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Sample records for mab lkt-induced calcium

  1. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in luck if you like sardines and canned salmon with bones. Almond milk. previous continue Working Calcium ... drinks, and cereals. Other Considerations for Building Bones Vitamin D is essential for calcium absorption, so it's ...

  2. Analysis list: mab-5 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available mab-5 Embryo,Larvae + ce10 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/target/mab-5.1.tsv http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/target/mab-5.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc....jp/kyushu-u/ce10/target/mab-5.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/colo/mab-5.Embryo.tsv,http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/colo/mab-5.Larvae.tsv http://dbar...chive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/colo/Embryo.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/colo/Larvae.gml ...

  3. A Method to the mAbNESS?

    OpenAIRE

    McCAIN, JACK

    2004-01-01

    It’s the hottest area of biotech drug development, with more than 100 currently in development. If mAbs make life easier for patients with devastating diseases, demand will skyrocket. Payers want want proof of their value.

  4. The UC Davis/NIH NeuroMab Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of the UC Davis/NIH NeuroMab facility is to generate and distribute high quality, validated mouse monoclonal antibodies against molecular targets found...

  5. Preparation for gluing of Carbon prototype MAB at INEGI, Porto

    CERN Multimedia

    Miguel Moreira, Porto, INEGI

    2001-01-01

    MAB's will assure the alignment of the CMS detector. It is equipped with muon cameras, measuring the position of the barrel muon stations and at the same time linking via the link elements, connecting the barrel muon detectors with the Tracker. In addition there is a connection with the endcap. More details can be found on the muon/alignment homepage on the web

  6. Analysis of Japanese Municipalities With Geopark, MAB, and GIAHS Certification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Kohsaka

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the discussions of Japanese municipalities in their process for obtaining certifications for the Geoparks by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO, the Man and the Biosphere Programme (MAB by the UNESCO, and the Globally Important Agricultural Heritage systems (GIAHS by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO of the United Nations. The official records at the municipality diet were analyzed in a quantitative manner from 2011 to 2013. As the first step, we analyzed the eight municipalities of Noto and Sado for the GIAHS, the cities Itoigawa and Hakusan for the Geopark, and Katsuyama Yamanouchi village from Nagano for the MAB. As individual examples, we analyzed City of Suzu with GIAHS, Itoigawa (Geopark, and Yamanouchi town (MAB with the text-mining approach. For the GIAHS, it was clear that the larger municipalities with city status tended to discuss certification issues more frequently than the smaller towns and villages. Terms such as conservation and certification tended to be used with GIAHS at the Suzu City. The term brand was used with GIAHS and MAB but not for the Geopark. The findings using quantitative methods are at initial stage for analysis of municipality strategies and require further future research.

  7. MabCent: Arctic marine bioprospecting in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The deep waters surrounding the coastline of the northern parts of Norway represent an exciting biotope for marine exploration. Dark and cold Arctic water generates a hostile environment where the ability to adapt is crucial to survival. These waters are nonetheless bountiful and a diverse plethora of marine organisms thrive in these extreme conditions, many with the help of specialised chemical compounds. In comparison to warmer, perhaps more inviting shallower tropical waters, the Arctic region has not been as thoroughly investigated. MabCent is a Norwegian initiative based in Tromsø that aims to change this. Since 2007, scientists within MabCent have focussed their efforts on the study of marine organisms inhabiting the Arctic waters with the long term goal of novel drug discovery and development. The activities of MabCent are diverse and range from sampling the Arctic ice shelf to the chemical synthesis of promising secondary metabolites discovered during the screening process. The current review will present the MabCent pipeline from isolation to identification of new bioactive marine compounds via an extensive screening process. An overview of the main activities will be given with particular focus on isolation strategies, bioactivity screening and structure determination. Pitfalls, hard earned lessons and the results so far are also discussed.

  8. Protective mAbs and Cross-Reactive mAbs Raised by Immunization with Engineered Marburg Virus GPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnie L Fusco

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The filoviruses, which include the marburg- and ebolaviruses, have caused multiple outbreaks among humans this decade. Antibodies against the filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP have been shown to provide life-saving therapy in nonhuman primates, but such antibodies are generally virus-specific. Many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs have been described against Ebola virus. In contrast, relatively few have been described against Marburg virus. Here we present ten mAbs elicited by immunization of mice using recombinant mucin-deleted GPs from different Marburg virus (MARV strains. Surprisingly, two of the mAbs raised against MARV GP also cross-react with the mucin-deleted GP cores of all tested ebolaviruses (Ebola, Sudan, Bundibugyo, Reston, but these epitopes are masked differently by the mucin-like domains themselves. The most efficacious mAbs in this panel were found to recognize a novel "wing" feature on the GP2 subunit that is unique to Marburg and does not exist in Ebola. Two of these anti-wing antibodies confer 90 and 100% protection, respectively, one hour post-exposure in mice challenged with MARV.

  9. Protective mAbs and Cross-Reactive mAbs Raised by Immunization with Engineered Marburg Virus GPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Marnie L; Hashiguchi, Takao; Cassan, Robyn; Biggins, Julia E; Murin, Charles D; Warfield, Kelly L; Li, Sheng; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Shulenin, Sergey; Vu, Hong; Olinger, Gene G; Kim, Do H; Whaley, Kevin J; Zeitlin, Larry; Ward, Andrew B; Nykiforuk, Cory; Aman, M Javad; Berry, Jody D; Berry, Jody; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2015-06-01

    The filoviruses, which include the marburg- and ebolaviruses, have caused multiple outbreaks among humans this decade. Antibodies against the filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP) have been shown to provide life-saving therapy in nonhuman primates, but such antibodies are generally virus-specific. Many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been described against Ebola virus. In contrast, relatively few have been described against Marburg virus. Here we present ten mAbs elicited by immunization of mice using recombinant mucin-deleted GPs from different Marburg virus (MARV) strains. Surprisingly, two of the mAbs raised against MARV GP also cross-react with the mucin-deleted GP cores of all tested ebolaviruses (Ebola, Sudan, Bundibugyo, Reston), but these epitopes are masked differently by the mucin-like domains themselves. The most efficacious mAbs in this panel were found to recognize a novel "wing" feature on the GP2 subunit that is unique to Marburg and does not exist in Ebola. Two of these anti-wing antibodies confer 90 and 100% protection, respectively, one hour post-exposure in mice challenged with MARV.

  10. Protective mAbs and Cross-Reactive mAbs Raised by Immunization with Engineered Marburg Virus GPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnie L Fusco

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The filoviruses, which include the marburg- and ebolaviruses, have caused multiple outbreaks among humans this decade. Antibodies against the filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP have been shown to provide life-saving therapy in nonhuman primates, but such antibodies are generally virus-specific. Many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs have been described against Ebola virus. In contrast, relatively few have been described against Marburg virus. Here we present ten mAbs elicited by immunization of mice using recombinant mucin-deleted GPs from different Marburg virus (MARV strains. Surprisingly, two of the mAbs raised against MARV GP also cross-react with the mucin-deleted GP cores of all tested ebolaviruses (Ebola, Sudan, Bundibugyo, Reston, but these epitopes are masked differently by the mucin-like domains themselves. The most efficacious mAbs in this panel were found to recognize a novel "wing" feature on the GP2 subunit that is unique to Marburg and does not exist in Ebola. Two of these anti-wing antibodies confer 90 and 100% protection, respectively, one hour post-exposure in mice challenged with MARV.

  11. LpMab-12 Established by CasMab Technology Specifically Detects Sialylated O-Glycan on Thr52 of Platelet Aggregation-Stimulating Domain of Human Podoplanin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukinari Kato

    Full Text Available Podoplanin (PDPN, also known as Aggrus, possesses three tandem repeat of platelet aggregation-stimulating (PLAG domains in its N-terminus. Among the PLAG domains, sialylated O-glycan on Thr52 of PLAG3 is essential for the binding to C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2 and the platelet-aggregating activity of human PDPN (hPDPN. Although various anti-hPDPN monoclonal antibodies (mAbs have been generated, no specific mAb has been reported to target the epitope containing glycosylated Thr52. We recently established CasMab technology to develop mAbs against glycosylated membrane proteins. Herein, we report the development of a novel anti-glycopeptide mAb (GpMab, LpMab-12. LpMab-12 detected endogenous hPDPN by flow cytometry. Immunohistochemical analyses also showed that hPDPN-expressing lymphatic endothelial and cancer cells were clearly labeled by LpMab-12. The minimal epitope of LpMab-12 was identified as Asp49-Pro53 of hPDPN. Furthermore, LpMab-12 reacted with the synthetic glycopeptide of hPDPN, corresponding to 38-54 amino acids (hpp3854: 38-EGGVAMPGAEDDVVTPG-54, which carries α2-6 sialylated N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc on Thr52. LpMab-12 did not recognize non-sialylated GalNAc-attached glycopeptide, indicating that sialylated GalNAc on Thr52 is necessary for the binding of LpMab-12 to hPDPN. Thus, LpMab-12 could serve as a new diagnostic tool for determining whether hPDPN possesses the sialylation on Thr52, a site-specific post-translational modification critical for the hPDPN association with CLEC-2.

  12. LpMab-23: A Cancer-Specific Monoclonal Antibody Against Human Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinji; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-04-07

    Human podoplanin (hPDPN), the ligand of C-type lectin-like receptor-2, is involved in cancer metastasis. Until now, many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been established against hPDPN. However, it is still difficult to develop a cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) against hPDPN because the protein sequence of hPDPN expressed in cancer cells is the same as that in normal cells. Herein, we report LpMab-23 of the mouse IgG1 subclass, a novel CasMab against hPDPN. In an immunohistochemical analysis, LpMab-23 reacted with tumor cells of human oral cancer, but did not react with normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). In contrast, LpMab-17, another anti-hPDPN mAb, reacted with both tumor cells and LECs. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis revealed that LpMab-23 reacted with hPDPN-expressing cancer cell lines (LN319, RERF-LC-AI/hPDPN, Y-MESO-14/hPDPN, and HSC3/hPDPN) but showed little reaction with normal cells (LECs and HEK-293T), although another anti-hPDPN mAb, LpMab-7, reacted with both hPDPN-expressing cancer cells and normal cells, indicating that LpMab-23 is a CasMab against hPDPN.

  13. The effect of unlabelled monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the biodistribution of [sup 131]I-anti-idiotype mAb in murine B cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiele, J. (Stanford University (United States). Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine); Knox, S.J. (Stanford University Medical Center (United States). Department of Radiation Oncology); Ruhl, W. (Stanford University (United States). Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Goris, M.L. (Stanford University Medical Center (United States). Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine)

    1992-07-01

    The 38C13 murine B cell lymphoma model was used to study the effect of the pre-injection of unlabelled anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the subsequent biodistribution of [sup 131]I-anti-idiotype mAb. Mice with established tumors received 0-500 [mu]g of unlabelled anti-idiotype mAb 24 h prior to the administration of [sup 131]I-anti-idiotype (specific), or both [sup 125]I-anti-idiotype and [sup 131]I-isotype-matched irrelevant control (non-specific) mAb. Mice were counted daily in a gamma counter and sacrificed at 2-144 h following injection. Mice were dissected and the weight and activity of the animals and organs were measured. Mice were bled periodically and circulating idiotype levels were measured using an ELISA assay. 500 [mu]g of unlabelled anti-idiotype mAb increased the retention time of the specific but not the nonspecific mAb in all organs and tumor. Following pretreatment with unlabelled mAb, the cumulative tumor/whole body and tumor/normal organ ratios became similar to those of the nonspecific mAb, with concentration ratios (specific/nonspecific mAb) of approximately 1, which persisted until 96 h post injection when circulating idiotype reappears in antigen excess. In the absence of unlabelled mAb there was less retention in tumor and normal tissue. This is presumed to be due in part to decreased levels of circulating [sup 131]I-mAb secondary to rapid plasma clearance of antigen-body complexes and tumor cell mediated dehalogenation, which results when the specific mAb specifically binds the target antigen. Thus, the addition of unlabelled mAb increased the retention by decreasing the specific behavior of the anti-idiotype antibody. (author). 12 refs.; 1 fig.; 3 tabs.

  14. File list: Oth.ALL.05.mab-5.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.mab-5.AllCell ce10 TFs and others mab-5 All cell types SRX331286,SRX0056...39,SRX331288,SRX005637,SRX331156,SRX331154 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.mab-5.AllCell.bed ...

  15. A new approach to quantification of mAb aggregates using peptide affinity probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Crystal S F; Anderson, Kyle W; Patel, Pooja M; Cade, Keale L; Phinney, Karen W; Turko, Illarion V

    2017-02-10

    Using mAbs as therapeutic molecules is complicated by the propensity of mAbs to aggregate at elevated concentrations, which can lead to a variety of adverse events in treatment. Here, we describe a proof-of-concept for new methodology to detect and quantify mAb aggregation. Assay development included using an aggregated mAb as bait for screening of phage display peptide library and identifying those peptides with random sequence which can recognize mAb aggregates. Once identified, the selected peptides can be used for developing quantitative methods to assess mAb aggregation. Results indicate that a peptide binding method coupled with mass spectrometric detection of bound peptide can quantify mAb aggregation and potentially be useful for monitoring aggregation propensity of therapeutic protein candidates.

  16. Antigen identification and characterization of lung cancer specific monoclonal antibodies produced by mAb proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongdong; Hincapie, Marina; Guergova-Kuras, Mariana; Kadas, Janos; Takacs, Laszlo; Karger, Barry L

    2010-04-05

    A mass spectrometric (MS)-based strategy for antigen (Ag) identification and characterization of globally produced monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is described. Mice were immunized with a mixture of native glycoproteins, isolated from the pooled plasma of patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), to generate a library of IgG-secreting hybridomas. Prior to immunization, the pooled NSCLC plasma was subjected to 3-sequential steps of affinity fractionation, including high abundant plasma protein depletion, glycoprotein enrichment, and polyclonal antibody affinity chromatography normalization. In this paper, to demonstrate the high quality of the globally produced mAbs, we selected 3 mAbs of high differentiating power against a matched, pooled normal plasma sample. After production of large quantities of the mAbs from ascites fluids, Ag identification was achieved by immunoaffinity purification, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, and MS analysis of in-gel digest products. One antigen was found to be complement factor H, and the other two were mapped to different subunits of haptoglobin (Hpt). The 2 Hpt mAbs were characterized in detail to assess the quality of the mAbs produced by the global strategy. The affinity of one of the mAbs to the Hpt native tetramer form was found to have a K(D) of roughly 10(-9) M and to be 2 orders of magnitude lower than the reduced form, demonstrating the power of the mAb proteomics technology in generating mAbs to the natural form of the proteins in blood. The binding of this mAb to the beta-chain of haptoglobin was also dependent on glycosylation on this chain. The characterization of mAbs in this work reveals that the global mAb proteomics process can generate high-quality lung cancer specific mAbs capable of recognizing proteins in their native state.

  17. MabCampath可有效治疗B-Cell CLL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨绍杰(摘)

    2006-01-01

    根据在《临床肿瘤学杂志》第10期上公布的数据,美国GenzymeOncology集团开发的MabCampath(alemtuzumab)(Ⅰ)与Fludara(fludarabine phosphate,伏达拉滨)(Ⅱ)联合使用可有效治疗B细胞慢性淋巴细胞性白血病(B-Cell CLL),在研究期间总应答率为83%。Berlex公司(Schering AG公司的子公司)在美国销售(Ⅰ)。

  18. Industrialization of mAb production technology The bioprocessing industry at a crossroads

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Manufacturing processes for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have evolved tremendously since the first licensed mAb product in 1986. The rapid growth in product demand for mAbs triggered parallel efforts to increase production capacity through construction of large bulk manufacturing plants as well as improvements in cell culture processes to raise product titers. This combination has led to an excess of manufacturing capacity, and together with improvements in conventional purificati...

  19. Conservation Compromises: The MAB and the Legacy of the International Biological Program, 1964–1974

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleper, Simone

    2016-01-01

    This article looks at the International Biological Program (IBP) as the predecessor of UNESCO’s well-known and highly successful Man and the Biosphere Programme (MAB). It argues that international conservation efforts of the 1970s, such as the MAB, must in fact be understood as a compound of two opp

  20. Dynamics of immature mAb glycoform secretion during CHO cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez del Val, Ioscani; Fan, Yuzhou; Weilguny, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    required to minimise mAb glycoform variability. Our results suggest that the availability of glycosylation machinery relative to cellular secretory capacity may play a crucial role in mAb glycosylation. In the future, the modelling framework presented here may aid in selecting and engineering cell lines...

