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Sample records for machinist trainees production

  1. Influence of a National Cancer Institute transdisciplinary research and training initiative on trainees' transdisciplinary research competencies and scholarly productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Amanda L; Feng, Annie; Oh, April; Hall, Kara L; Stipelman, Brooke A; Stokols, Daniel; Okamoto, Janet; Perna, Frank M; Moser, Richard; Nebeling, Linda

    2012-12-01

    Over the past several decades, there has been burgeoning interest and investment in large transdisciplinary (TD) team science initiatives that aim to address complex societal problems. Despite this trend, TD training opportunities in the health sciences remain limited, and evaluations of these opportunities are even more uncommon due to funding constraints. We had the unique opportunity to conduct an exploratory study to examine the potential outcomes and impacts of TD training in a National Cancer Institute-supported initiative for TD research and training-the Transdisciplinary Research on Energetics and Cancer I (TREC I) initiative. This study used a retrospective mixed-methods approach leveraging secondary analysis of existing data sources to learn about TREC trainees' experiences with TREC training, TD research competencies, changes in scholarly productivity, and the associations among these domains. Results indicated that, on average, TREC trainees were satisfied with their TREC mentoring experiences and believed that TREC training processes were effective, in general. Participation in TREC training was associated with TD research competencies, including TD research orientation, positive general attitude toward TD training, development of scientific skills for TD research, and intrapersonal/interpersonal competencies for collaboration. There was also a significant increase in trainees' scholarly productivity from before to after starting in TREC training, as indicated by average annual number of publications and presentations and average number of coauthors per publication. Perceived effectiveness of TREC training was positively correlated with change in average annual number of research presentations from before to after starting in TREC training (r = 0.65, p < 0.05, N = 12), as well as TD research orientation (r = 0.36, p < 0.05), general attitude toward TD training (0.39, p < 0.05), scientific skills for TD research (r = 0

  2. Westinghouse European trainee program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, G. [Safety and Licensing Department, Westinghouse Electric Spain, Padilla 17, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    Westinghouse Electric Company is proud of giving its employees the possibility to work and act globally. The company's European Trainee Program provides an opportunity to work within different fields of business within Westinghouse, participating in a wide range of projects and experiencing and learning from the different cultures of the company. In 2006 the first Trainee Program started with seven Swedish Trainees. During these eighteen months they worked 12 months in Sweden and then went off to six-month-assignments in France and in the US. In April 2008, the first European Trainee Program was launched with ten Trainees from four different countries: five from Sweden, two from Germany, two from Spain and one from Belgium. As with the previous program, its length was eighteen months. During the first year, the European Trainees had the opportunity to work in various areas within their country of hire, as well as to visit different Westinghouse headquarters in Europe and the US to learn more about the global business. Their kick-off session took place in Vaesteraas, Sweden in April 2008. During four days, the Trainees participated in group dynamic exercises as well as presentations of the business of Westinghouse abroad and in Sweden. Two of the most interesting parts of this session were the visits to the Fuel Factory and to the Field Services mock-ups. The second session took place in June 2008 in Monroeville, Pennsylvania (USA), where Westinghouse had its main headquarters, nowadays located in Cranberry, PA. During two weeks, the trainees got to know even more about Westinghouse through visits, lectures and forums for open discussions. The visits comprised for example the tubing factory at Blairsville, the Field Services main headquarters in Madison and the George Westinghouse Research and Technology Park near Pittsburgh. The meetings included presentations of each Westinghouse business unit, detailed information about future projects and round table

  3. Trainee Readiness For Diversity Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhyung Chung

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although trainee readiness is critical for diversity training effectiveness, extant research has not paid attention to the relationship between trainee readiness for diversity training and diversity training outcomes. This study identifies motivational, behavioral, and cognitive trainee readiness for diversity training and proposes a theoretical framework of how individual characteristics (perceived discrimination, demographic attributes, and previous diversity-related experience and organizational characteristics (diversity climate and demographic dissimilarity influence motivational, behavioral, and cognitive trainee readiness for diversity training.

  4. SUBJECTIVE DESCRIPTION OF TRAINEES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEARCE, FRANK C.

    THIS REPORT GIVES A SUBJECTIVE DESCRIPTION OF THE GENERAL POPULATION FROM WHICH TRAINEES FOR THE MODESTO MULTI-OCCUPATIONAL PROJECT WERE SELECTED. IT INCLUDES AN EXTENSIVE STUDY OF THE SOCIOLOGICAL BACKGROUND OF A GROUP OF WHITE MIGRANTS WHO MOVED FROM THE EASTERN UNITES STATES TO CALIFORNIA. THE AUTHOR ALSO INCLUDED REFERENCES TO THE CHANGING…

  5. Trainee and training issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, Nancy; Bartley, Catherine

    2006-12-01

    This chapter deals with the obligations of trainers and trainees to each other, the responsibilities of the programme and the conflicts of providing a service while training. Management of trainees with differing needs, such as those working part-time or returning to training after sickness, is reviewed. Assessment of performance and the obligation of consultants to identify, manage and support struggling trainees are discussed. Ethical discussion is based on the principles of autonomy, non-maleficence, beneficence, and justice to which fidelity is added. Case studies illustrating the application of ethical principles to work and decision-making are presented to stimulate debate. Opinions vary as to which principle carries more weight in individual cases, and how best to balance the conflicting requirements of the parties involved (patient, trainee,.trainer, employer, society). For all healthcare practitioners, the needs of patients remain our first concern. Acting in a consequentialist way, we must "maximise the good" and minimise the attendant harms in training. However, deontology states that certain sacrosanct rules and principles should never be breached. Doctors must abide by the duties of a doctor described in Good Medical Practice, maintaining standards in a way that ensures professional qualifications are respected. For the patient, there are advantages and disadvantages to receiving care in an educational setting. A 'teaching environment' tends to encourage and maintain high standards of practice from senior clinicians, but it also exposes patients to new learners, who are less efficient and polished and perhaps more prone to make errors. Learning has to fit round and complement the clinical and emotional needs of patients.

  6. Measuring Professional Identity Development among Counselor Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Hurt, Kara M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the differences in professional identity development between novice and advanced counselor trainees (N = 161). Multivariate analyses of variance indicated significant differences between groups. Specifically, advanced counselor trainees demonstrated greater professional development compared with novice counselor trainees. No…

  7. Apprentices & Trainees: September Quarter, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2013

    2013-01-01

    This publication presents estimates of apprentice and trainee activity in Australia for the September quarter 2012. The figures in this publication are derived from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection no.74 (December 2012 estimates). The most recent figures in this publication are estimated (those for training activity from the March…

  8. Socialising journalist trainees in the newsroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravengaard, Gitte; Rimestad, Lene

    2014-01-01

    , conversation analysis, and theories of profession in order to investigate and interpret social and cultural (re)production in the routinised practice in the newsroom. The units of analysis are interactions between journalist trainees and their editors concerning ideas for new news stories. These interactions...... play a key role in the socialisation process as important loci for learning about the craft because of the constant reinforcement of competent practice which takes place here. Thus, these interactions are important sites for cultural production and reproduction supporting the construction of the craft...

  9. Surgical trainees and trauma emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wybaillie, E; Broos, P L O

    2010-01-01

    An accident and emergency (A&E) training has been suggested as an essential part of the basic surgical training. The A&E curriculum should be divided into three sections: a critical curriculum, a core curriculum and a comprehensive curriculum. For instance, the critical curriculum contains topics that provide the opportunity to translate the ABCDE principles of trauma management into practice. Furthermore, a post in the A&E department provides the surgical trainee with significant exposure to the management of the polytrauma patient and to the management of other acute general surgical, urological and orthopaedic conditions. By presenting better educational programs and by reducing the non-medical tasks a trainee has to deal with, the education of surgical trainees during A&E attachment can be improved.

  10. Apprentices and Trainees: September Quarter, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents estimates of apprentice and trainee activity in Australia for the September quarter 2009. The figures in this publication are derived from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection no. 62 (December 2009 estimates). There were 425,500 apprentices and trainees in-training as at 30 September 2009, a decrease of 2.4%…

  11. Apprentices and Trainees: December Quarter, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents estimates of apprentice and trainee activity in Australia for the December quarter 2009. The figures in this publication are derived from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection no.63 (March 2010 estimates). There were 414 900 apprentices and trainees in-training as at 31 December 2009, a decrease of 0.6% from the…

  12. Assessing Trainee Surgeons’ Nontechnical Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Konge, Lars; Dieckmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trainee surgeons would benefit from regular, formative assessments to ensure they learn the nontechnical aspects of surgical performance. Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark (NOTSSdk) is a tool to assess surgeons' nontechnical skills (NTS) during an operation. The aims...

  13. Instigating change: trainee doctors' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Nassim; Shahaney, Sumera; Martin, Guy; Ahmad, Ahmir; Moghul, Masood

    2012-09-01

    In the 21st century, the core skills of trainee doctors are evolving as clinicians, leaders and innovators. Leadership skills are an essential tool for all doctors and need to be an integral part of their training and learning as set out in the General Medical Council's Good Medical Practice. It is essential to develop these skills at an early stage and continually improve them. A group of junior doctors participated in a pilot programme for leadership with the aim of executing a quality improvement (QI) project. This article describes our experiences of both the course itself and the project undertaken by our group. As part of the process of implementing change, we faced a number of challenges which contributed to our learning. These have been explored as well as potential ways to overcome them to enable the swift and smooth development of future QI projects. Using an example of a QI project looking at handover, this article demonstrates how a trainee doctor can implement their project for both professional and institutional improvement.

  14. Asphalt Raking. Instructor Manual. Trainee Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborers-AGC Education and Training Fund, Pomfret Center, CT.

    This packet consists of the instructor and trainee manuals for an asphalt raking course. The instructor manual contains a course schedule for 4 days of instruction, content outline, and instructor outline. The trainee manual is divided into five sections: safety, asphalt basics, placing methods, repair and patching, and clean-up and maintenance.…

  15. Radiographers and trainee radiologists reporting accident radiographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buskov, L; Abild, A; Christensen, A

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital.......To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital....

  16. Apprentices and Trainees: March Quarter, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents estimates of apprentice and trainee activity in Australia for the March quarter 2010. The figures in this publication are derived from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection no.64 (June 2010 estimates). The most recent figures in this publication are estimated (those for training activity from the September…

  17. Factors for Personal Counseling among Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. Stephen; Shufelt, Brett

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the use of counseling among counselor trainees and the characteristics of consumers and nonconsumers. Approximately 61% of those surveyed (n = 85) reported that they had received counseling, with the majority being mental health counseling trainees. Nonconsumers (n = 54) indicated that they coped with problems in other…

  18. Monitoring physiology trainee needs to focus professional society responses: the APS Trainee Needs Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, Marsha L; Lowy, Melinda E; Sweazea, Karen L; Alvarez, Diego F

    2011-06-01

    In 2004 and 2007, the American Physiological Society (APS) Trainee Advisory Committee (TAC) conducted surveys of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and new investigators in physiology to identify topics and issues important to those trainees. Two major trends emerged from the data. First, trainees in 2007 expressed somewhat greater interest in professional development information than did those in 2004. Second, needs expressed by trainees in both years were closely related to their specific career development stage. Survey findings guided the TAC and other APS committees and groups to focus their efforts toward the issues that were of the greatest interest to trainees. It also led to improved communication with trainees and increased involvement of trainees in APS governance.

  19. Driving Care Quality: Aligning Trainee Assessment and Supervision Through Practical Application of Entrustable Professional Activities, Competencies, and Milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraccio, Carol; Englander, Robert; Holmboe, Eric S; Kogan, Jennifer R

    2016-02-01

    To address the long-standing challenge of meaningful trainee assessment, the authors reviewed and expanded on the Accountable Assessment for Quality Care and Supervision (AAQCS) equation. The equation proposes that care quality is the product of the interaction between trainee performance (measured by workplace assessment) and supervision (required level of intervention to ensure care quality) in the context of the environment where the care occurs: Trainee performance × Appropriate supervision = Safe, effective patient-centered care. Assessing trainee performance and matching that performance to "appropriate" supervision, however, is fraught with challenges. The authors suggest a unifying framework that integrates entrustable professional activities (EPAs), competencies, and milestones to inform trainee assessment and supervision, thereby enabling the practical application of the AAQCS equation in the workplace. Because the unit of measure for an EPA is the outcome of whether the trainee can safely and effectively perform the professional activity without supervision, the proposed unifying framework directly aligns with the dependent variable in the AAQCS equation: care quality.The value of applying a unifying framework that integrates EPAs, competencies, and milestones to the AAQCS equation in the clinical learning environment lies in its ability to provide supervisors with a shared mental model of performance expectations for trainees, reducing unwanted variability and improving assessment accuracy; guidance for aligning performance milestones of trainees with the needed level of supervisor intervention to ensure care quality; and substrate for specific feedback to improve the trainee's professional development as a way to ensure future care quality.

  20. Trainee report dashboard: tool for enhancing feedback to radiology trainees about their reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorniak, Richard J T; Flanders, Adam E; Sharpe, Richard E

    2013-01-01

    During their radiology residency, trainees must learn multiple facets of radiology practice, including the writing of radiology reports. An important factor in the trainee's development of reporting skills is feedback from the attending radiologist on the trainee's preliminary reports. The quality and quantity of feedback may vary and are not typically documented. As radiology department workloads have increased and stricter limitations have been imposed on trainee work hours, less time is available for attending radiologists and trainees to perform a joint retrospective review of radiology reports. To compensate, the authors have developed a Web-based dashboard that provides trainees with case-specific feedback about their reports. Components include an attending radiologist-trainee report discrepancy logging and communication system that is integrated with the institutional picture archiving and communication system, an automated preliminary report-final report comparator, modules showing statistics related to the discrepancy logger and report comparator components, and a Web page that unifies these components with image and report display capabilities. Both the actual report feedback and the trainee's use of the system are documented, and the resultant data may be used for evaluating trainee competence in written communication, as mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. With these tools, trainees can obtain near-real-time feedback, which may pinpoint issues that can be corrected to improve the quality of their radiology reporting. This system, although it does not supplant face-to-face training sessions with attending radiologists, can augment traditional methods of learning.

  1. 360-degree feedback for medical trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Ellen; Holm, Kirsten; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2015-01-01

    In 360-degree feedback medical colleagues and collaborators give a trainee feedback by answering a questionnaire on behaviour of the trainee. The questionnaire may contain questions answered on a scale or/and they may contain open questions. The result from 360-degree feedback is used for formative...... feedback and assessment. In order to secure reliability 8-15 respondents are needed. It is a matter of discussion whether the respondents should be chosen by the trainee or by a third part, and if respondents should be anonymous. The process includes a feedback session with a trained supervisor....

  2. Safe laparoscopic colorectal surgery performed by trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff, Peter Koch; Schultz, Martin; Harvald, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    for the technique to spread. We routinely plan all operations as laparoscopic procedures and most cases are done by supervised trainees. The present study therefore presents the results of operations performed by trainees compared with results obtained by experienced laparoscopic surgeons.......Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer is safe, but there have been hesitations to implement the technique in all departments. One of the reasons for this may be suboptimal learning possibilities since supervised trainees have not been allowed to do the operations to an adequate extent...

  3. Student trainee report of George K. Hetzel

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The summer experiences on Malheur National Wildlife Refuge of first year student trainee George Kyle Hetzel are summarized in this report. These experiences varied...

  4. Trained to Be Reflective Interpreter Trainees

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘屹

    2015-01-01

    The thesis aims to provide the interpreter trainees with an effective way of learning during and after their training process by observing and explaining how the learning as well as practice is promoted effectively and consciously through reflective activities.

  5. Communication Skills among Surgical Trainees: Perceptions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Communication Skills among Surgical Trainees: Perceptions of Residents in a ... ability to communicate with patients and their family members is very important in the ... for training in communication skills as a basis for developing an effective ...

  6. Student trainee report of Walter L. Anderson

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following report is intended to summarize the activities of Walter L. Anderson, Student Trainee (Wildlife Biology) at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge during the...

  7. Acute Internal Medicine Trainee Survey 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Nicholas; Conway, Nerys

    2015-01-01

    To ascertain current Acute Internal Medicine (AIM) trainees' opinions on their training programme, practical procedures, specialist skills and AIM as a specialty. This can then be used to feedback to the national training committee to help shape training priorities. Online survey sent to all AIM Higher Specialty Trainees registered on the Society for Acute Medicine database, and advertised through e-mail communication and social media. The majority of trainees (55.5%) were quite happy or very happy with their training currently, although significant difficulties were highlighted with time off for specialist skill training and difficulty achieving certain procedural skills. The majority of trainees believe ultrasound should form a core component of AIM training (82.3%). A high proportion of trainees would recommend AIM as a specialty despite these difficulties. A number of issues were highlighted causing difficulties within AIM training, despite which the vast majority of trainees would recommend AIM as a career choice. The results were fed back to the training committee in March.

  8. Adaptive leadership curriculum for Indian paramedic trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantha, Aditya; Coggins, Nathaniel L; Mahadevan, Aditya; Strehlow, Rebecca N; Strehlow, Matthew C; Mahadevan, S V

    2016-12-01

    Paramedic trainees in developing countries face complex and chaotic clinical environments that demand effective leadership, communication, and teamwork. Providers must rely on non-technical skills (NTS) to manage bystanders and attendees, collaborate with other emergency professionals, and safely and appropriately treat patients. The authors designed a NTS curriculum for paramedic trainees focused on adaptive leadership, teamwork, and communication skills critical to the Indian prehospital environment. Forty paramedic trainees in the first academic year of the 2-year Advanced Post-Graduate Degree in Emergency Care (EMT-paramedic equivalent) program at the GVK-Emergency Management and Research Institute campus in Hyderabad, India, participated in the 6-day leadership course. Trainees completed self-assessments and delivered two brief video-recorded presentations before and after completion of the curriculum. Independent blinded observers scored the pre- and post-intervention presentations delivered by 10 randomly selected paramedic trainees. The third-party judges reported significant improvement in both confidence (25 %, p Self-reported competency surveys indicated significant increases in leadership (2.6 vs. 4.6, p speaking (2.9 vs. 4.6, p self-reflection (2.7 vs. 4.6, p self-confidence (3.0 vs. 4.8, p self-reported NTS commonly required of paramedics in the field. The authors recommend integrating focused NTS development curriculum into Indian paramedic education and further evaluation of the long term impacts of this adaptive leadership training.

  9. The supervisory needs of neophyte psychotherapy trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duryee, J; Brymer, M; Gold, K

    1996-11-01

    This article focuses on the difficulties facing the neophyte trainee in the field of psychotherapy. Three areas of such difficulties are identified, defined, and discussed: feelings of inadequacy and incompetence, anxieties concerning supervisors, and confusion concerning multiple theoretical views of clinical work. Two vignettes from the early training of the paper's junior authors illustrate and discuss these problems and their resolution in applied contexts. A conclusion is offered which emphasizes the value of supervisory recognition of these dimensions of trainees' experience, as well as their potential for modeling processes of growth that are likely to help supervisees' patients as well.

  10. Online Training: The Value of Capturing Trainee Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lori K.; DuBois, Cathy Z.; Faley, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Despite years of advice from researchers that trainee reactions provide training evaluation information that is of very limited use, trainee reactions remain the most commonly used measure of training effectiveness. Because the technology that supports online training facilitates the collection of trainee reaction information during and…

  11. Learning Strategies and Learning-Related Emotions among Teacher Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Teacher trainees are questioned about their strategic and emotional relationships with a key area of their future activity, learning. Characteristics of German teacher trainees are identified through comparisons with German students on a related course of study (educational science), and through comparisons with Swedish teacher trainees. N = 875…

  12. Job burnout in 159 anesthesiology trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesim Cokay Abut

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anesthesiology may be stressful and most anesthesiologists develop mechanisms for coping. However, inexperienced trainee anesthesiologists seem to be vulnerable. We studied stress perception and job burnout in trainee anesthesiologists. Methods: Responses to perceived stress scale (PSS and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI were evaluated in 159 trainee anesthesiologists. Results: In our results, when perceived stress was increased, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization increased but personal accomplishment decreased, as expected. Perceived stress was very high in the early years of training. There was a negative correlation between age and emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, but positive correlation with personal accomplishment. Female anesthesiologists had higher personal accomplishment, but lower depersonalization points than male anesthesiologists in our study. There was no statistical association between marital status, PSS, and MBI; ≥2 children group had a significant high personal accomplishment but low depersonalization and emotional exhaustion scores. Line regression analysis showed a statistically significant relationship between PSS and emotional exhaustion and between age and depersonalization. Conclusions: Social factors such as gender and number of children affect the work life of our trainees.

  13. Using Concept Maps with Trainee Physics Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Peter; Willson, Mike

    1996-01-01

    Describes how the technique of concept mapping can be useful for identifying gaps in preservice teachers' knowledge. Validity of the technique was tested using blind interviews with a representative sample of eight trainees. Has potential as a valuable self-diagnostic tool for teachers teaching outside their area of specialization. (DDR)

  14. Educational Supervision Appropriate for Psychiatry Trainee's Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rele, Kiran; Tarrant, C. Jane

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors studied the regularity and content of supervision sessions in one of the U.K. postgraduate psychiatric training schemes (Mid-Trent). Methods: A questionnaire sent to psychiatry trainees assessed the timing and duration of supervision, content and protection of supervision time, and overall quality of supervision. The authors…

  15. 29 CFR 553.214 - Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., constitutes engagement in activities under section 7(k) only when the employee meets all the applicable tests... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT TO EMPLOYEES OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Fire Protection and Law Enforcement Employees of Public Agencies Exemption Requirements § 553.214 Trainees. The attendance at a bona...

  16. Internet and Internet Use: Teacher Trainees' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinoglu, Orhan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present the development and issues of internet and internet use. The study has a descriptive survey design and 185 randomly selected teacher trainees at Marmara University, Ataturk Education Faculty in the 2001-2002 academic year constitute the sample. Data were collected via a questionnaire prepared by the researcher…

  17. LGBT Trainee and Health Professional Perspectives on Academic Careers--Facilitators and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Nelson F; Rankin, Susan; Callahan, Edward; Ng, Henry; Holaday, Louisa; McIntosh, Kadian; Poll-Hunter, Norma; Sánchez, John Paul

    2015-12-01

    Diversity efforts in the academic medicine workforce have often neglected the identification and inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health professionals. Many of these professionals have served as educators, researchers, administrators, and leaders at their academic institutions, but their perspectives on the barriers to and facilitators of pursuing academic careers, as well as the perspectives of trainees, have not been explored. We applied a purposeful convenience sampling strategy to collect quantitative and qualitative data among LGBT health care professionals (HCP) and trainees. The authors identified trends in data using bivariate analyses and consensual qualitative research methods. We analyzed data from 252 surveys completed by HCPs and trainees and a subset of 41 individuals participated in 8 focus groups. Among survey participants, 100% identified as lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) or queer; 4.5% identified along the trans-spectrum; 31.2% identified as a racial or ethnic minority; 34.1% identified as faculty; and 27.4% as trainees. Eighty-one percent of trainees were interested in academia and 47% of HCPs held faculty appointments. Overall, 79.4% were involved in LGBT-related educational, research, service, or clinical activities. Facilitators of academic careers included engagement in scholarly activities, mentorship, LGBT-specific networking opportunities, personal desire to be visible, campus opportunities for involvement in LGBT activities, and campus climate inclusive of LGBT people. Barriers included poor recognition of LGBT scholarship, a paucity of concordant mentors or LGBT networking opportunities, and hostile or non-inclusive institutional climates. LGBT trainees and HCPs contribute significantly to services, programs, and scholarship focused on LGBT communities. LGBT individuals report a desire for a workplace environment that encourages and supports diversity across sexual orientation and gender identities

  18. Developing Communication Skills of EFL Teacher Trainees

    OpenAIRE

    Akpınar, Kadriye Dilek

    2009-01-01

    Higher Education Council of Turkey has added a one term course named as “Effective Communication Skills” to the curriculum since 2006 in Foreign Language Education Departments because of the crucial importance of communication in the information society. In order to test the effectiveness of this course, a research project was developed by looking at the pre-and post course interviews conducted with first year teacher trainees about communication skills compared with the fourth year students’...

  19. Defining competence in obstetric epidural anaesthesia for inexperienced trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, E J; Coghill, J; Sneyd, J R

    2015-06-01

    Cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis has been used for assessing competence of trainees learning new technical skills. One of its disadvantages is the required definition of acceptable and unacceptable success rates. We therefore monitored the development of competence amongst trainees new to obstetric epidural anaesthesia in a large public hospital. Obstetric epidural data were collected prospectively between January 1996 and December 2011. Success rates for inexperienced trainees were calculated retrospectively for (1) the whole database, (2) for each consecutive attempt and (3) each trainee's individual overall success rate. Acceptable and unacceptable success rates were defined and CUSUM graphs generated for each trainee. Competence was assessed for each trainee and the number of attempts to reach competence recorded. Mean (sd) success rate for all inexperienced trainees was 76.8 (0.1%), range 63-90%. Consecutive attempt success rate produced a learning curve with a mean success rate commencing at 58% on attempt 1. After attempt 10 the attempt number had no effect on subsequent success rates. From these results, the acceptable and unacceptable success rates were set at 65 and 55% respectively. CUSUM graphs demonstrated 76 out of 81 trainees competent after a mean of 46 (22) attempts. CUSUM is useful for assessing trainee epidural competence. Trainees require approximately 50 attempts, as defined by CUSUM, to reach competence. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Trainee Perceptions of the Canadian Cardiac Surgery Workforce: A Survey of Canadian Cardiac Surgery Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewhort, Holly E M; Quantz, Mackenzie A; Hassan, Ansar; Rubens, Fraser D; Pozeg, Zlatko I; Perrault, Louis P; Feindel, Christopher M; Ouzounian, Maral

    2017-04-01

    Management of cardiac surgery health human resources (HHR) has been challenging, with recent graduates struggling to secure employment and a shortage of cardiac surgeons predicted as early as 2020. The length of cardiac surgery training prevents HHR supply from adapting in a timely fashion to changes in demand, resulting in a critical need for active workforce management. This study details the results of the 2015 Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons (CSCS) workforce survey undertaken as part of the CSCS strategy for active workforce management. The 38-question survey was administered electronically to all 96 trainees identified as being registered in a Canadian cardiac surgery residency program for the 2015-2016 academic year. Eighty-four of 96 (88%) trainees responded. The majority of participants were satisfied with their training experience. However, 29% stated that their clinical and operative exposure needed improvement, and 57% of graduating trainees did not believe that they would be competent to practice independently at the conclusion of their training. Although 51% of participants believe the job market is improving, 94% of senior trainees found it competitive or extremely difficult to secure an attending staff position. Participants highlighted a need for improved career counselling and formal mentorship. Although the job market is perceived to be improving, a mismatch in the cardiac surgery workforce supply and demand remains because current trainees continue to experience difficulty securing employment after the completion of residency training. Trainees have identified improved career counselling and mentorship as potential strategies to aid graduates in securing employment. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. What do gastroenterology trainees want: recognition, remuneration or recreation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, G C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational psychologists have identified three factors important in motivating physicians: financial reward, academic recognition, time off. AIM: To assess motivators among gastroenterology (GI) trainees. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to GI trainees to assess their motivators: (1) work fewer hours for less lucrative rate, (2) reduction in salary\\/increase in hours for academic protected time, and (3) work longer hours for higher total salary, but less lucrative hourly rate. RESULTS: Overall, 61 trainees responded; 52% of trainees would work shorter hours for less lucrative rate; 60% would accept a disproportionate reduction in salary\\/increase in hours for academic protected time; 54% would work longer hours for more money but less lucrative rate. Most trainees (93%) accepted at least one scenario. CONCLUSIONS: Most GI trainees are willing to modify their job description to align with their personal values. Tailoring job descriptions according to these values can yield economic benefits to GI Divisions.

  2. What do gastroenterology trainees want: recognition, remuneration or recreation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, G C

    2010-07-27

    BACKGROUND: Occupational psychologists have identified three factors important in motivating physicians: financial reward, academic recognition, time off. AIM: To assess motivators among gastroenterology (GI) trainees. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to GI trainees to assess their motivators: (1) work fewer hours for less lucrative rate, (2) reduction in salary\\/increase in hours for academic protected time, and (3) work longer hours for higher total salary, but less lucrative hourly rate. RESULTS: Overall, 61 trainees responded; 52% of trainees would work shorter hours for less lucrative rate; 60% would accept a disproportionate reduction in salary\\/increase in hours for academic protected time; 54% would work longer hours for more money but less lucrative rate. Most trainees (93%) accepted at least one scenario. CONCLUSIONS: Most GI trainees are willing to modify their job description to align with their personal values. Tailoring job descriptions according to these values can yield economic benefits to GI Divisions.

  3. Effect of Engaging Trainees by Assessing Peer Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loumann Krogh, Charlotte; Ringsted, Charlotte; Kromann, Charles B;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to explore the learning effect of engaging trainees by assessing peer performance during simulation-based training. METHODS: Eighty-four final year medical students participated in the study. The intervention involved trainees assessing peer performance...... performance did not show any significant difference between the two groups. Trainees who assessed peer performance were more satisfied with the training than those who did not: mean 6.36 (SD 1.00) versus 5.74 (SD 1.33) P = 0.025. CONCLUSION: Engaging trainees in the assessment of peer performance had...

  4. Training manual for precision hand deburring, Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-12-01

    Part 2 is presented of a 4-part training manual to be used by machinist trainees, production workers, and others removing burrs from precision miniature parts. The manuals are written to be self-teaching and are intended to be used with two hours of training each day along with another six hours of bench work in deburring.

  5. Psychological attributes of successful trainee accountants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmari Štrbac

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested that certain psychological attributes of accounting graduates are significant predictors of the later success of trainee accountants in the work environment. Since selection is a key human resources function in public accounting firms the present study investigated the relationship between academic performance, specific personality traits, examination pass rate and the work performance of a sample (N = 77 of trainee accountants from an international, mid-sized firm. The results indicate that the majority of cases could be correctly predicted as successful or not by a verbal ability variable and that the criterion measure developed for this study (Cronbach alpha = 0,95 can be used successfully to measure the work performance of trainee accountants. The importance of academic performance as well as the pass rate in the qualifying examinations are also discussed. Opsomming Daar word gesuggereer dat sekere sielkundige eienskappe van rekeningkunde gegradueerdes as voorspellers van hul latere sukses in die werkomgewing kan dien. Aangesien keuring ’n kernfunksie van die menslikehulpbronaktiwiteite binne openbare ouditeursfirmas is, het hierdie studie die verhouding tussen akademiese prestasie, spesifieke persoonlikheidstrekke, die eksamenslaagsyfer en die werkprestasie van ’n steekproef (N = 77 kwekelinggeoktrooieerde-rekenmeesters binne ’n internasionale, gemiddelde grootte firma ondersoek. Die resultate dui daarop dat die meerderheid gevalle korrek as suksesvol aldan nie voorspel kan word deur ’n verbale vermoëveranderlike en dat die kriteriuminstrument wat vir hierdie studie ontwikkel is (Cronbach alfa = 0,95, gebruik kan word om die werkprestasie van hierdie kwekelinge te meet. Die belangrikheid van akademiese prestasie en die slaagsyfer in die kwalifiserende eksamens word ook bespreek.

  6. Changing primary teacher trainees' attitudes to science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jane, Beverley; Martin, Marjory-Dore; Tytler, Russell

    1991-12-01

    A study of primary teacher trainees' perceptions and attitudes to science in 1990, has been useful in designing a semester unit aimed at increasing the confidence and interest of first year students at Victoria College. This paper outlines the background survey and discusses some, of the results and how they were used to develop the Professional Readiness Study-Understanding Science. This unit attempts to change attitudes by focussing on metacognition and encourages students to understand and control their own learning. Discussion involves teaching and learning strategies and alternative assessment approaches including the student's journal-the Personal Record.

  7. Relaxed acceleration tolerance in female pilot trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navathe, P D; Gomez, G; Krishnamurthy, A

    2002-11-01

    Female pilots now fly many types of aircraft including military fighters capable of maneuvers that produce high, sustained acceleration in the +Gz axis. Although women have participated as subjects in various centrifuge studies, little is known about the acceleration tolerance of female pilots. Between April 1995 and December 1997, 17 female pilot trainees were studied at the Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Bangalore, India. The subjects were 23.2 +/- 1.4 yr old and led physically active lives. Their relaxed +Gz tolerance limits (defined as peripheral light loss) were tested using the High G and Disorientation Demonstrator. The protocol included a series of rapid onset runs (RORs) to tolerance followed by a single gradual onset run (GOR) to tolerance. The mean ROR tolerance was 4.2 +/- 0.4 G. The mean GOR tolerance was 5.2 +/- 0.6 G. Three of the subjects were unable to complete the GOR due to severe nausea. Two women reported breast discomfort at levels of 3.5 G and beyond. No other problems were reported. The acceleration tolerances for the female pilot trainees were comparable to those for male pilots previously studied in our laboratory.

  8. Republished: instigating change: trainee doctors' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Nassim; Shahaney, Sumera; Martin, Guy; Ahmad, Ahmir; Moghul, Masood

    2013-10-01

    In the 21st century, the core skills of trainee doctors are evolving as clinicians, leaders and innovators. Leadership skills are an essential tool for all doctors and need to be an integral part of their training and learning as set out in the General Medical Council's Good Medical Practice. It is essential to develop these skills at an early stage and continually improve them. A group of junior doctors participated in a pilot programme for leadership with the aim of executing a quality improvement (QI) project. This article describes our experiences of both the course itself and the project undertaken by our group. As part of the process of implementing change, we faced a number of challenges which contributed to our learning. These have been explored as well as potential ways to overcome them to enable the swift and smooth development of future QI projects. Using an example of a QI project looking at handover, this article demonstrates how a trainee doctor can implement their project for both professional and institutional improvement.

  9. Improving medication management competency of clinical trainees in geriatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostas, Tia; Zimmerman, Kristin; Salow, Marci; Simone, Mark; Whitmire, Natalie; Rudolph, James L; McMahon, Graham T

    2014-08-01

    The authors hypothesized that an interprofessional workshop would improve geriatrics trainees' medication management. The workshop was based on a needs assessment and comprised an interactive session with pharmacists on managing medications in elderly adults. Participants were trainees in their geriatrics rotation at a tertiary care medical center. Trainees completed a medication appropriateness survey for three patients, one of which was their own. After the workshop, trainees reviewed medications of the three patients. Trainees completed online surveys after their rotation and 3 months later. Of 95 trainees rotating through geriatrics, 76 (80%) attended the workshop and completed the worksheet. Trainees' scores on reviewing medication lists improved significantly, from 6.7±2.3 to 7.7±2.0 out of 11 for standardized patient 1 (Pgeriatrics rotation. In conclusion, this interprofessional medication management workshop improved trainees' ability to perform medication reviews accurately and led to change in self-reported prescribing behavior. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Promoting Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Trainees Addressing Siloed Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Robert Li; Christodoulou, Joanna; Goldman, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Professional siloing within medical institutions has been identified as a problem in medical education, including resident training. The authors discuss how trainees from different disciplines can collaborate to address this problem. Method: A group of trainees from psychiatry, developmental medicine, neurology, and education came…

  11. Protocol Analysis of Social Problem Solving in Counselor Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Anne L.; And Others

    This study investigated social problem solving (SPS) and cognitive style (field dependence-independence) in 70 counselor trainees who were also elementary or secondary school teachers. Specifically, the study attempted to analyze and describe the SPS responses of counselor trainees; to examine whether SPS elements, styles, and processes varied…

  12. Competent Counseling for Middle Eastern American Clients: Implications for Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheilian, Sepideh S.; Inman, Arpana G.

    2015-01-01

    The authors used a factorial multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) to determine whether counselor trainees' group differences on measures of multicultural competence, empathy, and multicultural counseling self-efficacy (CSE) when working with Middle Eastern American (MEA) clients were moderated by trainee race. Two hundred and fifty-six…

  13. NNS Teacher Trainees in Western-based TESOL Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Suggests TESOL programs provide nonnative speaking (NNS) teacher trainees with instruction and support in key areas such as contextually responsive teacher education content, training in a different school culture, competing with native English-speaking teacher trainees, and self confidence. Suggests the use of an introductory course for NNS…

  14. NNS Teacher Trainees in Western-based TESOL Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Suggests TESOL programs provide nonnative speaking (NNS) teacher trainees with instruction and support in key areas such as contextually responsive teacher education content, training in a different school culture, competing with native English-speaking teacher trainees, and self confidence. Suggests the use of an introductory course for NNS…

  15. Analysis of qualitative interviews with Action Research Trainees, February 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Bente; Levinsen, Karin

    Interviews with trainees were conducted after the Action Research period (November-December 2006), when LBs 1-4 were tested on trainees. The aim of the interviews was to understand how teachers learn to teach and to relate to the online environment through the specific context of the Lancelot live...

  16. Elementary School Mathematics Teacher Trainees' Metacognitive Awareness Levels: Turkey Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memnun, Dilek Sezgin; Hart, Lynn Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the metacognitive awareness levels of elementary mathematics teacher trainees and to investigate whether their awareness differs according to gender and class level. We also investigate the relationship between the metacognitive awareness levels of trainee mathematics teacher's and their overall performance…

  17. Life and Work Values of Counselor Trainees: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busacca, Louis A.; Beebe, Ronald S.; Toman, Sarah M.

    2010-01-01

    This national web-based study used the Schwartz Value Survey (Schwartz, 1994) and Super's Work Values Inventory-Revised (Zytowski, n.d.) to identify general life and work value orientations of 674 female and male entry-level counselor trainees residing in 27 states. In general, trainees emphasized benevolence, self-direction, and achievement and…

  18. Impact of Patient Suicide on Psychiatrists and Psychiatric Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskin, R.; Sakinofsky, I.; Bagby, R. M.; Dickens, S.; Sousa, G.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigated the impact of patient suicides on trainees and psychiatrists and their utilization of supports. Methods: Graduates in practice and trainees of the residency program of the University of Toronto from 1980-1995 (N = 495) were surveyed, retrospectively, with 239/495 responding (48%). Demographic and educational…

  19. Analysis of qualitative interviews with Action Research Trainees, February 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Bente; Levinsen, Karin

    Interviews with trainees were conducted after the Action Research period (November-December 2006), when LBs 1-4 were tested on trainees. The aim of the interviews was to understand how teachers learn to teach and to relate to the online environment through the specific context of the Lancelot live...

  20. Personality differences among junior postgraduate trainees in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinou, Eirini; Allan, Hayley; Vig, Stella

    2015-01-01

    An early understanding of the personality profiles of junior trainees may be valuable for supporting the professional and educational development of tomorrow's doctors. This study aims to describe the personality profile of junior trainees and to explore whether the personality profiles differed according to the level of training, specialty choice, or gender. The Mental Muscle Diagram Indicator was distributed electronically. South West London, Health Education England South London. A total of 157 junior trainees completed the personality questionnaire. Specifically, there were core surgical (n = 40), core medical (n = 24), and foundation trainees (n = 93). The preferential profile across all groups was Extroversion (E), Sensing (S), Feeling (F), and Perception (P). More foundation doctors favored an extrovert and sensing personality when compared with core trainees (72% vs 60.4% and 77.4% vs 57.5%, respectively). More core surgical trainees appeared to prefer Extroversion when compared with their medical counterparts (66.7% vs 54.2%). More core medical trainees favored an intuitive behavior when compared with their surgical colleagues (50% vs 35%). Significantly, more female trainees (83.3%) displayed an extrovert personality than male trainees (66.7%) did. According to the Mental Muscle Diagram Indicator analysis, this work shows that the more junior the trainees are in their career, the more they tend to enjoy human interaction and to favor acting before thinking. The most junior trainees tend to be slightly more interested in dealing with facts rather than ideas and favor a flexible approach of life. The reducing ratio of Extroversion and Sensing in the core trainees when compared with foundation doctors may suggest that clinical experience has an effect on personality. As trainees begin to progress, they may tend to reflect more on their practice and to start thinking about more long term. These results suggest that a greater understanding of their personality

  1. Attitudes towards attrition among UK trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafson, Irene; Currie, Jane; O'Dwyer, Sabrina; Woolf, Katherine; Griffin, Ann

    2017-06-02

    Physician dissatisfaction in the workplace has consequences for patient safety. Currently in the UK, 1 in 5 doctors who enter specialist training in obstetrics and gynaecology leave the programme before completion. Trainee attrition has implications for workforce planning, organization of health-care services and patient care. The authors conducted a survey of current trainees' and former trainees' views concerning attrition and 'peri-attrition' - a term coined to describe the trainee who has seriously considered leaving the specialty. The authors identified six key themes which describe trainees' feelings about attrition in obstetrics and gynaecology: morale and undermining; training processes and paperwork; support and supervision; work-life balance and realities of life; NHS environment; and job satisfaction. This article discusses themes of an under-resourced health service, bullying, lack of work-life balance and poor personal support.

  2. Use of spaced education to deliver a curriculum in quality, safety and value for postgraduate medical trainees: trainee satisfaction and knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckel, Jeffrey; Carballo, Victoria; Kalibatas, Orinta; Soule, Michael; Wynne, Kathryn E; Ryan, Megan P; Shaw, Tim; Co, John Patrick T

    2016-03-01

    Quality, patient safety and value are important topics for graduate medical education (GME). Spaced education delivers case-based content in a structured longitudinal experience. Use of spaced education to deliver quality and safety education in GME at an institutional level has not been previously evaluated. To implement a spaced education course in quality, safety and value; to assess learner satisfaction; and to describe trainee knowledge in these areas. We developed a case-based spaced education course addressing learning objectives related to quality, safety and value. This course was offered to residents and fellows about two-thirds into the academic year (March 2014) and new trainees during orientation (June 2014). We assessed learner satisfaction by reviewing the course completion rate and a postcourse survey, and trainee knowledge by the per cent of correct responses. The course was offered to 1950 trainees. A total of 305 (15.6%) enrolled in the course; 265/305 (86.9%) answered at least one question, and 106/305 (34.8%) completed the course. Fewer participants completed the March programme compared with the orientation programme (42/177 (23.7%) vs 64/128 (50.0%), pquality, safety and value principles. Offering a voluntary course may result in low completion. Learners were satisfied with their experience and were introduced to new concepts. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Perspective: Entering uncharted waters: navigating the transition from trainee to career for the nonphysician clinician-scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Shannon E; Sharpe, Heather M; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Larsen, Bodil; MacKay, Lyndsay

    2013-01-01

    The transition from trainee to career clinician-scientist can be a stressful and challenging time, particularly for those entering the less established role of nonphysician clinician-scientist. These individuals are typically PhD-prepared clinicians in the allied health professions, who have either a formal or informal joint appointment between a clinical institution and an academic or research institution. The often poorly defined boundaries and expectations of these developing roles can pose additional challenges for the trainee-to-career transition.It is important for these trainees to consider what they want and need in a position in order to be successful, productive, and fulfilled in both their professional and personal lives. It is also critical for potential employers, whether academic or clinical (or a combination of both), to be fully aware of the supports and tools necessary to recruit and retain new nonphysician clinician-scientists. Issues of relevance to the trainee and the employer include finding and negotiating a position; the importance of mentorship; the value of effective time management, particularly managing clinical and academic time commitments; and achieving work-life balance. Attention to these issues, by both the trainee and those in a position to hire them, will facilitate a smooth transition to the nonphysician clinician-scientist role and ultimately contribute to individual and organizational success.

  4. Developing Communication Skills of EFL Teacher Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadriye Dilek Akpınar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Higher Education Council of Turkey has added a one term course named as “Effective Communication Skills” to the curriculum since 2006 in Foreign Language Education Departments because of the crucial importance of communication in the information society. In order to test the effectiveness of this course, a research project was developed by looking at the pre-and post course interviews conducted with first year teacher trainees about communication skills compared with the fourth year students’ ideas who did not take the course. This paper describes both the significance of effective communication skills and the benefits of the course for developing teacher trainees’ effective communication skills. The implementations and suggestions for teacher education has also been discussed.

  5. CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES OF THE EDUCATIONAL PLANNING BASED ON A COMPETENCIES APPROACH OF TEACHERS OF TRAINEE TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inocente Melitón-García

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the challenges faced by teachers in response to the innovation of curriculum and teaching matters, it is important to go deep into the the state of knowledge of trainee teachers education, analyze and systematize the production generated around this field called "didactic planning of the faculty". It is possible to state that talking about a daily basis teaching practice, it is a must to consider two aspects; on the one hand, referring to the work that prepares the teacher to the practice in schools for trainee teachers; on the other, updating and improvement during the professional performance. As a result, the hinge point to study all related to the planning of teaching from the perception of teachers of trainee school teachers, has been poorly treated by researchers or education specialist.

  6. Influences of Radiology Trainees on Screening Mammography Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Jeffrey R; Taylor, Clayton R; Cubbison, Alyssa M; Erdal, B Selnur; Yildiz, Vedat O; Carkaci, Selin

    2016-05-01

    Participation of radiology trainees in screening mammographic interpretation is a critical component of radiology residency and fellowship training. The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify the effects of trainee involvement on screening mammographic interpretation and diagnostic outcomes. Screening mammograms interpreted at an academic medical center by six dedicated breast imagers over a three-year period were identified, with cases interpreted by an attending radiologist alone or in conjunction with a trainee. Trainees included radiology residents, breast imaging fellows, and fellows from other radiology subspecialties during breast imaging rotations. Trainee participation, patient variables, results of diagnostic evaluations, and pathology were recorded. A total of 47,914 mammograms from 34,867 patients were included, with an overall recall rate for attending radiologists reading alone of 14.7% compared with 18.0% when involving a trainee (P radiology trainees, with no change in cancer detection rate. Radiology faculty members should be aware of this potentiality and mitigate tendencies toward greater false positives. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Educational assessment of general practice experience for psychiatric trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, T; MacDonald, L; Sibbald, B; Gask, L; Roberts, G

    1995-03-01

    Eighteen psychiatric trainees spent 6 months each as general practice trainees. The educational impact of the experience was assessed by a self-assessment questionnaire, a semi-structured interview and a videotaped interview with a psychiatric patient. Each assessment was conducted at a baseline and after 12 months. A control group of 14 trainees was recruited from the same rotation. On the self-assessment questionnaire, the study registrars rated their abilities to solve general medical problems significantly improved compared to controls. They had also acquired greater understanding of the limitation of their knowledge and their legal responsibilities towards their patients. The semi-structured interview failed to distinguish between the two groups. Videotapes for rating at baseline and follow-up were available for only 17 of the trainees. Assessment of the tapes used the Maguire Scale and the Interview Behaviour Scale. Neither scale demonstrated any intervention effect. The interviews were all characterized by a preponderance of 'closed psychological' and 'checking-out' questions. It appears that psychiatric trainees' interviewing styles had not been influenced by the experience. This study suggests that psychiatric trainees gain greater confidence in their role as a doctor and greater understanding of the scope and nature of general practice by such an attachment. It is unclear whether or not supplementary interviewing skills had been acquired which were not utilized in the taped interview, which conforms very much to traditional psychiatric examination behaviour. Trainees were reassured that they had increased their knowledge without losing any of their specific professional skills.

  8. Making robust assessments of specialist trainees' workplace performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, J M; Castanelli, D J; Chen, Y; Jolly, B

    2017-02-01

    Workplace-based assessments should provide a reliable measure of trainee performance, but have met with mixed success. We proposed that using an entrustability scale, where supervisors scored trainees on the level of supervision required for the case would improve the utility of compulsory mini-clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) assessments in a large anaesthesia training program. We analysed mini-CEX scores from all Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists trainees submitted to an online database over a 12-month period. Supervisors' scores were adjusted for the expected supervision requirement for the case for trainees at different stages of training. We used generalisability theory to determine score reliability. 7808 assessments were available for analysis. Supervision requirements decreased significantly (P  0.7) with a feasible number of assessments. Adjusting scores against the expected supervision requirement considerably improved reliability, with G > 0.8 achieved with only nine assessments. Three per cent of trainees generated average mini-CEX scores below the expected standard. Using an entrustment scoring system, where supervisors score trainees on the level of supervision required, mini-CEX scores demonstrated moderate reliability within a feasible number of assessments, and evidence of validity. When scores were adjusted against an expected standard, underperforming trainees could be identified, and reliability much improved. Taken together with other evidence on trainee ability, the mini-CEX is of sufficient reliability for inclusion in high stakes decisions on trainee progression towards independent specialist practice. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Support for Students, Postdoctoral Fellows and Trainees who have been accepted to present at the Terachem 2014 Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, Cathy S. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2016-09-29

    This award under the Office of nuclear Physics, isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program ($20,000) was to provide bursaries for U.S. students/trainees to enable them to participate in the Terachem 2014 Symposium.

  10. International perspectives on plagiarism and considerations for teaching international trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitman, Elizabeth; Litewka, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    In the increasingly global community of biomedical science and graduate science education, many US academic researchers work with international trainees whose views on scientific writing and plagiarism can be strikingly different from US norms. Although a growing number of countries and international professional organizations identify plagiarism as research misconduct, many international trainees come from research environments where plagiarism is ill-defined and even commonly practiced. Two research-ethics educators consider current perspectives on plagiarism around the world and contend that US research-training programs should focus on trainees' scientific writing skills and acculturation, not simply on preventing plagiarism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Trainee multicultural case conceptualization ability and couples therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomburg, Allison M; Prieto, Loreto R

    2011-04-01

    Previous literature on the assessment of multicultural counseling competence has been concerned only with counselors' abilities when working with individual clients. We expanded this line of research by investigating trainees' multicultural case conceptualization ability in the context of working with couples. Despite the fact that trainees self-reported a high level of multicultural competency, trainees were largely inattentive to racial factors in their case conceptualization responses to vignettes involving both African American and European American clients presenting for couples therapy. On the whole, despite didactic, clinical, and extracurricular training in multiculturalism, marriage and family therapy trainees did not sufficiently incorporate cultural factors into their clinical case conceptualizations. We discuss implications for teaching, practice, and future research.

  12. Radiation safety knowledge and practices among Irish orthopaedic trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, M

    2014-04-23

    Fluoroscopy is frequently used in orthopaedic surgery, particularly in a trauma setting. Exposure of patients and staff to ionising radiation has been studied extensively; however, little work has been done to evaluate current knowledge and practices among orthopaedic trainees.

  13. A survey of British senior psychiatry trainees' ethnocultural personal values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelam, Kishen; Duddu, Venugopal; Chaudhry, Imran Bashir; Antonysamy, A S; Husain, Nusrat

    2009-01-01

    The authors explored the ethnocultural values of a group of senior psychiatry trainees in the northwest region of England. The authors surveyed senior psychiatry trainees using the Personal Values Questionnaire and analyzed responses under the headings of ethnic stereotypes, ethnocultural service issues, and perceptions of racism. They also explored training requirements on cultural issues in a subsample of trainees. The majority of the trainees disagreed with certain commonly held ethnic stereotypes and acknowledged the role of culture in mental health. However, they had contrasting views on the need for culture-specific services and on perceptions of racism. They expressed interest in training programs on cultural issues in psychiatric practice. In multicultural settings, personal beliefs, perceptions, and values are likely to influence psychiatric practice. A training program on cultural aspects of mental health could help improve awareness and sensitivity of these issues and the quality of care.

  14. Satisfaction of trainees of Saudi Diploma Family Medicine, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaldi, Yahia M; AlDawood, Kassim M; AlKhudeer, Basima K; AlSaqqaf, Abdullah A

    2016-09-01

    This paper aims to assess trainees' satisfaction with the process and assessment aspects of the Saudi Diploma of Family Medicine (SDFM). This cross-sectional study was conducted in February 2015 among trainees undertaking the SDFM. A questionnaire was distributed to all trainees in four examination centres in Saudi Arabia, under the supervision and guidance of the investigators (four members of the scientific committee of SDFM). There was a total of 97 participants in this study, the majority of whom were Saudis. More than 85% were satisfied with most elements of training including; an adequate number and variety of patients and cases, allocating time for training, giving regular written evaluation. Satisfaction with mentoring and giving constructive feedback scored less well and trainees were less satisfied with some hospital clinical rotations, which requires further exploration.

