYS) ceramic nanofibers. Control composites (70 wt% glass particle filler, no nanofibers) and experimental composites (2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 wt% ZS or ZYS nanofibers replacing glass particle filler) were prepared by blending 29 wt% dental resin monomers, 70 wt% filler, and 1.0 wt% initiator, and polymerized by either heat or dental curing light. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), energy at break (EAB), and fracture toughness (FT) were tested after the specimens were stored in 37°C deionized water for 24h, 3 months, or 6 months. Degree of conversion (DC) of monomers in composites was measured using Fourier transformed near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy. Fractured surfaces were observed by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The data were analyzed using ANOVA with Tukey's Honestly Significant Differences test used for post hoc analysis. Reinforcement of dental composites with ZS or ZYS nanofibers (2.5% or 5.0%) can significantly increase the FS, FM and EAB of dental composites over the control. Further increase the content of ZS nanofiber (7.5%), however, decreases these properties (although they are still higher than those of the control). Addition of nanofibers did not decrease the long-term mechanical properties of these composites. All ZS reinforced composites (containing 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% ZS nanofibers) exhibit significantly higher fracture toughness than the control. The DC of the composites decreases with ZS nanofiber content. Incorporation of ceramic nanofibers in dental composites can significantly improve their mechanical properties and fracture toughness and thus may extend their service life. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Permeability of Electrospun Superhydrophobic Nanofiber Mats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfaraz U. Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the fabrication and characterization of electrospun nanofiber mats made up of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene polymer. The polymer was electrospun in different weight concentrations. The mats were characterized by their basis weight, fiber diameter distribution, contact angles, contact angle hysteresis, and air permeability. All of the electrospun nonwoven fiber mats had water contact angles greater than 150 degrees making them superhydrophobic. The permeabilities of the mats were empirically fitted to the mat basis weight by a linear relation. The experimentally measured air permeabilities were significantly larger than the permeabilities predicted by the Kuwabara model for fibrous media.

  18. Charge Injection and Transport in Organic Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Bøggild, Peter; Rubahn, H. G.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the carrier injection and transport in individual para-hexaphenylene nanofibers by electrical transport measurements at different temperatures. The injected current shows much weaker temperature dependence than what would be anticipated from a simplistic model that considers...... the injection barrier height equal to the difference between the metal electrode work function and the HOMO energy level of the organic semiconductor. Semiquantitative modeling suggests that the weak temperature dependence is due to injection into a distribution of states rather than into a single energy level...

  19. Highly stretchable electrospun conducting polymer nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubée de Gramont, Fanny; Zhang, Shiming; Tomasello, Gaia; Kumar, Prajwal; Sarkissian, Andranik; Cicoira, Fabio

    2017-08-01

    Biomedical electronics research targets both wearable and biocompatible electronic devices easily adaptable to specific functions. To achieve such goals, stretchable organic electronic materials are some of the most intriguing candidates. Herein, we develop highly stretchable poly-(3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene) (PEDOT) doped with tosylate (PEDOT:Tos) nanofibers. A two-step process involving electrospinning of a carrier polymer (with oxidant) and vapor phase polymerization was used to produce fibers on a polydimethylsiloxane substrate. The fibers can be stretched up to 140% of the initial length maintaining high conductivity.

  20. NMR RELAXIVITY AND IMAGING OF NEUTRAL MACROMOLECULAR POLYESTER GADOLINIUM (Ⅲ) COMPLEXES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai-chao Yu; Hong-bing Hu; Mai-li Liu; Han-zhen Yuan; Chao-hui Ye; Ren-xi Zhuo

    1999-01-01

    Five neutral macromolecular polyester gadolinium (Ⅲ) complexes with pendant hydrophobic alkyl and aromatic functional groups were prepared. The longitudinal relaxation rates of these complexes were measured. One of these Gd (Ⅲ) complexes was chosen for the acute toxicity test and T1-weighted imaging measurement. Preliminary results showed that. compared with Gd-DTPA, the neutral macromolecular gadolinium (Ⅲ) complexes provide higher T1 relaxivity enhancement and longer function duration.

  1. Performance evaluation of PAN nanofiber air filter fabricated by electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Cheol; Kim, Tae Eun; Lee, Jung Koo; Ahn, Ji Woong; Park, Sung Ho; Kim, Hyung Man [Dept. of Electronic, Telecommunications, Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Inje University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Nanomaterials possess unique mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. They are small, and have an ultrahigh surface area, making them suitable for air filter applications. Electrospinning has been recognized as an efficient technique for fabricating polymer nanofibers. In order to determine the optimum manufacturing conditions, the effects of several electrospinning process parameters on the diameter, orientation, and distribution of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofiber are analyzed. To improve interlaminar fracture toughness and suppress delamination in the form of laminated non-woven fibers by using a heat roller, the performances of filter efficiency and pressure drop achieved with PAN nanofiber air filter are evaluated experimentally.

  2. Enhanced thermal conductance of polymer composites through embeddingaligned carbon nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale K. Hensley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this work is to find a more efficient method of enhancing the thermal conductance of polymer thin films. This work compares polymer thin films embedded with randomly oriented carbon nanotubes to those with vertically aligned carbon nanofibers. Thin films embedded with carbon nanofibers demonstrated a similar thermal conductance between 40–60 μm and a higher thermal conductance between 25–40 μm than films embedded with carbon nanotubes with similar volume fractions even though carbon nanotubes have a higher thermal conductivity than carbon nanofibers.

  3. Preparation and Electrochemical Properties of Silver Doped Hollow Carbon Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Fu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Silver doped PAN-based hollow carbon nanofibers were prepared combining co-electrospinning with in situ reduction technique subsequently heat treatment to improve the electrochemical performances of carbon based supercapacitor electrodes. The morphology, structure and electrochemical performances of the resulted nanofiber were studied. The results show that the silver nanoparticles can be doped on the surface of hollow carbon nanofibers and the addition of silver favors the improvement of the electrochemical performances, exhibiting the enhanced reversibility of electrode reaction and the capacitance and the reduced charge transfer impedance.

  4. Electrostatic Self-Assembly of Polysaccharides into Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendes, Ana Carina Loureiro; Strohmenger, Timm; Goycoolea, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the anionic polysaccharide Xanthan gum (X) was mixed with positively charged Chitosan oligomers (ChO), and used as building blocks, to generate novel nanofibers by electrostatic self-assembly in aqueous conditions. Different concentrations, ionic strength and order of mixing of both...... components were tested and observed to affect the diameter, which ranged from 100 to 500 nm, and morphology of the self-assembled nanofibers. The release of diclofenac, as model drug, from self-assembled xanthan-chitosan nanofibers was demonstrated, suggesting that these nanostructures can be used...

  5. Hybrid electrospun chitosan-phospholipids nanofibers for transdermal drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendes, Ana Carina Loureiro; Gorzelanny, Christian; Halter, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan (Ch) polysaccharide was mixed with phospholipids (P) to generate electrospun hybrid nanofibers intended to be used as platforms for transdermal drug delivery. Ch/P nanofibers exibithed average diameters ranging from 248 +/- 94 nm to 600 +/- 201 nm, depending on the amount of phospholipids...... used. Fourier Transformed Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) data suggested the occurrence of electrostatic interactions between amine groups of chitosan with the phospholipid counterparts. The nanofibers were shown to be stable for at least 7 days in Phosphate Buffer...

  6. Facile aqueous-phase synthesis of copper sulfide nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zengmin; Im, Sang Hyuk; Kim, Woo-Sik; Yu, Taekyung

    2017-07-01

    We report a facile aqueous-phase synthetic route to vine-like copper sulfide (CuS) nanofibers prepared by reacting elemental sulfur with Cu+-branched polyethyleneimine (BPEI) complex obtained by the reaction of Cu2+ with ascorbic acid in the presence of BPEI. By controlling the concentration of BPEI, we could easily control the morphology of CuS from nanofibers to hollow nanoparticles. We also found that concentration of BPEI and the presence of halide anion would play important roles in the formation of vine-like CuS nanofibers.

  7. A versatile microparticle-based immunoaggregation assay for macromolecular biomarker detection and quantification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Wu

    Full Text Available The rapid, sensitive and low-cost detection of macromolecular biomarkers is critical in clinical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, research, etc. Conventional assay methods usually require bulky, expensive and designated instruments and relative long assay time. For hospitals and laboratories that lack immediate access to analytical instruments, fast and low-cost assay methods for the detection of macromolecular biomarkers are urgently needed. In this work, we developed a versatile microparticle (MP-based immunoaggregation method for the detection and quantification of macromolecular biomarkers. Antibodies (Abs were firstly conjugated to MP through streptavidin-biotin interaction; the addition of macromolecular biomarkers caused the aggregation of Ab-MPs, which were subsequently detected by an optical microscope or optical particle sizer. The invisible nanometer-scale macromolecular biomarkers caused detectable change of micrometer-scale particle size distributions. Goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulin and human ferritin were used as model biomarkers to demonstrate MP-based immunoaggregation assay in PBS and 10% FBS to mimic real biomarker assay in the complex medium. It was found that both the number ratio and the volume ratio of Ab-MP aggregates caused by biomarker to all particles were directly correlated to the biomarker concentration. In addition, we found that the detection range could be tuned by adjusting the Ab-MP concentration. We envision that this novel MP-based immunoaggregation assay can be combined with multiple detection methods to detect and quantify macromolecular biomarkers at the nanogram per milliliter level.

  8. JBluIce-EPICS control system for macromolecular crystallography.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanov, S.; Makarov, O.; Hilgart, M.; Pothineni, S.; Urakhchin, A.; Devarapalli, S.; Yoder, D.; Becker, M.; Ogata, C.; Sanishvili, R.; Nagarajan, V.; Smith, J. L.; Fischetti, R. F. (Biosciences Division); (Univ. of Michigan)

    2011-01-01

    The trio of macromolecular crystallography beamlines constructed by the General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA-CAT) in Sector 23 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) have been in growing demand owing to their outstanding beam quality and capacity to measure data from crystals of only a few micrometres in size. To take full advantage of the state-of-the-art mechanical and optical design of these beamlines, a significant effort has been devoted to designing fast, convenient, intuitive and robust beamline controls that could easily accommodate new beamline developments. The GM/CA-CAT beamline controls are based on the power of EPICS for distributed hardware control, the rich Java graphical user interface of Eclipse RCP and the task-oriented philosophy as well as the look and feel of the successful SSRL BluIce graphical user interface for crystallography. These beamline controls feature a minimum number of software layers, the wide use of plug-ins that can be written in any language and unified motion controls that allow on-the-fly scanning and optimization of any beamline component. This paper describes the ways in which BluIce was combined with EPICS and converted into the Java-based JBluIce, discusses the solutions aimed at streamlining and speeding up operations and gives an overview of the tools that are provided by this new open-source control system for facilitating crystallographic experiments, especially in the field of microcrystallography.

  9. Patch-clamp detection of macromolecular translocation along nuclear pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bustamante J.O.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reviews the application of patch-clamp principles to the detection and measurement of macromolecular translocation along the nuclear pores. We demonstrate that the tight-seal 'gigaseal' between the pipette tip and the nuclear membrane is possible in the presence of fully operational nuclear pores. We show that the ability to form a gigaseal in nucleus-attached configurations does not mean that only the activity of channels from the outer membrane of the nuclear envelope can be detected. Instead, we show that, in the presence of fully operational nuclear pores, it is likely that the large-conductance ion channel activity recorded derives from the nuclear pores. We conclude the technical section with the suggestion that the best way to demonstrate that the nuclear pores are responsible for ion channel activity is by showing with fluorescence microscopy the nuclear translocation of ions and small molecules and the exclusion of the same from the cisterna enclosed by the two membranes of the envelope. Since transcription factors and mRNAs, two major groups of nuclear macromolecules, use nuclear pores to enter and exit the nucleus and play essential roles in the control of gene activity and expression, this review should be useful to cell and molecular biologists interested in understanding how patch-clamp can be used to quantitate the translocation of such macromolecules into and out of the nucleus

  10. Timely deposition of macromolecular structures is necessary for peer review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joosten, Robbie P. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Soueidan, Hayssam; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Perrakis, Anastassis, E-mail: a.perrakis@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2013-12-01

    Deposition of crystallographic structures should be concurrent with or prior to manuscript submission for peer review, enabling validation and increasing reliability of the PDB. Most of the macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), which are used daily by thousands of educators and scientists alike, are determined by X-ray crystallography. It was examined whether the crystallographic models and data were deposited to the PDB at the same time as the publications that describe them were submitted for peer review. This condition is necessary to ensure pre-publication validation and the quality of the PDB public archive. It was found that a significant proportion of PDB entries were submitted to the PDB after peer review of the corresponding publication started, and many were only submitted after peer review had ended. It is argued that clear description of journal policies and effective policing is important for pre-publication validation, which is key in ensuring the quality of the PDB and of peer-reviewed literature.

  11. Synchrotron radiation macromolecular crystallography: science and spin-offs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Helliwell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A current overview of synchrotron radiation (SR in macromolecular crystallography (MX instrumentation, methods and applications is presented. Automation has been and remains a central development in the last decade, as have the rise of remote access and of industrial service provision. Results include a high number of Protein Data Bank depositions, with an increasing emphasis on the successful use of microcrystals. One future emphasis involves pushing the frontiers of using higher and lower photon energies. With the advent of X-ray free-electron lasers, closely linked to SR developments, the use of ever smaller samples such as nanocrystals, nanoclusters and single molecules is anticipated, as well as the opening up of femtosecond time-resolved diffraction structural studies. At SR sources, a very high-throughput assessment for the best crystal samples and the ability to tackle just a few micron and sub-micron crystals will become widespread. With higher speeds and larger detectors, diffraction data volumes are becoming long-term storage and archiving issues; the implications for today and the future are discussed. Together with the rise of the storage ring to its current pre-eminence in MX data provision, the growing tendency of central facility sites to offer other centralized facilities complementary to crystallography, such as cryo-electron microscopy and NMR, is a welcome development.

  12. New concepts and applications in the macromolecular chemistry of fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacalone, Francesco; Martín, Nazario

    2010-10-08

    A new classification on the different types of fullerene-containing polymers is presented according to their different properties and applications they exhibit in a variety of fields. Because of their interest and novelty, water-soluble and biodegradable C(60)-polymers are discussed first, followed by polyfullerene-based membranes where unprecedented supramolecular structures are presented. Next are compounds that involve hybrid materials formed from fullerenes and other components such as silica, DNA, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) where the most recent advances have been achieved. A most relevant topic is still that of C(60)-based donor-acceptor (D-A) polymers. Since their application in photovoltaics D-A polymers are among the most realistic applications of fullerenes in the so-called molecular electronics. The most relevant aspects in these covalently connected fullerene/polymer hybrids as well as new concepts to improve energy conversion efficiencies are presented.The last topics disccused relate to supramolecular aspects that are in involved in C(60)-polymer systems and in the self-assembly of C(60)-macromolecular structures, which open a new scenario for organizing, by means of non-covalent interactions, new supramolecular structures at the nano- and micrometric scale, in which the combination of the hydrofobicity of fullerenes with the versatility of the noncovalent chemistry afford new and spectacular superstructures.

  13. Macromolecular metallurgy of binary mesocrystals via designed multiblock terpolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Nan; Liu, Meijiao; Deng, Hanlin; Li, Weihua; Qiu, Feng; Shi, An-Chang

    2014-02-26

    Self-assembling block copolymers provide access to the fabrication of various ordered phases. In particular, the ordered spherical phases can be used to engineer soft mesocrystals with domain size at the 5-100 nm scales. Simple block copolymers, such as diblock copolymers, form a limited number of mesocrystals. However multiblock copolymers are capable to form more complex mesocrystals. We demonstrate that designed B1AB2CB3 multiblock terpolymers, in which the A- and C-blocks form spherical domains and the packing of these spheres can be controlled by changing the lengths of the middle and terminal B-blocks, self-assemble into various binary mesocrystals with space group symmetries of a large number of binary ionic crystals, including NaCl, CsCl, ZnS, α-BN, AlB2, CaF2, TiO2, ReO3, Li3Bi, Nb3Sn(A15), and α-Al2O3. This approach can be generalized to other terpolymers as well as to tetrapolymers to obtain ternary mesocrystals. Our study provides a new concept of macromolecular metallurgy for producing crystal phases in a mesoscale and thus makes multiblock copolymers a robust platform for the engineering of functional materials.

  14. Macromolecular Powder Diffraction: Ready for genuine biological problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavassili, Fotini; Margiolaki, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of 3D structures of biological molecules plays a major role in both understanding important processes of life and developing pharmaceuticals. Among several methods available for structure determination, macromolecular X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) has transformed over the past decade from an impossible dream to a respectable method. XRPD can be employed in biosciences for various purposes such as observing phase transitions, characterizing bulk pharmaceuticals, determining structures via the molecular replacement method, detecting ligands in protein-ligand complexes, as well as combining micro-sized single crystal crystallographic data and powder diffraction data. Studies using synchrotron and laboratory sources in some standard configuration setups are reported in this review, including their respective advantages and disadvantages. Methods presented here provide an alternative, complementary set of tools to resolve structural problems. A variety of already existing software packages for powder diffraction data processing and analysis, some of which have been adapted to large unit cell studies, are briefly described. This review aims to provide necessary elements of theory and current methods, along with practical explanations, available software packages and highlighted case studies.

  15. Canadian macromolecular crystallography facility: a suite of fully automated beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grochulski, Pawel; Fodje, Michel; Labiuk, Shaunivan; Gorin, James; Janzen, Kathryn; Berg, Russ

    2012-06-01

    The Canadian light source is a 2.9 GeV national synchrotron radiation facility located on the University of Saskatchewan campus in Saskatoon. The small-gap in-vacuum undulator illuminated beamline, 08ID-1, together with the bending magnet beamline, 08B1-1, constitute the Canadian Macromolecular Crystallography Facility (CMCF). The CMCF provides service to more than 50 Principal Investigators in Canada and the United States. Up to 25% of the beam time is devoted to commercial users and the general user program is guaranteed up to 55% of the useful beam time through a peer-review process. CMCF staff provides "Mail-In" crystallography service to users with the highest scored proposals. Both beamlines are equipped with very robust end-stations including on-axis visualization systems, Rayonix 300 CCD series detectors and Stanford-type robotic sample auto-mounters. MxDC, an in-house developed beamline control system, is integrated with a data processing module, AutoProcess, allowing full automation of data collection and data processing with minimal human intervention. Sample management and remote monitoring of experiments is enabled through interaction with a Laboratory Information Management System developed at the facility.

  16. Novel polyamide-based nanofibers prepared by electrospinning technique for headspace solid-phase microextraction of phenol and chlorophenols from environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Habib; Aghakhani, Ali; Baghernejad, Masoud; Akbarinejad, Alireza

    2012-02-24

    A novel solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber was fabricated by electrospinning method in which a polymeric solution was converted to nanofibers using high voltages. A thin stainless steel wire was coated by the network of polymeric nanofibers. The polymeric nanofiber coating on the wire was mechanically stable due to the fine and continuous nanofibers formation around the wire with a three dimensional structure. Polyamide (nylon 6), due to its suitable characteristics was used to prepare the unbreakable SPME nanofiber. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of this new coating showed a diameter range of 100-200 nm for polyamide nanofibers with a homogeneous and porous surface structure. The extraction efficiency of new coating was investigated for headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) of some environmentally important chlorophenols from aqueous samples followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Effect of different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency including extraction temperature, extraction time, ionic strength and polyamide amount were investigated and optimized. In order to improve the chromatographic behavior of phenolic compounds, all the analytes were derivatized prior to the extraction process using basic acetic anhydride. The detection limits of the method under optimized conditions were in the range of 2-10 ng L(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSD) (n=3) at the concentration level of 1.7-6.7 ng mL(-1) were obtained between 1 and 7.4%. The calibration curves of chlorophenols showed linearity in the range of 27-1330 ng L(-1) for phenol and monochlorophenols and 7-1000 ng L(-1) for dichloro and trichlorophenols. Also, the proposed method was successfully applied to the extraction of phenol and chlorophenols from real water samples and relative recoveries were between 84 and 98% for all the selected analytes except for 2,4,6 tricholophenol which was between 72 and 74%. Copyright © 2011

  17. Novel polyamide-based nanofibers prepared by electrospinning technique for headspace solid-phase microextraction of phenol and chlorophenols from environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Habib, E-mail: bagheri@sharif.edu [Environmental and Bio-Analytical Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Av., P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghakhani, Ali; Baghernejad, Masoud; Akbarinejad, Alireza [Environmental and Bio-Analytical Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Azadi Av., P.O. Box 11365-9516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-02-24

    A novel solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber was fabricated by electrospinning method in which a polymeric solution was converted to nanofibers using high voltages. A thin stainless steel wire was coated by the network of polymeric nanofibers. The polymeric nanofiber coating on the wire was mechanically stable due to the fine and continuous nanofibers formation around the wire with a three dimensional structure. Polyamide (nylon 6), due to its suitable characteristics was used to prepare the unbreakable SPME nanofiber. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of this new coating showed a diameter range of 100-200 nm for polyamide nanofibers with a homogeneous and porous surface structure. The extraction efficiency of new coating was investigated for headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) of some environmentally important chlorophenols from aqueous samples followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Effect of different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency including extraction temperature, extraction time, ionic strength and polyamide amount were investigated and optimized. In order to improve the chromatographic behavior of phenolic compounds, all the analytes were derivatized prior to the extraction process using basic acetic anhydride. The detection limits of the method under optimized conditions were in the range of 2-10 ng L{sup -1}. The relative standard deviations (RSD) (n = 3) at the concentration level of 1.7-6.7 ng mL{sup -1} were obtained between 1 and 7.4%. The calibration curves of chlorophenols showed linearity in the range of 27-1330 ng L{sup -1} for phenol and monochlorophenols and 7-1000 ng L{sup -1} for dichloro and trichlorophenols. Also, the proposed method was successfully applied to the extraction of phenol and chlorophenols from real water samples and relative recoveries were between 84 and 98% for all the selected analytes except for 2,4,6 tricholophenol which was between 72 and 74%.