  1. Immunogenicity of mAbs in non-human primates during nonclinical safety assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, P.J.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34153790X; Kooijman, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/322905788; Brinks, V.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31395979X; Gispen-de Wied, C.C.; Silva-Lima, B.; Moors, E.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/20241664X; Schellekens, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068406762

    2013-01-01

    The immunogenicity of biopharmaceuticals used in clinical practice remains an unsolved challenge in drug development. Non-human primates (NHPs) are often the only relevant animal model for the development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), but the immune response of NHPs to therapeutic mAbs is not con

  2. Mutations in MAB21L2 result in ocular Coloboma, microcornea and cataracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Deml

    Full Text Available Ocular coloboma results from abnormal embryonic development and is often associated with additional ocular and systemic features. Coloboma is a highly heterogeneous disorder with many cases remaining unexplained. Whole exome sequencing from two cousins affected with dominant coloboma with microcornea, cataracts, and skeletal dysplasia identified a novel heterozygous allele in MAB21L2, c.151 C>G, p.(Arg51Gly; the mutation was present in all five family members with the disease and appeared de novo in the first affected generation of the three-generational pedigree. MAB21L2 encodes a protein similar to C. elegans mab-21 cell fate-determining factor; the molecular function of MAB21L2 is largely unknown. To further evaluate the role of MAB21L2, zebrafish mutants carrying a p.(Gln48Serfs*5 frameshift truncation (mab21l2Q48Sfs*5 and a p.(Arg51_Phe52del in-frame deletion (mab21l2R51_F52del were developed with TALEN technology. Homozygous zebrafish embryos from both lines developed variable lens and coloboma phenotypes: mab21l2Q48Sfs*5 embryos demonstrated severe lens and retinal defects with complete lethality while mab21l2R51_F52del mutants displayed a milder lens phenotype and severe coloboma with a small number of fish surviving to adulthood. Protein studies showed decreased stability for the human p.(Arg51Gly and zebrafish p.(Arg51_Phe52del mutant proteins and predicted a complete loss-of-function for the zebrafish p.(Gln48Serfs*5 frameshift truncation. Additionally, in contrast to wild-type human MAB21L2 transcript, mutant p.(Arg51Gly mRNA failed to efficiently rescue the ocular phenotype when injected into mab21l2Q48Sfs*5 embryos, suggesting this allele is functionally deficient. Histology, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization experiments identified retinal invagination defects, an increase in cell death, abnormal proliferation patterns, and altered expression of several ocular markers in the mab21l2 mutants. These findings support the

  3. Neutron Reflection Study of Surface Adsorption of Fc, Fab, and the Whole mAb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zongyi; Li, Ruiheng; Smith, Charles; Pan, Fang; Campana, Mario; Webster, John R P; van der Walle, Christopher F; Uddin, Shahid; Bishop, Steve M; Narwal, Rojaramani; Warwicker, Jim; Lu, Jian Ren

    2017-07-12

    Characterizing the influence of fragment crystallization (Fc) and antigen-binding fragment (Fab) on monoclonal antibody (mAb) adsorption at the air/water interface is an important step to understanding liquid mAb drug product stability during manufacture, shipping, and storage. Here, neutron reflection is used to study the air/water adsorption of a mAb and its Fc and Fab fragments. By varying the isotopic contrast, the adsorbed amount, thickness, orientation, and immersion of the adsorbed layers could be determined unambiguously. While Fc adsorption reached saturation within the hour, its surface adsorbed amount showed little variation with bulk concentration. In contrast, Fab adsorption was slower and the adsorbed amount was concentration dependent. The much higher Fc adsorption, as compared to Fab, was linked to its lower surface charge. Time and concentration dependence of mAb adsorption was dominated by Fab behavior, although both Fab and Fc behaviors contributed to the amount of mAb adsorbed. Changing the pH from 5.5 to 8.8 did not much perturb the adsorbed amount of Fc, Fab, or mAb. However, a small decrease in adsorption was observed for the Fc over pH 8-8.8 and vice versa for the Fab and mAb, consistent with a dominant Fab behavior. As bulk concentration increased from 5 to 50 ppm, the thicknesses of the Fc layers were almost constant at 40 Å, while Fab and mAb layers increased from 45 to 50 Å. These results imply that the adsorbed mAb, Fc, and Fab all retained their globular structures and were oriented with their short axial lengths perpendicular to the interface.

  4. Anti-podoplanin Monoclonal Antibody LpMab-7 Detects Metastatic Lesions of Osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mika K; Oki, Hiroharu; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Takagi, Michiaki; Kato, Yukinari

    2015-06-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor and is highly metastatic to the lungs. Therefore, the development of a novel molecular targeting therapy against metastasis of osteosarcoma is necessary. A platelet aggregation-inducing factor, podoplanin/aggrus, is involved in tumor metastasis. Furthermore, podoplanin expression was reported to be involved in the poor prognosis of osteosarcoma patients. However, the association between podoplanin expression and metastasis of osteosarcoma remains unclear because of the lack of highly sensitive anti-podoplanin monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). In this study, we used a novel anti-podoplanin MAb, LpMab-7, which is more sensitive than well-known anti-podoplanin MAbs in immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemical analysis using LpMab-7 showed that podoplanin expression at primary lesions is observed in 15 out of 16 (93.8%) cases. Furthermore, podoplanin expression at metastatic lesions was higher compared with primary lesions in three out of four (75%) cases with lung metastasis. Because LpMab-7 has high sensitivity against podoplanin, it is expected to be useful for molecular targeting therapy for osteosarcomas.

  5. Postmortem distribution of MAB-CHMINACA in body fluids and solid tissues of a human cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Koutaro; Wurita, Amin; Minakata, Kayoko; Gonmori, Kunio; Nozawa, Hideki; Yamagishi, Itaru; Watanabe, Kanako; Suzuki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    During the latter part of 2014, we experienced an autopsy case in which 5-fluoro-ADB, one of the most dangerous synthetic cannabinoids, was identified and quantitated in solid tissues and in three herbal blend products [Forensic Toxicol (2015) 33:112-121]. At that time, although we suspected that there may be some drug(s) other than 5-fluoro-ADB in the herbal products, all trials to find it/them were unsuccessful. Subsequently, we carefully re-examined the presence of other synthetic cannabinoid(s) in the above herbal blend products using accurate mass spectrometry and found two new compounds, 5-fluoro-ADB-PINACA and MAB-CHMINACA (Forensic Toxicol. doi: 10.1007/s 11419-015-0264-y). In the present communication, we report the distribution of MAB-CHMINACA in body fluids and solid tissue specimens collected from the same deceased individual (kept frozen at -80 °C) as described above for demonstration of 5-fluoro-ADB. Unexpectedly, unchanged MAB-CHMINACA could be identified and quantitated in whole blood and in pericardial fluid specimens, but it was below the detection limit (0.1 ng/ml) in the urine specimen. A higher concentration of MAB-CHMINACA could be found in all of the nine solid tissues; the highest concentration of MAB-CHMINACA was found in the liver (156 ng/g), followed by the kidney, pancreas and so on. The compounds were detected in all nine solid tissues; their levels were generally higher than those in the whole blood and pericardial fluid. Contrary to expectations, the concentration of MAB-CHMINACA in the adipose tissue was relatively low. Our results show that the victim smoked one of the three herbal blend products containing both MAB-CHMINACA and 5-fluoro-ADB, resulting in the coexistence of both compounds. It should be concluded that 5-fluoro-ADB and MAB-CHMINACA synergically exerted their toxicities, leading to death after a short interval. The differences in the distribution of 5-fluoro-ADB and MAB-CHMINACA among the cadaver specimens were

  6. Dynamics of immature mAb glycoform secretion during CHO cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez del Val, Ioscani; Fan, Yuzhou; Weilguny, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Ensuring consistent glycosylation-associated quality of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has become a priority in pharmaceutical bioprocessing given that the distribution and composition of the carbohydrates (glycans) bound to these molecules determines their therapeutic efficacy and immu......Ensuring consistent glycosylation-associated quality of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has become a priority in pharmaceutical bioprocessing given that the distribution and composition of the carbohydrates (glycans) bound to these molecules determines their therapeutic efficacy...... and immunogenicity. However, the interaction between bioprocess conditions, cellular metabolism and the intracellular process of glycosylation remains to be fully understood. To gain further insight into these interactions, we present a novel integrated modelling platform that links dynamic variations in mAb...... glycosylation with cellular secretory capacity. Two alternative mechanistic representations of how mAb specific productivity (qp) influences glycosylation are compared. In the first, mAb glycosylation is modulated by the linear velocity with which secretory cargo traverses the Golgi apparatus. In the second...

  7. Conservation Compromises: The MAB and the Legacy of the International Biological Program, 1964-1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleper, Simone

    2017-02-01

    This article looks at the International Biological Program (IBP) as the predecessor of UNESCO's well-known and highly successful Man and the Biosphere Programme (MAB). It argues that international conservation efforts of the 1970s, such as the MAB, must in fact be understood as a compound of two opposing attempts to reform international conservation in the 1960s. The scientific framework of the MAB has its origins in disputes between high-level conservationists affiliated with the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) about what the IBP meant for the future of conservation. Their respective visions entailed different ecological philosophies as much as diverging sets of political ideologies regarding the global implementation of conservation. Within the IBP's Conservation Section, one group propagated a universal systems approach to conservation with a centralized, technocratic management of nature and society by an elite group of independent scientific experts. Within IUCN, a second group based their notion of environmental expert roles on a more descriptive and local ecology of resource mapping as practiced by UNESCO. When the IBP came to an end in 1974, both groups' ecological philosophies played into the scientific framework underlying the MAB's World Network or Biosphere Reserves. The article argues that it is impossible to understand the course of conservation within the MAB without studying the dynamics and discourses between the two underlying expert groups and their respective visions for reforming conservation.

  8. M.A.B. Vitreous coatings with bactericidal and fungicidal properties; M.A.B. Revestimientos vitreos con propiedades bactericidas y fungicidas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuoghi Fenollar, L.; Romero Valiente, J.; Villar Apellaniz, C.; Faubel Serra, V.; Noguera Orti, J. F.; Garcia Ten, J.; Yague Munoz, A.; Duran, A.

    2012-07-01

    This report describes the mosaic M.A.B. (bactericide and fungicide) produced by Togama S.A. belonging to the group Fluidra S.A., which has been awarded with the Silver Alfa Award by the Spanish Society of Ceramics and Glass at the International Fair Cevisama 2012. This award recognizes the R and D efforts developed by Togama, SA, already started with participation in the Alpha Awards 2009 and 2011. (Author)

  9. The UNC-4 homeobox protein represses mab-9 expression in DA motor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafari, Gholamali; Appleford, Peter J; Seago, Julian;

    2011-01-01

    The T-box transcription factor mab-9 has been shown to be required for the correct fate of the male-specific blast cells B and F, normal posterior hypodermal morphogenesis, and for the correct axon migration of motor neurons that project circumferential commissures to dorsal muscles. In this stud...

  10. Sorbitol crystallization-induced aggregation in frozen mAb formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedmonte, Deirdre Murphy; Hair, Alison; Baker, Priti; Brych, Lejla; Nagapudi, Karthik; Lin, Hong; Cao, Wenjin; Hershenson, Susan; Ratnaswamy, Gayathri

    2015-02-01

    Sorbitol crystallization-induced aggregation of mAbs in the frozen state was evaluated. The effect of protein aggregation resulting from sorbitol crystallization was measured as a function of formulation variables such as protein concentration and pH. Long-term studies were performed on both IgG1 and IgG2 mAbs over the protein concentration range of 0.1-120 mg/mL. Protein aggregation was measured by size-exclusion HPLC (SE-HPLC) and further characterized by capillary-electrophoresis SDS. Sorbitol crystallization was monitored and characterized by subambient differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. Aggregation due to sorbitol crystallization is inversely proportional to both protein concentration and formulation pH. At high protein concentrations, sorbitol crystallization was suppressed, and minimal aggregation by SE-HPLC resulted, presumably because of self-stabilization of the mAbs. The glass transition temperature (Tg ') and fragility index measurements were made to assess the influence of molecular mobility on the crystallization of sorbitol. Tg ' increased with increasing protein concentration for both mAbs. The fragility index decreased with increasing protein concentration, suggesting that it is increasingly difficult for sorbitol to crystallize at high protein concentrations.

  11. Multicapillary SDS-gel electrophoresis for the analysis of fluorescently labeled mAb preparations: a high throughput quality control process for the production of QuantiPlasma and PlasmaScan mAb libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Andrea; Szekrényes, Akos; Kerékgyártó, Márta; Balogh, Attila; Kádas, János; Lázár, József; Guttman, András; Kurucz, István; Takács, László

    2014-08-01

    Molecular heterogeneity of mAb preparations is the result of various co- and post-translational modifications and to contaminants related to the production process. Changes in molecular composition results in alterations of functional performance, therefore quality control and validation of therapeutic or diagnostic protein products is essential. A special case is the consistent production of mAb libraries (QuantiPlasma™ and PlasmaScan™) for proteome profiling, quality control of which represents a challenge because of high number of mAbs (>1000). Here, we devise a generally applicable multicapillary SDS-gel electrophoresis process for the analysis of fluorescently labeled mAb preparations for the high throughput quality control of mAbs of the QuantiPlasma™ and PlasmaScan™ libraries. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. mab-31 and the TGF-β pathway act in the ray lineage to pattern C. elegans male sensory rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Jacky KF

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C. elegans TGF-β-like Sma/Mab signaling pathway regulates both body size and sensory ray patterning. Most of the components in this pathway were initially identified by genetic screens based on the small body phenotype, and many of these mutants display sensory ray patterning defect. At the cellular level, little is known about how and where these components work although ray structural cell has been implicated as one of the targets. Based on the specific ray patterning abnormality, we aim to identify by RNAi approach additional components that function specifically in the ray lineage to elucidate the regulatory role of TGF-β signaling in ray differentiation. Result We report here the characterization of a new member of the Sma/Mab pathway, mab-31, recovered from a genome-wide RNAi screen. mab-31 mutants showed ray cell cluster patterning defect and mis-specification of the ray identity. mab-31 encodes a nuclear protein expressed in descendants of ray precursor cells impacting on the ray cell's clustering properties, orientation of cell division plane, and fusion of structural cells. Genetic experiments also establish its relationship with other Sma/Mab pathway components and transcription factors acting upstream and downstream of the signaling event. Conclusion mab-31 function is indispensable in Sma/Mab signal recipient cells during sensory rays specification. Both mab-31 and sma-6 are required in ray lineage at the late larval stages. They act upstream of C. elegans Pax-6 homolog and repress its function. These findings suggested mab-31 is a key factor that can integrate TFG-β signals in male sensory ray lineage to define organ identity.

  13. EGL-20/Wnt and MAB-5/Hox Act Sequentially to Inhibit Anterior Migration of Neuroblasts in C. elegans.

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    Matthew P Josephson

    Full Text Available Directed neuroblast and neuronal migration is important in the proper development of nervous systems. In C. elegans the bilateral Q neuroblasts QR (on the right and QL (on the left undergo an identical pattern of cell division and differentiation but migrate in opposite directions (QR and descendants anteriorly and QL and descendants posteriorly. EGL-20/Wnt, via canonical Wnt signaling, drives the expression of MAB-5/Hox in QL but not QR. MAB-5 acts as a determinant of posterior migration, and mab-5 and egl-20 mutants display anterior QL descendant migrations. Here we analyze the behaviors of QR and QL descendants as they begin their anterior and posterior migrations, and the effects of EGL-20 and MAB-5 on these behaviors. The anterior and posterior daughters of QR (QR.a/p after the first division immediately polarize and begin anterior migration, whereas QL.a/p remain rounded and non-migratory. After ~1 hour, QL.a migrates posteriorly over QL.p. We find that in egl-20/Wnt, bar-1/β-catenin, and mab-5/Hox mutants, QL.a/p polarize and migrate anteriorly, indicating that these molecules normally inhibit anterior migration of QL.a/p. In egl-20/Wnt mutants, QL.a/p immediately polarize and begin migration, whereas in bar-1/β-catenin and mab-5/Hox, the cells transiently retain a rounded, non-migratory morphology before anterior migration. Thus, EGL-20/Wnt mediates an acute inhibition of anterior migration independently of BAR-1/β-catenin and MAB-5/Hox, and a later, possible transcriptional response mediated by BAR-1/β-catenin and MAB-5/Hox. In addition to inhibiting anterior migration, MAB-5/Hox also cell-autonomously promotes posterior migration of QL.a (and QR.a in a mab-5 gain-of-function.