  15. Trainee doctors with learning difficulties: recognizing need and providing support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrewsbury, Duncan

    2012-06-01

    Specific learning difficulties affect medical students and trainee doctors. These conditions impact on processing and learning skills, and are associated with positive attributes. Having an awareness of these is key for successful and effective medical educators.

  16. Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons' non-technical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Dieckmann, Peter; Beier-Holgersen, Randi

    2015-01-01

    -Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark tool to stimulate feedback conversations. Audio recordings of post-operation feedback conversations were collected. Trainees and supervisors provided questionnaire responses on the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the feedback. The feedback conversations were...... qualitatively analyzed for content and feedback style. Usefulness was investigated using a scale from 1 to 5 and written comments were qualitatively analyzed. RESULTS: Six trainees and six supervisors participated in eight feedback conversations. Eighty questionnaires (response rate 83 percent) were collected...

  17. Exploring the impact of workplace cyberbullying on trainee doctors

    OpenAIRE

    Farley, S; Coyne, I; Sprigg, C.; Axtell, C.; Subramanian, G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Workplace bullying is an occupational hazard for trainee doctors. However, little is known about their experiences of cyberbullying at work. This study examines the impact of cyberbullying among trainee doctors, and how attributions of blame for cyberbullying influence individual and work-related outcomes.\\ud \\ud Methods: Doctors at over 6 months into training were asked to complete an online survey that included measures of cyberbullying, blame attribution, negative emotion, job ...

  18. Frequency and impact of patient suicide on psychiatric trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Guido; De Gucht, Véronique; Joos, Gustaaf; De Heyn, Elke

    2003-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to conduct a systematic inquiry into the frequency and impact of patients' suicide on psychiatric trainees, and the availability and usefulness of training courses. Data were collected from 114 psychiatric trainees of the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium, representing a 70% response rate. A self-report questionnaire developed in the UK was adapted to the Flemish situation. A Dutch version of the Impact of Event Scale (IES) inquiring about post-traumatic stress symptoms was also used. The frequency of suicide experience was considerably higher in the present study than in similar studies in the USA and the UK. Thirty percent of first year trainees had been confronted with patient suicide. Personal and professional impact of patient suicide, as well as post-traumatic stress scores were considerably lower in Flemish psychiatric trainees. They considered informal support to be of more value than formal support to come to terms with the event. Finally, postgraduate training in post-suicide management was found to be largely insufficient. The results of the present study show that psychiatric trainees in the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium are at a high risk of experiencing patient suicide, whereas the impact of this experience appears to be relatively low. Only a small minority of trainees has received adequate training on procedures to follow after patient suicide.

  19. Medical microbiology training needs and trainee experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Josephine; Elamin, Wael; Millar, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Training in microbiology is continuing to evolve. Standardisation of this process has, in part, been achieved through the development of a training curriculum by the Royal College of Pathologists (RCPath). A substantial proportion of microbiology training occurs through telephone consultations. To ascertain the content of these interactions and the extent to which the necessary skills outlined by the curriculum are attainable via these consultations. Records of telephone consultations made by microbiology registrars (SpR) on the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) over a 6 month period were analysed with regard to who initiated contact and the type of advice provided. An average of 426 SpR entries per month were made on the LIMS following telephone consultations. These consultations were predominantly initiated by fellow clinicians as opposed to the SpR. The majority (79%) of advice entailed guidance as to the use of antimicrobials which resulted in an alteration of the current regimen in 54% of cases. This study represents the first attempt to quantify the telephone consultations of microbiology trainees. It is concluded that although such interactions provide a means of attaining some of the competencies outlined by the RCPath curriculum, the bias towards antimicrobial advice reflects a discrepancy between the needs of the service users and the broad skill set advocated by the current microbiology training programme. Future modifications will need to take this into account to ensure both the training of SpRs and the microbiology service is fit for purpose.

  20. Survey of academic field experiences (SAFE: trainees report harassment and assault.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn B H Clancy

    Full Text Available Little is known about the climate of the scientific fieldwork setting as it relates to gendered experiences, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. We conducted an internet-based survey of field scientists (N = 666 to characterize these experiences. Codes of conduct and sexual harassment policies were not regularly encountered by respondents, while harassment and assault were commonly experienced by respondents during trainee career stages. Women trainees were the primary targets; their perpetrators were predominantly senior to them professionally within the research team. Male trainees were more often targeted by their peers at the research site. Few respondents were aware of mechanisms to report incidents; most who did report were unsatisfied with the outcome. These findings suggest that policies emphasizing safety, inclusivity, and collegiality have the potential to improve field experiences of a diversity of researchers, especially during early career stages. These include better awareness of mechanisms for direct and oblique reporting of harassment and assault and, the implementation of productive response mechanisms when such behaviors are reported. Principal investigators are particularly well positioned to influence workplace culture at their field sites.

  1. Perceptions of pathology informatics by non-informaticist pathologists and trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addie Walker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although pathology informatics (PI is essential to modern pathology practice, the field is often poorly understood. Pathologists who have received little to no exposure to informatics, either in training or in practice, may not recognize the roles that informatics serves in pathology. The purpose of this study was to characterize perceptions of PI by noninformatics-oriented pathologists and to do so at two large centers with differing informatics environments. Methods: Pathology trainees and staff at Cleveland Clinic (CC and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH were surveyed. At MGH, pathology department leadership has promoted a pervasive informatics presence through practice, training, and research. At CC, PI efforts focus on production systems that serve a multi-site integrated health system and a reference laboratory, and on the development of applications oriented to department operations. The survey assessed perceived definition of PI, interest in PI, and perceived utility of PI. Results: The survey was completed by 107 noninformatics-oriented pathologists and trainees. A majority viewed informatics positively. Except among MGH trainees, confusion of PI with information technology (IT and help desk services was prominent, even in those who indicated they understood informatics. Attendings and trainees indicated desire to learn more about PI. While most acknowledged that having some level of PI knowledge would be professionally useful and advantageous, only a minority plan to utilize it. Conclusions: Informatics is viewed positively by the majority of noninformatics pathologists at two large centers with differing informatics orientations. Differences in departmental informatics culture can be attributed to the varying perceptions of PI by different individuals. Incorrect perceptions exist, such as conflating PI with IT and help desk services, even among those who claim to understand PI. Further efforts by the PI community could

  2. The Role of Scientific Communication Skills in Trainees' Intention to Pursue Biomedical Research Careers: A Social Cognitive Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Carrie; Lee, Hwa Young; Anderson, Cheryl; Byars-Winston, Angela; Baldwin, Constance D; Chang, Shine

    2015-01-01

    Scientific communication (SciComm) skills are indispensable for success in biomedical research, but many trainees may not have fully considered the necessity of regular writing and speaking for research career progression. Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between SciComm skill acquisition and research trainees' intentions to remain in research careers. We used social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to test a model of the relationship of SciComm skills to SciComm-related cognitive variables in explaining career intentions. A sample of 510 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows at major academic health science centers in the Texas Medical Center, Houston, Texas, were surveyed online. Results suggested that interest in performing SciComm tasks, SciComm outcome expectations (SCOEs), and SciComm productivity predicted intention to remain in a research career, while SciComm self-efficacy did not directly predict career intention. SCOEs also predicted interest in performing SciComm tasks. As in other SCCT studies, SciComm self-efficacy predicted SCOEs. We conclude that social cognitive factors of SciComm skill acquisition and SciComm productivity significantly predict biomedical trainees' intentions to pursue research careers whether within or outside academia. While further studies are needed, these findings may lead to evidence-based interventions to help trainees remain in their chosen career paths.

  3. Factors associated with adverse clinical outcomes among obstetrics trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Catherine E; Aiken, Abigail R; Park, Hannah; Brockelsby, Jeremy C; Prentice, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether UK obstetrics trainees transitioning from directly to indirectly supervised practice have a higher likelihood of recording adverse patient outcomes in operative deliveries compared with other indirectly supervised trainees, and to examine whether performing more procedures under direct supervision is associated with fewer adverse outcomes in initial practice under indirect supervision. We examined all deliveries (13 856) conducted by obstetricians at a single centre over 6 years (2008-2013). Mixed-effects logistic regression models were used to compare estimated blood loss (EBL), maternal trauma, umbilical arterial pH, delayed neonatal respiration, failed instrumental delivery, and critical incidents for trainees in their first indirectly supervised year with those for trainees in all other years of indirect supervision. Outcomes for trainees in their first indirectly supervised 3 months were compared with their outcomes for the remainder of the year. Linear regression was used to examine the relationship between number of procedures performed under direct supervision and initial outcomes under indirect supervision. Trainees in their first indirectly supervised year had a higher likelihood of recording EBL of > 2 L at any delivery (odds ratio [OR] 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.64; p  1 L (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.88-3.20; p  1 L (p Obstetrics trainees in their first year of indirectly supervised practice have a higher likelihood of recording immediate adverse delivery outcomes, which are primarily maternal rather than neonatal. Undertaking more directly supervised procedures prior to transitioning to indirectly supervised practice may reduce adverse outcomes, which suggests that experience is a key consideration in obstetrics training programme design. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Providing Experiential Business and Management Training for Biomedical Research Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Kimberly A; Carnahan, Robert H; Brown, Abigail M; Gould, Kathleen L

    2017-01-01

    Many biomedical PhD trainees lack exposure to business principles, which limits their competitiveness and effectiveness in academic and industry careers. To fill this training gap, we developed Business and Management Principles for Scientists, a semester-long program that combined didactic exposure to business fundamentals with practical team-based projects aimed at solving real business problems encountered by institutional shared--resource core facilities. The program also included a retreat featuring presentations by and networking with local life science entrepreneurs and final team presentations to expert judges. Quantitative and qualitative metrics were used to evaluate the program's impact on trainees. A pretest-posttest approach was used to assess trainees' baseline knowledge and mastery of module concepts, and each individual's pretest and posttest responses were compared. The mean score improved by more than 17 percentage points. Trainees also took an online survey to provide feedback about the module. Nearly all participants agreed or strongly agreed that the module was a valuable use of their time and will help guide their career decisions and that project work helped drive home module concepts. More than 75% of trainees reported discussing the module with their research advisors, and all of these participants reported supportive or neutral responses. Collectively, the trainee feedback about the module, improvement in test scores, and trainee perception of advisor support suggest that this short module is an effective method of providing scientists with efficient and meaningful exposure to business concepts. © 2017 K. A. Petrie et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http

  5. The use of smartphone applications by urology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, G J; Burke, M J; Aslam, A; Kelly, M E; Akram, C M; Giri, S K; Flood, H D

    2015-10-01

    Mobile phone technology is continuously advancing- the smartphone allows users instant access to information via the internet. Downloadable applications (apps) are becoming widespread across medical specialities. The aim of this study was to assess the use of smartphone apps among urology trainees in Ireland. An anonymous electronic survey was distributed via Survey Monkey(®) to all urology trainees in Ireland assessing their ownership and use of smartphones and downloadable apps. A search of urology apps was performed using the Apple App Store and the Android Market. 36 (81.8%) of trainees responded with 100% ownership of smartphones. 28 (77%) report downloading apps with 11 (30.6%) reporting paying for them. The mean number of apps downloaded was 4 (Range 1-12). 16 (44.4%) trainees think apps for smartphones are very useful in clinical practice, 14 (42.4%) think they are useful. A total of 126 urology apps were available. 76 (60.3%) were designed for physicians, 46 (36.5%) for patients, 2 (1.6%) for students and 2 (1.6%) for urological nurses. There are an ever increasing number of urology apps available. Urology trainees are using smartphones as an educational and reference tool and find them a useful aide in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Geographic distribution of postgraduate dental trainees in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, SoIchiro; Mataki, Shiro; Akiyama, Hitoshi; Nitta, Hiroshi; Okada, Mahito; Sakayori, Takaharu; Sugito, Hiroki; Ishii, Takuo

    2009-05-01

    Postgraduate clinical training for dentists in Japan became mandatory in April 2006. Mandatory postgraduate clinical training for physicians has been criticized as having accelerated the imbalance in distribution of physicians. This suggests the danger that the same phenomenon might occur in distribution of dentists. It is also necessary to investigate the geographic distribution of dental trainees and practicing dentists in Japan. In this study, the number of dental trainees enrolled in each clinical training program and number that had actually received clinical training at each facility were compared by prefecture. The results suggest that disparities in the number of dental trainees among prefectures are being compensated for by movement across prefectural borders under the clinical training facilities-group system. Postgraduate dental trainees, however, showed a significantly greater imbalance in geographic distribution than practicing dentists. Continuation of the postgraduate clinical training for dentists under the existing system may accelerate this imbalance in distribution of dentists. To prevent this, practical measures should be taken in accordance with the coming review of the system, based on research regarding changes in geographic distribution of dental trainees.

  7. Occupational Blood Exposure among Health Care Personnel and Hospital Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hajjaji Darouiche

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood and body fluid Exposure is a major occupational safety problems for health care workers. Therefore, we conducted a descriptive and retrospective study to identify the characteristics of blood exposure accidents in health care settings which lasted five years (2005-2009 at the two university hospitals of Sfax. We have 593 blood exposure accidents in health care settings 152 (25.6% health personnel and 441 (74.4% trainees' doctors, nurses and health technicians. The mechanism of blood and body fluid exposure was accidental needle-stick injury in 78.9% of health staff, and 81% of trainees, accidental cut in 14.7% of health workers and 10.2% of trainees. The increasing severity of blood exposure accidents is linked to the lack of safe behavior against this risk.

  8. Occupational blood exposure among health care personnel and hospital trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjaji Darouiche, M; Chaabouni, T; Jmal Hammami, K; Messadi Akrout, F; Abdennadher, M; Hammami, A; Karray, H; Masmoudi, M L

    2014-01-01

    Blood and body fluid Exposure is a major occupational safety problems for health care workers. Therefor We conducted a descriptive and retrospective study to identify the characteristics of blood exposure accidents in health care settings which lasted five years (2005-2009) at the two university hospitals of Sfax. We have 593 blood exposure accidents in health care settings 152 (25.6%) health personnel and 441 (74.4%) trainees' doctors, nurses and health technicians. The mechanism of blood and body fluid exposure was accidental needle-stick injury in 78.9% of health staff, and 81% of trainees, accidental cut in 14.7% of health workers and 10.2% of trainees. The increasing severity of blood exposure accidents is linked to the lack of safe behavior against this risk.

  9. Assessing compliance: Active versus inactive trainees in a memory intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana K Bagwell

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Dana K Bagwell, Robin L WestDepartment of Psychology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Extensive research on memory interventions has confirmed their success with older adults, but the individual difference factors that predict successful training outcomes remain relatively unexplored. In the current intervention, trainees were identified as active (compliant with training regimens or inactive using trainer ratings based on attendance, homework completion, and class participation. The active group showed significantly greater training-related gains than the inactive group and the control group on most measures. Compliance was predicted by health, education, and self-efficacy. Specifically, active trainees were more likely to have advanced degrees and somewhat higher self-efficacy, and to have higher vitality and fewer functional limitations than the inactive trainees. This research may assist future investigators to target interventions to those who will show the most benefit.Keywords: compliance, memory training, aging, intervention

  10. How psychiatric trainees keep up to date: survey of psychiatric trainees' use of journals and other information sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Tilley, Tom; Bainton, John; Fernando, Matthew; Wong, Yimlun; Ko, Ba; Warner, James; Nilforooshan, Ramin

    2016-02-01

    Aims and method To gather information about psychiatric trainees' use of different information sources and academic materials, a questionnaire was distributed at the London Deanery Annual Psychiatry Trainee Conference and the training programmes of two teaching trusts. Results Participants returned 202 out of a total of 300 completed questionnaires (67%). Websites were the most commonly accessed information source ahead of textbooks, abstracts and journals. Year of training correlated positively with journal use and negatively with textbook use. Year of training also correlated positively with frequency of reading three journals published by the Royal College of Psychiatrists and with specific reasons for consulting journals, namely to improve clinical practice and inform trainees' own research. Clinical implications Respondents reported consulting websites more frequently than more traditional information sources but journals are still a widely used source of information for trainee clinicians. It is important that trainees continue to be equipped with skills to identify and access high-quality information at the point of clinical uncertainty.

  11. Primary prevention of emotional impairment among medical trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, R H; Perell, K; Ruckh, J M

    1990-09-01

    An extensive literature on medical students' and physicians' emotional impairment indicates the need for primary preventive programs, but few have been reported. This paper describes a seminar for premedical students aimed at preventing their later disillusionment and distress as medical trainees by fostering realistic expectations and emotional exploration. The seminar consists of open-ended discussions between premedical students and medical trainees/practitioners about stress and coping at various career stages, a physician preceptor for each student, and emotionally expressive readings and videotapes. Course-end and follow-up evaluations found that both the students' realism about their careers and their personal well-being were markedly increased.

  12. Characteristic Oral and Written Business Communication Problems of Selected Managerial Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Barry E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a study to determine characteristic oral and written business communication problems of selected managerial trainees and to assess whether the problems defined by these trainees were those recognized by their immediate supervisors and secretaries. (JMF)

  13. Which factors are associated with OB/GYN trainees' confidence in performing ultrasound examinations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin Grønnebæk; Rasmussen, Morten; Tappert, C

    2014-01-01

    To explore the association between clinical training characteristics and trainees' level of confidence in performing ultrasound scans independently.......To explore the association between clinical training characteristics and trainees' level of confidence in performing ultrasound scans independently....

  14. Effects of Role Conflict on Counselor Trainees' Self-Statements, Anxiety Level, and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigated if and how role conflict affects counselor trainees' self-statements, anxiety level, and performance. Results suggested role conflict may produce few adverse effects on beginning trainees' self-evaluations, affect, or behavior. Trainee performance was inversely related to anxiety level, and anxiety was inversely related to strength of…

  15. Understanding Trust as an Essential Element of Trainee Supervision and Learning in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Karen E.; ten Cate, Olle; Boscardin, Christy; Irby, David M.; Iobst, William; O'Sullivan, Patricia S.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical supervision requires that supervisors make decisions about how much independence to allow their trainees for patient care tasks. The simultaneous goals of ensuring quality patient care and affording trainees appropriate and progressively greater responsibility require that the supervising physician trusts the trainee. Trust allows the…

  16. Australian Vocational Education and Training Statistics: Apprentices & Trainees, September Quarter 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2014

    2014-01-01

    This publication presents estimates of apprentice and trainee activity in Australia for the September quarter 2014. The figures in this publication are derived from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection no. 82 (December 2014 estimates). There were 341,300 apprentices and trainees in-training as at 30 September 2014, a decrease of 18.4%…

  17. Assessing Changes in Counselor Trainees' Multicultural Competence Related to Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Debbiesiu L.; Rosen, Adam D.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2014-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined changes in self-reported multicultural competence and distress reactions of 32 counselor trainees engaged in service learning. Whereas 3 trainees significantly increased in self-reported multicultural competence, 5 significantly decreased. Trainees who significantly increased in multicultural competence reported…

  18. Clinical Judgments of Easy vs. Difficult Clients by Counselor Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Allen; Morrison, Thomas L.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated responses of counselor trainees (N=31) to easy versus difficult clients in terms of clinical judgments. Results indicated that clients with a difficult interpersonal style were not regarded as more psychologically disturbed, but were rated as having less potential for change and less ego strength. (LLL)

  19. Trainee Teachers with Dyslexia: Personal Narratives of Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazzard, Jonathan; Dale, Kirsty

    2013-01-01

    This paper tells the stories of two trainee teachers and their personal experiences of dyslexia. Both informants were English and training to be primary school teachers in England. Through drawing on their own experiences of education, the stories illustrate how dyslexia has shaped the self-concept, self-esteem and resilience of each informant.…

  20. 22 CFR 41.53 - Temporary workers and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary workers and trainees. 41.53 Section 41.53 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS VISAS: DOCUMENTATION OF NONIMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Business and Media Visas § 41.53 Temporary workers and...

  1. The Impact of Facebook in Teaching Practicum: Teacher Trainees' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktalay, Sehnaz Baltaci

    2015-01-01

    Prompt feedback is one of the critical components of teacher education programs. To reap the greatest benefit from the teaching practicum process, the quality of feedback as well as its implementation by stakeholders, supervisors, cooperating teachers, and teacher trainees, takes on great importance. The purpose of this study is to examine how Web…

  2. Correlates of empathic understanding among neophyte trainees in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puleo, S G; Schwartz, R C

    1999-04-01

    Results are summarized of an empirical study testing the associations among various academic, demographic, and personal characteristics and rated empathic understanding among 93 neophyte psychotherapy trainees from six universities. Multiple regression analyses suggested that completion of a graduate group counseling course with a specific personal growth component was the only characteristic significantly correlated with ratings of empathic understanding.

  3. Parental Leave Policies and Pediatric Trainees in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avika; Feldman-Winter, Lori; Szucs, Kinga A

    2015-08-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) states that each residency program should have a clearly delineated, written policy for parental leave. Parental leave has important implications for trainees' ability to achieve their breastfeeding goals. This study aimed to measure the knowledge and awareness among members of the AAP Section on Medical Students, Residents, and Fellowship Trainees (SOMSRFT) regarding parental leave. An online survey was emailed to SOMSRFT members in June 2013. Quantitative data are presented as percentage of respondents. Awareness of leave policies was analyzed based on having children and the sex of respondents. Nine hundred twenty-seven members responded to the survey. Among those with children, 40% needed to extend the duration of their training in order to have longer maternity leave, 44% of whom did so in order to breastfeed longer. Thirty percent of respondents did not know if their program had a written, accessible policy for parental leave. Trainees without children and men were more unaware of specific aspects of parental leave such as eligibility for the Family Medical Leave Act as compared to women and those with children. Despite the fact that United States national policies support parental leave during pediatrics training, and a majority of programs comply, trainees' awareness regarding these policies needs improvement. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Writing Autobiographies: A Meaningful Way to Sensitize Trainee Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Josefina C.; López, Margarita M.; Zuluaga, Carmen T. C.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the final results from a research work which aimed to identify the pedagogical processes that emerge from the autobiographies that modern languages trainee teachers at the University of Caldas write. These autobiographies become a starting point to develop their teaching practicum, and are considered to be of great…

  5. Trainee Primary Teachers' Ideas about the Ozone Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyes, Edward; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Survey results reveal trainee primary teachers are well informed about the nature and location of the ozone layer and appreciated that it screens the earth from ultraviolet (UV) rays, although some thought that it protects the earth from acid rain. Identifies themes in students' thinking and groups of students with different concepts. (LZ)

  6. Principles of Fidelity in Dynamic Equivalence Translation for Trainee Translators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘屹

    2011-01-01

    For trainee translators,the question of to what extent equivalence can be achieved between the source text and the target text is always one of the most challenging parts to deal with.The paper tries to provide core principles of fidelity in dynamic equiv

  7. Engaging trainees in shaping the future of health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Stephen; Sachedina, Nabihah; King, Judith; Mak, Matthew; Morganstein, Louise; Mytton, Oliver T; Thomas, Justyn

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the views and ideas generated at a recent health policy discussion for doctors in training. This provides an illustration of the creativity and enthusiasm that trainees can bring to the policy sphere by providing unique insights and a fresh perspective.

  8. Apprentices & Trainees: Early Trend Estimates. December Quarter, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2015

    2015-01-01

    This publication presents early estimates of apprentice and trainee commencements for the December quarter 2014. Indicative information about this quarter is presented here; the most recent figures are estimated, taking into account reporting lags that occur at the time of data collection. The early trend estimates are derived from the National…

  9. Apprentices & Trainees: Early Trend Estimates. March Quarter, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This publication presents early estimates of apprentice and trainee commencements for the March quarter 2012. Indicative information about this quarter is presented here; the most recent figures are estimated, taking into account reporting lags that occur at the time of data collection. The early trend estimates are derived from the National…

  10. Apprentices and Trainees: Early Trend Estimates. December Quarter 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2011

    2011-01-01

    This publication presents early estimates of apprentice and trainee commencements for the December quarter 2010. Indicative information about this quarter is presented here; the most recent figures are estimated, taking into account reporting lags that occur at the time of data collection. The early trend estimates are derived from the National…

  11. Apprentices & Trainees: Early Trend Estimates. March Quarter 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2010

    2010-01-01

    This new publication presents early estimates of apprentice and trainee commencements in the March quarter 2010. Indicative information about the current quarter is presented here in response to the demand for more timely data. The most recent figures are estimated, taking into account reporting lags that occur at the time of data collection. The…

  12. Apprentices & Trainees: Early Trend Estimates. December Quarter, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2013

    2013-01-01

    This publication presents early estimates of apprentice and trainee commencements for the December quarter 2012. Indicative information about this quarter is presented here; the most recent figures are estimated, taking into account reporting lags that occur at the time of data collection. The early trend estimates are derived from the National…

  13. Apprentices & Trainees: Early Trend Estimates. December Quarter 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This publication presents early estimates of apprentice and trainee commencements for the December quarter 2011. Indicative information about this quarter is presented here; the most recent figures are estimated, taking into account reporting lags that occur at the time of data collection. The early trend estimates are derived from the National…

  14. Apprentices and Trainees: Early Trend Estimates. June Quarter 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents early estimates of apprentice and trainee commencements for the June quarter 2010. Indicative information about this quarter is presented here; the most recent figures are estimated, taking into account reporting lags that occur at the time of data collection. The early trend estimates are derived from the National…

  15. Exploring Emotional Intelligence among Master's-Level Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Mullen, Patrick R.; Fox, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    The authors explored the relationship between counseling trainees' emotional intelligence (EI), empathy, stress, distress, and demographics. Results indicated that higher levels of EI were associated with lower stress and distress, higher affective and cognitive empathy, and age. These findings suggest curricular integration of EI and potential…

  16. Clinical Skills Verification, Formative Feedback, and Psychiatry Residency Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalack, Gregory W.; Jibson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the implementation of Clinical Skills Verification (CSV) in their program as an in-training assessment intended primarily to provide formative feedback to trainees, strengthen the supervisory experience, identify the need for remediation of interviewing skills, and secondarily to demonstrating resident competence…

  17. Apprentices and Trainees: Terms and Definitions. Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2017

    2017-01-01

    This document covers the data terms used in publications sourced from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection and their associated data tables. The primary purpose of this document is to assist users of the publications to understand the specific data terms used within them. Terms are listed in alphabetical order with the following…

  18. Exploring the impact of workplace cyberbullying on trainee doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Samuel; Coyne, Iain; Sprigg, Christine; Axtell, Carolyn; Subramanian, Ganesh

    2015-04-01

    Workplace bullying is an occupational hazard for trainee doctors. However, little is known about their experiences of cyberbullying at work. This study examines the impact of cyberbullying among trainee doctors, and how attributions of blame for cyberbullying influence individual and work-related outcomes. Doctors at over 6 months into training were asked to complete an online survey that included measures of cyberbullying, blame attribution, negative emotion, job satisfaction, interactional justice and mental strain. A total of 158 trainee doctors (104 women, 54 men) completed the survey. Overall, 73 (46.2%) respondents had experienced at least one act of cyberbullying. Cyberbullying adversely impacted on job satisfaction (β = - 0.19; p cyberbullying influenced its impact and the path of mediation. Negative emotion mediated the relationship between self-blame for a cyber-bullying act and mental strain, whereas interactional injustice mediated the association between blaming the perpetrator and job dissatisfaction. Acts of cyberbullying had been experienced by nearly half of the sample during their training and were found to significantly relate to ill health and job dissatisfaction. The deleterious impact of cyberbullying can be addressed through both workplace policies, and training for trainee doctors and experienced medical professionals. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Integrating Methods and Materials: Developing Trainees' Reading Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Jennifer

    1987-01-01

    Explores issues arising from a research project which studied ways of meeting the reading needs of trainee primary school teachers (from Malawi and Tanzania) of English as a foreign language. Topics discussed include: the classroom teaching situation; teaching "quality"; and integration of materials and methods. (CB)

  20. Ethical dilemmas experienced by clinical psychology trainee therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, Poornima; Sinha, Ananya; Sonkar, Suruchi; Raguram, Ahalya

    2015-01-01

    Ethical dilemmas are inevitable during psychotherapeutic interactions, and these complexities and challenges may be magnified during the training phase. The experience of ethical dilemmas in the arena of therapy and the methods of resolving these dilemmas were examined among 35 clinical psychologists in training, through an anonymous and confidential online survey. The trainees' responses to four open-ended questions on any one ethical dilemma encountered during therapy were analysed, using thematic content analysis. The results highlighted that the salient ethical dilemmas related to confidentiality and boundary issues. The trainees also raised ethical questions regarding therapist competence, the beneficence and non-maleficence of therapeutic actions, and client autonomy. Fifty-seven per cent of the trainees reported that the dilemmas were resolved adequately, the prominent methods of resolution being supervision or consultation and guidance from professional ethical guidelines. The trainees felt that the professional codes had certain limitations as far as the effective resolution of ethical dilemmas was concerned. The findings indicate the need to strengthen training and supervision methodologies and professional ethics codes for psychotherapists and counsellors in India.

  1. Reconciling the Professional and Student Identities of Clinical Psychology Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Karen; Cossar, Jill A.; Fawns, Tim; Murray, Aja L.

    2013-01-01

    The study explored the ways in which qualified and trainee clinical psychologists perceived professional behaviour, as illustrated in a series of short vignettes, in student and clinical practice contexts. Comparisons were made to identify the extent to which ideas of professionalism differed across different learning contexts and between…

  2. Reconciling the Professional and Student Identities of Clinical Psychology Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Karen; Cossar, Jill A.; Fawns, Tim; Murray, Aja L.

    2013-01-01

    The study explored the ways in which qualified and trainee clinical psychologists perceived professional behaviour, as illustrated in a series of short vignettes, in student and clinical practice contexts. Comparisons were made to identify the extent to which ideas of professionalism differed across different learning contexts and between…

  3. Professional Development Schools: A Model for Preparing School Counselor Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Michael; Steen, Sam; Williams, Franklyn

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a training model, based on The Education Trust, The American School Counselor Association, and The Holmes Partnership, consisting of school counselor trainees completing their clinical experiences in a Professional Development School. A case study demonstrating the role of the school counselor is presented along with…

  4. Conjunctivitis with Regional Lymphadenopathy in a Trainee Microbiologist▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcolea, Adela; Suarez, María Jesús; Lizasoain, Manuel; Tejada, Pilar; Chaves, Fernando; Palenque, Elia

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of conjunctival tuberculosis in a trainee microbiologist caused by direct inoculation. The resident strain was analyzed by DNA fingerprinting, and an identical pattern was found in an isolate from sputum handled by the resident. After 6 months of treatment, the patient was cured. PMID:19641061

  5. Conjunctivitis with regional lymphadenopathy in a trainee microbiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcolea, Adela; Suarez, María Jesús; Lizasoain, Manuel; Tejada, Pilar; Chaves, Fernando; Palenque, Elia

    2009-09-01

    We report a case of conjunctival tuberculosis in a trainee microbiologist caused by direct inoculation. The resident strain was analyzed by DNA fingerprinting, and an identical pattern was found in an isolate from sputum handled by the resident. After 6 months of treatment, the patient was cured.

  6. Evaluation of complications of extracapsular cataract extraction performed by trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezegwui, Ir; Aghaji, Ae; Okpala, Ne; Onwasigwe, En

    2014-01-01

    Cataract extraction is the most common intraocular surgery taught to residents. This study aims to review the complications of trainee-performed extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) so as to identify the steps in which the trainee can benefit from closer supervision and practice. This was a descriptive retrospective study of complications in the initial 150 ECCE with intraocular lens implant performed by two Ophthalmologists, from the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, who visited a high volume training center. Both the intraoperative and early post-operative complications were studied. Data entry and analysis were performed descriptively using the Statiscal Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS version 15.0 (Chicago, IL, USA). The age range of the patients was 40-95 years. The intraoperative complications included capsular flaps 12/161 (7.5%), posterior capsule rent, 10/161 (6.2%) and vitreous loss, 8/161 (5.0%). Corneal complications (striate keratopathy, superior corneal edema, generalized corneal edema and corneal folds) ranked highest in post-operative complications accounting for 34% (56/164). Performance of adequate and proper anterior capsulotomy, minimal handling of the cornea and avoidance of posterior capsular rent are some of the challenges of the trainee in mastering ECCE. Stepwise supervised training can help a trainee master these steps while keeping the complications at acceptably low levels.

  7. Psychiatry Trainees' Training and Experience in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Roy; O'Connor, Mary J.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: Alcohol is a teratogen. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) affect about 1% of live births, causing severe impairment. Individuals affected by FASDs are overrepresented in psychiatric settings. This study reports on the education and experience of psychiatry trainees in approaching FASDs. Method: Data were collected from…

  8. Counselor Trainee Attitudes toward Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sharon J.; Sneed, Zachery B.; Koch, D. Shane

    2010-01-01

    Using the Counselor Trainee Attitudes Measure (CTAM) to assess student attitudes toward alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA), results indicated that students had more positive attitudes toward AODA when they were in recovery or had a family member in recovery. Furthermore, completion of AODA related courses predicted more positive attitudes toward…

  9. Analysing the operative experience of basic surgical trainees in Ireland using a web-based logbook

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lonergan, Peter E

    2011-09-25

    Abstract Background There is concern about the adequacy of operative exposure in surgical training programmes, in the context of changing work practices. We aimed to quantify the operative exposure of all trainees on the National Basic Surgical Training (BST) programme in Ireland and compare the results with arbitrary training targets. Methods Retrospective analysis of data obtained from a web-based logbook (http:\\/\\/www.elogbook.org) for all general surgery and orthopaedic training posts between July 2007 and June 2009. Results 104 trainees recorded 23,918 operations between two 6-month general surgery posts. The most common general surgery operation performed was simple skin excision with trainees performing an average of 19.7 (± 9.9) over the 2-year training programme. Trainees most frequently assisted with cholecystectomy with an average of 16.0 (± 11.0) per trainee. Comparison of trainee operative experience to arbitrary training targets found that 2-38% of trainees achieved the targets for 9 emergency index operations and 24-90% of trainees achieved the targets for 8 index elective operations. 72 trainees also completed a 6-month post in orthopaedics and recorded 7,551 operations. The most common orthopaedic operation that trainees performed was removal of metal, with an average of 2.90 (± 3.27) per trainee. The most common orthopaedic operation that trainees assisted with was total hip replacement, with an average of 10.46 (± 6.21) per trainee. Conclusions A centralised web-based logbook provides valuable data to analyse training programme performance. Analysis of logbooks raises concerns about operative experience at junior trainee level. The provision of adequate operative exposure for trainees should be a key performance indicator for training programmes.

  10. Do trainees feel that they belong to a team?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sophie; Lusznat, Rosie

    2017-05-18

    Postgraduate medical education has undergone significant reorganisation in recent years, with changes to the traditional apprenticeship model and an increasing reliance on shift working. The importance of teamwork in clinical care is well established; however, there is little literature on the extent to which trainees actually feel part of a team in the context of current working patterns. This is a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews of medical and surgical trainees. Data were analysed thematically using an inductive qualitative approach. Fifteen trainees who had worked in a range of hospitals across the UK participated. Emerging themes fell into several categories: what constitutes the team; the effect of shift patterns on the team; the role of the team in education, support and well-being; and influences on team rapport. Whilst in general interviewees felt part of a team, this was not true for all posts. The nature of the team was also highly variable, and had evolved from the traditional 'Firm' structure to a more nebulous concept. Shift-working patterns could result in the fragmentation of the team, which had implications for patient care as well as for training. The team played an important role in both education and well-being for trainees, and several factors were identified that could engender a more supportive team. With an ageing population and with increasing demands on limited resources, the requirement for shift work is likely to increase, and there is a fundamental need to maintain support for the next generation of doctors. There is little literature on the extent to which trainees actually feel part of a team. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  11. Quality of colonoscopy performance among gastroenterology and surgical trainees: a need for common training standards for all trainees?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leyden, J E

    2011-11-01

    Cecal intubation and polyp detection rates are objective measures of colonoscopy performance. Minimum cecal intubation rates greater than 90% have been endorsed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) and the Joint Advisory Group (JAG) UK. Performance data for medical and surgical trainee endoscopists are limited, and we used endoscopy quality parameters to compare these two groups.

  12. Identifying Trainees' Computer Self-Efficacy in Relation to Some Variables: The Case of Turkish EFL Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inal, Sevim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the self-efficacy perception of Turkish ELT students and examine the relationship between their self-efficacy and such variables as grade level, computer ownership, first time computer use, and frequency of internet and computer use. The participants are 305 Turkish ELT trainees at Dokuz Eylul University,…

  13. Creating a knowledge translation trainee collaborative: from conceptualization to lessons learned in the first year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibbald Shannon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trainees (e.g., graduate students, residents, fellows are increasingly identifying knowledge translation as their research discipline. In Canada, a group of trainees have created a trainee-initiated and trainee-led national collaborative to provide a vehicle for trainees to examine the diversity of knowledge translation research and practice, and to link trainees from diverse geographical areas and disciplines. The aim of this paper is to describe our experience and lessons learned in creating the Knowledge Translation Trainee Collaborative. In this meeting report, we outline the process, challenges, and opportunities in planning and experiencing the collaborative's inaugural meeting as participant organizers, and present outcomes and learnings to date.

  14. Inclusion and exclusion processes in teacher trainees' professional practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elle, Birgitte

    In the autumn of 2009, a new initiative and way of thinking about teacher education started on a small scale in Denmark. This new Danish initiative consisted of a simultaneous trainee employment at a school, and maintaining the study activities at the teacher education college. This initiative...... differs from other ways that are well-known in western countries, of organising teacher education as school-based, with a strong workplace focus, as well as from the use of the teacher assistant as support staff in schools, or later in-service teacher education. This paper will discuss key findings...... between the teacher training college, the trainee jobs and the learning processes of the students. The results of the study are important for rethinking teacher education, but also for future discussions on the possible directions for the renewal of university colleges. It contributes to an understanding...

  15. Trainees' perceptions of practitioner competence during patient transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, Lawrence; Dubrowski, Adam; So, Steph; Kistner, Nicole; Carnahan, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Technical and communicative skills are both important features for one's perception of practitioner competence. This research examines how trainees' perceptions of practitioner competence change as they view health care practitioners who vary in their technical and communicative skill proficiencies. Occupational therapy students watched standardized encounters of a practitioner performing a patient transfer in combinations of low and high technical and communicative proficiency and then reported their perceptions of practitioner competence. The reports indicate that technical and communicative skills have independently identifiable impacts on the perceptions of practitioner competency, but technical proficiency has a special impact on the students' perceptions of practitioner communicative competence. The results are discussed with respect to the way in which students may evaluate their own competence on the basis of either technical or communicative skill. The issue of how this may lead trainees to dedicate their independent learning efforts to an incomplete set of features needed for the development of practitioner competency is raised.

  16. Attachment styles and clinical communication performance in trainee doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Ian; McCallum, Rachel; Peters, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between trainee doctors' attachment style and their performance in qualifying clinical and communication skills assessments. Participants were 190 undergraduate medical students whose performance was assessed by examiners across two areas (communication and clinical skills) during their qualifying Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Simulated patients also rated communication skills. Participants' attachment style was rated across two dimensions, avoidance and anxiety, using the Relationship Questionnaire (RQ). Lower levels of attachment avoidance and anxiety significantly predicted higher performance in both communication and clinical skills. Trainee doctors' attachment styles are associated with patient communication and clinical performance. Further research is needed to investigate the impact of attachment on consultations between doctors and patients within clinical settings. Attachment theory can inform our understanding why, for some student doctors, interacting with patients may be particularly challenging and require additional support by medical educators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Counseling psychology trainees' social justice interest and commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew J; Sendrowitz, Kerrin

    2011-04-01

    Scholars within the field of counseling psychology have for some time now articulated eloquent and compelling calls for attending to social justice in the social sciences. To date, counseling psychologists have been at the forefront of addressing social justice issues in research, practice, and professional development. The present study advances empirical perspectives on social justice by testing the external validity of M. J. Miller et al.'s (2009) social-cognitive model of social justice interest and commitment in a sample of 229 doctoral trainees in counseling psychology. Present findings support the ability of the model to explain, in part, counseling psychology trainees' social justice interest and commitment. In addition, the present study provides novel findings that demonstrate the direct and indirect ways in which program training environment and personal moral imperative relate to social justice interest and commitment. Study limitations, future directions for research, and implications for training are discussed.

  18. Palatalization in English: An Articulation Problem for Turkish Teacher Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Dr. Mehmet Demirezen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In the field of teacher training, there is a scarcity of teaching pronunciation teachingmethodology to cure the fossilized mistakes of teacher trainees and foreign language teacherson-the-job. A case study pertaining to this situation is handled for the first time in this articleunder the title of “Audio-articulation Method” (Demirezen, 2003; Hişmanoğlu, 2004. Thismethod takes up a fossilized mistake of teacher trainees or teachers on-the-job in fifty minutesand brings in pronunciation correction by using tongue-twisters, idioms, proverbs, and thelike. Thus, it cures the fossilized mistake to a grater extent by creating a higher awareness andimproving communicative fluency. This method through task-based point of view removesthe related fossilized mistake and brings in pronunciation betterment to the teacher traineesand the teachers on-the-job.

  19. Survey of overnight academic hospitalist supervision of trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnan, Jeanne M; Burger, Alfred; Boonyasai, Romsai T; Boonayasai, Romsai T; Leykum, Luci; Harrison, Rebecca; Machulsky, Julie; Parekh, Vikas; Sharpe, Bradley A; Schleyer, Anneliese M; Arora, Vineet M

    2012-09-01

    In 2003, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) announced the first in a series of guidelines related to the residency training. The most recent recommendations include explicit recommendations regarding the provision of on-site clinical supervision for trainees of internal medicine. To meet these standards, many internal medicine residency programs turned to hospitalist programs to fill that need. However, much is unknown about the current relationships between hospitalist and residency programs, specifically with regard to supervisory roles and supervision policies. We aimed to describe how academic hospitalists currently supervise housestaff during the on-call, or overnight, period and hospitalist program leader their perceptions of how these new policies would impact trainee-hospitalist interactions.

  20. Developing Evaluation Skills with Legal Translation Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vîlceanu Titela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Axiomatically, translation is twofold: an activity/process (more accurately designated by the term translating and a product (the term translation can be restricted to the product. It seems that the product dimension has gained increased importance, being the most visible part of translation as market-driven, design-oriented, precise and measurable - complying with specifications. Translation engenders a sequence: identification of text type and of end users’ needs (experts or non-experts in the field, evaluation of the complexity of the source text via global reading, followed by a close reading of its parts, the translating of the document, the translator’s checking of final version, editing and proofreading. The translator’s choices are accountable in point of cost-effectiveness (efficiency and effectiveness. Therefore, the legal translator should master the methodological toolkit, conceptual frame and related terminology, and adopt an inward-looking perspective (intuition, subjectivity, ingrained habits, insights deriving from his/her expertise and experience alongside an outward-looking one (working against objective criteria, standards of quality, benchmarks, etc.

  1. Virtual reality robotic surgical simulation: an analysis of gynecology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Sangini S; Fader, Amanda N; Tergas, Ana I; Kushnir, Christina L; Green, Isabel C

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the learning curves of gynecology trainees on several virtual reality da Vinci Skills Simulator exercises. Prospective cohort pilot study. Academic hospital-based gynecology training program. Novice robotic surgeons from a gynecology training program. Novice robotic surgeons from an academic gynecology training program completed 10 repetitions of 4 exercises on the da Vinci Skills Simulator: matchboard, ring and rail, suture sponge, and energy switching. Performance metrics measured included time to completion, economy of instrument movement, excessive force, collisions, master workspace range, missed targets, misapplied energy, critical errors, and overall score. Statistical analyses were conducted to define the learning curve for trainees and the optimal number of repetitions for each exercise. A total of 34 participants were enrolled, of which 9 were medical students, 22 were residents, and 3 were fellows. There was a significant improvement in performance between the 1st and 10th repetitions across multiple metrics for all exercises. Senior trainees performed the suture exercise significantly faster than the junior trainees during the first and last repetitions (p = 0.004 and p = 0.003, respectively). However, the performance gap between seniors and juniors narrowed significantly by the 10th repetition. The mean number of repetitions required to achieve performance plateau ranged from 6.4 to 9.3. Virtual reality robotic simulation improves ability through repetition at all levels of training. Further, a performance plateau may exist during a single training session. Larger studies are needed to further define the most high-yield simulator exercises, the ideal number of repetitions, and recommended intervals between training sessions to improve operative performance. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Teacher in Space trainees work with Arriflex motion picture camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Teacher in Space trainees work with Arriflex motion picture camera. Photos include view of Sharon Christa McAuliffe (left) and Barbara Morgan having hands-on experience with an Arriflex motion picture camera following a briefing on space photography (40668); Morgan adjusts a lens as a studious McAuliffe looks on (40669); McAuliffe zeroes in on a test subject during a practice session with the Arriflex (40670); Morgan focuses on a subject (40671).

  3. Does direct observation of procedural skills reflect trainee's progress in otolaryngology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Z; Hayden, L; Muthuswamy, K; Ziprin, P; Darzi, A; Tolley, N S

    2014-06-01

    UK surgical trainees are required to undertake work-based assessments each year in order to progress in their training. Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) is one of these assessments. We aim to investigate the validity of DOPS in assessing otolaryngology trainees at all levels. A retrospective search of the portfolios of all otolaryngology trainees in North Thames was carried out to identify otolaryngology-specific DOPS. A score (Cs) was calculated for each DOPS based on the percentage of satisfactorily-rated items. The overall performance rating (Ps) was analysed as a separate variable and compared with Cs. The Ps and Cs results were then compared across trainee grades and levels within each grade: Core trainees (CT1-CT2) and specialty trainees (ST3-ST8). Seven hundred and sixty-seven otolaryngology DOPS were completed between August 2008 and September 2013. The tool was found to be reliable and internally consistent. Trainees in ST grade had higher Cs and Ps scores than CT grade (P Otolaryngology DOPS is a useful tool in assessing otolaryngology trainees especially from CT1-ST3 level. DOPS can also differentiate between junior and senior trainees. However, it was not able to demonstrate progress at levels above ST3, most likely due to the simplicity of the procedures which trainees tend to master in the first few years of training. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Training manual for precision hand deburring, Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-05-01

    Part 1 is presented of 4 parts of a training manual to be used by machinist trainees, production workers, and others removing burrs from precision miniature parts. The manuals are written to be self-teaching and are intended to be used with two hours of training each day and are intended to be used with two hours of training each day along with another six hours of bench work in deburring.

  5. Some observations on the subjective experience of neophyte group therapy trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, L; Leszcz, M; Collings, A K; Salvendy, J

    1996-10-01

    Neophyte group therapy trainees often encounter significant difficulties in their initial experiences as group therapists. In this article, we report and discuss the results of a semistructured interview conducted with each of 16 neophyte group therapy trainees in an academic training program. The interview focused on the trainees' subjective experiences related to their initial training and group therapy clinical practice, with particular emphasis on their satisfaction with their training, and the role and impact of supervision. All trainees reported strong emotional reactions to their group experience and numerous technical concerns. However, trainees reported a broad range of degrees of satisfaction with their training Overall satisfaction with training strongly paralleled satisfaction with supervision and the supervisory relationship. Recommendations for improving the group therapy training experience that emerge from the evaluation of the trainees' subjective experiences are suggested.

  6. Evaluation of formal feedback on endoscopic competence among trainees: the EFFECT trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, G C

    2008-09-01

    The medical literature describes disparity in colonoscopy performance. This randomised, controlled study aimed to characterise the impact of feedback on colonoscopy performance among gastroenterology (GI) trainees.

  7. Complexity overlooked: enhancing cultural competency in the white lesbian counseling trainee through education and supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Deanna N

    2014-01-01

    Self-awareness is often associated with enhanced multicultural competency. Training programs must work to facilitate self-awareness in counseling trainees who hold both privileged and oppressed identities. In this article, I highlight a gap in the literature regarding how best to supervise white lesbian counseling trainees. Facilitating self-awareness through supervision will be explored as a tool for enhancing multicultural competency in the white lesbian counseling trainee. An exploration of understanding white privilege as well as the impact of oppression on lesbian counseling trainees, will be used to draw conclusions regarding effective supervision for this population. Additionally, suggestions for future research will be proposed.

  8. Importance of exchange of vascular trainees among centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosiers, M; Moreels, N; Callaert, J; Deloose, K

    2011-02-01

    Training in surgery has for a long time been based on the classical model of master-apprentice, leading to the creation of "schools" comparable to the famous painter schools of Rubens, Rembrandt and many others during the Middle Ages. Although it may offer some advantages, this model is no longer suitable today. Modern vascular surgery covers several fields, including not only open vascular and endovascular treatment, but also non-invasive diagnosis and medical treatment of vascular diseases in different parts of the human body. However, the goal of training remains the formation of a "holistic vascular surgeon", with knowledge of and experience in all these areas. As most training centers are more focused on and have more expertise in one or some of these areas, an ideal training curriculum would consist of a rotation between different centers with different points of attention and possibly even rotations in other specialties, such as interventional radiology, vascular medicine or ultrasonography. Such an exchange cannot only be beneficial for the trainee but contact with trainees with a different background can also offer an added value to the training center. Thanks to new ways of communication and transportation, exchange of trainees, even in different countries, has become much easier. Nevertheless, a problem often arises concerning the requirements for training as, despite the many efforts already undertaken, it still differs significantly between different countries. The development of a core-curriculum and mutual recognition of training centers is urgently needed and further steps in the harmonization of training programs and requirements need to be stimulated.

  9. Paediatric surgery: trends in UK surgical trainees' operative experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngson, G G; Adams, S; Winton, E

    2006-02-01

    This study assesses the effects of the reconfiguration of postgraduate surgical training and changes to work patterns through legislation within UK on the operative experience of trainees completing specialty training in paediatric surgery. Data were collected from the consolidation record of operative experience submitted by every candidate sitting the Intercollegiate Specialty Board Examination in Paediatric Surgery in UK from 1996 through 2004. A number of index procedures were chosen as surrogates of the overall operative experience and underwent detailed analysis. These comprised operations performed in the following categories: Neonatal Surgery, General Paediatric Surgery, Paediatric Urology, Paediatric Oncology, and Emergency Paediatric Surgery. Sixty-three sets of data comprising 12,866 operations were ultimately identified as being suitable for analysis. The average number of operations performed annually by trainees increased over the study period as did the number in each of the operative categories. The number of operations performed with senior assistance or supervision increased over this period by an average of 12.5%. This trend was also evident in emergency surgery where the average number of sample procedures performed by trainees increased by 28% over the study period. In 1995, reforms to the training grade within UK reduced the time spent in specialist training from a previously unregulated period to 72 months of higher surgical training. Subsequent directives in response to health and safety legislation have further abbreviated the length of time spent at the workplace, initially to 72 hours and more recently to 58 hours per week. This combination has been generally perceived throughout the surgical community as prejudicial to acquisition of clinical and operative competence. This study, however, fails to endorse this perception and suggests to the contrary that perhaps through increased delegation, the volume of training operations is being

  10. A Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp improves trainee confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Catherine K; Tannous, Paul; DeWitt, Elizabeth; Farias, Michael; Mansfield, Laura; Ronai, Christina; Schidlow, David; Sanders, Stephen P; Lock, James E; Newburger, Jane W; Brown, David W

    2016-12-01

    Introduction New paediatric cardiology trainees are required to rapidly assimilate knowledge and gain clinical skills to which they have limited or no exposure during residency. The Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp (PCBC) at Boston Children's Hospital was designed to provide incoming fellows with an intensive exposure to congenital cardiac pathology and a broad overview of major areas of paediatric cardiology practice. The PCBC curriculum was designed by core faculty in cardiac pathology, echocardiography, electrophysiology, interventional cardiology, exercise physiology, and cardiac intensive care. Individual faculty contributed learning objectives, which were refined by fellowship directors and used to build a programme of didactics, hands-on/simulation-based activities, and self-guided learning opportunities. A total of 16 incoming fellows participated in the 4-week boot camp, with no concurrent clinical responsibilities, over 2 years. On the basis of pre- and post-PCBC surveys, 80% of trainees strongly agreed that they felt more prepared for clinical responsibilities, and a similar percentage felt that PCBC should be offered to future incoming fellows. Fellows showed significant increase in their confidence in all specific knowledge and skills related to the learning objectives. Fellows rated hands-on learning experiences and simulation-based exercises most highly. We describe a novel 4-week-long boot camp designed to expose incoming paediatric cardiology fellows to the broad spectrum of knowledge and skills required for the practice of paediatric cardiology. The experience increased trainee confidence and sense of preparedness to begin fellowship-related responsibilities. Given that highly interactive activities were rated most highly, boot camps in paediatric cardiology should strongly emphasise these elements.