  18. Optimizing parameters on alignment of PCL/PGA nanofibrous scaffold: An artificial neural networks approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskiabi, Farnoush Asghari; Mirzaei, Esmaeil; Amani, Amir; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Saber, Reza; Faridi-Majidi, Reza

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes an artificial neural networks approach to finding the effects of electrospinning parameters on alignment of poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/poly(glycolic acid) blend nanofibers. Four electrospinning parameters, namely total polymer concentration, working distance, drum speed and applied voltage were considered as input and the standard deviation of the angles of nanofibers, introducing fibers alignments, as the output of the model. The results demonstrated that drum speed and applied voltage are two critical factors influencing nanofibers alignment, however their effect are entirely interdependent. Their effects also are not independent of other electrospinning parameters. In obtaining aligned electrospun nanofibers, the concentration and working distance can also be effective. In vitro cell culture study on random and aligned nanofibers showed directional growth of cells on aligned fibers.

  19. Nanofiber-based all-optical switches

    CERN Document Server

    Kien, Fam Le

    2016-01-01

    We study all-optical switches operating on a single four-level atom with the $N$-type transition configuration in a two-mode nanofiber cavity with a significant length (on the order of $20$ mm) and a moderate finesse (on the order of 300) under the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) conditions. In our model, the gate and probe fields are the quantum nanofiber-cavity fields excited by weak classical light pulses, and the parameters of the $D_2$ line of atomic cesium are used. We examine two different switching schemes. The first scheme is based on the effect of the presence of a photon in the gate mode on the EIT of the probe mode. The second scheme is based on the use of EIT to store a photon of the gate mode in the population of an appropriate atomic level, which leads to the reduction of the transmission of the field in the probe mode. We investigate the dependencies of the switching contrast on various parameters, such as the cavity length, the mirror reflectivity, and the detunings and powers ...

  20. Shear adhesion strength of aligned electrospun nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najem, Johnny F; Wong, Shing-Chung; Ji, Guang

    2014-09-01

    Inspiration from nature such as insects' foot hairs motivates scientists to fabricate nanoscale cylindrical solids that allow tens of millions of contact points per unit area with material substrates. In this paper, we present a simple yet robust method for fabricating directionally sensitive shear adhesive laminates. By using aligned electrospun nylon-6, we create dry adhesives, as a succession of our previous work on measuring adhesion energies between two single free-standing electrospun polymer fibers in cross-cylinder geometry, randomly oriented membranes and substrate, and peel forces between aligned fibers and substrate. The synthetic aligned cylindrical solids in this study are electrically insulating and show a maximal Mode II shear adhesion strength of 27 N/cm(2) on a glass slide. This measured value, for the purpose of comparison, is 270% of that reported from gecko feet. The Mode II shear adhesion strength, based on a commonly known "dead-weight" test, is 97-fold greater than the Mode I (normal) adhesion strength of the same. The data indicate a strong shear binding on and easy normal lifting off. Anisotropic adhesion (Mode II/Mode I) is pronounced. The size and surface boundary effects, crystallinity, and bending stiffness of fibers are used to understand these electrospun nanofibers, which vastly differ from otherwise known adhesive technologies. The anisotropic strength distribution is attributed to a decreasing fiber diameter and an optimized laminate thickness, which, in turn, influences the bending stiffness and solid-state "wettability" of points of contact between nanofibers and surface asperities.

  1. Drop impacts on electrospun nanofiber membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Rakesh P.; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2013-11-01

    This work reports a study of drop impacts of polar and non-polar liquids onto electrospun nanofiber membranes (of 8-10 mm thickness and pore sizes of 3-6 nm) with an increasing degree of hydrophobicity. The nanofibers used were electrospun from polyacrylonitrile (PAN), nylon 6/6, polycaprolactone (PCL) and Teflon. It was found that for any liquid/fiber pair there exists a threshold impact velocity (1.5 to 3 m/s) above which water penetrates membranes irrespective of their wettability. The low surface tension liquid left the rear side of sufficiently thin membranes as a millipede-like system of tiny jets protruding through a number of pores. For such a high surface tension liquid as water, jets immediately merged into a single bigger jet, which formed secondary drops due to capillary instability. An especially non-trivial result is that superhydrophobicity of the porous nano-textured Teflon skeleton with the interconnected pores is incapable of preventing water penetration due to drop impact, even at relatively low impact velocities close to 3.46 m/s. A theoretical estimate of the critical membrane thickness sufficient for complete viscous dissipation of the kinetic energy of penetrating liquid corroborates with the experimental data. The current work is supported by the Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center (NCRC).

  2. Tensile properties of bacterial cellulose nanofibers - polyester composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abral, H.; Mahardika, M.

    2016-07-01

    The paper shows tensile properties of bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers and polyester (PO) matrix composites. Tensile properties including tensile strength (TS), modulus elasticity (ME), and elongation (EL) were observed respectively. BC nanofibers exist in the form of a sheet that was then varied in matrix PO. The BC sheet was mounted by one, three, five and seven pieces respectively in the matrix PO. The tensile strength of the composites was conducted by using the tensile equipment. The results showed that the tensile strength of the composite with a single sheet of BC was lower than that of pure PO. The ST value achieved maximum level in the number of layers of BC three pieces, but then it decreased for the composites reinforced five and seven pieces of BC nanofiber, respectively. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) observation exhibits bad interface bonding between BC nanofibers and PO matrix.

  3. Oxygen-Generating Nanofiber Cell Scaffolds with Antimicrobial Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Junping; Zhu, Yizhou; Bawa, Harinder K.; Ng, Geoffrey; Wu, Yong; Libera, Matthew; van der Mei, H. C.; Busscher, H. J.; Yu, Xiaojun

    2011-01-01

    Many next-generation biomaterials will need ability to not only promote healthy tissue integration but to simultaneously resist bacterial colonization resulting biomaterials associated infection. For this purpose, antimicrobial nanofibers of (polycapro-lactone(PCL) were fabricated by incorporating c

  4. Method of synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Jaswinder K.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2015-09-15

    A method for synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves is provided. The method includes providing a solution of polyvinyl pyrrolidone, adding sodium citrate and ammonium hydroxide to form a first mixture, adding a silica-based compound to the solution to form a second mixture, and sonicating the second mixture to synthesize a plurality of silica nanofibers having an average cross-sectional diameter of less than 70 nm and having a length on the order of at least several hundred microns. The method can be performed without heating or electrospinning, and instead includes less energy intensive strategies that can be scaled up to an industrial scale. The resulting nanofibers can achieve a decreased mean diameter over conventional fibers. The decreased diameter generally increases the tensile strength of the silica nanofibers, as defects and contaminations decrease with the decreasing diameter.

  5. Multicolored Nanofiber Based Organic Light-Emitting Transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    With Jensen, Per Baunegaard; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Tavares, Luciana

    For optoelectronic applications, organic semiconductors have several advantages over their inorganic counterparts such as facile synthesis, tunability via synthetic chemistry, and low temperature processing. Self-assembled, molecular crystalline nanofibers are of particular interest as they could...... form ultra-small light-emitters in future nanophotonic applications. Such organic nanofibers exhibit many interesting optical properties including polarized photo- and electroluminescence, waveguiding, and emission color tunability. We here present a first step towards a multicolored, electrically...... driven device by combining nanofibers made from two different molecules, parahexaphenylene (p6P) and 5,5´-Di-4-biphenyl-2,2´-bithiophene (PPTTPP), which emits blue and green light, respectively. The organic nanofibers are implemented on a bottom gate/bottom contact field-effect transistor platform using...

  6. Preparation and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ning; WEI Qu-fu; LI Qi; XU Wen-zheng

    2006-01-01

    A new class of nanocomposites based on organic and inorganic species integrated at a nanoscale has obtained more attention these years. Organic-inorganic hybrids have both the advantages of organic materials, such as light weight, flexibility and good moldability, and inorganic materials, such as high strength, heat stability and chemical resistance. In this work, PVAc/TiO2 organicinorganic hybrid was prepared by sol-gel process. Electrospinning technique was used to fabricate PVAc/TiO2hybrid nanofibers. The structures and properties of the hybrid nanofibers were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscope (AFM),Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) and Fouriertransform infrared (FTIR) spectra. SEM and AFM were employed to study the topography of the hybrid nanofibers.The chemical structure of the hybrid nanofibers were examined by FTIR. The DSC scansrevealed the second order transition temperature of the hybrid materials were higher than PVAc.

  7. Multicolored Nanofiber Based Organic Light-Emitting Transistor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    With Jensen, Per Baunegaard; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Tavares, Luciana

    For optoelectronic applications, organic semiconductors have several advantages over their inorganic counterparts such as facile synthesis, tunability via synthetic chemistry, and low temperature processing. Self-assembled, molecular crystalline nanofibers are of particular interest as they could...... form ultra-small light-emitters in future nanophotonic applications. Such organic nanofibers exhibit many interesting optical properties including polarized photo- and electroluminescence, waveguiding, and emission color tunability. We here present a first step towards a multicolored, electrically...... driven device by combining nanofibers made from two different molecules, parahexaphenylene (p6P) and 5,5´-Di-4-biphenyl-2,2´-bithiophene (PPTTPP), which emits blue and green light, respectively. The organic nanofibers are implemented on a bottom gate/bottom contact field-effect transistor platform using...

  8. Method of synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Jaswinder K.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2017-08-08

    A method for synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves is provided. The method includes providing a solution of polyvinyl pyrrolidone, adding sodium citrate and ammonium hydroxide to form a first mixture, adding a silica-based compound to the solution to form a second mixture, and sonicating the second mixture to synthesize a plurality of silica nanofibers having an average cross-sectional diameter of less than 70 nm and having a length on the order of at least several hundred microns. The method can be performed without heating or electrospinning, and instead includes less energy intensive strategies that can be scaled up to an industrial scale. The resulting nanofibers can achieve a decreased mean diameter over conventional fibers. The decreased diameter generally increases the tensile strength of the silica nanofibers, as defects and contaminations decrease with the decreasing diameter.

  9. Method of synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jaswinder K.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2015-09-15

    A method for synthesizing silica nanofibers using sound waves is provided. The method includes providing a solution of polyvinyl pyrrolidone, adding sodium citrate and ammonium hydroxide to form a first mixture, adding a silica-based compound to the solution to form a second mixture, and sonicating the second mixture to synthesize a plurality of silica nanofibers having an average cross-sectional diameter of less than 70 nm and having a length on the order of at least several hundred microns. The method can be performed without heating or electrospinning, and instead includes less energy intensive strategies that can be scaled up to an industrial scale. The resulting nanofibers can achieve a decreased mean diameter over conventional fibers. The decreased diameter generally increases the tensile strength of the silica nanofibers, as defects and contaminations decrease with the decreasing diameter.

  10. Research on morphologies of polyvinyl alcohol/milk nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the surface morphologies of polyvinyl alcohol/milk nanofibers produced via electrospinning technique were investigated. The electrospinning process was performed at various processing parameters (flow rate, applied voltage and different polyvinyl acetate to milk ratios (100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 70/30, and 60/40. The scanning electron microscopy and Image J software were used to characterize the surface morphologies, especially the diameter distribution of electro spun nanofibers. The results of scanning electron microscopy show that the diameter of polyvinyl acetate/milk nanofibers increases with the increase of the spinning speed and spinning voltage but decreases with the increase of the weight percentage of milk in the spinning solution. The potential applications of this bicomponent nanofibers are numerous and diverse. The research results in present paper can contribute to better control of the electrospinning process and thus expanding the applicabilities, such as dressings for wound healing in sports.

  11. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) proposes to develop a silicon whisker and carbon nanofiber composite anode for lithium ion batteries on a Phase I program. This anode...

  12. Polyethylene/silver-nanofiber composites: A material for antibacterial films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Paula A; Larrea, Maialen; Tamayo, Laura; Rabagliati, Franco M; Azócar, M Ignacio; Páez, Maritza

    2016-12-01

    Silver nanofibers (Ag-Nfbs)~80nm in diameter were synthesized by hydrothermal treatment. The nanofibers (3 and 5wt%) were added in the initial feed together with the catalytic system. Polymerizations in an ethylene atmosphere were performed, yielding PE nanocomposites in situ with 3 and 5wt% content of Ag-Nfbs. The antibacterial effect of the silver-nanofiber composites was evaluated after incubation of Escherichia coli ATCC 25923 for 8h on their surface. Bacterial viability tests showed that the silver-nanofiber composites inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 25923 by 88 and 56%. This behavior is attributed to increased silver ions release from the nanocomposite. TEM analysis showed that the antibacterial effect is associated with membrane disruption but not with changes in shape.

  13. Improved fire retardancy of thermoset composites modified with carbon nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongfu Zhao and Jan Gou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctional thermoset composites were made from polyester resin, glass fiber mats and carbon nanofiber sheets (CNS. Their flaming behavior was investigated with cone calorimeter under well-controlled combustion conditions. The heat release rate was lowered by pre-planting carbon nanofiber sheets on the sample surface with the total fiber content of only 0.38 wt.%. Electron microscopy showed that carbon nanofiber sheet was partly burned and charred materials were formed on the combusting surface. Both the nanofibers and charred materials acted as an excellent insulator and/or mass transport barrier, improving the fire retardancy of the composite. This behavior agrees well with the general mechanism of fire retardancy in various nanoparticle-thermoplastic composites.

  14. Nanofiber-based optical trapping of cold neutral atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Vetsch, Eugen; Mitsch, Rudolf; Reitz, Daniel; Schneeweiss, Philipp; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental techniques and results related to the optimization and characterization of our nanofiber-based atom trap [Vetsch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 203603 (2010)]. The atoms are confined in an optical lattice which is created using a two-color evanescent field surrounding the optical nanofiber. For this purpose, the polarization state of the trapping light fields has to be properly adjusted. We demonstrate that this can be accomplished by analyzing the light scattered by the nanofiber. Furthermore, we show that loading the nanofiber trap from a magneto-optical trap leads to sub-Doppler temperatures of the trapped atomic ensemble and yields a sub-Poissonian distribution of the number of trapped atoms per trapping site.

  15. A review of opportunities for electrospun nanofibers in analytical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigome, Samuel; Torto, Nelson

    2011-11-07

    Challenges associated with analyte and matrix complexities and the ever increasing pressure from all sectors of industry for alternative analytical devices, have necessitated the development and application of new materials in analytical chemistry. To date, nanomaterials have emerged as having excellent properties for analytical chemistry applications mainly due to their large surface area to volume ratio and the availability of a wide variety of chemical and morphological modification methods. Of the available nanofibrous material fabrication methods, electrospinning has emerged as the most versatile. It is the aim of this contribution to highlight some of the recent developments that harness the great potential shown by electrospun nanofibers for application in analytical chemistry. The review discusses the use of electrospun nanofibers as a platform for low resolution separation or as a chromatographic sorbent bed for high resolution separation. It concludes by discussing the applications of electrospun nanofibers in detection systems with a specific focus on the development of simple electrospun nanofiber based colorimetric probes.

  16. Mechanical properties of homogeneous nanofiber composites fabricated by electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kentaro; Hotta, Atsushi

    2013-03-01

    A new composite that possesses uniformly dispersed polymeric nanofibers in different polymeric matrix was introduced by using electrospinning. Recently, nanofibers have been actively investigated for fillers for polymeric nano-composites to enhance the mechanical properties of the composites or to get highly functionalize polymer materials. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers were selected as polymeric fillers and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used for polymeric matrix. Internally well-dispersed composites were fabricated by this new method, whereas rather anisotropic composites were also made by the traditional sandwich method. The morphology of the composites was analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). It was found that, in the new internally well-dispersed composites, PVA nanofibers existed from the both surfaces of the polymer matrix, uniformly dispersed in the composite. Isotropic mechanical properties were observed for internally well-dispersed composites, whereas relatively anisotropic characteristics could be observed for the traditionally-made composites.

  17. Silicon Whisker and Carbon Nanofiber Composite Anode Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has successfully developed a silicon whisker and carbon nanofiber composite anode for lithium ion batteries on a Phase I program. PSI...

  18. Smart nanofibers with a photoresponsive surface for controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guo-Dong; Xu, Li-Qun; Yao, Fang; Li, Guo-Liang; Kang, En-Tang

    2009-11-01

    A novel photocontrolled "ON-OFF" release system for the alpha-cyclodextrin-5-fluorouracial (alpha-CD-5FU) prodrug, based on host-guest interaction on the photoresponsive and cross-linked nanofiber surface, was demonstrated. The nanofibers with a stimuli-responsive surface were electrospun from the block copolymer prepared via controlled radical polymerization, followed by surface modification via "Click Chemistry", and loading of the prodrug via host-guest interaction.

  19. High temperature resistant nanofiber by bubbfil-spinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat-resisting nanofibers have many potential applications in various industries, and the bubbfil spinning is the best candidate for mass-production of such materials. Polyether sulfone/zirconia solution with a bi-solvent system is used in the experiment. Experimental result reveals that polyether sulfone/zirconia nanofibers have higher resistance to high temperature than pure polyether sulfone fibers, and can be used as high-temperature-resistant filtration materials.

  20. Enhancement of radiative processes in nanofibers with embedded plasmonic nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Jurga, Radoslaw; Pisignano, Dario; Ciracì, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Efficient manipulation and long distance transport of single-photons is a key component in nanoscale quantum optics. In this letter, we study the emission properties of an individual light emitter placed into a nanofiber and coupled to a metallic nanoparticle. We find that plasmonic field enhancement together with the nanofiber optical confinement uniquely and synergistically contribute to an overall increase of emission rates as well as quantum yields.

  1. Preparation of nanofibers consisting of MnO/Mn3O4 by using the electrospinning technique: the nanofibers have two band-gap energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Woo, Kee-Do; Ansari, S. G.; Ko, Jung-Ahn; Kanjwal, Muzafar A.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2009-06-01

    In the present study, nanofibers consisting of manganese monoxide (MnO), which is hard to prepare because of the chemical activity of the manganese metal, and the popular Mn3O4 have been synthesized via the electrospinning technique. The nanofibers were obtained by electrospinning of an aqueous sol-gel consisting of manganese acetate tetra-hydrate and poly(vinyl alcohol). The obtained nanofiber mats were dried in vacuum at 80°C for 24 h and then calcined in argon atmosphere at 900°C for 5 h. According to X-ray diffraction results, the obtained nanofibers contain 65% MnO. Transmission electron microscope analysis reveals good crystallinity of the produced nanofibers. UV-visible spectroscopic analysis has indicated that the produced nanofibers have two band-gap energies, 2 and 3.7 eV, which enhances utilizing of the nanofibers in different applications.

  2. Optically Monitoring Mineralization and Demineralization on Photoluminescent Bioactive Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Li, Yangyang; Chen, Xiaoyi; Li, Binbin; Gao, Bo; Ren, Zhaohui; Han, Gaorong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-04-05

    Bone regeneration and scaffold degradation do not usually follow the same rate, representing a daunting challenge in bone repair. Toward this end, we propose to use an external field such as light (in particular, a tissue-penetrating near-infrared light) to precisely monitor the degradation of the mineralized scaffold (demineralization) and the formation of apatite mineral (mineralization). Herein, CaTiO3:Yb(3+),Er(3+)@bioactive glass (CaTiO3:Yb(3+),Er(3+)@BG) nanofibers with upconversion (UC) photoluminescence (PL) were synthesized. Such nanofibers are biocompatible and can emit green and red light under 980 nm excitation. The UC PL intensity is quenched during the bone-like apatite formation on the surface of the nanofibers in simulated body fluid; more mineral formation on the nanofibers induces more rapid optical quenching of the UC PL. Furthermore, the quenched UC PL can recover back to its original magnitude when the apatite on the nanofibers is degraded. Our work suggests that it is possible to optically monitor the apatite mineralization and demineralization on the surface of nanofibers used in bone repair.

  3. Antibacterial polylactic acid/chitosan nanofibers decorated with bioactive glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Yi-fan; Akram, Muhammad; Alshemary, Ammarz [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Hussain, Rafaqat, E-mail: rafaqat@comsats.edu.pk [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • PLA/Chitosan nanofibers were coated with functional bioglass. • Polymer/ceramic composite fibers exhibited good in-vitro bioactivity. • Nanofibers coated with Ag doped bioglass exhibited good antibacterial activity. - Abstract: In this study, we have presented the structural and in vitro characterization of electrospun polylactic acid (PLA)/Chitosan nanofibers coated with cerium, copper or silver doped bioactive glasses (CeBG/CuBG/AgBG). Bead-free, smooth surfaced nanofibers were successfully prepared by using electrospinning technique. The nanocomposite fibers were obtained using a facile dip-coating method, their antibacterial activities against E. coliE. coli (ATCC 25922 strains) were measured by the disk diffusion method after 24 h of incubation at 37 °C. CeBG and CuBG decorated PLA/Chitosan nanofibers did not develop an inhibition zone against the bacteria. On the other hand, nanofibers coated with AgBG developed an inhibition zone against the bacteria. The as-prepared nanocomposite fibers were immersed in SBF for 1, 3 and 7 days in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) for evaluation of in vitro bioactivity. All samples induced the formation of crystallites with roughly ruffled morphology and the pores of fibers were covered with the extensive growth of crystallites. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) composition analysis showed that the crystallites possessed Ca/P ratio close to 1.67, confirming the good in-vitro bioactivity of the fibers.