  14. Plant Recycling for Molecular Biofarming to Produce Recombinant Anti-cancer mAb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deuk-Su Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The expression and glycosylation patterns of anti-colorectal cancer therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb CO17-1A recognizing the tumor-associated antigen GA733-2, expressed in human colorectal carcinoma cells, were observed in the leaf and stem tissues of primary (T2; 0 cycle secondary (1 cycle, and tertiary (2 cycle growths of seedlings obtained from the stem cut of T2 plants. The bottom portion of the stem of T2 seedlings was cut to induce the 1 cycle shoot growth, which was again cut to induce the 2 cycle shoot growth. In the 1 and 2 cycle growths, the periods for floral organ formation was shorter (35 days than that (100 days for the 0 cycle growth. The genes of heavy and light chains of mAb CO17-1A existed at the top, middle, and basal portions of the leaves and stem obtained from the 0, 1, and 2 cycle plants. The protein levels in the leaves and stem tissues from the 1 and 2 cycles were similar to those in the tissues from the 0 cycle. The glycosylation level and pattern in the leaf and stem did not alter dramatically over the different cycles. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR confirmed that mAbs CO17-1A obtained from leaf and stem tissues of the 0, 1, and 2 cycles had similar binding affinity for the GA733-2 antigen. These data suggest that the shoot growth by bottom stem cutting is applicable to speed up the growth of plant biomass expressing anti-colorectal cancer mAb without variation of expression, glycosylation, and functionality.

  15. MAB4-induced auxin sink generates local auxin gradients in Arabidopsis organ formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Masahiko; Nakano, Yasukazu; Tasaka, Masao

    2014-01-21

    In Arabidopsis, leaves and flowers form cyclically in the shoot meristem periphery and are triggered by local accumulations of the plant hormone auxin. Auxin maxima are established by the auxin efflux carrier PIN-formed1 (PIN1). During organ formation, two distinct types of PIN1 polarization occur. First, convergence of PIN1 polarity in the surface of the meristem creates local auxin peaks. Second, basipetal PIN1 polarization causes auxin to move away from the surface in the middle of an incipient organ primordium, thought to contribute to vascular formation. Several mathematical models have been developed in attempts to explain the PIN1 localization pattern. However, the molecular mechanisms that control these dynamic changes are unknown. Here, we show that loss-of-function in the MACCHI-BOU 4 (MAB4) family genes, which encode nonphototropic hypocotyl 3-like proteins and regulate PIN endocytosis, cause deletion of basipetal PIN1 polarization, resulting in extensive auxin accumulation all over the meristem surface from lack of a sink for auxin. These results indicate that the MAB4 family genes establish inward auxin transport from the L1 surface of incipient organ primordia by basipetal PIN1 polarization, and that this behavior is essential for the progression of organ development. Furthermore, the expression of the MAB4 family genes depends on auxin response. Our results define two distinct molecular mechanisms for PIN1 polarization during organ development and indicate that an auxin response triggers the switching between these two mechanisms.

  16. Preparation of knockout extract for determination of really active compound using MAb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uto, Takuhiro; Tuvshintogtokh, Indree; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2011-03-01

    The crude-rhizome extract of P. japonicus was loaded on the immunoaffinity column conjugated with anti- ginsenoside-Rb1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) and washed with the washing solvent, followed by elution solvent, to give fraction 2 containing higher concentration of compound 1. Compound 1 clearly indicated a dammarane saponin having protopanaxadiol as a framework and three sugars in a molecule suggesting that compound 1 is chikusetsusaponin III. Compound 2 was also determined as chikusetsusaponin VI compared to the staining color, its Rf value and the comparison with ginsenoside Rb1. We succeeded in one step purification of ginsenoside-Rb1 by immunoaffinity column conjugated with anti- ginsenoside-Rb1 MAb leading to the knock-out extract which will be useful for pharmacological investigation. The antibody was stable when exposed to the eluent, and the immunoaffinity column showed almost no decrease in capacity after repeated use more than 10 times under the same conditions. From the crude extract of licorice we isolated glycyrrhizin by one-step purification by the immunoaffinity column using anti-glycyrrhizin MAb. Washing fraction contained all components except for only glycyrrhizin and was named as the knockout extract. We confirmed the synergic effect of glycyrrhizin with some other components for the inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) production by blocking inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by using its knockout extract.

  17. Industrialization of mAb production technology: the bioprocessing industry at a crossroads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Manufacturing processes for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have evolved tremendously since the first licensed mAb product in 1986. The rapid growth in product demand for mAbs triggered parallel efforts to increase production capacity through construction of large bulk manufacturing plants as well as improvements in cell culture processes to raise product titers. This combination has led to an excess of manufacturing capacity, and together with improvements in conventional purification technologies, promises nearly unlimited production capacity in the foreseeable future. The increase in titers has also led to a marked reduction in production costs, which could then become a relatively small fraction of sales price for future products which are sold at prices at or near current levels. The reduction of capacity and cost pressures for current state-of-the-art bulk production processes may shift the focus of process development efforts and have important implications for both plant design and product development strategies for both biopharmaceutical and contract manufacturing companies.

  18. TGF-beta Sma/Mab signaling mutations uncouple reproductive aging from somatic aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijing Luo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Female reproductive cessation is one of the earliest age-related declines humans experience, occurring in mid-adulthood. Similarly, Caenorhabditis elegans' reproductive span is short relative to its total life span, with reproduction ceasing about a third into its 15-20 day adulthood. All of the known mutations and treatments that extend C. elegans' reproductive period also regulate longevity, suggesting that reproductive span is normally linked to life span. C. elegans has two canonical TGF-beta signaling pathways. We recently found that the TGF-beta Dauer pathway regulates longevity through the Insulin/IGF-1 Signaling (IIS pathway; here we show that this pathway has a moderate effect on reproductive span. By contrast, TGF-beta Sma/Mab signaling mutants exhibit a substantially extended reproductive period, more than doubling reproductive span in some cases. Sma/Mab mutations extend reproductive span disproportionately to life span and act independently of known regulators of somatic aging, such as Insulin/IGF-1 Signaling and Dietary Restriction. This is the first discovery of a pathway that regulates reproductive span independently of longevity and the first identification of the TGF-beta Sma/Mab pathway as a regulator of reproductive aging. Our results suggest that longevity and reproductive span regulation can be uncoupled, although they appear to normally be linked through regulatory pathways.

  19. H2Mab-77 is a Sensitive and Specific Anti-HER2 Monoclonal Antibody Against Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, Shunsuke; Fujii, Yuki; Kaneko, Mika K; Yamada, Shinji; Nakamura, Takuro; Yanaka, Miyuki; Saidoh, Noriko; Chang, Yao-Wen; Handa, Saori; Takahashi, Maki; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-08-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) plays a critical role in the progression of breast cancers, and HER2 overexpression is associated with poor clinical outcomes. Trastuzumab is an anti-HER2 humanized antibody that leads to significant survival benefits in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancers. In this study, we developed novel anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and characterized their efficacy in flow cytometry, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analyses. Initially, we expressed the full length or ectodomain of HER2 in LN229 glioblastoma cells and then immunized mice with ectodomain of HER2 or LN229/HER2, and performed the first screening by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays using ectodomain of HER2. Subsequently, we selected mAbs according to their efficacy in flow cytometry (second screening), Western blot (third screening), and immunohistochemical analyses (fourth screening). Among 100 mAb clones, only three mAbs reacted with HER2 in Western blot, and clone H2Mab-77 (IgG1, kappa) was selected. Finally, immunohistochemical analyses with H2Mab-77 showed sensitive and specific reactions against breast cancer cells, warranting the use of H2Mab-77 to detect HER2 in pathological analyses of breast cancers.

  20. Results from a survey of the dynamics shaping Uranus' Mab/μ-ring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kartik; de Pater, Imke; Showalter, Mark R.

    2014-11-01

    Based on Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data, Showalter and Lissauer (2006) reported the discovery of two faint rings beyond Uranus’ main rings: the ν- and μ- rings. They constitute Uranus' outer ring system and are located beyond the ɛ-ring but interior to the large classical moons. After co-adding a series of HST images, Showalter and Lissauer (2006) obtained radial profiles for both new rings. They discovered that the peak radial intensity of the μ-ring aligns closely with the orbit of Mab. Along with numerous other observations, this points to the fact that the Mab/μ-ring system is highly coupled.The discovery of the μ-ring has led to open questions about dust dynamics beyond Uranus' main rings. Like Saturn's E-ring, observations reveal that the μ-ring is blue, indicative of a pre-dominance of sub-micron-sized particles (de Pater et al., 2006). The E-ring results from plumes on Enceladus' south pole, however the origin of the μ-ring remains a mystery. The latter is likely fed by ejecta from micro-meteorite impacts with Mab, much like Jupiter's faint rings are regenerated by companion (small) moons (Burns et al., 1999). The μ-ring's steep size-distribution suggests that there is an unknown mechanism at play that hides or removes large dust particles. We present results from an investigation into the forces shaping the μ-ring. To simulate the motion of dust in the Mab/μ-ring system, we developed a numerical toolbox (Dustsim; Kumar et al., 2015) that uses Tudat (Kumar et al., 2012). We performed integrations using Dustsim that included the effects of Uranus' gravity field, titled magnetic moment, solar radiation pressure, and collisions with a putative suite of large μ-ring bodies, hypothesized as the cause of Mab's anomalous orbital motion (Kumar et al., 2014). Following on from previous studies (e.g., Sfair and Giuliatti Winter, 2009; Sfair and Giuliatti Winter, 2012), we present a survey of the expected lifetime of μ-ring dust, as a function of

  1. Sequence analysis and mRNA expression of mab-21 gene in the Chinese honeybee, Apis cerana cerana (Hymenoptera: Apidae)%中华蜜蜂mab-21基因序列分析及表达特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛菲; 吴鹏杰; 李雨时; 王秀红; 国占宝; 徐书法; 吴杰

    2015-01-01

    [目的]探究中华蜜蜂Apis cerana cerana Male abnomal 21(mab-21)基因在不同发育阶段的表达特性及染螨条件下mab-21基因表达变化规律.[方法]本研究利用RT-PCR方法,克隆了中华蜜蜂mab-21的基因编码区;采用荧光定量PCR方法检测了中华蜜蜂mab-21在不同发育时期(新出房蜂、哺育蜂、守卫蜂及采集蜂)工蜂头部中mRNA的表达量以及接种大蜂螨Varroa destructor前后mab-21基因的表达变化.[结果]克隆获得中华蜜蜂mab-21cDNA,命名为Accmab21(GenBank登录号KR000001).序列分析显示,该编码区开放阅读框长为1 098 bp,编码365个氨基酸,推测的编码蛋白的相对分子量和等电点分别为41.63 kD和8.53.系统发育分析表明中华蜜蜂mab-21与西方蜜蜂Apis mellifera mab-21、小蜜蜂Apis florea mab-21和熊蜂Bombus impatiens mab-21聚成一支.该基因在中华蜜蜂工蜂的不同发育时期均有表达,其中哺育蜂阶段显著高于新出房蜂、守卫蜂和采集蜂(P<0.05).接种大蜂螨后,哺育蜂和守卫蜂中mab-21基因的表达下降显著(P<0.05);而在新出房蜂和采集蜂中表达量变化不显著.[结论]该基因可能与中华蜜蜂抗螨行为相关.

  2. Generation, characterization and therapeutic potential of anti-feline TNF-alpha MAbs for feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doki, Tomoyoshi; Takano, Tomomi; Nishiyama, Yuri; Nakamura, Michiyo; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2013-12-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a lethal infectious disease affecting domestic and wild cats. Several reports suggested that TNF-alpha is related to the progression of FIP. Thus, the administration of a feline TNF-alpha-neutralizing antibody to cats with FIP may reduce the disease progression. In this study, we have prepared nine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that recognize feline TNF-alpha. All MAbs neutralized recombinant TNF-alpha. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of the MAbs for the cytotoxicity of recombinant TNF-alpha were 5-684 ng/ml. MAb 2-4 exhibited high neutralizing activity against natural TNF-alpha derived from FIPV-infected macrophages, and was confirmed to inhibit the following feline TNF-alpha-induced conditions in vitro: (i) an increase in the survival rate of neutrophils from cats with FIP, (ii) aminopeptidase N (APN) mRNA expression in macrophages, and (iii) apoptosis of a feline T-lymphocyte cell line.

  3. Mab-3 is a direct tra-1 target gene regulating diverse aspects of C. elegans male sexual development and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, W; Ross, J M; Zarkower, D

    2000-10-01

    Sex determination is controlled by global regulatory genes, such as tra-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans, Sex lethal in Drosophila, or Sry in mammals. How these genes coordinate sexual differentiation throughout the body is a key unanswered question. tra-1 encodes a zinc finger transcription factor, TRA-1A, that regulates, directly or indirectly, all genes required for sexual development. mab-3 (male abnormal 3), acts downstream of tra-1 and is known to be required for sexual differentiation of at least two tissues. mab-3 directly regulates yolk protein transcription in the intestine and specifies male sense organ differentiation in the nervous system. It encodes a transcription factor related to the products of the Drosophila sexual regulator doublesex (dsx), which also regulates yolk protein transcription and male sense-organ differentiation. The similarities between mab-3 and dsx led us to suggest that some aspects of sex determination may be evolutionarily conserved. Here we find that mab-3 is also required for expression of male-specific genes in sensory neurons of the head and tail and for male interaction with hermaphrodites. These roles in male development and behavior suggest further functional similarity to dsx. In male sensory ray differentiation we find that MAB-3 acts synergistically with LIN-32, a neurogenic bHLH transcription factor. Expression of LIN-32 is spatially restricted by the combined action of the Hox gene mab-5 and the hairy homolog lin-22, while MAB-3 is expressed throughout the lateral hypodermis. Finally, we find that mab-3 transcription is directly regulated in the intestine by TRA-1A, providing a molecular link between the global regulatory pathway and terminal sexual differentiation.

  4. P3 mAb: An Immunogenic Anti-NeuGcGM3 Antibody with Unusual Immunoregulatory Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Darel; Rodríguez, Nely; Griñán, Tania; Rondón, Teresa; Vázquez, Ana María; Pérez, Rolando; Hernández, Ana María

    2012-01-01

    P3 is a murine IgM mAb that recognize N-glycosylated gangliosides, sulfatides, and antigens expressed in melanoma, breast, and lung human tumors. This antibody has the ability to trigger an IgG antibody response in the syngeneic BALB/c model, even when it is administered in the absence of adjuvant or carrier protein. The mechanism by which the P3 mAb, a self-immunoglobulin, induce this immune response in the absence of co-stimulatory or classical danger signals is still unknown. In the present paper we show that the high immunogenicity of P3 mAb depends not only on CD4 but also on CD8(+) T cells, since the depletion of CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cells led to the loss of P3 mAb immunogenicity in the syngeneic model. Furthermore, the immunization with P3 mAb enhanced the recovery of the CD8(+) T cell population in mice treated with an anti-CD8a antibody. Additionally, the immunization with P3 mAb restored the capacity of immunosuppressed mice to reject allogeneic tumors, a mechanism mediated by the action of CD8(+) T cells. Finally, in mice with cyclophosphamide induced lymphopenia, the administration of P3 mAb accelerated the recovery of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. These results show new possibilities for B and CD8(+) T cells interactions during the immune response elicited by a self-protein. Furthermore they point to P3 mAb as a potential interesting candidate for the treatment of immunosuppressed patients.

  5. P3 mAb: an immunogenic anti-NeuGcGM3 antibody with unusual immunoregulatory properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darel eMartínez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available P3 is a murine IgM mAb that recognize N-glycolilated gangliosides, sulphatides and antigens expressed in melanoma, breast and lung human tumors. This antibody has the ability to trigger an IgG antibody response in the syngeneic BALB/c model, even when it is administered in the absence of adjuvant or carrier protein. The mechanism by which the P3 mAb, a self immunoglobuline, induce this immune response in the absence of co-stimulatory or classical danger signals is still unknown. In the present paper we show that the high immunogenicity of P3 mAb depends not only on CD4 but also on CD8+ T cells, since the depletion of CD8+ or CD4+ T cells led to the loss of P3 mAb immunogenicity in the syngeneic model. Furthermore, the immunization with P3 mAb enhanced the recovery of the CD8+ T cell population in mice treated with an anti-CD8a antibody. Additionally, the immunization with P3 mAb restored the capacity of immunosuppressed mice to reject allogeneic tumors, a mechanism mediated by the action of CD8+ T cells. Finally, in mice with cyclophosphamide induced lymphopenia, the administration of P3 mAb accelerated the recovery of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results show new possibilities for B and CD8+ T cells interactions during the immune response elicited by a self-protein. Furthermore they point to P3 mAb as a potential interesting candidate for the treatment of immunosuppressed patients.