  11. Pubertal assessment: targeted educational intervention for pediatric trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Aditi; Nagarajan, Sairaman; Ravichandran, Yagnaram; Perez-Colon, Sheila

    2017-08-18

    Background Timely and periodic pubertal assessment in children is vital to identify puberty related disorders. Pediatricians need to have working knowledge of puberty time and tempo. Pediatric residency is an important platform to acquire physical examination skills including pubertal assessment. Objective An educational intervention for teaching pubertal assessment was piloted on pediatric residents at our institution. Methods The intervention comprised of interactive lecture series, ID badge size Tanner stage cards and Tanner posters placed in residents' continuity clinics. Pre-intervention, post-intervention and 3 months post-intervention surveys for participating trainees were administered to determine the effectiveness of the intervention. Attitudes, practices, knowledge scores, and barriers to Tanner staging conduct were analyzed. Results Forty-three residents participated in the intervention. Knowledge scores of PGY1 (5.95 ± 1.6 vs. 7.47 ± 1.4, p < 0.01) improved right after the intervention, as did self-reported clinical practices of all trainees 3 months post- intervention with regards to conducting external genital examination and performing pubertal assessment. Confidence levels of pediatric trainees in conducting pubertal assessment and comfort levels in assessing the need for endocrine referral based on abnormal Tanner staging improved after the intervention, although the effect was not statistically significant. Conclusion Our intervention is a worthwhile technique for teaching pubertal assessment to residents as it is simple to conduct, easily reproducible, provides baseline knowledge needed for recognition of normal pubertal development and puberty related conditions, and instills confidence in residents.

  12. Tuberculosis infection among young nursing trainees in South India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devasahayam J Christopher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among healthcare workers in developing countries, nurses spend a large amount of time in direct contact with tuberculosis (TB patients, and are at high risk for acquisition of TB infection and disease. To better understand the epidemiology of nosocomial TB among nurses, we recruited a cohort of young nursing trainees at Christian Medical College, a large, tertiary medical school hospital in Southern India. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Among 535 nursing students enrolled in 2007, 468 gave consent to participate, and 436 underwent two-step tuberculin skin testing (TST. A majority (95% were females, and almost 80% were under 22 years of age. Detailed TB exposure information was obtained using interviews and clinical log books. Prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI was estimated using Bayesian latent class analyses (LCA. Logistic regression analyses were done to determine the association between LTBI prevalence and TB exposure and risk factors. 219 of 436 students (50.2%, 95% CI: 45.4-55.0 were TST positive using the 10 mm or greater cut-off. Based on the LCA, the prevalence of LTBI was 47.8% (95% credible interval 17.8% to 65.6%. In the multivariate analysis, TST positivity was strongly associated with time spent in health care, after adjusting for age at entry into healthcare. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed a high prevalence of LTBI even in young nursing trainees. With the recent TB infection control (TBIC policy guidance from the World Health Organization as the reference, Indian healthcare providers and the Indian Revised National TB Control Programme will need to implement TBIC interventions, and enhance capacity for TBIC at the country level. Young trainees and nurses, in particular, will need to be targeted for TBIC interventions.

  13. Virtual reality training for surgical trainees in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Palanivelu, Latha; Davidson, Brian R

    2009-01-21

    Surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is time consuming, costly, and of variable effectiveness. Training using a virtual reality simulator is an option to supplement standard training. To determine whether virtual reality training can supplement or replace conventional laparoscopic surgical training (apprenticeship) in surgical trainees with limited or no prior laparoscopic experience. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, and grey literature until March 2008. We included all randomised clinical trials comparing virtual reality training versus other forms of training including video trainer training, no training, or standard laparoscopic training in surgical trainees with little or no prior laparoscopic experience. We also included trials comparing different methods of virtual reality training. We collected the data on the characteristics of the trial, methodological quality of the trials, mortality, morbidity, conversion rate, operating time, and hospital stay. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using RevMan Analysis. For each outcome we calculated the standardised mean difference with 95% confidence intervals based on intention-to-treat analysis. We included 23 trials with 612 participants. Four trials compared virtual reality versus video trainer training. Twelve trials compared virtual reality versus no training or standard laparoscopic training. Four trials compared virtual reality, video trainer training and no training, or standard laparoscopic training. Three trials compared different methods of virtual reality training. Most of the trials were of high risk of bias. In trainees without prior surgical experience, virtual

  14. The educational value of ward rounds for junior trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidon-Marios Laskaratos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ward round (WR is a complex task and medical teachers are often faced with the challenge of finding a balance between service provision and clinical development of learners. The educational value of WRs is an under-researched area. This short communication aims to evaluate the educational role of WRs for junior trainees and provides insight into current practices. It also identifies obstacles to effective teaching/training in this setting and provides suggestions for improving the quality of WR teaching.

  15. Survey of UK radiology trainees in the aftermath of ‘Modernising Medical Careers’

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Following implementation of Modernising Medical Careers (MMC) in the UK, potential radiology trainees must decide on their career and apply sooner than ever before. We aimed to determine whether current trainees were sufficiently informed to make an earlier career decision by comparing the early radiology experiences of Traditional and Foundation Trainees. Methods 344 radiology trainees were appointed through MMC in 2007/08. This cohort was surveyed online. Results Response rate was 174/344 (51%). Traditional Trainees made their career decision 2.6 years after graduation compared with 1.2 years for Foundation Trainees (57/167, 34%). Nearly half of responders (79/169, 47%) experienced no formal radiology teaching as undergraduates. Most trainees regularly attended radiology meetings, spent time in a radiology department and/or performed radiology research. Many trainees received no career advice specific to radiology (69/163, 42%) at any point prior to entering the specialty; this includes both formal and informal advice. Junior doctor experiences were more frequently cited as influencing career choice (98/164, 60%). An earlier career decision was associated with; undergraduate radiology projects (-0.72 years, p = 0.018), career advice (-0.63 years, p = 0.009) and regular attendance at radiology meetings (-0.65 years, p = 0.014). Conclusion Early experience of radiology enables trainees to make an earlier career decision, however current radiology trainees were not always afforded relevant experiences prior to entering training. Radiologists need to be more proactive in encouraging the next generation of trainees. PMID:23031228

  16. [Geriatric post-graduate training: Current recommendations and opinion of the trainees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Nozal, Jesús; Guardado Fuentes, Lara; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, José; Ribera Casado, José Manuel

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the level of compliance with the official curriculum residence programme by geriatrics trainees, and to analyse their level of satisfaction. A questionnaire was developed including these sections: trainee filiation, and questions related to their clinical training, academic formation, research training, satisfaction, and other comments. The survey was performed in Survey Monkey and sent to a geriatric trainee per hospital in March 2014. The results were collected between March and April of 2014. Responses were received from 41% of the trainees of 23 Geriatric Teaching Units. Rates of over 95% were observed as regards clinical rotations in the basic period, while in the specific period these percentages varied between 34% and 69%, probably because some of the trainees had not yet arrived at the period in which these rotations are programmed. An external rotation could be performed by 83% of the trainees, and 90% do the recommended number of shifts. The mean number of instruction sessions per week was 2.3, and the number of meetings with the tutor was 2.5 times per year. The median number of presentations in congresses was 3.7 per trainee, with 0.2 publications during training. Each trainee attended 1.2 national meetings, 0.3 European meetings, and 0.1 American. Most of the trainees (85%) were satisfied or very satisfied with their training. Geriatrics curricula for trainees are followed in the basic aspects, but not so much in the specific ones. The average level satisfaction of the trainees is very high. The recommended training activities within the specific department (sessions, etc.) are not always fulfilled. The research activity, evaluated by publications and presentations at meetings, is low. Following these data, reflection and the establishment of improvements are required in Geriatrics training at post-graduate level. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Bullying among trainee doctors in Southern India: A questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bairy K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Workplace bullying is an important and serious issue in a healthcare setting because of its potential impact on the welfare of care-providers as well as the consumers. Aims: To gauge the extent of bullying among the medical community in India; as a subsidiary objective, to assess the personality trait of the bullying victims. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional, anonymous, self-reported questionnaire survey was undertaken among a convenient sample of all the trainee doctors at a Government Medical College in Tamil Nadu, India. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire, in English with standard written explanation of bullying was used. Basic information like age, sex, job grade and the specialty in case of Postgraduates (PGs were also collected. Statistical Analysis: The results were subjected to descriptive statistical analysis and Chi-square test for comparison of frequencies. Results: A total of 174 doctors (115 PGs and 59 junior doctors, took part in the study with a cent percent response. Nearly half of the surveyed population reported being subjected to bullying. Nearly 54 (53% of the men and 35 (48% of women were subjected to bullying. Significant proportions ( P < 0.0001 of medical personnel and paramedical staff bullied the PGs and junior doctors, respectively. More than 85 (90% of bullying incidents went unreported. A significant ( P < 0.0001 percentage of PGs and junior doctors revealed a personality trait towards bully. Conclusions: Workplace bullying is common among trainee doctors and usually goes unreported.

  18. Routine Use of Glidescope and Macintosh Laryngoscope by Trainee Anesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqil, Mansoor; Khan, Mueen Ullah; Hussain, Altaf; Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Mansoor, Saara; Alzahrani, Tariq

    2016-04-01

    To compare intubating conditions, success rate, and ease of intubation by anesthesia trainees using Glidescope Videolaryngoscope (GVL) compared to Macintosh laryngoscope (MCL). Comparative study. King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from January 2012 to February 2015. Eighty adult patients ASAI and II with normal airway, scheduled to undergo elective surgery requiring endotracheal (ET) intubation were enrolled. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups: GVL and MCL. All intubations were performed by trainee residents having experience of more than 1 year and who had successfully performed more than 50 tracheal intubations with each device. Glottic view based on Cormack and Lehane's (C&L's) score and percentage of glottis opening (POGO) score, time to successful intubation, need of external pressure, and overall difficulty scores were compared using either GVL or MCL. View of glottis based on C&L's classification was better (p < 0.001) and POGO score was higher (88.25 ±22.06 vs. 57.25 ±29.26, p < 0.001) with GVL compared to MCL. Time to intubate in seconds was (32.90 ±8.69 vs. 41.33 ±15.29, p = 0.004) and overall difficulty score was less 2.78 ±1.39 vs. 4.85 ±1.75 (p < 0.001) using GVL compared to MCL. Residents found ET intubation to be faster and easier with superior glottic view using GVL compared to MCL in patients with normal airway.

  19. Wanted: pediatric nephrologists! - why trainees are not choosing pediatric nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Maria; Iglesia, Edward; Ko, Zion; Amamoo, Ahinee; Mahan, John; Desai, Tejas; Gibson, Keisha; Jhaveri, Kenar; Primack, William

    2014-09-01

    A workforce crisis for many pediatric specialties, particularly nephrology, is due to growing retirement rates, attrition during training, and retention difficulties. To obtain specific information regarding pediatric nephrology trainee shortages, we administered two cross-sectional surveys to non-renal pediatric subspecialty fellows and pediatric nephrology program directors. We characterized the fellows' experiences with nephrology and the program directors' experiences with their fellows as well as their outcomes in the last 10 years. We analyzed responses from 531 non-renal fellows (14.4% response rate). Overall, 317 (60%) fellows rated nephrology as difficult, particularly women (65.4% vs. 49.5%, p nephrology as more difficult compared to all others (p = 0.001). More men than women (24% vs. 8%, p nephrology workforce. These findings support our belief that a strong effort needs to be made by the academic community to teach nephrology in more interesting and understandable formats. While these are national samples, we were unable to contact non-nephrology fellows directly and program directors from larger programs were underrepresented. Difficulties in attracting/retaining trainees (particularly women) to nephrology must be addressed systematically, identifying incentives to practice in this field. Bold concerted efforts are required and we propose seven steps to achieve this goal.

  20. Information Activities and Appropriation in Teacher Trainees' Digital, Group-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanell, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports results from an ethnographic study of teacher trainees' information activities in digital, group-based learning and their relation to the interplay between use and appropriation of digital tools and the learning environment. Method: The participants in the present study are 249 pre-school teacher trainees in…

  1. Supervision in Language Teaching: A Supervisor's and Three Trainee Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahyalar, Eda; Yazici, lkay Çelik

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the findings from a study which investigated supervision in language teaching from a supervisor's and her three trainee teachers' perspectives. The data in the study were from three sources: 1) audio recordings of the supervisor's feedback sessions with each trainee teacher, 2) audio recording of an interview between the…

  2. The Trainee Teacher and His Practice Class. Fifty Pointers for the Student-Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Alun L. W.

    1969-01-01

    This handbook, based on the author's experience of supervising the English practice-classes of trainee teachers, was originally compiled for the specific use of students at the National University of Trujillo, Peru, and consists of a list of pointers embracing the most prevalent of trainees' shortcomings observed over a period of years at all…

  3. Counselor Trainees' Self-Statement Responses to Sexually and Physically Abused Clients, and Client Role Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisien, Lynne S.; Long, Bonita C.

    1994-01-01

    Assessed 63 female counselor trainees after viewing videotape of client reporting sexual abuse, physical abuse, or role conflict. Results indicated that trainees who expected to counsel sexually abused client increased their positive self-statements. Applied Schwartz's States-of-Mind model to self-statement ratios, and, according to model,…

  4. Non-Music Specialist Trainee Primary School Teachers' Confidence in Teaching Music in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Frederick; Biasutti, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Prior research has revealed that non-music specialist trainee primary school teachers lack confidence in teaching music in spite of changes to teacher training and the introduction of music in the National Curriculum in England. The current study investigated the effects on non-music specialist trainee primary teachers' confidence to teach music…

  5. Empathy and Emotional Intelligence among Eastern and Western Counsellor Trainees: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Kaelber, Kara A.; Schwartz, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored degree of empathy and emotional intelligence among Thai (n?=?48) and American (n?=?53) counsellor trainees to determine if differences in Eastern and Western cultural orientations (e.g., interdependent versus independent self-construals) affect foundational counselling skills. Results indicated that Western trainees showed…

  6. Are Diarist Teacher Trainees Happier than Non-Diarists? Or Is It Vice Versa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz-Duran, Nagihan

    2010-01-01

    Considering the coping effect and health connections of diary-keeping behaviour, the purpose of the present study was to investigate diary-keeping in relation to happiness and gender among Turkish teacher trainees. A sample of 417 teacher trainees between the ages of 18 and 29 was surveyed. Happiness was considered as consisting of positive and…

  7. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Practice: Treatment Delivered by Trainees at an Outpatient Clinic Is Clinically Effective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forand, Nicholas R.; Evans, Susan; Haglin, Dean; Fishman, Baruch

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is known to be effective for a number of disorders, and can be delivered effectively by trainees in controlled settings. However, the effectiveness of trainee therapists in general practice compared to that of more experienced therapists is unknown. In this study, the authors used a benchmarking strategy to…

  8. Empathy and Emotional Intelligence among Eastern and Western Counsellor Trainees: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Kaelber, Kara A.; Schwartz, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored degree of empathy and emotional intelligence among Thai (n?=?48) and American (n?=?53) counsellor trainees to determine if differences in Eastern and Western cultural orientations (e.g., interdependent versus independent self-construals) affect foundational counselling skills. Results indicated that Western trainees showed…

  9. Australian Vocational Education and Training Statistics: Apprentices and Trainees. December Quarter, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This publication presents estimates of apprentice and trainee activity in Australia for the December quarter 2011. The figures in this publication are derived from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection no.71 (March 2012 estimates). The most recent figures in this publication are estimated (those for training activity from the June quarter…

  10. Australian Vocational Education and Training Statistics: Apprentices and Trainees. June Quarter, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This publication presents estimates of apprentice and trainee activity in Australia for the June quarter 2012. The figures in this publication are derived from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection no.73 (September 2012 estimates). The most recent figures in this publication are estimated (those for training activity from the December…

  11. Australian Vocational Education and Training Statistics: Apprentices and Trainees. December Quarter, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2011

    2011-01-01

    This publication presents estimates of apprentice and trainee activity in Australia for the December quarter 2010. The figures in this publication are derived from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection no.67 (March 2011 estimates). The most recent figures in this publication are estimated (those for training activity from the June quarter…

  12. Australian Vocational Education and Training Statistics: Apprentices and Trainees. September Quarter, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2011

    2011-01-01

    This publication presents estimates of apprentice and trainee activity in Australia for the September quarter 2010. The figures in this publication are derived from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection no.66 (December 2010 estimates). The most recent figures in this publication are estimated (those for training activity from the March…

  13. Australian Vocational Education and Training Statistics: Apprentices and Trainees. March Quarter, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2011

    2011-01-01

    This publication presents estimates of apprentice and trainee activity in Australia for the March quarter 2011. The figures in this publication are derived from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection no. 68 (June 2011 estimates). The most recent figures in this publication are estimated (those for training activity from the September…

  14. Reliability and validity of a tool to assess airway management skills in anesthesia trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The tool designed to assess bag-mask ventilation and tracheal intubation skills in anesthesia trainees demonstrated excellent inter-rater reliability, fair test-retest reliability, and good construct validity. The authors recommend its use for formative and summative assessment of junior anesthesia trainees.

  15. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Practice: Treatment Delivered by Trainees at an Outpatient Clinic Is Clinically Effective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forand, Nicholas R.; Evans, Susan; Haglin, Dean; Fishman, Baruch

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is known to be effective for a number of disorders, and can be delivered effectively by trainees in controlled settings. However, the effectiveness of trainee therapists in general practice compared to that of more experienced therapists is unknown. In this study, the authors used a benchmarking strategy to…

  16. Exploring Malaysian Trainee Teachers' Adoption of the Internet as Information Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teck-Chai, Lau; Kim-Hong, Yeoh; Ching-Ching, Choong

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the usage of three commercial Internet search engines in information seeking among trainee teachers at a teacher training institute in Malaysia. It attempts to investigate the information seeking behavior of the trainees via three Internet search engines (Google, Yahoo and MSN) as gateways to information for research in academic…

  17. "Miss, You're so Gay." Queer Stories from Trainee Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, David; Givens, Nick

    2004-01-01

    This study focuses on interviews with six lesbian, gay or bisexual trainee teachers, and explores their experiences in relation to sexual orientation. Initial analysis reveals interesting perspectives on the lives of trainees in Higher Education, during school-based work and socially; it also provides a window onto the attitudes to sexuality…

  18. Is Suicide Training Sufficient for Psychology Trainees to Respond Appropriately to Suicidal Clients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Nicole M.

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the frequency of suicide training for current psychology trainees. Additionally, the research uses the Suicide Intervention Response Inventory-Second Edition (SIRI-2) to assess psychology trainees' ability to respond appropriately to suicidal clients. This study compares scores on the SIRI-2 between participants who are in…

  19. Choosing a career in paediatrics: do trainees' views change over the first year of specialty training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Helen M; Lakshminarayana, Indumathy; Wall, David; Bindal, Taruna

    2014-09-01

    To look at why a regional cohort of UK doctors chose a paediatric career and to ascertain views on their career near the end of training year one. A 20-item questionnaire was sent to all new regional paediatric specialty trainees. Three focus groups were held with trainees near the end of year one to elicit key themes. West Midlands Deanery, UK. Twenty-nine new regional paediatric specialty trainees in year one completed the questionnaire. A total of 15 trainees participated in the focus groups near the end of year one training. Reasons for choosing a paediatric career and factors which further influence career choice for trainees during their first specialty training year. Key influencing factors for choosing paediatrics were enjoying working with children and positive undergraduate experience of the specialty. All trainees had paediatrics as their first choice specialty and undertook a paediatric Foundation post. Near the end of year one, doubts were cast on career aspirations due to seeing middle grade colleagues struggling with work-life balance and a growing feeling that family came first. Senior trainees need to be aware that they act as powerful role models for their more junior colleagues and therefore have an influential role on how juniors perceive a paediatric career. Family friendly flexible working patterns in paediatrics are vital to retain junior trainees. All paediatric staff are role models and need to be enthusiastic, keen to teach and to promote a positive working environment.

  20. Teacher Trainees' Strategies for Managing the Behaviours of Students with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Manisah Mohd.; Abdullah, Rozila; Majid, Rosadah Abdul

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine how a group of teacher trainees handled challenging behaviour by students during teaching practice. A total of 35 teacher trainees from the special education programme of a local university were chosen as respondents. A questionnaire based on a 5-point Likert-type scale was administered in this study. The data were…

  1. Vocational trainees' views and experiences regarding the learning and teaching of communication skills in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuland, Marc; Thijs, Gabie; Van Royen, Paul; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Goedhuys, Jo

    2010-01-01

    To explore the views and experiences of general practice (GP) vocational trainees regarding communication skills (CS) and the teaching and learning of these skills. A purposive sample of second and third (final) year GP trainees took part in six focus group (FG) discussions. Transcripts were coded and analysed in accordance with a grounded theory approach by two investigators using Alas-ti software. Finally results were triangulated by means of semi-structured telephone interviews. The analysis led to three thematic clusters: (1) trainees acknowledge the essential importance of communication skills and identified contextual factors influencing the learning and application of these skills; (2) trainees identified preferences for learning and receiving feedback on their communication skills; and (3) trainees perceived that the assessment of communication skills is subjective. These themes are organised into a framework for a better understanding of trainees' communication skills as part of their vocational training. The framework helps in leading to a better understanding of the way in which trainees learn and apply communication skills. The unique context of vocational training should be taken into account when trainees' communication skills are assessed. The teaching and learning should be guided by a learner-centred approach. The framework is valuable for informing curricular reform and future research.

  2. Meta-Cognitive Strategy Usage and Epistemological Beliefs of Primary School Teacher Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belet, S. Dilek; Guven, Meral

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed as a descriptive survey study in order to determine primary education teacher trainees' epistemological beliefs; the use of metacognitive strategies; and the relationship between epistemological beliefs and metacognitive strategies. 820 primary education teacher trainees' were selected from the department of primary…

  3. Personal Growth and Awareness of Counseling Trainees in an Experiential Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Melissa; Kiweewa, John M.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports research that utilized a grounded theory methodology to explore the experiences of 14 master's level counselor trainees who participated in an experiential group as part of their counselor education course work. Data were collected through weekly reflection journals. Trainees identified 30 systemically interconnected aspects…

  4. Interprofessional communication between surgery trainees and nurses in the inpatient wards: Why time and space matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Oshan; Coburn, Natalie G; Nathens, Avery B; Hallet, Julie; Ahmed, Najma; Conn, Lesley Gotlib

    2016-09-01

    Optimal interprofessional communication (IPC) is broadly viewed as a prerequisite to providing quality patient care. In this study, we explored the enablers and barriers to IPC between surgical trainees and ward nurses with a view towards improving IPC and the quality of surgical patient care. We conducted an ethnography in two academic centres in Canada totalling 126 hours of observations and 32 semi-structured interviews with trainees and nurses. Our findings revealed constraints on IPC between trainees and nurses derived from contested meanings of space and time. Trainees experienced the contested spatial boundaries of the surgical ward when they perceived nurses to project a sense of territoriality. Nurses expressed difficulty getting trainees to respond and attend to pages from the ward, and to have a poor understanding of the nurses' role. Contestations over time spent in training and patient care were found in trainee-nurse interactions, wherein trainees perceived seasoned nurses to devalue their clinical knowledge on the ward. Nurses viewed the limited time that trainees spent in clinical rotation in the ward as adversely affecting communication. This study underscores that challenges to enhancing IPC at academic health centres are rooted in team and professional cultures. Efforts to improve IPC should therefore: identify and target the social and cultural dimensions of healthcare team member relations; recognise how power is deployed and experienced in ways that negatively impact IPC; and enhance an understanding and appreciation in the temporal and spatial dimensions of IPC.

  5. Teaching Beliefs: A Comparison between Italian Primary and Secondary School Trainee Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents research which compares the teaching beliefs of primary and secondary school trainee teachers. Participants were 177 trainee teachers, 92 enrolled in a primary school teacher degree course, and 85 enrolled in a postgraduate teacher training course specifically for music teaching at secondary school level (middle and high…

  6. Alcoholism Counselor Trainees: Some Changes in Job Related Functioning Following Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuja, Andris T.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Following an intense training program, 41 alcoholism counselor trainees were evaluated on changes in five parameters of job related functioning. Supervisor ratings indicated positive changes in trainee's clinical competence, utilization in alcoholism work, personal involvement in alcoholism work, degree of assigned responsibilities, and overall…

  7. Third-Country National Students and Trainees in the EU: Caught between Learning and Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. de Lange

    2015-01-01

    Foreign students and trainees are welcomed by the EU for study purposes. Member States must ensure that during their studies third-country national (TCN) students can legally work for at least ten hours a week, whereas trainees may not. This article deals with these often overlooked TCN students and

  8. Malaysian Teacher Trainees' Practices on Science and the Relevance of Science Education for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Subadrah Madhawa; Mohamed, Abdul Rashid; Marimuthu, Nagamah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the practice of teacher trainees on science and the relevance of science education. The study focuses on teacher trainees' practice on science teaching and its relevance to understanding science education. Design/methodology/approach: The study employed a survey method using questionnaires. The…

  9. An "Afterthought": Counseling Trainees' Multicultural Competence within the Spiritual/Religious Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaldi-Dopman, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Although spiritual/religious identity development is included within multicultural training on the theoretical level, significant gaps exist in counseling trainees' practical preparation for spiritual/religious competence. This grounded theory study explores counseling trainees' multicultural counseling competence within the…

  10. Developing skilled doctor–patient communication in the workplace: a qualitative study of the experiences of trainees and clinical supervisors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Giroldi (Esther); I.K. Veldhuijzen (Irene); Geelen, K. (Kristel); J. Muris; F. Bareman (Frits); H.J. Bueving (Herman); T. van der Weijden (Trudy); C.P.M. van der Vleuten (Cees)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractTo inform the development of recommendations to facilitate learning of skilled doctor–patient communication in the workplace, this qualitative study explores experiences of trainees and supervisors regarding how trainees learn communication and how supervisors support trainees’ learning

  11. Is the learning value of workplace-based assessment being realised? A qualitative study of trainer and trainee perceptions and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Aileen; Galvin, Rose; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; Teunissen, Pim W; O'Shaughnessy, Ann; Horgan, Mary

    2017-03-01

    Workplace-based assessments (WBAs) were originally intended to inform learning and development by structuring effective observation-based feedback. The success of this innovation has not yet been established due in part to the widely varied tools, implementation strategies and research approaches. Using a conceptual framework of experience, trajectories and reifications in workplace learning, we aimed to explore trainer and trainee experiences and perceptions of the learning value of WBAs. Trainers and trainees who had used at least one WBA in the previous year were invited to participate in semistructured interviews for this phenomenological study. We used a template analysis method to explore and compare the experiences of the two groups, using the emergent themes to develop an understanding of the impact of these experiences on perceptions of learning value. Nine trainers and eight trainees participated in the study. Common themes emerged among the two groups around issues of responsibility and engagement along with (mis)understandings of the purpose of the individual tools. Trainer-specific themes emerged related to the concurrent implementation of a new e-portfolio and perceptions of increased workload. Trainees associated WBA with a training structure support value but could not translate experiences into learning values. WBAs provide trainees with a justified reason to approach trainers for feedback. WBAs, however, are not being reified as the formative assessments originally intended. A culture change may be required to change the focus of WBA research and reconceptualise this set of tools and methods as a workplace learning practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Support for Students, Postdoctoral Fellows and Trainees to Attend Radiochemistry-­Related Symposia at Pacifichem 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbur, Daniel Scott [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2016-02-06

    This project was undertaken to meet the growing need for training personnel who will be involved in professional careers requiring knowledge of radiochemistry, such as those working in radionuclide production, and in biological, industrial, medical and environmental fields that use radionuclides in their work. The goal of the project was to provide financial assistance to students and trainees from academic and government institutions (US preferred) to attend selected radiochemistry-­related symposia at the Pacifichem 2015 meeting held in Honolulu, Hawaii in December 2015. The funding, meant to provide a portion of an awardee’s travel cost, was specifically directed at attendance to the following symposia: #363, Isotope production-­ Providing Important Materials for Research and Applications; #215, Chemistry of Molecular Imaging, and #11, Chemistry for Development of Theranostic Radiopharmaceuticals. Those symposia were held December 16th (am & pm: #11, #363), December 17th (am: #11, #363; pm: #275) and December 18th (am & pm: #275). Pacifichem meetings are held every 5 years in Honolulu, Hawaii. The meetings are joint sponsored by a number of Chemistry Societies from Pacific Rim countries. The meetings are composed of a large number of symposia (>300) on a wide variety of topics, which make them similar to small meetings within the larger overall meeting. Therefore, attendance at the three symposia within Pacifichem 2015 was similar to attending a meeting focused entirely on radiochemistry-­related topics. To obtain the financial assistance, the student/trainee: (a) had to be an undergraduate student, graduate student or Postdoctoral Fellow in a physical science department or National Laboratory; (b) had to submit a letter from their supervisor indicating that he/she will be enrolled as a student/trainee at the time of the meeting, and were committed to attending the meeting; and (c) had to submit a resume or curriculum vitae along with a brief statement of

  13. Non-technical skills of surgical trainees and experienced surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostlow, H; Marlow, N; Thomas, M J W; Hewett, P J; Kiermeier, A; Babidge, W; Altree, M; Pena, G; Maddern, G

    2017-05-01

    In addition to technical expertise, surgical competence requires effective non-technical skills to ensure patient safety and maintenance of standards. Recently the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons implemented a new Surgical Education and Training (SET) curriculum that incorporated non-technical skills considered essential for a competent surgeon. This study sought to compare the non-technical skills of experienced surgeons who completed their training before the introduction of SET with the non-technical skills of more recent trainees. Surgical trainees and experienced surgeons undertook a simulated scenario designed to challenge their non-technical skills. Scenarios were video recorded and participants were assessed using the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) scoring system. Participants were divided into subgroups according to years of experience and their NOTSS scores were compared. For most NOTSS elements, mean scores increased initially, peaking around the time of Fellowship, before decreasing roughly linearly over time. There was a significant downward trend in score with increasing years since being awarded Fellowship for six of the 12 NOTSS elements: considering options (score -0·015 units per year), implementing and reviewing decisions (-0·020 per year), establishing a shared understanding (-0·014 per year), setting and maintaining standards (-0·024 per year), supporting others (-0·031 per year) and coping with pressure (-0·015 per year). The drop in NOTSS score was unexpected and highlights that even experienced surgeons are not immune to deficiencies in non-technical skills. Consideration should be given to continuing professional development programmes focusing on non-technical skills, regardless of the level of professional experience. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of the educational climate for specialty trainees in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, J M R; Passi, V

    2016-06-01

    Dermatology specialty trainees (STs) in the United Kingdom (UK) are few in number and will join a thinly spread national consultant body. It is of paramount importance to deliver training programmes of the highest quality for these doctors, central to which is the establishment and maintenance of an educational climate conducive to learning. To conduct a pilot study to evaluate the educational climate for dermatology STs in one UK deanery (West Midlands). Secondary analysis of published data was performed, from the UK's General Medical Council (GMC) national training survey, and the Job Evaluation Survey Tool (JEST) administered by the West Midlands deanery. A modified online version of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) was circulated among dermatology STs. The GMC's survey data show that UK dermatology STs rated their training highly in comparison with undifferentiated UK postgraduate trainees. West Midlands dermatology STs (n = 22) scored very similarly to UK dermatology STs. The JEST gave broadly encouraging results, with 21/22 (95%) happy to recommend their posts to colleagues. The modified PHEEM yielded a global mean score of 96.5/152, attracting the descriptor 'more positive than negative but room for improvement'. Despite inherent methodological limitations, the GMC, JEST and modified PHEEM surveys have revealed useful comparative triangulated data which allows the conclusion that West Midlands dermatology STs seem to be training in a favourable educational climate. This represents an important facet of the quality assurance process for medical education, and allows insight into areas which may require improvement. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  15. Virtual reality training for surgical trainees in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendran, Myura; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Loizidou, Marilena; Davidson, Brian R

    2013-08-27

    Standard surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is time-consuming, costly, and of variable effectiveness. Training using a virtual reality simulator is an option to supplement standard training. Virtual reality training improves the technical skills of surgical trainees such as decreased time for suturing and improved accuracy. The clinical impact of virtual reality training is not known. To assess the benefits (increased surgical proficiency and improved patient outcomes) and harms (potentially worse patient outcomes) of supplementary virtual reality training of surgical trainees with limited laparoscopic experience. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Science Citation Index Expanded until July 2012. We included all randomised clinical trials comparing virtual reality training versus other forms of training including box-trainer training, no training, or standard laparoscopic training in surgical trainees with little laparoscopic experience. We also planned to include trials comparing different methods of virtual reality training. We included only trials that assessed the outcomes in people undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Two authors independently identified trials and collected data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using Review Manager 5 analysis. For each outcome we calculated the mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals based on intention-to-treat analysis. We included eight trials covering 109 surgical trainees with limited laparoscopic experience. Of the eight trials, six compared virtual reality versus no supplementary training. One trial compared virtual reality training versus box-trainer training and versus no supplementary training, and one trial compared

  16. Does interpersonal behaviour of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna Ida Fincke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees' interpersonal behaviour on Work Involvement (WI and compared their social behaviour within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. Methods: The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic (PA, psychodynamic (PD and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT training. Trainees from sample 1 (N = 184 were asked to describe their interpersonal behaviour in relation to their patients when filling out the Intrex, whereas trainees from sample 2 (N = 135 were asked to describe the private relationship with a significant other. Results: Interpersonal affiliation in professional relationships significantly predicted the level of Healing Involvement (HI, while Stress Involvement (SI was predicted by interpersonal affiliation and interdependence in trainees' relationships with their patients. Social behaviour within professional relationships provided higher correlations with WI than private interpersonal behaviour. Significant differences were found between private and professional relation settings in trainees’ interpersonal behaviour with higher levels of affiliation and interdependence with significant others. Differences between therapeutic orientation and social behaviour could only be found when comparing trainees' level of interdependence with the particular relationship setting. Conclusion: Trainees' interpersonal level of affiliation in professional relationships is a predictor for a successful psychotherapeutic development. Vice versa, controlling behaviour in professional settings can be understood as a risk factor against psychotherapeutic growth. Both results strengthen an evidence-based approach for competence development during psychotherapy training.

  17. 2015 American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN) student affairs committee survey of neuropsychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Douglas M; Guidotti Breting, Leslie M; Butts, Alissa M; Hahn-Ketter, Amanda E; Osborn, Katie; Towns, Stephanie J; Barisa, Mark; Santos, Octavio A; Smith, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Surveys of practicing neuropsychologists have been conducted for years; however, there have been no comprehensive surveys of neuropsychology trainees, which may result in important issues being overlooked by the profession. This survey assessed trainees' experiences in areas such as student debt, professional development, and training satisfaction. Survey items were written by a task force of the AACN Student Affairs Committee (SAC), and neuropsychology trainees were recruited via neuropsychology-focused listservs. In total, 344 trainees completed the survey (75% female) and included participants from every region of the US and Canada. Based on the survey questions, nearly half of all trainees (47%) indicated financial factors were the greatest limitation in their training. Student debt had a bimodal distribution; 32.7% had minimal debt, but 45% had debt >$100,000. In contrast, expected starting salaries were modest, but consistent with findings ($80-100,000). While almost all trainees intended to pursue board certification (97% through ABPP), many were 'not at all' or only 'somewhat' familiar with the process. Results indicated additional critical concerns beyond those related to debt and lack of familiarity with board certification procedures. The results will inform SAC conference programming and the profession on the current 'state of the trainees' in neuropsychology.

  18. Learning Curves of Macintosh Laryngoscope in Nurse Anesthetist Trainees Using Cumulative Sum Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panthila Rujirojindakul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tracheal intubation is a potentially life-saving procedure. This skill is taught to many anesthetic healthcare professionals, including nurse anesthetists. Our goal was to evaluate the learning ability of nurse anesthetist trainees in their performance of orotracheal intubation with the Macintosh laryngoscope. Methods. Eleven nurse anesthetist trainees were enrolled in the study during the first three months of their training. All trainees attended formal lectures and practice sessions with manikins at least one time on performing successful tracheal intubation under supervision of anesthesiology staff. Learning curves for each nurse anesthetist trainee were constructed with the standard cumulative summation (cusum methods. Results. Tracheal intubation was attempted on 388 patients. Three hundred and six patients (78.9% were successfully intubated on the trainees’ first attempt and 17 patients (4.4% on the second attempt. The mean ± SD number of orotracheal intubations per trainee was 35.5 ± 5.1 (range 30–47. Ten (90.9% of 11 trainees crossed the 20% acceptable failure rate line. A median of 22 procedures was required to achieve an 80% orotracheal intubations success rate. Conclusion. At least 22 procedures were required to reach an 80% success rate for orotracheal intubation using Macintosh laryngoscope in nonexperienced nurse anesthetist trainees.

  19. How Supervisor Experience Influences Trust, Supervision, and Trainee Learning: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Leslie; Kogan, Jennifer R; Hauer, Karen E

    2017-09-01

    Appropriate trust and supervision facilitate trainees' growth toward unsupervised practice. The authors investigated how supervisor experience influences trust, supervision, and subsequently trainee learning. In a two-phase qualitative inductive content analysis, phase one entailed reviewing 44 internal medicine resident and attending supervisor interviews from two institutions (July 2013 to September 2014) for themes on how supervisor experience influences trust and supervision. Three supervisor exemplars (early, developing, experienced) were developed and shared in phase two focus groups at a single institution, wherein 23 trainees validated the exemplars and discussed how each impacted learning (November 2015). Phase one: Four domains of trust and supervision varying with experience emerged: data, approach, perspective, clinical. Early supervisors were detail oriented and determined trust depending on task completion (data), were rule based (approach), drew on their experiences as trainees to guide supervision (perspective), and felt less confident clinically compared with more experienced supervisors (clinical). Experienced supervisors determined trust holistically (data), checked key aspects of patient care selectively and covertly (approach), reflected on individual experiences supervising (perspective), and felt comfortable managing clinical problems and gauging trainee abilities (clinical). Phase two: Trainees felt the exemplars reflected their experiences, described their preferences and learning needs shifting over time, and emphasized the importance of supervisor flexibility to match their learning needs. With experience, supervisors differ in their approach to trust and supervision. Supervisors need to trust themselves before being able to trust others. Trainees perceive these differences and seek supervision approaches that align with their learning needs.

  20. Psychotherapy trainees' multicultural case conceptualization content: thematic differences across three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Debbiesiu L; Sheridan, Daniel J; Rosen, Adam D; Jones, Isaiah

    2013-06-01

    This study examined thematic differences in the multicultural case conceptualization content of 61 psychotherapy trainees across three different cases and trainee demographics (number of multicultural courses completed, years of supervised clinical practicum completed, and White trainee vs. trainee of color). Themes across cases included general counseling skills (attend to affect, build rapport, focus on specific client concerns, use of specific clinical interventions, and use of external resources not related to culture), as well as multicultural specific counseling skills (focus on culture, focus on discrimination, use of culturally competent interventions, and use of external resources related to culture). Thematic differences across case were found in three of the nine themes (affect, culture, discrimination). No systematic differences were found across multicultural training, clinical training, or race. Implications of these results are discussed.

  1. How clinical supervisors develop trust in their trainees: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, K.E.; Oza, S.K.; Kogan, J.R.; Stankiewicz, C.A.; Stenfors-Hayes, T.; ten Cate, TJ; Batt, Joanne; O’Sullivan, P.S.

    2015-01-01

    Context Clinical supervisors oversee trainees’ performance while granting them increasing opportunities to work independently. Although the factors contributing to supervisors’ trust in their trainees to conduct clinical work have been identified, how the development of trust is shaped by these

  2. Knowledge, Skills and Experience Managing Tracheostomy Emergencies: A Survey of Critical Care Medicine trainees

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nizam, AA

    2016-10-01

    Since the development of percutaneous tracheostomy, the number of tracheostomy patients on hospital wards has increased. Problems associated with adequate tracheostomy care on the wards are well documented, particularly the management of tracheostomy-related emergencies. A survey was conducted among non-consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs) starting their Critical Care Medicine training rotation in a university affiliated teaching hospital to determine their basic knowledge and skills in dealing with tracheostomy emergencies. Trainees who had received specific tracheostomy training or who had previous experience of dealing with tracheostomy emergencies were more confident in dealing with such emergencies compared to trainees without such training or experience. Only a minority of trainees were aware of local hospital guidelines regarding tracheostomy care. Our results highlight the importance of increased awareness of tracheostomy emergencies and the importance of specific training for Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine trainees.

  3. A Survey of Clinical Uncertainty from the Paediatric Basic Specialist Trainee Perspective

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Neill, MB

    2017-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate uncertainty from the Basic Specialist Trainee perspective. The survey of trainees explored 1) factors in decision making, 2) the personal impact of uncertainty, 3) the responses to both clinical errors and challenges to their decision making and 4) the potential strategies to address uncertainty. Forty-one (93%) of trainees surveyed responded. Important factors in decision making were clinical knowledge and senior colleague’s opinion. Sixty percent experienced significant anxiety post call as a consequence of their uncertainty. When errors are made by colleagues, the trainee’s response is acceptance (52.5%), and sympathy (32%).Trainees are strongly influenced by the opinions of senior colleagues often changing their opinions having made confident decisions. Solutions to address uncertainty include enhanced knowledge translation, and to a lesser extent, enhanced personal awareness and resilience awareness. To enhance the training experience for BST and lessen the uncertainty experienced these strategies need to be enacted within the training milieu.

  4. Fundamental Study of Evaluation at Berthing Training for Pilot Trainees Using a Ship Maneuvering Simulator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kazuki Inoue; Tadatsugi Okazaki; Koji Murai; Yuji Hayashi

    2013-01-01

    Use of the ship maneuvering simulator (SMS) is at the core of pilot trainees education and training, so it is desirable to have an evaluation method that can be completed shortly after each berthing training session...

  5. Smart(phone) Learning Experience Among Vascular Trainees Using a Response System Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jundi, Wissam; Kayssi, Ahmed; Papia, Giuseppe; Dueck, Andrew

    Smartphones have become the most important personal technological device. M-learning is learning through mobile device educational technology. We aim to assess the acceptability of a smartphone learning experience among the vascular trainees and determine if results could inform formal teaching efforts. A survey of the vascular trainees at a single center was conducted following a trial of smartphone learning experience. A vascular fellow used a smartphone response system application (Polltogo, Inspirapps Inc.) to send a daily multiple-choice question to the vascular residents for 20 consecutive working days. The application allows for only one attempt from each user, and the answers are registered anonymously. However, each participant receives instant feedback on his/her response by viewing the correct answer after answering each question along with a distribution of answers among other users. A total of 9 trainees participated in the trial, and all of them filled a posttrial survey. All the trainees possessed smartphones. The majority (78%) were not aware of the concept of m-learning. The mobile engagement score (number of answers received divided by total possible answers) was 145/180 (81%). All the trainees were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with the experience, and the same number stated that they were "likely" or "very likely" to use this technology in the future. The majority (89%) agreed that such an application could assist them in preparing for their board examination. On 3 occasions, 75% or more of the participating trainees answered the multiple-choice question incorrectly, which resulted in addressing the relevant topics in the unit's weekly teaching conference. Using smartphones for education is acceptable among the vascular trainees, and the trial of a response system application with instant written feedback represents a novel method for using smartphones for collaborative learning. Such an application can also inform program directors and

  6. Does interpersonal behaviour of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    OpenAIRE

    Janna Ida Fincke; Heidi eMöller; Svenja eTaubner

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees' interpersonal behaviour on Work Involvement (WI) and compared their social behaviour within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. Methods: The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS) were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic (PA), psychodynamic (PD) and cognitive behavi...

  7. Improving communication: a practical programme for teaching trainees about communication issues in the general practice consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, M; Griffiths, J; Hall, D; McIntyre, M; Oliver, B; Woodward, J

    1984-07-01

    This paper describes a teaching programme, for use in general practice vocational training, which provides a theoretical and practical framework for exploring key aspects of the consultation with trainees. A particular emphasis is on the educational or 'cognitive' outcomes of the consultation and skills for improving them. The five stages of the programme are described and an example of experience of each stage is given. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the programme by the trainers, trainees and social scientist involved.

  8. Left-handed cardiac surgery: tips from set up to closure for trainees and their trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, Clare; Dunning, Joel; Goodwin, Andrew; Theakston, Maureen; Kendall, Simon

    2016-09-01

    There are certain obstacles which left-handed surgeons can face when training but these are not necessary and often perpetuated by a lack of knowledge. Most have been encountered and overcome at some point but unless recorded and disseminated they will have to be resolved repeatedly by each trainee and their trainers. This article highlights difficulties that the left-hander may encounter in cardiac surgery and gives practical operative advice for both trainees and their trainers to help overcome them.

  9. Improving workplace learning of lifelong learning sector trainee teachers in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, Bronwen

    2014-01-01

    Learning in the teaching workplace is crucial for the development of all trainee teachers. Workplace learning is particularly important for trainee teachers in the lifelong learning sector (LLS) in the UK, the majority of whom are already working as teachers, tutors, trainers or lecturers while undertaking initial teacher education. However, literature indicates that LLS workplace conditions often inhibit teacher learning. This paper reviews the research base on LLS trainees’ workplace learn...

  10. An analysis of ophthalmology trainees' perceptions of feedback for cataract surgery training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saedon H

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Habiba Saedon Birmingham Midland Eye Centre, Birmingham, West Midlands, UK Objectives: To determine whether feedback for cataract surgery is perceived to be given to trainee ophthalmologists, the way in which any feedback is given, and what the trainee perceives to be the effect of feedback on their performance. Design: Cross-sectional qualitative study. Participants: Twelve trainee ophthalmologists at various levels of specialty training in the UK. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted via telephone or face to face. Interviews were transcribed and underwent thematic analysis using a qualitative software data package. Main outcome measures: The importance of feedback to the trainee and methods to improve the giving of feedback. Results: Feedback was thought to be a useful tool for improving performance in cataract surgery by all participants. Emergent themes were the importance of specificity of feedback and having confidence in the supervisor. Participants suggested ways that the feedback given can be improved upon. An insight was gained into how the feedback has an effect on their performance. Conclusion: This study showed that trainees perceive the feedback they receive to be of high quality. Feedback enables the trainees to self-reflect and improve their surgical techniques. Keywords: postgraduate training, education, phacoemulsification, microsurgical skills, cognitive learning, reflection

  11. Irish (Republic) versus British (North West) orthopaedic trainees: what are the differences?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Banks, L N

    2012-02-01

    British Trainees have gradually had their working week curtained over the last 8 years. The Republic of Ireland Trainees have not been subjected to the European Working Time Directive prior to 2009 and have therefore worked on average, more hours than their British counterparts. We wanted to see if the differing schemes had an impact on recruiting and training orthopaedic surgeons. We surveyed Republic of Ireland orthopaedic specialist registrars (SpRs) and North West (NW) British SpRs\\/specialist trainees (ST3 and above) to see if there were any discernable differences in working patterns and subsequent training exposure. A standard proforma was given to Irish Trainees and to NW SpRs\\/STs at their National or regional teaching (January\\/February 2009). 62% of Irish and 47% of British NW Trainees responded. Irish trainees were more likely to have obtained a post-graduate degree (p = 0.03). The Irish worked more hours per week (p < 0.001) doing more trauma operative lists (p = 0.003) and more total cases per 6 months than the NW British (p = 0.003). This study suggests that more hours worked, equals more operative exposure, without detriment to the academic side of training. Obviously it is not possible to say whether fewer operations make for a poorer surgeon, but the evidence suggests that it may be true.

  12. EXPLORING MALAYSIAN TRAINEE TEACHERS’ ADOPTION OF THE INTERNET AS INFORMATION TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Teck-Chai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the usage of three commercial Internet search engines in information seeking among trainee teachers at a teacher training institute in Malaysia. It attempts to investigate the information seeking behavior of the trainees via three Internet search engines (Google, Yahoo and MSN as gateways to information for research in academic learning using two cohorts of trainee teachers. The study surveyed 166 trainee teachers undergoing a 5-year Bachelor’s Degree program and compares the statistical differences on gender, programs and years of computer technology experiences. The results revealed that there were significant differences between gender for all the three search engines. Furthermore it also indicated that there was a significant difference between TESL and PISMP group for Yahoo and MSN but not for Google. A significant difference was also observed between years of computer technology experiences and the frequency of usage in the case of MSN. Post hoc test revealed a significant difference in the Internet search between those with more than 7 years of experience with those with less than 2 years experience and those between 2-4 years computing experience. The results provide insight into TESL and PPISMP trainee teachers’ use of the Internet search engines as a tool in information seeking when approaching research for their academic learning activities. Implications on the impact of the Internet to the trainee teachers’ academic learning in approaching research needs were discussed.

  13. Night shift fatigue among anaesthesia trainees at a major metropolitan teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancman, B M

    2016-05-01

    Night shifts expose anaesthesia trainees to the risk of fatigue and, potentially, fatigue-related performance impairment. This study examined the workload, fatigue and coping strategies of anaesthesia trainees during night shifts. A blinded survey-based study was undertaken at a major single centre metropolitan teaching hospital in Australia. All ten anaesthesia trainees who worked night shifts participated. The survey collected data on duration of night shifts, workload, and sleep patterns. Fatigue was assessed using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). There were 93 night shifts generating data out of a potential 165. Trainees tended to sleep an increasing amount before their shift as the nights progressed from 1 to 5. Night 1 was identified as an 'at risk' night due to the amount of time spent awake before arriving at work (32% awake for U+003E8 hours); on all other nights trainees were most likely to have slept 6-8 hours. The KSS demonstrated an increase in sleepiness of 3 to 4 points on the scale from commencement to conclusion of a night shift. The Night 1 conclusion sleepiness was markedly worse than any other night with 42% falling into an 'at-risk' category. The findings demonstrate fatigue and inadequate sleep in anaesthesia trainees during night shifts in a major metropolitan teaching hospital. The data obtained may help administrators prepare safer rosters, and junior staff develop improved strategies to reduce the likelihood of fatigue.

  14. A community of practice for knowledge translation trainees: an innovative approach for learning and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, Robin; Cornelissen, Evelyn; Lal, Shalini; Colquhoun, Heather; Klein, Gail; Richmond, Sarah; Witteman, Holly O

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of researchers and trainees identify knowledge translation (KT) as their field of study or practice. Yet, KT educational and professional development opportunities and established KT networks remain relatively uncommon, making it challenging for trainees to develop the necessary skills, networks, and collaborations to optimally work in this area. The Knowledge Translation Trainee Collaborative is a trainee-initiated and trainee-led community of practice established by junior knowledge translation researchers and practitioners to: examine the diversity of knowledge translation research and practice, build networks with other knowledge translation trainees, and advance the field through knowledge generation activities. In this article, we describe how the collaborative serves as an innovative community of practice for continuing education and professional development in knowledge translation and present a logic model that provides a framework for designing an evaluation of its impact as a community of practice. The expectation is that formal and informal networking will lead to knowledge sharing and knowledge generation opportunities that improve individual members' competencies (eg, combination of skills, abilities, and knowledge) in knowledge translation research and practice and contribute to the development and advancement of the knowledge translation field.