  4. Single flexible nanofiber to simultaneously realize electricity-magnetism bifunctionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ming; Sheng, Shujuan; Ma, Qianli; Lv, Nan; Yu, Wensheng; Wang, Jinxian; Dong, Xiangting; Liu, Guixia, E-mail: wenshengyu2009@sina.com, E-mail: dongxiangting888@163.com [Key Laboratory of Applied Chemistry and Nanotechnology at Universities of Jilin Province, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun (China)

    2016-03-15

    In order to develop new-typed multifunctional composite nanofibers, PANI/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/PVP flexible bifunctional composite nanofibers with simultaneous electrical conduction and magnetism have been successfully fabricated via a facile electrospinning technology. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) is used as a matrix to construct composite nanofibers containing different amounts of polyaniline (PANI) and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs). The bifunctional composite nanofibers simultaneously possess excellent electrical conductivity and magnetic properties. The electrical conductivity reaches up to the order of 10{sup -3} S·cm{sup -1}. The electrical conductivity and saturation magnetization of the composite nanofibers can be respectively tuned by adding various amounts of PANI and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. The obtained electricity-magnetism bifunctional composite nanofibers are expected to possess many potential applications in areas such as electromagnetic interference shielding, special coating, microwave absorption, molecular electronics and future nanomechanics. More importantly, the design concept and construct technique are of universal significance to fabricate other bifunctional one-dimensional nanostructures. (author)

  5. Cellulose nanofiber extraction from grass by a modified kitchen blender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaito, Antonio Norio; Ikenaga, Koh; Takagi, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    Cellulose nanofibers have been used to reinforce polymers, delivering composites with strength that in some cases can be superior to that of engineering plastics. The extraction of nanofibers from plant fibers can be achieved through specialized equipment that demands high energy input, despite delivering extremely low yields. The high extraction cost confines the use of cellulose nanofibers to the laboratory and not for industrial applications. This study aims to extract nanofibers from grass by using a kitchen blender. Earlier studies have demonstrated that paper sheets made of blender-extracted nanofibers (after 5 min to 10 min of blending) have strengths on par with paper sheets made from commercially available cellulose nanofibers. By optimizing the design of the blender bottle, nanofibrillation can be achieved in shorter treatment times, reducing the energy consumption (in the present case, to half) and the overall extraction cost. The raw materials used can be extended to the residue straw of agricultural crops, as an alternative to the usual pulp fibers obtained from wood.

  6. Preparation and biomedical applications of chitin and chitosan nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kazuo; Ifuku, Shinsuke; Osaki, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Yoshiharu; Minami, Saburo

    2014-10-01

    Chitin (β-(1-4)-poly-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine) is widely distributed in nature and is the second most abundant polysaccharide after cellulose. Chitin occurs in nature as ordered macrofibrils. It is the major structural component in the exoskeleton of crab and shrimp shells and the cell wall of fungi and yeast. As chitin is not readily dissolved in common solvents, it is often converted to its more deacetylated derivative, chitosan. Chitin, chitosan, and its derivatives are widely used in tissue engineering, wound healing, and as functional foods. Recently, easy methods for the preparation of chitin and chitosan nanofibers have been developed, and studies on biomedical applications of chitin and chitosan nanofibers are ongoing. Chitin and chitosan nanofibers are considered to have great potential for various biomedical applications, because they have several useful properties such as high specific surface area and high porosity. This review summarizes methods for the preparation of chitin and chitosan nanofibers. Further, biomedical applications of chitin and chitosan nanofibers in (i) tissue engineering, (ii) wound dressing, (iii) cosmetic and skin health, (iv) stem cell technology, (v) anti-cancer treatments and drug delivery, (vi) anti-inflammatory treatments, and (vii) obesity treatment are summarized. Many studies indicate that chitin and chitosan nanofibers are suitable materials for various biomedical applications.

  7. Effect of electrospun nanofibers on flexural properties of fiberglass composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Fatima T.

    In the present study, sintered electrospun TEOS nanofibers were interleaved in S2 fiberglass woven fabric layers, and composite panels were fabricated using the heated vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (H-VARTM) process. Cured panels were water jet cut to obtain the flexural test coupons. Flexural coupons were then tested using ASTM D7264 standard. The mechanical properties such as flexural strength, ultimate flexural failure strains, flexural modulus, and fiber volume fraction were measured. The S-2 fiberglass composite with the sintered TEOS electrospun nanofibers displayed lower flexural stiffness and strength as compared to the composites that were fabricated using S-2 fiberglass composite without the TEOS electrospun nanofibers. The present study also indicated that the composites fabricated with sintered TEOS electrospun nanofibers have larger failure strains as compared to the ones that were fabricated without the presence of electrospun nanofibers. The study indicates that the nanoengineered composites have better energy absorbing mechanism under flexural loading as compared to conventional fiberglass composites without presence of nanofibers.

  8. Effect of Nanofibers on Spore Penetration and Lunar Dust Filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Gibson, Ph.D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of two separate studies on biological spore penetration and simulated lunar dust filtration illustrate the use of nanofibers in some nonstandard filtration applications (nanofibers are generally defined as having diameters of less than a micron. In the first study, a variety of microporous liners containing microfibers and nanofibers were combined with cotton-based fabrics in order to filter aerosolized spores. The aerosol penetration resistance of the nanofiber-lined fabrics was measured, and some analysis was conducted of where the particles are captured within the fabric layers. Testing was conducted with aerosolized living spores, in order to evaluate the efficacy of various fabric treatments on spore viability within the fabric layers after exposure. Reported are the results of studies on fabrics with and without a removable electrospun nanofiber liner, and the fate of the spores within the fabric layers. In the second study, non-instrumented filtration testing using simulated lunar dust determined the comparative filtration efficiency of various nonwoven filtration media. Nanofiber witness media, combined with scanning electron microscope images, showed that an electrospun nonwoven filter layer effectively filtered out all the large and fine particles of the simulated lunar dust.

  9. Synthesis of Keratin-based Nanofiber for Biomedical Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Zanshe S; Rijal, Nava P; Jarvis, David; Edwards, Angela; Bhattarai, Narayan

    2016-02-07

    Electrospinning, due to its versatility and potential for applications in various fields, is being frequently used to fabricate nanofibers. Production of these porous nanofibers is of great interest due to their unique physiochemical properties. Here we elaborate on the fabrication of keratin containing poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers (i.e., PCL/keratin composite fiber). Water soluble keratin was first extracted from human hair and mixed with PCL in different ratios. The blended solution of PCL/keratin was transformed into nanofibrous membranes using a laboratory designed electrospinning set up. Fiber morphology and mechanical properties of the obtained nanofiber were observed and measured using scanning electron microscopy and tensile tester. Furthermore, degradability and chemical properties of the nanofiber were studied by FTIR. SEM images showed uniform surface morphology for PCL/keratin fibers of different compositions. These PCL/keratin fibers also showed excellent mechanical properties such as Young's modulus and failure point. Fibroblast cells were able to attach and proliferate thus proving good cell viability. Based on the characteristics discussed above, we can strongly argue that the blended nanofibers of natural and synthetic polymers can represent an excellent development of composite materials that can be used for different biomedical applications.

  10. Tuned Morphological Electrospun Hydroxyapatite Nanofibers via pH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Song; Fengguang Ling; Haotian Li; Zhantuan Gao; Xuesi Chen

    2012-01-01

    The concept of biocompatible,osteoconductive and noninflammatory material mimicking the structure of natural bone has generated a considerable interest in recent decades.Hydroxyapatite (HA) is an important bionic material that is used for bone grafting in osseous defects and drug carriers.HA with various morphologies and surface properties have been widely investigated.In this paper,HA nanofibers are produced through a combination of electrospinning and sol-gel technique.The morphologies,composition and structure are investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM),Thermogravimetic Analysis (TGA),Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR),X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns,Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).The results show that HA nanofibers are even and well-crystallized,and pH is crucial for producing HA nanofibers.With the change ofpH from 4 to 9,nanofibers grow densely along (210) plane and become compact while surface area,pore volume and pore size decrease correspondingly.The synthesized HA nanofibers are nontoxic and safe.Zn can be also incorporated into HA nanofibers,which will endow them with more perfect function.

  11. Non-contact luminescence lifetime cryothermometry for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykhaylyk, V B; Wagner, A; Kraus, H

    2017-05-01

    Temperature is a very important parameter when aiming to minimize radiation damage to biological samples during experiments that utilize intense ionizing radiation. A novel technique for remote, non-contact, in situ monitoring of the protein crystal temperature has been developed for the new I23 beamline at the Diamond Light Source, a facility dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX) with long-wavelength X-rays. The temperature is derived from the temperature-dependent decay time constant of luminescence from a minuscule scintillation sensor (luminescence lifetime thermometry is presented, the features of the detection method and the choice of temperature sensor are discussed, and it is demonstrated how the temperature monitoring system was integrated within the viewing system of the endstation used for the visualization of protein crystals. The thermometry system was characterized using a Bi4Ge3O12 crystal scintillator that exhibits good responsivity of the decay time constant as a function of temperature over a wide range (8-270 K). The scintillation sensor was calibrated and the uncertainty of the temperature measurements over the primary operation temperature range of the beamline (30-150 K) was assessed to be ±1.6 K. It has been shown that the temperature of the sample holder, measured using the luminescence sensor, agrees well with the expected value. The technique was applied to characterize the thermal performance of different sample mounts that have been used in MX experiments at the I23 beamline. The thickness of the mount is shown to have the greatest impact upon the temperature distribution across the sample mount. Altogether, these tests and findings demonstrate the usefulness of the thermometry system in highlighting the challenges that remain to be addressed for the in-vacuum MX experiment to become a reliable and indispensable tool for structural biology.

  12. A Compact X-Ray System for Macromolecular Crystallography. 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ciszak, Ewa; Ponomarev, Igor; Joy, Marshall

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a high flux x-ray system for macromolecular crystallography that combines a microfocus x-ray generator (40 gm FWHM spot size at a power level of 46.5Watts) and a 5.5 mm focal distance polycapillary optic. The Cu K(sub alpha) X-ray flux produced by this optimized system is 7.0 times above the X-ray flux previously reported. The X-ray flux from the microfocus system is also 3.2 times higher than that produced by the rotating anode generator equipped with a long focal distance graded multilayer monochromator (Green optic; CMF24-48-Cu6) and 30% less than that produced by the rotating anode generator with the newest design of graded multilayer monochromator (Blue optic; CMF12-38-Cu6). Both rotating anode generators operate at a power level of 5000 Watts, dissipating more than 100 times the power of our microfocus x-ray system. Diffraction data collected from small test crystals are of high quality. For example, 42,540 reflections collected at ambient temperature from a lysozyme crystal yielded R(sub sym) 5.0% for the data extending to 1.7A, and 4.8% for the complete set of data to 1.85A. The amplitudes of the reflections were used to calculate difference electron density maps that revealed positions of structurally important ions and water molecules in the crystal of lysozyme using the phases calculated from the protein model.

  13. A Compact X-Ray System for Macromolecular Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ciszak, Ewa; Ponomarev, Igor; Gibson, Walter; Joy, Marshall

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of a high flux x-ray system for a macromolecular crystallography that combines a microfocus x-ray generator (40 micrometer full width at half maximum spot size at a power level of 46.5 W) and a collimating polycapillary optic. The Cu Ka lpha x-ray flux produced by this optimized system through a 500,um diam orifice is 7.0 times greater than the x-ray flux previously reported by Gubarev et al. [M. Gubarev et al., J. Appl. Crystallogr. 33, 882 (2000)]. The x-ray flux from the microfocus system is also 2.6 times higher than that produced by a rotating anode generator equipped with a graded multilayer monochromator (green optic, Osmic Inc. CMF24-48-Cu6) and 40% less than that produced by a rotating anode generator with the newest design of graded multilayer monochromator (blue optic, Osmic, Inc. CMF12-38-Cu6). Both rotating anode generators operate at a power level of 5000 W, dissipating more than 100 times the power of our microfocus x-ray system. Diffraction data collected from small test crystals are of high quality. For example, 42 540 reflections collected at ambient temperature from a lysozyme crystal yielded R(sub sym)=5.0% for data extending to 1.70 A, and 4.8% for the complete set of data to 1.85 A. The amplitudes of the observed reflections were used to calculate difference electron density maps that revealed positions of structurally important ions and water molecules in the crystal of lysozyme using the phases calculated from the protein model.

  14. A simple quantitative model of macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding: Application to the murine prion protein(121-231)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2013-06-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. Macromolecular crowding is found to promote a decrease of the entropic cost of folding of proteins that produces an increase of both the stability and the folding rate. The acceleration of the folding rate due to macromolecular crowding is shown to be a topology-dependent effect. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). The differential effect of macromolecular crowding as a function of protein topology suffices to make non-native configurations relatively more accessible.

  15. Salivary gland cell differentiation and organization on micropatterned PLGA nanofiber craters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soscia, David A; Sequeira, Sharon J; Schramm, Robert A; Jayarathanam, Kavitha; Cantara, Shraddha I; Larsen, Melinda; Castracane, James

    2013-09-01

    There is a need for an artificial salivary gland as a long-term remedy for patients suffering from salivary hypofunction, a leading cause of chronic xerostomia (dry mouth). Current salivary gland tissue engineering approaches are limited in that they either lack sufficient physical cues and surface area needed to facilitate epithelial cell differentiation, or they fail to provide a mechanism for assembling an interconnected branched network of cells. We have developed highly-ordered arrays of curved hemispherical "craters" in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using wafer-level integrated circuit (IC) fabrication processes, and lined them with electrospun poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nanofibers, designed to mimic the three-dimensional (3-D) in vivo architecture of the basement membrane surrounding spherical acini of salivary gland epithelial cells. These micropatterned scaffolds provide a method for engineering increased surface area and were additionally investigated for their ability to promote cell polarization. Two immortalized salivary gland cell lines (SIMS, ductal and Par-C10, acinar) were cultured on fibrous crater arrays of various radii and compared with those grown on flat PLGA nanofiber substrates, and in 3-D Matrigel. It was found that by increasing crater curvature, the average height of the cell monolayer of SIMS cells and to a lesser extent, Par-C10 cells, increased to a maximum similar to that seen in cells grown in 3-D Matrigel. Increasing curvature resulted in higher expression levels of tight junction protein occludin in both cell lines, but did not induce a change in expression of adherens junction protein E-cadherin. Additionally, increasing curvature promoted polarity of both cell lines, as a greater apical localization of occludin was seen in cells on substrates of higher curvature. Lastly, substrate curvature increased expression of the water channel protein aquaporin-5 (Aqp-5) in Par-C10 cells, suggesting that curved nanofiber substrates

  16. Fabrication of AlN/BN bishell hollow nanofibers by electrospinning and atomic layer deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Haider

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum nitride (AlN/boron nitride (BN bishell hollow nanofibers (HNFs have been fabricated by successive atomic layer deposition (ALD of AlN and sequential chemical vapor deposition (CVD of BN on electrospun polymeric nanofibrous template. A four-step fabrication process was utilized: (i fabrication of polymeric (nylon 6,6 nanofibers via electrospinning, (ii hollow cathode plasma-assisted ALD of AlN at 100 °C onto electrospun polymeric nanofibers, (iii calcination at 500 °C for 2 h in order to remove the polymeric template, and (iv sequential CVD growth of BN at 450 °C. AlN/BN HNFs have been characterized for their chemical composition, surface morphology, crystal structure, and internal nanostructure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Measurements confirmed the presence of crystalline hexagonal BN and AlN within the three dimensional (3D network of bishell HNFs with relatively low impurity content. In contrast to the smooth surface of the inner AlN layer, outer BN coating showed a highly rough 3D morphology in the form of BN nano-needle crystallites. It is shown that the combination of electrospinning and plasma-assisted low-temperature ALD/CVD can produce highly controlled multi-layered bishell nitride ceramic hollow nanostructures. While electrospinning enables easy fabrication of nanofibrous template, self-limiting reactions of plasma-assisted ALD and sequential CVD provide control over the wall thicknesses of AlN and BN layers with sub-nanometer accuracy.

  17. Ammonia Sensing Behaviors of TiO2-PANI/PA6 Composite Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingqing; Dong, Xianjun; Pang, Zengyuan; Du, Yuanzhi; Xia, Xin; Wei, Qufu; Huang, Fenglin

    2012-01-01

    Titanium dioxide-polyaniline/polyamide 6 (TiO2-PANI/PA6) composite nanofibers were prepared by in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of PA6 nanofibers and a sputtering-deposition process with a high purity titanium sputtering target. TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers and PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers were fabricated for ammonia gas sensing. The ammonia sensing behaviors of the sensors were examined at room temperature. All the results indicated that the ammonia sensing property of TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers was superior to that of PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers. TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers had good selectivity to ammonia. It was also found that the content of TiO2 had a great influence on both the morphology and the sensing property of TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers. PMID:23235446

  18. Ammonia Sensing Behaviors of TiO2-PANI/PA6 Composite Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglin Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide-polyaniline/polyamide 6 (TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers were prepared by in situ polymerization of aniline in the presence of PA6 nanofibers and a sputtering-deposition process with a high purity titanium sputtering target. TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers and PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers were fabricated for ammonia gas sensing. The ammonia sensing behaviors of the sensors were examined at room temperature. All the results indicated that the ammonia sensing property of TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers was superior to that of PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers. TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers had good selectivity to ammonia. It was also found that the content of TiO2 had a great influence on both the morphology and the sensing property of TiO2-PANI/PA6 composite nanofibers.

  19. Transparent Conductive Films Fabricated from Polythiophene Nanofibers Composited with Conventional Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borjigin Aronggaowa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Transparent, conductive films were prepared by compositing poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT nanofibers with poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA. The transparency, conductivity, atmospheric stability, and mechanical strength of the resulting nanofiber composite films when doped with AuCl3 were evaluated and compared with those of P3HT nanofiber mats. The conductivity of the nanofiber composite films was 4.1 S∙cm−1, which is about seven times less than that which was previously reported for a nanofiber mat with the same optical transmittance (~80% reported by Aronggaowa et al. The time dependence of the transmittance, however, showed that the doping state of the nanofiber composite films in air was more stable than that of the nanofiber mats. The fracture stress of the nanofiber composite film was determined to be 12.3 MPa at 3.8% strain.

  20. A super hydrophilic modification of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanofibers: By in situ hydrothermal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Faheem A.; Zargar, Mohammad Afzal; Tamboli, Ashif H.; Kim, Hern

    2016-11-01

    Nanofibers fabricated from Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) possesses potential applications in the field of filtrations, because of their excellent resistance towards harsh chemicals. However, the hydrophobicity restricts its further application. In this work, we focus on optimal parameters for post-electrospun tethering of Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) as superhydrophilic domain onto each individual PVDF nanofibers by exploiting the in situ hydrothermal approach. The results indicated an increase in nanofiber diameters due to coating of PVA and improved surface wettability of PVDF nanofibers. The tensile tests of nanofibers indicated that mechanical properties of PVDF nanofibers could be sharply tuned from rigid to ductile. Furthermore, the studies strongly suggest that in situ hydrothermal treatment of post-electrospun nanofibers can improve the water contact angle and these nanofibers can be used in varied applications (e.g., in water purification systems).

  1. Efficient Roll-on Transfer Technique for Well-Aligned Organic Nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2011-01-01

    A transfer technique enabling efficient device integration of fragile organic nanostructures is presented. The technique is capable of transferring organic nanofibers to arbitrary substrates, the preservation of nanofiber morphology is demonstrated, and the optical properties are unaffected or ev...

  2. Robust superhydrophobic mats based on electrospun crystalline nanofibers combined with a silane precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Song Hee; Lee, Song Min; Lim, Ho Sun; Han, Joong Tark; Lee, Dong Ryeol; Shin, Hwa Sung; Jeong, Youngjin; Kim, Jooyong; Cho, Jeong Ho

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of solvent-resistant, mechanically robust, superhydrophobic nanofibrous mats by electrospinning of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) in the presence of inorganic silane materials. The solvent resistance and mechanical strength of nanofibrous mats were dramatically increased through the crystallization of as-spun PVDF fibers or incorporation of a tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) sol into the nanofibrous matrix. The electrospun nanofibrous mats yielded a water contact angle of 156 degrees that did not vary with TEOS content. The solvent resistance and mechanical robustness of the electrospun mats were significantly enhanced through extensive cross-linking of TEOS, even after short PVDF annealing times. The interpenetrating polymer network, which embeds polymer chains in a TEOS network, allows the fabrication of robust functional nanofibers by combining semicrystalline polymers with electrospinning techniques.

  3. Prospects for simulating macromolecular surfactant chemistry at the ocean-atmosphere boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, S.; Burrows, S. M.; Deal, C.; Liu, X.; Long, M.; Ogunro, O.; Russell, L. M.; Wingenter, O.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water-air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea-air interface into aerosol-cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification.

  4. Prospects for Simulating Macromolecular Surfactant Chemistry at the Ocean-Atmosphere Boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, S.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Deal, C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Long, M.; Ogunro, O.; Russell, Lynn M.; Wingenter, O.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water-air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea-air interface into aerosol-cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties in the surfactant logic distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification.

  5. Fabrication of Cellulose Nanofiber/AlOOH Aerogel for Flame Retardant and Thermal Insulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bitao Fan; Shujun Chen; Qiufang Yao; Qingfeng Sun; Chunde Jin

    2017-01-01

    Cellulose nanofiber/AlOOH aerogel for flame retardant and thermal insulation was successfully prepared through a hydrothermal method. Their flame retardant and thermal insulation properties were investigated. The morphology image of the cellulose nanofiber/AlOOH exhibited spherical AlOOH with an average diameter of 0.5 μm that was wrapped by cellulose nanofiber or adhered to them. Cellulose nanofiber/AlOOH composite aerogels exhibited excellent flame retardant and thermal insulation propertie...

  6. Fifteen years of the Protein Crystallography Station: the coming of age of macromolecular neutron crystallography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian C.-H. Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Protein Crystallography Station (PCS, located at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE, was the first macromolecular crystallography beamline to be built at a spallation neutron source. Following testing and commissioning, the PCS user program was funded by the Biology and Environmental Research program of the Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-OBER for 13 years (2002–2014. The PCS remained the only dedicated macromolecular neutron crystallography station in North America until the construction and commissioning of the MaNDi and IMAGINE instruments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which started in 2012. The instrument produced a number of research and technical outcomes that have contributed to the field, clearly demonstrating the power of neutron crystallography in helping scientists to understand enzyme reaction mechanisms, hydrogen bonding and visualization of H-atom positions, which are critical to nearly all chemical reactions. During this period, neutron crystallography became a technique that increasingly gained traction, and became more integrated into macromolecular crystallography through software developments led by investigators at the PCS. This review highlights the contributions of the PCS to macromolecular neutron crystallography, and gives an overview of the history of neutron crystallography and the development of macromolecular neutron crystallography from the 1960s to the 1990s and onwards through the 2000s.