  6. Prognostic Role of 14F7 Mab Immunoreactivity against N-Glycolyl GM3 Ganglioside in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Lahera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the prognostic role of 14F7 Mab immunoreactivity, against N-Glycolyl GM3 ganglioside, in patients with colon cancer (CC and to evaluate the relationship between its expression and clinicopathological features. Methods. Paraffin-embedded specimens were retrospectively collected from 50 patients with CC operated between 2004 and 2008. 14F7 Mab staining was determined by immunohistochemistry technique and its relation with survival and clinicopathologic features was evaluated. Results. The reactivity of 14F7 Mab was detected in all cases. Most cases had high level of immunostaining (70% that showed statistical correlation with TNM stage (P=0.025. In univariate survival analysis, level of 14F7 Mab immunoreactivity (P=0.0078, TNM Stage (P=0.0007 and lymphovascular invasion (0.027 were significant prognostic factors for overall survival. Among these variables, level of 14F7 Mab immunoreactivity  (HR=0.268; 95%  CI  0.078–0.920; P=0.036 and TNM stage (HR=0.249; 95%  CI   0.066–0.932; P=0.039 were independent prognostic factors on multivariate analysis. Conclusions. This study is the first approach on the prognostic significance of 14F7 Mab immunoreactivity in patients with colon adenocarcinoma and this assessment might be used in the prognostic estimate of CC, although further studies will be required to validate these findings.

  7. Combined Protein A and size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography for the single-step measurement of mAb, aggregates and host cell proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjoka, Xhorxhi; Schofield, Mark; Cvetkovic, Aleksandar; Gantier, Rene

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of monoclonal antibody (mAb) monomer, mAb aggregates, and host cell proteins (HCPs) is critical for the optimization of the mAb production process. The present work describes a single high throughput analytical tool capable of tracking the concentration of mAb, mAb aggregate and HCPs in a growing cell culture batch. By combining two analytical HPLC methods, Protein A affinity and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), it is possible to detect a relative increase or decrease in the concentration of all three entities simultaneously. A comparison of the combined Protein A-SEC assay to SEC alone was performed, demonstrating that it can be useful tool for the quantification of mAb monomer along with trending data for mAb aggregate and HCP. Furthermore, the study shows that the Protein A-SEC method is at least as accurate as other commonly used analytical methods such as ELISA and Bradford.

  8. L-asparaginase production by mangrove derived Bacillus cereus MAB5:optimization by response surface methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ThenmozhiC; SankarR; KaruppiahV; SampathkumarP

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To isolate marine bacteria, statistically optimize them for maximum asparaginase production. Methods:In the present study, statistically based experimental designs were applied to maximize the production of L-asparaginase from bacterial strain of Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) MAB5 (HQ675025) isolated and identified by 16S rDNA sequencing from mangroves rhizosphere sediment. Results:Plackett-Barman design was used to identify the interactive effect of the eight variables viz. yeast extract, soyabean meal, glucose, magnesium sulphate, KH2PO4, wood chips, aspargine and sodium chloride. All the variables are denoted as numerical factors and investigated at two widely spaced intervals designated as-1 (low level) and+1 (high level). The effect of individual parameters on L-asparaginase production was calculated. Soyabean meal, aspargine, wood chips and sodium chloride were found to be the significant among eight variables. The maximum amount of L-asparaginase produced (51.54 IU/mL) from the optimized medium containing soyabean meal (6.282 8 g/L), aspargine (5.5 g/L), wood chips (1.383 8 g/L) and NaCl (4.535 4 g/L). Conclusions:The study revealed that, it is useful to produce the maximum amount of L-asparaginase from B. cereus MAB5 for the treatment of various infections and diseases.

  9. Calcium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... D is needed to help your body use calcium. Milk is fortified with vitamin D for this reason. ... of calcium dietary supplements include calcium citrate and calcium carbonate. Calcium citrate is the more expensive form of ...

  10. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center. Calcium and vitamin D: Important at every age. NIAMS.NIH.gov website. www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Bone/Bone_Health/Nutrition . Updated May 2015. Accessed March ...

  11. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  12. Monoclonal antibody proteomics: use of antibody mimotope displaying phages and the relevant synthetic peptides for mAb scouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdú, István; Flachner, Beáta; Bognár, Melinda; Végh, Barbara M; Dobi, Krisztina; Lőrincz, Zsolt; Lázár, József; Cseh, Sándor; Takács, László; Kurucz, István

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibody proteomics uses nascent libraries or cloned (Plasmascan™, QuantiPlasma™) libraries of mAbs that react with individual epitopes of proteins in the human plasma. At the initial phase of library creation, cognate protein antigen and the epitope interacting with the antibodies are not known. Scouting for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with the best binding characteristics is of high importance for mAb based biomarker assay development. However, in the absence of the identity of the cognate antigen the task represents a challenge. We combined phage display, and surface plasmon resonance (Biacore) experiments to test whether specific phages and the respective mimotope peptides obtained from large scale studies are applicable to determine key features of antibodies for scouting. We show here that mAb captured phage-mimotope heterogeneity that is the diversity of the selected peptide sequences, is inversely correlated with an important binding descriptor; the off-rate of the antibodies and that represents clues for driving the selection of useful mAbs for biomarker assay development. Carefully chosen synthetic mimotope peptides are suitable for specificity testing in competitive assays using the target proteome, in our case the human plasma.

  13. Immunohistochemical Analysis Using Antipodocalyxin Monoclonal Antibody PcMab-47 Demonstrates Podocalyxin Expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itai, Shunsuke; Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-09-05

    Podocalyxin is a CD34-related type I transmembrane protein that is highly glycosylated with N-glycan, O-glycan, and keratan sulfate. Podocalyxin was originally found in the podocytes of rat kidney and is reportedly expressed in many types of tumors, including brain tumors, colorectal cancers, and breast cancers. Overexpression of podocalyxin is an independent predictor of progression, metastasis, and poor outcome. We recently immunized mice with recombinant human podocalyxin, which was produced using LN229 glioblastoma cells, and produced a novel antipodocalyxin monoclonal antibody (mAb), PcMab-47, which reacts with endogenous podocalyxin-expressing cancer cell lines and normal cell lines independent of glycosylation in Western blot, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical analyses. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical analysis against oral cancers using PcMab-47. PcMab-47-stained oral squamous cell carcinoma cells in a cytoplasmic pattern and detected 26/38 (68.4%) of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells on tissue microarrays. These results indicate that PcMab-47 is useful in detecting podocalyxin of oral cancers for immunohistochemical analysis.

  14. Expression and purification of Ctomp2aa167-aa434 and preparation of its mAb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN HONG ZUO; LI ZHI TAN; CHAO QUN CHEN; NING ZHENG DONG; XIA BAI; CHANG GENG RUAN

    2006-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis outer membrane protein 2 (Ctomp2) is a major immunogen in chlamydial infections and a highly genus-conserved structural protein of all Chlamydia species. To purify the protein and to prepare monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against it, the recombinant protein was induced by IPTG, which was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and purified by means of a Ni2+ -charged resin column. The denatured protein was refolded in the GSH-GSSH buffer gradually and identified by Western blotting. Then the BALB/c mice were immunized with the recombinant protein to prepare the mAb against Ctomp2. The obtained mAbs were characterized. Genital specimens were tested with indirect ELISA mostly made of the mAb and cell culture in 84 patients with genital symptoms. The results showed that high-level expression of the recombinant protein was achieved, which existed as inclusion body and amounted to 38 % of total bacterium protein. A mAb against Ctomp2 was obtained. It belongs to IgG 2b. The titers were as high as 1:40 000. The Western blotting showed that the mAb only reacted with the recombinant protein. It had no crossing reactions against E. coli, N. gonorhoea, M.hominis, U. urealyticum and M. penetrans. It had high specifity. In comparison with gold standard test-cell culture, the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values and negative predictive values of indirect ELISA were 95.24%, 100%, 100% and 98.44%, respectively. The above-mentioned research work contributed not only to the further study of the structure and function of this protein, but also to the establishment of the method for its clinical application, for it had not been reported before.

  15. P3 mAb: An Immunogenic Anti-NeuGcGM3 Antibody with Unusual Immunoregulatory Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, Darel; Rodríguez, Nely; Griñán, Tania; Rondón, Teresa; Vázquez, Ana María; Pérez, Rolando; Hernández, Ana María

    2012-01-01

    P3 is a murine IgM mAb that recognize N-glycosylated gangliosides, sulfatides, and antigens expressed in melanoma, breast, and lung human tumors. This antibody has the ability to trigger an IgG antibody response in the syngeneic BALB/c model, even when it is administered in the absence of adjuvant or carrier protein. The mechanism by which the P3 mAb, a self-immunoglobulin, induce this immune response in the absence of co-stimulatory or classical danger signals is still unknown. In the presen...

  16. P3 mAb: an immunogenic anti-NeuGcGM3 antibody with unusual immunoregulatory properties.

    OpenAIRE

    Darel eMartínez; Nely eRodríguez; Tania eGriñán; Teresa eRondón; Ana María Vázquez1; Rolando ePérez; Ana María eHernández

    2012-01-01

    P3 is a murine IgM mAb that recognize N-glycolilated gangliosides, sulphatides and antigens expressed in melanoma, breast and lung human tumors. This antibody has the ability to trigger an IgG antibody response in the syngeneic BALB/c model, even when it is administered in the absence of adjuvant or carrier protein. The mechanism by which the P3 mAb, a self immunoglobuline, induce this immune response in the absence of co-stimulatory or classical danger signals is still unknown. In the presen...

  17. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 mutation is a frequent event in osteosarcoma detected by a multi-specific monoclonal antibody MsMab-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing; Kato, Yukinari; Kaneko, Mika Kato; Sugawara, Masato; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Yuta; Naganuma, Yasushi; Yamakawa, Mitsunori; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Takagi, Michiaki

    2013-12-01

    Somatic mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and IDH2 occur in gliomas, acute myeloid leukemia, and cartilaginous tumors. Somatic mosaic IDH1/2 mutations are also reported in Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome, which are characterized by multiple central cartilaginous tumors. Although IDH1/2 mutation analysis against osteosarcoma has been performed in several studies, no IDH1/2 mutation has been reported. Herein, we newly report the IDH2-R172S mutation in three of 12 (25%) osteosarcoma patients, which was detected by direct DNA sequencing. No monoclonal antibody (mAb) has been reported against IDH2-R172S mutation. However, we demonstrate that the IDH2-R172S peptide was recognized by our established multi-specific anti-mutated IDH1/2 mAb, MsMab-1, in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Western blot analysis revealed that MsMab-1 reacts with PA tag combined recombinant proteins of IDH2-R172S. Furthermore, MsMab-1 stained IDH2-R172S-expressing osteosarcoma tissues in immunohistochemistry. The MsMab-1 stained nine of 32 (28.1%) osteosarcomas in a tissue microarray. This report is the first describing IDH2 mutations in osteosarcoma, which can be detected by MsMab-1 mAb. Taken together, these results show that MsMab-1 can be anticipated for use in immunohistochemical determination of IDH1/2 mutation-bearing osteosarcoma.

  18. MAB21L2, a vertebrate member of the Male-abnormal 21 family, modulates BMP signaling and interacts with SMAD1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longhi Renato

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Through in vivo loss-of-function studies, vertebrate members of the Male abnormal 21 (mab-21 gene family have been implicated in gastrulation, neural tube formation and eye morphogenesis. Despite mounting evidence of their considerable importance in development, the biochemical properties and nature of MAB-21 proteins have remained strikingly elusive. In addition, genetic studies conducted in C. elegans have established that in double mutants mab-21 is epistatic to genes encoding various members of a Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-beta signaling pathway involved in the formation of male-specific sensory organs. Results Through a gain-of-function approach, we analyze the interaction of Mab21l2 with a TGF-beta signaling pathway in early vertebrate development. We show that the vertebrate mab-21 homolog Mab21l2 antagonizes the effects of Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP4 overexpression in vivo, rescuing the dorsal axis and restoring wild-type distribution of Chordin and Xvent2 transcripts in Xenopus gastrulae. We show that MAB21L2 immunoprecipitates in vivo with the BMP4 effector SMAD1, whilst in vitro it binds SMAD1 and the SMAD1-SMAD4 complex. Finally, when targeted to an heterologous promoter, MAB21L2 acts as a transcriptional repressor. Conclusions Our results provide the first biochemical and cellular foundation for future functional studies of mab-21 genes in normal neural development and its pathological disturbances.

  19. ING-1(heMAb, a Monoclonal Antibody to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule, Inhibits Tumor Metastases in a Murine Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry H. Ruan

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available ING-1(heMAb, a human-engineered monoclonal antibody (MAb that specifically targets the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM, kills adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of ING-1(heMAb in a murine model of cancer metastases. Mice received intravenous dosing of 1 mg/kg ING-1(heMAb, twice a week, starting on day 2 or day 5. A negative control group received 1 mg/kg human immunoglobulin G with the same dose frequency starting on day 2. A positive control group received weekly 100 mg/kg 54lurouracil/leucovorin starting on day 2. ING-1(heMAb/day 2 treatment significantly reduced both the number of visible tumor nodules in body cavities (P < .01 and the number of metastases on lung surfaces (P < .005. The treatment also resulted in a 91% reduction of micrometastases in lung tissues (P <.0001. Delaying ING-1(heMAb treatment until day 5 caused 54% reduction in micrometastases (P <.005. Our results indicate that a number of parameters, including treatment starting day, dose level, and dose frequency, are critical in achieving the optimal efficacy of ING-1(heMAb. We conclude that ING-1(heMAb effectively reduced tumor metastases in a murine cancer model. Immunotherapy with ING-1(heMAb may be beneficial in treating human metastatic diseases.

  20. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  1. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease or stomach conditions.tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking calcium carbonate, call your doctor.

  2. Calcium Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... if a person has symptoms of a parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , or an overactive thyroid. A total calcium level is often measured as part of a routine health screening. It is included in the comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) and the basic metabolic panel (BMP) , ...

  3. EPITOPE MAPPING OF SCLC-CLUSTER-2 MABS AND GENERATION OF ANTIBODIES DIRECTED AGAINST NEW EGP-2 EPITOPES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HELFRICH, W; KONING, PW; THE, TH; DELEIJ, L

    1994-01-01

    Western blot analysis proved that all cluster-2 MAbs recognize identical or overlapping disulfide-bond-dependent epitopes, indicating the presence of a disulfide-bond-stabilized EGP-2 domain carrying highly immunodominant non-linear epitopes. The apparent immunodominance of this domain makes it diff

  4. Development of an ELP-Z based mAb affinity precipitation process using scaled-down filtration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rahul D; Bhut, Bharat V; Jin, Mi; Li, Zhengjian; Chen, Wilfred; Cramer, Steven M

    2014-12-20

    In this work, a proof of concept elastin-like polypeptide-Z domain fusion (ELP-Z) based monoclonal antibody (mAb) affinity precipitation process is developed using scaled-down filtration techniques. Tangential flow filtration (TFF) is examined for the recovery of ELP-Z-mAb precipitates formed during the mAb binding step and the ELP-Z precipitates formed during the mAb elution step. TFF results in complete precipitate recovery during both stages of the process and high host cell protein and DNA impurity clearance after diafiltration. Total recycle TFF experiments are then employed to determine permeate flux as a function of the precipitate concentration for both stages of the process. While the ELP-Z-mAb precipitate recovery step resulted in high permeate flux (550-600L/m(2)/h/bar), the ELP-Z precipitates are shown to severely foul the TFF membrane, causing rapid flux decay. Confocal microscopy of the ELP-Z-mAb and ELP-Z precipitates suggests significant differences in the morphology and the kinetics of formation of these precipitates, which is likely responsible for their different behavior during TFF. Finally, an alternative normal flow filtration strategy is developed for the ELP-Z precipitate recovery step during mAb elution, using a combination of 5μm and a 0.45/0.2μm filters. Using this approach, the ELP-Z precipitates are separated from the final mAb elution pool at high volumetric throughputs and high ELP-Z recovery (96%) is obtained after resolubilization from the filter. This study demonstrates that the ELP-Z affinity precipitation process can be readily scaled up using conventional membrane processing.