  15. In search of work/life balance: trainee perspectives on part-time obstetrics and gynaecology specialist training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Part-time training (PTT is accessed by approximately 10% of Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees, a small but increasing minority which reflects the growing demand for improved work/life balance amongst the Australian medical workforce. This survey reports the attitudes and experiences of both full-time and part-time trainees to PTT. Methods An email-based anonymous survey was sent to all Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in April 2009, collecting demographic and training status data, data on personal experiences of PTT and/or trainees, and attitudes towards PTT. Results 105 responses were received (20% response rate. These indicated strong support (90% from both full-time (FT and part-time (PT trainees for the availability of PTT. PT trainees were significantly more likely than FT trainees to be female with children. Improved morale was seen as a particular advantage of PTT; decreased continuity of care as a disadvantage. Conclusions Although limited by poor response rate, both PT and FT Australian obstetric trainees were supportive of part-time training. Both groups recognised important advantages and disadvantages of this mode of training. Currently, part-time training is accessed primarily by female trainees with family responsibilities, with many more trainees considering part-time training than the number that access it.

  16. Baseline urologic surgical skills among medical students: Differentiating trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishaal; Lantz, Andrea G; Alzharani, Tarek; Foell, Kirsten; Lee, Jason Y

    2014-07-01

    Urology training programs seek to identify ideal candidates with the potential to become competent urologic surgeons. It is unclear whether innate technical ability has a role in this selection process. We aimed to determine whether there are any innate differences in baseline urologic technical skills among medical students. Second-year medical students from the University of Toronto were recruited for this study and stratified into surgical and non-surgical cohorts based on their reported career aspirations. After a pre-test questionnaire, subjects were tested on several urologic surgical skills: laparoscopy, cystoscopy and robotic surgery. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared test, student t-tests and Spearman's correlation where appropriate. A total of 29 students participated in the study and no significant baseline differences were found between cohorts with respect to demographics and prior surgical experience. For laparoscopic skills, the surgical cohort outperformed the non-surgical cohort on several exercises: Lap Beans Missed (4.9 vs. 9.3, p robotic surgery performance metrics: Task Time (50.6 vs. 76.3, p robotics, may differ between early trainees interested in a surgical career compared to those interested in a non-surgical career. Further studies are required to illicit what impact such differences have on future performance and competence.

  17. Technological pedagogical content knowledge and teaching practice of mathematics trainee teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajudin, Nor'ain Mohd.; Kadir, Noor Zarinawaty Abd.

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to identify the level of technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) of mathematics trainee teachers at Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI) and explore their teaching practices during practical training at school. The study was conducted in two phases using a mix-method research. In the first phase, a survey method using a questionnaire was carried out on 156 trainee teachers of Bachelor of Mathematics Education (AT14) and Bachelor of Science (Mathematics) with Education (AT48). The instrument used was a questionnaire that measures the level of content knowledge, pedagogy, technology and TPCK of mathematics. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, namely the mean. While in the second phase, the interview method involved four trainee teachers were performed. The instrument used was the semi-structured interview protocol to assess the trainee teacher's TPCK integration in their teaching practice. Data were analyzed using the content analysis. The findings showed that the level of knowledge of TPCK among trainee teachers was moderate with overall mean score of 3.60. This level did not show significant differences between the two programs with mean scores of 3.601 for the AT14 group and 3.603 for the AT48 group. However, there was a difference for gender classification such that the female trainees had mean score of 3.58 and male trainees with mean score of 3.72. Although students' TPCK level was moderate, the level of content knowledge (CK), technological knowledge (TK) and pedagogical knowledge (PK), showed a higher level with overall mean scores of 3.75, 3.87 and 3.84 respectively. The findings also showed that in terms of content knowledge, trainee teacher's learning mathematics background was good, but the knowledge of mathematics was limited in the curriculum, philosophy and application aspect. In terms of pedagogical content knowledge, all respondents tend to use lecture and discussion methods in teaching Trigonometry topic

  18. Trainees operating on high-risk patients without cardiopulmonary bypass: a high-risk strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascione, Raimondo; Reeves, Barnaby C; Pano, Marco; Angelini, Gianni D

    2004-07-01

    The safety of teaching off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting to trainees is best tested in high-risk patients, who are more likely to experience significant morbidity after surgery. This study compared outcomes of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting operations performed by consultants and trainees in high-risk patients. Data for consecutive patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting were collected prospectively. Patients satisfying at least one of the following criteria were classified as high-risk: age older than 75 years, ejection fraction less than 0.30, myocardial infarction in the previous month, current congestive heart failure, previous cerebrovascular accident, creatinine greater than 150 micromol/L, respiratory impairment, peripheral vascular disease, previous cardiac surgery, and left main stem stenosis greater than 50%. Early morbidity, 30-day mortality, and late survival were compared. From April 1996 to December 2002, 686 high-risk patients underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting revascularization. Operations by five consultants (416; 61%) and four trainees (239; 35%) were the focus of subsequent analyses. Nine visiting or research fellows performed the other 31 operations. Prognostic factors were more favorable in trainee-led operations. On average, consultants and trainees grafted the same number of vessels. There were 18 (4.3%) and 5 (1.9%) deaths within 30 days, and 14 (3.4%) and 5 (1.9%) myocardial infarctions in consultant and trainee groups, respectively. After adjusting for imbalances in prognostic factors, odd ratios for almost all adverse outcomes implied no increased risk with trainee operators, although patients operated on by trainees had longer postoperative stays and were more likely to have a red blood cell transfusion. Kaplan-Meier cumulative mortality estimates at 24-month follow-up were 10.5% (95% confidence interval, 7.7% to 14.2%) and 6.4% (95% confidence interval, 3.8% to 10.9%) in consultant

  19. CUSUM method for construction of trainee spinal ultrasound learning curves following standardised teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, A J; Melhuishi, N S; Terblanche, N C S

    2014-07-01

    Spinal ultrasonography is a promising aid for epidural insertion. We aimed to determine the learning curve of spinal ultrasonography tasks and the number of training scans required to reach competency after undergoing standardised step-wise teaching. Trainees were required to complete a minimum of 60 assessed scans on selected non-pregnant models following attendance at two training sessions, with feedback from an expert after each scan. Learning curves were plotted using the non-risk cumulative summation technique and an acceptable failure rate of 20%. Five trainees completed between 65 and 75 scans each. All trainees were competent at identifying a randomly assigned intervertebral space after a median of five scans (range one to nine) and at measuring the depth from skin to the posterior complex after a median of 10 scans (range 1 to 42). Two trainees were competent at marking an ideal needle insertion point after 55 scans, while three trainees did not attain competency. All trainees were competent after 60 scans if the tolerance was changed from five to eight millimetre for marking the needle insertion point. The average time taken to complete a scan was 163 seconds. Our study showed that after a standardised educational intervention, anaesthetic trainees are able to identify a lumbar interlaminar space easily and can measure the depth to the posterior complex after a reasonable number of additional practice scans, but experienced difficulty accurately marking the needle insertion point whilst using spinal ultrasonography. We confirmed that it was hard to achieve competency in all aspects of spinal ultrasonography, based on assessment using our predefined competency criteria.

  20. The Role of Ultrasound Simulation in Obstetrics and Gynecology Training: A UK Trainees' Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hersha; Chandrasekaran, Dhivya; Myriokefalitaki, Eva; Gebeh, Alpha; Jones, Kate; Jeve, Yadava B

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasonography is a core skill required by all obstetrics and gynecology trainees; however, training opportunities in clinical ultrasound are declining. Simulation ultrasound training has been proposed as a strategy to overcome this.The study aims were to determine the current availability of clinical and simulation ultrasound training in obstetrics and gynecology in the United Kingdom and to explore the trainees' perspective on the role of ultrasound simulation. All obstetrics and gynecology trainees within the East Midlands Local Education Training Board in the United Kingdom were asked to complete an anonymous web-based survey in July 2014. Of 140 trainees, 70 (50%) responded to the survey, and 69% reported rarely having dedicated clinical ultrasound sessions. Fifty percent had failed to achieve ultrasound competencies required for their stage of training, and 83% felt that the pressures of service provision limited their exposure to clinical ultrasound.Seventy-three percent of the trainees considered ultrasound simulation to be an essential component of training, and 69% agreed that it would help improve their clinical skills. Only 50% had access to an ultrasound simulator. Seventy-seven percent of the trainees thought that it would be useful to have ultrasound simulation integrated into training. Trainees are struggling to achieve minimal ultrasound competences with clinical ultrasound training alone. They believe that ultrasound simulation will shorten the learning curve and improve their clinical skills and knowledge. Despite the cost implications of simulation training, we propose that consideration is given to formal integration of ultrasound simulation into the curriculum as a possible way forward.

  1. Dimensions, discourses and differences: trainees conceptualising health care leadership and followership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lisi J; Rees, Charlotte E; Ker, Jean S; Cleland, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    As doctors in all specialties are expected to undertake leadership within health care organisations, leadership development has become an inherent part of medical education. Whereas the leadership literature within medical education remains mostly focused on individual, hierarchical leadership, contemporary theory posits leadership as a group process, which should be distributed across all levels of health care organisation. This gap between theory and practice indicates that there is a need to understand what leadership and followership mean to medical trainees working in today's interprofessional health care workplace. Epistemologically grounded in social constructionism, this research involved 19 individual and 11 group interviews with 65 UK medical trainees across all stages of training and a range of specialties. Semi-structured interviewing techniques were employed to capture medical trainees' conceptualisations of leadership and followership. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic framework analysis to identify leadership and followership dimensions which were subsequently mapped onto leadership discourses found in the literature. Although diversity existed in terms of medical trainees' understandings of leadership and followership, unsophisticated conceptualisations focusing on individual behaviours, hierarchy and personality were commonplace in trainees' understandings. This indicated the dominance of an individualist discourse. Patterns in understandings across all stages of training and specialties, and whether definitions were solicited or unsolicited, illustrated that context heavily influenced trainees' conceptualisations of leadership and followership. Our findings suggest that UK trainees typically hold traditional understandings of leadership and followership, which are clearly influenced by the organisational structures in which they work. Although education may change these understandings to some extent

  2. Characteristics of the informal curriculum and trainees' ethical choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundert, E M; Hafferty, F; Christakis, D

    1996-06-01

    In October 1995, the Association of American Medical Colleges held its first Conference on Students' and Residents' Ethical and Professional Development. In a plenary session and break-out sessions, the 150 participants, representing a wide variety of medical and professional specialties and roles, discussed the factors and programs that affect medical trainees' development of ethical and professional standards of behavior. The main challenge of addressing students' professional development is the enormous range of influences on that development, many of which, such as the declines in civic responsibility and good manners throughout the United States, fall outside the scope of academic medicine. Nonetheless, many influences fall within reach of medical educators. In a pre-conference survey, participants ranked eight issues related to graduating ethical physicians. The respondents ranked highest the inadequacy of the understanding of how best to influence students' ethical development, followed by faculty use of dehumanizing coping mechanisms, and the "business" of medicine's taking precedence over academic goals. The plenary speakers discussed the "informal curriculum" and the "hidden curriculum" and the need for medical faculty to take seriously the great influence they have on students' and residents' moral and professional development as they become physicians. Whether consciously or not, medical education programs are producing physicians who do not meet the ethical standards the profession has traditionally expected its members to meet. In three series of break-out sessions, the participants analyzed the nature of the ethical dilemmas that medical students and residents face from virtually the first day of their training, the use of role playing in promoting ethical development, and ways to improve policies and overcome barriers to change.

  3. The effect of medical trainees on pediatric emergency department flow: a discrete event simulation modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuis, Emerson D; Doan, Quynh

    2013-11-01

    Providing patient care and medical education are both important missions of teaching hospital emergency departments (EDs). With medical school enrollment rising, and ED crowding becoming an increasing prevalent issue, it is important for both pediatric EDs (PEDs) and general EDs to find a balance between these two potentially competing goals. The objective was to determine how the number of trainees in a PED affects patient wait time, total ED length of stay (LOS), and rates of patients leaving without being seen (LWBS) for PED patients overall and stratified by acuity level as defined by the Pediatric Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS) using discrete event simulation (DES) modeling. A DES model of an urban tertiary care PED, which receives approximately 40,000 visits annually, was created and validated. Thirteen different trainee schedules, which ranged from averaging zero to six trainees per shift, were input into the DES model and the outcome measures were determined using the combined output of five model iterations. An increase in LOS of approximately 7 minutes was noted to be associated with each additional trainee per attending emergency physician working in the PED. The relationship between the number of trainees and wait time varied with patients' level of acuity and with the degree of PED utilization. Patient wait time decreased as the number of trainees increased for low-acuity visits and when the PED was not operating at full capacity. With rising numbers of trainees, the PED LWBS rate decreased in the whole department and in the CTAS 4 and 5 patient groups, but it rose in patients triaged CTAS 3 or higher. A rising numbers of trainees was not associated with any change to flow outcomes for CTAS 1 patients. The results of this study demonstrate that trainees in PEDs have an impact mainly on patient LOS and that the effect on wait time differs between patients presenting with varying degrees of acuity. These findings will assist PEDs in finding a

  4. When is differential treatment discriminatory? Legal, ethical, and professional considerations for psychology trainees with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube, Daniel O; Olkin, Rhoda

    2011-11-01

    A supervisor may tell graduate trainees with obvious disabilities to disclose the disability to potential clients. Legal and ethical guidelines only partially address whether this requirement is permissible. Here we examine such disclosures from several vantage points. Professional judgments guide supervisors in deciding whether to request that a trainee disclose a disability. The law provides little guidance to supervisors in making this decision. Instead, professional ethics and beliefs about disability drive decisions, and these beliefs may be prejudicial. In this article, we examine whether it is good practice for a supervisor in a practicum or internship to require a trainee with an obvious disability to disclose the disability to potential clients before the first meeting so that the client has freedom to request a different therapist. We use this situation to examine the pertinent legal standards; ethical guidelines; and clinical, professional, and social justice issues. The requirement of disclosure may not be in the best interests of the client and has deleterious repercussions for trainees with disabilities, their peers, and the profession. Unless addressed without prejudice, differential treatment becomes discriminatory and is an obstacle to successful completion of professional education by trainees with obvious disabilities.

  5. The "new normal": Adapting doctoral trainee career preparation for broad career paths in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Clair, Rebekah; Hutto, Tamara; MacBeth, Cora; Newstetter, Wendy; McCarty, Nael A; Melkers, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Doctoral recipients in the biomedical sciences and STEM fields are showing increased interest in career opportunities beyond academic positions. While recent research has addressed the interests and preferences of doctoral trainees for non-academic careers, the strategies and resources that trainees use to prepare for a broad job market (non-academic) are poorly understood. The recent adaptation of the Social Cognitive Career Theory to explicitly highlight the interplay of contextual support mechanisms, individual career search efficacy, and self-adaptation of job search processes underscores the value of attention to this explicit career phase. Our research addresses the factors that affect the career search confidence and job search strategies of doctoral trainees with non-academic career interests and is based on nearly 900 respondents from an NIH-funded survey of doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows in the biomedical sciences at two U.S. universities. Using structural equation modeling, we find that trainees pursuing non-academic careers, and/or with low perceived program support for career goals, have lower career development and search process efficacy (CDSE), and receive different levels of support from their advisors/supervisors. We also find evidence of trainee adaptation driven by their career search efficacy, and not by career interests.

  6. The “new normal”: Adapting doctoral trainee career preparation for broad career paths in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, Rebekah; Hutto, Tamara; MacBeth, Cora; Newstetter, Wendy; McCarty, Nael A.

    2017-01-01

    Doctoral recipients in the biomedical sciences and STEM fields are showing increased interest in career opportunities beyond academic positions. While recent research has addressed the interests and preferences of doctoral trainees for non-academic careers, the strategies and resources that trainees use to prepare for a broad job market (non-academic) are poorly understood. The recent adaptation of the Social Cognitive Career Theory to explicitly highlight the interplay of contextual support mechanisms, individual career search efficacy, and self-adaptation of job search processes underscores the value of attention to this explicit career phase. Our research addresses the factors that affect the career search confidence and job search strategies of doctoral trainees with non-academic career interests and is based on nearly 900 respondents from an NIH-funded survey of doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows in the biomedical sciences at two U.S. universities. Using structural equation modeling, we find that trainees pursuing non-academic careers, and/or with low perceived program support for career goals, have lower career development and search process efficacy (CDSE), and receive different levels of support from their advisors/supervisors. We also find evidence of trainee adaptation driven by their career search efficacy, and not by career interests. PMID:28542304

  7. The impact of expert visual guidance on trainee visual search strategy, visual attention and motor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Daniel R; James, David R C; Orihuela-Espina, Felipe; Kwok, Ka-Wai; Sun, Loi Wah; Mylonas, George; Athanasiou, Thanos; Darzi, Ara W; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive and robotic surgery changes the capacity for surgical mentors to guide their trainees with the control customary to open surgery. This neuroergonomic study aims to assess a "Collaborative Gaze Channel" (CGC); which detects trainer gaze-behavior and displays the point of regard to the trainee. A randomized crossover study was conducted in which twenty subjects performed a simulated robotic surgical task necessitating collaboration either with verbal (control condition) or visual guidance with CGC (study condition). Trainee occipito-parietal (O-P) cortical function was assessed with optical topography (OT) and gaze-behavior was evaluated using video-oculography. Performance during gaze-assistance was significantly superior [biopsy number: (mean ± SD): control = 5.6 ± 1.8 vs. CGC = 6.6 ± 2.0; p visual search, and alleviates the burden in brain centers subserving visual attention and does not induce changes in the trainee's O-P functional network observable with the current OT technique. The results imply that through visual guidance, attentional resources may be liberated, potentially improving the capability of trainees to attend to other safety critical events during the procedure.

  8. Integrating Family as a Discipline by Providing Parent Led Curricula: Impact on LEND Trainees' Leadership Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keisling, Bruce L; Bishop, Elizabeth A; Roth, Jenness M

    2017-01-20

    Background While the MCH Leadership Competencies and family as a discipline have been required elements of Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and related Disabilities (LEND) programs for over a decade, little research has been published on the efficacy of either programmatic component in the development of the next generation of leaders who can advocate and care for Maternal and Child Health (MCH) populations. Objective To test the effectiveness of integrating the family discipline through implementation of parent led curricula on trainees' content knowledge, skills, and leadership development in family-centered care, according to the MCH Leadership Competencies. Methods One hundred and two long-term (≥ 300 h) LEND trainees completed a clinical and leadership training program which featured intensive parent led curricula supported by a full-time family faculty member. Trainees rated themselves on the five Basic and Advanced skill items that comprise MCH Leadership Competency 8: Family-centered Care at the beginning and conclusion of their LEND traineeship. Results When compared to their initial scores, trainees rated themselves significantly higher across all family-centered leadership competency items at the completion of their LEND traineeship. Conclusions The intentional engagement of a full-time family faculty member and parent led curricula that include didactic and experiential components are associated with greater identification and adoption by trainees of family-centered attitudes, skills, and practices. However, the use of the MCH Leadership Competencies as a quantifiable measure of program evaluation, particularly leadership development, is limited.

  9. How we treat our own: the experiences and characteristics of psychology trainees with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Emily M; Andrews, Erin E; Holt, Judith M

    2014-11-01

    To better understand the characteristics and experiences of psychologists and trainees with disabilities. An invitation to participate in a survey of psychologists and psychology trainees with disabilities was sent to professional listservs related to psychology and/or disability. Fifty-six trainees and psychologists with doctoral training in clinical, counseling, school, or rehabilitation psychology completed the survey. Over half (57.1%) were practicing psychologists and 42.9% were current trainees. The most commonly reported disabilities were physical, sensory, and chronic health. The majority of the participants reported experiencing disability-related discrimination during their training, and less than one third had received mentorship from psychologists with disabilities. Less than half of respondents disclosed their disability to a university disability services office, and many relied on informal accommodations alone. Most participants did not disclose their disability during the graduate school, internship, or postdoctoral application processes. Professional psychology programs and training sites should work to remove barriers and provide support for trainees with disabilities, especially during preinternship doctoral training. Programs should not expect disability services offices to provide all support for students with disabilities, especially support related to clinical training. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Pubertal assessment: a national survey of attitudes, knowledge and practices of the US pediatric trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Aditi; Ravichandran, Yagnaram; Stefanov, Dimitre G; Perez-Colon, Sheila

    2017-07-06

    Background and objective Sex maturity rating (SMR), defines different levels of sexual maturity, based on the development of secondary sexual characteristics. Periodic assessment of pubertal maturation by physicians is crucial for timely identification of puberty-related disorders. With this pilot study, we aimed to assess the attitudes, knowledge and practices of pubertal assessment by current US pediatric trainees. Methods An anonymous online survey questionnaire was sent to categorical pediatric residents at different levels of training and pediatric chief residents across the US. Results We received responses from 2496 pediatric residents from all over the US. We found that 96% of trainees understand the importance of assessing SMR, 62% feel confident in assessing it and 55% feel comfortable assessing the need for an endocrinology referral. Only 33% of trainees performed external genital exams during all regular clinic visits while 26.9% never performed them during sick visits and 6% never assessed SMR during any of the patient visits. Higher levels of training and having completed an endocrinology rotation were associated with improvement in comfort level, practice and knowledge of trainees regarding pubertal assessment. Conclusion This study revealed that the current clinical practices of performing external genital exams and SMR among pediatric residents need improvement. Stronger reinforcement from continuity clinic preceptors and/or online and clinic based resources for SMR assessment for trainees may improve adherence to the recommended guidelines.

  11. Leveraging Trainees to Improve Quality and Safety at the Point of Care: Three Models for Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson Faherty, Laura; Mate, Kedar S; Moses, James M

    2016-04-01

    Trainees, as frontline providers who are acutely aware of quality improvement (QI) opportunities and patient safety (PS) issues, are key partners in achieving institutional quality and safety goals. However, as academic medical centers accelerate their initiatives to prioritize QI and PS, trainees have not always been engaged in these efforts. This article describes the development of an organizing framework with three suggested models of varying scopes and time horizons to effectively involve trainees in the quality and safety work of their training institutions. The proposed models, which were developed through a literature review, expert interviews with key stakeholders, and iterative testing, are (1) short-term, team-based, rapid-cycle initiatives; (2) medium-term, unit-based initiatives; and (3) long-term, health-system-wide initiatives. For each, the authors describe the objective, scope, duration, role of faculty leaders, steps for implementation in the clinical setting, pros and cons, and examples in the clinical setting. There are many barriers to designing the ideal training environments that fully engage trainees in QI/PS efforts, including lack of protected time for faculty mentors, time restrictions due to rotation-based training, and structural challenges. However, one of the most promising strategies for overcoming these barriers is integrating QI/PS principles into routine clinical care. These models provide opportunities for trainees to successfully learn and apply quality and safety principles to routine clinical care at the team, unit, and system level.

  12. Effects of hospitalist attending physicians on trainee satisfaction with teaching and with internal medicine rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Karen E; Wachter, Robert M; McCulloch, Charles E; Woo, Garmen A; Auerbach, Andrew D

    2004-09-27

    Hospitalists are increasingly serving as inpatient attendings at teaching hospitals. The educational impact of this new model is unclear. We evaluated the relationship between type of attending (hospitalist vs traditional) and trainees' ratings of attending teaching and the overall ward rotation. We analyzed data from a Web-based evaluation system containing all house staff and student evaluations of their attendings and internal medicine ward rotations at 2 university-affiliated teaching hospitals over a 2-year period (1999-2001). The overall evaluation completion rate was 91% (1587 of 1742 evaluations) by trainees working with 17 hospitalists and 52 traditional attendings. Trainees reported significantly more overall satisfaction with hospitalists than traditional attendings (8.3 vs 8.0 on a 9-point scale; Protations was higher with hospitalist attendings (3.9 vs 3.7 on a 5-point scale; P =.04). Trainees evaluated hospitalists' knowledge, teaching, and feedback as superior to that of traditional attendings. There were no significant differences in reports of attendings' interest in teaching or patients, availability, or emphasis on cost-effectiveness. Trainees reported more effective teaching and more satisfying inpatient rotations when supervised by hospitalists. This analysis suggests that hospitalists may possess or accrue a specific inpatient knowledge base and teaching skill that distinguishes them from nonhospitalists.

  13. Innovative model of delivering quality improvement education for trainees – a pilot project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Ramar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: After incorporating quality improvement (QI education as a required curriculum for our trainees in 2010, a need arose to readdress our didactic sessions as they were too long, difficult to schedule, and resulting in a drop in attendance. A ‘flipped classroom’ (FC model to deliver QI education was touted to be an effective delivery method as it allows the trainees to view didactic materials on videos, on their own time, and uses the classroom to clarify concepts and employ learned tools on case-based scenarios including workshops. Methods: The Mayo Quality Academy prepared 29 videos that incorporated the previously delivered 17 weekly didactic sessions, for a total duration of 135 min. The half-day session clarified questions related to the videos, followed by case examples and a hands-on workshop on how to perform and utilize a few commonly used QI tools and methods. Results: Seven trainees participated. There was a significant improvement in knowledge as measured by pre- and post-FC model test results [improvement by 40.34% (SD 16.34, p<0.001]. The survey results were overall positive about the FC model with all trainees strongly agreeing that we should continue with this model to deliver QI education. Conclusions: The pilot project of using the FC model to deliver QI education was successful in a small sample of trainees.

  14. Identification and Cost of Disposable Endourological Devices for Nephrolithiasis: A Cross-Sectional Study Among Urological Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Niall F; Browne, Cliodhna; Galvin, David J; Quinlan, David M; Lennon, Gerald M; Mulvin, David W

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Knowledge on health economics among urology trainees is not formally assessed. The cost of commonly utilised endourological devices may not be considered by trainees. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to assess whether urology trainees were knowledgeable on identification and cost of commonly used disposable devices in the management of nephrolithiasis. Materials and Methods Forty urology trainees in Ireland were invited to complete a visual online questionnaire on the identification of 10 frequently utilised disposable endourological devices. In addition, trainees were requested to estimate the cost of 12 disposable endourological devices. Responses were stratified according to trainee grade and urological subspecialty of interest. Data are presented as a mean ± standard deviation. Results The response rate was 70% (28/40). Endourology was the subspecialty of interest in 21% (n= 6). No trainee correctly identified all 10 endourological devices and the mean test score was 5.32 ± 2.28. No trainee accurately estimated the cost for all 12 devices assessed. The cost of endourological devices was underestimated by €67.13 ± €60.76 per device. A total of 54% (n=15) of trainees underestimated the total cost of disposable devices used during standard flexible ureterorenoscopy, laser lithotripsy and JJ stent insertion by €303.66 ± €113.83. Conclusion Our findings indicate deficiencies in trainee knowledge on endourological devices and their associated costs. Incorporating a health economics module into postgraduate urology training may familiarise trainees with healthcare expenditure within their departments. PMID:27891391

  15. Designing of Scale to Measure the Attitude of ARS Trainees towards FOCARS Programme of NAARM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prashanth

    2016-05-01

    The extent of effectivenesss of the programme is depends on the attitude change of the trainees. To measure the attitude of the trainees a standardised scale was essential. Hence, it was felt necessary to construct a comprehensive, valid and reliable scale for studying the attitude of trainees towards FOCARS programme. Method of equal appearing intervals developed by Thurstone and Chave (1929 was used. Finally sixty statements were selected after the editing based on Edwards criteria. The statements were then subjected for judging to 40 experts. Each subject was asked to judge the degree of more favorableness or more unfavorableness of feeling expressed by each statement in terms of the 11 intervals. Finally, 26 statements were selected from statements for which scale (S and Q values were worked out. The scale values of the statements on the psychological continuum were relatively equally spaced.

  16. One or two trainees per workplace in a structured multimodality training curriculum for laparoscopic surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, Felix; Jede, Felix; Minassian, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    different approaches for optimal training outcome. However, no standards currently exist for the number of trainees assigned per workplace. Methods. This is a monocentric, open, three-arm randomized controlled trial. The participants are laparoscopically-naive medical students from Heidelberg University...... individual factors that might exert influence on training outcome. Discussion. This study aims to assess whether workplaces in laparoscopy training courses for beginners should be used by one trainee or two trainees simultaneously, by measuring the impact on operative performance and learning curves....... Possible factors of influence, such as the role of observing the training partner, exchange of thoughts, active reflection, model learning, motivation, pauses, and sympathy will be explored in the data analysis. This study will help optimize the efficiency of laparoscopy training courses. Trial...

  17. Attachment style and its relationship to working alliance in the supervision of British clinical psychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Joanne M; Moberly, Nicholas J; Marshall, Yehuda; Reilly, James

    2011-01-01

    Although the supervisory relationship is thought to be critical in training clinical psychologists, little is known about factors affecting the supervisory alliance. We conducted an Internet survey of British clinical doctoral trainees (N = 259) in which participants rated their supervisory working alliance, parental style during childhood, pathological adult attachment behaviours and attachment style for themselves and their supervisors. Trainees' ratings of the working alliance were associated with perceptions of supervisors' attachment style, but not with perceptions of trainees' own attachment styles. Path analysis supported a causal chain linking parental indifference, compulsive self-reliance, insecure supervisor attachment style and lower ratings of the working alliance. Our results broadly replicate data from a US sample and suggest that attachment theory is helpful in understanding clinical supervisory processes.

  18. Performance on a virtual reality angled laparoscope task correlates with spatial ability of trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Rachel; Hamel, Christian; Oertli, Daniel; Demartines, Nicolas; Gantert, Walter A

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether trainees' performance on a virtual reality angled laparoscope navigation task correlates with scores obtained on a validated conventional test of spatial ability. 56 participants of a surgery workshop performed an angled laparoscope navigation task on the Xitact LS 500 virtual reality Simulator. Performance parameters were correlated with the score of a validated paper-and-pencil test of spatial ability. Performance at the conventional spatial ability test significantly correlated with performance at the virtual reality task for overall task score (p travel speed (p = 0.947). In conclusion, trainees' performance in a standardized virtual reality camera navigation task correlates with their innate spatial ability. This VR session holds potential to serve as an assessment tool for trainees.

  19. The use of therapist self-disclosure: clinical psychology trainees' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottrill, Samantha; Pistrang, Nancy; Barker, Chris; Worrell, Michael

    2010-03-01

    This qualitative study examined clinical psychology trainees' experiences of using, or not using, therapist self-disclosure and their experience of training and supervision on this issue. Fourteen trainees were interviewed and their accounts analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, yielding nine themes organized into two domains. The first domain ("the decision in the moment") concerned participants' struggle with decision making about disclosure; the second ("the developing therapist") reflected their evolving ideas about disclosure over training and within the wider philosophical context of therapy. The dilemmas surrounding disclosure seemed to distill some central issues associated with participants' developing professional therapist identity. Working out one's position on self-disclosure is a challenge that trainee therapists may require support in mastering.

  20. A modern approach to teaching pancreatic surgery: stepwise pancreatoduodenectomy for trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marangoni, Gabriele

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) has always been regarded as one of the most technically demanding abdominal procedures, even when carried out in high-volume centers by experienced surgeons. The reduction in higher surgical trainees working hours has led to reduced exposure, and consequently less experience in operative procedures. Furthermore, trainees have also become victims as health care systems striving for operating room efficiency, have attempted to reduce procedure duration by encouraging consultant led procedures at the expense of training. A strategy therefore needs to be developed to match the ability of the trainee with the complexity of the surgical procedure. As a PD can be deconstructed into a number of different steps, it may indeed be an ideal training operation for varying levels of ability.

  1. Survey of the incidence and effect of major life events on graduate medical education trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars J. Grimm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to assess the incidence of major life events during graduate medical education (GME training and to establish any associations with modifiable activities and career planning. Methods: The authors surveyed graduating GME trainees from their parent institution in June 2013. Demographic information (clinical department, gender, training duration and major life events (marriage, children, death/illness, home purchase, legal troubles, property loss were surveyed. Respondents were queried about the relationship between life events and career planning. A multivariable logistic regression model tested for associations. Results: A total of 53.2% (166/312 of graduates responded to the survey. 50% (83/166 of respondents were female. Major life events occurred in 96.4% (160/166 of respondents. Male trainees were more likely (56.1% [46/82] vs. 30.1% [25/83] to have a child during training (p=0.01. A total of 41.6% (69/166 of responders consciously engaged or avoided activities during GME training, while 31.9% (53/166 of responders reported that life events influenced their career plans. Trainees in lifestyle residencies (p=0.02, those who experienced the death or illness of a close associate (p=0.01, and those with legal troubles (p=0.04 were significantly more likely to consciously control life events. Conclusion: Major life events are very common and changed career plans in nearly a third of GME trainees. Furthermore, many trainees consciously avoided activities due to their responsibilities during training. GME training programs should closely assess the institutional support systems available to trainees during this difficult time.

  2. Is laparoscopic appendicectomy a safe procedure for trainees in the peripheral hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Emmanuel, A

    2011-10-01

    Laparoscopic appendicectomy has become standard in the treatment of acute appendicitis in most hospitals in Ireland. Studies have shown that it is a safe procedure for trainees to perform. However, these studies were conducted in university teaching hospitals whereas a significant proportion of training in Ireland takes place in peripheral hospitals which provide a different training environment. The aim of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for surgical trainees to perform in a peripheral hospital setting. A retrospective analysis was performed of appendicectomies carried out at a peripheral hospital over a 12 month period. Comparisons were made between consultant surgeons and trainees for a variety of outcomes. Of 155 appendicectomies, 129 (83.2%) were performed laparoscopically, of which 10 (7.75%) were converted to open. Consultants performed 99 (77%) laparoscopic appendicectomies. There were no statistically significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (19 (19.2%) vs. 4 (13.3%), p = 0.46), mean length of hospital stay (4.7 +\\/- 4.0 vs. 3.4 +\\/- 3.3 days, p = 0.13), or rate of conversion to open operation (9 (9.1%) vs. 1 (3.3%), p = 0.45). For cases of complicated appendicitis there were no significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (12 vs. 2, p = 0.40) or length of hospital stay (6.4 +\\/- 3.9 vs. 4.7 +\\/- 5.6 days, p = 0.27). We conclude that laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for trainees to perform in the peripheral hospital setting and should be incorporated into surgical training programs at an early stage of training.

  3. Description and Rate of Musculoskeletal Injuries in Air Force Basic Military Trainees, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Nathaniel S; Pawlak, Mary T; Webber, Bryant J; Tchandja, Juste N; Milner, Michelle R

    2016-11-01

     Musculoskeletal injuries are common in military trainees and have significant medical and operational effects.  To provide current musculoskeletal injury epidemiology data for US Air Force basic military trainees.  Descriptive epidemiologic study with cross-sectional features.  US Air Force Basic Military Training, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas.  All recruits who entered training between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2014.  Incidence density rate of all musculoskeletal injuries (stratified by body region and type) and factors and costs associated with injuries.  Of the 67 525 trainees, 12.5% sustained 1 or more musculoskeletal injuries. The overall incidence density rate was 18.3 injuries per 1000 person-weeks (15.1 for men and 29.4 for women). The most common diagnosis (n = 2984) was Pain in joint, lower leg, as described in the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, code 719.46. Injuries were more common among those with lower levels of baseline aerobic and muscular fitness. Injured trainees were 3.01 times (95% confidence interval = 2.85, 3.18) as likely to be discharged, and injured trainees who did graduate were 2.88 times (95% confidence interval = 2.72, 3.04) as likely to graduate late. During the surveillance period, injuries resulted in more than $43.7 million in medical ($8.7 million) and nonmedical ($35 million) costs.  Musculoskeletal injuries, predominantly of the lower extremities, have significant fiscal and operational effects on Air Force Basic Military Training. Further research into prevention and early rehabilitation of these injuries in military trainees is warranted.

  4. The need for more workshops in laparoscopic surgery and surgical anatomy for European gynaecological oncology trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Halaska, Michael J; Piek, Jurgen M

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to highlight the relative preference of European gynecologic oncology trainees for workshops that could support and supplement their training needs. METHODS: A Web-based survey was sent to 900 trainees on the European Network of Young Gynaecological...... Oncologists database in November 2011. Respondents were asked to rate a 13-item questionnaire (using a 1- to 5-point Likert scale) on workshop topics they felt would most benefit their training requirements. Free text space for additional topics was also provided. Descriptive analysis was used to describe...

  5. [Effective communication strategies to frame the trainer-trainee dialogue in the clinical setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachoud, D; Félix, S; Monti, M

    2015-11-04

    Communication between trainer and trainee plays a central role in teaching and learning in the clinical environment. There are various strategies to frame the dialogue between trainee and trainer. These strategies allow trainers to be more effective in their supervision, which is important in our busy clinical environment. Communication strategies are well adapted to both in- and out-patient settings, to both under- and postgraduate contexts. This article presents three strategies that we think are particularly useful. They are meant to give feedback, to ask questions and to present a case.

  6. Experiences of clinical teaching for dental core trainees working in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, C J; Brotherton, P

    2014-07-11

    There is recognition that the provision of excellence in education and training results in a skilled and competent workforce. However, the educational experiences of dental core trainees (DCT's) working in the hospital oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) setting have not been previously investigated. In this paper, we examine DCT's learning experiences both 'formal' and 'non-formal' within the hospital setting of ward and clinic-based teaching. Are hospital dental core trainees receiving a meaningful educational experience? To conclude this paper, the authors recommend methods, based upon sound educational principles, to maximise the value of clinical sessions for teaching.

  7. Psychomotor skills of surgical trainees compared with those of different medical specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C J; Herbert, M; Steele, R J

    1994-03-01

    Forty-eight trainees in surgery, psychiatry, anaesthetics and medicine underwent objective testing of manual dexterity (Mandex test), hand-eye coordination (Gibson spiral maze test) and visuospatial ability (embedded figures task). Surgical trainees performed significantly more quickly on the spiral maze test than psychiatrists (P = 0.03) but made more errors (P = 0.02). Combining male and female subjects across all groups, women were significantly more accurate than men. When men only were compared no psychomotor differences between specialty groups could be demonstrated. There were no differences in visuospatial ability by either sex or specialty. Self-selection on the basis of such skill is therefore unlikely.

  8. The role of individual differences on the effect of synchronous coaching of trainee teachers in plenary situations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooreman, Ralph W.; Kommers, Piet A.M.; Jochems, Wim M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Historically, synchronous (direct) coaching is an addition to the traditional asynchronous (indirect) supervision of trainee teachers. The new trainee receives concrete hints on “how to proceed further” via an earpiece. In this study the role of personality traits and the orientation of learning to

  9. Teacher Trainees' Use of Computer-Mediated Tasks in Teaching English as a Second Language: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Misrah Hamisah; Embi, Mohamed Amin

    2013-01-01

    This study is to identify the level of use of technology-mediated tasks amongst teacher trainees during their teaching practicum. This article reports a survey conducted with 63 teacher trainees and a semi-structured interview conducted with nine lecturers in a TESL programme at a Malaysian university. The result of the quantitative and…

  10. Rules of Engagement: The Joint Influence of Trainer Expressiveness and Trainee Experiential Learning Style on Engagement and Training Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Bertha; Chung, Wonjoon; Harris, T. Brad; Carpenter, Nichelle C.; Chiaburu, Dan S.; Moore, Jenna L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the joint effect of trainer expressiveness and trainee experiential learning style on training transfer intentions. Extending prior research where trainer expressiveness has been established as a positive predictor of transfer, we show that trainer expressiveness is more impactful for trainees with high (vs. low) experiential…

  11. The Influence of Organisational Commitment, Job Involvement and Utility Perceptions on Trainees' Motivation to Improve Work through Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Treuer, Kathryn; McHardy, Katherine; Earl, Celisha

    2013-01-01

    Workplace training is a key strategy often used by organisations to optimise performance. Further, trainee motivation is a key determinant of the degree to which the material learned in a training programme will be transferred to the workplace, enhancing the performance of the trainee. This study investigates the relationship between several…

  12. Free Open Access Medical Education resource knowledge and utilisation amongst Emergency Medicine trainees: A survey in four countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Thurtle

    2016-03-01

    The Emergency Medicine trainees in both developed and low resource settings studied were aware that Free Open Access Medical Education resources exist, but trainees in lower income settings were generally less aware of specific resources. Lack of internet and device access was not a barrier to use in this group.

  13. Stigma and Mental Illness: Investigating Attitudes of Mental Health and Non-Mental-Health Professionals and Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Allison L.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored attitudes toward adults with mental illness. Results suggest that mental health trainees and professionals had less stigmatizing attitudes than did non-mental-health trainees and professionals. Professionals receiving supervision had higher mean scores on the Benevolence subscale than did professionals who were not receiving…

  14. Stigma and Mental Illness: Investigating Attitudes of Mental Health and Non-Mental-Health Professionals and Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Allison L.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored attitudes toward adults with mental illness. Results suggest that mental health trainees and professionals had less stigmatizing attitudes than did non-mental-health trainees and professionals. Professionals receiving supervision had higher mean scores on the Benevolence subscale than did professionals who were not receiving…

  15. The Influence of Organisational Commitment, Job Involvement and Utility Perceptions on Trainees' Motivation to Improve Work through Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Treuer, Kathryn; McHardy, Katherine; Earl, Celisha

    2013-01-01

    Workplace training is a key strategy often used by organisations to optimise performance. Further, trainee motivation is a key determinant of the degree to which the material learned in a training programme will be transferred to the workplace, enhancing the performance of the trainee. This study investigates the relationship between several…

  16. Understanding Faculty and Trainee Needs Related to Scholarly Activity in a Large, Nonuniversity Graduate Medical Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Davida; Garth, Hanna; Hollander, Rachel; Klein, Felice; Klau, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Context: Graduate medical education (GME) programs must develop curriculum to ensure scholarly activity among trainees and faculty to meet accreditation requirements and to support evidence-based medicine. Objective: Test whether research-related needs and interests varied across four groups: primary care trainees, specialty trainees, primary care faculty, and specialty faculty. Design: We surveyed a random sample of trainees and faculty in Kaiser Permanente Southern California’s GME programs. We investigated group differences in outcomes using Fisher exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Main Outcome Measures: Research experiences, skills, barriers, motivators, and interests in specific research skills development. Results: Participants included 47 trainees and 26 faculty (response rate = 30%). Among primary care faculty, 12 (71%) reported little or no research experience vs 1 (11%) for specialty faculty, 14 (41%) for primary care trainees, and 1 (8%) for specialty trainees (p skills also differed across groups (p skill level. Research barriers that differed across groups included other work roles taking priority; desire for work-life balance; and lack of managerial support, research equipment, administrative support, and funding. Conclusion: Faculty and trainees in primary care and specialties have differing research-related needs that GME programs should consider when designing curricula to support scholarly activity. Developing research skills of primary care faculty is a priority to support trainees’ scholarly activity. PMID:28333607

  17. Trainees' Perceived Knowledge Gain Unrelated to the Training Domain: The Joint Action of Impression Management and Motives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaburu, Dan S.; Huang, Jason L.; Hutchins, Holly M.; Gardner, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Trainees' knowledge gains represent an important outcome in human resource development. In this research, we tested a model examining the joint influence of social desirability (impression management, self-deception) and motives (need for power, need for approval) on trainees' self-reported knowledge gain. We conducted a study with…

  18. Outbreak of Pneumonia in the Setting of Fatal Pneumococcal Meningitis among US Army Trainees: Potential Role of Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Stephanie L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to the civilian population, military trainees are often at increased risk for respiratory infections. We investigated an outbreak of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia that was recognized after 2 fatal cases of serotype 7F pneumococcal meningitis were reported in a 303-person military trainee company (Alpha Company. Methods We reviewed surveillance data on pneumonia and febrile respiratory illness at the training facility; conducted chart reviews for cases of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia; and administered surveys and collected nasopharyngeal swabs from trainees in the outbreak battalion (Alpha and Hotel Companies, associated training staff, and trainees newly joining the battalion. Results Among Alpha and Hotel Company trainees, the average weekly attack rates of radiologically-confirmed pneumonia were 1.4% and 1.2% (most other companies at FLW: 0-0.4%. The pneumococcal carriage rate among all Alpha Company trainees was 15% with a predominance of serotypes 7F and 3. Chlamydia pneumoniae was identified from 31% of specimens collected from Alpha Company trainees with respiratory symptoms. Conclusion Although the etiology of the outbreak remains unclear, the identification of both S. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae among trainees suggests that both pathogens may have contributed either independently or as cofactors to the observed increased incidence of pneumonia in the outbreak battalion and should be considered as possible etiologies in outbreaks of pneumonia in the military population.

  19. The Influence of Organisational Commitment, Job Involvement and Utility Perceptions on Trainees' Motivation to Improve Work through Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Treuer, Kathryn; McHardy, Katherine; Earl, Celisha

    2013-01-01

    Workplace training is a key strategy often used by organisations to optimise performance. Further, trainee motivation is a key determinant of the degree to which the material learned in a training programme will be transferred to the workplace, enhancing the performance of the trainee. This study investigates the relationship between several…

  20. Trainees' Perceived Knowledge Gain Unrelated to the Training Domain: The Joint Action of Impression Management and Motives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaburu, Dan S.; Huang, Jason L.; Hutchins, Holly M.; Gardner, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Trainees' knowledge gains represent an important outcome in human resource development. In this research, we tested a model examining the joint influence of social desirability (impression management, self-deception) and motives (need for power, need for approval) on trainees' self-reported knowledge gain. We conducted a study with…

  1. Survey of practices around pharmaceutical company funding for continuing professional development among medical oncologists and trainees in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeh Chen; Kroon, René; Koczwara, Bogda; Haines, Ian; Francis, Kay; Millward, Michael; Kefford, Richard; Olver, Ian; Mileshkin, Linda

    2017-08-01

    The completion of continuing professional development (CPD) is mandatory for medical oncologists and trainees (MO&T). Pharmaceutical companies may fund some CPD activities, but there is increasing debate about the potential for conflicts of interest (COI). To assess current practices around funding to attend CPD activities. An electronic survey was distributed to Australian MO&T. The survey asked questions about current practices, institutional policies and perceptions about attending CPD funded by pharmaceutical companies. The design looked at comparing responses between MO&T as well as their understanding of and training around institutional and ethical process. A total of 157 of 653 (24%) responses was received, the majority from MO (76%). Most CPD activities attended by MO&T were self-funded (53%), followed by funding from institutions (19%), pharmaceutical companies (16%) and salary award (16%). Most institutions allowed MO&T to receive CPD funding from professional organisations (104/157, 66%) or pharmaceutical companies (90/157, 57%). A minority of respondents (13/157, 8%) reported that the process to use pharmaceutical funds had been considered by an ethics committee. Although 103/157 (66%) had received pharmaceutical funding for CPD, most (109/157, 69%) reported never receiving training about potential COI. The lack of education was more noticeable among trainees (odds ratio (OR) 8.61, P = 0.02). MO&T acknowledged the potential bias towards a pharmaceutical product (P = 0.05) but believed there was adequate separation between themselves and pharmaceutical companies (P < 0.01). Majority of CPD attended by MO&T is self-funded. There is lack of clarity in institutional policies regarding external funding support for CPD activities. Formal education about potential COI is lacking. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  2. Training manual for precision hand deburring, Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1981-03-01

    This publication is Part 3 of a 4 part training manual to be used by machinist trainees, production workers, and others removing burrs from precision miniature parts. The manuals are written to be self-teaching and are intended to be used with two hours of training each day along with six additional hours of bench work in deburring. This part describes mounted stones, scrapers, hand stones, abrasive filled rubber and cotton tools, abrasive paper products, felt bobs and lapping compounds, mandrels and arbors, miscellaneous tools, personal techniques for assuring quality, cleaning parts, and deburring gears and plastic parts.

  3. Learning Crafts as Practices of Masculinity. Finnish Male Trainee Teachers' Reflections and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokko, Sirpa

    2012-01-01

    Craft education in Finland has long gendered traditions that effect the present situation. The aim of this paper is to analyse the processes of learning the interlinking of crafts and gender. The analysis concentrates on male trainee teachers' experiences of craft education in comprehensive schools in Finland. Data were collected through memory…

  4. From Autopsy to Biopsy: A Metacognitive View of Lesson Planning and Teacher Trainees in ELT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Indika; Bartlett, Brendan John

    2010-01-01

    Lesson planning and implementation of those plans are complex and cognitively demanding for English Language Teacher trainees preparing for the profession. Many find it difficult to develop a lesson holistically and to maintain alignment across aims, procedural steps, and evaluation when planning and implementing a lesson. We attempted to address…

  5. The Effect of Brief Training in Motivational Interviewing on Client Outcomes and Trainee Skill Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Tabitha L.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an evidence-based practice that focuses on working through client ambivalence and increasing clients' motivation to change. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effect that a unique student-based training in MI had on counselor trainees' ability to perform MI, and on client outcomes. This training…

  6. Basic Geriatrics Knowledge Among Internal Medicine Trainees in a Teaching Hospital in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aama, Tareef

    2016-06-01

    To assess the basic knowledge of medical trainees, in the absence of a structured geriatrics curriculum, around a variety of geriatric medicine components that are considered essential for the care of the rapidly increasing elderly population. Eighty-three trainees at different levels of training in internal medicine were asked about a variety of common geriatric conditions. Those included: delirium, falls, geriatric syndromes, pain, cognitive impairment, and medications. The trainees' knowledge about common geriatric condition was overall poor. The most pronounced deficits included: the lack of familiarity in diagnosing geriatric syndromes (63 %) or managing them (67 %), the underestimation of the prevalence of delirium (49 %), and the tendency to undertreat pain (64 %). Poor familiarity with polypharmacy and its impact, as well as inappropriate prescription practices in the elderly were also observed. In the absence of a structured geriatric medicine curriculum, internal medicine trainees' knowledge about important geriatric conditions is poor, even if their internal medicine knowledge is overall adequate. This would translate into suboptimal care for this vulnerable and rapidly expanding segment of the population.

  7. The Impact of CBT and ACT Models Using Psychology Trainee Therapists: A Preliminary Controlled Effectiveness Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappalainen, Raimo; Lehtonen, Tuula; Skarp, Eerika; Taubert, Eija; Ojanen, Markku; Hayes, Steven C.

    2007-01-01

    The present study compares the impact of individualized treatment provided by trainee therapists based on a traditional cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) model. Fourteen therapists were given initial training in CBT and ACT. Outpatients (N = 28) were randomized to either approach, with each therapist…

  8. Emotional Intelligence of In-Service and Pre-Service Trainee Teachers: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gaurav; Kumar, Girijesh

    2009-01-01

    A teacher is more near to students than any other during his school days. Students want to share each and every thing related to educational as well as personal matters with him. It reflects that a teacher has strong emotional bondage with students. In the light of above discussion researcher decided to carry out a research on trainee teachers to…

  9. Interactivity in a Web Conference Training Context: Effects on Trainers and Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Keri K.; Mottet, Timothy P.