  7. Fifteen years of the Protein Crystallography Station: the coming of age of macromolecular neutron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Julian C-H; Unkefer, Clifford J

    2017-01-01

    The Protein Crystallography Station (PCS), located at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE), was the first macromolecular crystallography beamline to be built at a spallation neutron source. Following testing and commissioning, the PCS user program was funded by the Biology and Environmental Research program of the Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-OBER) for 13 years (2002-2014). The PCS remained the only dedicated macromolecular neutron crystallography station in North America until the construction and commissioning of the MaNDi and IMAGINE instruments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which started in 2012. The instrument produced a number of research and technical outcomes that have contributed to the field, clearly demonstrating the power of neutron crystallo-graphy in helping scientists to understand enzyme reaction mechanisms, hydrogen bonding and visualization of H-atom positions, which are critical to nearly all chemical reactions. During this period, neutron crystallography became a technique that increasingly gained traction, and became more integrated into macromolecular crystallography through software developments led by investigators at the PCS. This review highlights the contributions of the PCS to macromolecular neutron crystallography, and gives an overview of the history of neutron crystallography and the development of macromolecular neutron crystallography from the 1960s to the 1990s and onwards through the 2000s.

  8. Detection of Macromolecular Fractions in HCN Polymers Using Electrophoretic and Ultrafiltration Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Yaseli, Margarita R; Cid, Cristina; Yagüe, Ana I; Ruiz-Bermejo, Marta

    2017-02-01

    Elucidating the origin of life involves synthetic as well as analytical challenges. Herein, for the first time, we describe the use of gel electrophoresis and ultrafiltration to fractionate HCN polymers. Since the first prebiotic synthesis of adenine by Oró, HCN polymers have gained much interest in studies on the origins of life due to the identification of biomonomers and related compounds within them. Here, we demonstrate that macromolecular fractions with electrophoretic mobility can also be detected within HCN polymers. The migration of polymers under the influence of an electric field depends not only on their sizes (one-dimensional electrophoresis) but also their different isoelectric points (two-dimensional electrophoresis, 2-DE). The same behaviour was observed for several macromolecular fractions detected in HCN polymers. Macromolecular fractions with apparent molecular weights as high as 250 kDa were detected by tricine-SDS gel electrophoresis. Cationic macromolecular fractions with apparent molecular weights as high as 140 kDa were also detected by 2-DE. The HCN polymers synthesized were fractionated by ultrafiltration. As a result, the molecular weight distributions of the macromolecular fractions detected in the HCN polymers directly depended on the synthetic conditions used to produce these polymers. The implications of these results for prebiotic chemistry will be discussed.

  9. A high output voltage flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator using porous lead-free KNbO3 nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshkumar, Rajasekaran; Cheah, Chin Wei; Xu, Ruize; Kim, Sang-Gook; Zhao, Rong

    2017-07-01

    Self-powered nanodevices for applications such as sensor networks and IoTs are among the emerging technologies in electronics. Piezoelectric nanogenerators (P-NGs) that harvest energy from mechanical stimuli are highly valuable in the development of self-sufficient nanosystems. Despite progress in the development of P-NGs, the use of porous perovskite ferroelectric nanofibers was barely considered or discussed. In this letter, a flexible high output nanogenerator is fabricated using a nanocomposite comprising porous potassium niobate (KNbO3) nanofibers and polydimethylsiloxane. When a compressive force was applied to as-fabricated P-NG, a peak-to-peak output voltage of ˜16 V and a maximum closed circuit current of 230 nA were obtained, which are high enough to realize self-powered nanodevices. In addition, due to their porosity and non-toxic nature, KNbO3 nanofibers may be used as an alternative to the dominant lead-based piezoelectric devices. Besides the high output performance of the device, multifunctional capability, flexible design, and cost-effective construction of the as-fabricated P-NG can be crucial to large-scale deployment of autonomous devices.

  10. Crosslinking of poly(L-lactide) nanofibers with triallyl isocyanutrate by gamma-irradiation for tissue engineering application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chuanglong; Feng, Wei; Cao, Lijun; Fan, Linpeng

    2011-12-15

    The radiation crosslinked poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) electrospun nanofibers have been developed with improved thermal stability and mechanical properties. Trially isocyanurate (TAIC) were added into PLLA solution at different weight ratios (1, 3, and 5%) and electrospun into nanofibrous mats, the mats were then irradiated by gamma ray at different radiation doses (5, 10, and 25 kGy) to crosslink the PLLA chains. Their surface morphology, thermal properties, mechanical properties, and biodegradation properties were investigated and compared before and after gamma irradiation. Furthermore, the in vitro biocompatibilities were also evaluated by using mouse L929 fibroblasts. The results indicated that the efficient crosslinking networks can be generated when the TAIC content is higher than 3%. The thermal stability and tensile mechanical properties were significantly increased at higher irradiation dose of 10 and 25 kGy. However, radiation dose at 25 kGy have an adverse effect on the thermal stability of crosslinked samples due to thermal degradation induced by irradiation, the crosslinked samples irradiated at 10 kGy exhibited the best enzymatic degradation. The in vitro results also revealed that the crosslinked PLLA/TAIC composite nanofibers did not induce cytotoxic effects and are suitable for cell growth. Therefore, the crosslinked PLLA nanofibers are one of the promising materials for future tissue engineering applications.

  11. Controlled Angiogenesis in Peptide Nanofiber Composite Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickremasinghe, Navindee C; Kumar, Vivek A; Shi, Siyu; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2015-09-14

    Multidomain peptide (MDP) nanofibers create scaffolds that can present bioactive cues to promote biological responses. Orthogonal self-assembly of MDPs and growth-factor-loaded liposomes generate supramolecular composite hydrogels. These composites can act as delivery vehicles with time-controlled release. Here we examine the controlled release of placental growth factor-1 (PlGF-1) for its ability to induce angiogenic responses. PlGF-1 was loaded either in MDP matrices or within liposomes bound inside MDP matrices. Scaffolds showed expected rapid infiltration of macrophages. When released through liposomes incorporated in MDP gels (MDP(Lipo)), PlGF-1 modulates HUVEC VEGF receptor activation in vitro and robust vessel formation in vivo. These loaded MDP(Lipo) hydrogels induce a high level of growth-factor-mediated neovascular maturity. MDP(Lipo) hydrogels offer a biocompatible and injectable platform to tailor drug delivery and treat ischemic tissue diseases.

  12. Carbon nanofiber supercapacitors with large areal capacitances

    KAUST Repository

    McDonough, James R.

    2009-01-01

    We develop supercapacitor (SC) devices with large per-area capacitances by utilizing three-dimensional (3D) porous substrates. Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) functioning as active SC electrodes are grown on 3D nickel foam. The 3D porous substrates facilitate a mass loading of active electrodes and per-area capacitance as large as 60 mg/ cm2 and 1.2 F/ cm2, respectively. We optimize SC performance by developing an annealing-free CNF growth process that minimizes undesirable nickel carbide formation. Superior per-area capacitances described here suggest that 3D porous substrates are useful in various energy storage devices in which per-area performance is critical. © 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Superhydrophobic behavior of fluorinated carbon nanofiber arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chien-Te; Fan, Wen-Syuan

    2006-06-01

    Superhydrophobic behavior of fluorinated carbon nanofiber (CNF) arrays, prepared by a template-assisted synthesis, has been investigated. A thermal chemical vapor method, using perfluorohexane as the precursor, was used to coat fluorocarbon on the surface of the CNFs, thus lowering their surface tension. The F-coated CNFs exhibited a good water-repellent behavior, i.e., the highest value of contact angle ˜166°. The superhydrophobicity of water droplets on the arrays can be well predicted by a modified Cassie-Baxter model, incorporating the pore size distributions determined from the density functional theory method. This satisfactory result would shed one light on how the variation of opened sizes would induce the superhydrophobicity of nanostructured surfaces.

  14. Microstructure transformation of carbon nanofibers during graphitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; TANG Yuan-hong; LIN Liang-wu; ZHANG En-lei

    2008-01-01

    The mierostructures of vapor-grown carbon nanofibers(CNFs) before and after graphitization process were analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy(HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry(XRD), near-edge-X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy(NEXAFS) and thermogravimetric analysis(TGA). The results indicate that although non-graphitized CNFs have the characteristics of higher disorder, a transformation is found in the inner layer of tube wall where graphite sheets become stiff, which demonstrates the characteristics of higher graphitization of graphitized CNFs. The defects in outer tube wall disappear because the amorphous carbon changes to perfect crystalline carbon after annealing treatment at about 2 800 ℃. TGA analysis in air indicates that graphitized CNFs have excellent oxidation resistance up to 857 ℃. And the graphitization mechanism including four stages was also proposed.

  15. Frame Stability of Tunnel‐Structured Cryptomelane Nanofibers: The Role of Tunnel Cations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Tao; Norby, Poul

    2013-01-01

    The role of tunnel K+ ions on the growth and stability of tunnel‐structured cryptomelane‐type MnO2 nanofibers (denoted as cryptomelane nanofibers hereafter) has been discussed by means of X‐ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Cryptomelane nanofibers with typical diameters of 20–80 nm and len...

  16. Fabrications of electrospun nanofibers containing inorganic fillers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Keun; Hwang, Won-Pill; Seo, Min-Hye; Lee, Jin-Kook; Kim, Mi-Ra

    2014-08-01

    Poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) nanofibers containing inorganic fillers were fabricated by electrospinning. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) using these nanofibers showed improved short circuit currents without degraded fill factors or open circuit voltages. The long-term stabilities of cells using electrospun PVDF-HFP/titanium isopropoxide (TIP) nanofibers were significantly improved.

  17. Imaging, spectroscopy, mechanical, alignment and biocompatibility studies of electrospun medical grade polyurethane (Carbothane™ 3575A) nanofibers and composite nanofibers containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Faheem A; Macossay, Javier; Cantu, Travis; Zhang, Xujun; Shamshi Hassan, M; Esther Salinas, M; Farhangi, Chakavak S; Ahmad, Hassan; Kim, Hern; Bowlin, Gary L

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we discuss the electrospinning of medical grade polyurethane (Carbothane™ 3575A) nanofibers containing multi-walled-carbon-nanotubes (MWCNTs). A simple method that does not depend on additional foreign chemicals has been employed to disperse MWCNTs through high intensity sonication. Typically, a polymer solution consisting of polymer/MWCNTs has been electrospun to form nanofibers. Physiochemical aspects of prepared nanofibers were evaluated by SEM, TEM, FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, confirming nanofibers containing MWCNTs. The biocompatibility and cell attachment of the produced nanofiber mats were investigated while culturing them in the presence of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. The results from these tests indicated non-toxic behavior of the prepared nanofiber mats and had a significant attachment of cells towards nanofibers. The incorporation of MWCNTs into polymeric nanofibers led to an improvement in tensile stress from 11.40 ± 0.9 to 51.25 ± 5.5 MPa. Furthermore, complete alignment of the nanofibers resulted in an enhancement on tensile stress to 72.78 ± 5.5 MPa. Displaying these attributes of high mechanical properties and non-toxic nature of nanofibers are recommended for an ideal candidate for future tendon and ligament grafts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of miktoarm star copolymer of styrene and butadiene using multifunctional macromolecular initiator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Yan Zhang; Xing Ying Zhang

    2009-01-01

    A new kind of multifunctional macromolecular initiator with Sn-C bonds and polydiene arms was synthesized by living anionic polymerization.At first,polydiene-stannum chloride(PD-SnCl3)was prepared by the reaction of n-butyl-Li(n-BuLi),stannic chloride(SnCl4)and diene.Then PD-SnCl3 was used to react with the dilithium initiator to prepare the multifunctional organic macromolecular initiators.The result suggested that the initiators had a remarkable yield by GPC,nearly 90%.By using these multifunctional macromolecular initiators,styrene and butadiene were effectively polymerized via anionic polymerization,which gave birth to novel miktoarm star copolymers.The relative molecular weight and polydispersity index,microstructure contents,copolymerization components,glass transition temperature(Tg)and morphology of the miktoarm star copolymers were investigated by GPC-UV,1H NMR,DSC and TEM,respectively.

  19. Use of Site-Specifically Tethered Chemical Nucleases to Study Macromolecular Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Srabani

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During a complex macromolecular reaction multiple changes in molecular conformation and interactions with ligands may occur. X-ray crystallography may provide only a limited set of snapshots of these changes. Solution methods can augment such structural information to provide a more complete picture of a macromolecular reaction. We analyzed the changes in protein conformation and protein:nucleic acid interactions which occur during transcription initiation by using a chemical nuclease tethered to cysteines introduced site-specifically into the RNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7 (T7 RNAP. Changes in cleavage patterns as the polymerase steps through transcription reveal a series of structural transitions which mediate transcription initiation. Cleavage by tethered chemical nucleases is seen to be a powerful method for revealing the conformational dynamics of macromolecular reactions, and has certain advantages over cross-linking or energy transfer approaches.

  20. 二氧化硅@聚合物同轴纳米纤维%Silica@Polymers Coaxial Nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪友良; 商铁存; 靳玉伟; 杨帆; 王策

    2005-01-01

    The preparation and formation mechamsm ot silica/polyvinylpyrrolidone(PAN) coaxial nanofibers were presented in this paper. The PVP-PAN composite nanofibers were obtained via an electrospinning technique, while SiO2 nanoparticles were prepared according to a Stoeher method. The measurements of water contact angle(WCA), the compared results of silica coating PVPPAN composite nanofibers with PAN nanofibers indicate that much PVP resided on the composite nanofiber surface, which resuks in the occurrence of SiO2@polymer coaxial nanofibers due to the formation of hydrogen bonding between silica and composite nanofibers and subsequent adsorption of silica on the fiber surface.

  1. Macromolecular Hydrogen Sulfide Donors Trigger Spatiotemporally Confined Changes in Cell Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercole, Francesca; Mansfeld, Friederike M; Kavallaris, Maria; Whittaker, Michael R; Quinn, John F; Halls, Michelle L; Davis, Thomas P

    2016-01-11

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in a myriad of cell signaling processes that trigger physiological events ranging from vasodilation to cell proliferation. Moreover, disturbances to H2S signaling have been associated with numerous pathologies. As such, the ability to release H2S in a cellular environment and stimulate signaling events is of considerable interest. Herein we report the synthesis of macromolecular H2S donors capable of stimulating cell signaling pathways in both the cytosol and at the cell membrane. Specifically, copolymers having pendent oligo(ethylene glycol) and benzonitrile groups were synthesized, and the benzonitrile groups were subsequently transformed into primary aryl thioamide groups via thionation using sodium hydrosulfide. These thioamide moieties could be incorporated into a hydrophilic copolymer or a block copolymer (i.e., into either the hydrophilic or hydrophobic domain). An electrochemical sensor was used to demonstrate release of H2S under simulated physiological conditions. Subsequent treatment of HEK293 cells with a macromolecular H2S donor elicited a slow and sustained increase in cytosolic ERK signaling, as monitored using a FRET-based biosensor. The macromolecular donor was also shown to induce a small, fast and sustained increase in plasma membrane-localized PKC activity immediately following addition to cells. Studies using an H2S-selective fluorescent probe in live cells confirmed release of H2S from the macromolecular donor over physiologically relevant time scales consistent with the signaling observations. Taken together, these results demonstrate that by using macromolecular H2S donors it is possible to trigger spatiotemporally confined cell signaling events. Moreover, the localized nature of the observed signaling suggests that macromolecular donor design may provide an approach for selectively stimulating certain cellular biochemical pathways.

  2. A single-composition CaSi2O2N2:RE (RE=Ce3+/Tb3+, Eu2+, Mn2+) phosphor nanofiber mat: Energy transfer, luminescence and tunable color properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bo; Chen, Zhenhua; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Hongzhi; Li, Yaogang

    2017-09-01

    CaSi2O2N2:RE (RE = Ce3+/Tb3+, Eu2+, Mn2+) phosphor nanofiber mat has been prepared via the electrospinning process and further annealing treatment. The diameter of nanofiber precursors are generally in a range of 400-600 nm, which exhibits smooth and uniform surface morphology. After removing the polymer template by high temperature treatment, the fabricated mats have been transformed into a phosphor film and maintain uniform nanofiber network microstructures. Photoluminescence (PL) properties of CaSi2O2N2 phosphor nanofiber mat have been activated by Ce3+/Tb3+, Eu2+ and Mn2+. The emission color of CaSi2O2N2:Ce3+/Tb3+, Eu2+, Mn2+ phosphor mats can be adjusted by modifying the concentration of doped Tb3+/Mn2+/Eu2+ and the resultant energy transfer process. Owing to the energy transfer of Ce3+-Tb3+, the emitting color of the phosphor mat can be changed from blue to green. Meanwhile, we still found that the switching of emitting colors from blue to red and blue to yellow can be achieved via the energy transfer of Ce3+-Mn2+ and Ce3+-Eu2+, respectively. We demonstrated a white light emission phosphor nanofiber mat by using CaSi2O2N2 system, which exhibited promising applications for near-UV WLEDs.

  3. The Joint Structural Biology Group beam lines at the ESRF: Modern macromolecular crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, E P

    2001-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography has evolved considerably over the last decade. Data sets in under an hour are now possible on high throughput beam lines leading to electron density and, possibly, initial models calculated on-site. There are five beam lines currently dedicated to macromolecular crystallography: the ID14 complex and BM-14 (soon to be superseded by ID-29). These lines handle over five hundred projects every six months and demand is increasing. Automated sample handling, alignment and data management protocols will be required to work efficiently with this demanding load. Projects developing these themes are underway within the JSBG.

  4. Aging changes of macromolecular synthesis in the mitochondria of mouse hepatocytes as revealed by microscopic radioautography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Tetsuji [Shinshu University, Matsumoto (Japan). Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology

    2007-07-01

    This mini-review reports aging changes of macromolecular synthesis in the mitochondria of mouse hepatocytes. We have observed the macromolecular synthesis, such as DNA, RNA and proteins, in the mitochondria of various mammalian cells by means of electron microscopic radioautography technique developed in our laboratory. The number of mitochondria per cell, number of labeled mitochondria per cell with 3H-thymidine, 3H-uridine and 3H-leucine, precursors for DNA, RNA and proteins, respectively, were counted and the labeling indices at various ages, from fetal to postnatal early days and several months to 1 and 2 years in senescence, were calculated, which showed variations due to aging. (author)

  5. THE STEADY/PULSATILE FLOW AND MACROMOLECULAR TRANSPORT IN T-BIFURCATION BLOOD VESSELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丁; 温功碧

    2003-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the steady and pulsatile, macromolecular( such as lowdensity lipopotein ( LDL ), Albumin ) transport in T-bifurcation was proposed. Theinfluence of Reynolds number and mass flow ratio etc. parameters on the velocity field andmass transport were calculated. The computational results predict that the blood flow factorsaffect the macromolecular distribution and the transport across the wall, it shows thathemodynamic play an important role in the process of atherosclerosis . The LDL and Albuminconcentration on the wall varies most greatly in flow bifurcation area where the wall shearstress varies greatly at the branching vessel and the atherosclerosis often appears there.

  6. Accounting for large amplitude protein deformation during in silico macromolecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastard, Karine; Saladin, Adrien; Prévost, Chantal

    2011-02-22

    Rapid progress of theoretical methods and computer calculation resources has turned in silico methods into a conceivable tool to predict the 3D structure of macromolecular assemblages, starting from the structure of their separate elements. Still, some classes of complexes represent a real challenge for macromolecular docking methods. In these complexes, protein parts like loops or domains undergo large amplitude deformations upon association, thus remodeling the surface accessible to the partner protein or DNA. We discuss the problems linked with managing such rearrangements in docking methods and we review strategies that are presently being explored, as well as their limitations and success.

  7. Influence of protein crowder size on hydration structure and dynamics in macromolecular crowding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Po-hung; Yu, Isseki; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the effects of protein crowder sizes on hydration structure and dynamics in macromolecular crowded systems by all-atom MD simulations. The crowded systems consisting of only small proteins showed larger total surface areas than those of large proteins at the same volume fractions. As a result, more water molecules were trapped within the hydration shells, slowing down water diffusion. The simulation results suggest that the protein crowder size is another factor to determine the effect of macromolecular crowding and to explain the experimental kinetic data of proteins and DNAs in the presence of crowding agents.

  8. Accounting for Large Amplitude Protein Deformation during in Silico Macromolecular Docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastard, Karine; Saladin, Adrien; Prévost, Chantal

    2011-01-01

    Rapid progress of theoretical methods and computer calculation resources has turned in silico methods into a conceivable tool to predict the 3D structure of macromolecular assemblages, starting from the structure of their separate elements. Still, some classes of complexes represent a real challenge for macromolecular docking methods. In these complexes, protein parts like loops or domains undergo large amplitude deformations upon association, thus remodeling the surface accessible to the partner protein or DNA. We discuss the problems linked with managing such rearrangements in docking methods and we review strategies that are presently being explored, as well as their limitations and success. PMID:21541061

  9. Accounting for Large Amplitude Protein Deformation during in Silico Macromolecular Docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Prévost

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid progress of theoretical methods and computer calculation resources has turned in silico methods into a conceivable tool to predict the 3D structure of macromolecular assemblages, starting from the structure of their separate elements. Still, some classes of complexes represent a real challenge for macromolecular docking methods. In these complexes, protein parts like loops or domains undergo large amplitude deformations upon association, thus remodeling the surface accessible to the partner protein or DNA.We discuss the problems linked with managing such rearrangements in docking methods and we review strategies that are presently being explored, as well as their limitations and success.

  10. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Diffraction Imaging of Defects in Biological Macromolecular Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z. W.; Lai, B.; Chu, Y. S.; Cai, Z.; Mancini, D. C.; Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Characterization of defects and/or disorder in biological macromolecular crystals presents much greater challenges than in conventional small-molecule crystals. The lack of sufficient contrast of defects is often a limiting factor in x-ray diffraction topography of protein crystals. This has seriously hampered efforts to understand mechanisms and origins of formation of imperfections, and the role of defects as essential entities in the bulk of macromolecular crystals. In this report, we employ a phase sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging approach for augmenting the contrast of defects in protein crystals.

  11. Poly(isophthalic acid)(ethylene oxide) as a Macromolecular Modulator for Metal-Organic Polyhedra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Teng-Hao; Wang, Le; Trueblood, Jonathan V; Grassian, Vicki H; Cohen, Seth M

    2016-08-03

    A new strategy was developed by using a polymer ligand, poly(isophthalic acid)(ethylene oxide), to modulate the growth of metal-organic polyhedra (MOP) crystals. This macromolecular modulator can effectively control the crystal habit of several different Cu24L24 (L = isophthalic acid derivatives) MOPs. The polymer also directed the formation of MOP structures under reaction conditions that only produce metal-organic frameworks in the absence of modulator. Moreover, the polymer also enabled the deposition of MOP crystals on glass surfaces. This macromolecular modulator strategy provides an innovative approach to control the morphology and assembly of MOP particles.