  5. Authorized manufacturing changes for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in European Public Assessment Report (EPAR) documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezér, Balázs; Buzás, Zsuzsanna; Sebeszta, Miklós; Zrubka, Zsombor

    2016-05-01

    Background The quality of biologicals, including biosimilars, is subject to change as a result of manufacturing process modifications following initial authorization. It is important that such product changes have no adverse impact on product efficacy or safety, including immunogenicity. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the number and types of manufacturing changes for originator mAbs (the reference for the comparability exercise to confirm biosimilarity) according to European Public Assessment Report (EPAR) documentation and to ascertain the level of risk these changes might impart. The extensive body of evidence contained in the EPAR documents can help support the EMA during the EC marketing authorization approval process for biosimilars, since it provides a broad base of scientific experience. Research designs and methods For EPAR-listed mAbs, details of all changes listed chronologically in the EPAR were evaluated and described. Based on these descriptions the manufacturing changes can be categorized by risk status (low, moderate or high). Results Entries for 29 mAbs with publicly available EPAR reports were reviewed. These contained details of 404 manufacturing changes authorized by the European Medicines Agency (EMA): 22 were categorized as high risk, 286 as moderate risk and 96 as low risk manufacturing changes. A limitation of this analysis is that it only summarizes publicly available data from EPAR documents. Conclusions Manufacturing change data indicate that the EMA has significant experience of process changes for originator mAbs, and the impact they may have on the efficacy and safety of biologicals. This experience will be useful in biosimilar product development to ensure adherence to sound scientific principles. Compared with the established manufacturing process for a reference product, the production of biosimilars will usually be different. Consequently, in addition to a comprehensive comparative functional and physicochemical

  6. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 [mu]M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 [mu]M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  7. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 {mu}M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 {mu}M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  8. [Rituximab (MabThera)--a new biological medicine in rheumatoid arthritis therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, P

    2007-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious, chronic, inflammatory disorder that damages the joints. The chronic destructive process causes pain to patients with RA and leads to the development of permanent disability. At present, great emphasis is placed on timely and effective therapy for RA, which is able to halt or slow the development of the disorder. At present we do not have any means of curing RA, the main objective for treatment is to induce remission of the disorder and prevent structural damage to the joints and the development of permanent disability. The relatively frequent failure of disease modifying medications (DMARDs) lead to efforts to find new resources for the treatment of RA. So called biological medicines were recently introduced into therapeutic use. These were mainly TNFalpha blockers. Experience has shown that approximately a third of patients with RA do not respond even to treatment with such medicines. Rituximab (MabThera), a monoclonal antibody against CD20 positive B-lymphocytes, is a new biological medicine approved for RA therapy. It represents a new hope for patients with active RA, for whom earlier therapy with TNFa blockers has failed.

  9. MAB_3551c encodes the primary triacylglycerol synthase involved in lipid accumulation in Mycobacterium abscessus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Albertus; Blaise, Mickael; de Chastellier, Chantal; Kremer, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    Slow growing pathogenic mycobacteria utilize host-derived lipids and accumulate large amounts of triacylglycerol (TAG) in the form of intracytoplasmic lipid inclusions (ILI), serving as a source of carbon and energy during prolonged infection. Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging and rapidly growing species capable to induce severe and chronic pulmonary infections. However, whether M. abscessus, like Mycobacterium tuberculosis, possesses the machinery to acquire and store host lipids, remains unaddressed. Herein, we aimed at deciphering the contribution of the seven putative M. abscessus TAG synthases (Tgs) in TAG synthesis/accumulation thanks to a combination of genetic and biochemical techniques and a well-defined foamy macrophage (FM) model along with electron microscopy. Targeted gene deletion and functional complementation studies identified the MAB_3551c product, Tgs1, as the major Tgs involved in TAG production. Tgs1 exhibits a preference for long acyl-CoA substrates and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that His144 and Gln145 are essential for enzymatic activity. Importantly, in the lipid-rich intracellular context of FM, M. abscessus formed large ILI in a Tgs1-dependent manner. This supports the ability of M. abscessus to assimilate host lipids and the crucial role of Tgs1 in intramycobacterial TAG production, which may represent important mechanisms for long-term storage of a rich energy supply.

  10. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture, exhausti

  11. Verhulst and stochastic models for comparing mechanisms of MAb productivity in six CHO cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirsat, Nishikant; Avesh, Mohd; English, Niall J; Glennon, Brian; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    The present study validates previously published methodologies-stochastic and Verhulst-for modelling the growth and MAb productivity of six CHO cell lines grown in batch cultures. Cytometric and biochemical data were used to model growth and productivity. The stochastic explanatory models were developed to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of growth and productivity, whereas the Verhulst mechanistic models were developed for their predictability. The parameters of the two sets of models were compared for their biological significance. The stochastic models, based on the cytometric data, indicated that the productivity mechanism is cell specific. However, as shown before, the modelling results indicated that G2 + ER indicate high productivity, while G1 + ER indicate low productivity, where G1 and G2 are the cell cycle phases and ER is Endoplasmic Reticulum. In all cell lines, growth proved to be inversely proportional to the cumulative G1 time (CG1T) for the G1 phase, whereas productivity was directly proportional to ER. Verhulst's rule, "the lower the intrinsic growth factor (r), the higher the growth (K)," did not hold for growth across all cell lines but held good for the cell lines with the same growth mechanism-i.e., r is cell specific. However, the Verhulst productivity rule, that productivity is inversely proportional to the intrinsic productivity factor (r x ), held well across all cell lines in spite of differences in their mechanisms for productivity-that is, r x is not cell specific. The productivity profile, as described by Verhulst's logistic model, is very similar to the Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetic equation, suggesting that productivity is more likely enzymatic in nature. Comparison of the stochastic and Verhulst models indicated that CG1T in the cytometric data has the same significance as r, the intrinsic growth factor in the Verhulst models. The stochastic explanatory and the Verhulst logistic models can explain the

  12. Analysis of HLDA9 mAbs on plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezón, Raquel; Sintes, Jordi; Llinàs, Laia; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel

    2011-01-30

    Dendritic cells are a heterogeneous population of bone marrow derived leucocytes that play a crucial role in both pathogen recognition and the initiation of primary T cell immune responses. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), also known as natural interferon-producing cells, comprise one of two major human dendritic cell subsets that strongly influences immune balance. pDCs remain a poorly characterized subset. Several studies have suggested the existence of a close phenotypic and functional relationship between B-cells and pDCs. The surface reactivity of a panel of 96 monoclonal antibodies submitted to the ninth Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens workshop (HLDA9) B cell section was analyzed using pDCs as target cells. The results showed that eight of the mAbs reacted positively on pDCs: CD86, CD229, CD319, CD305, CD184, CD84, CD85g and FcɛRIa, confirming previously published reports. Interestingly, this study also revealed the expression of eight surface molecules not previously described on pDCs, including CD352(NTBA), CD272(BTLA), CD357(GITR), CD48, CD270(HVEM), Galectin-3, CD148, and CD361. The present report summarizes the expression of these molecules on freshly isolated pDCs. Significantly, we have identified several new molecules expressed by these intriguing cells, ones we believe will open new avenues for the study of pDC functionality and their role in human health and diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of New Synthetic Cannabinoid ADB-CHMINACA (MAB-CHMINACA) Metabolites in Human Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Jeremy; Diao, Xingxing; Sempio, Cristina; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2017-03-01

    ADB-CHMINACA (MAB-CHMINACA) is a new synthetic cannabinoid with high potency and many reported adverse events and fatalities. The drug is currently scheduled in several countries in Europe and the USA. Analytical methods need to be developed to confirm ADB-CHMINACA intake for clinical and forensic programs. For many synthetic cannabinoids, parent compound is not detectable in biological samples after intake, making the detection of metabolites the only way to prove consumption. Therefore, detection of ADB-CHMINACA metabolites in biological specimens is critical. Since there are currently no published data on ADB-CHMINACA metabolism, we aimed to identify its major metabolites. Cryopreserved human hepatocytes were incubated with 10 μmol/L ADB-CHMINACA for 3 h. Incubations were analyzed with liquid chromatography on a biphenyl column, high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (orbitrap), and metabolite identification software. A reference standard of six commercially available potential metabolites was simultaneously analyzed under the same conditions to allow correct assignment of isomers. We detected ten major metabolites. Biotransformations mainly occurred at the cyclohexylmethyl tail of the compound, as also observed with structural analogs' metabolism. Minor reactions also occurred at the tert-butyl chain. Only two analytical standards of potential metabolites matched an actual metabolite detected in hepatocyte incubations. We recommend A9 (ADB-CHMINACA hydroxycyclohexylmethyl), A4 (ADB-CHMINACA 4″-hydroxycyclohexyl), and A6 (ADB-CHMINACA hydroxycyclohexylmethyl) as metabolite targets to document ADB-CHMINACA intake in clinical and forensic cases. Additionally, these results will guide analytical standard manufacturers to better provide suitable references for further studies on ADB-CHMINACA metabolism.

  14. Investigations into the fouling mechanism of parvovirus filters during filtration of freeze-thawed mAb drug substance solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, James G; Kahn, David; Cetlin, David; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2014-03-01

    Filtration to remove viruses is one of the single most expensive steps in the production of mAb drug products. Therefore, virus filtration steps should be fully optimized, and any decline in flow rates warrants investigation into the causes of such membrane fouling. In the current study, it was found that freezing and thawing of a mAb bulk drug solution caused a substantial decrease in viral filter membrane flow rate. Freezing and thawing also caused formation of aggregates and particles across a broad size range, including particles that could be detected by microflow imaging (≥1 μm in size). However, removal of these particles offered little protection against flow rate decline during viral filtration. Further investigation revealed that trace amounts of aggregates (ca. 10⁻⁶ of the total mass of protein in solution) approximately 20-40 nm in size were primarily responsible for the observed membrane fouling.

  15. Adaptarea culturală a MAB-II (Multidimensional Aptitude Battery în România

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoş Iliescu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the cultural adaptation of the Multidimensional Aptitude Battery II in Romania. Cultural adaptation of the items and the standardization process are described. The psychometric characteristics of the Romanian version are shown to be excellent in terms of reliability and construct validity (intertest correlations and EFA. Further studies conducted in Romania are discussed, both on the correlation with other cognitive ability tests and on the criterion validity of the MAB-II.

  16. Adaptarea culturală a MAB-II (Multidimensional Aptitude Battery) în România

    OpenAIRE

    Dragoş Iliescu; Florin Glintă; Dan Ispas

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the cultural adaptation of the Multidimensional Aptitude Battery II in Romania. Cultural adaptation of the items and the standardization process are described. The psychometric characteristics of the Romanian version are shown to be excellent in terms of reliability and construct validity (intertest correlations and EFA). Further studies conducted in Romania are discussed, both on the correlation with other cognitive ability tests and on the criterion validity of the MAB-II.

  17. The "New Polyethylene Glycol Dilemma": Polyethylene Glycol Impurities and Their Paradox Role in mAb Crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Christian; Joos, Lea; Saedler, Rainer; Winter, Gerhard

    2015-06-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEG) represent the most successful and frequently applied class of excipients used for protein crystallization. PEG auto-oxidation and formation of impurities such as peroxides and formaldehydes that foster protein drug degradation is known. However, their effect on mAb crystallization has not been studied in detail before. During the present study, a model IgG1 antibody (mAb1) was crystallized in PEG solutions. Aggregate formation was observed during crystallization and storage that was ascribed to PEG degradation products. Reduction of peroxide and formaldehyde levels prior to crystallization by vacuum and freeze-drying was investigated for its effect on protein degradation. Vacuum drying was superior in removal of peroxides but inferior in reducing formaldehyde residues. Consequently, double purification allowed extensive removal of both impurities. Applying of purified PEG led to 50% lower aggregate fractions. Surprisingly, PEG double purification or addition of methionine prior to crystallization prevented crystal formation. With increased PEG concentration or spiking with peroxides and formaldehydes, crystal formation could be recovered again. With these results, we demonstrate that minimum amounts of oxidizing impurities and thus in consequence chemically altered proteins are vital to initiate mAb1 crystallization. The present study calls PEG as good precipitant for therapeutic biopharmaceuticals into question.

  18. Aree Protette del Po e della Collina Torinese: studi propedeutici alla Candidatura MAB - Man and the Biosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cimnaghi Elisabetta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Il programma MAB fu lanciato dall’UNESCO negli anni ’70 al fine di migliorare il rapporto tra uomo e ambiente. Negli anni il programma ha portato al riconoscimento di Riserve della Biosfera che gli Stati Membri si impegnano a gestire nella prospettiva della conservazione delle risorse. L’Organismo Gestore dell’Area Protetta, partendo, da un lato, dalla consapevolezza della ricchezza ambientale che caratterizza il suo territorio e, dall’altro, del contesto di sviluppo antropico elevato in cui essa è situata, ha riconosciuto nel programma MAB un’opportunità per incrementare le sue attività di protezione e potenziamento delle risorse. Questo articolo descrive i primi risultati ottenuti negli studi preliminari per la Designazione al MAB, con particolare attenzione sia alle opportunità di implementazione di progetti legati al marchio “Collina Po”, creato dall’Organo di Gestione del Parco, si ain termini di scambio di ‘best practices’ con altre Riserve di Biosfera.

  19. Nonautonomous Roles of MAB-5/Hox and the Secreted Basement Membrane Molecule SPON-1/F-Spondin in Caenorhabditis elegans Neuronal Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Matthew P; Miltner, Adam M; Lundquist, Erik A

    2016-08-01

    Nervous system development and circuit formation requires neurons to migrate from their birthplaces to specific destinations.Migrating neurons detect extracellular cues that provide guidance information. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Q right (QR) and Q left (QL) neuroblast descendants migrate long distances in opposite directions. The Hox gene lin-39 cell autonomously promotes anterior QR descendant migration, and mab-5/Hox cell autonomously promotes posterior QL descendant migration. Here we describe a nonautonomous role of mab-5 in regulating both QR and QL descendant migrations, a role masked by redundancy with lin-39 A third Hox gene, egl-5/Abdominal-B, also likely nonautonomously regulates Q descendant migrations. In the lin-39 mab-5 egl-5 triple mutant, little if any QR and QL descendant migration occurs. In addition to well-described roles of lin-39 and mab-5 in the Q descendants, our results suggest that lin-39, mab-5, and egl-5 might also pattern the posterior region of the animal for Q descendant migration. Previous studies showed that the spon-1 gene might be a target of MAB-5 in Q descendant migration. spon-1 encodes a secreted basement membrane molecule similar to vertebrate F-spondin. Here we show that spon-1 acts nonautonomously to control Q descendant migration, and might function as a permissive rather than instructive signal for cell migration. We find that increased levels of MAB-5 in body wall muscle (BWM) can drive the spon-1 promoter adjacent to the Q cells, and loss of spon-1 suppresses mab-5 gain of function. Thus, MAB-5 might nonautonomously control Q descendant migrations by patterning the posterior region of the animal to which Q cells respond. spon-1 expression from BWMs might be part of the posterior patterning necessary for directed Q descendant migration.

  20. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d......-saccharate becomes spontaneously supersaturated with both d-gluconate and d-saccharate calcium salts, from which only calcium d-saccharate slowly precipitates. Calcium d-saccharate is suggested to act as a stabilizer of supersaturated solutions of other calcium hydroxycarboxylates with endothermic complex formation...

  1. Immunotherapeutic synergy between anti-CD137 mAb and intratumoral administration of a cytopathic Semliki Forest virus encoding IL-12

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quetglas, José I; Dubrot, Juan; Bezunartea, Jaione; Sanmamed, Miguel F; Hervas-Stubbs, Sandra; Smerdou, Cristian; Melero, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    .... In this study, we provide evidence for powerful synergistic effects of a combined strategy consisting of intratumoral injection of SFV-IL-12 and systemic delivery of agonist anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs...

  2. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...... current understanding of calcium sensing in neurotransmitter release and hormone secretion....

  3. Ultrasonic atomization and subsequent desolvation for monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the glycoprotein (GP) IIIa receptor into drug eluting stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G X; Luo, L L; Yin, T Y; Li, Y; Jiang, T; Ruan, C G; Guidoin, R; Chen, Y P; Guzman, R

    2010-01-01

    An eluting-stent system with mAb dispersed in the PLLA (poly (L-lactic acid)) was validated in vitro. Specifically designed spray equipment based on the principle of ultrasonic atomization was used to produce a thin continuous PLLA (poly (L-lactic acid)) polymer coating incorporating monoclonal antibody (mAb). This PLLA coating was observed in light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The concentration of the monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIIa receptor and the eluting rate were then measured by a radioisotope technique with (125)I-labelled GP IIIa mAb. An in vitro perfusion circuit was designed to evaluate the release rates at different velocities (10 or 20 ml min(-1)). The PLLA coating was thin and transparent, uniformly distributed on the surface of the stent. Three factors influenced its thickness: PLLA concentration, duration and gas pressure. The concentration of mAb was influenced by the duration of absorption and the concentration of the mAb solution; the maximum was 1662.23 + or - 38.83 ng. The eluting rate was fast for the first 2 h, then decreased slowly and attained 80% after 2 weeks. This ultrasonic atomization spray equipment and technological process to prepare protein eluting-stents were proved to be effective and reliable.