    2008-01-01

    Organizations continue to use technology to train and share information. This study focused specifically on how trainers and trainees interact in the mediated Web conference training context. Using the rhetorical and relational goal theory of instructional communication, this 2x2 experimental study tested the effects of trainer-controlled and…

  10. Prosody teaching matters in developing speaking skills for Farsi-English interpreter trainees : An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yenkimaleki, M.; V.J., van Heuven

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of explicit teaching of prosody on developing speaking skills for Farsi-English interpreter trainees. Two groups of student interpreters were formed. All were native speakers of Farsi who studied English translation and interpreting at the BA level at Tafres

  11. Consistency of Supervisor and Peer Ratings of Assessment Interviews Conducted by Psychology Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalvez, Craig J.; Deane, Frank P.; Caputi, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Observation of counsellor skills through a one-way mirror, video or audio recording followed by supervisors and peers feedback is common in counsellor training. The nature and extent of agreement between supervisor-peer dyads are unclear. Using a standard scale, supervisors and peers rated 32 interviews by psychology trainees observed through a…

  12. Reflections of Two Trainees: Person-of-the-Therapist Training for Marriage and Family Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Lauren; Irizarry, Sarah Spell

    2009-01-01

    In this article we share our personal and professional experiences, struggles, and growth, as former trainees of the Person-of-the-Therapist Training pilot study, conducted during our master's coursework in the Couple and Family Therapy Department at Drexel University. We include our perceptions of the training process in vivo, the challenges and…

  13. Evaluating Clinical Trainees in the Workplace. On Supervision, Trust and the Role of Competency Committees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, K.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the promise of competency-based medical education (CMBE) to ensure that trainees achieve desired outcomes of training, challenges have arisen in the implementation of this educational framework. Drawing on conceptual work on social cognitive theory by Bandura, Billett’s and Dorna

  14. Current status of robotic training in the UK – a trainees perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaite E Chan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The validation of robotic surgery in a growing number of operative procedures has increased its acceptance nationwide and its usage is becoming widespread. Training needs to reflect this fast paced environment to ensure that surgeons continue to progress competently and safely. Current surgical training in the UK is validated through the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme (ISCP with progression assessed through an Annual Review of Curriculum Progress (ARCP. There has been some resistance to this since its introduction and many trainees remain dissatisfied with this programme. Training in robotic surgery is currently focused through fellowships with little regular exposure to urology trainees at more junior levels. Robotic simulation provides a useful adjunct to training for both technical and non-technical skills. Its usage is particularly valuable to more inexperienced trainees but may be of limited benefit in those with more advanced skills. Training programmes such as the fundamental skills in robotic surgery (FSRS have been created to facilitate robotic training and it is likely that the future of robotic surgery training will include a combination of theoretical learning, training programmes and fellowship training.-------------------------------------------------------Cite this article as: Chan KE, Vasdev N. Current status of robotic training in the UK – a trainees perspective. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(1:02013.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0201.3

  15. Counseling psychology trainees' perceptions of training and commitments to social justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Amanda M; Spanierman, Lisa B; Greene, Jennifer C; Todd, Nathan R

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined social justice commitments of counseling psychology graduate trainees. In the quantitative portion of the study, a national sample of trainees (n = 260) completed a web-based survey assessing their commitments to social justice and related personal and training variables. Results suggested that students desired greater social justice training than what they experienced in their programs. In the qualitative portion, we used a phenomenological approach to expand and elaborate upon quantitative results. A subsample (n = 7) of trainees who identified as strong social justice activists were interviewed regarding their personal, professional, and training experiences. Eleven themes related to participants' meanings of and experiences with social justice emerged within 4 broad categories: nature of social justice, motivation for activism, role of training, and personal and professional integration. Thematic findings as well as descriptive statistics informed the selection and ordering of variables in a hierarchical regression analysis that examined predictors of social justice commitment. Results indicated that trainees' perceptions of training environment significantly predicted their social justice commitment over and above their general activist orientation and spirituality. Findings are discussed collectively, and implications for training and future research are provided.

  16. Five-factor model (Big Five) personality traits and universal-diverse orientation in counselor trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Russel L; Brossart, Daniel F; Carlozzi, Alfred F; Miville, Marie L

    2002-09-01

    In this study the authors explored the relationship between five-factor model (FFM: Big Five) personality traits (J. M. Digman, 1990; R. R. McCrae & O. P. John, 1992; J. S. Wiggins & P. D. Trappnell, 1997) and universal-diverse orientation (UDO; M. L. Miville et al., 1999) in counselor trainees. FFM traits were measured using the NEO-Personality Inventory-Revised (P. T. Costa & R. R. McCrae, 1992). Statistically significant relationships were found between UDO and one of the Big Five personality traits (Openness to Experience) in counselor trainees. Further regression analysis suggested a relationship between UDO and a particular facet of Openness to Experience, Openness to Aesthetics. This finding suggests that counselor trainees who are open to the creative expressions of others may be comfortable working with a wide variety of clients. These results suggest that counselor training that encourages experiences of aesthetic diversity in addition to an exploration of values may promote trainees' ability to work with diverse clients.

  17. Patient Safety Curriculum for Anatomic Pathology Trainees: Recommendations Based on Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samulski, Teresa D; Montone, Kathleen; LiVolsi, Virginia; Patel, Ketan; Baloch, Zubair

    2016-03-01

    Because of the unique systems and skills involved in patient care by the pathologist, it is challenging to design and implement relevant training in patient safety for pathology trainees. We propose a patient safety curriculum for anatomic pathology (AP) residents based on our institutional experience. The Hospital of the University of the Pennsylvania employs a self-reporting safety database. The occurrences from July 2013 to June 2015 recorded in this system that involved the division of AP were reviewed and cataloged as preanalytic, analytic, and postanalytic. The distribution of these occurrences was then used to create a framework for curriculum development in AP. We identified areas in which trainees are involved in the identification and prevention of common patient safety errors that occur in our AP department. Using these data-proven target areas, and employing current Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recommendations and patient safety literature, a strategy for delivering relevant patient safety training is proposed. Teaching patient safety to pathology trainees is a challenging, yet necessary, component of AP training programs. By analyzing the patient safety errors that occur in the AP department, relevant and actionable training can be developed. This provides quality professional development and improves overall performance as trainees are integrated into laboratory systems.

  18. Intercultural Experience in Online Collaboration: A Case of Polish and Romanian Teacher-Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wach, Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    This study examines intercultural learning during an email collaboration project carried out as part of an EFL didactics course attended by Polish and Romanian teacher-trainees. Email entries and the results of a final questionnaire were used as sources of data that offered insight into the intercultural dimension of the participants'…

  19. The perception of readiness for teaching profession: a case of pre-service trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straková Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-service teacher training offers various opportunities for trainees to become aware of and understand the qualities of good teaching. Towards the end of their training they should be able to identify clearly the criteria for measuring their readiness for teaching profession as well as identify their own strong and weak areas.

  20. Education in medical billing benefits both neurology trainees and academic departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Jeff L

    2014-11-11

    The objective of residency training is to produce physicians who can function independently within their chosen subspecialty and practice environment. Skills in the business of medicine, such as clinical billing, are widely applicable in academic and private practices but are not commonly addressed during formal medical education. Residency and fellowship training include limited exposure to medical billing, but our academic department's performance of these skills was inadequate: in 56% of trainee-generated outpatient notes, documentation was insufficient to sustain the chosen billing level. We developed a curriculum to improve the accuracy of documentation and coding and introduced practice changes to address our largest sources of error. In parallel, we developed tools that increased the speed and efficiency of documentation. Over 15 months, we progressively eliminated note devaluation, increased the mean level billed by trainees to nearly match that of attending physicians, and increased outpatient revenue by $34,313/trainee/year. Our experience suggests that inclusion of billing education topics into the formal medical curriculum benefits both academic medical centers and trainees. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Towards a Formative Assessment of Classroom Competencies (FACCs for postgraduate medical trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Andrew

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An assumption of clinical competency is no longer acceptable or feasible in routine clinical practice. We sought to determine the feasibility, practicability and efficacy of undertaking a formal assessment of clinical competency for all postgraduate medical trainees in a large NHS foundation trust. Methods FY1 doctors were asked to complete a questionnaire to determine prior experience and self reported confidence in performing the GMC core competencies. From this a consensus panel of key partners considered and developed an 8 station Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE circuit to assess clinical competencies in all training grade medical staff... The OSCE was then administered to all training grade doctors as part of their NHS trust induction process. Results 106 (87.6% of all trainees participated in the assessment during the first 14 days of appointment. Candidates achieved high median raw percentage scores for the majority of stations however analysis of pre defined critical errors and omissions identified important areas for concern. Performance of newly qualified FY1 doctor was significantly better than other grades for the arterial blood gas estimation and nasogastric tube insertion stations. Discussion Delivering a formal classroom assessment of clinical competencies to all trainees as part of the induction process was both feasible and useful. The assessment identified areas of concern for future training and also served to reassure as to the proficiency of trainees in undertaking the majority of core competencies.

  2. Supervision and Increasing Self-Efficacy in the Therapist-Trainee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanklin, Jennifer E.

    This work includes a discussion of the concept of self-efficacy, originally introduced by Albert Bandura, as it pertains to the therapist-trainee. Therapist self-efficacy has only recently gained attention theoretically as well as empirically. Measures used to assess the self-efficacy of the therapist are highlighted as well as factors…

  3. Learning Crafts as Practices of Masculinity. Finnish Male Trainee Teachers' Reflections and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokko, Sirpa

    2012-01-01

    Craft education in Finland has long gendered traditions that effect the present situation. The aim of this paper is to analyse the processes of learning the interlinking of crafts and gender. The analysis concentrates on male trainee teachers' experiences of craft education in comprehensive schools in Finland. Data were collected through memory…

  4. The effect of prosody teaching on developing word recognition skills for interpreter trainees. An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yenkimaleki, M.; V.J., van Heuven

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the explicit teaching of prosodic features on developing word recognition skills with interpreter trainees. Two groups of student interpreters were composed. All were native speakers of Farsi who studied English translation and interpreting at the BA

  5. Prosody teaching matters in developing speaking skills for Farsi-English interpreter trainees : An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yenkimaleki, M.; V.J., van Heuven

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of explicit teaching of prosody on developing speaking skills for Farsi-English interpreter trainees. Two groups of student interpreters were formed. All were native speakers of Farsi who studied English translation and interpreting at the BA level at

  6. The effect of prosody teaching on developing word recognition skills for interpreter trainees : An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yenkimaleki, M.; V.J., van Heuven

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the explicit teaching of prosodic features on developing word recognition skills with interpreter trainees. Two groups of student interpreters were composed. All were native speakers of Farsi who studied English translation and interpreting at the BA

  7. Special Education Trainee Teachers' Perceptions of Their Professional World: Motives, Roles, and Expectations from Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavish, Bella

    2017-01-01

    To open a window into perceptions entailed in the professional world view of special education teacher trainees, three research questions were developed: (a) What are their motives for joining the profession? (b) How do they perceive the role of the special education teacher? and (c) What are their expectations from teacher training? The research…

  8. Adjustment Notes for Apprentice and Trainee Estimates: December Quarter 2014. Support Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2015

    2015-01-01

    Apprentice and trainee data are reported by the State and Territory Training Authorities to National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) on a quarterly basis, starting at the September quarter of 1994. The set of data submitted that quarter is referred to as Collection 1. The sets of data submitted in subsequent quarters are referred…

  9. Towards a Formative Assessment of Classroom Competencies (FACCs) for postgraduate medical trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Christopher S; Hildreth, Anthony J; Fisher, Catherine; Brown, Andrew; Jones, Anita; Turner, Ruth; Boobis, Leslie

    2008-12-17

    An assumption of clinical competency is no longer acceptable or feasible in routine clinical practice. We sought to determine the feasibility, practicability and efficacy of undertaking a formal assessment of clinical competency for all postgraduate medical trainees in a large NHS foundation trust. FY1 doctors were asked to complete a questionnaire to determine prior experience and self reported confidence in performing the GMC core competencies. From this a consensus panel of key partners considered and developed an 8 station Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) circuit to assess clinical competencies in all training grade medical staff... The OSCE was then administered to all training grade doctors as part of their NHS trust induction process. 106 (87.6% of all trainees) participated in the assessment during the first 14 days of appointment. Candidates achieved high median raw percentage scores for the majority of stations however analysis of pre defined critical errors and omissions identified important areas for concern. Performance of newly qualified FY1 doctor was significantly better than other grades for the arterial blood gas estimation and nasogastric tube insertion stations. Delivering a formal classroom assessment of clinical competencies to all trainees as part of the induction process was both feasible and useful. The assessment identified areas of concern for future training and also served to reassure as to the proficiency of trainees in undertaking the majority of core competencies.

  10. How clinical supervisors develop trust in their trainees: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, K.E.; Oza, S.K.; Kogan, J.R.; Stankiewicz, C.A.; Stenfors-Hayes, T.; ten Cate, TJ; Batt, Joanne; O’Sullivan, P.S.

    2015-01-01

    Context Clinical supervisors oversee trainees’ performance while granting them increasing opportunities to work independently. Although the factors contributing to supervisors’ trust in their trainees to conduct clinical work have been identified, how the development of trust is shaped by these fact

  11. International Cultural Immersion: Assessing the Influence of a Group Intervention on Intercultural Sensitivity for Counselor Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Sejal M.; Shannonhouse, Laura; Mobley, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Scholars (e.g., Bemak & Chung, 2004) underscore the need for group workers to be culturally sensitive. One group training strategy, cultural immersion, is often employed to develop cultural sensitivity. However, no studies have utilized quasi-experimental methodologies to assess differences in cultural sensitivity between trainees that immerse…

  12. From Autopsy to Biopsy: A Metacognitive View of Lesson Planning and Teacher Trainees in ELT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Indika; Bartlett, Brendan John

    2010-01-01

    Lesson planning and implementation of those plans are complex and cognitively demanding for English Language Teacher trainees preparing for the profession. Many find it difficult to develop a lesson holistically and to maintain alignment across aims, procedural steps, and evaluation when planning and implementing a lesson. We attempted to address…

  13. The Relationship between Trainee Teachers' Views and Practices Related to Classroom Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustunel, Eda

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the relationship between English language trainee teachers' views on how to deal with large classes at the primary school level, create a positive environment in young learners' classroom and hold young learners' attention, and how far their views are reflected in classroom practice. The data were collected by means of…

  14. Burnout and quality of life among orthopaedic trainees in a modern educational programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vendeloo, S. N.; Brand, P. L. P.; Verheyen, C. C. P. M.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine quality of life and burnout among Dutch orthopaedic trainees following a modern orthopaedic curriculum, with strict compliance to a 48-hour working week. We also evaluated the effect of the clinical climate of learning on their emotional wellbeing. We assessed burnout, quality

  15. Professional Burnout, Early Maladaptive Schemas, and Physical Health in Clinical and Counselling Psychology Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeding, April; Sougleris, Christina; Reid, Corinne; van Vreeswijk, Michiel F; Hayes, Christopher; Dorrian, Jill; Simpson, Susan

    2017-05-15

    Little is known about the personal factors that increase vulnerability to job-related stress and burnout among psychologists in training. This study was based on a large international sample and aimed to explore the role of early maladaptive schemas (EMS) in predicting vulnerability to burnout, as well as attendant effects on short-term physical health, in clinical and counseling postgraduate psychology trainees. An online, quantitative, cross-sectional survey method design was used to collect self-report data that measured burnout, EMS, and physical health from 1,297 trainees. Only the unrelenting standards (US) schema predicted high burnout among trainees. The most commonly endorsed physical health symptoms were back and neck pain and tiredness, and were more severe for those experiencing high burnout. The current study contributes to our understanding of the role of the US EMS in the evolution of burnout in trainees and has implications for the development of self-awareness training programs for this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Treatment via videoconferencing: a pilot study of delivery by clinical psychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstan, Debra A; Tooth, Susan M

    2012-04-01

    This pilot study explored the outcomes of clinical psychology trainees delivering treatments via videoconferencing. A noncurrent, multiple baseline across subjects and settings. University outpatient psychology clinic. Six clients (two men and four women) with an anxiety or depressive disorder were randomly assigned to received six sessions of individual therapy (either via videoconferencing or face to face) from a male or female clinical psychology trainee. Participants provided daily ratings (0-10) of subjective distress/well-being via text messaging, and at pre-, post-, and 1 month follow-up of treatment, completed the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and the Outcome Questionnaire-45. Along with the trainees, participants also provided feedback on the therapy experience. The subjective well-being of all participants improved, and all videoconferencing participants showed a statistically and clinically significant reduction in symptomology and gains in general life functioning. Feedback comments were positive. This study suggests that there is value in clinical psychology trainees gaining experience in the delivery of treatments via videoconferencing. Further study is needed to demonstrate the potential for university clinics to deliver mental health services, via this modality, to rural and remote areas. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © 2012 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  17. Collaborative Script-Based Experiences for Bilingual Speech-Language Pathology Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedore, Lisa M.; Perez, Anita Mendez; White, Melissa D.

    2008-01-01

    The advantages and the significance of the collaborative script-based experiences for the trainees of the bilingual speech-language pathology are explained. The clinicians are shown to collaborate with expert clinicians and educators to reach common goals in such script-based experiences.

  18. The Effect of Self and In Vivo Desensitization on Counselor Trainee Anxiety and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas V.

    The rationale, planning and implementing of this research is discussed in terms of its three hypotheses: (1) that both self desensitization and in vivo desensitization would result in lower Fear Index and Anxiety Differential scores of counselor trainees just prior to communicating with a role playing client in a counseling room where they are…

  19. Trench Protection and Principles of Pipe Laying. Instructor Manual. Trainee Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborers-AGC Education and Training Fund, Pomfret Center, CT.

    This packet contains the instructor and trainee manuals for a course dealing with trench protection and principles of pipe laying. Part 1 is the instructor guide for an 80-hour course--12 classroom hours and 68 hours of hands-on exercises. Contents are as follows: a course outline; course schedule; equipment list; material and equipment checklist;…

  20. The effect of prosody teaching on developing word recognition skills for interpreter trainees : An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yenkimaleki, M.; V.J., van Heuven

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the explicit teaching of prosodic features on developing word recognition skills with interpreter trainees. Two groups of student interpreters were composed. All were native speakers of Farsi who studied English translation and interpreting at the BA leve

  1. The effect of prosody teaching on developing word recognition skills for interpreter trainees. An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yenkimaleki, M.; V.J., van Heuven

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the explicit teaching of prosodic features on developing word recognition skills with interpreter trainees. Two groups of student interpreters were composed. All were native speakers of Farsi who studied English translation and interpreting at the BA leve

  2. Computer Education and Instructional Technology Teacher Trainees' Opinions about Cloud Computing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamete, Aysen

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to show the present conditions about the usage of cloud computing in the department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) amongst teacher trainees in School of Necatibey Education, Balikesir University, Turkey. In this study, a questionnaire with open-ended questions was used. 17 CEIT teacher trainees…

  3. Live Counselor Supervision: Focus on Trainee, Acculturation and Supervisor Intervention Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenzer, Donald L.; And Others

    Supervision of the counselor trainee by a supervisor during an actual counseling session is the topic of this presentation. The first page, presented in outline form, lists six types of live supervision: bug-in-the-ear, monitoring, in vivo, phone-in, consultation, and walk-in. Also listed are differences between individual and family live…

  4. The In-Session Self-Awareness of Therapist-Trainees: Hindering or Helpful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauth, James; Williams, Elizabeth Nutt

    2005-01-01

    Although therapist self-awareness has been hailed as a critical component of psychotherapy, recent evidence suggests that therapists' in-session self-awareness may hinder rather than help the therapeutic process. The authors examined the in-session self-awareness of therapists in training (trainees) in relation to their interpersonal involvement…

  5. Gender, Self-Efficacy and Achievement among South African Technology Teacher Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, James; Parkinson, Jean

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the relationship between gender and self-efficacy in teacher trainees engaged in an electricity-related design and construction task. Quantitative data (examination scores, task assessment, and questionnaire) and qualitative data (interviews and written student reflections) were collected. There is a gender bias in student…

  6. Team-Based Simulations: Learning Ethical Conduct in Teacher Trainee Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the learning aspects of team-based simulations (TBS) through the analysis of ethical incidents experienced by 50 teacher trainees. A four-dimensional model emerged: learning to make decisions in a "supportive-forgiving" environment; learning to develop standards of care; learning to reduce misconduct; and learning to…

  7. The effect of prosody teaching on developing word recognition skills for interpreter trainees. An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yenkimaleki, M.; V.J., van Heuven

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the explicit teaching of prosodic features on developing word recognition skills with interpreter trainees. Two groups of student interpreters were composed. All were native speakers of Farsi who studied English translation and interpreting at the BA leve

  8. Prosody teaching matters in developing speaking skills for Farsi-English interpreter trainees : An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yenkimaleki, M.; V.J., van Heuven

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the effect of explicit teaching of prosody on developing speaking skills for Farsi-English interpreter trainees. Two groups of student interpreters were formed. All were native speakers of Farsi who studied English translation and interpreting at the BA level at Tafres

  9. Facilitating Trainees' Multicultural Development and Social Justice Advocacy through a Refugee/Immigrant Mental Health Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johanna E.; Schale, Codi L.; Khamphakdy-Brown, Supavan

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study explored trainees' experiences in an outreach program for refugee/immigrant women to examine if those experiences facilitated the development of multicultural competency and social justice advocacy. Twelve students were interviewed, and their responses yielded 3 categories: development of cultural knowledge,…

  10. A Phenomenological Exploration of the Experiences of Master's Level Counselor Trainees in Expressive Arts Group Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Martha Howe

    2010-01-01

    Expressive arts group supervision is the use of music, stories, movement, poetry or prose, role-play or psychodrama, art, guided imagery, or play to help trainees develop reflective skills (Wilkins, 1995), express thoughts and feelings (Knill, Levine & Levine, 2005; Lahad, 2000), develop new perspectives (Gladding, 2005), increase communication…

  11. Primary Mathematics Trainee Teacher Confidence and Its Relationship to Mathematical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine trainee primary school teachers' confidence in their mathematical content knowledge (MCK) and confidence to teach specific primary mathematics concepts (mathematics pedagogical content knowledge --MPCK) which was correlated to their actual MCK on specific tasks. For this correlational study survey and test…

  12. Perceptions of the Value of Collective Worship amongst Trainee Teachers in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogra, Imran

    2016-01-01

    This article draws on a survey conducted with primary school trainee teachers in a university in England. The survey set out to investigate their knowledge, understanding and their view about the role that Collective Worship (CW) plays in schools. A sample of 125 participants contributed to the findings of this inquiry by completing a…

  13. What Do Secondary Trainee Teachers Say about Teaching as a Profession of Their "Choice" in Malawi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtika, Peter; Gates, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This interview-based qualitative study is concerned with the recruitment of secondary teachers in Malawi. This study shows a range of perspectives for pursuing a teacher training course: failure to follow a desired career, springboard to other careers, to upgrade, and teaching out of vocation. It shows that trainee teachers held a range of images…

  14. Dental foundation year 2 training in oral and maxillofacial surgery units - the trainees' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildan, T; Amin, J; Bowe, D; Gerber, B; Saeed, N R

    2013-10-01

    Most dental foundation year 2 (DF2) training takes place in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) units. We did a survey of DF2 trainees in these units by telephone interviews and an online questionnaire to find out about their experience of training and their career aspirations. A total of 123 responded, which is roughly 41% of the total estimated number of trainees. Trainees applied for these posts mainly to improve their dentoalveolar skills (50%), and this was cited as the best aspect of the training. Most (81%) were on-call at night and this was generally thought to be a valuable training experience (77%), but 20% thought that it was the worst aspect of the job. Most did not regret taking up the post although the experience had caused 75% to alter their intentions about their future career; general dental practice was the commonest choice. In conclusion, trainees are generally satisfied with their training and these positions have guided their choices about future careers.

  15. Views and Experiences of Malaysian Family Medicine Trainees of Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Pauline Siew Mei; Tan, Sing Yee; Liew, Su May

    2016-11-01

    Sociocultural factors have been shown to be important influencers of sexual health and sexuality. Hence, the aim of our study was to explore the views and experiences of family medicine trainees regarding female sexual dysfunction (FSD) with a focus on the barriers and facilitators towards the initiation of conversation on this topic. A qualitative study design involving semi-structured focus group discussions (FGDs) was conducted with 19 family medicine trainees in Malaysia. The conceptual framework used was based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. Thematic approach was used to analyze the data. Participants perceived FSD as being uncommon and unimportant. According to our participants, patients often presented with indirect complaints, and doctors were not proactive in asking about FSD. Three main barriers were identified: doctor factors, perceived patient factors, and system factors. Lack of confidence, knowledge, experience, time, and embarrassment were the key barriers identified at the doctors' level. Lack of awareness, among patients regarding FSD, and local cultural and religious norms were the perceived patient barriers. System barriers were lack of time and privacy. Various facilitators, such as continuous medical education and public forums, were suggested as means to encourage family medicine trainees to initiate discussion on sexual matters during consultations. In conclusion, family medicine trainees found it difficult to initiate conversation on FSD with patients. Interventions to encourage conversation on FSD should target this and other identified barriers.

  16. Predicting Ratings of Counselor Trainee Empathy with Self-Report Anxiety Measures and Skin Conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, James T.; Giesen, J. Martin

    1982-01-01

    Investigated the degree of relationship between clients' and judges' ratings of counselor trainee (N=29) empathy and self-report anxiety and skin conductance measures. Results indicated the usefulness of anxiety measures to predict counselor empathy is predicated on the criterion for rating counselor empathy. (RC)

  17. Workplace Learning Impact: An Analysis of French-Secondary-Trainee Teachers' Perception of their Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosnefroy, Laurent; Buhot, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how French-secondary-trainee teachers perceive their professional development over their year-long training. Two research questions are addressed: How prominent is workplace learning in teaching competencies acquisition? Is there a relationship between learning modes and the kind of teaching competencies to be acquired? Four…

  18. Cyclical Nature of Problem-Solving Process: Case Study of Trainees in a Teachers' Training Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Koay Chen; Saleh, Fatimah

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the mathematical problem-solving process of trainee teachers in a teachers' training institute. This research adopts a constructivist perspective that views learning mathematics as a process of constructing meaningful representation and knowledge as being constructed by the individual. The research methodology employs the case…

  19. Flight Turbulence: The Stormy Professional Trajectory of Trainee Early Years' Teachers in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This paper documents trainees' "flight turbulence" as they negotiate the complexities that lie between "the self" and the securing of Early Years Teaching Status in England. Early Years Teachers, besides teaching, are expected to lead improvements to the quality of provision. However, drawing on interview data, an impasse is…

  20. Acute Respiratory Disease in US Army Trainees 3 Years after Reintroduction of Adenovirus Vaccine1

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormic, Zachary D.; Gaydos, Joel C.; Hawksworth, Anthony W.; Jordan, Nikki N.

    2017-01-01

    The 1999 cessation of vaccination against adenovirus types 4 and 7 among US Army trainees resulted in reemergence of acute respiratory disease (ARD) outbreaks. The 2011 implementation of a replacement vaccine led to dramatic and sustained decreases in ARD cases, supporting continuation of vaccination in this population at high risk for ARD. PMID:27748651

  1. VR-simulation cataract surgery in non-experienced trainees: evolution of surgical skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Per; Erngrund, Markus; Skarman, Eva; Nordh, Leif; Laurell, Carl-Gustaf

    2011-03-01

    Conclusion: The current data imply that the performance index as defined herein is a valid measure of the performance of a trainee using the virtual reality phacoemulsification simulator. Further, the performance index increase linearly with measurement cycles for less than five measurement cycles. To fully use the learning potential of the simulator more than four measurement cycles are required. Materials and methods: Altogether, 10 trainees were introduced to the simulator by an instructor and then performed a training program including four measurement cycles with three iterated measurements of the simulation at the end of each cycle. The simulation characteristics was standardized and defined in 14 parameters. The simulation was measured separately for the sculpting phase in 21 variables, and for the evacuation phase in 22 variables. A performance index based on all measured variables was estimated for the sculpting phase and the evacuation phase, respectively, for each measurement and the three measurements for each cycle were averaged. Finally, the performance as a function of measurement cycle was estimated for each trainee with regression, assuming a straight line. The estimated intercept and inclination coefficients, respectively, were finally averaged for all trainees. Results: The performance increased linearly with the number of measurement cycles both for the sculpting and for the evacuation phase.

  2. Co-Relates between Anxiety and Academic Achievement in Teacher Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Shivani; Sharma, Savita

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the major predictors of academic performance. Teacher trainees with anxiety disorder display a passive attitude in their studies such as lack of interest in learning, poor performance in exams, and on lesson plans & assignments. This research observes the relationship between level of anxiety and academic achievement of…

  3. Pengaruh Trainee terhadap Kinerja Karyawan di Unit Front Office di Hotel X Ancol Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliana

    2011-04-01

    hotel. Officers in the unit front office should be able to well communicate and able to provide the needed of the guest. Because of limited number of employees, the trainees are very instrumental in petrified duties and responsibilities in the front office. Its presence will bring influence to the performance of employees in the front office.

  4. Trainees versus Staff: Exploring Counseling Outcomes in a College Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilagan, Guy; Vinson, Mike; Sharp, Julia L.; Havice, Pamela; Ilagan, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Investigators compared counseling outcomes among nonpaid graduate-level trainees and professional staff at a college counseling center. Counseling outcomes for 331 college student participants were measured using the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 (OQ45.2), employing a pretest--posttest design. The two groups of service providers did not differ…

  5. Evaluating Clinical Trainees in the Workplace. On Supervision, Trust and the Role of Competency Committees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, K.E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the promise of competency-based medical education (CMBE) to ensure that trainees achieve desired outcomes of training, challenges have arisen in the implementation of this educational framework. Drawing on conceptual work on social cognitive theory by Bandura, Billett’s and

  6. Computer Education and Instructional Technology Teacher Trainees' Opinions about Cloud Computing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamete, Aysen

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to show the present conditions about the usage of cloud computing in the department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) amongst teacher trainees in School of Necatibey Education, Balikesir University, Turkey. In this study, a questionnaire with open-ended questions was used. 17 CEIT teacher trainees…

  7. Workplace Learning Impact: An Analysis of French-Secondary-Trainee Teachers' Perception of their Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosnefroy, Laurent; Buhot, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This study explores how French-secondary-trainee teachers perceive their professional development over their year-long training. Two research questions are addressed: How prominent is workplace learning in teaching competencies acquisition? Is there a relationship between learning modes and the kind of teaching competencies to be acquired? Four…

  8. Trainee Hairdressers' Uses of Facebook as a Community of Gendered Literacy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Julia

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents research into how four female trainee hairdressers use Facebook. The participants are friends, attending college in the north of England. In this work I was interested in participants' presentations of self as presented through their Facebook activities. This work draws on New Literacy Studies to consider the written texts and…

  9. Reviewing Personality Compliance Level of Trainee Music Teachers in Terms of Music Genres, and Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirgon, Yuksel

    2014-01-01

    In this study, personality compliance levels are examined according to tonality and tempo variables, which are acquired in consequence of analysis of music genres and pieces to which fine arts faculty, trainee music teachers mostly listen. A total of 31 students participated in the study. Data acquired from Hacettepe Personality Inventory (HPI)…

  10. The delivery of general paediatric surgery in Ireland: a survey of higher surgical trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2012-12-01

    The delivery of general paediatric surgery is changing in Ireland. Fewer paediatric surgical procedures are being performed by newly appointed consultant general surgeons, resulting in increased referrals to the specialist paediatric surgeons of uncomplicated general paediatric surgical problems. We surveyed current higher surgical trainees about their views on provision of paediatric surgical services.

  11. Influenza vaccine effectiveness among US military basic trainees, 2005-06 season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Jennifer K; Hawksworth, Anthony W; Myers, Christopher; Irvine, Marina; Ryan, Margaret A K; Russell, Kevin L

    2007-04-01

    Virtually all US military basic trainees receive seasonal influenza vaccine. Surveillance data collected from December 2005 through March 2006 were evaluated to estimate effectiveness of the influenza vaccine at 6 US military basic training centers. Vaccine effectiveness against laboratory-confirmed influenza was 92% (95% confidence interval 85%-96%).

  12. Context, Agency and Professional Workplace Learning: Trainee Accountants in Large and Small Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the ways in which organisational context and individual agency interact (co-participate) to shape the workplace learning of graduate trainee accountants, and to examine the role of firm size in conditioning this interaction. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative, comparative approach was…

  13. Choice of antipsychotic treatment by European psychiatry trainees: are decisions based on evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauhar Sameer

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the factors influencing treatment choice in psychosis, the majority of this work being conducted with specialists (consultant in psychiatry. We sought to examine trainees' choices of treatment for psychosis if they had to prescribe it for themselves, their patients, and factors influencing decision-making. Methods Cross-sectional, semi-structured questionnaire-based study. Results Of the 726 respondents (response rate = 66%, the majority chose second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs if they had to prescribe it for themselves (n = 530, 93% or for their patients (n = 546, 94%. The main factor influencing choice was perceived efficacy, 84.8% (n = 475 of trainees stating this was the most important factor for the patient, and 77.8% (n = 404 stating this was the most important factor for their own treatment. Trainees with knowledge of trials questioning use of SGAs (CATIE, CUtLASS, TEOSS were more likely to choose second-generation antipsychotics than those without knowledge of these trials (χ2 = 3.943; p = 0.047; O.R. = 2.11; 95% C.I. = 1.0-4.48. Regarding psychotherapy, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT was the most popular choice for self (33.1%; n = 240 and patient (30.9%; n = 224. Trainees were significantly more likely to prefer some form of psychotherapy for themselves rather than patients (χ2 = 9.98; p Conclusions Trainees are more likely to choose second-generation antipsychotic medication for patients and themselves. Despite being aware of evidence that suggests otherwise, they predominantly base these choices on perceived efficacy.

  14. Analysis of cricoid pressure application: anaesthetic trainee doctors vs. nursing anaesthetic assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Nurul Haizam; Teo, Rufinah; Izaham, Azarinah; Tang, Shereen; Mohamad Yusof, Aliza; Abdul Manap, Norsidah

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of anaesthetic trainee doctors compared to nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage, applying the appropriate cricoid pressure and producing an adequate laryngeal inlet view. Eighty-five participants, 42 anaesthetic trainee doctors and 43 nursing anaesthetic assistants, were asked to complete a set of questionnaires which included the correct amount of force to be applied to the cricoid cartilage. They were then asked to identify the cricoid cartilage and apply the cricoid pressure on an upper airway manikin placed on a weighing scale, and the pressure was recorded. Subsequently they applied cricoid pressure on actual anaesthetized patients following rapid sequence induction. Details regarding the cricoid pressure application and the Cormack-Lehane classification of the laryngeal view were recorded. The anaesthetic trainee doctors were significantly better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage (95.2% vs. 55.8%, p=0.001). However, both groups were equally poor in the knowledge about the amount of cricoid pressure force required (11.9% vs. 9.3% respectively) and in the correct application of cricoid pressure (16.7% vs. 20.9% respectively). The three-finger technique was performed by 85.7% of the anaesthetic trainee doctors and 65.1% of the nursing anaesthetic assistants (p=0.03). There were no significant differences in the Cormack-Lehane view between both groups. The anaesthetic trainee doctors were better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in cricoid cartilage identification but both groups were equally poor in their knowledge and application of cricoid pressure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. [Analysis of cricoid pressure application: anaesthetic trainee doctors vs. nursing anaesthetic assistants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Nurul Haizam; Teo, Rufinah; Izaham, Azarinah; Tang, Shereen; Mohamad Yusof, Aliza; Abdul Manap, Norsidah

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of anaesthetic trainee doctors compared to nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage, applying the appropriate cricoid pressure and producing an adequate laryngeal inlet view. Eighty-five participants, 42 anaesthetic trainee doctors and 43 nursing anaesthetic assistants, were asked to complete a set of questionnaires which included the correct amount of force to be applied to the cricoid cartilage. They were then asked to identify the cricoid cartilage and apply the cricoid pressure on an upper airway manikin placed on a weighing scale, and the pressure was recorded. Subsequently they applied cricoid pressure on actual anaesthetized patients following rapid sequence induction. Details regarding the cricoid pressure application and the Cormack-Lehane classification of the laryngeal view were recorded. The anaesthetic trainee doctors were significantly better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage (95.2% vs. 55.8%, p=0.001). However, both groups were equally poor in the knowledge about the amount of cricoid pressure force required (11.9% vs. 9.3% respectively) and in the correct application of cricoid pressure (16.7% vs. 20.9% respectively). The three-finger technique was performed by 85.7% of the anaesthetic trainee doctors and 65.1% of the nursing anaesthetic assistants (p=0.03). There were no significant differences in the Cormack-Lehane view between both groups. The anaesthetic trainee doctors were better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in cricoid cartilage identification but both groups were equally poor in their knowledge and application of cricoid pressure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of cricoid pressure application: anaesthetic trainee doctors vs. nursing anaesthetic assistants

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    Nurul Haizam Yahaya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the ability of anaesthetic trainee doctors compared to nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage, applying the appropriate cricoid pressure and producing an adequate laryngeal inlet view. METHODS: Eighty-five participants, 42 anaesthetic trainee doctors and 43 nursing anaesthetic assistants, were asked to complete a set of questionnaires which included the correct amount of force to be applied to the cricoid cartilage. They were then asked to identify the cricoid cartilage and apply the cricoid pressure on an upper airway manikin placed on a weighing scale, and the pressure was recorded. Subsequently they applied cricoid pressure on actual anaesthetized patients following rapid sequence induction. Details regarding the cricoid pressure application and the Cormack-Lehane classification of the laryngeal view were recorded. RESULTS: The anaesthetic trainee doctors were significantly better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in identifying the cricoid cartilage (95.2% vs. 55.8%, p = 0.001. However, both groups were equally poor in the knowledge about the amount of cricoid pressure force required (11.9% vs. 9.3% respectively and in the correct application of cricoid pressure (16.7% vs. 20.9% respectively. The three-finger technique was performed by 85.7% of the anaesthetic trainee doctors and 65.1% of the nursing anaesthetic assistants (p = 0.03. There were no significant differences in the Cormack-Lehane view between both groups. CONCLUSION: The anaesthetic trainee doctors were better than the nursing anaesthetic assistants in cricoid cartilage identification but both groups were equally poor in their knowledge and application of cricoid pressure.

  17. Choice of antipsychotic treatment by European psychiatry trainees: are decisions based on evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhar, Sameer; Guloksuz, Sinan; Andlauer, Olivier; Lydall, Greg; Marques, João Gama; Mendonca, Luis; Dumitrescu, Iolanda; Roventa, Costin; De Vriendt, Nele; Van Zanten, Jeroen; Riese, Florian; Nwachukwu, Izu; Nawka, Alexander; Psaras, Raphael; Masson, Neil; Krishnadas, Rajeev; Volpe, Umberto

    2012-03-30

    Little is known about the factors influencing treatment choice in psychosis, the majority of this work being conducted with specialists (consultant) in psychiatry. We sought to examine trainees' choices of treatment for psychosis if they had to prescribe it for themselves, their patients, and factors influencing decision-making. Cross-sectional, semi-structured questionnaire-based study. Of the 726 respondents (response rate = 66%), the majority chose second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs) if they had to prescribe it for themselves (n = 530, 93%) or for their patients (n = 546, 94%). The main factor influencing choice was perceived efficacy, 84.8% (n = 475) of trainees stating this was the most important factor for the patient, and 77.8% (n = 404) stating this was the most important factor for their own treatment. Trainees with knowledge of trials questioning use of SGAs (CATIE, CUtLASS, TEOSS) were more likely to choose second-generation antipsychotics than those without knowledge of these trials (χ2 = 3.943; p = 0.047; O.R. = 2.11; 95% C.I. = 1.0-4.48). Regarding psychotherapy, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) was the most popular choice for self (33.1%; n = 240) and patient (30.9%; n = 224). Trainees were significantly more likely to prefer some form of psychotherapy for themselves rather than patients (χ2 = 9.98; p < 0,002; O.R. = 1.54; 95% CIs = 1.18-2.0). Trainees are more likely to choose second-generation antipsychotic medication for patients and themselves. Despite being aware of evidence that suggests otherwise, they predominantly base these choices on perceived efficacy.

  18. Professional growth of trainees: applying teacher training models to the training of GPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriel, George; Gavriel, Jennifer

    2011-10-01

    Study of professional growth is useful for reflective purposes at any time during a career. The concept of known knowns and unknowns with a training twist can be used to summarise the overall stages of any trainee. At the start of vocational training the trainee does not know what they do not know, they have not yet recognised how much they have to learn. This happens in the second stage (that could be equated to survival) when they begin to understand the vast array of skills they must develop to make it look easy. With time and practice they will reach the point where they know what they have to do--not always getting it right but then who does? Finally, and it is particularly important that trainers recognise this, an individual will reach the point where everything is so automatic they are no longer aware of the intricacies of the skills they have acquired. This is where most trainers, both for teachers and GPs, find themselves and this can be frustrating for both trainee and trainer as they find they are unable to communicate effectively. A good trainer will spend time dissecting and 'unlearning' their skills so they are able to teach their trainees successfully. Trainees, meanwhile, must realise that, one day, they will have their own unknown knowns, but they cannot expect it to happen overnight or without substantial effort. In moving forward from our training it is how we deal with repeated survival stages that determines if we can keep doing the job, it is how we deal with the plateau that determines if we will be any good at it--effective on-the-job training leads to lifelong on-the-job learning.

  19. Assessing the Nontechnical Skills of Surgical Trainees: Views of the Theater Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jundi, Wissam; Wild, Jonathan; Ritchie, Judith; Daniels, Sarah; Robertson, Eleanor; Beard, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the views of members of theater teams regarding the proposed introduction of a workplace-based assessment of nontechnical skills of surgeons (NOTSS) into the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme in the United Kingdom. In addition, the previous training and familiarity of the members of the surgical theater team with the concept and assessment of NOTSS would be evaluated. A regional survey of members of theater teams (consultant surgeons, anesthetists, scrub nurses, and trainees) was performed at 1 teaching and 2 district general hospitals in South Yorkshire. There were 160 respondents corresponding to a response rate of 81%. The majority (77%) were not aware of the NOTSS assessment tool with only 9% of respondents reporting to have previously used the NOTSS tool and just 3% having received training in NOTSS assessment. Overall, 81% stated that assessing NOTSS was as important as assessing technical skills. Trainees attributed less importance to nontechnical skills than the other groups (p ≤ 0.016). Although opinion appears divided as to whether the presence of a consultant surgeon in theater could potentially make it difficult to assess a trainee's leadership skills and decision-making capabilities, overall 60% agree that the routine use of NOTSS assessment would enhance safety in the operating theater and 80% agree that the NOTSS tool should be introduced to assess the nontechnical skills of trainees in theater. However, a significantly lower proportion of trainees (45%) agreed on the latter compared with the other groups (p = 0.001). Our survey demonstrates acceptability among the theater team for the introduction of the NOTSS tool into the surgical curriculum. However, lack of familiarity highlights the importance of faculty training for assessors before such an introduction. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Impact of Expert Visual Guidance on Trainee Visual Search Strategy, Visual Attention and Motor Skills

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    Daniel Richard Leff

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive and robotic surgery changes the capacity for surgical mentors to guide their trainees with the control customary to open surgery. This neuroergonomic study aims to assess a Collaborative Gaze Channel (CGC; which detects trainer gaze-behaviour and displays the point of regard to the trainee. A randomised crossover study was conducted in which twenty subjects performed a simulated robotic surgical task necessitating collaboration either with verbal (control condition or visual guidance with CGC (study condition. Trainee occipito-parietal (O-P cortical function was assessed with optical topography (OT and gaze-behaviour was evaluated using video-oculography. Performance during gaze-assistance was significantly superior [biopsy number: (mean ± SD: control=5·6±1·8 vs. CGC=6·6±2·0; p< 0.05] and was associated with significantly lower O-P cortical activity [∆HbO2 mMol x cm [median (IQR] control = 2.5 (12.0 vs. CGC 0.63 (11.2, p < 0.001]. A random effect model confirmed the association between guidance mode and O-P excitation. Network cost and global efficiency and global efficiency were not significantly influenced by guidance mode. A gaze channel enhances performance, modulates visual search, and alleviates the burden in brain centres subserving visual attention and does not induce changes in the trainee's O-P functional network observable with the current OT technique. The results imply that through visual guidance, attentional resources may be liberated, potentially improving the capability trainees to attend to other safety critical events during the procedure.

  1. The impact of the European Working Time Regulations on Ophthalmic Specialist Training--a national trainee survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gallagher, M K; Lewis, G; Mercieca, K; Moutray, T

    2013-01-01

    To assess ophthalmic trainees' perspective of the impact of the European Working Time Regulations (EWTR) on their training. All trainees in ophthalmology in the UK were emailed a link to an electronic survey asking about their experiences of the EWTR. 324 trainees (46% of those invited) responded to the survey. 44.4% of trainees reported that their posts were compliant with the EWTR. 40.7% felt that training had been adversely affected. 49.1% thought that ophthalmic trainees should opt out of the EWTR to work more than 48 h per week, with 57 the mean number of hours suggested appropriate. Many ophthalmic trainees in the United Kingdom are working in rotas which are not compliant with the European Working Time Directive. Many trainees feel that implementation of the EWTD has had a negative effect on training and feel it would be acceptable to work a higher number of hours per week. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pick up a book or "google it?" a survey of radiologist and trainee-preferred references and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhauser, Blake D; Liaw, Kevin; McDonald, Robert J; Thomas, Kristen B; Hudson, Kathleen T; Kallmes, David F

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate radiologist and trainee-preferred sources for solving imaging questions. The institutional review board determined this study to be exempt from informed consent requirements. Web-based surveys were distributed to radiology staff and trainees at 16 academic institutions. Surveys queried ownership and use of tablet computers and habits of utilization of various electronic and hardcopy resources for general reference. For investigating specific cases, respondents identified a single primary resource. Comparisons were performed using Fisher's exact test. For staff, use of Google and online journals was nearly universal for general imaging questions (93 [103/111] and 94 % [104/111], respectively). For trainees, Google and resident-generated study materials were commonly utilized for such questions (82 [111/135] and 74 % [100/135], respectively). For specific imaging questions, online journals and PubMed were rarely chosen as a primary resource; the most common primary resources were STATdx for trainees and Google for staff (44 [55/126] and 52 % [51/99], respectively). Use of hard copy journals was nearly absent among trainees. Sixty percent of trainees (78/130) own a tablet computer versus 41 % of staff (46/111; p = 0.005), and 71 % (55/78) of those trainees reported at least weekly use of radiology-specific tablet applications, compared to 48 % (22/46) of staff (p books but have replaced hard copy journals with online resources.

  3. Learning, technology and intellectual property: a survey of the philosophies and preferences of our trainees and peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Maria A; Back, Susan J; Scanlon, Mary H; Delgado, Jorge; Darge, Kassa; Reid, Janet R

    2016-12-01

    Increasing workloads threaten the quality of teaching in academic radiology practices. There is a wealth of unfiltered educational resources for radiology on the internet. As a digital native, today's radiology trainee may have differing opinions from teachers about learning and intellectual property. To identify the preferences and philosophies regarding learning, technology and intellectual property toward the future development of an innovative radiology curriculum. An electronic survey with 22 questions was sent to 2,010 members of the Society for Pediatric Radiology and 100 radiology trainees. Three hundred sixty-one of the 2,110 surveys were returned. All questions were completed in 342 surveys. Fifty-three respondents were trainees (residents and fellows) and 289 respondents were radiologists (teachers). Time needed for a single learning activity in both groups is teachers spend less time (P=0.007). The preferred learning environments were point-of-care and outside work hours for both groups. Ideal lecture durations were 31-45 min for trainees and 21-30 min for teachers (P=0.001). Adoption of new technology showed late majority and laggard trends for both groups (P=0.296). Interest in gadgets was greater in trainees (17%) than teachers (2%) (Pteachers (61%) (P=0.008). More trainees (61%) than teachers (42%) would not charge money for educational materials (P=0.028); 27% versus 13%, respectively, disagreed with dissemination of those materials beyond the institution (P=0.013). While millennial trainees are adult learners with a stronger comfort with technology, learning styles of trainees and teachers are more similar than was previously believed. Trainees and teachers hold conflicting philosophies about intellectual property. Results herein speak favorably for revising our teaching portfolio to include practical learning materials of short duration available at point-of-care.

  4. Flipping The Practice Based Pathology Laboratory-Can It Support Development Of Practitioner Capability For Trainee Pathologists in Gynaecological Cytopathology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sara; Ganesan, Raji; Martin, Jan

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the role of 'flipping', the practice-based pathology laboratory and classroom to support the development of trainee pathologist practitioners' in the field of gynaecological cytopathology, addressing development of their knowledge and practical application in the clinical setting. Content-rich courses traditionally involve lecture led delivery which restricts tutors from adopting approaches that support greater student engagement in the topic area and application of knowledge to practice. We investigated the role of 'flipping', the practice-based pathology laboratory and classroom where 'virtual lectures' were accessed outside of 'class time' allowing more time for students to engage in active learning under the supervision of a consultant histopathologist. 'Flipping' was used to support two gynaecological cytopathology training courses with cohorts of eight trainee pathologists on the first course and six on the second. Lectures were made available to the trainees to watch before attending the workshops. The workshops consisted of group activities and individual practical exercises allowing trainees to review and report on patient practice cases with the support of their peers and tutors. Focus group sessions were held after each course, allowing trainee pathologists to reflect on their experiences. Discussions were transcribed and thematic analysis was used to capture key themes discussed by the trainees. Trainees' identified that 'flipping' provided them with more time during face-to-face sessions, enabling a greater depth of questioning and engagement with the consultant histopathologists. Having already watched the lectures, trainees were able to attend the sessions having identified areas in which they needed additional support and development. Trainee pathologists reported they had more time to concentrate on developing their skills and practise under the guidance of the consultant histopathologists so developing their capability in

  5. Specialist training in obstetrics and gynaecology: a survey on work-life balance and stress among trainees in UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaratinam, S; Yanamandra, S R; Deb, S; Coomarasamy, A

    2006-05-01

    The object of this study was to evaluate perceptions about work-life balance and levels of stress in obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in the UK. This was a questionnaire survey conducted at the National Obstetric and Gynaecology Specialist Registrar Meeting (SpROGs 2004, Birmingham, UK). A total of 190 trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology attended the meeting. Trainees at the meeting were given a questionnaire to fill in regarding their perception of work-life balance, stress at work and their attitude to training in obstetrics and gynaecology. The response rate was 128/190 (67%). Half of the trainees (64/128, 50%) felt that they had achieved satisfactory work-life balance. There was a trend towards more men achieving this balance compared with women (25/42 (60%) vs 38/83 (46%), p = 0.19). Unsatisfactory social life (82%) and scarce time with the family (74%) were cited as the most common reasons for not achieving a satisfactory work-life balance. More than two-thirds of the trainees (83/128, 65%) found their work moderately or very stressful. Senior trainees (years 4 or more of specialist training) found work more stressful than junior trainees (years 1 - 3 of specialist training) (29/35 (83%) vs 54/93 (58%), p = 0.01). However, 77/128 (60%) of trainees would still recommend a career in obstetrics and gynaecology to medical students. A majority (85/128, 66%) claimed that they would choose obstetrics and gynaecology again if given a second chance. A large number of trainees (110/128, 86%) were looking forward to their future in this field. In spite of the high levels of perceived work-life imbalance and stress at work, most trainees would choose the same specialty given another chance and would recommend the same to others, indicating a certain level of satisfaction with the specialty. However, our study shows that improvements in the working lives of obstetrics and gynaecology trainees are still needed, especially given the current context of difficulty with

  6. The supervised curricular internship in the initial training for teaching: the meanings of trainees as actors in the process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Rinaldi Bisconsini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to analyze the role of supervised curricular internship in initial teacher education, in the trainees perspective. The research is descriptive and qualitative characteristic. Had as a tool for data collection a questionnaire with closed and open questions. 130 trainees participated in six degree courses of an institution of Paraná Public Higher Education. The results indicate a process of high complexity on the structure and development of supervised curricular internship. The trainees hoped that the curriculum components establish closer to the requirements for the exercise of the teaching profession. There was no evidence is sufficient interaction between the actors involved.

  7. A Novel Pain Interprofessional Education Strategy for Trainees: Assessing Impact on Interprofessional Competencies and Pediatric Pain Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith P. Hunter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Health care trainees/students lack knowledge and skills for the comprehensive clinical assessment and management of pain. Moreover, most teaching has been limited to classroom settings within each profession.

  8. Trainee teachers’ experiences using contextual teaching and learning: Implications for incorporation of indigenous knowledge in instructional design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzwangowenyu Mukwambo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Some schools do not have local formal work environments enabling learners to interact with members in community of practice. This is noticeable in schools in developing countries, including the north eastern Zambezi Region of Namibia, where the study took place. To close the gap in which trainee science and mathematics teachers who were the participants failed to contextualize teaching and learning (CTL using formal work situations, this qualitative study investigated use of Indigenous Knowledge (IK practices as an alternative. A cultural group presented IK practices which trainees observed and participated. Pottery making, an IK practice, reflects Science knowledge which teachers sometimes shun. Audio-visual, lesson plans and interviews were also used to generate data. To intervene Cultural historical activity theory (CHAT was used as a tool. Revelations are trainee teachers in rural schools initially viewed CTL designing as impossible. Further, trainees engaged with CTL through allowing IK to compliment modern science and were equipped with pedagogical tools.