  12. Effect of macromolecular crowding on the rate of diffusion-limited enzymatic reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manish Agrawal; S B Santra; Rajat Anand; Rajaram Swaminathan

    2008-08-01

    The cytoplasm of a living cell is crowded with several macromolecules of different shapes and sizes. Molecular diffusion in such a medium becomes anomalous due to the presence of macromolecules and diffusivity is expected to decrease with increase in macromolecular crowding. Moreover, many cellular processes are dependent on molecular diffusion in the cell cytosol. The enzymatic reaction rate has been shown to be affected by the presence of such macromolecules. A simple numerical model is proposed here based on percolation and diffusion in disordered systems to study the effect of macromolecular crowding on the enzymatic reaction rates. The model qualitatively explains some of the experimental observations.

  13. Nanofibers of Ca2Fe2O5: A novel material for aqueous supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundriyal, Sandeep Kumar; Bhagwan, Jai; Sharma, Yogesh

    2016-05-01

    Porous, aligned and high aspect ratio nanofibers of Ca2Fe2O5 (CFO) have been fabricated by varying various system and process parameter of electrospinning technique for the first time. CFO nanofibers are further characterized by XRD, FESEM and BET surface area. The diameter of as-spun nanofibers of CFO was found to be polymer concentration dependent. Heating profile is found to be responsible for alignment of CFO nanofibers. For the first time, novel CFO nanofibers were subjected to cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD) cycling to investigate its energy storage performance as electrode material for aqueous supercapacitor, and accordingly preliminary results are discussed.

  14. Wet-Laid Meets Electrospinning: Nonwovens for Filtration Applications from Short Electrospun Polymer Nanofiber Dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Markus; Greiner, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Dispersions of short electrospun fibers are utilized for the preparation of nanofiber nonwovens with different weight area on filter substrates. The aerosol filtration efficiencies of suspension-borne nanofiber nonwovens are compared to nanofiber nonwovens prepared directly by electrospinning with similar weight area. The filtration efficiencies are found to be similar for both types of nonwovens. With this, a large potential opens for processing, design, and application of new nanofiber nonwovens obtained by wet-laying of short electrospun nanofiber suspensions. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Synthesis and electrical property of indium tin oxide nanofibers using electrospinning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-In; Lee, Kun-Jae; Kim, Ki Do; Kim, Hee Taik; Chang, Young-Wook; Kang, Shin-Choon; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2007-11-01

    In this study indium tin oxide (ITO) nanofibers were synthesized using an electrospinning method. The morphological properties of the ITO nanofibers were considered and their specific resistances were measured to determine their applicability as filler for a transparent conducting film. ITO/PVP composite nanofibers were successfully obtained by electrospinning using a precursor solution containing indium nitrate, tin chloride, and poly(vinlypyrrolidone). After the heat treatment of ITO/PVP composite nanofibers at 600 degrees C and 1000 degrees C, ITO nanofibers with an average diameter of about 168 nm and 165 nm were synthesized, respectively.

  16. Spherical and rodlike inorganic nanoparticle regulated the orientation of carbon nanotubes in polymer nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Linbin; Tu, Hu; Lu, Yuan; Wu, Yang; Tian, Jing; Shi, Xiaowen; Wang, Qun; Zhan, Yingfei; Huang, Zuqiang; Deng, Hongbing

    2016-04-01

    PVA nanofibers containing carboxylic-modified MWCNTs were fabricated via electrospinning of PVA/MWCNTs mixed solution. The alignment of MWCNTs in PVA nanofibers was studied using transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope. In addition, the orientation of MWCNTs in PVA nanofibers was further investigated in the presence of rod-like nanoparticle rectorite (REC) and of spherical nanoparticle titanium dioxide (TiO2). The images demonstrated the embedment of MWCNTs in the nanofibers and the alignment of MWCNTs along the fiber axis. Moreover, the addition of REC and TiO2 improved the alignment of MWCNTs in PVA nanofibers.

  17. Polypyrrole-Coated Electrospun PLGA Nanofibers for Neural Tissue Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Young; Bashur, Chris A.; Goldstein, Aaron S.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning is a promising approach to create nanofiber structures that are capable of supporting adhesion and guiding extension of neurons for nerve regeneration. Concurrently, electrical stimulation of neurons in the absence of topographical features also has been shown to guide axonal extension. Therefore, the goal of this study was to form electrically conductive nanofiber structures and to examine the combined effect of nanofiber structures and electrical stimulation. Conductive meshes were produced by growing polypyrrole (PPy) on random and aligned electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers, as confirmed by scanning electron micrographs and X-ray photon spectroscopy. PPy-PLGA electrospun meshes supported the growth and differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells and hippocampal neurons comparable to non-coated PLGA control meshes, suggesting that PPy-PLGA may be suitable as conductive nanofibers for neuronal tissue scaffolds. Electrical stimulation studies showed that PC12 cells, stimulated with a potential of 10 mV/cm on PPy-PLGA scaffolds, exhibited 40–50% longer neurites and 40–90% more neurite formation compared to unstimulated cells on the same scaffolds. In addition, stimulation of the cells on aligned PPy-PLGA fibers resulted in longer neurites and more neurite-bearing cells than stimulation on random PPy-PLGA fibers, suggesting a combined effect of electrical stimulation and topographical guidance and the potential use of these scaffolds for neural tissue applications. PMID:19501901

  18. Application of Nanofiber Technology to Nonwoven Thermal Insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip W. Gibson, Ph.D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanofiber technology (fiber diameter less than 1 micrometer is under development for future Army lightweight protective clothing systems. Nanofiber applications for ballistic and chemical/biological protection are being actively investigated, but the thermal properties of nanofibers and their potential protection against cold environments are relatively unknown. Previous studies have shown that radiative heat transfer in fibrous battings is minimized at fiber diameters between 5 and 10 micrometers. However, the radiative heat transfer mechanism of extremely small diameter fibers of less than 1 micrometer diameter is not well known. Previous studies were limited to glass fibers, which have a unique set of thermal radiation properties governed by the thermal emissivity properties of glass. We are investigating the thermal transfer properties of high loft nanofiber battings composed of carbon fiber and various polymeric fibers such as polyacrylonitrile, nylon, and polyurethane. Thermal insulation battings incorporating nanofibers could decrease the weight and bulk of current thermal protective clothing, and increase mobility for soldiers in the battlefield.

  19. Encapsulation of Lactobacillus plantarum 423 and its Bacteriocin in Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heunis, T D J; Botes, M; Dicks, L M T

    2010-03-01

    Plantaricin 423, produced by Lactobacillus plantarum 423, was encapsulated in nanofibers that were produced by the electrospinning of 18% (w/v) polyethylene oxide (200 000 Da). The average diameter of the nanofibers was 288 nm. Plantaricin 423 activity decreased from 51 200 AU/ml to 25 600 AU/ml and from 204 800 AU/ml to 51 200 AU/ml after electrospinning, as determined against Lactobacillus sakei DSM 20017 and Enterococcus faecium HKLHS, respectively. Cells of L. plantarum 423 encapsulated in nanofibers decreased from 2.3 × 10(10) cfu/ml before electrospinning to 4.7 × 10(8) cfu/ml thereafter. Cells entrapped in the nanofibers continued to produce plantaricin 423. This is the first report on the encapsulation of a bacteriocin and cells of L. plantarum in nanofibers. The method may be used to design a drug delivery system for bacteriocins and the encapsulation of probiotic lactic acid bacteria. The technology is currently being optimized.

  20. Solution Blow Spinning of Food-Grade Gelatin Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Avena-Bustillos, Roberto J; Bilbao-Sainz, Cristina; Woods, Rachelle; Chiou, Bor-Sen; Wood, Delilah; Williams, Tina; Yokoyama, Wallace; Glenn, Gregory M; McHugh, Tara H; Zhong, Fang

    2017-06-01

    The primary advantage of nanofibers over larger diameter fibers is the larger surface area to volume ratio. This study evaluated solution blow spinning (SBS) processing conditions for obtaining food-grade gelatin nanofibers from mammalian and fishery byproducts, such as pork skin gelatins (PGs) and high molecular weight fish skin gelatin (HMWFG). HMWFG had a highest intact collagen structure compared to PGs. PGs with different Bloom values, solution viscosities, and surface tensions were compared with HMWFG for their ability to produce nanofibers through SBS. Only HMWFG fibers were obtained irrespective of processing conditions, which looked like fluffy cotton candy. HMWFG nanofibers had round morphologies with a narrower diameter distribution and lower average fiber diameter (AFD) under medium gelatin concentrations, medium air pressures, and medium feed rates. The highest glass transition temperature (Tg ) values were obtained at medium concentrations, medium air pressure, and either high or low feed rate. The thinnest HMWFG nanofibers with an AFD of 80.1 nm and the highest Tg value of 59.0 °C could be formed by combining a concentration of 17.6% (w/v), an air pressure of 0.379 MPa, and a feed rate of 0.06 mL/min from the response surface analysis. HMWFG Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller surface area increased from 221 to 237 m(2) /g, indicating their potential applicability for active compound carrier. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  1. Phytotoxicity of soluble graphitic nanofibers to model plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorka, Danielle E; Jeger, Jonathan Litvak; Zhang, Hongbo; Ma, Yanwen; Colman, Benjamin P; Bernhardt, Emily S; Liu, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are considered promising for applications in energy storage, catalysis, and electronics. This has motivated study of their potential environmental toxicity. Recently, a novel nanomaterial consisting of graphene oxide wrapped around a carbon nanotube (CNT) core was synthesized. The resulting soluble graphitic nanofibers were found to have superior catalytic properties, which could result in their use in fuel cells. Before this material undergoes widespread use, its environmental toxicity must be determined because of its aqueous solubility. The authors used the plant species Lolium multiflorum, Solanum lycopersicum, and Lactuca sativa to study the toxicity of the soluble graphitic nanofibers, as well as multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphene oxide, all synthesized in-house. Soluble graphitic nanofiber-exposed plant roots and shoots showed decreased growth, with roots showing more toxicity than shoots. Decreased pH of nanomaterial solutions corresponded to insignificantly decreased root growth, suggesting that another mechanism of toxicity must exist. Agglomeration and adsorption of soluble graphitic nanofibers onto the roots likely caused the remaining toxicity because a gray layer could be seen around the surface of the root. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes showed little toxicity over the concentration range tested, whereas graphene oxide showed a unique pattern of high toxicity at both the lowest and highest concentrations tested. Overall, soluble graphitic nanofibers showed moderate toxicity between that of the more toxic graphene oxide and the relatively nontoxic MWCNTs. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2941-2947. © 2016 SETAC.

  2. Needleless Electrospinning Experimental Study and Nanofiber Application in Semiconductor Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianwei

    Electronics especially mobile electronics such as smart phones, tablet PCs, notebooks and digital cameras are undergoing rapid development nowadays and have thoroughly changed our lives. With the requirement of more transistors, higher power, smaller size, lighter weight and even bendability, thermal management of these devices became one of the key challenges. Compared to active heat management system, heat pipe, which is a passive fluidic system, is considered promising to solve this problem. However, traditional heat pipes have size, weight and capillary limitation. Thus new type of heat pipe with smaller size, lighter weight and higher capillary pressure is needed. Nanofiber has been proved with superior properties and has been applied in multiple areas. This study discussed the possibility of applying nanofiber in heat pipe as new wick structure. In this study, a needleless electrospinning device with high productivity rate was built onsite to systematically investigate the effect of processing parameters on fiber properties as well as to generate nanofiber mat to evaluate its capability in electronics cooling. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) and Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) nanofibers were generated. Tensiometer was used for wettability measurement. The results show that independent parameters including spinneret type, working distance, solution concentration and polymer type are strongly correlated with fiber morphology compared to other parameters. The results also show that the fabricated nanofiber mat has high capillary pressure.

  3. Antibacterial Properties of Novel Bacterial Cellulose Nanofiber Containing Silver Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨加志; 刘晓丽; 黄立勇; 孙东平

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we describe a novel facile method to prepare long one-dimensional hybrid nanofibers by using hydrated bacterial cellulose nanofibers (BCF) as a template. Silver (Ag) nanoparticles with an average di-ameter of 1.5 nm were well dispersed on BCF via a simple in situ chemical-reduction between AgNO3 and NaBH4 at a relatively low temperature. A growth mechanism is proposed that Ag nanoparticles are uniformly anchored onto BCF by coordination with BC-containing hydroxyl groups. The bare BCF and as-prepared Ag/BCF hybrid nanofibers were characterized by several techniques including transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogra-vimetric analyses, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectra. The antibacterial properties of Ag/BCF hybrid nanofibers against Escherichia coli (E. coli, Gram-negative) and Staphylococcu saureus (S. saureus, Gram-positive) bacteria were evaluated by using modified Kirby Bauer method and colony forming count method. The results show that Ag nanoparticles are well dispersed on BCF surface via in situ chemical-reduction. The Ag/BCF hybrid nanofiber presents strong antibacterial property and thus offers its candidature for use as functional antimicrobial agents.

  4. Enhancement of Ultrahigh Performance Concrete Material Properties with Carbon Nanofiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libya Ahmed Sbia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh performance concrete (UHPC realized distinctly high mechanical, impermeability, and durability characteristics by reducing the size and content of capillary pore, refining the microstructure of cement hydrates, and effectively using fiber reinforcement. The dense and fine microstructure of UHPC favor its potential to effectively disperse and interact with nanomaterials, which could complement the reinforcing action of fibers in UHPC. An optimization experimental program was implemented in order to identify the optimum combination of steel fiber and relatively low-cost carbon nanofiber in UHPC. The optimum volume fractions of steel fiber and carbon nanofiber identified for balanced improvement of flexural strength, ductility, energy sorption capacity, impact, and abrasion resistance of UHPC were 1.1% and 0.04%, respectively. Desired complementary/synergistic actions of nanofibers and steel fibers in UHPC were detected, which were attributed to their reinforcing effects at different scales, and the potential benefits of nanofibers to interfacial bonding and pull-out behavior of fibers in UHPC. Modification techniques which enhanced the hydrophilicity and bonding potential of nanofibers to cement hydrates benefited their reinforcement efficiency in UHPC.

  5. Evaluation of proanthocyanidin-crosslinked electrospun gelatin nanofibers for drug delivering system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chiung-Hua [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 40601, Taiwan (China); Chi, Chin-Ying [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 40601, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yueh-Sheng [School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuo-Yu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pei-Lain [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung 40601, Taiwan (China); Yao, Chun-Hsu, E-mail: chyao@mail.cmu.edu.tw [School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are excellent candidates for various biomedical applications. We successfully fabricated proanthocyanidin-crosslinked gelatin electrospun nanofibers. Proanthocyanidin, a low cytotoxic collagen crosslinking reagent, increased the gelatin crosslinking percentage in the nanofibers from 53% to 64%. The addition of proanthocyanidin kept the nanofibers from swelling, and, thus, made the fibers more stable in the aqueous state. The compatibility and the release behavior of the drug in the nanofibers were examined using magnesium ascorbyl phosphate as the model drug. Proanthocyanidin also promoted drug loading and kept the drug release rate constant. These properties make the proanthocyanidin-crosslinked gelatin nanofibers an excellent material for drug delivery. In the cell culture study, L929 fibroblast cells had a significantly higher proliferation rate when cultured with the gelatin/proanthocyanidin blended nanofibers. This characteristic showed that proanthocyanidin-crosslinked gelatin electrospun nanofibers could potentially be employed as a wound healing material by increasing cell spreading and proliferation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proanthocyanidin-crosslinked gelatin nanofibers (GEL/PA) is synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proanthocyanidin promoted drug loading and kept the drug release rate constant. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The GEL/PA nanofibers accelerate fibroblast cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The GEL/PA nanofibers increase the drug loading efficiency.

  6. Surface functionalization of carbon nanofibers by sol-gel coating of zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao Dongfeng [Key Laboratory of Eco-textiles, Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China); Changzhou Textile Garment Institute, Changzhou 213164 (China); Wei Qufu [Key Laboratory of Eco-textiles, Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)], E-mail: qfwei@jiangnan.edu.cn; Zhang Liwei; Cai Yibing; Jiang Shudong [Key Laboratory of Eco-textiles, Ministry of Education, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122 (China)

    2008-08-15

    In this paper the functional carbon nanofibers were prepared by the carbonization of ZnO coated PAN nanofibers to expand the potential applications of carbon nanofibers. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers were obtained by electrospinning. The electrospun PAN nanofibers were then used as substrates for depositing the functional layer of zinc oxide (ZnO) on the PAN nanofiber surfaces by sol-gel technique. The effects of coating, pre-oxidation and carbonization on the surface morphology and structures of the nanofibers were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results of SEM showed a significant increase of the size of ZnO nanograins on the surface of nanofibers after the treatments of coating, pre-oxidation and carbonization. The observations by SEM also revealed that ZnO nanoclusters were firmly and clearly distributed on the surface of the carbon nanofibers. FTIR examination also confirmed the deposition of ZnO on the surface of carbon nanofibers. The XRD analysis indicated that the crystal structure of ZnO nanograins on the surface of carbon nanofibers.

  7. Cyclodextrin-grafted electrospun cellulose acetate nanofibers via “Click” reaction for removal of phenanthrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebioglu, Asli; Demirci, Serkan; Uyar, Tamer

    2014-06-01

    Beta-cyclodextrin (β-CD) functionalized cellulose acetate (CA) nanofibers have been successfully prepared by combining electrospinning and “click” reaction. Initially, β-CD and electrospun CA nanofibers were modified so as to be azide-β-CD and propargyl-terminated CA nanofibers, respectively. Then, “click” reaction was performed between modified CD molecules and CA nanofibers to obtain permanent grafting of CDs onto nanofibers surface. It was observed from the SEM image that, while CA nanofibers have smooth surface, there were some irregularities and roughness at nanofibers morphology after the modification. Yet, the fibrous structure was still protected. ATR-FTIR and XPS revealed that, CD molecules were successfully grafted onto surface of CA nanofibers. The adsorption capacity of β-CD-functionalized CA (CA-CD) nanofibers was also determined by removing phenanthrene (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAH) from its aqueous solution. Our results indicate that CA-CD nanofibers have potential to be used as molecular filters for the purpose of water purification and waste water treatment by integrating the high surface area of nanofibers with inclusion complexation property of CD molecules.

  8. Bioactive Glass Nanoparticles-Loaded Poly(ɛ-caprolactone Nanofiber as Substrate for ARPE-19 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeu Henrique Lima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass nanoparticles-loaded poly(ɛ-caprolactone nanofibers (BIOG PCL nanofibers were synthesized and evaluated as substrates for ocular cells (ARPE-19. BIOG PCL nanofibers were characterized using SEM, FTIR, and DSC, and the in vitro degradation profile was also investigated. The in vitro ocular biocompatibility of nanofibers was exploited in Müller glial cells (MIO-M1 cells and in chorioallantoic membrane (CAM; and the proliferative capacity, cytotoxicity, and functionality were evaluated. Finally, ARPE-19 cells were seeded onto BIOG PCL nanofibers and they were investigated as supports for in vitro cell adhesion and proliferation. SEM images revealed the incorporation of BIOG nanoparticles into PCL nanofibers. Nanoparticles did not induce modifications in the chemical structure and semicrystalline nature of PCL in the nanofiber, as shown by FTIR and DSC. MIO-M1 cells exposed to BIOG PCL nanofibers showed viability, and they were able to proliferate and to express GFAP, indicating cellular functionality. Moreover, nanofibers were well tolerated by CAM. These findings suggested the in vitro ocular biocompatibility and absence of toxicity of these nanofibers. Finally, the BIOG nanoparticles modulated the protein adsorption, and, subsequently, ARPE-19 cells adhered and proliferated onto the nanostructured supports, establishing cell-substrate interactions. In conclusion, the biodegradable and biocompatible BIOG PCL nanofibers supported the ARPE-19 cells.

  9. Biomedical Applications of Antibacterial Nanofiber Mats Made of Electrospinning with Wire Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jun Pan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Twisted stainless steel wires are used as wire electrodes for electrospinning the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/zinc citrate nanofiber mats. The morphology and diameter of the nanofibers in PVA/zinc citrate nanofiber mats are evaluated. We measured the antibacterial efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus and Escherichia coli (E. coli of the nanofiber mats. We also examined the cell adhesion affinity of mammalian tissue culture cells on these nanofiber mats. Our results indicate that an increase in zinc citrate increases the viscosity and electrical conductivity of PVA solution. In addition, increasing zinc citrate results in a smaller diameter of nanofibers that reaches below 100 nm. According to the antibacterial test results, increasing zinc citrate enlarges the inhibition zone of S. aureus but only has a bacteriostatic effect against E. coli. Finally, cell adhesion test results indicate that all nanofiber mats have satisfactory cell attachment regardless of the content of zinc citrate.

  10. Highly Aligned Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoro propylene) Nanofibers via Electrospinning Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-Hwan; Nirmala, R; Kim, Tae Woo; Navamathavan, R; Kim, Hak Yong; Park, Soo Jin

    2016-01-01

    We report on the simple way of obtaining aligned poly(vinylidiene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) nanofibers by electrospinning process. The collector drum rotation speed was adjusted to prepare well aligned PVDF-HFP nanofibers. The degree of alignment and the orientation of PVDF-HFP nanofibers can be significantly altered by varying the speed of collector drum rotation. The resultant PVDF-HFP nanofibers were systematically characterized. From the scanning electron microscopy data, it was found that the electrospun PVDF-HFP nanofibers were formed with well-aligned nature. The X-ray diffraction results revealed that the electrospun PVDF-HFP nanofibers with β-phase can be formed by the increased collector drum rotation speed. Overall, the collector rotation speed during the electrospinning process plays an important role in obtaining well-aligned and improved characteristics of PVDF-HFP nanofibers.