  4. Molecular characterization of cold-responsive basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors MabHLHs that interact with MaICE1 in banana fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huan-Huan; Shan, Wei; Kuang, Jian-Fei; Lu, Wang-Jin; Chen, Jian-Ye

    2013-11-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) are ubiquitously involved in the response of higher plants to various abiotic stresses. However, little is known about bHLH TFs involved in the cold stress response in economically important fruits. Here, five novel full-length bHLH genes, designated as MabHLH1-MabHLH5, were isolated and characterized from banana fruit. Gene expression profiles revealed that MabHLH1/2/4 were induced by cold stress and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment. Transient assays in tobacco BY2 protoplasts showed that MabHLH1/2/4 promoters were activated by cold stress and MeJA treatments. Moreover, protein-protein interaction analysis demonstrated that MabHLH1/2/4 not only physically interacted with each other to form hetero-dimers in the nucleus, but also interacted with an important upstream component of cold signaling MaICE1, with different interaction domains at their N-terminus. These results indicate that banana fruit cold-responsive MabHLHs may form a big protein complex in the nucleus with MaICE1. Taken together, our findings advance our understanding of the possible involvement of bHLH TFs in the regulatory network of ICE-CBF cold signaling pathway.

  5. Small-Animal PET Imaging of Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts Using a 64Cu-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody, MAb159.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Li, Dan; Liu, Shuanglong; Liu, Ren; Yuan, Hong; Krasnoperov, Valery; Shan, Hong; Conti, Peter S; Gill, Parkash S; Li, Zibo

    2015-06-01

    Overexpression of the GRP78 receptor on cell surfaces has been linked with tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. We developed a (64)Cu-labeled probe for PET imaging of tumor GRP78 expression based on a novel anti-GRP78 monoclonal antibody, MAb159. MAb159 was conjugated with the (64)Cu-chelator DOTA through lysines on the antibody. DOTA-human IgG was also prepared as a control that did not bind to GRP78. The resulting PET probes were evaluated in BXPC3 pancreatic cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice. The radiotracer was synthesized with a specific activity of 0.8 MBq/μg of antibody. In BXPC3 xenografts, (64)Cu-DOTA-MAb159 demonstrated prominent tumor accumulation (4.3 ± 1.2, 15.4 ± 2.6, and 18.3 ± 1.0 percentage injected dose per gram at 1, 17, and 48 after injection, respectively). In contrast, (64)Cu-DOTA-human IgG had low BXPC3 tumor accumulation (4.8 ± 0.5, 7.5 ± 0.7, and 4.6 ± 0.8 percentage injected dose per gram at 1, 17, and 48 h after injection, respectively). We demonstrated that GRP78 can serve as a valid target for pancreatic cancer imaging. The success of this approach will be valuable for evaluating disease course and therapeutic efficacy at the earliest stages of anti-GRP78 treatment. Moreover, these newly developed probes may have important applications in other types of cancer overexpressing GRP78. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  6. Imaging calcium in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grienberger, Christine; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-03-08

    Calcium ions generate versatile intracellular signals that control key functions in all types of neurons. Imaging calcium in neurons is particularly important because calcium signals exert their highly specific functions in well-defined cellular subcompartments. In this Primer, we briefly review the general mechanisms of neuronal calcium signaling. We then introduce the calcium imaging devices, including confocal and two-photon microscopy as well as miniaturized devices that are used in freely moving animals. We provide an overview of the classical chemical fluorescent calcium indicators and of the protein-based genetically encoded calcium indicators. Using application examples, we introduce new developments in the field, such as calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals and the use of calcium imaging for mapping single spine sensory inputs in cortical neurons in vivo. We conclude by providing an outlook on the prospects of calcium imaging for the analysis of neuronal signaling and plasticity in various animal models.

  7. Modifiche compositive e strutturali in soprassuoli in evoluzione naturale della riserva M.a.B. di Montedimezzo (Isernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara Manetti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Tree species composition and structural dynamics in forest stands under natural evolution in the Montedimezzo M.a.B. reserve. This study is included in an experimental protocol established in 1954 aimed at examining the natural dynamics in mixed broadleaves high forests dominated by Turkey oak (Quercus cerris L. and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.. Stand development patterns in the last fifteen years are reported. Repeated quantitative and qualitative inventories were carried out in two permanent plots (3 ha each and in two structural transects (0.2 ha each located in Collemeluccio-Montedimezzo M.a.B. reserve (Is. The study highlighted, as already observed in 1954, the differences between the two multilayered stands. In the higher elevation beech is the predominant species recording 53% of importance value index (I, followed by Turkey oak (I=25%. In the lower elevation the dominant species is Turkey oak (I=46%, followed by hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L. (I=28% and beech (I=12%. The decreased presence of Turkey oak and the increase of beech density are confirmed in each plot over the last fifteen years. Among the other tree species, importance values rise only for silver fir (Abies alba Mill. (introduced and holly tree (Ilex aquifolium L., while hornbeam and hedge maple have been reducing their own presence.

  8. Endocrine side-effects of anti-cancer drugs: mAbs and pituitary dysfunction: clinical evidence and pathogenic hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torino, Francesco; Barnabei, Agnese; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Marchetti, Paolo; Salvatori, Roberto; Corsello, Salvatore Maria

    2013-12-01

    mAbs are established targeted therapies for several diseases, including hematological and solid malignancies. These agents have shown a favorable toxicity profile, but, despite their high selectivity, new typical side-effects have emerged. In cancer patients, pituitary dysfunction may be mainly due to brain metastases or primary tumors and to related surgery and radiotherapy. Anticancer agents may induce hypopituitarism in patients cured for childhood cancers. These agents infrequently affect pituitary function in adult cancer patients. Notably, hypophysitis, a previously very rare disease, has emerged as a distinctive side-effect of ipilimumab and tremelimumab, two mAbs inhibiting the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 receptor, being occasionally seen with nivolumab, another immune checkpoint inhibitor. Enhanced antitumor immunity is the suggested mechanism of action of these drugs and autoimmunity the presumptive mechanism of their toxicity. Recently, ipilimumab has been licensed for the treatment of patients affected by metastatic melanoma. With the expanding use of these drugs, hypophysitis will be progressively encountered by oncologists and endocrinologists in clinical practice. The optimal management of this potentially life-threatening adverse event needs a rapid and timely diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. Hypopituitarism caused by these agents is rarely reversible, requiring prolonged or lifelong substitutive hormonal treatment. Further studies are needed to clarify several clinical and pathogenic aspects of this new form of secondary pituitary dysfunction.

  9. A comparison of the biodistribution and biokinetics of {sup 99m}Tc-anti-CD66 mAb BW 250/183 and {sup 99m}Tc-anti-CD45 mAb YTH 24.5 with regard to suitability for myeloablative radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmann, Inga [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Ulm (Germany); Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Gebaeude 210, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, 55101, Mainz (Germany); Kull, Thomas; Glatting, Gerhard; Kotzerke, Jorg; Rattat, Dirk; Reske, Sven N. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Ulm (Germany); Bunjes, Donald; Dohner, Hartmut [Department of Hematology, University Hospital, Ulm (Germany); Hale, Geoffrey [Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2003-05-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is an effective method of achieving myeloablation in leukaemia patients prior to stem cell transplantation (SCT). We wished to compare the approaches of specific binding to leukaemic blasts and non-specific binding to benign red marrow cells, which results in a myeloablative ''cross-fire'' effect. Therefore, we prospectively evaluated the biodistribution and biokinetics of the anti-CD45 mAb YTH 24.5 and the anti-CD66 mAb BW 250/183 with regard to their suitability for myeloablative RIT. The red marrow selective anti-CD66 mAb BW 250/183 (IgG1) binds to normal granulopoietic cells. In contrast, the anti-CD45 mAb YTH 24.5 (IgG2b) binds to 85-90% of acute leukaemic blasts and almost all haematopoietic white cells. Patients with leukaemic blast infiltration of the marrow <25% and assigned for RIT and SCT were included. Twelve patients (eight male, four female; median age 46{+-}7 years) with AML (5), CML (5) or ALL (2) were examined. Both mAbs were labelled with technetium-99m. Within 48 h, 906{+-}209 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-anti-CD66 mAb and 760{+-}331 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-anti-CD45 mAb were injected consecutively. Scintigraphic and urinary measurements were performed 1, 2, 4 and 24 h after injection. Serum activities were evaluated 2, 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 min and 2, 4 and 24 h after injection. Compared with the anti-CD45 mAb, the anti-CD66 mAb showed an approximately fourfold higher accumulation in the red marrow, a 2.5-fold lower accumulation in the liver and similar accumulation in the kidneys. The serum activity (% of the injected dose) initially decreased faster for the anti-CD45 mAb but was similar for the two mAbs 24 h after injection: 3.3%{+-}1.2% (anti-CD66 mAb) and 2.4%{+-}1.1% (anti-CD45 mAb). The cumulated urinary excretion was 17%{+-}6.6% (anti-CD66 mAb) and 27.3%{+-}7.9% (anti-CD45 mAb) 24 h after application. In these patients with low tumour load, the anti-CD66 mAb BW 250

  10. Physico-chemical Stability of MabThera Drug-product Solution for Subcutaneous Injection under in-use Conditions with Different Administration Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Claudia; Dietel, Elke; Heynen, Severin R; Nalenz, Heiko; Goldbach, Pierre; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Schmidt, Johannes; Grauschopf, Ulla; Schoenhamnmer, Karin

    2015-01-01

    MabThera is an essential component of the standard-of-care regimens in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia. MabThera for subcutaneous injection is a novel line extension that has been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of patients with follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This study aimed to evaluate in-use stability data of MabThera subcutaneous drug-product solution in single-use syringes for subcutaneous administration according to the European Medicines Agency guideline. The drug-product solution was exposed to material contact surfaces of five different administration setups commonly used in subcutaneous drug delivery. MabThera subcutaneous was transferred under aseptic conditions into polypropylene and polycarbonate syringes and stored for 1, 2, and 4 weeks at 2°C to 8°C followed by 24 hours at 30°C. After storage, subcutaneous administration was simulated and MabThera subcutaneous drug-product solution quality attributes were evaluated by using compendial physico-chemical tests, as well as suitable and validated molecule- and formulation-specific analytical methods. MabThera subcutaneous vials were treated and analyzed in parallel. The physico-chemical results of MabThera subcutaneous in the different setups were comparable to the control for all timepoints. No change in drug-product quality after storage and simulated administration was found compared to the control. However, since single-dose products do not contain preservatives, microbial contamination and growth needs to be avoided and product sterility needs to be ensured. The results showed that MabThera subcutaneous remains compatible and stable, from a physico-chemical perspective, for up to 4 weeks at 2°C to 8°C followed by 24 hours at 30°C with the contact materials tested in this study. In order to avoid and minimize microbial growth, MabThera subcutaneous should be used immediately after removal from the original

  11. mAb CZP-315.D9: An Antirecombinant Cruzipain Monoclonal Antibody That Specifically Labels the Reservosomes of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiano Martin Batista

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reservosomes are large round vesicles located at the posterior end of epimastigote forms of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. They are the specific end organelles of the endocytosis pathway of T. cruzi, and they play key roles in nutrient uptake and cell differentiation. These lysosome-like organelles accumulate ingested macromolecules and contain large amounts of a major cysteine proteinase (cruzipain or GP57/51 protein. Aim of this study was to produce a monoclonal antibody (mAb against a recombinant T. cruzi cruzipain (TcCruzipain that specifically labels the reservosomes. BALB/c mice were immunized with purified recombinant TcCruzipain to obtain the mAb. After fusion of isolated splenocytes with myeloma cells and screening, a mAb was obtained by limiting dilution and characterized by capture ELISA. We report here the production of a kappa-positive monoclonal IgG antibody (mAb CZP-315.D9 that recognizes recombinant TcCruzipain. This mAb binds preferentially to a protein with a molecular weight of about 50 kDa on western blots and specifically labels reservosomes by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. The monoclonal CZP-315.D9 constitutes a potentially powerful marker for use in studies on the function of reservosomes of T. cruzi.

  12. Integumentary loss of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J Y; Margen, S; Calloway, D H; Costa, F M

    1979-08-01

    Integumentary calcium loss was studied in 16 healthy young men. The daily loss by the 16 ambulatory but relatively sedentary young men in 52 determinations of 6-day periods each was 8.7 +/- 1.9 mg/m2 per day (average 15.8 mg/man per day). The amount lost was not influenced by calcium intake (0.1 to 2.3 g/day). In contrast to urinary calcium excretion, which is directly related to protein intake, there was no significant change in integumentary calcium loss with varying protein intakes (1 to 96 g nitrogen per day). No compensatory relationship between urinary and integumentary calcium excretion was noted. During strenuous exercise calcium loss increased to an average of 25 mg in 40 min. There was no compensatory decrease in urinary excretion on the day of strenuous exercise. It was also noted that integumentary calcium loss was not affected by general calcium balance.

  13. Targeting glioblastoma with NK cells and mAb against NG2/CSPG4 prolongs animal survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Aurélie; Wang, Jian; Domingues, Olivia; Planagumà, Jesús; Yan, Tao; Rygh, Cecilie Brekke; Skaftnesmo, Kai Ove; Thorsen, Frits; McCormack, Emmet; Hentges, François; Pedersen, Paal Henning; Zimmer, Jacques; Enger, Per Øyvind; Chekenya, Martha

    2013-09-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most malignant brain tumor where patients' survival is only 14.6 months, despite multimodal therapy with debulking surgery, concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. There is an urgent, unmet need for novel, effective therapeutic strategies for this devastating disease. Although several immunotherapies are under development for the treatment of GBM patients, the use of natural killer (NK) cells is still marginal despite this being a promising approach to treat cancer. In regard of our knowledge on the role of NG2/CSPG4 in promoting GBM aggressiveness we investigated the potential of an innovative immunotherapeutic strategy combining mAb9.2.27 against NG2/CSPG4 and NK cells in preclinical animal models of GBM. Multiple immune escape mechanisms maintain the tumor microenvironment in an anti-inflammatory state to promote tumor growth, however, the distinct roles of resident microglia versus recruited macrophages is not elucidated. We hypothesized that exploiting the cytokine release capabilities of activated (NK) cells to reverse the anti-inflammatory axis combined with mAb9.2.27 targeting the NG2/CSPG4 may favor tumor destruction by editing pro-GBM immune responses. Combination treatment with NK+mAb9.2.27 diminished tumor growth that was associated with reduced tumor proliferation, increased cellular apoptosis and prolonged survival compared to vehicle and monotherapy controls. The therapeutic efficacy was mediated by recruitment of CCR2low macrophages into the tumor microenvironment, increased ED1 and MHC class II expression on microglia that might render them competent for GBM antigen presentation, as well as elevated IFN-γ and TNF-α levels in the cerebrospinal fluid compared to controls. Depletion of systemic macrophages by liposome-encapsulated clodronate decreased the CCR2low macrophages recruited to the brain and abolished the beneficial outcomes. Moreover, mAb9.2.27 reversed tumor-promoting effects of patient-derived tumor

  14. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  15. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  16. Calcium - Function and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Jianfen; He, Yifan; Gao, Qian; Wang, Xuan; Nout, M.J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the primary food source for more than half of the world population. Levels of calcium contents and inhibitor - phytic acid are summarized in this chapter. Phytic acid has a very strong chelating ability and it is the main inhibit factor for calcium in rice products. Calcium contents in br

  17. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of cardiop

  18. System visualization of integrated biofuels and high value chemicals developed within the MacroAlgaeBiorefinery (MAB3) project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seghetta, Michele; Hasler, Berit; Bastianoni, Simone

    MacroAlgaeBiorefinery (MAB3) may functions as production platform and raw material supplier for future sustainable production chains of biofuels and high value chemicals. Biofuels are interesting energy source but challenges in terms of the composition of the biomass and resulting energy...... efficiencies has to be compensated for to make the biofuel prices competitive in replacing fossil fuel. Since it is difficult to increase the yield of the single biorefinery, the overall system productivity can be improved integrating different sub-systems. In this study, macroalgae cultivation in Denmark...... is integrated with a biogas biorefinery, a bioethanol biorefinery and a fish feed industry. The modeled system is able to adapt itself to different amount and quality of feedstock and to maximize valuable outputs (e.g. bio-fuels and chemical). Macroalgae are harvested and utilized as feedstock in bioethanol...