  9. Diagnosis and management of acute kidney injury: deficiencies in the knowledge base of non-specialist, trainee medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniraju, T M; Lillicrap, M H; Horrocks, J L; Fisher, J M; Clark, R M W; Kanagasundaram, N S

    2012-06-01

    Enhanced education has been recommended to improve non-specialist management of acute kidney injury (AKI). However, the extent of any gaps in knowledge has yet to be defined fully. The aim of this study was to assess understanding of trainee doctors in the prevention, diagnosis and initial management of AKI. An anonymised questionnaire was completed by hospital-based trainees across Newcastle Renal Unit's catchment area. Responses were evaluated against a panel of pre-defined ideal answers. The median score was 9.5 out of 20 (n = 146; range 0-17) and was lower in more junior trainees. Fifty percent of trainees could not define AKI, 30% could not name more than two risk factors for AKI and 37% could not name even one indication for renal referral. These serious gaps in knowledge highlight the need for enhanced education aimed at all training grades. Organisational changes may also be required to optimise patient safety.

  10. The Benefit of the Smartphone in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: Smartphone Use Among Maxillofacial Surgery Trainees and iPhone Apps for the Maxillofacial Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Elinor; Payne, Karl Frederick Braekkan; Ahmed, Nabeela; Goodson, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    The use of smartphones has soared among healthcare professionals in recent years, with estimated figures reporting that the majority of clinicians own and use smartphones in the workplace. Smartphones allow the clinician to carry textbooks in their pocket, write documents on the move and use email and internet to enhance productivity and clinical decision making. These advances in smartphone technology have enabled access to healthcare information for the clinician and transfer of data between team members, giving rise to the phenomenon of telemedicine. With the ability to instantly transfer clinical data to the off-site surgeon, combined with purpose-built medical apps, the smartphone is rapidly becoming an invaluable tool for the modern surgeon. Many studies have linked the benefits of smartphones and apps in other surgical specialities, but no article to date has highlighted the merits and full scope of this technology to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. We report that 94 % of British maxillofacial surgery trainees own a smartphone, with 61 % owning an iPhone. 89 % of trainees questioned had downloaded medical apps and used them regularly during clinical activities. We discuss the clinical application of the smartphone in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery and review a list of useful and relevant apps for the modern maxillofacial surgeon using the iPhone as an example platform.

  11. Are Surgeons Born or Made? A Comparison of Personality Traits and Learning Styles Between Surgical Trainees and Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Ryan A; Cope, Alexandra C

    2016-01-01

    Medical students and surgical trainees differ considerably in both their preferential learning styles and personality traits. This study compares the personality profiles and learning styles of surgical trainees with a cohort of medical students specifically intent on pursuing a surgical career. A cross-sectional study was conducted contrasting surgical trainees with medical students specifying surgical career intent. The 50-item International Personality Item Pool Big-Five Factor Marker (FFM) questionnaire was used to score 5 personality domains (extraversion, conscientiousness, agreeableness, openness to experience, and neuroticism). The 24-item Learning Style Inventory (LSI) Questionnaire was used to determine the preferential learning styles (visual, auditory, or tactile). χ(2) Analysis and independent samples t-test were used to compare LSI and FFM scores, respectively. Surgical trainees from several UK surgical centers were contrasted to undergraduate medical students. A total of 53 medical students who had specifically declared desire to pursue a surgical career and were currently undertaking an undergraduate intercalated degree in surgical sciences were included and contrasted to 37 UK core surgical trainees (postgraduate years 3-4). The LSI questionnaire was completed by 53 students and 37 trainees. FFM questionnaire was completed by 29 medical students and 34 trainees. No significant difference for learning styles preference was detected between the 2 groups (p = 0.139), with the visual modality being the preferred learning style for both students and trainees (69.8% and 54.1%, respectively). Neuroticism was the only personality trait to differ significantly between the 2 groups, with medical students scoring significantly higher than trainees (2.9 vs. 2.6, p = 0.03). Medical students intent on pursuing a surgical career exhibit similar personality traits and learning styles to surgical trainees, with both groups preferring the visual learning modality

  12. Simulating Four Essential Conversations with Hematology/Oncology Trainees: a Qualitative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaoutakis, Konstantinos; Anders, Michael; Berry, Katherine

    2016-03-01

    Hematologists/oncologists have a crucial responsibility to effectively communicate with patients. However, they have been criticized for ineffective communication with patients. To develop effective communication behaviors that meet the needs of patients and families, trainees need practice and feedback about their performance. Medical faculties frequently teach communication skills using simulation-based curricula; however, they often include only general communication skills, without tailored approaches for specialties. This study examined Hematology/Oncology trainees' qualitative perceptions about the value of and techniques used for simulations of specialty specific, essential conversations with patients and families, and debriefing sessions. Results demonstrate a highly effective curriculum and positive learner experiences. While most reports on this topic take place within major academic cancer centers, outcomes from a mid-sized Hematology/Oncology training program are unknown. The study confirms feasibility for implementing a simulation-based communications program in a mid-sized Hematology/Oncology program and describes simulation techniques that were effective.

  13. The influence of computer navigation on trainee learning in hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saithna, Adnan; Dekker, Andrew Peter

    2009-01-01

    Computer navigation in arthroplasty surgery is a form of concurrent augmented feedback. Motor learning theory suggests such feedback may be detrimental to learning as a result of the learner either developing a dependence on the additional feedback or being distracted from using intrinsic feedback. To determine whether computer navigation influences the learning curve of novices performing hip resurfacing arthroplasty, a systematic review and critical appraisal of the current English-language literature on the topic was conducted. There is some evidence that use of navigation by trainees facilitates more accurate placement of arthroplasty components as compared to conventional instrumentation. However, there is no evidence that training with computer navigation impairs performance in retention or transfer tests. Thus, although the published literature has significant limitations, there is no evidence that supports concerns regarding the impact of computer navigation on the learning curve of arthroplasty trainees.

  14. Aprendizagem Organizacional e suas Modalidades: Desenvolvendo a Habilidade Interpessoal nos Programas Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Gilberto Dos-Santos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é identificar quais modalidades de aprendizagem organizacional mais influenciam o desenvolvimento da habilidade interpessoal em novos gestores. As modalidades de aprendizagem organizacional identificadas na literatura incluem treinamento tradicional, leitura de textos, acesso a banco de dados, comunidades de prática, mentoria, treinamento on-the-job e interações casuais. A partir de uma metodologia quantitativa, foram desenvolvidas e validadas estatisticamente a Escala de Modalidades em Aprendizagem Organizacional (EMA e uma escala para mensurar a habilidade interpessoal, aplicadas a trainees e ex-trainees de empresas com atuação no Brasil. A partir do uso de análise fatorial exploratória e regressão multivariada, os resultados indicam que a modalidade mentoria é a principal responsável pelo desenvolvimento da habilidade interpessoal, a qual ocorre em caráter formal e informal nesse contexto. 

  15. NeuroDebian Virtual Machine Deployment Facilitates Trainee-Driven Bedside Neuroimaging Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alexander; Kenney-Jung, Daniel; Botha, Hugo; Tillema, Jan-Mendelt

    2016-09-21

    Freely available software, derived from the past 2 decades of neuroimaging research, is significantly more flexible for research purposes than presently available clinical tools. Here, we describe and demonstrate the utility of rapidly deployable analysis software to facilitate trainee-driven translational neuroimaging research. A recipe and video tutorial were created to guide the creation of a NeuroDebian-based virtual computer that conforms to current neuroimaging research standards and can exist within a HIPAA-compliant system. This allows for retrieval of clinical imaging data, conversion to standard file formats, and rapid visualization and quantification of individual patients' cortical and subcortical anatomy. As an example, we apply this pipeline to a pediatric patient's data to illustrate the advantages of research-derived neuroimaging tools in asking quantitative questions "at the bedside." Our goal is to provide a path of entry for trainees to become familiar with common neuroimaging tools and foster an increased interest in translational research.

  16. [Work-related behaviour and experience patterns and mental health: a study in psychotherapy trainees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundmann, Johanna; Sude, Kerstin; Löwe, Bernd; Wingenfeld, Katja

    2013-03-01

    In view of the fact that many reports have been published that emphasize the difficult conditions of the German psychotherapy training, the aim of this study was to investigate psychotherapy trainees´ work stress as well as work-related psychosocial risks and resources. Variables of interest were work-related behaviour and experience patterns (AVEM), effort-reward-imbalance, chronic stress and health-related quality of life. 321 participants completed an online survey. The distribution of work-related behaviour and experience patterns as well as the results regarding work overload and mental health are evidence of psychotherapy trainees' strain. AVEM-risk patterns are associated with effort-reward-imbalance, chronic stress and reduced mental health. These results clearly support claims for a modification of the psychotherapy training in Germany. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Is psychiatry an art or a science? The views of psychiatrists and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chur-Hansen, Anna; Parker, Damon

    2005-12-01

    It is generally considered by many practitioners that psychiatry is an art, that is, one of the humanities, as well as being a science. We systematically collected the views of practitioners and trainee psychiatrists regarding the question 'Is psychiatry an art or a science?' Eleven supervisors and nine trainees were interviewed and their responses analysed, using a qualitative method, the modified framework approach. Several themes emerged from the data: that 'art' and 'science' are different; psychiatry as a discipline is difficult to define; psychiatry demands a broader range of skills than other medical specialties; the relationship of psychology to psychiatry; supervisor cynicism to the 'science' of psychiatry; and the 'art' and 'science' of the assessment process. The tension that exists within the profession's identity as a discipline has important implications for teaching, learning, and clinical and research practices.

  18. Analysis of inpatient dermatologic referrals: insight into the educational needs of trainee doctors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmad, K

    2012-01-31

    AIM: To analyse inpatient consultation referrals to the Dermatology Department and to identify the educational needs of junior\\/trainee doctors. METHODS: Consultation data of inpatients referred to the Dermatology Department between 2001 and 2006 was reviewed. RESULTS: There were 703 referrals identified. Patients were referred from all wards in the hospital. There were a total of 113 different dermatological diagnoses in the group. One-fifth (22%) consultations were for skin infections, 12% had atopic dermatitis, 8% had psoriasis and 8% had clear or suspected drug cause for their rash. In 391 cases, the Consultant Dermatologist\\'s diagnosis was different to the inpatient referral diagnosis on the consultation referral form. CONCLUSIONS: Our results emphasise the need for junior dermatology trainees to undertake extra training in both the dermatologic conditions. This data supports the need for expansion of service provision of dermatology in the region.

  19. Attitudes towards abortion among trainees in obstetrics/gynecology and clinical genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Marie Diness; Diness, Birgitte Rode; Norup, Michael Slott

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to provide knowledge about attitudes towards abortion among Danish physicians in training in the specialties of obstetrics/gynecology and clinical genetics. The study was a questionnaire survey among trainees in these specialties. Ninety-six responded. Trainees in clinical genetics...... were more pro-abortion than those in obstetrics/gynecology (p=0.04). Of the respondents, 30 versus 48% found working with early and late abortions unpleasant. Nearly half agreed that they had chosen their specialty despite having to counsel and treat women having abortions. Twenty-one percent agreed...... that working with late abortion affected their job satisfaction negatively. Those agreeing with the above statements had a tendency towards lower pro-abortion scores than those who were indifferent or who disagreed but the differences were not significant. A substantial fraction of physicians in training have...

  20. 26 CFR 1.871-9 - Nonresident alien students or trainees deemed to be engaged in U.S. business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nonresident alien students or trainees deemed to... Corporations § 1.871-9 Nonresident alien students or trainees deemed to be engaged in U.S. business. (a) Participants in certain exchange or training programs. For purposes of §§ 1.871-7 and 1.871-8 a nonresident...

  1. Developing skilled doctor-patient communication in the workplace: a qualitative study of the experiences of trainees and clinical supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroldi, Esther; Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Geelen, Kristel; Muris, Jean; Bareman, Frits; Bueving, Herman; van der Weijden, Trudy; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2017-02-20

    To inform the development of recommendations to facilitate learning of skilled doctor-patient communication in the workplace, this qualitative study explores experiences of trainees and supervisors regarding how trainees learn communication and how supervisors support trainees' learning in the workplace. We conducted a qualitative study in a general practice training setting, triangulating various sources of data to obtain a rich understanding of trainees and supervisors' experiences: three focus group discussions, five discussions during training sessions and five individual interviews. Thematic network analysis was performed during an iterative process of data collection and analysis. We identified a communication learning cycle consisting of six phases: impactful experience, change in frame of reference, identification of communication strategies, experimentation with strategies, evaluation of strategies and incorporation into personal repertoire. Supervisors supported trainees throughout this process by creating challenges, confronting trainees with their behaviour and helping them reflect on its underlying mechanisms, exploring and demonstrating communication strategies, giving concrete practice assignments, creating safety, exploring the effect of strategies and facilitating repeated practice and reflection. Based on the experiences of trainees and supervisors, we conclude that skilled communication involves the development of a personal communication repertoire from which learners are able to apply strategies that fit the context and their personal style. After further validation of our findings, it may be recommended to give learners concrete examples, opportunities for repeated practise and reflection on personal frames of reference and the effect of strategies, as well as space for authenticity and flexibility. In the workplace, the clinical supervisor is able to facilitate all these essential conditions to support his/her trainee in becoming a skilled

  2. Racism and cultural identity: the reflections of two Black trainee teachers' engagement with the Stephen Lawrence Symposium

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Martyn

    2015-01-01

    The Stephen Lawrence Symposium held in London in 2013 provided an opportunity for academics and educators to reflect on changes in education and wider society resulting from the legacy of Stephen Lawrence over the 20 years since his racist murder. A Black African trainee teacher and a Black Caribbean trainee teacher in post-16 teacher training at a large university in the North of England participated in a series of lunchtime discussion groups as part of their university-based training. This ...

  3. Beliefs and values about intra-operative teaching and learning: a case study of surgical teachers and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Caroline C P; Dodds, Agnes; Nestel, Debra

    2016-08-01

    Surgeons require advanced psychomotor skills, critical decision-making and teamwork skills. Much of surgical skills training involve progressive trainee participation in supervised operations where case variability, operating team interaction and environment affect learning, while surgical teachers face the key challenge of ensuring patient safety. Using a theoretical framework of situated learning including cognitive apprenticeship, we explored teachers' and trainees' beliefs and values about intra-operative training and reasons for any differences. A qualitative case study method was used where five teacher-trainee pairs participating in an observed teaching operation were separately interviewed about the same operation. Thematic analysis of transcribed interviews and observations was performed with iterative refinement and a reflexive approach was adopted throughout the study. We found that in all cases, teachers and trainees had shared recognition of learning about technical skills whereas they differed in three cases regarding non-technical skills such as surgical reasoning and team management. Factors contributing to teacher and trainee satisfaction with the process were successful trainee completion of operation without need for surgeon take-over, a positive learning environment and learning new things. Teaching-learning behaviours observed and discussed were modeling, coaching and scaffolding, while exploration, reflection and articulation were less common. Our study reveals differing teacher and trainee perspectives of some aspects of intra-operative training and surfaces new reasons other than amount of feedback and autonomy given. Factors contributing to different perspectives include teacher and trainee abilities, values and situational influences. Targeted teaching-learning strategies could enhance intra-operative learning.

  4. Does interpersonal behavior of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    OpenAIRE

    Fincke, Janna I.; Möller, Heidi; Taubner, Svenja

    2015-01-01

    • Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees’ interpersonal behavior on work involvement (WI) and compared their social behavior within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. • Methods: The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS) were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, and cognitive behaviora...

  5. Work-family balance by women GP specialist trainees in Slovenia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petek, Davorina; Gajsek, Tadeja; Petek Ster, Marija

    2016-01-28

    Women physicians face many challenges while balancing their many roles: doctor, specialist trainee, mother and partner. The most opportune biological time for a woman to start a family coincides with a great deal of demands and requirements at work. In this study we explored the options and capabilities of women GP specialist trainees in coordinating their family and career. This is a phenomenological qualitative research. Ten GP specialist trainees from urban and rural areas were chosen by the purposive sampling technique, and semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted, recorded, transcribed and analysed by using thematic analysis process. Open coding and the book of codes were formed. Finally, we performed the process of code reduction by identifying the themes, which were compared, interpreted and organised in the highest analytical units--categories. One hundred fifty-five codes were identified in the analysis, which were grouped together into eleven themes. The identified themes are: types, causes and consequences of burdens, work as pleasure and positive attitude toward self, priorities, planning and help, and understanding of superiors, disburdening and changing in specialisation. The themes were grouped into four large categories: burdens, empowerment, coordination and needs for improvement. Women specialist trainees encounter intense burdens at work and home due to numerous demands and requirements during their specialisation training. In addition, there is also the issue of the work-family conflict. There are many consequences regarding burden and strain; however, burnout stands out the most. In contrast, reconciliation of work and family life and needs can be successful. The key element is empowerment of women doctors. The foremost necessary systemic solution is the reinforcement of general practitioners in primary health care and their understanding of the specialisation training scheme with more flexible possibilities for time adaptations of

  6. Consistency of Pilot Trainee Cognitive Ability, Personality, and Training Performance in Undergraduate Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-09

    4343. Table A-16. Differences by Year for the NEO-PI-R Extraversion Score: T-38 Training Year 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004...AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2013-0081 CONSISTENCY OF PILOT TRAINEE COGNITIVE ABILITY, PERSONALITY, AND TRAINING PERFORMANCE IN UNDERGRADUATE PILOT... TRAINING Mark S. Teachout University of the Incarnate Word San Antonio, TX Malcolm James Ree Erica L. Barto Operational Technologies

  7. Prospective controlled assessment of impact of feedback on gastroenterology trainees in outpatient practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Previous studies have demonstrated the value of systematic feedback in enhancing endoscopic procedure performance. It remains unknown whether feedback may play a role in modifying physician performance in outpatient practice. This study aimed to assess the impact of systematic feedback on duration of office visits of gastroenterology (GI) trainees in outpatient practice. METHODS: Patients attending a GI outpatient department in an academic medical center were prospectively followed over 4 months. The duration of office visits for consecutive patients seen by five GI fellows of similar experience level were recorded for 2 months (pre-feedback); confidential feedback was then provided to each fellow on a weekly basis for 2 months detailing their individual consultation times and the comparative, anonymous times of the other fellows (post-feedback). RESULTS: Over the course of the study, 1,647 outpatients were seen by five GI fellows. Pre-feedback consultation durations differed significantly with one fellow taking 2.5 times longer than their colleague. Following feedback, times shortened significantly for all fellows, with the greatest impact observed in those trainees taking longer at baseline. There were no significant differences in satisfaction levels among patients seen by each trainee. CONCLUSIONS: There was a wide disparity in the consultation times among GI fellows. Systematic feedback shortened times among all trainees and enhanced uniformity by having the greatest impact among those fellows taking longer at baseline. Routine provision of feedback may be valuable in enhancing uniformity of outpatient practice although clinicians should ensure that shortening consultation visits does not compromise quality of patient care. Future larger studies of feedback in this setting will be enhanced by incorporating objective measures of quality of care and patient satisfaction.

  8. Prospective Controlled Assessment of Impact of Feedback on Gastroenterology Trainees in Outpatient Practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2011-03-29

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Previous studies have demonstrated the value of systematic feedback in enhancing endoscopic procedure performance. It remains unknown whether feedback may play a role in modifying physician performance in outpatient practice. This study aimed to assess the impact of systematic feedback on duration of office visits of gastroenterology (GI) trainees in outpatient practice. METHODS: Patients attending a GI outpatient department in an academic medical center were prospectively followed over 4 months. The duration of office visits for consecutive patients seen by five GI fellows of similar experience level were recorded for 2 months (pre-feedback); confidential feedback was then provided to each fellow on a weekly basis for 2 months detailing their individual consultation times and the comparative, anonymous times of the other fellows (post-feedback). RESULTS: Over the course of the study, 1,647 outpatients were seen by five GI fellows. Pre-feedback consultation durations differed significantly with one fellow taking 2.5 times longer than their colleague. Following feedback, times shortened significantly for all fellows, with the greatest impact observed in those trainees taking longer at baseline. There were no significant differences in satisfaction levels among patients seen by each trainee. CONCLUSIONS: There was a wide disparity in the consultation times among GI fellows. Systematic feedback shortened times among all trainees and enhanced uniformity by having the greatest impact among those fellows taking longer at baseline. Routine provision of feedback may be valuable in enhancing uniformity of outpatient practice although clinicians should ensure that shortening consultation visits does not compromise quality of patient care. Future larger studies of feedback in this setting will be enhanced by incorporating objective measures of quality of care and patient satisfaction.

  9. Antibiotic prescribing for the future: exploring the attitudes of trainees in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallas, Anthea; van Driel, Mieke; van de Mortel, Thea; Magin, Parker

    2014-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a public health concern worldwide. A high proportion of antibiotics are prescribed in primary care, often for conditions where there is no evidence of benefit. Without a change in these prescribing patterns, resistance will persist as a significant problem in the future. Little is known about how trainees in general practice perceive and develop their prescribing. To explore the attitudes of trainees in general practice towards antibiotic use and resistance, and the perceived influences on their prescribing. A qualitative study of 17 vocational trainees in general practice (GP registrars) in both rural and urban areas in Australia employing semi-structured interviews and a focus group. Maximum variation purposive sampling of GP registrars from diverse backgrounds and training stages continued until thematic saturation was achieved. Topics of discussion included awareness of antibiotic resistance, use of evidence-based guidelines, and perceived influences on prescribing. Transcribed interviews were coded independently by two researchers. Data collection and analysis were concurrent and cumulative, using a process of iterative thematic analysis. Registrars were aware of the importance of evidence-based antibiotic prescribing and the impact of their decisions on resistance. Many expressed a sense of dissonance between their knowledge and behaviours. Contextual influences on their decisions included patient and system factors, diagnostic uncertainty, transitioning from hospital medicine, and the habits of, and relationship with, their supervisor. Understanding how trainees in general practice perceive and develop antibiotic prescribing habits will enable targeted educational interventions to be designed and implemented at a crucial stage in training, working towards ensuring appropriate antibiotic prescribing in the future. © British Journal of General Practice 2014.

  10. Surgical trainees neuropraxia? An unusual case of compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seoighe, D M

    2010-09-01

    Compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm is an uncommon diagnosis but has been associated with strenuous upper limb activity. We report the unique case of a 32-year-old male orthopaedic trainee who suffered this nerve palsy as a result of prolonged elbow extension and forearm pronation while the single assistant during a hip resurfacing procedure. Conservative measures were sufficient for sensory recovery to be clinically detectable after 12 weeks.

  11. Communication skills among surgical trainees: Perceptions of residents in a teaching hospital in Northern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, A; Z I Delia; M E Asuku; Dahiru, T

    2011-01-01

    Objective Communication between the surgeon and the patient is a core clinical skill. The ability to communicate with patients and their family members is very important in the optimum care of the surgical patient. Few studies have assessed communication between surgical trainees and their patients in sub-Saharan Africa. In response to this, the communication skills of residents in the department of surgery were evaluated to determine their perception of competency and perceived need for ...

  12. Obstetric Provider Trainees in Georgia: Characteristics and Attitudes About Practice in Obstetric Provider Shortage Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smulian, Elizabeth A; Zahedi, Leilah; Hurvitz, Julie; Talbot, Abigail; Williams, Audra; Julian, Zoë; Zertuche, Adrienne D; Rochat, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Objectives In Georgia, 52 % of the primary care service areas outside metropolitan Atlanta have a deficit of obstetric providers. This study was designed to identify factors associated with the likelihood of Georgia's obstetric trainees (obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents and certified nurse midwifery (CNM) students) to practice in areas of Georgia that lack obstetric providers and services, i.e. rural Georgia. Methods Pilot-tested electronic and paper surveys were distributed to all of Georgia's OB/GYN residents (N = 95) and CNM students (N = 28). Mixed-methods survey questions assessed characteristics, attitudes, and incentives that might be associated with trainee desire to practice in areas of Georgia that lack obstetric providers and services. Surveys also gathered information about concerns that may prevent trainees from practicing in shortage areas. Univariate and bivariate analyses were performed, and qualitative themes were abstracted from open-ended questions. Results The survey response rate was 87.8 % (108/123). Overall, 24.4 % (19/78) of residents and 53.6 % (15/28) of CNM students expressed interest in practicing in rural Georgia, and both residents and CNM students were more likely to desire to practice in rural Georgia with the offer of any of six financial incentives (P < 0.001). Qualitative themes highlighted trainees' strong concerns about Georgia's political environment as it relates to reproductive healthcare. Conclusions Increasing state-level, rurally-focused financial incentive programs and emphasizing the role of CNMs may alleviate obstetric provider shortages in Georgia.

  13. ELT Methodology and Learners Meet in Techniques: A Lesson Planning Perspective for Teacher Trainees

    OpenAIRE

    Sarıgöz, İskender Hakkı

    2014-01-01

    Problem: Teacher trainees attending English language teaching departments learn and practice major foreign language teaching methods and techniques. The abundance of methods and techniques requires a serious selection in order to compile the best lesson. The pre-service teachers are equipped with the required methodological knowledge and ready to implement teaching. Nevertheless, the learners are not aware of the huge teaching technology behind this rule governed and complicated discipline. T...

  14. Employment prospects and trends for gastroenterology trainees in Canada: a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razik, Roshan; Cino, Maria; Nguyen, Geoffrey C

    2013-11-01

    Many gastroenterology (GI) trainees face a variety of barriers to stable employment and are finding it increasingly difficult to secure employment in their chosen field. To elucidate factors that contribute to the burden of unemployment and underemployment, and to examine solutions that may remedy this growing problem in the field of GI. A nationwide survey of current, incoming and recently graduated individuals of GI training programs in Canada was conducted. Trainees in pediatric GI programs and those enrolled in subspecialty programs within GI were also included. The response rate was 62%, with 93% of respondents enrolled in an adult GI training program. Many (73%) respondents planned to pursue further subspecialty training and the majority (53%) reported concerns regarding job security after graduation as contributory factors. Only 35% of respondents were confident that they would secure employment within six months of completing their training. Regarding barriers to employment, the most cited perceived reasons were lack of funding (both from hospitals and provincial governments) and senior physicians who continue to practice beyond retirement years. Sixty-nine per cent perceived a greater need for career guidance and 49% believed there were too many GI trainees relative to the current job market in their area. Most residents had a contingency plan if they remained unemployed >18 months, which often included moving to another province or to the United States. GI trainees throughout Canada reported substantial concerns about securing employment, citing national retirement trends and lack of funding as primary barriers to employment. Although these issues are not easily modifiable, certain problems should be targeted including optimizing training quotas, tailoring career guidance to the needs of the population, and emphasizing credentialing and quality control in endoscopy.

  15. Is training in psychosocial interventions worthwhile? Report of a psychosocial intervention trainee follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Charlie; Saul, Carol; Robinson, Jeannie; King, Jenny; Dudley, Mike

    2003-09-01

    A follow-up study of psychosocial intervention (PSI) trainees from the Sheffield and Maudsley training centres was undertaken in three stages. In Stage 1, 141 students, at two PSI training centres, were sent a simple postal questionnaire to elicit career trajectory following PSI training. A response rate of 82% was achieved. The sub-group, who had been trained and who still engaged in clinical practice were identified and followed-up in more detail (n=96). The effect of PSI training in a range of domains was investigated. The impact of training may not be to equip students with formal technical skills in CBT and family work. What is more likely is that trainees acquired proficiency in: working effectively using a case management model; conveying 'therapeutic optimism'; enabling users to meet their own goals and helping them to develop better coping strategies; using 'stress vulnerability' and formal outcome measures as means of structuring this approach. The secondary aim of the study was to identify and prioritise the barriers that impede the effective implementation of PSI skills in routine service settings. For the second phase of the survey the response rate was again 82%. This group's service managers were identified and surveyed for the same information and 59% responded. The aim was to gather information about implementation issues from both the clinical and service perspectives. The results of the survey indicate that PSI training has a positive impact on the development of services for people with serious mental health problems although there are serious organisational hurdles for managers, trainees and organisations to overcome if PSI skills are to be properly implemented. Key factors that impact upon faithful implementation are related to resource issues (caseload size), organisational factors (the existence of an implementation plan and training strategy), and the extent to which the trainee's team is supportive.

  16. Physicians and Physician Trainees Rarely Identify or Address Overweight/Obesity in Hospitalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Marta A; Nkoy, Flory L; Maloney, Christopher G; Mihalopoulos, Nicole L

    2015-10-01

    To determine how frequently physicians identify and address overweight/obesity in hospitalized children and to compare physician documentation across training level (medical student, intern, resident, attending). We conducted a retrospective chart review. Using an administrative database, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention body mass index calculator, and random sampling technique, we identified a study population of 300 children aged 2-18 years with overweight/obesity hospitalized on the general medical service of a tertiary care pediatric hospital. We reviewed admission, progress, and discharge notes to determine how frequently physicians and physician trainees identified (documented in history, physical exam, or assessment) and addressed (documented in hospital or discharge plan) overweight/obesity. Physicians and physician trainees identified overweight/obesity in 8.3% (n = 25) and addressed it in 4% (n = 12) of 300 hospitalized children with overweight/obesity. Interns were most likely to document overweight/obesity in history (8.3% of the 266 patients they followed). Attendings were most likely to document overweight/obesity in physical examination (8.3%), assessment (4%), and plan (4%) of the 300 patients they followed. Medical students were least likely to document overweight/obesity including it in the assessment (0.4%) and plan (0.4%) of the 244 hospitalized children with overweight/obesity they followed. Physicians and physician trainees rarely identify or address overweight/obesity in hospitalized children. This represents a missed opportunity for both patient care and physician trainee education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Spiritual Needs of the Religiously Unaffiliated Airmen and Trainees in Basic Military Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    and Trainees in Basic Military Training presented at/published to the Division 19 Section, APA Conference 2016, Denver, CO 5 Aug 2016 with MDWI 41...demonstrated at meeting: name of meeting, city, state. and date of meeting.) Division 19 Section, APA Conference 2016, Denver, CO, 05 AUG 16 D 11d. PLATFORM...of this population. The program includes an 8-week sequential format through the following topics: (1) Humanism, Communication, and Military Life, (2

  18. Factors influencing trainee doctor emigration in a high income country: a mixed methods study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clarke, Nicholas

    2017-09-25

    The Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel focuses particularly on migration of doctors from low- and middle-income countries. Less is understood about migration from high-income countries. Recession has impacted several European countries in recent years, and in some cases emigration has reached unprecedented levels. This study measures and explores the predictors of trainee doctor emigration from Ireland.

  19. Personality, cognitive styles and Morningness-Eveningness disposition in a sample of Yoga trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallera, Guido M.; Gatto, Massimo; Boari, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Background Yoga is a psychophysical, spiritual science of holistic living, aiming towards body and mind development; it can influence well-being, cognitive processes, personality (Gunas), psychophysiological parameters, and human health. Since it has been observed that Morningness-Eveningness disposition is associated with personality, and that personality can characterize people practicing Yoga, in this exploratory study we posited that Morningness-Eveningness might be associated with personality in Yoga trainees. Since Yoga can have influences over cognitive perspectives, and since it has been observed that Morningness-Eveningness disposition can associate with cognitive processes, we investigated a sample of Yoga trainees with reference to relationship with styles of learning and thinking (relevant aspects of cognitive functioning) and also with Morningness-Eveningness disposition. Material/Method We tested 184 Yoga trainees using the following questionnaires: Styles of Learning and Thinking (Torrance), Big Five Questionnaire (Caprara, Barbaranelli, Borgogni), and reduced Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (Natale). Results We found that Morning types score significantly higher than Evening types on Conscientiousness, Friendliness, Scrupulousness, Openness to Culture, emotional Stability, emotion Control, they score higher than intermediate types on Conscientiousness, Friendliness, Scrupulousness. Moreover, data showed that the high majority of subjects, also with reference to Morningness-Eveningness disposition, have right-sided styles of learning and thinking, pointing out a tendency towards right-sided cognitive precessing in the whole sample. Personality traits of the Yoga trainees were also investigated. Conclusions Data are discussed with reference to existing literature, psychological and neuroscientific perspectives are suggested, previous studies about Yoga published on Medical Science Monitor are also considered. PMID:24531385

  20. Derivation of Two Critical Appraisal Scores for Trainees to Evaluate Online Educational Resources: A METRIQ Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Teresa M.; Thoma, Brent; Krishnan, Keeth; Lin, Michelle; Carpenter, Christopher R.; Astin, Matt; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Online education resources (OERs), like blogs and podcasts, increasingly augment or replace traditional medical education resources such as textbooks and lectures. Trainees’ ability to evaluate these resources is poor, and few quality assessment aids have been developed to assist them. This study aimed to derive a quality evaluation instrument for this purpose. Methods We used a three-phase methodology. In Phase 1, a previously derived list of 151 OER quality indicators was reduced to 13 items using data from published consensus-building studies (of medical educators, expert podcasters, and expert bloggers) and subsequent evaluation by our team. In Phase 2, these 13 items were converted to seven-point Likert scales used by trainee raters (n=40) to evaluate 39 OERs. The reliability and usability of these 13 rating items was determined using responses from trainee raters, and top items were used to create two OER quality evaluation instruments. In Phase 3, these instruments were compared to an external certification process (the ALiEM AIR certification) and the gestalt evaluation of the same 39 blog posts by 20 faculty educators. Results Two quality-evaluation instruments were derived with fair inter-rater reliability: the METRIQ-8 Score (Inter class correlation coefficient [ICC]=0.30, pgestalt (Pearson’s r=0.35, p=0.03 and r=0.41, pgestalt ratings of online educational resources by faculty educators. Further testing is needed to ensure these instruments are accurate when applied by trainees. PMID:27625722

  1. The future of patient safety: Surgical trainees accept virtual reality as a new training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Rachel; Gantert, Walter A; Hamel, Christian; Metzger, Jürg; Kocher, Thomas; Vogelbach, Peter; Demartines, Nicolas; Hahnloser, Dieter

    2008-06-11

    The use of virtual reality (VR) has gained increasing interest to acquire laparoscopic skills outside the operating theatre and thus increasing patients' safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate trainees' acceptance of VR for assessment and training during a skills course and at their institution. All 735 surgical trainees of the International Gastrointestinal Surgery Workshop 2006-2008, held in Davos, Switzerland, were given a minimum of 45 minutes for VR training during the course. Participants' opinion on VR was analyzed with a standardized questionnaire. Fivehundred-twenty-seven participants (72%) from 28 countries attended the VR sessions and answered the questionnaires. The possibility of using VR at the course was estimated as excellent or good in 68%, useful in 21%, reasonable in 9% and unsuitable or useless in 2%. If such VR simulators were available at their institution, most course participants would train at least one hour per week (46%), two or more hours (42%) and only 12% wouldn't use VR. Similarly, 63% of the participants would accept to operate on patients only after VR training and 55% to have VR as part of their assessment. Residents accept and appreciate VR simulation for surgical assessment and training. The majority of the trainees are motivated to regularly spend time for VR training if accessible.

  2. Counseling psychology trainees' experiences with debt stress: a mixed methods examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson-Garriott, Amber N; Garriott, Patton O; Rigali-Oiler, Marybeth; Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien

    2015-04-01

    Financial debt accrued by graduate psychology students has increased in recent years and is a chief concern among psychology trainees (El-Ghoroury, Galper, Sawaqdeh, & Bufka, 2012). This study examined debt stress among counseling psychology trainees using a complementary mixed methods research design. Qualitative analyses (N = 11) using the consensual qualitative research method (CQR; Hill, Thompson, & Williams, 1997; Hill et al., 2005) revealed six domains, 15 categories, and 34 subcategories. Domains included social class contributions, institutional contributions, long-term effects, coping mechanisms, personal relationships, and effect on well-being. The transactional model of stress and coping (Lazarus & Folkman, 1984) and social class worldview model (Liu, Soleck, Hopps, Dunston, & Pickett, 2004) guided quantitative analyses. Results of a path analysis (N = 285) indicated total debt and subjective social class were significant predictors of debt stress and that the relationship between debt stress and psychological distress was mediated by avoidant coping. Avoidant coping also moderated the association between debt stress and psychological distress. Results are discussed in relation to professional training and the career development of counseling psychology trainees.

  3. Trainee Perspectives of the Effectiveness of Active Learning in a Legal Education Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Hession

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article explores whether active learning techniques can be effectively introduced to large group lectures in the context of legal professional training. It is limited to the perspective of the students (trainee solicitors. It is evident from research literature that a student-centred approach in the form of active learning techniques engages students and is considered a more effective form of teaching than the traditional lecturing style generally adopted at higher level education. There is a distinctive gap in the research literature relating to professional education. This article discusses a small scale qualitative study which adopted an action research methodology to determine the effectiveness of active learning techniques in this particular context. The study was confined to the introduction of two particular techniques, an in-class computation exercise and a re-cap technique, to the traditional lecture format. The views of a small focus group of trainee solicitors from the Law Society’s of Ireland Professional Practice Course were engaged. Findings from this study indicate that active learning techniques are effective in achieving learning outcomes from a trainees’ perspective. The author concludes that limitations of the use of the techniques can be overcome. Important directions for future research include in-depth analysis of the effectiveness of the techniques in preparing trainee solicitors for the professional role.

  4. The future of patient safety: Surgical trainees accept virtual reality as a new training tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogelbach Peter

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of virtual reality (VR has gained increasing interest to acquire laparoscopic skills outside the operating theatre and thus increasing patients' safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate trainees' acceptance of VR for assessment and training during a skills course and at their institution. Methods All 735 surgical trainees of the International Gastrointestinal Surgery Workshop 2006–2008, held in Davos, Switzerland, were given a minimum of 45 minutes for VR training during the course. Participants' opinion on VR was analyzed with a standardized questionnaire. Results Fivehundred-twenty-seven participants (72% from 28 countries attended the VR sessions and answered the questionnaires. The possibility of using VR at the course was estimated as excellent or good in 68%, useful in 21%, reasonable in 9% and unsuitable or useless in 2%. If such VR simulators were available at their institution, most course participants would train at least one hour per week (46%, two or more hours (42% and only 12% wouldn't use VR. Similarly, 63% of the participants would accept to operate on patients only after VR training and 55% to have VR as part of their assessment. Conclusion Residents accept and appreciate VR simulation for surgical assessment and training. The majority of the trainees are motivated to regularly spend time for VR training if accessible.

  5. Experiences of Irish general practice trainees who participate in 4-month rotations in Malawi and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Stephanie; Rouse, Martin; Farrell, John; Brennan, Darach

    2015-11-01

    International health electives provide doctors and medical students with unique educational experiences. The HSE South East GP training programme in Waterford, Ireland has run a four-month elective to Malawi since 2006, and also ran a four-month placement in Australia between 2004 and 2011. The aim of this study was to see whether these overseas electives provide Irish GP trainees with any positive or negative experiences, and to make recommendations regarding future similar rotations abroad. This study used the Delphi survey technique, a qualitative research method. The first round questionnaire asked about challenges faced while overseas, what the trainees learned, and how the placement influenced their clinical practice on their return to Ireland. Doctors were also asked about the benefits and/or limitations of an overseas placement during GP training. These Irish GP trainees reported very positive outcomes from time spent in Malawi and Australia. They reported improved knowledge and skills, and increased awareness of health issues and cultural differences in another country. Moreover, they had an opportunity to reflect and grow personally as doctors. This is the first study looking at an international health elective as part of a vocational training programme in Ireland.

  6. Development of a curriculum in molecular diagnostics, genomics and personalized medicine for dermatology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael J; Shahriari, Neda; Payette, Michael; Mnayer, Laila; Elaba, Zendee

    2016-10-01

    Results of molecular studies are redefining the diagnosis and management of a wide range of skin disorders. Dermatology training programs maintain a relative gap in relevant teaching. To develop a curriculum in molecular diagnostics, genomics and personalized medicine for dermatology trainees at our institution. The aim is to provide trainees with a specialty-appropriate, working knowledge in clinical molecular dermatology. The Departments of Dermatology and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine collaborated on the design and implementation of educational objectives and teaching modalities for the new curriculum. A multidisciplinary curriculum was developed. It comprises: (i) assigned reading from the medical literature and reference textbook; (ii) review of teaching sets; (iii) two 1 hour lectures; (iv) trainee presentations; (v) 1-week rotation in a clinical molecular pathology and cytogenetics laboratory; and (vi) assessments and feedback. Residents who participated in the curriculum to date have found the experience to be of value. Our curriculum provides a framework for other dermatology residency programs to develop their own specific approach to molecular diagnostics education. Such training will provide a foundation for lifelong learning as molecular testing evolves and becomes integral to the practice of dermatology. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Laparoscopic surgical box model training for surgical trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Nagendran, Myura; Toon, Clare D; Davidson, Brian R

    2014-03-01

    Surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is time consuming, costly, and of variable effectiveness. Training using a box model physical simulator is an option to supplement standard training. However, the value of this modality on trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience is unknown. To compare the benefits and harms of box model training for surgical trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience versus standard surgical training or supplementary animal model training. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Science Citation Index Expanded to May 2013. We planned to include all randomised clinical trials comparing box model trainers versus other forms of training including standard laparoscopic training and supplementary animal model training in surgical trainees with limited prior laparoscopic experience. We also planned to include trials comparing different methods of box model training. Two authors independently identified trials and collected data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using Review Manager 5. For each outcome, we calculated the risk ratio (RR), mean difference (MD), or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on intention-to-treat analysis whenever possible. We identified eight trials that met the inclusion criteria. One trial including 17 surgical trainees did not contribute to the meta-analysis. We included seven trials (249 surgical trainees belonging to various postgraduate years ranging from year one to four) in which the participants were randomised to supplementary box model training (122 trainees) versus standard training (127 trainees). Only one trial (50 trainees) was at low risk of bias. The box trainers used in all the seven trials were video trainers. Six trials were

  8. Structured extracapsular cataract extraction-intraocular lens microsurgical training: report of a trainee's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaji, A E; Natchiar, G

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to report the experience an ophthalmologist gained in a structured intraocular lens (IOL) microsurgery training program for the information and benefit of colleagues in ophthalmology training institutions. An ophthalmologist was trained in extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE)-IOL implant in Aravind Eye Hospital (AEH), Madurai, for a period of 8 weeks. Details of patients operated on, procedures observed, and conferences attended were prospectively recorded in a log book. Training was available in conventional ECCE with posterior chamber IOL (ECCE-PCIOL), small incision sutureless cataract surgery, and phacoemulsification. During the period, this trainee observed a total of 1527 cataract extractions, administered 528 retrobulbar and 1047 facial blocks, and also operated on 75 patients. The trainee gained experience and confidence to perform high-quality, low-cost cataract surgery. Hands-on experience and competence in quality ECCE-IOL implant microsurgery can be acquired in a short period of time in a high-volume cataract center. Trainees can also be exposed to other techniques of cataract surgery. Ophthalmology training centers with diminishing surgical training opportunities can also benefit from this structured training in a high-volume cataract center like Aravind Eye Hospital.

  9. Machinist's Mate 1 and C: Rate Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naval Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

    The rate training manual covers the duties required to efficiently operate and maintain ship propulsion machinery and associated equipment and to maintain applicable records and reports. Chapters cover: turbines; reduction gears; steam-driven generators; heat exchangers and air ejectors; pumps; piping and valves; distilling plants; refrigeration…

  10. Mobile technology supporting trainee doctors’ workplace learning and patient care: an evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The amount of information needed by doctors has exploded. The nature of knowledge (explicit and tacit) and processes of knowledge acquisition and participation are complex. Aiming to assist workplace learning, Wales Deanery funded “iDoc”, a project offering trainee doctors a Smartphone library of medical textbooks. Methods Data on trainee doctors’ (Foundation Year 2) workplace information seeking practice was collected by questionnaire in 2011 (n = 260). iDoc baseline questionnaires (n = 193) collected data on Smartphone usage alongside other workplace information sources. Case reports (n = 117) detail specific instances of Smartphone use. Results Most frequently (daily) used information sources in the workplace: senior medical staff (80% F2 survey; 79% iDoc baseline); peers (70%; 58%); and other medical/nursing team staff (53% both datasets). Smartphones were used more frequently by males (p < 0.01). Foundation Year 1 (newly qualified) was judged the most useful time to have a Smartphone library because of increased responsibility and lack of knowledge/experience. Preferred information source varied by question type: hard copy texts for information-based questions; varied resources for skills queries; and seniors for more complex problems. Case reports showed mobile technology used for simple (information-based), complex (problem-based) clinical questions and clinical procedures (skills-based scenarios). From thematic analysis, the Smartphone library assisted: teaching and learning from observation; transition from medical student to new doctor; trainee doctors’ discussions with seniors; independent practice; patient care; and this ‘just-in-time’ access to reliable information supported confident and efficient decision-making. Conclusion A variety of information sources are used regularly in the workplace. Colleagues are used daily but seniors are not always available. During transitions, constant access to the electronic

  11. Mobile technology supporting trainee doctors’ workplace learning and patient care: an evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardyman Wendy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of information needed by doctors has exploded. The nature of knowledge (explicit and tacit and processes of knowledge acquisition and participation are complex. Aiming to assist workplace learning, Wales Deanery funded “iDoc”, a project offering trainee doctors a Smartphone library of medical textbooks. Methods Data on trainee doctors’ (Foundation Year 2 workplace information seeking practice was collected by questionnaire in 2011 (n = 260. iDoc baseline questionnaires (n = 193 collected data on Smartphone usage alongside other workplace information sources. Case reports (n = 117 detail specific instances of Smartphone use. Results Most frequently (daily used information sources in the workplace: senior medical staff (80% F2 survey; 79% iDoc baseline; peers (70%; 58%; and other medical/nursing team staff (53% both datasets. Smartphones were used more frequently by males (p  Preferred information source varied by question type: hard copy texts for information-based questions; varied resources for skills queries; and seniors for more complex problems. Case reports showed mobile technology used for simple (information-based, complex (problem-based clinical questions and clinical procedures (skills-based scenarios. From thematic analysis, the Smartphone library assisted: teaching and learning from observation; transition from medical student to new doctor; trainee doctors’ discussions with seniors; independent practice; patient care; and this ‘just-in-time’ access to reliable information supported confident and efficient decision-making. Conclusion A variety of information sources are used regularly in the workplace. Colleagues are used daily but seniors are not always available. During transitions, constant access to the electronic library was valued. It helped prepare trainee doctors for discussions with their seniors, assisting the interchange between explicit and tacit knowledge. By

  12. Mobile technology supporting trainee doctors' workplace learning and patient care: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardyman, Wendy; Bullock, Alison; Brown, Alice; Carter-Ingram, Sophie; Stacey, Mark

    2013-01-21

    The amount of information needed by doctors has exploded. The nature of knowledge (explicit and tacit) and processes of knowledge acquisition and participation are complex. Aiming to assist workplace learning, Wales Deanery funded "iDoc", a project offering trainee doctors a Smartphone library of medical textbooks. Data on trainee doctors' (Foundation Year 2) workplace information seeking practice was collected by questionnaire in 2011 (n = 260). iDoc baseline questionnaires (n = 193) collected data on Smartphone usage alongside other workplace information sources. Case reports (n = 117) detail specific instances of Smartphone use. Most frequently (daily) used information sources in the workplace: senior medical staff (80% F2 survey; 79% iDoc baseline); peers (70%; 58%); and other medical/nursing team staff (53% both datasets). Smartphones were used more frequently by males (p < 0.01). Foundation Year 1 (newly qualified) was judged the most useful time to have a Smartphone library because of increased responsibility and lack of knowledge/experience.Preferred information source varied by question type: hard copy texts for information-based questions; varied resources for skills queries; and seniors for more complex problems. Case reports showed mobile technology used for simple (information-based), complex (problem-based) clinical questions and clinical procedures (skills-based scenarios). From thematic analysis, the Smartphone library assisted: teaching and learning from observation; transition from medical student to new doctor; trainee doctors' discussions with seniors; independent practice; patient care; and this 'just-in-time' access to reliable information supported confident and efficient decision-making. A variety of information sources are used regularly in the workplace. Colleagues are used daily but seniors are not always available. During transitions, constant access to the electronic library was valued. It helped prepare trainee doctors for discussions

  13. A recommended technique of renal vein anastomosis in rat kidney transplantation for trainee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Dongming; Heng Baoli; Lai Caiyong; Guo Zexiong; Su Zexuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Various rat kidney transplantation models have been introduced over the decades and the study on the models seems to lack novelty and necessity.However,vascular anastomosis,especially renal vein,is still very difficult for trainees.The aim of this study was to provide the modified renal venous anastomosis of rat kidney transplantation to substitute the currant method for trainees.Methods Male Wistar rats were used as donors and recipients,respectively.Left orthotopic transplantation was performed with a modified technique of renal vein anastomosis,combining the end-to-end sutures with epidural catheter.Meanwhile,the survival rate,warm ischemia time,renal venous anastomosis time,and complications were recorded to evaluate the merits of the modified technique compared with the current recommended technique of rat renal vein.Two trainees took part in the learning of the models in two methods for performing 30 operations,respectively.Results The difference in warm ischemia time (from (57.25±7.30) minutes in the first 10 operations to (30.05±1.85)minutes in the third 10 operations) and renal vein anastomosis time (from (32.80±3.80) minutes in the first 10 operations to (19.30±0.98) minutes in the third 10 operations) was significantly short (P<0.01) and the survival rate was statistically high (from (25±7)% in the first 10 operations to 70% in the third 10 operations) in equal number of operations (P<0.01) by comparing with the current recommended method ((47.60±7.19) minutes to (22.8±1.85) minutes,(22.40±3.10) minutes to (9.95±1.50) minutes,45%±7% to 80%±0,respectively).The intraoperative complications and postoperative complications of renal venous anastomosis were also significantly decreased (P<0.01).Conclusions The technique with epidural catheter can shorten the learning curve of the trainee learning rat kidney transplantation.It may replace the currently recommended technique of rat renal vein for trainees.

  14. Personality profiling of the modern surgical trainee: insights into generation X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jennifer A; Antonoff, Mara B; D'Cunha, Jonathan; Maddaus, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Surgical education is undergoing a revolution in its approach to training. Duty-hour limitations, the need for strong teamwork, and increased cross-coverage have all impacted the culture of a surgical residency. This, combined with the profound shift in our culture at large has led to the suggestion that our specialty is attracting a different or more "modern" trainee (Generation X) with personality attributes that differ considerably from previous surgical residents. Historically, personality profiling of surgeons (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)) has favored the ESTJ personality type [extroversion (E), sensing (S), thinking (T), and judging (J)]. We hypothesized that the changing surgical training paradigms are attracting a different personality profile. To test this, we administered the MBTI examination to a large cohort of surgical trainees in one academic surgical training program. In 2009, with Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, we administered online MBTI Step I form M tests to all 41 categorical surgery residents from our Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited general surgery program. The test results were distributed by a certified MBTI consultant and compared with previously published data of staff surgeons. The data were analyzed using a χ(2) analysis to determine differences between groups (α = 0.05). Of the 41 categorical surgery residents, 39 (95%) residents completed the MBTI assessment, (54% male). The most frequent preferential personality type of the resident surgeon was ISTJ [introversion (I)], 30.8%, n = 12. When the results were compared with previously published personality profiles of practicing surgeons, there was a significant difference (p = 0.009) between E and I, contrasting the 2 groups (Table 1). However, the preferences of sensing, thinking, and judging (STJ) over all others was not significantly different (p = 0.203). Most current surgical trainees demonstrate the I personality type. This

  15. Semi-automated scoring of pulmonary emphysema from X-ray CT: Trainee reproducibility and accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owrangi, Amir M., E-mail: aowrangi@robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); Entwistle, Brandon, E-mail: Brandon.Entwistle@londonhospitals.ca; Lu, Andrew, E-mail: Andrew.Lu@londonhospitals.ca; Chiu, Jack, E-mail: Jack.Chiu@londonhospitals.ca; Hussain, Nabil, E-mail: Nabil.Hussain@londonhospitals.ca; Etemad-Rezai, Roya, E-mail: Roya.EtemadRezai@lhsc.on.ca; Parraga, Grace, E-mail: gparraga@robarts.ca [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London (Canada); Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, Department of Medical Imaging, Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2013-11-01

    Objective: We developed a semi-automated tool to quantify emphysema from thoracic X-ray multi-detector (64-slice) computed tomography (CT) for training purposes and multi-reader studies. Materials and Methods: Thoracic X-ray CT was acquired in 93 ex-smokers, who were evaluated by six trainees with little or no expertise (trainees) and a single experienced thoracic radiologist (expert). A graphic user interface (GUI) was developed for emphysema quantification based on the percentile of lung where a score of 0 = no abnormalities, 1 = 1–25%, 2 = 26–50%, 3 = 51–75% and 4 = 76–100% for each lung side/slice. Trainees blinded to subject characteristics scored randomized images twice; accuracy was determined by comparison to expert scores, density histogram 15th percentile (HU{sub 15}), relative area at −950 HU (RA{sub 950}), low attenuation clusters at −950 HU (LAC{sub 950}), −856 HU (LAC{sub 856}) and the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DL{sub CO%pred}). Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility was evaluated using coefficients-of-variation (COV), intra-class (ICC) and Pearson correlations. Results: Trainee–expert correlations were significant (r = 0.85–0.97, p < 0.0001) and a significant trainee bias (0.15 ± 0.22) was observed. Emphysema score was correlated with RA{sub 950} (r = 0.88, p < 0.0001), HU{sub 15} (r = −0.77, p < 0.0001), LAC{sub 950} (r = 0.76, p < 0.0001), LAC{sub 856} (r = 0.74, p = 0.0001) and DL{sub CO%pred} (r = −0.71, p < 0.0001). Intra-observer reproducibility (COV = 4–27%; ICC = 0.75–0.94) was moderate to high for trainees; intra- and inter-observer COV were negatively and non-linearly correlated with emphysema score. Conclusion: We developed a GUI for rapid and interactive emphysema scoring that allows for comparison of multiple readers with clinical and radiological standards.