  11. Electrospun nanofibers of collagen-chitosan and P(LLA-CL) for tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Xiumei; CHEN Zonggang; Hans J.Weber

    2007-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers could be used to mimic the nanofibrous structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in native tissue.In tissue engineering,the ECM could be used as tissue engineering scaffold to solve tissue engineering prob-lems.In this paper,poly(L-lactid-co-ε-caprolactone) [P(LLA-CL)] nanofibers and collagen-chitosan complex nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning.Results of the experi-ments showed that the mechanical properties of the collagen- chitosan complex nanofibers varied with the collagen content in the complex.It was also found that the biodegradability of P(LLA-CL) nanofibers was faster than its membrane and that smooth muscle cells (SMC) grow faster on collagen nanofibers than on P(LLA-CL) nanofibers.

  12. Fabrication and optical properties of Y2O3: Eu3+ nanofibers prepared by electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guoping; Chi, Yingzhi; Xiao, Xiudi; Liu, Xiaofeng; Qian, Bin; Ma, Zhijun; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping; Chen, Danping; Qiu, Jianrong

    2009-12-07

    Y(2)O(3): Eu(3+) nanofibers with the average diameter of ~300 nm were in situ fabricated by electrospinning. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirmed that the Y(2)O(3): Eu(3+) nanofibers were composed of pure body-centered cubic (bcc) Y(2)O(3) phase. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results indicated that Y(2)O(3): Eu(3+) nanofibers were constituted of nonspherical crystalline grains, and these crystalline grains were orderly arranged along the axial direction of single nanofiber. These Y(2)O(3): Eu(3+) nanofibers showed a partially polarized photoluminescence (PL). The arrangement of crystalline grains and the mismatch of dielectric constant between Y(2)O(3): Eu(3+) nanofiber and its environment probably contributed together to the polarized PL from Y(2)O(3): Eu(3+) nanofiber.

  13. Antibacterial Properties of Titanate Nanofiber Thin Films Formed on a Titanium Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsunori Yada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A sodium titanate nanofiber thin film and a silver nanoparticle/silver titanate nanofiber thin film formed on the surface of a titanium plate exhibited strong antibacterial activities against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which is one of the major bacteria causing in-hospital infections. Exposure of the sodium titanate nanofiber thin film to ultraviolet rays generated a high antibacterial activity due to photocatalysis and the sodium titanate nanofiber thin film immediately after its synthesis possessed a high antibacterial activity even without exposure to ultraviolet rays. Elution of silver from the silver nanoparticle/silver titanate nanofiber thin film caused by the silver ion exchange reaction was considered to contribute substantially to the strong antibacterial activity. The titanate nanofiber thin films adhered firmly to titanium. Therefore, these titanate nanofiber thin film/titanium composites will be extremely useful as implant materials that have excellent antibacterial activities.

  14. Development of green nanocomposites reinforced by cellulose nanofibers extracted from paper sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hitoshi; Nakagaito, Antonio N.; Kusaka, Kazuya; Muneta, Yuya

    2015-03-01

    Cellulose nanofibers have been showing much greater potential to enhance the mechanical and physical properties of polymer-based composite materials. The purpose of this study is to extract the cellulose nanofibers from waste bio-resources; such as waste newspaper and paper sludge. The cellulosic raw materials were treated chemically and physically in order to extract individualized cellulose nanofiber. The combination of acid hydrolysis and following mechanical treatment resulted in the extraction of cellulose nanofibers having diameter of about 40 nm. In order to examine the reinforcing effect of the extracted cellulose nanofibers, fully biodegradable green nanocomposites were fabricated by composing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) resin with the extracted cellulose nanofibers, and then the tensile tests were conducted. The results showed that the enhancement in mechanical properties was successfully obtained in the cellulose nanofiber/PVA green nanocomposites.

  15. Electrospinning cellulose based nanofibers for sensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nartker, Steven

    2009-12-01

    Bacterial pathogens have recently become a serious threat to the food and water supply. A biosensor based on an electrochemical immunoassay has been developed for detecting food borne pathogens, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7. These sensors consist of several materials including, cellulose, cellulose nitrate, polyaniline and glass fibers. The current sensors have not been optimized in terms of microscale architecture and materials. The major problem associated with the current sensors is the limited concentration range of pathogens that provides a linear response on the concentration conductivity chart. Electrospinning is a process that can be used to create a patterned fiber mat design that will increase the linear range and lower the detection limit of these sensors by improving the microscale architecture. Using the electrospinning process to produce novel mats of cellulose nitrate will offer improved surface area, and the cellulose nitrate can be treated to further improve chemical interactions required for sensor activity. The macro and micro architecture of the sensor is critical to the performance of the sensors. Electrospinning technology can be used to create patterned architectures of nanofibers that will enhance sensor performance. To date electrospinning of cellulose nitrate has not been performed and optimization of the electrospinning process will provide novel materials suitable for applications such as filtration and sensing. The goal of this research is to identify and elucidate the primary materials and process factors necessary to produce cellulose nitrate nanofibers using the electrospinning process that will improve the performance of biosensors. Cellulose nitrate is readily dissolved in common organic solvents such as acetone, tetrahydrofuran (THF) and N,N dimethylformamide (DMF). These solvents can be mixed with other latent solvents such as ethanol and other alcohols to provide a solvent system with good electrospinning behavior

  16. Fabrication of NiO/zirconium oxide nanofibers by electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Venkatesan, Arunachalam; Agarwal, Satya R; Ahamed, Nabeela Nasreen Shaik Anwar; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-12-01

    The electrospinning technique has been used to fabricate 1D inorganic-organic composite nanofibers from solutions containing poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and suitable aqueous precursors of nickel and zirconium ions. Upon calcination, nickel oxide/zirconia nanofibers retained the original morphological features of as-spun nanofibers. X-ray diffraction was used to identify the crystalline nature of the final product and analytical tools such as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to elucidate the pathway of ceramic phase formation and the systematic evolution of morphological features in the as-spun and calcined fibers. These fibers will find potential applications in biomedical field.

  17. Laser-induced charge separation in organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Behn, Dino; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    -assemble into crystalline nanofibers by vapor deposition onto muscovite mica substrates, and we have recently shown that such nanofibers can be transferred to different substrates by roll-printing and used as the active material in e.g. organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs......Organic semiconductors have unique properties that can be tailored via synthetic chemistry for specific applications, which combined with their low price and straight-forward processing over large areas make them interesting materials for future devices. Certain oligomers can self......), and organic phototransistors (OPTs). However, several device-related issues incl. charge-separation and local band structure remain poorly understood. In this work, we use electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) combined with optical microscopy to study the local surface charge of an individual organic nanofiber...

  18. Laser-induced charge separation in organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Behn, Dino; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Organic semiconductors have unique properties that can be tailored via synthetic chemistry for specific applications, which combined with their low price and straight-forward processing over large areas make them interesting materials for future devices. Certain oligomers can self......-assemble into crystalline nanofibers by vapor deposition onto muscovite mica substrates, and we have recently shown that such nanofibers can be transferred to different substrates by roll-printing and used as the active material in e.g. organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs......), and organic phototransistors (OPTs). However, several device-related issues incl. charge-separation and local band structure remain poorly understood. In this work, we use electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) combined with optical microscopy to study the local surface charge of an individual organic nanofiber...

  19. Conductive Behaviors of Carbon Nanofibers Reinforced Epoxy Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI Qilin; WANG Jihui; WANG Fuling; HUANG Zhixiong; YANG Xiaolin; WEI Tao

    2008-01-01

    By means of ultrasonic dispersion,carbon nanofibers reinforced epoxy resin composite was prepared in the lab,the electrical conductivity of composite with different carbon nanofibers loadings were studied,also the voltage-current relationship,resistance-temperature properties and mechano-electric effect were investigated.Results show that the resistivity of composite decreases in geometric progression with the increasing of carbon nanofibers,and the threshold ranges between 0.1 wt%-0.2 wt%.The voltage-current relationship is in good conformity with the Ohm's law,both positive temperature coefficient and negative temperature coefficient can be found at elevated temperature.In the course of stretching,the electrical resistance of the composites increases with the stress steadily and changes sharply near the breaking point,which is of importance for the safety monitor and structure health diagnosis.

  20. Giant Thermal Rectification from Polyethylene Nanofiber Thermal Diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Teng

    2015-01-01

    The realization of phononic computing is held hostage by the lack of high performance thermal devices. Here we show through theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics simulations that unprecedented thermal rectification factors (as large as 1.20) can be achieved utilizing the phase dependent thermal conductivity of polyethylene nanofibers. More importantly, such high thermal rectifications only need very small temperature differences (< 20 oC) across the device, which is a significant advantage over other thermal diodes which need temperature biases on the order of the operating temperature. Taking this into consideration, we show that the dimensionless temperature-scaled rectification factors of the polymer nanofiber diodes range from 12 to 25 - much larger than other thermal diodes (< 8). The polymer nanofiber thermal diode consists of a crystalline portion whose thermal conductivity is highly phase-sensitive and a cross-linked portion which has a stable phase. Nanoscale size effect can be utilized t...

  1. Properties of Electrospun TiO2 Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Caratão

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium oxide filled polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP composite nanofibers have been prepared via a simple electrospinning technique. The combination of good TiO2 properties with its high surface area leads these nanofibers into having a vast applicability such as cosmetics, scaffolds for tissue engineering, catalytic devices, sensors, solar cells, and optoelectronic devices. The structural and chemical properties of the prepared samples have been studied. The presence of the TiO2 phase on the nanofibers was confirmed. An anatase to rutile transformation was observed at 600°C. Regarding the thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA/DTA, the TIP decomposition and the PVP evaporation at 225°C were verified.

  2. Uniaxially aligned ceramic nanofibers obtained by chemical mechanical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tararam, R. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Instituto de Química, Rua Prof. Francisco Degni n° 55, CEP 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Foschini, C.R. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Faculdade de Engenharia de Bauru, Dept. de Eng. Mecanica, Av. Eng. Luiz Edmundo C. Coube 14-01, CEP 17033-360 Bauru, SP (Brazil); Destro, F.B. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratinguetá, Guaratinguetá 12516-410, SP (Brazil); Simões, A.Z., E-mail: alezipo@yahoo.com [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Faculdade de Engenharia de Guaratinguetá, Guaratinguetá 12516-410, SP (Brazil); Longo, E.; Varela, J.A. [Univ Estadual Paulista – UNESP – Instituto de Química, Rua Prof. Francisco Degni n° 55, CEP 14800-900 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    For this study, we investigated a simple method to generate well aligned nanofibers over large areas using an organic polymer stretched over the substrate surface With this method, ZnO and CuO 3D parallel nanowire arrays were successfully prepared by calcinations of the polymer fibers. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the copper oxide has a monoclinic structure while the zinc oxide has a hexagonal structure. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed ceramic nanofibers with an average diameter of 120 nm which were composed of small nanoparticles which are 10 nm in diameter. The ability to obtain uniaxially aligned nanofibers reveals a range of interesting properties with potential applications for sensors, catalysts and energy technologies.

  3. Electrochemical characteristics of activated carbon nanofiber electrodes for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Min-Kang [Dept. of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-Jin [Dept. of Chemistry, Inha University, 253, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sjpark@inha.ac.kr

    2009-08-25

    In this work, poly(amide imide) solutions in dimethylformamide were electrospun into webs consisting of 350 nm ultrafine nanofibers. These nanofiber webs were used to produce activated carbon nanofibers (ACNFs), through stabilization and carbonisation-activation processes. Experimental results indicated that ACNFs activated at 800 deg. C afforded the highest specific surface area but low mesopore volume. The high specific surface area, mainly due to the micropores, introduced maximum specific capacitance at low current density (150 F g{sup -1} at 10 mA g{sup -1}). Elevating the volume fraction of mesopores gave maximum specific capacitance at high current density (100 F g{sup -1} at 1000 mA g{sup -1}), which could be explained on the basis of ion mobility in the pores. Thus, the capacitance of the supercapacitors was strongly dependent on the specific surface area and micro- or mesopore volume of the ACNFs.

  4. Morphology and internal structure of polymeric and carbon nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhenxin

    Evaporation and the associated solidification are important factors that affect the diameter of electrospun nanofibers. The evaporation and solidification of a charged jet were controlled by varying the partial pressure of water vapor during electrospinning of poly(ethylene oxide) from aqueous solution. As the partial pressure of water vapor increases, the solidification process of the charged jet becomes slower, allowing elongation of the charged jet to continue longer and thereby to form thinner fibers. The morphology and internal structure of electrospun poly(vinylidene fluorides) nanofibers were investigated. Low voltage high resolution scanning electron microscopy was used to study the surface of electrospun nanofibers. Control of electrospinning process produced fibers with various morphological forms. Fibers that were beaded, branched, or split were obtained when different instabilities dominated in the electrospinning process. The high ratio of stretching during electrospinning aligns the polymer molecules along the fiber axis. A rapid evaporation of solvent during electrospinning gives fibers with small and imperfect crystallites. These can be perfected by thermal annealing. Fibers annealed at elevated temperature form plate-like lamellar crystals tightly linked by tie molecules. Electrospinning can provide ultrafine nanofibers with cross-sections that contain only a few polymer molecules. Ultrafine polymer nanofibers are extremely stable in transmission electron microscope. Electrospun nanofibers suspended on a holey carbon film showed features of individual polymer molecules. Carbon fibers with diameters ranging from 100 nm to several microns were produced from mesophase pitch by a low cost gas jet process. The structure of mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers was investigated as a function of heat treatment temperatures. Submicron-sized graphene oxide flakes were prepared by a combination of oxidative treatment and ultrasonic radiation. Because pitch is

  5. Advances in Poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline) Nanofibers Preparation by Electrospinning Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Pina, C; Busacca, C; Frontera, P; Antonucci, P L; Scarpino, L A; Sironi, A; Falletta, E

    2016-05-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanofibers are drawing a great deal of interest from academia and industry due to their multiple applications, especially in biomedical field. PANI nanofibers were successfully electrospun for the first time by MacDiarmid and co-workers at the beginning of the millennium and since then many efforts have been addressed to improve their quality. However, traditional PANI prepared from aniline monomer shows some drawbacks, such as presence of toxic (i.e., benzidine) and inorganic (salts and metals) co-products, that complicate polymer post-treatment, and low solubility in common organic solvents, making hard its processing by electrospinning technique. Some industrial sectors, such as medical and biomedical, need to employ materials free from toxic and polluting species. In this regard, the oxidative polymerization of N-(4-aminophenyl)aniline, aniline dimer, to produce poly(4-aminodiphenylaniline), P4ADA, a kind of PANI, represents an innovative alternative to the traditional synthesis because the obtained polymer results free from carcinogenic and/or polluting co-products, and, moreover, more soluble than traditional PANI. This latter feature can be exploited to obtain P4ADA nanofibers by electrospinning technique. In this paper we report the advances obtained in the P4ADA nanofibers electrospinnig. A comparison among polyethylene oxide (PEO), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polystyrene (PS), as the second polymer to facilitate the electrospinning process, is shown. In order to increase the conductivity of P4ADA nanofibers, two strategies were adopted and compared: selective insulating binder removal from electrospun nanofibers by a rinsing tratment, afterwards optimizing the minimum amount of binder necessary for the electrospinning process. Moreover, the effect of PEO/P4ADA weight ratio on the fibers morphology and conductivity was highlighted.

  6. Stability of β-carotene in polyethylene oxide electrospun nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peinado, I., E-mail: irpeipar@upvnet.upv.es [Free University of Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Mason, M.; Romano, A. [Free University of Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Biasioli, F. [Department of Food Quality and Nutrition, Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach (FEM), via E. Mach 1, 38010 San Michele all ‘Adige, TN (Italy); Scampicchio, M., E-mail: matteo.scampicchio@unibz.it [Free University of Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy)

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • β-carotene was incorporated into PEO-nanofibers by electrospinning. • Properties of the fibers were analyzed by SEM, color analysis, and DSC. • TGA coupled to PTR–ms resulted promising to online-monitoring thermal degradation. • Thermal stability of βc increased after encapsulation into the PEO-nanofibers. - Abstract: β-carotene (βc) was successfully incorporated into electrospun nanofibers of poly-(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with the aim of prolonging its shelf life and thermal stability. The physical and thermal properties of the βc-PEO-nanofibers were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), color analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The nanofibers of PEO and βc-PEO exhibited average fiber diameters of 320 ± 46 and 230 ± 21 nm, with colorimetric coordinates L* = 95.7 ± 2.4 and 89.4 ± 4.6 and b* = −0.5 ± 0.1 and 6.2 ± 3.0 respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis coupled with Proton Transfer–Mass Spectroscopy (TGA/PTR–ms) demonstrated that coated βc inside PEO nanofibers increased thermal stability when compared to standard βc in powder form. In addition, β-carotene in the membranes showed higher stability during storage when compared with β-carotene in solution with a decrease in concentration of 57 ± 4% and 70 ± 2% respectively, thus should extend the shelf life of this compound. Also, TGA coupled with PTR–MS resulted in a promising technique to online-monitoring thermal degradation.

  7. Interplay between the bacterial nucleoid protein H-NS and macromolecular crowding in compacting DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wintraecken, C.H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

      In this dissertation we discuss H-NS and its connection to nucleoid compaction and organization. Nucleoid formation involves a dramatic reduction in coil volume of the genomic DNA. Four factors are thought to influence coil volume: supercoiling, DNA charge neutralization, macromolecular crow

  8. A kinetic type extended model for dense gases and macromolecular fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cristina Carrisi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Extended thermodynamics is an important theory which is appreciated from mathematicians and physicists. Following its ideas and considering the macroscopic approach with suggestions from the kinetic one, we find in this paper, the solution of an interesting model: the model for dense gases and macromolecular fluids.

  9. Reliable and efficient solution of genome-scale models of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ding; Yang, Laurence; Fleming, Ronan M. T.

    2017-01-01

    Constraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) is currently the only methodology that permits integrated modeling of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression (ME) at genome-scale. Linear optimization computes steady-state flux solutions to ME models, but flux values are spread over many...

  10. Isolation and chemical characterization of resistant macromolecular constituents in microalgae and marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelin, F.

    1996-01-01

    The recognition of novel, insoluble and non-hydrolysable macromolecular constituents in protective tissues of fresh-water algae and higher plants has had a major impact on our understanding of the origin and fate of sedimentary organic matter (OM) in terrestrial and lacustrine deposits. The investig

  11. Researches, Publications and Achievements 2007-2011, Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    All teaching staffs at Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering (19 members)

    2012-01-01

    Recent researches, publications and achievements are presented, which were made during these five years (2007-2011) by 19 members at Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering. Listed publications include original papers, books, reviews and reports. Achievements such as invited lectures, patents, funds and financial supports, and awards are also listed.

  12. Synergy of DNA-bending nucleoid proteins and macromolecular crowd-condensing DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bessa Ramos, E.; Wintraecken, C.H.J.M.; Geerling, A.C.M.; Vries, de R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Many prokaryotic nucleoid proteins bend DNA and form extended helical protein-DNA fibers rather than condensed structures. On the other hand, it is known that such proteins (such as bacterial HU) strongly promote DNA condensation by macromolecular crowding. Using theoretical arguments, we show that

  13. The Postgraduate Study of Macromolecular Sciences at the University of Zagreb (1971-1980

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunst, B.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The postgraduate study of macromolecular sciences (PSMS was established at the University of Zagreb in 1971 as a university study in the time of expressed interdisciplinary permeation of natural sciences - physics, chemistry and biology, and application of their achievements in technologicaldisciplines. PSMS was established by a group of prominent university professors from the schools of Science, Chemical Technology, Pharmacy and Medicine, as well as from the Institute of Biology. The study comprised basic fields of macromolecular sciences: organic chemistry of synthetic macromolecules, physical chemistry of macromolecules, physics of macromolecules, biological macromolecules and polymer engineering with polymer application and processing, and teaching was performed in 29 lecture courses lead by 30 professors with their collaborators. PSMS ceased to exist with the change of legislation in Croatia in 1980, when the attitude prevailed to render back postgraduate studies to the university schools. During 9 years of existence of PSMS the MSci grade was awarded to 37 macromolecular experts. It was assessed that the PSMS some thirty years ago was an important example of modern postgraduate education as compared with the international postgraduate development. In concordance with the recent introduction of similar interdisciplinary studies in macromolecular sciences elsewhere in the world, the establishment of a modern interdisciplinary study in the field would be of importance for further development of these sciences in Croatia.

  14. Macromolecular Crowding Modulates Folding Mechanism of α/β Protein Apoflavodoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homouz, D.; Stagg, L.; Wittungstafshede, P.; Cheung, M.

    2009-01-01

    Protein dynamics in cells may be different from that in dilute solutions in vitro since the environment in cells is highly concentrated with other macromolecules. This volume exclusion due to macromolecular crowding is predicted to affect both equilibrium and kinetic processes involving protein conformational changes. To quantify macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding mechanisms, here we have investigated the folding energy landscape of an alpha/beta protein, apoflavodoxin, in the presence of inert macromolecular crowding agents using in silico and in vitro approaches. By coarse-grained molecular simulations and topology-based potential interactions, we probed the effects of increased volume fraction of crowding agents (phi_c) as well as of crowding agent geometry (sphere or spherocylinder) at high phi_c. Parallel kinetic folding experiments with purified Desulfovibro desulfuricans apoflavodoxin in vitro were performed in the presence of Ficoll (sphere) and Dextran (spherocylinder) synthetic crowding agents. In conclusion, we have identified in silico crowding conditions that best enhance protein stability and discovered that upon manipulation of the crowding conditions, folding routes experiencing topological frustrations can be either enhanced or relieved. The test-tube experiments confirmed that apoflavodoxin's time-resolved folding path is modulated by crowding agent geometry. We propose that macromolecular crowding effects may be a tool for manipulation of protein folding and function in living cells.

  15. Hydropyrolysis: A new technique for the analysis of macromolecular material in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sephton, Mark A.; Love, Gordon D.; Meredith, Will; Snape, Colin E.; Sun, Cheng-Gong; Watson, Jonathan S.