  19. Humanized mAb H22 binds the human high affinity Fc receptor for IgG (FcgammaRI), blocks phagocytosis, and modulates receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, P K; Keler, T; Coleman, K; Fisher, J; Vitale, L; Graziano, R F; Guyre, P M; Fanger, M W

    1997-10-01

    About 10-15% of patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) cannot be controlled by corticosteroid therapy and splenectomy. For these patients treatment with high-dose IVIgG induces partial or complete responses. The clinical benefits of IVIgG could be due to blockade of Fc receptors for IgG (FcgammaR), because several model systems clearly show that functional FcgammaR are essential for establishment of ITP and related diseases. However, the specific contributions of the three individual classes of FcgammaR remain to be more completely defined. Recently monoclonal antibody (mAb) H22, which recognizes an epitope on FcgammaRI (CD64) outside the ligand binding domain, was humanized by grafting its complementarity determining regions onto human IgG1 constant domains. Because FcgammaRI has a high affinity for human IgG1 antibodies, we predicted mAb H22 would also bind to FcgammaRI through its Fc domain and block FcgammaRI-mediated phagocytosis. These studies demonstrate that mAb H22 blocked phagocytosis of opsonized red blood cells 1000 times more effectively than an irrelevant IgG. Moreover, cross-linking FcgammaRI with mAb H22 rapidly down-modulated FcgammaRI expression on monocytes without affecting other surface antigens. We conclude that because mAb H22 is a humanized mAb that blocks the FcgammaRI ligand binding domain and down-modulates FcgammaRI expression, it is a particularly good candidate for evaluating the role of FcgammaRI in patients with ITP.

  20. Development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to feline interferon (fIFN)-γ as tools to evaluate cellular immune responses to feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Ryoichi; Kaku, Ayumi; Satomura, Megumi; Kohori, Michiyo; Noura, Kanako; Furukawa, Tomoko; Kotake, Masako; Takano, Tomomi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2011-06-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) can cause a lethal disease in cats, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). The antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of FIPV infection has been recognised in experimentally infected cats, and cellular immunity is considered to play an important role in preventing the onset of FIP. To evaluate the importance of cellular immunity for FIPV infection, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against feline interferon (fIFN)-γ were first created to establish fIFN-γ detection systems using the MAbs. Six anti-fIFN-γ MAbs were created. Then, the difference in epitope which those MAbs recognise was demonstrated by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and IFN-γ neutralisation tests. Detection systems for fIFN-γ (sandwich ELISA, ELISpot assay, and two-colour flow cytometry) were established using anti-fIFN-γ MAbs that recognise different epitopes. In all tests, fIFN-γ production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from cats experimentally infected with an FIPV isolate that did not develop the disease was significantly increased by heat-inactivated FIPV stimulation in comparison with medium alone. Especially, CD8(+)fIFN-γ(+) cells, but not CD4(+)fIFN-γ(+) cells, were increased. In contrast, fIFN-γ production from PBMCs isolated from cats that had developed FIP and specific pathogen-free (SPF) cats was not increased by heat-inactivated FIPV stimulation. These results suggest that cellular immunity plays an important role in preventing the development of FIP. Measurement of fIFN-γ production with the anti-fIFN-γ MAbs created in this study appeared to be useful in evaluating cellular immunity in cats.

  1. Combining NK cells and mAb9.2.27 to combat NG2-dependent and anti-inflammatory signals in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmiecik, Justyna; Gras Navarro, Andrea; Poli, Aurelie; Planagumà, Jesús Planagumà; Zimmer, Jacques; Chekenya, Martha

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is a deadly brain cancer with limited treatment options. Targeting chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4, best known as NG2) with the monoclonal antibody mAb9.2.27 and activated natural killer (NK) cells abrogated the tumor growth and prolonged the survival of glioblastoma-bearing animals by favoring the establishment of a pro-inflammatory microenvironment. The combination of NK cells and mAb9.2.27 recruited ED1(+)CCR2(low) macrophages that stimulated ED1(+)ED2(low)MHCII(high) microglial cells to exert robust cytotoxicity. Our findings demonstrate the therapeutic potential of targeting salient tumor associated-antigens.

  2. Calcium signaling and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2014-08-01

    Calcium signaling is involved in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms. Over the last decade, it has been increasingly recognized as an important factor in epileptogenesis, and it is becoming obvious that the excess synchronization of neurons that is characteristic for seizures can be linked to various calcium signaling pathways. These include immediate effects on membrane excitability by calcium influx through ion channels as well as delayed mechanisms that act through G-protein coupled pathways. Calcium signaling is able to cause hyperexcitability either by direct modulation of neuronal activity or indirectly through calcium-dependent gliotransmission. Furthermore, feedback mechanisms between mitochondrial calcium signaling and reactive oxygen species are able to cause neuronal cell death and seizures. Unravelling the complexity of calcium signaling in epileptogenesis is a daunting task, but it includes the promise to uncover formerly unknown targets for the development of new antiepileptic drugs.

  3. Calcium-sensitive immunoaffinity chromatography: Gentle and highly specific retrieval of a scarce plasma antigen, collectin-LK (CL-LK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Maiken L; Madsen, Kirstine L; Skjoedt, Karsten; Hansen, Soren

    2014-11-01

    Immunoaffinity chromatography is a powerful fractionation technique that has become indispensable for protein purification and characterization. However, it is difficult to retrieve bound proteins without using harsh or denaturing elution conditions, and the purification of scarce antigens to homogeneity may be impossible due to contamination with abundant antigens. In this study, we purified the scarce, complement-associated plasma protein complex, collectin LK (CL-LK, complex of collectin liver 1 and kidney 1), by immunoaffinity chromatography using a calcium-sensitive anti-collectin-kidney-1 mAb. This antibody was characterized by binding to CL-LK at hypo- and physiological calcium concentrations and dissociated from CK-LK at hyperphysiological concentrations of calcium. We purified CL-LK from plasma to a purity of 41% and a yield of 38%, resulting in a purification factor of more than 88,000 in a single step. To evaluate the efficiency of this new purification scheme, we purified CL-LK using the same calcium-sensitive mAb in combination with acidic elution buffer and by using calcium-dependent anti-CL-K1 mAbs in combination with EDTA elution buffer. We found that calcium-sensitive immunoaffinity chromatography was superior to the traditional immunoaffinity chromatographies and resulted in a nine-fold improvement of the purification factor. The technique is applicable for the purification of proteins in complex mixtures by single-step fractionation without the denaturation of eluted antigens, and it allows for the purification of scarce proteins that would have otherwise been impossible to purify and, hence, to characterize. This technique may also potentially be applied for the purification of proteins that only interact with calcium ions at hyperphysiological concentrations.

  4. Influence of epidermal growth factor receptor monoclony antibody MAb225 on DNA repair of tongue carcinoma cell after radiation%表皮生长因子受体单抗MAb225对舌癌细胞DNA放射后损伤修复的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王明国; 王中和

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody MAb225 on repair of DNA double strand break (DNA-DSB) after radiation in tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell. Methods The single cell gel electrophoresis(SCGE) was performed to estimate the repair of DNA-DSB induced by radiation in human tongue carcinoma cells Tca8113 treated with or without MAb225. Expression of Ku70 and Ku80 were detected by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western bolt Results Comet tail moment of MAb225 treated cell was significantly higher than untreated cell(P<0.05). The expression of Ku70 and Ku80 were inhibited by MAb225. Conclusion MAb225 can inhibit repair of DNA-DSB induced by down-regulated expression of Ku70 and Ku80.%目的 研究表皮生长因子受体(EGFR)单克隆抗体MAb225对放射所致舌癌细胞DNA损伤修复的影响及其作用机制.方法 应用单细胞凝胶电泳的方法检测MAb225对舌鳞癌细胞Tca8113放射后DNA双链断裂所致的尾矩,半定量逆转录多聚酶链反应和Western blot检测MAb225对DNA蛋白激酶Ku70、Ku80表达的影响.结果 MAb225作用后的细胞单细胞凝胶电泳的彗星尾矩明显高于未处理细胞(P<0.05),并能显著抑制DNA蛋白激酶Ku70、Ku80的表达.结论 MAb225通过抑制DNA蛋白激酶Ku70、Ku80的表达影响了DNA双链断裂的修复能力.

  5. Public availability of a genotyped, segregating population may foster marker assisted breeding (MAB) and quantitative trait loci (QTL) discovery: An example using strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much of the cost associated with marker discovery for marker assisted breeding (MAB) can be eliminated if a diverse, segregating population is generated, genotyped and made available to the global breeding community. Herein, we present an example of a hybrid, wild-derived family of the octoploid str...

  6. Calcium channel blocker poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers act at L-type calcium channels in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles by preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decrease in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy, chronotropy and dromotropy. Poisoning with calcium channel blockers results in reduced cardiac output, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension and shock. The findings of hypotension and bradycardia should suggest poisoning with calcium channel blockers.Conclusions: Treatment includes immediate gastric lavage and whole-bowel irrigation in case of ingestion of sustainedrelease products. All patients should receive an activated charcoal orally. Specific treatment includes calcium, glucagone and insulin, which proved especially useful in shocked patients. Supportive care including the use of catecholamines is not always effective. In the setting of failure of pharmacological therapy transvenous pacing, balloon pump and cardiopulmonary by-pass may be necessary.

  7. Calcium is important forus.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高利平

    2005-01-01

    Calcium is important for our health.We must have it in our diet to stay well.A good place to get it is from dairy products like milk, cheese and ice cream.One pound of cheese has fifty times the calcium we should have every day.Other foods have less.For example,a pound of beans also has calcium.But it has only three times the amount we ought to have daily.

  8. Differential expression of Meis2, Mab21l2 and Tbx3 during limb development associated with diversification of limb morphology in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Mengyao; Wang, Yao; Fang, Lu; Irwin, David M; Zhu, Tengteng; Zhang, Junpeng; Zhang, Shuyi; Wang, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Bats are the only mammals capable of self-powered flight using wings. Differing from mouse or human limbs, four elongated digits within a broad wing membrane support the bat wing, and the foot of the bat has evolved a long calcar that spread the interfemoral membrane. Our recent mRNA sequencing (mRNA-Seq) study found unique expression patterns for genes at the 5' end of the Hoxd gene cluster and for Tbx3 that are associated with digit elongation and wing membrane growth in bats. In this study, we focused on two additional genes, Meis2 and Mab21l2, identified from the mRNA-Seq data. Using whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH) we validated the mRNA-Seq results for differences in the expression patterns of Meis2 and Mab21l2 between bat and mouse limbs, and further characterize the timing and location of the expression of these two genes. These analyses suggest that Meis2 may function in wing membrane growth and Mab21l2 may have a role in AP and DV axial patterning. In addition, we found that Tbx3 is uniquely expressed in the unique calcar structure found in the bat hindlimb, suggesting a role for this gene in calcar growth and elongation. Moreover, analysis of the coding sequences for Meis2, Mab21l2 and Tbx3 showed that Meis2 and Mab21l2 have high sequence identity, consistent with the functions of genes being conserved, but that Tbx3 showed accelerated evolution in bats. However, evidence for positive selection in Tbx3 was not found, which would suggest that the function of this gene has not been changed. Together, our findings support the hypothesis that the modulation of the spatiotemporal expression patterns of multiple functional conserved genes control limb morphology and drive morphological change in the diversification of mammalian limbs.

  9. Differential expression of Meis2, Mab21l2 and Tbx3 during limb development associated with diversification of limb morphology in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengyao Dai

    Full Text Available Bats are the only mammals capable of self-powered flight using wings. Differing from mouse or human limbs, four elongated digits within a broad wing membrane support the bat wing, and the foot of the bat has evolved a long calcar that spread the interfemoral membrane. Our recent mRNA sequencing (mRNA-Seq study found unique expression patterns for genes at the 5' end of the Hoxd gene cluster and for Tbx3 that are associated with digit elongation and wing membrane growth in bats. In this study, we focused on two additional genes, Meis2 and Mab21l2, identified from the mRNA-Seq data. Using whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH we validated the mRNA-Seq results for differences in the expression patterns of Meis2 and Mab21l2 between bat and mouse limbs, and further characterize the timing and location of the expression of these two genes. These analyses suggest that Meis2 may function in wing membrane growth and Mab21l2 may have a role in AP and DV axial patterning. In addition, we found that Tbx3 is uniquely expressed in the unique calcar structure found in the bat hindlimb, suggesting a role for this gene in calcar growth and elongation. Moreover, analysis of the coding sequences for Meis2, Mab21l2 and Tbx3 showed that Meis2 and Mab21l2 have high sequence identity, consistent with the functions of genes being conserved, but that Tbx3 showed accelerated evolution in bats. However, evidence for positive selection in Tbx3 was not found, which would suggest that the function of this gene has not been changed. Together, our findings support the hypothesis that the modulation of the spatiotemporal expression patterns of multiple functional conserved genes control limb morphology and drive morphological change in the diversification of mammalian limbs.

  10. Anti-CD154 mAb and rapamycin induce T regulatory cell mediated tolerance in rat-to-mouse islet transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick D Muller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-CD154 (MR1 monoclonal antibody (mAb and rapamycin (RAPA treatment both improve survival of rat-to-mouse islet xenograft. The present study investigated the effect of combined RAPA/MR1 treatment on rat-to-mouse islet xenograft survival and analyzed the role of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ T regulatory cells (Treg in the induction and maintenance of the ensuing tolerance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: C57BL/6 mice were treated with MR1/RAPA and received additional monoclonal anti-IL2 mAb or anti CD25 mAb either early (0-28 d or late (100-128 d post-transplantation. Treg were characterised in the blood, spleen, draining lymph nodes and within the graft of tolerant and rejecting mice by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Fourteen days of RAPA/MR1 combination therapy allowed indefinite islet graft survival in >80% of the mice. Additional administration of anti-IL-2 mAb or depleting anti-CD25 mAb at the time of transplantation resulted in rejection (100% and 89% respectively, whereas administration at 100 days post transplantation lead to lower rejection rates (25% and 40% respectively. Tolerant mice showed an increase of Treg within the graft and in draining lymph nodes early post transplantation, whereas 100 days post transplantation no significant increase of Treg was observed. Rejecting mice showed a transient increase of Treg in the xenograft and secondary lymphoid organs, which disappeared within 7 days after rejection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCES: These results suggest a critical role for Treg in the induction phase of tolerance early after islet xenotransplantation. These encouraging data support the need of developing further Treg therapy for overcoming the species barrier in xenotransplantation.

  11. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and inhibi...

  12. Calcium signaling in neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreses-Werringloer Ute

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is a key signaling ion involved in many different intracellular and extracellular processes ranging from synaptic activity to cell-cell communication and adhesion. The exact definition at the molecular level of the versatility of this ion has made overwhelming progress in the past several years and has been extensively reviewed. In the brain, calcium is fundamental in the control of synaptic activity and memory formation, a process that leads to the activation of specific calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways and implicates key protein effectors, such as CaMKs, MAPK/ERKs, and CREB. Properly controlled homeostasis of calcium signaling not only supports normal brain physiology but also maintains neuronal integrity and long-term cell survival. Emerging knowledge indicates that calcium homeostasis is not only critical for cell physiology and health, but also, when deregulated, can lead to neurodegeneration via complex and diverse mechanisms involved in selective neuronal impairments and death. The identification of several modulators of calcium homeostasis, such as presenilins and CALHM1, as potential factors involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, provides strong support for a role of calcium in neurodegeneration. These observations represent an important step towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of calcium signaling disturbances observed in different brain diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases.

  13. Structural Analysis of Human and Macaque mAbs 2909 and 2.5B: Implications for the Configuration of the Quaternary Neutralizing Epitope of HIV-1 gp120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spurrier, Brett; Sampson, Jared M.; Totrov, Maxim; Li, Huiguang; O; Neal, Timothy; Williams, Constance; Robinson, James; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Kong, Xiang-Peng (Molsoft); (Tulane); (NYUSM)

    2011-08-25

    The quaternary neutralizing epitope (QNE) of HIV-1 gp120 is preferentially expressed on the trimeric envelope spikes of intact HIV virions, and QNE-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) potently neutralize HIV-1. Here, we present the crystal structures of the Fabs of human mAb 2909 and macaque mAb 2.5B. Both mAbs have long beta hairpin CDR H3 regions >20 {angstrom} in length that are each situated at the center of their respective antigen-binding sites. Computational analysis showed that the paratopes include the whole CDR H3, while additional CDR residues form shallow binding pockets. Structural modeling suggests a way to understand the configuration of QNEs and the antigen-antibody interaction for QNE mAbs. Our data will be useful in designing immunogens that may elicit potent neutralizing QNE Abs.