  16. Systematic Review of Voluntary Participation in Simulation-Based Laparoscopic Skills Training: Motivators and Barriers for Surgical Trainee Attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostlow, Hannah; Marlow, Nicholas; Babidge, Wendy; Maddern, Guy

    To examine and report on evidence relating to surgical trainees' voluntary participation in simulation-based laparoscopic skills training. Specifically, the underlying motivators, enablers, and barriers faced by surgical trainees with regard to attending training sessions on a regular basis. A systematic search of the literature (PubMed; CINAHL; EMBASE; Cochrane Collaboration) was conducted between May and July 2015. Studies were included on whether they reported on surgical trainee attendance at voluntary, simulation-based laparoscopic skills training sessions, in addition to qualitative data regarding participant's perceived barriers and motivators influencing their decision to attend such training. Factors affecting a trainee's motivation were categorized as either intrinsic (internal) or extrinsic (external). Two randomised control trials and 7 case series' met our inclusion criteria. Included studies were small and generally poor quality. Overall, voluntary simulation-based laparoscopic skills training was not well attended. Intrinsic motivators included clearly defined personal performance goals and relevance to clinical practice. Extrinsic motivators included clinical responsibilities and available free time, simulator location close to clinical training, and setting obligatory assessments or mandated training sessions. The effect of each of these factors was variable, and largely dependent on the individual trainee. The greatest reported barrier to attending voluntary training was the lack of available free time. Although data quality is limited, it can be seen that providing unrestricted access to simulator equipment is not effective in motivating surgical trainees to voluntarily participate in simulation-based laparoscopic skills training. To successfully encourage participation, consideration needs to be given to the factors influencing motivation to attend training. Further research, including better designed randomised control trials and large

  17. European Network of Trainees in Obstetrics and Gynaecology: experiences from the 2016 exchange programme in Turin, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eismann, Sabine; Brandl, Mario; Spinnewijn, Laura; Everden, Caroline; Campolo, Federica; Schott, Sarah

    2017-02-01

    The European Network of Trainees in Obstetrics and Gynaecology (ENTOG) is an organization representing trainees from 30 European member countries. Together with the European Board and College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (EBCOG), it seeks to achieve the highest possible standards of training and consequently to improve the quality of medical care in the field of gynaecology and obstetrics. Every year, the ENTOG council meets and holds a scientific meeting in a different European country. To coincide with this, the host country arranges an exchange, to which each member country can send two trainees. This exchange allows trainees to gain insight into both daily clinical work and the structure of the health care system. This article reports the experiences of participants in the May 2016 ENTOG exchange to Turin, Italy. The aim is to outline differences in training between Germany and Italy as well as some striking differences with other European countries. The participants' personal benefit from this unique experience was not only to get familiar with the Italian trainee programme and health care system, but also to exchange experiences among representatives from other European countries and build up a young gynaecological network within Europe.

  18. Surgical education and training in an outer metropolitan hospital: a qualitative study of surgical trainers and trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestel, Debra; Harlim, Jennifer; Bryant, Melanie; Rampersad, Rajay; Hunter-Smith, David; Spychal, Bob

    2016-07-14

    The landscape of surgical training is changing. The anticipated increase in the numbers of surgical trainees and the shift to competency-based surgical training places pressures on an already stretched health service. With these pressures in mind, we explored trainers' and trainees' experiences of surgical training in a less traditional rotation, an outer metropolitan hospital. We considered practice-based learning theories to make meaning of surgical training in this setting, in particular Actor-network theory. We adopted a qualitative approach and purposively sampled surgical trainers and trainees to participate in individual interviews and focus groups respectively. Transcripts were made and thematically analysed. Institutional human research ethics approval was obtained. Four surgical trainers and fourteen trainees participated. Almost without exception, participants' report training needs to be well met. Emergent inter-related themes were: learning as social activity; learning and programmatic factors; learning and physical infrastructure; and, learning and organizational structure. This outer metropolitan hospital is suited to the provision of surgical training with the current rotational system for trainees. The setting offers experiences that enable consolidation of learning providing a rich and varied overall surgical training program. Although relational elements of learning were paramount they occurred within a complex environment. Actor-network theory was used to give meaning to emergent themes acknowledging that actors (both people and objects) and their interactions combine to influence training quality, shifting the focus of responsibility for learning away from individuals to the complex interactions in which they work and learn.

  19. Do medical trainees feel confident communicating with low health literacy patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia K. Ali

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical trainees infrequently use health literacy (HL skills and overestimate their use of plain language and teach back skills. The aim of this study is to assess if level of training impacts the perception of medical trainees around HL knowledge and skills. Methods: A structured questionnaire consisting of 5 questions assessing the respondents’ perception of their confidence in their HL knowledge, ability to identify and communicate with low HL patients, and use of relevant resources was completed by medical students and residents of 2 community-based internal medicine programs in Pennsylvania and Maryland between July 2012 and January 2013. Results: The response rate was 100% (40 for the PA program and 42% (17 for the MD residency program. All rotating medical students (17 completed the questionnaire. Out of 74 participants, less than 10% were confident of their HL knowledge and ability to identify and communicate with low HL patients. Only 1.4% (1 were confident of their ability to identify appropriate resources. There was no significant difference in communication skills (P=0.305 and ability to identify appropriate resources (P=0.143 across all participants irrespective of their training level. A significant improvement in HL knowledge was observed during the progression from first-year to third-year medical school (P=0.0126 and from internship to second year of residency (P=0.0496. Conclusion: Medical trainees perceive that they do not receive adequate training on HL knowledge and skills required to feel confident in identifying and communicating with low HL patients and identifying appropriate resources. There is a need for addressing these deficiencies via medical school and residency curricula.

  20. Milestone-Based Assessments Are Superior to Likert-Type Assessments in Illustrating Trainee Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Kathleen W; Whicker, Shari A; Bookman, Jack; Narayan, Aditee P; Staples, Betty B; Hering, Holly; McGann, Kathleen A

    2015-03-01

    The Pediatrics Milestone Project uses behavioral anchors, narrative descriptions of observable behaviors, to describe learner progression through the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. Starting June 2014, pediatrics programs were required to submit milestone reports for their trainees semiannually. Likert-type scale assessment tools were not designed to inform milestone reporting, creating a challenge for Clinical Competency Committees. To determine if milestone-based assessments better stratify trainees by training level compared to Likert-type assessments. We compared assessment results for 3 subcompetencies after changing from a 5-point Likert scale to milestone-based behavioral anchors in July 2013. Program leadership evaluated the new system by (1) comparing PGY-1 mean scores on Likert-type versus milestone-based assessments; and (2) comparing mean scores on the Likert-type versus milestone-based assessments across PGY levels. Mean scores for PGY-1 residents were significantly higher on the prior year's Likert-type assessments than milestone-based assessments for all 3 subcompetencies (P Likert-type assessments (eg, interpersonal and communication skills 1 [ICS1] mean score for PGY-1, 3.99 versus PGY-3, 3.98; P  =  .98). In contrast, milestone-based assessments demonstrated stratification by PGY level (eg, the ICS1 mean score was 3.06 for PGY-1, 3.83 for PGY-2, and 3.99 for PGY-3; P Likert-type assessments. Average PGY-level scores from milestone-based assessments may ultimately provide guidance for determining whether trainees are progressing at the expected pace.

  1. An evaluation of UK foundation trainee doctors' learning behaviours in a technology-enhanced learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Hannah L; Pontefract, Sarah K; Hodson, James; Blackwell, Nicholas; Hughes, Elizabeth; Marriott, John F; Coleman, Jamie J

    2016-05-03

    Technology-Enhanced Learning (TEL) can be used to educate Foundation Programme trainee (F1 and F2) doctors. Despite the advantages of TEL, learning behaviours may be exhibited that are not desired by system developers or educators. The aim of this evaluation was to investigate how learner behaviours (e.g. time spent on task) were affected by temporal (e.g. time of year), module (e.g. word count), and individual (e.g. knowledge) factors for 16 mandatory TEL modules related to prescribing and therapeutics. Data were extracted from the SCRIPT e-Learning platform for first year Foundation trainee (F1) doctors in the Health Education England's West Midland region from 1(st) August 2013 to 5(th) August 2014. Generalised Estimating Equation models were used to examine the relationship between time taken to complete modules, date modules were completed, pre- and post-test scores, and module factors. Over the time period examined, 688 F1 doctors interacted with the 16 compulsory modules 10,255 times. The geometric mean time taken to complete a module was 28.9 min (95% Confidence Interval: 28.4-29.5) and 1,075 (10.5%) modules were completed in less than 10 min. In February and June (prior to F1 progression reviews) peaks occurred in the number of modules completed and troughs in the time taken. Most modules were completed, and the greatest amount of time was spent on the learning on a Sunday. More time was taken by those doctors with greater pre-test scores and those with larger improvements in test scores. Foundation trainees are exhibiting unintended learning behaviours in this TEL environment, which may be attributed to several factors. These findings can help guide future developments of this TEL programme and the integration of other TEL programmes into curricula by raising awareness of potential behavioural issues that may arise.

  2. What is the chance all your trainees will pass the next Fellowship exam: A statistician's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kevin H; Mahmoud, Ibrahim; Brown, Anthony Ft

    2017-02-01

    Your department has had a good track record over many years for preparing trainees to successfully sit for the ACEM Fellowship exam. On average the pass rate for your trainees is over 80%. Then, to your dismay, suddenly only two of five of your trainees pass the latest Fellowship exam. Does this anomaly necessitate an urgent review of your department's training programme, or is it just a statistical quirk? Let us suppose you can prepare candidates so that they all have at least an 80% chance of passing. The probability that all five candidates would have passed is 32.8% (or 0.8(5) ) based on the multiplication rule of probability for independent events. The probability that only two of five passed is 5.1% (or 10 × 0.8(2) × 0.2(3) ) based on the binomial distribution, which is a probability distribution analogous to the normal distribution. The construction of the binomial distribution depends on two parameters: (i) number of candidates sitting ('n'), and (ii) probability of passing for any individual candidate ('P'). The distribution gives the probability that 'x' number of individuals will pass when 'n' number of individuals sit. Thus despite an 80% pass rate historically, the probability that only two of five candidates will pass is not negligible at 5.1%. It is an anomaly, which we may choose not to act on unless it is recurrent, noting it will be expected to occur naturally about one time out of 20. The real challenge is to maintain or increase that individual probability at 80% or higher.

  3. Outcomes of endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy: Experience of a fellowship trainee at a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aims to report a single trainee's experience of learning and performing endoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (En-DCR. Settings and Design: This study was a retrospective, interventional case series. Subjects and Methods: Fifty-four eyes of fifty patients presenting at a tertiary eye care center over 1 year were included in the study. All cases underwent endoscopic DCR with mitomycin-C and silicone intubation. The parameters studied included demographics, clinical features, intraoperative details, and postoperative ostium evaluation. Stent removal and nasal endoscopy were performed at 6 weeks and a further ostium evaluation at 3 and 6 months following surgery. Anatomical success rate was defined as patent irrigation, and functional success rate was defined as positive functional endoscopic dye test and absence of epiphora. Results: Fifty-four eyes of fifty patients were operated, and three cases were lost to follow-up after surgery. The mean age at presentation was 34 (4–75 years. Clinical diagnosis included primary acquired nasolacrimal duct (NLD obstruction in 72% (39/54, acute dacryocystitis in 15% (8/54, failed DCR in 7% (4/54, and persistent congenital NLD obstruction in 5% (3/54. The first five cases needed intervention by the mentor for superior osteotomy. Common variations in anatomical landmarks were posterior location of sac, large ethmoidal bulla, high internal common opening, and thick maxillary bone. Surgical time taken in the last 27 eyes was significantly lesser compared to the surgical duration taken in the initial 27 cases (P < 0.05. Anatomical and functional success rate was 94% (48/51 at 6 months follow-up period. Conclusions: Endoscopic En-DCR has a good success rate when performed by oculoplastic surgery trainees. Nasal anatomical variations, instrument handling, and adaptation to monocular view of endoscope are few of the challenges for beginners. Structured skill transfer can help trainees to learn

  4. Blended learning experience in teacher education: the trainees´ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Černá

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with blended learning in the context of pre-graduate English language teacher education. Firstly, the concept of blended learning is defined, then, the attention is focused on the online component of a blend, namely on the issue of interpersonal interaction including the challenges, which learning through online networking poses. Finally, results of a small–scale research are provided to offer insights into teacher trainees´ perspective of the blended learning experience at the University of Pardubice, Czech Republic.

  5. Breaking the mould: profiles of six pioneer trainee or beginning teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLay, Margaret

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been much recent attention on increasing the diversity of teachers in the Lifelong Learning Sector (LLS in order to provide a more representative workforce. This is seen as vital not only in engaging learners from minorities but also in increasing the experience of others in working with underrepresented groups. There has been less attention on how to support and sustain teachers from minorities once in post. This study profiles six pioneering teachers/trainees, looking at how they came into their chosen profession and subsequently into teaching, and what processes and attitudes help or hinder them in their work.

  6. Derivation of Two Critical Appraisal Scores for Trainees to Evaluate Online Educational Resources: A METRIQ Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa M. Chan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Online education resources (OERs, like blogs and podcasts, increasingly augment or replace traditional medical education resources such as textbooks and lectures. Trainees’ ability to evaluate these resources is poor, and few quality assessment aids have been developed to assist them. This study aimed to derive a quality evaluation instrument for this purpose. Methods: We used a three-phase methodology. In Phase 1, a previously derived list of 151 OER quality indicators was reduced to 13 items using data from published consensus-building studies (of medical educators, expert podcasters, and expert bloggers and subsequent evaluation by our team. In Phase 2, these 13 items were converted to seven-point Likert scales used by trainee raters (n=40 to evaluate 39 OERs. The reliability and usability of these 13 rating items was determined using responses from trainee raters, and top items were used to create two OER quality evaluation instruments. In Phase 3, these instruments were compared to an external certification process (the ALiEM AIR certification and the gestalt evaluation of the same 39 blog posts by 20 faculty educators. Results: Two quality-evaluation instruments were derived with fair inter-rater reliability: the METRIQ-8 Score (Inter class correlation coefficient [ICC]=0.30, p<0.001 and the METRIQ-5 Score (ICC=0.22, p<0.001. Both scores, when calculated using the derivation data, correlated with educator gestalt (Pearson’s r=0.35, p=0.03 and r=0.41, p<0.01, respectively and were related to increased odds of receiving an ALiEM AIR certification (odds ratio=1.28, p=0.03; OR=1.5, p=0.004, respectively. Conclusion: Two novel scoring instruments with adequate psychometric properties were derived to assist trainees in evaluating OER quality and correlated favourably with gestalt ratings of online educational resources by faculty educators. Further testing is needed to ensure these instruments are accurate when applied by

  7. Machine Translation in the Hands of Trainee Translators – an Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sycz-Opoń Joanna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Automated translation (machine translation, MT is systematically gaining popularity among professional translators, who claim that editing MT output requires less time and effort than translating from scratch. MT technology is also offered in leading translator’s workstations, e.g., SDL Trados Studio, memoQ, Déjà Vu and Wordfast. Therefore, the dilemma arises: should MT be introduced into formal translation training? In order to answer this question, first, it is necessary to understand how trainee translators actually use MT.

  8. / production

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    François Arleo; Pol-Bernard Gossiaux; Thierry Gousset; Jörg Aichelin

    2003-04-01

    For more than 25 years /Ψ production has helped to sharpen our understanding of QCD. In proton induced reaction some observations are rather well understood while others are still unclear. The current status of the theory of /Ψ production will be sketched, paying special attention to the issues of formation time and /Ψ re-interaction in a nuclear medium.

  9. Feedback from educational supervisors and trainees on the implementation of curricula and the assessment system for core medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gavin; Barrett, James; Jones, Mike; Parry, David; Wade, Winnie

    2008-10-01

    A pilot of core medical training (CMT) was conducted in 2006-7 with 160 trainees and 130 supervisors in the 10 hospitals within the Mersey Deanery. Questionnaires and focus groups were used to gain feedback from trainees and supervisors in relation to the components of CMT (the curricula, workplace-based assessments, appraisal, and the e-portfolio). There was generally a positive attitude to the CMT package. In particular the opportunities to give and receive feedback were appreciated; the e-portfolio was identified as helpful for recording assessment outcomes and supporting educational development for the trainees. The workplace-based assessments were well received. Many of the benefits of the components of CMT depended on the skill of the supervisor. The time required for effective training supervision and workplace-based assessments was identified as an important issue. This pilot was invaluable in informing the widespread implementation of CMT in 2007.

  10. Mental Health Trainees' Explicit and Implicit Attitudes Toward Transracial Adoptive Families Headed by Lesbian, Gay, and Heterosexual Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tony Xing; Jordan-Arthur, Brittany; Garafano, Jeffrey S; Curran, Laura

    2016-09-15

    We investigated 109 (79.8% female; 76% White, and 83.5% Heterosexual) mental health trainees' explicit and implicit attitudes toward heterosexual, lesbian, and gay White couples adopting and raising Black children. To determine explicit attitudes, we used a vignette depicting a Black child ready for adoption and three types of equally qualified White families who were headed by a heterosexual couple, gay couple, or lesbian couple. The trainees were asked to indicate which type of family they preferred to adopt the child. To determine implicit attitudes, we used the computer programed latency-based multifactor implicit association test (IAT) protocol. The IAT data were collected from each participant individually. Explicit data showed that over 80% of the participants indicated no strong preference in terms of which type of family should adopted the child. However, IAT data showed that the trainees implicitly preferred lesbian couples. Overall, the degree of congruence between explicit and implicit was very low. Implications for training were discussed.

  11. How Prepared are Trainee Teachers of University Putra Malaysia (UPM to Integrate Computer Technology in Classroom Teaching?

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    Shamsiah Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is a presentation of a study on trainee teachers' preparedness to integrate computer technology in teaching. One-hundred and thirty-nine trainee teachers participated in the study. They comprised 12.2% male students and 87.8% female. They majored in agricultural science, home-science, language, economics or accounting and science and mathematics. Their academic achievements were between 2.00 and 3.74 (Mean = 2.91, SD = 0.41. More than 50% of them felt ready to integrate computer in teaching. In general, UPM trainee teachers had positive attitudes towards the integration of computer in teaching. They had a moderately high computer efficacy. There are significant relationships between attitudes towards the integration of computers in teaching and their perceptions about their abilities to work on: data base graphics, electronic spreadsheet and word processing.

  12. Signposting GP trainees to relevant learning opportunities in hospital posts:the Super-condensed Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, MeiLing

    2014-01-01

    UK three-year GP specialty training programmes consist of 18 months in hospital posts and 18 months in general practice. Within the hospital setting, clinical supervisors of GP trainees may have difficulty determining which learning opportunities available within the post are most relevant to training for a future career in general practice. Feedback from GP trainees has indicated that there is a lack of consistency in hospital posts regarding relevance of training for general practice. The aim of the project was to provide support to the hospital supervisors in order to improve the overall quality of hospital posts in GPST programmes and their relevance to General Practice training, and to provide guidance to GP trainees to target their learning most effectively within each specialty post to improve relevance to future career. The deanery set out to develop a tool, the Super Condensed Curriculum Guide (SCCG) consisting of a set of documents created for a specialty with involvement from stakeholder groups. It was intended that this guide would stand alongside the relevant part of the GP curriculum. A programme of familiarisation and initial training for clinical supervisors was delivered. Take-up of the clinical supervisor training sessions was not uniform. Following favourable initial feedback from trainee groups and clinical supervisors across the region, the guides were developed for the remaining specialties in the programme. Trainees were also informed about the guide and how it might help focus their learning in a hospital post. Feedback from trainees across the specialties was positive, but more needs to be done to engage clinical supervisors across the range of specialties. This will improve the utility of the tool, help to guide the clinical supervisor in their teaching, and make sure each post is as educationally effective as possible.

  13. Effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) Training on Clinical Psychology Trainee Stress, Therapist Skills and Attributes, and ACT Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakenham, Kenneth I

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increasing uptake of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) by mental health practitioners, few studies have investigated the effects of ACT training on trainees. Clinical psychology trainees (CPTs) are susceptible to high stress such that their training represents a teachable moment for personal application of the therapy skills they learn for clinical practice. This study investigates the effects of ACT training on stress, therapist skills and attributes, and the personal acquisition of ACT strategies in CPTs. Thirty-two CPTs completed questionnaires before and after university-based ACT training that consisted of 12 2-h weekly workshops. Pairwise t-tests showed that CPTs reported improvements from before to after training on measures of counselling self-efficacy, client-therapist alliance, self-kindness, acceptance, defusion, mindfulness and values, and a marginally significant improvement on somatic symptoms, despite a trend towards increased work-related stress. As predicted, each of the ACT process variables was related to one or more of the therapist stress, skill and attribute variables, such that greater levels of mindfulness, values and acceptance, and less thought suppression were related to better trainee outcomes. This study provides preliminary data on therapist skill development and personal benefits for CPTs related to receiving ACT training that interweaves instruction in competencies acquisition with self-care. This study provides preliminary data on therapist skill development and personal benefits for clinical psychology trainees related to receiving ACT training that integrates training in competencies acquisition with self-care. The ACT training offers a framework for integrating the acquisition of clinical competencies and self-care skills and positive therapist attributes in trainees. Findings support a strong positive union between the ACT processes and better trainee personal and professional outcomes. Copyright © 2014 John

  14. ENDOCRINE TRAINEES EXHIBIT SENSITIVE BUT CONSERVATIVE ATTITUDES TOWARDS THE MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE CONDITIONS IN HIV PATIENTS IN SINGAPORE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jye, Seow Cherng; Weiliang, Chen Abel; Han, Hoi Wai; Dalan, Rinkoo

    2017-09-01

    With advances in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, the life expectancy of people with HIV (PWH) is fast approaching that of the general population. Endocrine and metabolic disorders occur more frequently in PWH than in the general population. This study assessed the knowledge, practice patterns, and confidence levels among endocrinology trainees in Singapore in managing endocrine disorders in PWH. An anonymous, 31-item survey was administered to 23 endocrinology trainees. Four domains were assessed: (1) previous exposure to endocrine disorders in PWH; (2) attitudes towards treating PWH, (3) case studies in endocrinology designed to assess for differences in treatment philosophy between a PWH and a noninfected counterpart, and (4) confidence in managing endocrine disorders in PWH. The participation rate was 73.9%, with the majority of trainees (88.2%) having managed fewer than 5 PWH with endocrine disorders. A total of 94.1% of the trainees had little or no hesitation in treating PWH, but more than half (58.8%) felt inadequate in confidently managing them. A total of 82.4% deemed HIV endocrinology as an emerging field and were open to the idea of pursuing it as a subspecialty in the future. Re-assuringly, most trainees would not compromise medical treatment for a PWH if it were indicated. More than half were ambivalent about prescribing cross-hormonal therapy to transgender individuals. Endocrinology trainees feel that while HIV endocrinology is an emerging field, they lack exposure, training, and confidence in the management of these patients. Although they would treat medical conditions well, they lacked knowledge in hormonal treatment of transgender individuals. HIV = human immunodeficiency virus PWH = people with HIV.

  15. Curriculum development for basic gynaecological laparoscopy with comparison of expert trainee opinions; prospective cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Christy; Fox, Robert; Lenguerrand, Erik; Hinshaw, Kim; Draycott, Timothy J; James, Mark

    2014-09-01

    To develop content for a basic laparoscopic curriculum in gynaecology. Prospective cross-sectional observational study. Modified Delphi method with three iterations undertaken by an invited group of national experts across the United Kingdom (UK). Two anonymous online surveys and a final physical group meeting were undertaken. Junior trainees in gynaecology undertook a parallel iteration of the Delphi process for external validation. Population included: expert panel - certified specialists in minimal-access gynaecological surgery, RCOG national senior trainee representatives, and medical educationalists, junior trainees group - regional trainees in gynaecology in first and second year of speciality training. Experts (n=37) reached fair to almost complete significant agreement (κ=0.100-0.8159; pcurriculum. Findings indicated that 39 categories should be included in the curriculum. Port placement, laparoscopic equipment and patient selection were ranked the most important theoretical categories. Hand-eye co-ordination, camera navigation and entry techniques were deemed the most valuable skills. Diagnostic laparoscopy, laparoscopic sterilisation, and laparoscopic salpingectomy were the operations agreed to be most important for inclusion. Simulation training was agreed as the method of skill development. The expert panel favoured box trainers, whereas the junior trainee group preferred virtual reality simulators. A basic simulation laparoscopic hand-eye co-ordination test was proposed as a final assessment of competence in the curriculum. Consensus was achieved on the content of a basic laparoscopic curriculum in gynaecology, in a cost- and time-effective, scientific process. The Delphi method provided a simple, structured consumer approach to curriculum development that combined views of trainers and trainees that could be used to develop curricula in other areas of post-graduate education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Conceptions of Learning: The Design and Validation of a Questionnaire for Trainee Teachers

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    Silvia L. Vilanova

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Teachers as well as trainee teachers have conceptions of teaching and learning that do not correspond to the learning theories studied within the university course programs. The predominating ideas in this paradigmatic context, which are based upon the fact that subjects understand an action scenario, posses an implicit character and differ from the notion that they are expressed explicitly most of times. The objective of this article is to introduce the adaption and validation of an instrument designed to research on the conceptions of trainee teachers of the School of Humanities as well as the School of Exact and Natural Sciences of the National University of Mar del Plata (Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata in Argentina about learning. Also, it intends to conduct a first analysis of the results obtained after it has been administered. The instrument is an adaption of a dilemma questionnaire designed by Martín, Mateos, Pérez-Echeverría, Pozo, Pecharromán, Martínez, and Villalón, which they administered to 120 students. Cronbach’s Alpha was used to determine factor analysis reliability, and consequently construct validity. The following data analysis shows the application of the interpretative theory of learning based on an epistemological conception related to critical realism.

  17. Discharge Education for Residents: A Study of Trainee Preparedness for Hospital Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, Jennifer L; Fletcher, Kathlyn E

    2015-10-01

    Safe hospital discharges have become a major focus in the national discussion on transitions of care and care coordination. Education on the hospital discharge process is evolving as the needs of trainees are better understood. This study is a cross-sectional survey of residents in a Midwestern residency program about their confidence in safely discharging patients from the hospital, including how they have or have not learned to do so. An anonymous paper questionnaire was distributed to a convenience sample of interns and residents at a weekly meeting of the residency program. Most residents reported a general confidence in their abilities to safely discharge patients from the hospital; however, further probing revealed that their confidence breaks down when required to competently perform specific tasks of the discharge process such as activity restrictions or facilitation of home care. More than 50% of house staff surveyed responded that their education in many specific aspects of the discharge process are lacking. Interdisciplinary care education, and the discharge summary in particular, warrant further scrutiny as a care transition tool and means of teaching safe hospital discharge to trainees. We present a questionnaire that may serve useful as an anonymous tool to gauge residents' educational needs.

  18. Incidence and Type of Errors in Microsurgical Technique in Surgical Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Jill P; Doherty, Christopher C; Schrag, Christiaan H

    2016-09-01

    Background The purpose of our study was first to identify microsurgical errors and their incidence. Identifying these common errors and the theoretical approach to prevent or repair them may provide benefit to trainees in the laboratory setting and, ultimately, in the clinical setting. Methods Using a rat femoral artery anastomoses model for resident microsurgical training, direct staff observation with real-time feedback and error identification was employed. Types of microsurgical errors were recorded and instructor feedback relayed to five resident participants. Results Errors were cataloged into five main categories: insufficient approximation (26.1%), vessel backwall (21.7%), incomplete bites (19.6%), tissue tear (19.6%), and irregular widths (13.0%). Further subdivision of the incomplete bite error based on vessel layer violated was performed. Representative figures were created outlining these errors. Conclusions We present common microsurgical errors in trainees and a training model with synchronous feedback. Visual images were designed outlining these errors as an adjunct for teaching.

  19. The Relationship of Endoscopic Proficiency to Educational Expense for Virtual Reality Simulator Training Amongst Surgical Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raque, Jessica; Goble, Adam; Jones, Veronica M; Waldman, Lindsey E; Sutton, Erica

    2015-07-01

    With the introduction of Fundamentals of Endoscopic Surgery, training methods in flexible endoscopy are being augmented with simulation-based curricula. The investment for virtual reality simulators warrants further research into its training advantage. Trainees were randomized into bedside or simulator training groups (BED vs SIM). SIM participated in a proficiency-based virtual reality curriculum. Trainees' endoscopic skills were rated using the Global Assessment of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Skills (GAGES) in the patient care setting. The number of cases to reach 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score and calculated costs of training were compared. Nineteen residents participated in the study. There was no difference in the average number of cases required to achieve 90 per cent of the maximum GAGES score for esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 13 (SIM) versus11 (BED) (P = 0.63), or colonoscopy 21 (SIM) versus 4 (BED) (P = 0.34). The average per case cost of training for esophagogastroduodenoscopy was $35.98 (SIM) versus $39.71 (BED) (P = 0.50), not including the depreciation costs associated with the simulator ($715.00 per resident over six years). Use of a simulator appeared to increase the cost of training without accelerating the learning curve or decreasing faculty time spent in instruction. The importance of simulation in endoscopy training will be predicated on more cost-effective simulators.

  20. Improving clinician competency in communication about schizophrenia: a pilot educational program for psychiatry trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughland, Carmel; Kelly, Brian; Ditton-Phare, Philippa; Sandhu, Harsimrat; Vamos, Marina; Outram, Sue; Levin, Tomer

    2015-04-01

    Important gaps are observed in clinicians' communication with patients and families about psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Communication skills can be taught, and models for education in these skills have been developed in other fields of medicine, such as oncology, providing a framework for training communication skills relevant to psychiatric practice. This study evaluated a pilot communication skills education program for psychiatry trainees, focusing on discussing schizophrenia diagnosis and prognosis. Communication skills training modules were developed based on an existing theoretical framework (ComSkil), adapted for discussing a schizophrenia diagnosis and prognosis. Pre-post training rating of self-reported confidence in a range of communication tasks was obtained, along with trainee views on the training methods. Thirty-eight participants completed the training. Significant improvements in confidence were reported post training for discussing schizophrenia prognosis, including an increased capacity to critically evaluate their own communication skills. Participants reported high levels of satisfaction with the program. This preliminary study provides support for the translation of a well-established educational model to psychiatric training addressing core clinical communication tasks and provides the foundation for the development of a more comprehensive evaluation and an extended curriculum regarding other aspects of care for patients with schizophrenia: ongoing management and recovery, dealing with conflict, and conducting a family interview.

  1. Communication skills among surgical trainees: Perceptions of residents in a teaching hospital in Northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Communication between the surgeon and the patient is a core clinical skill. The ability to communicate with patients and their family members is very important in the optimum care of the surgical patient. Few studies have assessed communication between surgical trainees and their patients in sub-Saharan Africa. In response to this, the communication skills of residents in the department of surgery were evaluated to determine their perception of competency and perceived need for training in communication skills as a basis for developing an effective education programme. Method A survey of patient care - related communication skills among surgery residents and assessment of competence, rating the importance and perceived need for training in communication skills. Results Most residents rated their skills as either fairly or extremely competent in all areas except in providing bereavement counseling. They found all skills important and indicated a need for training in them. Senior registrars rated their competence and the importance higher in skills relating to breaking bad news, educating and preparing patients and families for surgery and encouraging them to express their anxieties. (p 0.05. Conclusion Residents face difficult communication challenges with patients and their families. There is a dire need for improved education in communication skills. Understanding the surgical trainees perceptions of patient care related communication skills is the first step in designing an effective education programme.

  2. Knowing and acting in the clinical workplace: trainees' perspectives on modelling and feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegeman, J H; Schoten, E J; Terpstra, O T

    2013-10-01

    In this article we discuss clinical workplace learning using a dual approach: a theoretical one and an empirical one. Drawing on the philosophical work of Aristotle, Polanyi and Schön we posit that the 'knowing and acting' underpinning day-to-day medical practice is personal and embraces by nature a tacit dimension. Consequently, imparting and acquiring this knowledge type necessitates personal interaction between trainer and trainee. The tacit dimension particularly influences modelling and feedback. In our empirical exploration we explore these educational routes in two disparate disciplines: surgery and paediatrics. We use a longitudinal design with in-depth interviewing. Our conclusion on modelling is: modelling is a dynamic and fragmented process reflecting discipline bound characteristics and working styles. On feedback it is: 'feedback' serves as vehicle for three distinctive forms of commenting on performance, each holding a specific power of expression for learning. We propose to view clinical workplace learning as: an interactive master-apprenticeship model encompassing modelling and feedback as natural educational routes. We conceptualise modelling and feedback as 'function' of interaction (developing grounded theory). Modelling function and feedback function may serve to study these routes as didactical components of ongoing interaction between trainer and trainee rather than an educator-driven series of unrelated events.

  3. Teaching corner: "first do no harm": teaching global health ethics to medical trainees through experiential learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logar, Tea; Le, Phuoc; Harrison, James D; Glass, Marcia

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies show that returning global health trainees often report having felt inadequately prepared to deal with ethical dilemmas they encountered during outreach clinical work. While global health training guidelines emphasize the importance of developing ethical and cultural competencies before embarking on fieldwork, their practical implementation is often lacking and consists mainly of recommendations regarding professional behavior and discussions of case studies. Evidence suggests that one of the most effective ways to teach certain skills in global health, including ethical and cultural competencies, is through service learning. This approach combines community service with experiential learning. Unfortunately, this approach to global health ethics training is often unattainable due to a lack of supervision and resources available at host locations. This often means that trainees enter global health initiatives unprepared to deal with ethical dilemmas, which has the potential for adverse consequences for patients and host institutions, thus contributing to growing concerns about exploitation and "medical tourism." From an educational perspective, exposure alone to such ethical dilemmas does not contribute to learning, due to lack of proper guidance. We propose that the tension between the benefits of service learning on the one hand and the respect for patients' rights and well-being on the other could be resolved by the application of a simulation-based approach to global health ethics education.

  4. A study of trainee teachers’ image of practising teachers and their ICT expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Harangus

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Digital illiteracy is one of the great challenges of education. In our information society, an adequate level of digital proficiency is an important requirement and teachers’ skills, personality, competence and professional experience are important factors in determining the efficiency of the teaching-learning process. This research has two goals. First, we tried to find out what characteristics a “good” and a “bad” teacher would have based on the trainee teachers’ own experience as secondary school students. We also wanted to know what they think about the social roles of teachers; about the importance of native language in education; what expectations they have regarding the computer skills and competences of secondary school teachers; and what experience they have regarding the use of ICT equipment in the education process. The answers to the open questions about teachers were grouped into four categories: professional expectations, preparedness, teaching skills, personality traits and behaviour. We developed four statistically relevant factors to determine the level of teachers’ computer skills and we used a set of questions containing 10 items to examine the experience of trainee teachers regarding the use of ICT in education. Our study reveals the situation of Hungarian vocational training from Romania, which is a key factor for high-quality teacher training.

  5. The effect of introducing a Trauma Network on patient flow, hospital finances and trainee operating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipps, Daniel; Jameson, Simon; Murty, An; Gregory, Rob; Large, David; Gregson, Jackie; Refaie, Ramsay; Reed, Mike

    2015-02-01

    In April 2012 the National Health Service in England introduced the Trauma Network system with the aim of improving the quality of trauma care. In this study we wished to determine how the introduction of the Trauma network has affected patient flow, hospital finances and orthopaedic trauma training across our region. The overall pattern of trauma distribution was not greatly affected, reflecting the relative rarity of major trauma in the UK. A small decrease in the total number of operations performed by trainees was noted in our region. Trainees at units designated as Major Trauma Centres gained slightly more operative experience in trauma procedures overall, and specifically in those associated with high energy, such as long bone nail insertion and external fixation procedures. However, there have been no significant changes in this pattern since the introduction of the Trauma Networks. Falling operative numbers presents a challenge for delivering high quality training within a surgical training programme, and each case should be seen as a vital educational opportunity. Best practice tariff targets for trauma were delivered for 99% of cases at our MTCs. Future audit and review to analyse the evolving role of the MTCs is desirable.

  6. Justice, Courage, and Truthfulness: Virtues That Medical Trainees Can and Must Learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karches, Kyle E; Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2016-07-01

    Medical educators and powerful physician organizations agree on the importance of professionalism for the formation of good physicians. However, the many definitions of professionalism found in the literature lack content and differ significantly, undermining attempts to describe and implement professionalism curricula. The work of the contemporary moral philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre on the virtues may help provide some of the content that the concept of professionalism currently lacks. MacIntyre shows the importance of the virtues, particularly justice, courage, and truthfulness, for the success of any "practice," defined as a form of cooperative human activity. Medicine fits his definition of a practice, and accordingly, medical trainees require these virtues, among others, to succeed. This analysis may provide a foundation for a new form of ethical instruction, in which excellent clinician-educators model the virtues for students and residents, thereby combating the "hidden curriculum" that sometimes corrodes these values. This educational model resembles the way in which masters of other practices, such as music, teach their students and help them become lifelong learners. Such an approach requires leaders at academic medical centers to commit to the establishment of communities in which the virtues flourish. Instruction in the virtues could supplement the emphasis on principles and rule following that predominates in medical education. It would also allow physicians and students to engage with the various cultural and religious traditions in which virtue ethics has flourished, enriching the diversity of medical ethics education and promoting trainees' professional development.

  7. Attitudes towards shared learning of trainee dental technicians and undergraduate dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeson, Michael G; Walker-Gleaves, Caroline; Ellis, Ian

    2015-01-01

    The challenges of health care are increasingly complex and subject to frequent change. Meeting these demands requires that health professionals work in partnership with each other and the patient. One way of contributing to this is for students to learn together. However, effective teamwork requires an education system that helps to foster understanding among all those entering the health workforce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes towards shared learning of undergraduate dental students and trainee dental technicians in a university dental school/hospital in the United Kingdom. Twenty-five trainee dental technicians and 75 undergraduate dental students took part in the study over five academic years. Data were collected using structured questionnaires. A 100% response rate was achieved from the questionnaires. The results indicated the majority of students recognized the benefits of shared learning and viewed the acquisition of teamworking skills as useful for their future working lives, beneficial to the care of their patients, and likely to enhance professional working relationships. The study also found a positive association of being valued as an individual in the dental team by all student groups. Future dental curricula should provide opportunities to develop effective communication between these two groups and encourage teamworking opportunities. These opportunities need to be systematically developed in the dental curriculum to achieve the desired goals.

  8. Fundamental Study of Evaluation at Berthing Training for Pilot Trainees Using a Ship Maneuvering Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Inoue

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Use of the ship maneuvering simulator (SMS is at the core of pilot trainees education and training, so it is desirable to have an evaluation method that can be completed shortly after each berthing training session. There are basically two methods of docking maneuvering that pilot trainees learn: one in which the ship enters from outside the port and is berthed directly at the target quay, and a second method in which the vessel carries out a turn in front of the target quay before berthing. The authors suggested an evaluation index in a previous study concerning the first docking method. In the present study, the authors propose an evaluation method for the case of berthing the vessel using the turning maneuver. Since the index obtained by this method offers a single numerical benchmark, it is an easy–to-understand result of the training exercise. The authors carried out experiments using a SMS and confirmed that the proposed evaluation method is effective and helpful to improve the effectiveness of SMS training.

  9. Bacterial Etiology and Risk Factors Associated with Cellulitis and Purulent Skin Abscesses in Military Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ryan C.; Ellis, Michael W.; Schlett, Carey D.; Millar, Eugene V.; LaBreck, Patrick T.; Mor, Deepika; Elassal, Emad M.; Lanier, Jeffrey B.; Redden, Cassie L.; Cui, Tianyuan; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa; Bishop, Danett K.; Hall, Eric R.; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Military trainees are at high risk for skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). Although Staphylococcus aureus is associated with purulent SSTI, it is unclear to what degree this pathogen causes nonpurulent cellulitis. To inform effective prevention strategies and to provide novel insights into SSTI pathogenesis, we aimed to determine the etiology of SSTI in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study in US Army Infantry trainees with SSTI (cutaneous abscesses and cellulitis) from July 2012 through December 2014. We used standard microbiology, serology, and high-throughput sequencing to determine the etiology of SSTI. Furthermore, we compared purported risk factors as well as anatomic site colonization for S. aureus. Among 201 SSTI cases evaluated for SSTI risk factors, cellulitis was associated with lower extremity blisters (P = 0.01) and abscess was associated with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonization (Pmicrobiome analysis, only 1 leading edge aspirate was culturable (Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus). Microbiome evaluation of aspirate specimens demonstrated that Rhodanobacter terrae was the most abundant species (66.8% average abundance), while abscesses were dominated by S. aureus (92.9% average abundance). Although abscesses and cellulitis share the spectrum of clinical SSTI, the bacterial etiologies as determined by current technology appear distinct. Furthermore, the presence of atypical bacteria within cellulitis aspirates may indicate novel mechanisms of cellulitis pathogenesis. Clinical Trials Registration: NCT01105767. PMID:27780238

  10. ELT Methodology and Learners Meet in Techniques: A Lesson Planning Perspective for Teacher Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İskender Hakkı Sarıgöz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Problem: Teacher trainees attending English language teaching departments learn and practice major foreign language teaching methods and techniques. The abundance of methods and techniques requires a serious selection in order to compile the best lesson. The pre-service teachers are equipped with the required methodological knowledge and ready to implement teaching. Nevertheless, the learners are not aware of the huge teaching technology behind this rule governed and complicated discipline. They are only exposed to the program offered and the techniques that systematize instruction. The lesson plan which is a collection of instructional techniques offers ELT methodology and learners a meeting zone. The arrangement of such a meeting is always a demanding task. Purpose: This discussion attempts to examine basic aspects of the meeting mentioned above and how it can be organized through a skills-based approach. Method: A discussion about skills-based lesson planning has been presented along with a survey of literature. The suggested components of the teaching fashion discussed have been listed and explained briefly. Conclusion: It is argued here that English language learners and ELT methodology meet in the techniques. Teacher trainees should consider all the variables and collect the most suitable set of techniques when they design their microteachings.

  11. Developing a Compassionate Internal Supervisor: Compassion-Focused Therapy for Trainee Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Tobyn; Dixon, Alison; Kolts, Russell

    2016-07-25

    The concept of an 'internal supervisor' has been used in psychotherapy to describe the way in which the supervisory relationship is internalized and utilized by the supervisee. This research explores the possibility, and potential benefit, of training therapists to develop a 'compassionate internal supervisor'. A training programme was developed for trainee cognitive-behavioural therapists using adapted versions of compassion-focused therapy interventions. The training focused on guided imagery exercises and reflective practices undertaken for a 4-week period. Seven trainee cognitive-behavioural therapists were interviewed, utilizing a semi-structured format, regarding their experience of the training programme. The resulting transcriptions were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). The analysis identified six super-ordinate themes: (1) the varied nature of the supervisor image, (2) blocks and their overcoming, (3) increased compassion and regulation of emotion, (4) impact on cognitive processes, (5) internalization and integration, and (6) professional and personal benefit. The themes describe the varied ways in which participants created and experienced their compassionate supervisor imagery. Working with the personal blocks encountered in the process provided participants with a deeper understanding of the nature of compassion and its potential to support them in their training, practice and personal lives. The process and impact of 'internalizing' a compassionate supervisory relationship is described by participants and then discussed for potential implications for psychotherapy training and self-practice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels Among Boston Trainee Doctors in Winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Clark

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available As indoor workers, trainee doctors may be at risk for inadequate vitamin D. All trainee doctors (residents in a Boston pediatric training program (residency were invited to complete a survey, and undergo testing for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD], PTH, and calcium during a 3-week period in March 2010. We examined the association between resident characteristics and serum 25(OHD using Chi2 and Kruskal-Wallis test and multivariable linear and logistic regression. Of the 119 residents, 102 (86% participated. Although the mean serum 25(OHD level was 67 nmol/L (±26, 25 (25% had a level < 50 nmol/L and 3 (3% residents had levels < 25 nmol/L. In the multivariable model, factors associated with 25(OHD levels were: female sex (β 12.7, 95% CI 3.6, 21.7, white race (β 21.7, 95% CI 11.7, 31.7, travel to more equatorial latitudes during the past 3 months (β 6.3, 95% CI 2.0, 10.5 and higher daily intake of vitamin D (β 1.1, 95% CI 0.04, 2.1. Although one in four residents in our study had a serum 25(OHD < 50 nmol/L, all of them would have been missed using current Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS screening guidelines. The use of traditional risk factors appears insufficient to identify low vitamin D in indoor workers at northern latitudes.

  13. Body Image, Dieting and Disordered Eating and Activity Practices among Teacher Trainees: Implications for School-Based Health Education and Obesity Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Zali; O'Dea, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to investigate and compare body image, body dissatisfaction, dieting, disordered eating, exercise and eating disorders among trainee health education/physical education (H&PE) and non-H&PE teachers. Participants were 502 trainee teachers randomly selected from class groups at three Australian universities who completed the…

  14. Body Image, Dieting and Disordered Eating and Activity Practices among Teacher Trainees: Implications for School-Based Health Education and Obesity Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Zali; O'Dea, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to investigate and compare body image, body dissatisfaction, dieting, disordered eating, exercise and eating disorders among trainee health education/physical education (H&PE) and non-H&PE teachers. Participants were 502 trainee teachers randomly selected from class groups at three Australian universities who completed the…

  15. Burnout syndrome among psychiatric trainees in 22 countries: Risk increased by long working hours, lack of supervision, and psychiatry not being first career choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, N; Podlesek, A; Volpe, U; Barrett, E; Ferrari, S; Rojnic Kuzman, M; Wuyts, P; Papp, S; Nawka, A; Vaida, A; Moscoso, A; Andlauer, O; Tateno, M; Lydall, G; Wong, V; Rujevic, J; Platz Clausen, N; Psaras, R; Delic, A; Losevich, M A; Flegar, S; Crépin, P; Shmunk, E; Kuvshinov, I; Loibl-Weiß, E; Beezhold, J

    2016-02-01

    Postgraduate medical trainees experience high rates of burnout, but evidence regarding psychiatric trainees is missing. We aim to determine burnout rates among psychiatric trainees, and identify individual, educational and work-related factors associated with severe burnout. In an online survey psychiatric trainees from 22 countries were asked to complete the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI-GS) and provide information on individual, educational and work-related parameters. Linear mixed models were used to predict the MBI-GS scores, and a generalized linear mixed model to predict severe burnout. This is the largest study on burnout and training conditions among psychiatric trainees to date. Complete data were obtained from 1980 out of 7625 approached trainees (26%; range 17.8-65.6%). Participants were 31.9 (SD 5.3) years old with 2.8 (SD 1.9) years of training. Severe burnout was found in 726 (36.7%) trainees. The risk was higher for trainees who were younger (Pburnout, severe burnout remained associated with long working hours (Pburnout. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. RE-SEARCHING SECONDARY TEACHER TRAINEES IN DISTANCE EDUCATION AND FACE-TO-FACE MODE: Study of Their Background Variables, Personal Characteristics and Academic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta GARG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was conducted to describe and compare the background variables, personal characteristics and academic performance of secondary teacher trainees in distance education and face-to-face mode. The results indicated that teacher trainees in distance education differed from their counterparts in age, marital status, sex and socio-economic status. Distance trainees outperformed the on-campus trainees on their preference for left-hemispheric styles of learning and thinking, budgeting time, learning motivation, overall study habits, academic motivation, attitude towards education, work methods, interpersonal relations, and on their perception about relevance of course content of theory papers in B.Ed., but on-campus trainees outperformed distance trainees on preference for right-hemispheric learning styles, need for achievement, motivation for sports, attitude towards teaching profession, child-centered practices, teachers, overall attitude towards teaching along with their perception for development of teaching skills and attitude, personality development during B.Ed. course. In academic performance distance trainees lag behind the on-campus trainee in their marks in theory papers, skills in teaching and in aggregate.

  17. The Manifestation of the Value of Patriotism among Israeli Trainee Teachers--Natives and Immigrants: How Will They Educate Their Pupils in the Light of This Value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, Sara; Horowitz, Tamar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study has been to examine the expressions of the value of patriotism and its trends among trainee teachers. To what extent do the trainee teachers adhere to the values of patriotism? Have the values of the old Land of Israel patriotism been replaced by the values of globalism? What are the attitudes of immigrant teacher…

  18. Differentiation, context and teacher education: the changing profile of trainees on in-service initial teacher training programmes in the lifelong learning sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel, Penny

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of initial teacher training (ITT student data relating to the University of Huddersfield part-time in-service Cert Ed/PGCE over a three-year period has revealed significant change in the make-up of trainee cohorts. There has been an increase in younger trainees and in trainees very new to teaching, although more experienced and older trainees do continue to enrol. There has also been a considerable shift in the balance of trainees away from further education (FE college staff. These changes have implications for those who manage and deliver teacher education for the sector. It remains of key importance that the curriculum is not experienced as overly ‘FE-college centric’ and that mentoring arrangements acknowledge the needs of trainees from diverse contexts. It is clear that in the delivery of ITT for the lifelong learning sector, increasingly, one size will not comfortably fit all. Within teacher education much emphasis is placed upon the role of differentiation in regard to trainee practice. The changing trainee profile identified requires that teacher education itself unambiguously models a differentiated approach – and, in relation to teacher education for the lifelong learning sector, differentiation must address workplace context.