    2005-10-01

    The carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are fragments of asteroids that have remained relatively unprocessed since the formation of the Solar System 4.56 billion years ago. The major organic component in these meteorites is a macromolecular phase that is resistant to solvent extraction. The information contained within macromolecular material can be accessed by degradative techniques such as pyrolysis. Hydropyrolysis refers to pyrolysis assisted by high hydrogen gas pressures and a dispersed sulphided molybdenum catalyst. Hydropyrolysis of the Murchison macromolecular material successfully releases much greater quantities of hydrocarbons than traditional pyrolysis techniques (twofold greater than hydrous pyrolysis) including significant amounts of high molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) such as phenanthrene, carbazole, fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, perylene, benzoperylene and coronene units with varying degrees of alkylation. When hydropyrolysis products are collected using a silica trap immersed in liquid nitrogen, the technique enables the solubilisation and retention of compounds with a wide range of volatilities (i.e. benzene to coronene). This report describes the hydropyrolysis method and the information it can provide about meteorite macromolecular material constitution.

  16. CONFORMATION AND MICROSTRUCTURE OF CARBON NANOFIBERS DEPOSITED ON FOAM Ni

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Bundles of pure carbon nanofibers were prepared by catalytic decomposition of acetylene on foam Ni. The morphological and structural characteristics of the carbon nanostructures, in the as-prepared state, were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HTEM). A special conformation of carbon nanofibers composed of segmented structures was found among the products by both SEM and TEM observations. Further HTEM ex amination indicated that the segments were stacked with well ordered graphite platelets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the filaments.

  17. Nanofibers Offer Alternative Ways to the Treatment of Skin Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. J. Heunis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury to the skin causes a breach in the protective layer surrounding the body. Many pathogens are resistant to antibiotics, rendering conventional treatment less effective. This led to the use of alternative antimicrobial compounds, such as silver ions, in skin treatment. In this review nanofibers, and the incorporation of natural antimicrobial compounds in these scaffolds, are discussed as an alternative way to control skin infections. Electrospinning as a technique to prepare nanofibers is discussed. The possibility of using these structures as drug delivery systems is investigated.

  18. Dispersive Optical Interface Based on Nanofiber-Trapped Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dawkins, S T; Reitz, D; Vetsch, E; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2011-01-01

    We dispersively interface an ensemble of one thousand atoms trapped in the evanescent field surrounding a tapered optical nanofiber. This method relies on the azimuthally-asymmetric coupling of the ensemble with the evanescent field of an off-resonant probe beam, transmitted through the nanofiber. The resulting birefringence and dispersion are significant; we observe a phase shift per atom of $\\sim$\\,1\\,mrad at a detuning of six times the natural linewidth, corresponding to an effective resonant optical density per atom of 2.7\\,%. Moreover, we utilize this strong dispersion to non-destructively determine the number of atoms.

  19. Field-enhanced nonlinear optical properties of organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Brewer, Jonathan R.;

    Second harmonic generation in nonlinearly optically active organic nanofibers, generated via self-assembled surface growth from nonsymmetrically functionalized para-quarterphenylene (CNHP4) molecules, has been investigated. After the growth on mica templates, nanofibers have been transferred onto...... lithographically defined regular arrays of metal and dielectric nanostructures. Such hybrid systems were employed to correlate the second harmonic response to both morphology of the fibers i.e. local field enhancement due to local changes in the fiber’s morphology and field enhancement effects appearing...

  20. Field-enhanced nonlinear optical properties of organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Brewer, Jonathan R.;

    2014-01-01

    Second harmonic generation in nonlinearly optically active organic nanofibers, generated via self-assembled surface growth from nonsymmetrically functionalized para-quarterphenylene (CNHP4) molecules, has been investigated. After the growth on mica templates, nanofibers have been transferred onto...... lithographically defined regular arrays of metal and dielectric nanostructures. Such hybrid systems were employed to correlate the second harmonic response to both morphology of the fibers i.e. local field enhancement due to local changes in the fiber’s morphology and field enhancement effects appearing...

  1. CHARACTERIZATION AND ADSORPTION PROPERTIES OF POROUS CARBON NANOFIBER GRANULES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiuling Chen; Qinghai Chen; Yongdan Li

    2006-01-01

    The properties of the porous granules produced by agglomeration of catalytically grown carbon nanofibers were investigated in this work. The single pellet crushing strength of the granules is high, e.g., 1.6-2.5 MPa. They have adsorption at 298 K of benzene or phenol on the granules is much lower than that on activated carbon and depends not only on the specific surface area of the carbon material but also on the sewing structure of the granules and the morphology of the carbon nanofibers. Treatment in dilute nitric acid appreciably reduces such adsorption.

  2. Local field enhanced second-harmonic response of organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek

    Organic CNHP4 nanofibers showing a strong second-harmonic (SH) response have been successfully implemented as active components in a metal-organic hybrid system. Using nondestructive roll-on transfer technique nanofibers were transferred from the growing mica substrates onto electron......-beam lithography-defined regular arrays of gold, titanium and silicon oxide. As shown in a femtosecond laser scanning microscopy study the fiber-substrate interplay leads (only) on gold to a significantly enhanced SH signal. We suggest that this effect is driven by the local field enhancement i.e. the excitation...

  3. The effect of DNA on mechanical properties of nanofiber hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Shi Hyeong; Jung, Sung-il; Kim, Sun I.; Kim, Seon Jeong; Kim, Byung Joo; So, Insuk

    2008-10-01

    Uniform poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofiber gels incorporating double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) were fabricated without the aid of cross-linkers employing electrospinning. Creep and tensile tests of the DNA/PVA nanofiber gels were carried out in an aqueous medium to analyze interactions between the DNA and PVA. The DNA/PVA gels had a higher elastic modulus than the PVA gel. The viscosity with increasing external load was calculated by applying the Burger model to the creep curves. We conclude that DNA is relatively weakly bound with the PVA chains, although the elastic modulus of the DNA/PVA gels was higher than that of PVA gel.

  4. Engineered Polymer Composites Through Electrospun Nanofiber Coating of Fiber Tows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Bakis, Charles; Williams, Tiffany S.; Johnston, James C.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Composite materials offer significant weight savings in many aerospace applications. The toughness of the interface of fibers crossing at different angles often determines failure of composite components. A method for toughening the interface in fabric and filament wound components using directly electrospun thermoplastic nanofiber on carbon fiber tow is presented. The method was first demonstrated with limited trials, and then was scaled up to a continuous lab scale process. Filament wound tubes were fabricated and tested using unmodified baseline towpreg material and nanofiber coated towpreg.

  5. Nb2O5 nanofiber memristor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, A. M.; Velichko, A. A.; Jalalian, A.

    2013-07-01

    Non-woven bead-free 100 μm long and 80-200 nm in diameter highly crystalline orthorhombic T-Nb2O5 nanofibers were sintered by sol-gel assisted electrospinning technique. Electrical and dielectric spectroscopy tests of individual fibers clamped onto Pt coated Si substrate were performed using a spreading resistance mode of atomic force microscope. Reproducible resistive switching with ON-OFF resistance ratio as high as 2 × 104 has a bipolar character, starts with a threshold voltage of 0.8-1.7 V, and follows by continuous growth of conductivity. Resistive memory effect is associated with a voltage-driven accumulation/depletion of oxygen vacancies at Nb2O5/Pt cathode interface. Poole-Frenkel emission from the electronic states trapped at reduced NbOx complexes determines a shape of Nb2O5/Pt diode I-V characteristics. Simple thermodynamic model explains a threshold character of switching, relates experimentally observed characteristics in low and high resistive states, and gives a reasonable estimate of the concentration of oxygen vacancies.

  6. Radiation Effects on Polypropylene Carbon Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, John; Mion, Thomas; Chipara, Alin C.; Ibrahim, Elamin I.; Lozano, Karen; Chipara, Magdalena; Tidrow, Steven C.; Chipara, Mircea

    2010-03-01

    Dispersion of carbon nanostructures within polymeric matrices affects most physical and chemical properties of the polymeric matrix (increased Young modulus, improved thermal stability, faster crystallization rates, higher equilibrium degree of crystallinity, modified glass, melting, and crystallization temperatures, enhanced thermal and electrical conductivity). Such changes have been reported and explained by thorough spectroscopic investigations. Nevertheless, little is known about the radiation stability of such nanocomposites. The research is focused on spectroscopic investigations of radiation-induced modifications in isotactic polypropylene (iPP)-vapor grown nanofiber (VGCNF)composites. VGCNF were dispersed within iPP by extrusion at 180^oC. Composites containing various amounts of VGCNFs ranging from 0 to 20 % wt. were prepared and subjected to gamma irradiation, at room temperature, at various integral doses (10 MGy, 20 MGy, and 30 MGy). Raman spectroscopy, ATR, and WAXS were used to assess the radiation-induced modifications in these nanocomposites. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Welch Foundation (Department of Chemistry at UTPA) and by US Army Research Office (AMSRD-ARL-RO-SI: 54498-MS-ISP).

  7. Carbon Nanofiber Nanoelectrodes for Biosensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica Erin

    2014-01-01

    A sensor platform based on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (CNFs) has been developed. Their inherent nanometer scale, high conductivity, wide potential window, good biocompatibility and well-defined surface chemistry make them ideal candidates as biosensor electrodes. Here, we report two studies using vertically aligned CNF nanoelectrodes for biomedical applications. CNF arrays are investigated as neural stimulation and neurotransmitter recording electrodes for application in deep brain stimulation (DBS). Polypyrrole coated CNF nanoelectrodes have shown great promise as stimulating electrodes due to their large surface area, low impedance, biocompatibility and capacity for highly localized stimulation. CNFs embedded in SiO2 have been used as sensing electrodes for neurotransmitter detection. Our approach combines a multiplexed CNF electrode chip, developed at NASA Ames Research Center, with the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) system, developed at the Mayo Clinic. Preliminary results indicate that the CNF nanoelectrode arrays are easily integrated with WINCS for neurotransmitter detection in a multiplexed array format. In the future, combining CNF based stimulating and recording electrodes with WINCS may lay the foundation for an implantable smart therapeutic system that utilizes neurochemical feedback control while likely resulting in increased DBS application in various neuropsychiatric disorders. In total, our goal is to take advantage of the nanostructure of CNF arrays for biosensing studies requiring ultrahigh sensitivity, high-degree of miniaturization, and selective biofunctionalization.

  8. Polymethylsilsesquioxane-cellulose nanofiber biocomposite aerogels with high thermal insulation, bendability, and superhydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayase, Gen; Kanamori, Kazuyoshi; Abe, Kentaro; Yano, Hiroyuki; Maeno, Ayaka; Kaji, Hironori; Nakanishi, Kazuki

    2014-06-25

    Polymethylsilsesquioxane-cellulose nanofiber (PMSQ-CNF) composite aerogels have been prepared through sol-gel in a solvent containing a small amount of CNFs as suspension. Since these composite aerogels do not show excessive aggregation of PMSQ and CNF, the original PMSQ networks are not disturbed. Composite aerogels with low density (0.020 g cm(-3) at lowest), low thermal conductivity (15 mW m(-1) K(-1)), visible light translucency, bending flexibility, and superhydrophobicity thus have been successfully obtained. In particular, the lowest density and bending flexibility have been achieved with the aid of the physical supporting effect of CNFs, and the lowest thermal conductivity is comparable with the original PMSQ aerogels and standard silica aerogels. The PMSQ-CNF composite aerogels would be a candidate to practical high-performance thermal insulating materials.

  9. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on hierarchically structured cobalt nanoparticle/carbon nanofiber/carbon felt composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarubova, Sarka; Rane, Shreyas; Yang, Jia; Yu, Yingda; Zhu, Ye; Chen, De; Holmen, Anders

    2011-07-18

    The hierarchically structured carbon nanofibers (CNFs)/carbon felt composites, in which CNFs were directly grown on the surface of microfibers in carbon felt, forming a CNF layer on a micrometer range that completely covers the microfiber surfaces, were tested as a novel support material for cobalt nanoparticles in the highly exothermic Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. A compact, fixed-bed reactor, made of disks of such composite materials, offered the advantages of improved heat and mass transfer, relatively low pressure drop, and safe handling of immobilized CNFs. An efficient 3-D thermal conductive network in the composite provided a relatively uniform temperature profile, whereas the open structure of the CNF layer afforded an almost 100 % effectiveness of Co nanoparticles in the F-T synthesis in the fixed bed. The greatly improved mass and heat transport makes the compact reactor attractive for applications in the conversion of biomass, coal, and natural gas to liquids.

  10. Surface modification of polyvinyl alcohol/malonic acid nanofibers by gaseous dielectric barrier discharge plasma for glucose oxidase immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Esmail; Mazinani, Saeedeh; Ranaei-Siadat, Seyed-Omid; Ghomi, Hamid

    2016-11-01

    Polymeric nanofiber prepares a suitable situation for enzyme immobilization for variety of applications. In this research, we have fabricated polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/malonic acid nanofibers using electrospinning. After fabrication of nanofibers, the effect of air, nitrogen, CO2, and argon DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) plasmas on PVA/malonic acid nanofibers were analysed. Among them, air plasma had the most significant effect on glucose oxidase (GOx) immobilization. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrum analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results revealed that in case of air plasma modified nanofibers, the carboxyl groups on the surface are increased. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that, after GOx immobilization, the modified nanofibers with plasma has retained its nanofiber structure. Finally, we analysed reusability and storage stability of GOx immobilized on plasma modified and unmodified nanofibers. The results were more satisfactory for modified nanofibers with respect to unmodified ones.

  11. Lysozyme-immobilized electrospun PAMA/PVA and PSSA-MA/PVA ion-exchange nanofiber for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonglairoum, Prasopchai; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2014-08-27

    Abstract This research was aimed to develop the lysozyme immobilized ion-exchange nanofiber mats for wound healing. To promote the healing process, the PSSA-MA/PVA and PAMA ion-exchange nanofiber mats were fabricated to mimic the extracellular matrix structure using electrospinning process followed by thermally crosslinked. Lysozyme was immobilized on the ion-exchane nanofibers by an adsorption method. The ion-exchange nanofibers were investigated using SEM, FTIR and XRPD. Moreover, the lysozyme-immobilized ion-exchange nanofibers were further investigated for lysozyme content and activity, lysozyme release and wound healing activity. The fiber diameters of the mats were in the nanometer range. Lysozyme was gradually absorbed into the PSSA-MA/PVA nanofiber with higher extend than that is absorbed on the PAMA/PVA nanofiber and exhibited higher activity than lysozyme-immobilized PAMA/PVA nanofiber. The total contents of lysozyme on the PSSA-MA/PVA and PAMA/PVA nanofiber were 648 and 166 µg/g, respectively. FTIR and lysozyme activity results confirmed the presence of lysozyme on the nanofiber mats. The lysozyme was released from the PSSA-MA/PVA and PAMA/PVA nanofiber in the same manner. The lysozyme-immobilized PSSA-MA/PVA nanofiber mats and lysozyme-immobilized PAMA/PVA nanofiber mats exhibited significantly faster healing rate than gauze and similar to the commercial antibacterial gauze dressing. These results suggest that these nanofiber mats could provide the promising candidate for wound healing application.

  12. Preparation of Ag/HBP/PAN Nanofiber Web and Its Antimicrobial and Filtration Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Rong Yao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To widen the application of nanofibers web in the field of medical health materials, a new Ag/amino-terminated hyperbranched polymer (HBP/polyacrylonitrile (PAN nanofiber web with excellent antimicrobial activity and filtration property was produced with Ag/HBP dispersion solution and PAN nanofiber. Ag/HBP dispersion solution was prepared with HBP as reducer and stabilizer, and Ag/HBP/PAN nanofiber was prepared by modifying electrospun PAN nanofiber with Ag/HBP aqueous solution. The characterization results showed that spherical Ag nanoparticles were prepared and they had a narrow distribution in HBP aqueous solution. The results of Ag/HBP/PAN nanofiber characterized with SEM and EDS showed that the content of silver nanoparticles on the surface of PAN nanofiber was on the increase when the treating temperature rose. The bacterial reduction rates of HBP-treated PAN nanofiber against S. aureus and E. coli were about 89%, while those of the Ag/HBP/PAN nanofiber against S. aureus and E. coli were 99.9% and 99.96%, respectively, due to the cooperative effects from the amino groups in HBP and Ag nanoparticles. Moreover, the small pores and high porosity in Ag/HBP/PAN nanofiber web resulted in high filtration efficiency (99.9% for removing smaller particles (0.1 μm~0.7 μm, which was much higher than that of the gauze mask.

  13. Influence of polyvinyl alcohol amount on producing in situ photo-crosslinked thioamide functionalized nanofiber membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeytuncu Bihter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinyl alcohol/maleic anhydride/acryloyl thioamide monomer (PVA/MA/ATM photo-cured nanofiber membranes and pure PVA nanofiber membranes were produced by electrospinning technique. In situ UV radiation was applied during the electrospinning in order to provide polymerization during the jet flight and promote crosslinking of ATM and MA with PVA. The cross-linking was examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The morphology and thermal behavior of electrospun nanofiber were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, respectively. The surface area of nanofiber membranes was measured by Brunauer-Emmert-Teller (BET analysis. Furthermore, water durability test was examined. Water durability test demonstrated that in situ photo-cured PVA/MA/ATM nanofiber membrane had the least average mass loss. The surface areas of PVA/MA/ATM nanofiber membranes were 160-280 m2/g. The surface area and diameter of PVA/MA/ATM nanofibers decreased as the PVA content increased. The diameter of nanofibers was obtained less than 100 nm. The results showed that the water-insoluble nanofiber membranes with better chemical and thermal resistance were obtained. These nanofiber membranes may be a promising candidate for the usage of water treatment.

  14. Biodegradable poly (ɛ-caprolactone)/gelatin nanofibers: Effect of tubular halloysite on structure and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švachová, Veronika; Khunová, Viera; Vojtová, Lucy; PavliÅák, David

    2016-05-01

    The work explores preparation of new advanced nanofibers based on biodegradable polymers and biocompatible tubular halloysite (HNT). Electrospun nanofibers comprising 8 wt% gelatin (Gel) and 8 wt% poly (͛-caprolactone) (PCL) have been prepared by using eco-friendly solvent - acetic acid. The content of HNT in PCL/Gel nanofibers was 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0 and 9.0 wt%. It was found that the addition of HNT significantly affected the polymer mixture spinnability and the fiber diameter. SEM observations revealed that the structure of nanofibers depends on nanofiber composition. Whilst in nanofibers with lower HNT content uniform morphology with HNTs located merely inside the individual nanofibers has been observed, in nanofibers with 6 and 9 wt% HNT individual particles as well as the agglomerates of HNT have been detected in both, the inner part as well as outside part of nanofiber. Important reinforcing effect has been achieved in whole HNT content. The highest improvement has been reached when the HNT content was 0.5 wt%. In this case, multiple enhancements of strength (2x), elongation (4x) and modulus (2x) have been confirmed. ATR-FTIR revealed that improvement of mechanical properties is also due to the increase of interface interaction in between PCL/Gel and HNT. The prepared PCL/Gel/HNT nanofibers can be used for tissue engineering and/or as drug carriers or signal molecules in whole spectrum of medical applications.

  15. Osteoinductive peptide-functionalized nanofibers with highly ordered structure as biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaohong; Song, Jinlin; Xu, Xiao; Xu, Anxiu; Wang, Mengke; Xie, Bingwu; Huang, Enyi; Deng, Feng; Wei, Shicheng

    2015-01-01

    The construction of functional biomimetic scaffolds that recapitulate the topographical and biochemical features of bone tissue extracellular matrix is now of topical interest in bone tissue engineering. In this study, a novel surface-functionalized electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber scaffold with highly ordered structure was developed to simulate the critical features of native bone tissue via a single step of catechol chemistry. Specially, under slightly alkaline aqueous solution, polydopamine (pDA) was coated on the surface of aligned PCL nanofibers after electrospinning, followed by covalent immobilization of bone morphogenetic protein-7-derived peptides onto the pDA-coated nanofiber surface. Contact angle measurement, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of pDA and peptides on PCL nanofiber surface. Our results demonstrated that surface modification with osteoinductive peptides could improve cytocompatibility of nanofibers in terms of cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation. Most importantly, Alizarin Red S staining, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunostaining, and Western blot revealed that human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on aligned nanofibers with osteoinductive peptides exhibited enhanced osteogenic differentiation potential than cells on randomly oriented nanofibers. Furthermore, the aligned nanofibers with osteoinductive peptides could direct osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells even in the absence of osteoinducting factors, suggesting superior osteogenic efficacy of biomimetic design that combines the advantages of osteoinductive peptide signal and highly ordered nanofibers on cell fate decision. The presented peptide-decorated bone-mimic nanofiber scaffolds hold a promising potential in the context of bone tissue engineering.

  16. Incorporation of functionalized gold nanoparticles into nanofibers for enhanced attachment and differentiation of mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Dongju

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electrospun nanofibers have been widely used as substrata for mammalian cell culture owing to their structural similarity to natural extracellular matrices. Structurally consistent electrospun nanofibers can be produced with synthetic polymers but require chemical modification to graft cell-adhesive molecules to make the nanofibers functional. Development of a facile method of grafting functional molecules on the nanofibers will contribute to the production of diverse cell type-specific nanofiber substrata. Results Small molecules, peptides, and functionalized gold nanoparticles were successfully incorporated with polymethylglutarimide (PMGI nanofibers through electrospinning. The PMGI nanofibers functionalized by the grafted AuNPs, which were labeled with cell-adhesive peptides, enhanced HeLa cell attachment and potentiated cardiomyocyte differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells. Conclusions PMGI nanofibers can be functionalized simply by co-electrospinning with the grafting materials. In addition, grafting functionalized AuNPs enable high-density localization of the cell-adhesive peptides on the nanofiber. The results of the present study suggest that more cell type-specific synthetic substrata can be fabricated with molecule-doped nanofibers, in which diverse functional molecules are grafted alone or in combination with other molecules at different concentrations.