  19. University versus Practice: A Pilot Study to Identify Skills Shortages That Exist in First-Year Trainee Accountants in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Romburgh, Henriëtte; van der Merwe, Nico

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the skills shortages in first-year trainee accountants entering practice in South Africa and to recommend ways to address and overcome those shortages. Questionnaires were administered to registered audit firms in Gauteng Province to gather the perceptions of senior trainees, managers and partners on the skills…

  20. In-Country TEFL/Crossover Tropical Agricultural Training Manual. Trainee Edition. Training for Development. Peace Corps Information Collection & Exchange Training Manual No. T-37A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Carl R.; And Others

    Correlated to the trainer's manual for the same course, this trainee's manual has been designed for Peace Corps trainees coming to Thailand without stateside agricultural training. Although it was developed for the training of Test of English as a Foreign Language (TEFL)/Crossovers, the majority of sessions are appropriate for other Peace Corps…

  1. Re-Searching Secondary Teacher Trainees in Distance Education and Face-to-Face Mode: Study of Their Background Variables, Personal Characteristics and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Mamta; Gakhar, Sudesh

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to describe and compare the background variables, personal characteristics and academic performance of secondary teacher trainees in distance education and face-to-face mode. The results indicated that teacher trainees in distance education differed from their counterparts in age, marital status, sex and…

  2. A Conflict in Your Head: An Exploration of Trainee Science Teachers' Subject Matter Knowledge Development and Its Impact on Teacher Self-Confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    Teachers' subject matter knowledge (SMK) is one factor contributing to teaching 'successfully', as this provides a basis from which pedagogical content knowledge develops. UK-based trainee science teachers teach all sciences to age 14 and often up to age 16. Trainees have specialist science knowledge in chemistry, physics, or biology from their…

  3. Sex, women and the menopause: are specialist trainee doctors up for it? A survey of views and attitudes of specialist trainee doctors in Community Sexual & Reproductive Health and Obstetrics & Gynaecology around sexuality and sexual healthcare in the (peri)menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleser, Heike

    2015-03-01

    Sexual health, function and pleasure can contribute significantly towards the wellbeing of (peri-)menopausal women. Healthcare professionals specialising in women's health should therefore be able to provide 'sex-positive' menopause care, which proactively addresses any sexual issues and assesses the need for contraception and prevention of sexually transmitted infections. A survey was used to investigate the views and attitudes of specialist trainee doctors in Community Sexual & Reproductive Health (cSRH) and Obstetrics & Gynaecology towards sexual health in the (peri)menopause as they play a key role in promoting the sexual wellbeing of their patients. The results showed that both study groups had positive attitudes towards sexuality and sexual healthcare of mid-life and older women. However, cSRH trainees had significantly more confidence in dealing with psychosexual problems and perceived significantly less barriers to deliver comprehensive menopausal care within the mostly community-based Sexual & Reproductive Healthcare settings they are working in compared to their mainly hospital-based gynaecological colleagues. Profiting from seemingly better training in the topic cSRH trainees also noticed considerably less embarrassment from their patients when addressing sexual issues. Nonetheless, training needs were identified in both trainee groups.

  4. Burnout, stress and satisfaction among Australian and New Zealand radiation oncology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, John; Rioseco, Pilar

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the incidence of burnout among radiation oncology trainees in Australia and New Zealand and the stress and satisfaction factors related to burnout. A survey of trainees was conducted in mid-2015. There were 42 Likert scale questions on stress, 14 Likert scale questions on satisfaction and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey assessed burnout. A principal component analysis identified specific stress and satisfaction areas. Categorical variables for the stress and satisfaction factors were computed. Associations between respondent's characteristics and stress and satisfaction subscales were examined by independent sample t-tests and analysis of variance. Effect sizes were calculated using Cohens's d when significant mean differences were observed. This was also done for respondent characteristics and the three burnout subscales. Multiple regression analyses were performed. The response rate was 81.5%. The principal component analysis for stress identified five areas: demands on time, professional development/training, delivery demands, interpersonal demands and administration/organizational issues. There were no significant differences by demographic group or area of interest after P-values were adjusted for the multiple tests conducted. The principal component analysis revealed two satisfaction areas: resources/professional activities and value/delivery of services. There were no significant differences by demographic characteristics or area of interest in the level of satisfaction after P-values were adjusted for the multiple tests conducted. The burnout results revealed 49.5% of respondents scored highly in emotional exhaustion and/or depersonalization and 13.1% had burnout in all three measures. Multiple regression analysis revealed the stress subscales 'demands on time' and 'interpersonal demands' were associated with emotional exhaustion. 'Interpersonal demands' was also associated with depersonalization and correlated negatively

  5. Effectiveness of Mathematics Teaching and Learning Experiences through Wireless Technology as Recent Style to Enhance B.Ed. Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joan, D. R. Robert

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to find out the effect of learning through Wireless technologies and the traditional method in teaching and learning Mathematics. The investigator adopted experimental research to find the effectiveness of implementing Wireless technologies in the population of B.Ed. trainees. The investigator selected 32 B.Ed.…

  6. The Application of Problem Solving Method on Science Teacher Trainees on the Solution of the Environmental Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogru, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    Helping students to improve their problems solving skills is the primary target of science teacher trainees. In modern science, for training the students, methods should be used for improving their thinking skills, making connections with events and concepts and scientific operations skills rather than information and definition giving. One of…

  7. A Study on Attitude and Opinion towards Using Computer Technology in Teaching among B.Ed. Trainees in Tiruchirappalli District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, C. Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to find out whether there was a significant difference in the attitude and opinion towards using Computer Technology in teaching among B.Ed., trainees in terms of select independent variables. Normative survey was the technique employed. Opinion towards Computer Usage and Attitude towards Computer Technology inventory…

  8. The Supervisor Training Curriculum: Evidence-Based Ways to Promote Work Quality and Enjoyment among Support Staff (Trainee Guide)

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Trainee Guide for the Supervisor Training Curriculum" summarizes key points in the Curriculum and is meant as a note taking and reference tool. The Supervisor Training Curriculum instructs supervisors on ways in which they can direct and motivate staff working with people with intellectual disabilities. Based on three decades of applied…

  9. Investigating and Promoting Trainee Science Teachers' Conceptual Change of the Nature of Science with Digital Dialogue Games "Interloc"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Nasser; Wegerif, Rupert; Skinner, Nigel; Postlethwaite, Keith; Hetherington, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore how an online-structured dialogue environment supported (OSDE) collaborative learning about the nature of science among a group of trainee science teachers in the UK. The software used (InterLoc) is a linear text-based tool, designed to support structured argumentation with openers and "dialogue…

  10. An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Online Text-to-Speech Tools in Improving EFL Teacher Trainees' Pronunciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eksi, Gonca Yangin; Yesilçinar, Sabahattin

    2016-01-01

    Given the limited time for instruction in the classroom, pronunciation often ends up as the most neglected aspect of language teaching. However, in cases when the learner's pronunciation is expected to be good or native-like, as is expected of language teacher trainees, out-of-class self-study options become prominent. This study aimed to…

  11. What influences the quality of educational encounters between trainer and trainee in vocational training for general practice?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boendermaker, PM; Ket, P; Dusman, H; Schuling, J; Van der Vleuten, CPM; Tan, LHC

    2002-01-01

    This study of educational encounters between a trainer and a trainee in vocational training for general practice investigates the quality of the encounter. The study focuses on the relation between the quality of the encounter and elements such as presence of feedback, duration, use of media, etc. A

  12. Problems in the Application of Behavior Modification Principles for Teaching Job-Required Behaviors to Disadvantaged Manpower Trainees. Special Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feifer, Irwin; And Others

    In its attempts to apply behavior modification principles to teaching job-required behaviors to manpower trainees, the Mobilization for Youth-Experimental Manpower Laboratory (MFY-EML), has mounted a number of reinforcement-based Neighborhood Youth Corps training programs. The nature, magnitude and scheduling of reinforcers, the nature of the…

  13. Formative Assessment in Teacher Education: The Development of a Diagnostic Language Test for Trainee Teachers of German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of a diagnostic test of German and its integration in a programme of formative assessment during a one-year initial teacher-training course. The test focuses on linguistic aspects that cause difficulty for trainee teachers of German as a foreign language and assesses implicit and explicit…

  14. International Counseling Trainees' Experiences and Perceptions of Their Multicultural Counseling Training in the United States: A Mixed Method Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shannon D.; Ng, Kok-Mun

    2009-01-01

    This study examined international counseling students' (ICTs) experiences and perceptions of their multicultural counseling training (MCT) in the United States. The focus was on (a) relevance of the training, (b) effectiveness of the training methods, and (c) development of cross-cultural competence as trainees. Major findings indicated that ICTs…

  15. The Effect of Instructional Methods (Lecture-Discussion versus Group Discussion) and Teaching Talent on Teacher Trainees Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutrofin; Degeng, Nyoman Sudana; Ardhana, Wayan; Setyosari, Punaji

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine difference in the effect of instructional methods (lecture-discussion versus group discussion) and teaching talent on teacher trainees student learning outcomes. It was conducted by a quasi-experimental design using the factorialized (2 x 2) version of the nonequivalent control group design. The subjects were…

  16. Change of outlook on elderly persons with dementia: a study of trainees during a year of special education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skog, M; Grafström, M; Negussie, B; Winblad, B

    1999-08-01

    In 1996 the Silvia Home Foundation started a non-governmental education programme with an integrated day-care unit devoted to patients with dementia: Working chairwoman of the foundation is HM Queen Silvia of Sweden. This study aims to describe the trainees' changed outlook on elderly people with dementia during a year of special education. Data were collected by interviews, informal discussions and participant observations during the lessons. The investigation focused on two questions: the trainees' outlook on the patients and their outlook on the work with the patients. At the beginning of their education, the trainees looked at the patients from a staff's perspective. During their education, this was gradually toned down and they changed to a disease perspective, and eventually to a human dignity perspective. After initially seeing dementia patients as a homogeneous group, the trainees went on to see them as unique human beings. Their outlook on their work also changed, from being task-oriented to a more humanitarian approach.

  17. Comparative Analysis of Teacher Trainee Students' eLearning Technology (ELT) Readiness towards Promoting Global Curriculum Best Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogwu, Edna N.

    2016-01-01

    This study compares teacher trainee students (TTSs), electronic learning technology (ELT) readiness, competence as well as their constraints to ELT readiness using 373 University education students' from Botswana and Nigeria that are randomly selected. Data was descriptively analysed based on the research objectives and hypotheses using mean…

  18. Self-Efficacy and New Technology Adoption and Use among Trainee Mid-Wives in Ijebu-Ode, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awodoyin, Anuoluwa; Adetoro, Niran; Osisanwo, Temitope

    2017-01-01

    Technology has impacted positively on health care delivery and particularly medical personnel have had to embrace emerging technologies in order to provide safe, competent and quality health care. The study investigated self-efficacy for new technology adoption and use by trainee midwives at the school of midwifery, Ijebu-Ode. The study is a…

  19. Training to Teach Physical Education in an Opposite-Sex Secondary School: A Qualitative Analysis of Trainee Teachers' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stidder, Gary

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the school-based training experiences of trainee physical education teachers in opposite-sex secondary schools in south-east England which has been presented and discussed elsewhere in the academic community. Through an interpretive paradigm, using critical incident writing as a means of collecting computer-mediated data, one…

  20. Methods Matter: Teacher-Trainee Perspectives on Language Teaching Methods in a South Korean TESOL Certificate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobbitt, Todd

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to ascertain Korean teacher-trainees' perspectives on the awareness, likability, perceived usefulness and prospective application of varied language teaching methods that they had been taught in a sixteen-week language teaching methodology course. What did the students think about these methods? Will students…

  1. Effect of health education on trainee teachers' knowledge, attitudes, and first aid management of epilepsy : An interventional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eze, Christian N.; Ebuehi, Olufunke M.; Brigo, Francesco; Otte, Willem M.; Igwe, Stanley C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: High rates of poor knowledge of, and negative attitudes towards people with epilepsy (PWE) are generally found among school teachers. Their first aid epilepsy management skills are poor. It remains unknown if this is different among trainee teachers and whether educational intervention

  2. Field Experiments in Manpower Issues: The Reward Preferences of NYC Trainees: II Program Tenure Correlates of Differential Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Bruce; Simons, Judith

    Concerned with the possible redesign of training incentives developed by the Neighborhood Youth Corp (NYC) for use in its former project so as to enhance program desirability for trainees who have difficulty sustaining training programs, 149 disadvantaged NYC applicants were asked to rank their preferences among ten luxury and basic items as…

  3. Is It Science? A Study of the Attitudes of Medical Trainees and Physicians toward Qualitative and Quantitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguen, Jeannette; Knight, Melanie; Tiberius, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the degree of acceptance of qualitative research by medical trainees and physicians, and explored the causes for any differences in their support of qualitative versus quantitative research. Thirty-two individuals at four levels of medical training were studied. Eight philosophers of science served for construct validation.…

  4. Teaching Style Preferences of Trainees at Police In-Service Training Sessions and Differences among Demographic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Mesut

    2011-01-01

    Studies in adult learning have increased and better developed in the past century. From them adult learning theory emerged, comprised of andragogy, self-directed learning, and transformational learning. The main purpose of this study is to measure the teaching style preferences of trainees at a mid-size police department. The second purpose is to…

  5. An observational study assessing completion time and accuracy of completing the tactical combat casualty care card by combat medic trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therien, Sean P; Andrews, James E; Nesbitt, Michael E; Mabry, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Prehospital care documentation is crucial to improving battlefield care outcomes. Developed by United States Army Ranger Special Operations Combat Medics (SOCMs), the Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) is currently fielded to deployed units to record prehospital injury data. This study documents length of time and accuracy of U.S. Army Combat Medic trainees in completing the minimum preestablished required fields on the TCCC card, establishing a baseline for point-of-injury cards. This was a prospective observational study in which U.S. Army combat medic trainees were timed while recording data on the TCCC card in both the classroom and simulated combat environment. We hypothesized that trainees could complete the TCCC card in less than 1 minute with 90% or greater accuracy. We enrolled 728 U.S. Army Combat Medic trainees in the study during May?June 2011 at Fort Sam Houston, TX. We observed an average TCCC card completion time of less than 1 minute with greater than 90% accuracy in the unstressed classroom environment but an increase to nearly 2 minutes on average and a decrease to 85% accuracy in the simulated combat environment. RESULTS imply that the TCCC card is well designed to quickly and accurately record prehospital combat injury information. Further investigation and future studies may compare other prehospital data collection methods with the TCCC card in terms of timely and accurate data collection. 2014.

  6. Developing Confidence in Uncertainty: Conflicting Roles of Trainees as They Become Educators in Veterinary and Human Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygo-Baker, Simon; Kokotailo, Patricia K; Young, Karen M

    2015-01-01

    The important role of medical trainees (interns and residents) as teachers is increasingly recognized in veterinary and human medicine, but often is not supported through adult learning programs or other preparatory training methods. To develop appropriate teaching programs focused on effective clinical teaching, more understanding is needed about the support required for the trainee's teaching role. Following discussion among faculty members from education and veterinary and pediatric medicine, an experienced external observer and expert in higher education observed 28 incoming and outgoing veterinary and pediatric trainees in multiple clinical teaching settings over 10 weeks. Using an interpretative approach to analyze the data, we identified five dynamics that could serve as the foundation for a new program to support clinical teaching: (1) Novice-Expert, recognizing transitions between roles; (2) Collaboration-Individuality, recognizing the power of peer learning; (3) Confidence-Uncertainty, regarding the confidence to act; (4) Role-Interdisciplinarity, recognizing the ability to maintain a discrete role and yet synthesize knowledge and cope with complexity; and (5) Socialization-Identity, taking on different selves. Trainees in veterinary and human medicine appeared to have similar needs for support in teaching and would benefit from a variety of strategies: faculty should provide written guidelines and practical teaching tips; set clear expectations; establish sustained support strategies, including contact with an impartial educator; identify physical spaces in which to discuss teaching; provide continuous feedback; and facilitate peer observation across medical and veterinary clinical environments.

  7. Effect of health education on trainee teachers' knowledge, attitudes, and first aid management of epilepsy: An interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Christian N; Ebuehi, Olufunke M; Brigo, Francesco; Otte, Willem M; Igwe, Stanley C

    2015-12-01

    High rates of poor knowledge of, and negative attitudes towards people with epilepsy (PWE) are generally found among school teachers. Their first aid epilepsy management skills are poor. It remains unknown if this is different among trainee teachers and whether educational intervention might reduce these rates. We examined the effect of health education on the knowledge, attitudes, and first aid management of epilepsy on trainee teachers in Nigeria. Baseline data and socio-demographic determinants were collected from 226 randomly selected trainee teachers, at the Federal College of Education, Lagos, Nigeria, with self-administered questionnaires. They received a health intervention comprising an hour and half epilepsy lecture followed by a discussion. Baseline knowledge of, and attitudes towards PWE and their first aid epilepsy management skills were compared to post-interventional follow-up data collected twelve weeks later with similar questionnaires. At baseline the majority (61.9%) and largest proportion (44.2%) of respondents had negative attitudes and poor knowledge of epilepsy, respectively. The knowledge of, and attitudes towards epilepsy, and the first aid management skill increased in most respondents, post-intervention. The proportion of respondents with poor knowledge and negative attitudes dropped by 15.5% (pmanagement skills increased by 25.0% (peducation could increase trainee teachers' knowledge of, and attitudes towards epilepsy and facilitate correct first aid management. This emphasizes the potential benefit of incorporating an epilepsy tailored intervention programme into teachers' training curricula. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effects of Formalism on Teacher Trainees' Algebraic and Geometric Interpretation of the Notions of Linear Dependency/Independency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, E.; Solak, S.; Yazici, E.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the effects of formalism in teaching on primary and secondary school mathematics teacher trainees' algebraic and geometric interpretations of the notions of linear dependency/independency. Quantitative research methods are drawn in order to determine differences in success levels between algebraic and geometric…

  9. Investigating and Promoting Trainee Science Teachers' Conceptual Change of the Nature of Science with Digital Dialogue Games "Interloc"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Nasser; Wegerif, Rupert; Skinner, Nigel; Postlethwaite, Keith; Hetherington, Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore how an online-structured dialogue environment supported (OSDE) collaborative learning about the nature of science among a group of trainee science teachers in the UK. The software used (InterLoc) is a linear text-based tool, designed to support structured argumentation with openers and "dialogue…

  10. Teaching Style Preferences of Trainees at Police In-Service Training Sessions and Differences among Demographic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Mesut

    2011-01-01

    Studies in adult learning have increased and better developed in the past century. From them adult learning theory emerged, comprised of andragogy, self-directed learning, and transformational learning. The main purpose of this study is to measure the teaching style preferences of trainees at a mid-size police department. The second purpose is to…

  11. Power to the People: Using Learner Control to Improve Trainee Reactions and Learning in Web-Based Instructional Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orvis, Karin A.; Fisher, Sandra L.; Wasserman, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    This experimental study investigated the mechanisms by which learner control influences learning in an e-learning environment. The authors hypothesized that learner control would enhance learning indirectly through its effect on trainee reactions and learner engagement (in particular, off-task attention), such that learners who were more satisfied…

  12. Virtual patients: an effective educational intervention to improve paediatric basic specialist trainee education in the management of suspected child abuse?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEvoy, M M

    2011-09-01

    Child abuse is a particularly difficult subject to teach at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. Most doctors are dissatisfied with their training in child abuse recognition and management. We developed an interactive video based Virtual Patient to provide formal training for paediatric Basic Specialist Trainees in the recognition of suspected child abuse. The Virtual Patient case revolves around the management of suspected physical abuse in a seven month old child, who initially presents to the Emergency Department with viral upper respiratory tract symptoms. This Virtual Patient was used to facilitate a case discussion with Basic Specialist Trainees. A questionnaire was developed to determine their perception of the value of the Virtual Patient as an educational tool. Twenty five Basic Specialist Trainees completed the questionnaire. Upon completion of the case, 23\\/25 (92%) participants reported greater self confidence in their ability to recognize cases of suspected child abuse and 24\\/25 (96%) of participants reported greater self confidence in their ability to report cases of suspected child abuse. Basic Specialist Trainees perceived the Virtual Patient to be a useful educational tool. Virtual Patients may have a role to play in enhancing postgraduate training in the recognition of suspected child abuse.

  13. Validity and Reliability of Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills (GOALS) in Novice Trainees Performing a Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramp, Kelvin H.; van Det, Marc J.; Hoff, Christiaan; Lamme, Bas; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E. N.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills (GOALS) assessment has been designed to evaluate skills in laparoscopic surgery. A longitudinal blinded study of randomized video fragments was conducted to estimate the validity and reliability of GOALS in novice trainees. METHODS: In tota

  14. How shall we know them? Trainee teachers’ perceptions of their learners’ abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushton, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article, being the final one in a series of three for this journal, is concerned with trainee teachers’ changing perceptions of their learners and focuses on two areas: trainees’ perceptions of their learners’ abilities and how they are formed by their own experiences as learners; and the changes in trainees’ perceptions over the duration of their two year Initial Teacher Education (ITE course in the Lifelong Learning Sector (LLS. Working within a multi-method approach to action research, this small-scale study found that trainees’ perceptions were influenced not so much by their own identities and habitus, although social capital was a prominent feature, but by a problematic mix of competing cultures and the impact of casualisation in the sector.

  15. Simulation in neurosurgical training: a blueprint and national approach to implementation for initial years trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lihan; Kamaly, Ian; Luthra, Pramod; Whitfield, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Simulation has played an increasing role in surgical training in recent years, this follows from various reports such as the Chief Medical Officer annual report and Sir John Temple's 'Time for Training' and also from other factors such as increasing focus on efficiency and transparency within the healthcare system. Evidence has shown that simulation can develop and improve technical, clinical, communication and management skills. With technological advances, the quality of simulation has also improved with more realistic models and environment. We have undertaken a review of recent drivers for simulation training in the UK, current techniques and have focused on the application of simulation training within the current UK Neurosurgical curriculum for newly appointed trainees.

  16. Moving from silos to teamwork: integration of interprofessional trainees into a medical home model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Theodore; Dann, Sarah; Wolff, Marissa Lynn; Brienza, Rebecca S

    2014-09-01

    As the United States faces an impending shortage in the primary care workforce, interprofessional teamwork training to improve clinic efficiency and health outcomes is becoming increasingly important. Currently there is limited integration of interprofessional training in educational models for health professionals. The implementation of Patient Aligned Care Teams at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has provided an opportunity for interprofessional collaboration among trainee and faculty providers within the VA system. However, integration of interprofessional education is also necessary to train future providers in order to provide effective team-based care. We describe a transportable educational model for health professional collaboration from our experience as a VA Center of Excellence in Primary Care Education, including a complementary novel one-year post-Master's adult nurse practitioner interprofessional clinical fellowship. With growing recognition that interprofessional care can improve efficiency and outcomes, there is an increasing need for programs that train future providers in collaboration and team-based care.

  17. Performance of an objective structured clinical examination in a national certification process of trainees in rheumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual Ramos, Virginia; Medrano Ramírez, Gabriel; Solís Vallejo, Eunice; Bernard Medina, Ana Guilaisne; Flores Alvarado, Diana Elsa; Portela Hernández, Margarita; Andrade Ortega, Lilia; Vera Lastra, Olga; Espinosa Morales, Rolando; Miranda Limón, Juan Manuel; Maldonado Velázquez, María Del Rocío; Jara Quezada, Luis Javier; Amezcua Guerra, Luis Manuel; López Zepeda, Judith; Saavedra Salinas, Miguel Ángel; Arce Salinas, Cesar Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    To assess reliability and validity of the objectively-structured clinical examination (OSCE) applied in postgraduate certification processes by the Mexican Board of Rheumatology. Thirty-two (2013) and 38 (2014) Rheumatology trainees (RTs) underwent an OSCE consisting of 12 and 15 stations respectively, scored according to a validated check-list, as well as 300-multiple-choice 300 question examination (MCQ). Previously, 3 certified rheumatologists underwent a pilot-OSCE. A composite OSCE score was obtained for each participant and its performance examined. In 2013, OSCE mean score was 7.1±0.6 with none RT receiving a failing score while the MCQ score was 6.5±0.6 and 7 (21.9%) RTs receiving a failing (Rheumatology clinical skills in RTs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. One or two trainees per workplace in a structured multimodality training curriculum for laparoscopic surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, Felix; Jede, Felix; Minassian, Andreas;

    2014-01-01

    different approaches for optimal training outcome. However, no standards currently exist for the number of trainees assigned per workplace. Methods. This is a monocentric, open, three-arm randomized controlled trial. The participants are laparoscopically-naive medical students from Heidelberg University....... After a standardized introduction to laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) with online learning modules, the participants perform a baseline test for basic skills and LC performance on a virtual reality (VR) trainer. A total of 100 students will be randomized into three study arms, in a 2:2:1 ratio...... training between tests. A post-test is performed to reassess basic skills and LC performance on the VR trainer. The performance of a cadaveric porcine LC is then measured as the primary outcome using standardized and validated ratings by blinded experts with the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical...

  19. Specialist trainees on rotation cannot replace dedicated consultant clinicians for antimicrobial stewardship of specialty disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeo Chay Leng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our prospective-audit-and-feedback antimicrobial stewardship (AS program for hematology and oncology inpatients was switched from one led by dedicated clinicians to a rotating team of infectious diseases trainees in order to provide learning opportunities and attempt a “de-escalation” of specialist input towards a more protocol-driven implementation. However, process indicators including the number of recommendations and recommendation acceptance rates fell significantly during the year, with accompanying increases in broad-spectrum antibiotic prescription. The trends were reversed only upon reverting to the original setup. Dedicated clinicians play a crucial role in AS programs involving immunocompromised patients. Structured training and adequate succession/contingency planning is critical for sustainability.

  20. Teaching and Working With Millennial Trainees: Impact on Radiological Education and Work Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco, Ana P; Cronan, John J

    2017-01-01

    Many feel that the generational differences encountered with Millennial trainees are novel; the reality is that prior generations have always bemoaned generational differences. This is not a new problem; some of the same things may even have been said about us during our own training! There are a variety of myths and misconceptions about the Millennial generation (also known as Generation Y). In this article we review some of the differences frequently encountered as we educate and work alongside our Millennial colleagues, dispelling some of the myths and misconceptions. With increased understanding of this talented group of individuals, we hope to be more effective teachers and have more successful professional relationships. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. European Association of Young Neurologists and Trainees: position paper on teaching courses for Generation Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struhal, Walter; Falup-Pecurariu, Cristian; Sztriha, Laszlo K; Grisold, Wolfgang; Sellner, Johann

    2011-01-01

    The European Association of Young Neurologists and Trainees (EAYNT) is a non-profit organization which acts on behalf of young neurologists in Europe and concertedly exerts influence on the formation of a new generation of neurologists [Struhal et al.: Eur J Neurol 2009;16:e146-e148]. This concerns particularly the Generation Y (Gen Y), also known as Millennial Generation, Digital Natives or Generation Next, a demographic cohort defined by birth between 1981 and 1999 [Elkind: Neurology 2009;72:657-663]. A unifying feature is the increased use and familiarity with online media and digital technologies. Online social networks and interactive communication have not only shaped this cohort but necessitate a different approach towards educational matters. This position paper aims to address the changing needs for Gen Yers in the context of education. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Final visual outcome following re exploration of cataracts performed by trainee surgeons in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehul A Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the outcome of secondary intraocular lens implantation, compare final visual outcome between different categories of surgeon, and evaluate care provided by teaching hospitals to patients with capsular complications. Materials and Methods: Setting: Teaching hospital. Design: Retrospective study. Subjects were recruited by examination of electronic medical records. All patients operated for corrective surgery following capsular complications during cataract surgery were included. All patient medical records were reviewed, and data were collected for 359 eyes. Main outcome measures: Visual acuity and major complications. All collected data were entered into Microsoft Excel and analyzed by SPSS 17 software using cross tabulation and Chi-squared tests. Results: Surgical intervention made a significant difference to the final visual outcome (P < 0.001. The category of the trainee had a significant effect on the final visual outcome (P = 0.021. Conclusion: Capsular complications during cataract surgery should be surgically treated to improve outcome.

  3. AN ANALYSIS OF THE PERCEPTION OF CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT TRAINEES REGARDING ACCESS TO THE ACCOUNTING PROFESSION AND PROFESSIONAL TRAINING NEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunea Ștefan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In Romania, the certification of the quality of chartered accountant is accomplished by CECCAR(i. It is conditioned by the completion of the period of initial training. A part of this period is provided by the universities, while the other part is provided by CECCAR through the national 3-year internship programme. The objective of our survey was to analyse the way in which chartered accountant trainees perceive the access to the accounting profession, their own limitations in terms of competences, the need for professional training, and the benefits ensured by the professional training within CECCAR. Being a member of IFAC(ii, CECCAR has implemented the requirements of the international education standards. The results of the survey confirm that due to differences in their educational backgrounds trainees perceived certain barriers preventing their access to the accounting profession. They also considered that the training of chartered accountants should be provided by CECCAR rather than by the universities. The self-assessed competence level of trainees in fields such as accounting, taxation, or IT was appreciated as at least good, while the competences regarding organizations and businesses, international financial reporting, corporate governance, and financial markets were appreciated as modest. The need for professional training is assessed by trainees considering the immediate practice and not the expectations regarding future career development or future evolutions of accounting practices. The trainees in our survey do not consider necessary any investment in competences that they cannot use immediately at the level required by small and medium-sized businesses they work for. This implicates that results should be interpretated with caution and other factors (such as long term trends and expectations should be considered in establishing the educational needs of future accountants.

  4. Developing personal values: trainees' attitudes toward strikes by health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Ting T; Srinivasan, Malathi; Der-Martirosian, Claudia; Kravitz, Richard L; Wilkes, Michael S

    2011-05-01

    Worldwide, health care providers use strikes and job actions to influence policy. For health care providers, especially physicians, strikes create an ethical tension between an obligation to care for current patients (e.g., to provide care and avoid abandonment) and an obligation to better care for future patients by seeking system improvements (e.g., improvements in safety, to access, and in the composition and strength of the health care workforce). This tension is further intensified when the potential benefit of a strike involves professional self-interest and the potential risk involves patient harm or death. By definition, trainees are still forming their professional identities and values, including their opinions on fair wages, health policy, employee benefits, professionalism, and strikes. In this article, the authors explore these ethical tensions, beginning with a discussion of reactions to a potential 2005 nursing strike at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. The authors then propose a conceptual model describing factors that may influence health care providers' decisions to strike (including personal ethics, personal agency, and strike-related context). In particular, the authors explore the relationship between training level and attitudes toward taking a job action, such as going on strike. Because trainees' attitudes toward strikes continue to evolve during training, the authors maintain that open discussion around the ethics of health care professionals' strikes and other methods of conflict resolution should be included in medical education to enhance professionalism and systems-based practice training. The authors include sample case vignettes to help initiate these important discussions.

  5. Surveys of Health Professions Trainees: Prevalence, Response Rates, and Predictive Factors to Guide Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew W; Friedman, Benjamin T; Utrankar, Amol; Ta, Andrew Q; Reddy, Shalini T; Durning, Steven J

    2017-02-01

    To establish a baseline overall response rate for surveys of health professions trainees, determine strategies associated with improved response rates, and evaluate for the presence of nonresponse bias. The authors performed a comprehensive analysis of all articles published in Academic Medicine, Medical Education, and Advances in Health Sciences Education in 2013, recording response rates. Additionally, they reviewed nonresponse bias analyses and factors suggested in other fields to affect response rate including survey delivery method, prenotification, and incentives. The search yielded 732 total articles; of these, 356 were research articles, and of these, 185 (52.0%) used at least one survey. Of these, 66 articles (35.6%) met inclusion criteria and yielded 73 unique surveys. Of the 73 surveys used, investigators reported a response rate for 63.0% of them; response rates ranged from 26.6% to 100%, mean (standard deviation) 71.3% (19.5%). Investigators reported using incentives for only 16.4% of the 73 surveys. The only survey methodology factor significantly associated with response rate was single- vs. multi-institutional surveys (respectively, 74.6% [21.2%] vs. 62.0% [12.8%], P = .022). Notably, statistical power for all analyses was limited. No articles evaluated for nonresponse bias. Approximately half of the articles evaluated used a survey as part of their methods. Limited data are available to establish a baseline response rate among health professions trainees and inform researchers which strategies are associated with higher response rates. Journals publishing survey-based health professions education research should improve reporting of response rate, nonresponse bias, and other survey factors.

  6. Attitudes of US medical trainees towards neurology education: "Neurophobia" - a global issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Wendy A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies in the United Kingdom and Asia have suggested that medical students and residents have particular difficulty in diagnosing and managing patients with neurological problems. Little recent information is available for US trainees. We examined whether students and residents at a US university have difficulty in dealing with patients with neurological problems, identified the perceived sources of these difficulties and provide suggestions for the development of an effective educational experience in neurology. Methods A questionnaire was administered to third and fourth year medical students at a US school of medicine and to residents of an internal medicine residency program affiliated with that school. Perceived difficulties with eight medical specialties, including neurology, were examined. Methods considered to be most useful for learning medicine were documented. Reasons why neurology is perceived as difficult and ways to improve neurological teaching were assessed. Results 152 surveys were completed. Participation rates varied, with medical students having higher response rates (> 50% than medical residents (27%-48%. Respondents felt that neurology was the medical specialty they had least knowledge in (p Conclusions Medical students and residents at this US medical university found neurology difficult. Although this is consistent with prior reports from Europe and Asia, studies in other universities are needed to confirm generalizability of these findings. The optimal opportunity for improvement is during the transition from preclinical to clinical years. Enhanced integration of basic neurosciences and clinical neurology with emphasis on increased bedside tutorials and patient exposure should improve teaching. Studies are needed to quantify the effect of these interventions on confidence of trainees when dealing with patients presenting with neurological complaints.

  7. Effects of coaching supervision, mentoring supervision and abusive supervision on talent development among trainee doctors in public hospitals: moderating role of clinical learning environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Anusuiya; Silong, Abu Daud; Uli, Jegak; Ismail, Ismi Arif

    2015-08-13

    Effective talent development requires robust supervision. However, the effects of supervisory styles (coaching, mentoring and abusive supervision) on talent development and the moderating effects of clinical learning environment in the relationship between supervisory styles and talent development among public hospital trainee doctors have not been thoroughly researched. In this study, we aim to achieve the following, (1) identify the extent to which supervisory styles (coaching, mentoring and abusive supervision) can facilitate talent development among trainee doctors in public hospital and (2) examine whether coaching, mentoring and abusive supervision are moderated by clinical learning environment in predicting talent development among trainee doctors in public hospital. A questionnaire-based critical survey was conducted among trainee doctors undergoing housemanship at six public hospitals in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. Prior permission was obtained from the Ministry of Health Malaysia to conduct the research in the identified public hospitals. The survey yielded 355 responses. The results were analysed using SPSS 20.0 and SEM with AMOS 20.0. The findings of this research indicate that coaching and mentoring supervision are positively associated with talent development, and that there is no significant relationship between abusive supervision and talent development. The findings also support the moderating role of clinical learning environment on the relationships between coaching supervision-talent development, mentoring supervision-talent development and abusive supervision-talent development among public hospital trainee doctors. Overall, the proposed model indicates a 26 % variance in talent development. This study provides an improved understanding on the role of the supervisory styles (coaching and mentoring supervision) on facilitating talent development among public hospital trainee doctors. Furthermore, this study extends the literature to better

  8. The impact of assignment strategy on the performance of postgraduate trainees: An analysis of the assessment scores database in a military medicine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hung Tsai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students who graduate after 2003 need to participate in the "Postgraduate Primary Care Medical Training Program," provided by the Taiwan Joint Commission on Hospital Accreditation. We wish to know how the education and assignment strategy influences National Defense Medical Center (NDMC graduates. We examined whether the performance of postgraduate year (PGY trainees would be affected by the assignment strategies. Materials and Methods: We consecutively collected 173 NDMC graduated trainees who participated in 6-months of PGY training and another 94 trainees who participated for 1-year. During the training period, all the trainees were evaluated by several assessment tools. Trainees were dichotomized according to the levels of dispatched hospitals and preassigned specialty, respectively, to evaluate those effects on the performance of the 6-month PGY training period. Results: We describe the assessment scores of NDMC graduate M.D. trainees engaged in the Tri-Service General Hospital (TSGH PGY training program. PGY trainees who were preassigned to TSGH due to better overall averages in medical school had better scores in case-based discussion, mini-clinical evaluation exercise, and direct observation of procedural skills than those who were preassigned to the Regional Teaching Hospitals. There was no statistically significant difference in the overall scores. The preassigned specialties themselves did not affect the performance in PGY training. Incorporation of PGY scores in the assignment strategy significantly elevated the performance of PGY trainees who were dispatched to TSGH. Conclusion: The accumulated PGY training database provides educators a unique opportunity in reviewing the effects of education policies and strategies. Assignment strategy could affect the performance of PGY trainees during their training period.

  9. How do postgraduate GP trainees regulate their learning and what helps and hinders them? A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagasser Margaretha H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-regulation is essential for professional development. It involves monitoring of performance, identifying domains for improvement, undertaking learning activities, applying newly learned knowledge and skills and self-assessing performance. Since self-assessment alone is ineffective in identifying weaknesses, learners should seek external feedback too. Externally regulated educational interventions, like reflection, learning portfolios, assessments and progress meetings, are increasingly used to scaffold self-regulation. The aim of this study is to explore how postgraduate trainees regulate their learning in the workplace, how external regulation promotes self-regulation and which elements facilitate or impede self-regulation and learning. Methods In a qualitative study with a phenomenologic approach we interviewed first- and third-year GP trainees from two universities in the Netherlands. Twenty-one verbatim transcripts were coded. Through iterative discussion the researchers agreed on the interpretation of the data and saturation was reached. Results Trainees used a short and a long self-regulation loop. The short loop took one week at most and was focused on problems that were easy to resolve and needed minor learning activities. The long loop was focused on complex or recurring problems needing multiple and planned longitudinal learning activities. External assessments and formal training affected the long but not the short loop. The supervisor had a facilitating role in both loops. Self-confidence was used to gauge competence.Elements influencing self-regulation were classified into three dimensions: personal (strong motivation to become a good doctor, interpersonal (stimulation from others and contextual (organizational and educational features. Conclusions Trainees did purposefully self-regulate their learning. Learning in the short loop may not be visible to others. Trainees should be encouraged to actively seek

  10. Virtual reality simulation training for health professions trainees in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Catharine M; Sherlock, Mary E; Ling, Simon C; Carnahan, Heather

    2012-06-13

    Traditionally, training in gastrointestinal endoscopy has been based upon an apprenticeship model, with novice endoscopists learning basic skills under the supervision of experienced preceptors in the clinical setting. Over the last two decades, however, the growing awareness of the need for patient safety has brought the issue of simulation-based training to the forefront. While the use of simulation-based training may have important educational and societal advantages, the effectiveness of virtual reality gastrointestinal endoscopy simulators has yet to be clearly demonstrated. To determine whether virtual reality simulation training can supplement and/or replace early conventional endoscopy training (apprenticeship model) in diagnostic oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy and/or sigmoidoscopy for health professions trainees with limited or no prior endoscopic experience. Health professions, educational and computer databases were searched until November 2011 including The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Biosis Previews, CINAHL, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, ERIC, Education Full Text, CBCA Education, Career and Technical Education @ Scholars Portal, Education Abstracts @ Scholars Portal, Expanded Academic ASAP @ Scholars Portal, ACM Digital Library, IEEE Xplore, Abstracts in New Technologies and Engineering and Computer & Information Systems Abstracts. The grey literature until November 2011 was also searched. Randomised and quasi-randomised clinical trials comparing virtual reality endoscopy (oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy) simulation training versus any other method of endoscopy training including conventional patient-based training, in-job training, training using another form of endoscopy simulation (e.g. low-fidelity simulator), or no training (however defined by authors) were included.  Trials comparing one method of virtual reality training versus

  11. Need for enforcement of ethicolegal education – an analysis of the survey of postgraduate clinical trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takase Kozo

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of medical lawsuits in Japan was between 14 and 21 each year before 1998, but increased to 24 to 35 per year after 1999. There were 210 lawsuits during this 10-year period. There is a need for skills and knowledge related to ethics, which is as fundamental to the practice of medicine as basic sciences or clinical skills. in Japan education in ethics is relatively rare and its importance is not yet recognized. Establishing ethics education using legal precedents, which has already been achieved in Western countries, will be a very important issue in Japan. In the present study, a questionnaire survey was conducted among graduate intern doctors, in order to investigate whether ethics education using precedents might have a positive effect in Japan. Methods In 2002, a questionnaire survey entitled Physicians' Clinical Ethics was carried out in a compulsory orientation lecture given to trainees before they started clinical practice in our hospital. The attendees at this lecture were trainees who came from colleges in various districts of Japan. During the lecture, 102 questionnaires were distributed, completed by attendees and collected. The recovery rate was 100%. The questionnaire consisted of 22 questions (in three categories, of which 20 were answered by multiple choices, and the other two were answered by description. The time required to complete the questionnaire was about 10 minutes. Results The recovered questionnaires were analyzed using statistical analysis software (SPSS for Windows, Release 10.07J-1/June/2000, in addition to simple statistical analysis. answers using multiple choices for the 20 questions in the questionnaire were input into SPSS. The principal component analysis was performed for each question. As a result, the item that came to the fore was "legal precedent". Since many intern doctors were interested in understanding laws and precedents, learning about ethical considerations through

  12. Instructional Vignettes in Publication and Journalism Ethics in Radiology Research: Assessment via a Survey of Radiology Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Ginocchio, Luke A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the potential usefulness of written instructional vignettes relating to publication and journalism ethics in radiology via a survey of radiology trainees. A literature review was conducted to guide the development of vignettes, each describing a scenario relating to an ethical issue in research and publication, with subsequent commentary on the underlying ethical issue and potential approaches to its handling. Radiology trainees at a single institution were surveyed regarding the vignettes' perceived usefulness. A total of 21 vignettes were prepared, addressing institutional review board and human subjects protection, authorship issues, usage of previous work, manuscript review, and other miscellaneous topics. Of the solicited trainees, 24.7% (16/65) completed the survey. On average among the vignettes, 94.0% of the participants found the vignette helpful; 19.9 received prior formal instruction on the issue during medical training; 40.0% received prior informal guidance from a research mentor; and 42.0% indicated that the issue had arisen in their own or a peer's prior research experience. The most common previously experienced specific issue was authorship order (93.8%). Free-text responses were largely favorable regarding the value of the vignettes, although also indicated numerous challenges in properly handling the ethical issues: impact of hierarchy, pressure to publish, internal politics, reluctance to conduct sensitive conversations with colleagues, and variability in journal and professional society policies. Radiology trainees overall found the vignettes helpful, addressing commonly encountered topics for which formal and informal guidance were otherwise lacking. The vignettes are publicly available through the Association of University Radiologists (AUR) website and may foster greater insights by investigators into ethical aspects of the publication and journalism process, thus contributing to higher quality

  13. Knowledge of the Costs of Diagnostic Imaging: A Survey of Physician Trainees at a Large Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayasarathi, Arvind; Duszak, Richard; Gelbard, Rondi B; Mullins, Mark E

    2016-11-01

    To study the awareness of postgraduate physician trainees across a variety of specialties regarding the costs of common imaging examinations. During early 2016, we conducted an online survey of all 1,238 physicians enrolled in internships, residencies, and fellowships at a large academic medical center. Respondents were asked to estimate Medicare national average total allowable fees for five commonly performed examinations: two-view chest radiograph, contrast-enhanced CT abdomen and pelvis, unenhanced MRI lumbar spine, complete abdominal ultrasound, and unenhanced CT brain. Responses within ±25% of published amounts were deemed correct. Respondents were also asked about specialty, postgraduate year of training, previous radiology education, and estimated number of imaging examinations ordered per week. A total of 381 of 1,238 trainees returned complete surveys (30.8%). Across all five examinations, only 5.7% (109/1,905) of responses were within the correct ±25% range. A total of 76.4% (291/381) of all respondents incorrectly estimated every examination's cost. Estimation accuracy was not associated with number of imaging examinations ordered per week or year of training. There was no significant difference in cost estimation accuracy between those who participated in medical school radiology electives and those who did not (P = .14). Only 17.5% of trainees considered their imaging cost knowledge adequate. Overall, 75.3% desire integration of cost data into clinical decision support and/or computerized physician order entry systems. Postgraduate physician trainees across all disciplines demonstrate limited awareness of the costs of commonly ordered imaging examinations. Targeted medical school education and integration of imaging cost information into clinical decision support / computerized physician order entry systems seems indicated. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Balancing student/trainee learning with the delivery of patient care in the healthcare workplace: a protocol for realist synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholl, Sarah; Ajjawi, Rola; Allbutt, Helen; Butler, Jane; Jindal-Snape, Divya; Morrison, Jill; Rees, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A national survey was recently conducted to explore medical education research priorities in Scotland. The identified themes and underlying priority areas can be linked to current medical education drivers in the UK. The top priority area rated by stakeholders was: ‘Understanding how to balance service and training conflicts’. Despite its perceived importance, a preliminary scoping exercise revealed the least activity with respect to published literature reviews. This protocol has therefore been developed so as to understand how patient care, other service demands and student/trainee learning can be simultaneously facilitated within the healthcare workplace. The review will identify key interventions designed to balance patient care and student/trainee learning, to understand how and why such interventions produce their effects. Our research questions seek to address how identified interventions enable balanced patient care-trainee learning within the healthcare workplace, for whom, why and under what circumstances. Methods and analysis Pawson's five stages for undertaking a realist review underpin this protocol. These stages may progress in a non-linear fashion due to the iterative nature of the review process. We will: (1) clarify the scope of the review, identifying relevant interventions and existing programme theories, understanding how interventions act to produce their intended outcomes; (2) search journal articles and grey literature for empirical evidence from 1998 (introduction of the European Working Time Directive) on the UK multidisciplinary team working concerning these interventions, theories and outcomes, using databases such as ERIC, Scopus and CINAHL; (3) assess study quality; (4) extract data; and (5) synthesise data, drawing conclusions. Ethics and dissemination A formal ethical review is not required. These findings should provide an important understanding of how workplace-based interventions influence the balance of trainee

  15. Experiences on Tooth Decay in Trainees of sena Oral Health Technical Program, Medellín, 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Bedoya, Juan Pablo; Gonzalez Penagos, Catalina; Calle Henao, Natalia; Berruecos Orozco, Carolina; Cano Gómez, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: some studies have strictly treated the association between the most frequent oral pathologies and the social economic and educational levels, finding out that the lower the social economic and educative level, the higher the presence of oral pathologies. The goal of this study was to describe the social demographic variables, oral health habits, experience and prevalence of tooth decay of the trainees of sena oral health technical program, in Medellín, Colombia. Materials and me...

  16. Dissemination of CPR video self-instruction materials to secondary trainees: Results from a hospital-based CPR education trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Daniel J; Buckler, David G; Li, Jiaqi; Agarwal, Amit K; Di Taranti, Laura J; Kurtz, James; Reis, Ryan Dos; Leary, Marion; Abella, Benjamin S; Blewer, Audrey L

    2016-03-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) video self-instruction (VSI) materials have been promoted as a scalable approach to increase the prevalence of CPR skills among the lay public, in part due to the opportunity for secondary training (i.e., sharing of training materials). However, the motivations for, and barriers to, disseminating VSI materials to secondary trainees is poorly understood. This work represents an ancillary investigation of a prospective hospital-based CPR education trial in which family members of cardiac patients were trained using VSI. Mixed-methods surveys were administered to primary trainees six months after initial enrollment. Surveys were designed to capture motivations for, and barriers to, sharing VSI materials, the number of secondary trainees with whom materials were shared, and the settings, timing, and recipients of trainings. Between 07/2012 and 05/2015, 653 study participants completed a six-month follow-up interview. Of those, 345 reported sharing VSI materials with 1455 secondary trainees. Materials were shared most commonly with family members. In a logistic regression analysis, participants in the oldest quartile (age >63 years) were less likely to share materials compared to those in the youngest quartile (age ≤ 44 years, OR 0.58, CI 0.37-0.90, p=0.02). Among the 308 participants who did not share their materials, time constraints was the most commonly cited barrier for not sharing. VSI materials represent a strategy for secondary dissemination of CPR training, yet older individuals have a lower likelihood of sharing relative to younger individuals. Further work is warranted to remedy perceived barriers to CPR dissemination among the lay public using VSI approaches. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dissemination of CPR video self-instruction materials to secondary trainees: results from a hospital-based CPR education trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Daniel J.; Buckler, David G.; Li, Jiaqi; Agarwal, Amit K.; Di Taranti, Laura J.; Kurtz, James; dos Reis, Ryan; Leary, Marion; Abella, Benjamin S.; Blewer, Audrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) video self-instruction (VSI) materials have been promoted as a scalable approach to increase the prevalence of CPR skills among the lay public, in part due to the opportunity for secondary training (i.e., sharing of training materials). However, the motivations for, and barriers to, disseminating VSI materials to secondary trainees is poorly understood. Methods This work represents an ancillary investigation of a prospective hospital-based CPR education trial in which family members of cardiac patients were trained using VSI. Mixed-methods surveys were administered to primary trainees six months after initial enrollment. Surveys were designed to capture motivations for, and barriers to, sharing VSI materials, the number of secondary trainees with whom materials were shared, and the settings, timing, and recipients of trainings. Results Between 07/2012–05/2015, 653 study participants completed a six-month follow-up interview. Of those, 345 reported sharing VSI materials with 1455 secondary trainees. Materials were shared most commonly with family members. In a logistic regression analysis, participants in the oldest quartile (age > 63 years) were less likely to share materials compared to those in the youngest quartile (age ≤ 44 years, OR 0.58, CI 0.37–0.90, p=0.02). Among the 308 participants who did not share their materials, time constraints was the most commonly cited barrier for not sharing. Conclusions VSI materials represent a strategy for secondary dissemination of CPR training, yet older individuals have a lower likelihood of sharing relative to younger individuals. Further work is warranted to remedy perceived barriers to CPR dissemination among the lay public using VSI approaches. PMID:26776900

  18. AN ANALYSIS OF THE PERCEPTION OF CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT TRAINEES REGARDING ACCESS TO THE ACCOUNTING PROFESSION AND PROFESSIONAL TRAINING NEEDS

    OpenAIRE

    Bunea Ștefan; Sãcãrin Marian; Gîrbinã Maria Mãdãlina

    2013-01-01

    In Romania, the certification of the quality of chartered accountant is accomplished by CECCAR(i). It is conditioned by the completion of the period of initial training. A part of this period is provided by the universities, while the other part is provided by CECCAR through the national 3-year internship programme. The objective of our survey was to analyse the way in which chartered accountant trainees perceive the access to the accounting profession, their own limitations in terms of compe...

  19. A survey of ENT experience in South West Peninsula general practitioner trainees: how can post-graduate ENT training be improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easto, R H; Reddy, V

    2016-10-01

    To assess how much ENT experience regional general practitioner trainees received, both in their undergraduate and post-graduate training, and to establish if trainees felt they required further ENT training to manage ENT complaints. An online survey was emailed to general practitioner trainees in Cornwall and Devon. Of 200 general practitioner trainees, 121 (60.5 per cent) responded to the survey. Of these respondents, 95.9 per cent felt ENT experience was important as a general practitioner; however, 59.5 per cent had no ENT experience in their post-graduate training. Sixty-five per cent of trainees had not had any formal ENT teaching since leaving medical school; however, 93.4 per cent would attend a 1-day course if offered the opportunity locally. Finally, 75.8 per cent of trainees would have liked an ENT post during their post-graduate training. Further ENT training is required for doctors in general practitioner training schemes to aid improvement of patient care. The most logical way to enhance ENT training in a post-graduate setting is through up-to-date courses held locally with a faculty made up of experts working within the specialty.

  20. Supervisor trainees' and their supervisors' perceptions of attainment of knowledge and skills: an empirical evaluation of a psychotherapy supervisor training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, Eva C; Ogren, Marie-Louise; Boëthius, Siv Boalt

    2008-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the success of a 2-year, part-time training programme for psychotherapy supervisors. A second aim was to examine factors that might contribute to perceived knowledge and skills attainment during the training course. This is a naturalistic, longitudinal study where several measures are used to examine group process and outcome. Supervisor trainees' (N=21) and their facilitators' (N=6) ratings of learning (knowledge and skills), relations to the supervisor and supervision group, usage of the group, and supervisor style were completed at three time points. The findings suggested that both trainees and their supervisors perceived that the trainees attained a substantial amount of knowledge and skills during the course. In accordance with the literature and expectations, the regression analysis suggested a strong negative association between a strong focus on group processes in the initial and middle phases of the training and perceived knowledge and skills attainment in the final phase of the training. The expected, positive role of relations among trainees in the supervision group in the first half of the training and perceived knowledge and skills attainment in the final part of the training was obtained, whilst the hypothesized significance of the relationship between trainee and supervisor did not receive support. The supervisory course seemed to provide a training that allowed trainees to attain knowledge and skills that are necessary for psychotherapy supervisors. The results of this pilot study also emphasize the need of more research on learning in the context of group supervision in psychotherapy.