  17. Environmental remediation and superhydrophilicity of ultrafine antibacterial tungsten oxide-based nanofibers under visible light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srisitthiratkul, Chutima; Yaipimai, Wittaya [Nano Functional Textile Laboratory, National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), 111 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Rd., Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Intasanta, Varol, E-mail: varol@nanotec.or.th [Nano Functional Textile Laboratory, National Nanotechnology Center (NANOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), 111 Thailand Science Park, Phahonyothin Rd., Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand)

    2012-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanosilver-decorated WO{sub 3} photocatalytic nanofibers are antibacterial and superhydrophilic under a visible light source. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deposition of nanosilver onto electrospun WO{sub 3} nanofibers' surface was done exploiting visible or UV light driven photoreduction of silver ion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofibers showed antibacterial characteristics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofibers degraded a model toxin effectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanofibers showed superhydrophilicity under a visible light source. - Abstract: Fabrication of nanosilver-decorated WO{sub 3} nanofibers was successfully performed. First, deposition of nanosilver onto electrospun WO{sub 3} nanofibers' surface was done via photoreduction of silver ion under visible or UV light. The resulting hybrid nanofibers not only revealed antibacterial characteristics but also maintained their photocatalytic performance towards methylene blue decomposition. Unexpectedly, the nanofibrous layers prepared from these nanofibers showed superhydrophilicity under a visible light source. The nanofibers might be advantageous in environmental and hygienic nanofiltration under natural light sources, where the self-cleaning characteristics could be valuable in maintenance processes.

  18. Flexibility damps macromolecular crowding effects on protein folding dynamics: Application to the murine prion protein (121-231)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergasa-Caceres, Fernando; Rabitz, Herschel A.

    2014-01-01

    A model of protein folding kinetics is applied to study the combined effects of protein flexibility and macromolecular crowding on protein folding rate and stability. It is found that the increase in stability and folding rate promoted by macromolecular crowding is damped for proteins with highly flexible native structures. The model is applied to the folding dynamics of the murine prion protein (121-231). It is found that the high flexibility of the native isoform of the murine prion protein (121-231) reduces the effects of macromolecular crowding on its folding dynamics. The relevance of these findings for the pathogenic mechanism are discussed.

  19. Chitin Nanofiber Transparent Paper for Flexible Green Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jungho; Lee, Daewon; Im, Hyeon-Gyun; Han, Yun Cheol; Jeong, Eun Gyo; Rolandi, Marco; Choi, Kyung Cheol; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2016-07-01

    A transparent paper made of chitin nanofibers (ChNF) is introduced and its utilization as a substrate for flexible organic light-emitting diodes is demonstrated. Given its promising macroscopic properties, biofriendly characteristics, and availability of the raw material, the utilization of the ChNF transparent paper as a structural platform for flexible green electronics is envisaged.

  20. Electrospun gelatin/polyurethane blended nanofibers for wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Heo, Dong Nyoung; Lee, Jung Bok; Kwon, Il Keun [Department of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Ryul; Park, Sang Hyuk [Conservative Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seong Ho, E-mail: kwoni@khu.ac.k [College of Pharmacy, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    In this study, we prepared a blended nanofiber scaffold using synthetic and natural polymers, polyurethane (PU) and gelatin respectively, using the electrospinning method to prepare a material for wound dressing. In order to confirm the properties of this gelatin/PU blended nanofiber scaffold, we performed scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, contact angle, water uptake, mechanical property, recovery, and degradation tests, and cellular response. The results obtained indicate that the mean diameter of these nanofibers was uniformly electrospun and ranged from 0.4 to 2.1{mu}m. According to the results, when the amount of gelatin in the blended solution decreased, the contact angle increased and water uptake of the scaffold decreased concurrently. In the mechanical tests, the blended nanofibrous scaffolds were elastic, and elasticity increased as the total amount of PU increased. Moreover, as the total amount of gelatin increased, the cell proliferation increased with the same amount of culture time. Therefore, this gelatin/PU blended nanofiber scaffold has potential application for use as a wound dressing.

  1. Effect of bubble size on nanofiber diameter in bubble electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Zhong-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer bubbles are widely used for fabrication of nanofibers. Bubble size affects not only bubble's surface tension, but also fiber's morphology. A mathematical model is established to reveal the effect of bubble size on the spinning process, and the experiment verification shows the theoretical analysis is reliable.

  2. Micro-nanofibers with hierarchical structure by bubbfil-spinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Peng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bubbfil spinning is used to fabricate micro/nanofibers with hierarchical structure. The wall of a polymer film is attenuated unevenly by a blowing air. The burst of the bubble results in film fragments with different thickness, as a result, different sizes of fibers are obtained.

  3. Silver nanowire dopant enhancing piezoelectricity of electrospun PVDF nanofiber web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baozhang; Zheng, Jianming; Xu, Chunye

    2013-08-01

    A highly sensitive flexible piezoelectric material is developed by using a composite nanofibers web of polymer and metal. The nanofibers webs are made by electrospinning a mixed solution of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and silver nanowires (AgNWs) in the co-solvent of dimethyl formamide and acetone. SEM images show that the obtained webs are composed of AgNWs doped PVDF fibers with diameters ranging from 200nm to 500nm. Our FTIR and XRD results indicate that doping AgNWs into PVDF fiber can enhance the contents of beta phase of the PVDF. UV-Vis spectrum shows a slightly red shift at 324 nm and 341 nm after the AgNWs doping into PVDF, proving the presence of interaction between AgNWs and the PVDF polymer chain. The piezoelectric constant d33 of the nanofibers webs tested with a homemade system, reveals a good agreement with FTIR and XRD characteristic, and the highest one is up to 29.8 pC/N for the nanofibers webs containing 1.5% AgNWs, which is close to that of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE), 77/23). This study may provide a way to develop high-performance flexible sensors.

  4. Electrical properties of single p-hexaphenylene nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob; Henrichsen, H.H.; Bøggild, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The electrical characteristics of individual para-hexaphenylene (p6P) nanofibers with typical widths of a few hundred nanometers and heights of a few ten nanometers are investigated. For that purpose we transfer the narofibers onto a lithographically patterned silicon oxide electrode support...

  5. The photophysics of luminescence in multilayered organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Quochi, Francesco; Simbrunner, Clemens

    Periodic deposition of para-hexaphenyl (p6P) and alfa-sexithiophene (6T) molecules on a muscovite mica substrate by hot wall epitaxy results in multilayered, crystalline nanofibers. By varying the relative thicknesses of the constituent materials, the fluorescence spectrum can be tuned within the...

  6. Facile Fabrication of Multifunctional Aramid Nanofiber Films by Spin Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Jing; Liu, Lehao; Zhao, Xing; Shang, Yudong; Zhao, Tingkai; Li, Tiehu

    2016-11-01

    Polymer matrices with excellent mechanical properties, thermal stability and other features are highly demanded for the effective utilization within nanocomposites. Here, we fabricate free-standing aramid nanofiber films via spin coating of an aramid nanofiber/dimethyl sulfoxide solution. Compared with traditional film fabrication methods, this process is time-saving and also able to easily tune the thickness of the films. The resultant films show greatly improved stretchability than that of Kevlar threads and relatively high mechanical strength. Typically, these films with a thickness of 5.5 µm show an ultimate strength of 182 MPa with an ultimate tensile strain of 10.5%. We also apply a finite element modeling to simulate the strain and strength distributions of the films under uniaxial tension, and the results of the simulation are in accordance with the experimental data. Furthermore, the aramid nanofiber films exhibit outstanding thermostability (decomposition at 550 °C under N2 atmosphere and 500 °C in air) and chemical inertness, which would endure acid and alkali. The simple method demonstrated here provides an important way to prepare high-performance aramid nanofiber films for designing new composite systems.

  7. Spontaneous Four-Wave Mixing in an Irregular Nanofiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukhin A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The features of biphotons states generated via spontaneous four-wave mixing in nanofibers with a variable cross-section are studied. The spectral amplitude of the biphoton field is calculated and the effects of interference and phase modulation of the biphoton field in such structures is discussed.

  8. Chemical filtration of Cr (VI) with electrospun chitosan nanofiber membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Li, Yanxiang; Yang, Chuanfang

    2016-04-20

    Chitosan nanofibers (average diameter of 75nm) were electrospun on polyester (PET) scrim to form composite nanofiber membranes with controlled pore size. The membranes were then stacked as a membrane bed for chemical filtration of Cr (VI) of 1-5mg/L. The performance of the bed with respect to loading capacity at breakthrough, bed saturation and utilization efficiency were carefully investigated. The results showed that while these three parameters were dependent on pH, flow rate, flow distribution and packed pattern of the membrane, the latter two were less affected by feed Cr (VI) concentration and bed length. The maximum bed loading capacity for 1mg/L Cr (VI) filtration at breakthrough was found to be 16.5mg-chromium/g-chitosan, higher than the static adsorption capacity of 11.0mg-chromium/g-chitosan using nanofiber mats, indicating the membranes' better potential for dynamic adsorption. The minimum bed length required to avoid breakthrough was determined to be three layers of stacked membranes with nanofiber deposition density of 1g/m(2) by applying bed depth service time (BDST) model.

  9. Dislocation Starvation and Exhaustion Hardening in Mo-alloy Nanofibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, Claire [University of California, Berkeley & LBNL; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; Lowry, M. B. [University of California, Berkeley; Oh, Jason [Hysitron, Inc., MN; Asif, S.A. Syed [Hysitron, Inc., MN; Warren, O. [Hysitron, Inc., MN; Shan, Zhiwei [Xi' an Jiaotong University, China & Hysitron, Inc., MN; George, Easo P [ORNL; Minor, Andrew [University of California, Berkeley & LBNL

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of defects in Mo alloy nanofibers with initial dislocation densities ranging from 0 to 1.6 1014 m2 were studied using an in situ push-to-pull device in conjunction with a nanoindenter in a transmission electron microscope. Digital image correlation was used to determine stress and strain in local areas of deformation. When they had no initial dislocations the Mo alloy nanofibers suffered sudden catastrophic elongation following elastic deformation to ultrahigh stresses. At the other extreme fibers with a high dislocation density underwent sustained homogeneous deformation after yielding at much lower stresses. Between these two extremes nanofibers with intermediate dislocation densities demonstrated a clear exhaustion hardening behavior, where the progressive exhaustion of dislocations and dislocation sources increases the stress required to drive plasticity. This is consistent with the idea that mechanical size effects ( smaller is stronger ) are due to the fact that nanostructures usually have fewer defects that can operate at lower stresses. By monitoring the evolution of stress locally we find that exhaustion hardening causes the stress in the nanofibers to surpass the critical stress predicted for self-multiplication, supporting a plasticity mechanism that has been hypothesized to account for the rapid strain softening observed in nanoscale bcc materials at high stresses.

  10. Structure and properties of carbon nanofibers. application as electrocatalyst support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. del Rio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to gain an insight into the physical-chemical properties of carbon nanofibers and the relationship between those properties and the electrocatalytic behavior when used as catalyst support for their application in fuel cells.

  11. Stability of β-carotene in polyethylene oxide electrospun nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, I.; Mason, M.; Romano, A.; Biasioli, F.; Scampicchio, M.

    2016-05-01

    β-carotene (βc) was successfully incorporated into electrospun nanofibers of poly-(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with the aim of prolonging its shelf life and thermal stability. The physical and thermal properties of the βc-PEO-nanofibers were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), color analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The nanofibers of PEO and βc-PEO exhibited average fiber diameters of 320 ± 46 and 230 ± 21 nm, with colorimetric coordinates L* = 95.7 ± 2.4 and 89.4 ± 4.6 and b* = -0.5 ± 0.1 and 6.2 ± 3.0 respectively. Thermogravimetric analysis coupled with Proton Transfer-Mass Spectroscopy (TGA/PTR-ms) demonstrated that coated βc inside PEO nanofibers increased thermal stability when compared to standard βc in powder form. In addition, β-carotene in the membranes showed higher stability during storage when compared with β-carotene in solution with a decrease in concentration of 57 ± 4% and 70 ± 2% respectively, thus should extend the shelf life of this compound. Also, TGA coupled with PTR-MS resulted in a promising technique to online-monitoring thermal degradation.

  12. Electrospun propolis/polyurethane composite nanofibers for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong In [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Pant, Hem Raj, E-mail: hempant@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Science and Humanities, Pulchowk Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu (Nepal); Research Institute for Next Generation, Kalanki, Kathmandu (Nepal); Sim, Hyun-Jaung [Department of Bioactive Material Science, Research Center of Bioactive Material, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Chonbuk (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Min [Department of Molecular Biology, College of Natural Science, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, 561–756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Cheol Sang, E-mail: chskim@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bio-nano System Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561–756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering requires functional polymeric membrane for adequate space for cell migration and attachment within the nanostructure. Therefore, biocompatible propolis loaded polyurethane (propolis/PU) nanofibers were successfully prepared using electrospinning of propolis/PU blend solution. Here, composite nanofibers were subjected to detailed analysis using electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and mechanical properties and water contact angle measurement. FE-SEM images revealed that the composite nanofibers became point-bonded with increasing amounts of propolis in the blend due to its adhesive properties. Incorporation of small amount of propolis through PU matrix could improve the hydrophilicity and mechanical strength of the fibrous membrane. In order to assay the cytocompatibility and cell behavior on the composite scaffolds, fibroblast cells were seeded on the matrix. Results suggest that the incorporation of propolis into PU fibers could increase its cell compatibility. Moreover, composite nanofibers have effective antibacterial activity. Therefore, as-synthesized nanocomposite fibrous mat has great potentiality in wound dressing and skin tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Sufficient amount of propolis is simply loaded through PU fibers. • Propolis increases the hydrophilicity and mechanical properties of PU fibers. • Composite mat shows excellent antibacterial activity. • Small amount of propolis can enhance the cell compatibility of PU fibers.

  13. Ultralight, scalable, and high-temperature–resilient ceramic nanofiber sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haolun; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Ning; Li, Yan; Feng, Xue; Huang, Ya; Zhao, Chunsong; Liu, Zhenglian; Fang, Minghao; Ou, Gang; Gao, Huajian; Li, Xiaoyan; Wu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Ultralight and resilient porous nanostructures have been fabricated in various material forms, including carbon, polymers, and metals. However, the development of ultralight and high-temperature resilient structures still remains extremely challenging. Ceramics exhibit good mechanical and chemical stability at high temperatures, but their brittleness and sensitivity to flaws significantly complicate the fabrication of resilient porous ceramic nanostructures. We report the manufacturing of large-scale, lightweight, high-temperature resilient, three-dimensional sponges based on a variety of oxide ceramic (for example, TiO2, ZrO2, yttria-stabilized ZrO2, and BaTiO3) nanofibers through an efficient solution blow-spinning process. The ceramic sponges consist of numerous tangled ceramic nanofibers, with densities varying from 8 to 40 mg/cm3. In situ uniaxial compression in a scanning electron microscope showed that the TiO2 nanofiber sponge exhibits high energy absorption (for example, dissipation of up to 29.6 mJ/cm3 in energy density at 50% strain) and recovers rapidly after compression in excess of 20% strain at both room temperature and 400°C. The sponge exhibits excellent resilience with residual strains of only ~1% at 800°C after 10 cycles of 10% compression strain and maintains good recoverability after compression at ~1300°C. We show that ceramic nanofiber sponges can serve multiple functions, such as elasticity-dependent electrical resistance, photocatalytic activity, and thermal insulation. PMID:28630915

  14. Synthesis of Carbon Nanofibers on Large Woven Cloth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotanjac, Z.; Lefferts, L.; Koissin, V.; Warnet, L.; Akkerman, R.

    2015-01-01

    This experimental study aims at the in situ growth of carbon nano-fibers (CNFs) on relatively large (25 × 30 cm2) single-layer carbon-fiber fabrics. It is shown that CNFs can be grown with the distribution potentially suitable for a future use in polymer-matrix composite materials. Details of tuning

  15. Recent prospective of nanofiber scaffolds fabrication approaches for skin regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi-Aghkand, Fateme; Gholizadeh-Ghaleh Aziz, Shiva; Panahi, Yunes; Daraee, Hadis; Gorjikhah, Fateme; Gholizadeh-Ghaleh Aziz, Sara; Hsanzadeh, Arash; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-11-01

    The largest organ of human body is skin, which acting as a barrier with immunologic, sensorial and protective functions. It is always in exposure to the external environment, which can result many different types of damage and injury with loss of variable volumes of extracellular matrix (ECM). For the treatment of skin lesions and damages, several approaches are now accessible, such as the application of allografts, autografts, and tissue-engineered substitutes, wound dressings and nanofiber scaffolds approaches. Even though proven clinically effective, these methods are still characterized by main drawbacks such as patient inadequate vascularization, morbidity, the inability to reproduce skin appendages, low adherence to the wound bed and high manufacturing costs. Advanced approaches based on nanofiber scaffolds approaches offer a permanent, viable and effective substitute to explain the drawbacks of skin regeneration and repair by combining growth factors, cells, and biomaterials and advanced biomanufacturing methods. This review details recent advances of nanofiber scaffolds in skin regeneration and repair strategies, and describes a synthesis method of nanofiber scaffolds.

  16. Preparation of Electrically Conductive Polystyrene/Carbon Nanofiber Nanocomposite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luyi; O'Reilly, Jonathan Y.; Tien, Chi-Wei; Sue, Hung-Jue

    2008-01-01

    A simple and effective approach to prepare conductive polystyrene/carbon nanofiber (PS/CNF) nanocomposite films via a solution dispersion method is presented. Inexpensive CNF, which has a structure similar to multi-walled carbon nanotubes, is chosen as a nanofiller in this experiment to achieve conductivity in PS films. A good dispersion is…

  17. Polysaccharide-coated PCL nanofibers for wound dressing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croisier, Florence; Atanasova, Ganka; Poumay, Yves; Jérôme, Christine

    2014-12-01

    Polysaccharide-based nanofibers with a multilayered structure are prepared by combining electrospinning (ESP) and layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition techniques. Charged nanofibers are firstly prepared by electrospinning poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) with a block-copolymer bearing carboxylic acid functions. After deprotonation of the acid groups, the layer-by-layer deposition of polyelectrolyte polysaccharides, notably chitosan and hyaluronic acid, is used to coat the electrospun fibers. A multilayered structure is achieved by alternating the deposition of the positively charged chitosan with the deposition of a negatively charged polyelectrolyte. The construction of this multilayered structure is followed by Zeta potential measurements, and confirmed by observation of hollow nanofibers resulting from the dissolution of the PCL core in a selective solvent. These novel polysaccharide-coated PCL fiber mats remarkably combine the mechanical resistance typical of the core material (PCL)-particularly in the hydrated state-with the surface properties of chitosan. The control of the nanofiber structure offered by the electrospinning technology, makes the developed process very promising to precisely design biomaterials for tissue engineering. Preliminary cell culture tests corroborate the potential use of such system in wound healing applications.

  18. Highly crystalline MOF-based materials grown on electrospun nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechelany, M.; Drobek, M.; Vallicari, C.; Abou Chaaya, A.; Julbe, A.; Miele, P.

    2015-03-01

    Supported Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) with a high specific surface area are of great interest for applications in gas storage, separation, sensing, and catalysis. In the present work we report the synthesis of a novel composite architecture of MOF materials supported on a flexible mat of electrospun nanofibers. The system, based on three-dimensional interwoven nanofibers, was designed by using a low-cost and scalable multistep synthesis protocol involving a combination of electrospinning and low-temperature atomic layer deposition of oxide materials, and their subsequent solvothermal conversion under either conventional or microwave-assisted heating. This highly versatile approach allows the production of different types of supported MOF crystals with controlled sizes, morphology, orientation and high accessibility.Supported Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) with a high specific surface area are of great interest for applications in gas storage, separation, sensing, and catalysis. In the present work we report the synthesis of a novel composite architecture of MOF materials supported on a flexible mat of electrospun nanofibers. The system, based on three-dimensional interwoven nanofibers, was designed by using a low-cost and scalable multistep synthesis protocol involving a combination of electrospinning and low-temperature atomic layer deposition of oxide materials, and their subsequent solvothermal conversion under either conventional or microwave-assisted heating. This highly versatile approach allows the production of different types of supported MOF crystals with controlled sizes, morphology, orientation and high accessibility. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06640e

  19. Antibacterial polylactic acid/chitosan nanofibers decorated with bioactive glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yi-fan; Akram, Muhammad; Alshemary, Ammarz; Hussain, Rafaqat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we have presented the structural and in vitro characterization of electrospun polylactic acid (PLA)/Chitosan nanofibers coated with cerium, copper or silver doped bioactive glasses (CeBG/CuBG/AgBG). Bead-free, smooth surfaced nanofibers were successfully prepared by using electrospinning technique. The nanocomposite fibers were obtained using a facile dip-coating method, their antibacterial activities against E. coliE. coli (ATCC 25922 strains) were measured by the disk diffusion method after 24 h of incubation at 37 °C. CeBG and CuBG decorated PLA/Chitosan nanofibers did not develop an inhibition zone against the bacteria. On the other hand, nanofibers coated with AgBG developed an inhibition zone against the bacteria. The as-prepared nanocomposite fibers were immersed in SBF for 1, 3 and 7 days in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) for evaluation of in vitro bioactivity. All samples induced the formation of crystallites with roughly ruffled morphology and the pores of fibers were covered with the extensive growth of crystallites. Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) composition analysis showed that the crystallites possessed Ca/P ratio close to 1.67, confirming the good in-vitro bioactivity of the fibers.

  20. Electrospun Nanofiber Scaffolds with Gradations in Fiber Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandalavala, Karl; Jiang, Jiang; Shuler, Franklin D.; Xie, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this protocol is to report a simple method for generating nanofiber scaffolds with gradations in fiber organization and test their possible applications in controlling cell morphology/orientation. Nanofiber organization is controlled with a new fabrication apparatus that enables the gradual decrease of fiber organization in a scaffold. Changing the alignment of fibers is achieved through decreasing deposition time of random electrospun fibers on a uniaxially aligned fiber mat. By covering the collector with a moving barrier/mask, along the same axis as fiber deposition, the organizational structure is easily controlled. For tissue engineering purposes, adipose-derived stem cells can be seeded to these scaffolds. Stem cells undergo morphological changes as a result of their position on the varied organizational structure, and can potentially differentiate into different cell types depending on their locations. Additionally, the graded organization of fibers enhances the biomimicry of nanofiber scaffolds so they more closely resemble the natural orientations of collagen nanofibers at tendon-to-bone insertion site compared to traditional scaffolds. Through nanoencapsulation, the gradated fibers also afford the possibility to construct chemical gradients in fiber scaffolds, and thereby further strengthen their potential applications in fast screening of cell-materials interaction and interfacial tissue regeneration. This technique enables the production of continuous gradient scaffolds, but it also can potentially produce fibers in discrete steps by controlling the movement of the moving barrier/mask in a discrete fashion. PMID:25938562