  14. Transfer of a three step mAb chromatography process from batch to continuous: Optimizing productivity to minimize consumable requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjoka, Xhorxhi; Gantier, Rene; Schofield, Mark

    2017-01-20

    The goal of this study was to adapt a batch mAb purification chromatography platform for continuous operation. The experiments and rationale used to convert from batch to continuous operation are described. Experimental data was used to design chromatography methods for continuous operation that would exceed the threshold for critical quality attributes and minimize the consumables required as compared to batch mode of operation. Four unit operations comprising of Protein A capture, viral inactivation, flow-through anion exchange (AEX), and mixed-mode cation exchange chromatography (MMCEX) were integrated across two Cadence BioSMB PD multi-column chromatography systems in order to process a 25L volume of harvested cell culture fluid (HCCF) in less than 12h. Transfer from batch to continuous resulted in an increase in productivity of the Protein A step from 13 to 50g/L/h and of the MMCEX step from 10 to 60g/L/h with no impact on the purification process performance in term of contaminant removal (4.5 log reduction of host cell proteins, 50% reduction in soluble product aggregates) and overall chromatography process yield of recovery (75%). The increase in productivity, combined with continuous operation, reduced the resin volume required for Protein A and MMCEX chromatography by more than 95% compared to batch. The volume of AEX membrane required for flow through operation was reduced by 74%. Moreover, the continuous process required 44% less buffer than an equivalent batch process. This significant reduction in consumables enables cost-effective, disposable, single-use manufacturing. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. TetraMabs: simultaneous targeting of four oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases for tumor growth inhibition in heterogeneous tumor cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoldi, Raffaella; Schanzer, Jürgen; Panke, Christian; Jucknischke, Ute; Neubert, Natalie J.; Croasdale, Rebecca; Scheuer, Werner; Auer, Johannes; Klein, Christian; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Kobold, Sebastian; Sustmann, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody-based targeted tumor therapy has greatly improved treatment options for patients. Antibodies against oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), especially the ErbB receptor family, are prominent examples. However, long-term efficacy of such antibodies is limited by resistance mechanisms. Tumor evasion by a priori or acquired activation of other kinases is often causative for this phenomenon. These findings led to an increasing number of combination approaches either within a protein family, e.g. the ErbB family or by targeting RTKs of different phylogenetic origin like HER1 and cMet or HER1 and IGF1R. Progress in antibody engineering technology enabled generation of clinical grade bispecific antibodies (BsAbs) to design drugs inherently addressing such resistance mechanisms. Limited data are available on multi-specific antibodies targeting three or more RTKs. In the present study, we have evaluated the cloning, eukaryotic expression and purification of tetraspecific, tetravalent Fc-containing antibodies targeting HER3, cMet, HER1 and IGF1R. The antibodies are based on the combination of single-chain Fab and Fv fragments in an IgG1 antibody format enhanced by the knob-into-hole technology. They are non-agonistic and inhibit tumor cell growth comparable to the combination of four parental antibodies. Importantly, TetraMabs show improved apoptosis induction and tumor growth inhibition over individual monospecific or BsAbs in cellular assays. In addition, a mimicry assay to reflect heterogeneous expression of antigens in a tumor mass was established. With this novel in vitro assay, we can demonstrate the superiority of a tetraspecific antibody to bispecific tumor antigen-binding antibodies in early pre-clinical development. PMID:27578890

  16. Fabrication of mAb G250-SPIO molecular magnetic resonance imaging nanoprobe for the specific detection of renal cell carcinoma in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cailuan Lu

    Full Text Available Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI has been paid more and more attention for early diagnosis of cancer. A sensitive and specific mMRI probe plays the most important role in this technique. In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles and mAb G250 were conjugated as mMRI probe for the detection of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC using 3.0-Tesla MRI in vitro. mAb G250 could specifically recognize carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX antigen overexpressed in ccRCC and the SPIO nanoparticles as MRI contrast agent presented excellent MRI response and good biocompatibility. The successful assembly of this nanoprobe was confirmed by UV-vis spectrum, FT-IR spectroscopy and DLS analysis. In vitro MRI study on ccRCC cells and control cells indicated that our fabricated mAb G250-SPIO nanoprobe could be used in the specific labeling of clear cell renal carcinoma cells successfully.

  17. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pizza, cheese, frozen 1 serving 115 mg Pudding, chocolate, prepared with 2% milk 4 oz 160 mg ... Treatment Medication and Treatment Adherence Calcium/Vitamin D Nutrition Overall Health Fractures/Fall Prevention Exercise/Safe Movement ...

  18. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  19. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources You may also be interested in: Calcium: Shopping list Menopause: Questions for ... A Federal Government website managed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services healthfinder.gov is ...

  20. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  1. Calcium and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for dinner. Create mini-pizzas by topping whole-wheat English muffins or bagels with pizza sauce, low- ... Minerals Do I Need to Drink Milk? Lactose Intolerance Becoming a Vegetarian Soy Foods and Health Calcium ...

  2. Calcium and Calcium-Base Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-01-01

    should be satisfactory, because the electrolytic process for •(!>: A. H. Everts and G. D. Baglev’, " Physical «nrt m<„.+„4 i «_ of Calcium«, Electrochem...Rev. Metalurgie , 3j2, (1), 129 (1935). 10 ^sm^mssss^ma^^ extension between two known loads, is preferable to the value of 3,700,000 p.B.i. obtained

  3. Communique: Special Issue on the International Scientific Conference and Exhibit and the 7th Session of the International Co-Ordinating Council for MAB (Paris, Sept. 22-Oct. 2, 1981) = Numero special sur la Conference Scientifique Internationale et Exposition et al 7e session du Counseil International de Coordination du MAB (Paris, du 22 Sept. au 2 Oct. 1981).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Communique, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presented are summaries of two separate but closely-related conferences. The International Scientific Conference and Exhibit, organized to mark the 10th anniversary of the Man and the Biosphere Program (MAB), was based on the theme "ecology in practice: establishing a scientific basis for land management." This summary includes: a 10…

  4. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate ab

  5. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate ab

  6. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate

  7. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  8. Elemental calcium intake associated with calcium acetate/calcium carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Rosamund J; Copley, J Brian

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcium-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binders have similar efficacy in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia; however, calcium-based binders may be associated with hypercalcemia, vascular calcification, and adynamic bone disease. Scope A post hoc analysis was carried out of data from a 16-week, Phase IV study of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who switched to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy from baseline calcium acetate/calcium carbonate monotherapy. Of the intent...

  9. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  10. Inositol trisphosphate and calcium signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate is a second messenger that controls many cellular processes by generating internal calcium signals. It operates through receptors whose molecular and physiological properties closely resemble the calcium-mobilizing ryanodine receptors of muscle. This family of intracellular calcium channels displays the regenerative process of calcium-induced calcium release responsible for the complex spatiotemporal patterns of calcium waves and oscillations. Such a dynamic signalling pathway controls many cellular processes, including fertilization, cell growth, transformation, secretion, smooth muscle contraction, sensory perception and neuronal signalling.

  11. Characterization of Calflagin, a Flagellar Calcium-Binding Protein from Trypanosoma congolense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyford, Brett A.; Kaufman, Laura; Salama-Alber, Orly; Loveless, Bianca; Pope, Matthew E.; Burke, Robert D.; Matovu, Enock; Boulanger, Martin J.; Pearson, Terry W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Identification of species-specific trypanosome molecules is important for laboratory- and field-based research into epidemiology and disease diagnosis. Although Trypanosoma congolense is the most important trypanosome pathogen of cattle in Africa, no species-specific molecules found in infective bloodstream forms (BSF) of the parasites have been identified, thus limiting development of diagnostic tests. Methods Immuno-mass spectrometric methods were used to identify a protein that is recognized by a T. congolense-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) Tc6/42.6.4. The identified molecule was expressed as a recombinant protein in E. coli and was tested in several immunoassays for its ability to interact with the mAb. The three dimensional structure of the protein was modeled and compared to crystal- and NMR-structures of the homologous proteins from T. cruzi and T. brucei respectively, in order to examine structural differences leading to the different immunoreactivity of the T. congolense molecule. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) were used to measure antibodies produced by trypanosome-infected African cattle in order to assess the potential for use of T. congolense calflagin in a serodiagnostic assay. Results The antigen recognized by the T. congolense-specific mAb Tc6/42.6.4 was identified as a flagellar calcium-binding protein, calflagin. The recombinant molecule showed immunoreactivity with the T. congolense-specific mAb confirming that it is the cognate antigen. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed that Ca2+ modulated the localization of the calflagin molecule in trypanosomes. Structural modelling and comparison with calflagin homologues from other trypanosomatids revealed four non-conserved regions on the surface of the T. congolense molecule that due to differences in surface chemistry and structural topography may form species-specific epitopes. ELISAs using the recombinant calflagin as antigen to detect antibodies in trypanosome

  12. Calcium and Calcium Supplements: Achieving the Right Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bone mass, which is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Many Americans don't get enough calcium in their diets. Children and adolescent girls are at particular risk, but so are adults age 50 and older. How much calcium you ...

  13. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  14. Effects of interleukin-18 and Anti-interleukin-18-mAb on Experimental immunological Liver Fibrosis induced by Repeatedly Administered Concanavalin A and its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-wen Tan; Jian-cheng Wu; Yun Ye; Li Chen; Peng-li Pai

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the prevention of IL-18 or anti-IL-18-mAb to the immune liver fibrosis model induced by repeated injection of concanavalin A in BALB/c mice and its mechanism. Methods Total of 120 BALB/c mice were divided into four groups, control group mice (Ga) were injected weekly with normal saline, concanavalin A group was divided into Gb, Gc, Gd. All mice were injected with concanavalin A (15 mg/kg) once a week. Moreover, Gc, Gd mice were injected weekly with IL-18 (7.5 mg/kg) and anti-IL-18-mAb (10 mg/kg) 2 hours before treatment with concanavalin A, respectively. Twenty-four hours after concanavalin A challenge at 1, 5, 12 and 20 weeks, 3 mice were killed by vena orbitalis, repectively. The sera were storaged at 4℃for detecting of up TNF-αand IFN-γby ELISA. The liver of mice in different groups were excised and fixed in 10%formalin for HE staining and Masson staining or frozen in liquid nitrogen for immunohistochemical staining forα-SMA. After extracting of total RNA from liver tissue, MMP-2 and TIMP-1 A messenger RNA were amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Products were electrophoresed on agrose gel containing ethidium bromide and visualized under ultraviolet light. Densitometric RT-PCR data were standardized withβ-actin signals. Results After experiment, the number of dead mice of Ga, Gb, Gc and Gd were 0, 6, 15 and 3, respectively. There were significant difference on each group (P<0.05). At the fifth week of experiment, hepatocellular necrosis in IL-18 administered group mice had become widespread throughout the lobule. Evidence of liver fibrosis was observed during this period. However, at the twelfth week of experimemt, bridging fibrosis and large fibrosis strip in the parenchyma with hepatocellular necrosis was detectable in Gb, but at twentieth week, only the small fibrosis strip had been found in anti-IL-18-mAb administered group mice by HE staining and Masson staining. The serum levels of TNF-αand IFN

  15. Generation of mAbs to foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A and application in a competitive ELISA for serodiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Xu, Wanhong; Bittner, Hilary; Horsington, Jacquelyn; Vosloo, Wilna; Goolia, Melissa; Lusansky, Diana; Nfon, Charles

    2016-11-28

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is an economically devastating disease that severely limits international trade of animals. Of the seven FMD virus (FMDV) serotypes, serotype A is one of the most widespread cross the world. Currently antibodies to FMDV are detected in animals using the virus neutralization test (VNT) and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The VNT is laborious, time-consuming and reliant on live virus and cell cultures, while ELISA has the advantage of using inactivated antigens and often provides more reproducible results. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable and rapid competitive ELISA (cELISA) for the detection of antibodies to FMDV serotype A (FMDV/A). A panel of FMDV/A specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was generated and their ability to compete with a polyclonal serum from FMDV/A-infected cattle was examined. Two mAbs inhibited the binding of a polyclonal serum to FMDV/A viruses. The binding epitopes of each were determined as conformational and located on the VP2 viral capsid protein. The FMDV/A cELISA was developed using these two mAbs and FMDV/A inactivated virus as antigen. The diagnostic specificity and sensitivity were 99.7 and 99.3% (98.5-100%) respectively, based on a predetermined cut-off of 50% inhibition. When analysing sera from animals experimentally infected with FMDV/A, the cELISA detected antibodies from 5-days post infection (dpi) and remained positive for at least 21-28 days post infection. Comparison based on the Kappa coefficient showed strong agreement (90-94%) between cELISA and VNT. The cELISA results are comparable to the VNT for antibody detection making it a simple and reliable test to detect antibodies against FMDV/A.

  16. [Comparison of the antigenic spectrum A1, A2, and Ax erythrocytes: inhibition of mab with glucoconjugates of lipid and protein nature with different isoelectric properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delevskiĭ, Iu P; Zinchenko, A A

    2007-12-01

    The inhibition of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (anti-A1 2-24, anti-A 2-22, anti- 2-19, and anti- A 2-18; Workshop IV) by glycotopes (glycoconjugates) obtained by the enzymatic treatment of A1, A2, and Ax erythrocytes and by chloroform-methanol method from the membranes of these erythrocytes, followed by ion-exchange gel chromatography was evaluated. According to specificity and isoelectric properties, glycoconjugates (in the sequence of desorption from an anion exchanger) of glycoprotein (A(pr-00), A(pr-0), A(pr-1), A(pr-3)) and glycosphingolipid (A1p,00, A(1p-0), A(1p-1), A(1p-3), A(1p-3)) origin were identified. A1 erythrocytes showed the broad-spectrum inhibiting activity of glycoconjugates, which being at maximum with acid A(1p-00) and A(pr-3) (the ionic points of pH 6.55 and 6.45), as well as with A(lp-00) and A(1p-00) 1 The inhibition of A(pr-3) from A2 was significantly weaker that that from A1. An A(pr-3) fraction from Ax erythrocytes inhibited as strongly as in A1 and A2. The inhibition of A(pr-3p) from Ax either failed to develop at all (MAb 2-19) or turned out be weakened (MAbs 2-22 and 2-18). Thus, the cascade decrease in agglutinogenicity in the order of A1, A2, and Ax correlated with the reduction in the inhibiting capacity of A(pr-3) in all the study groups, including Ax.

  17. Aeroallergen analyses and their clinical relevance. I. Immunochemical quantification of allergens by RAST-inhibition, Mab-ELISA, basophil histamine release, and counter current immuno electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, C R; Abrahamsen, L; Stahl Skov, P;

    1991-01-01

    The aim was to compare IgE and IgG4 RAST-inhibition assay (RI), monoclonal antibody ELISA (Mab-ELISA), counter current immuno electrophoresis (CCIE) and histamine release from basophil leukocytes (HR) for allergen quantification with special reference to aeroallergen detection. As components...... and Derm. pter. (10-10(2) SQ-U/ml), and 10(2)-10(3) SQ-U/ML for dog. Because of cross-reactivity, a minor degree of interference was observed in the IgE-RI and the HR test for the highest concentration of cat and dog allergens....

  18. Calcium, vitamin D and bone

    OpenAIRE

    Borg, Andrew A.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium, protein and vitamin D are the main nutrients relevant to bone health. This short article discusses the importance of vitamin D and its relation to calcium homeostasis. The various causes, clinical manifestations and treatment are outlined.

  19. Calcium ion channel and epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yudan Lü; Weihong Lin; Dihui Ma

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between calcium ion channel and epilepsy for well investigating the pathogenesis of epilepsy and probing into the new therapeutic pathway of epilepsy.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online research Calcium ion channel and epilepsy related articles published between January 1994 and December 2006 in the CKNI and Wanfang database with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy, calcium-channel blocker". The language was limited to Chinese. At the same time,related articles published between January 1993 and December 2006 in Pubmed were searched for on online with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy" in English.STUDY SELECTION: The materials were selected firstly. Inclusive criteria: ① Studies related to calcium ion channel and the pat1hogenesis of epilepsy. ② Studies on the application of calcium ion channel blocker in the treatment of epilepsy. Exclusive criteria: repetitive or irrelated studies.DATA EXTRACTION: According to the criteria, 123 articles were retrieved and 93 were excluded due to repetitive or irrelated studies. Altogether 30 articles met the inclusive criteria, 11 of them were about the structure and characters of calcium ion channel, 10 about calcium ion channel and the pathogenesis of epilepsy and 9 about calcium blocker and the treatment of epilepsy.DATA SYNTHESIS: Calcium ion channels mainly consist of voltage dependent calcium channel and receptor operated calcium channel. Depolarization caused by voltage gating channel-induced influxion is the pathological basis of epileptic attack, and it is found in many studies that many anti-epileptic drugs have potential and direct effect to rivalizing voltage-dependent calcium ion channel.CONCLUSION: Calcium influxion plays an important role in the seizure of epilepsy. Some calcium antagonists seen commonly are being tried in the clinical therapy of epilepsy that is being explored, not applied in clinical practice. If there are enough evidences to

  20. High Blood Calcium (Hypercalcemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as well as kidney function and levels of calcium in your urine. Your provider may do other tests to further assess your condition, such as checking your blood levels of phosphorus (a mineral). Imaging studies also may be helpful, such as bone ...

  1. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium carbonate is not very poisonous. Recovery is quite likely. But, long-term overuse is more serious than a single overdose, because it can cause kidney damage. Few people die from an antacid overdose. Keep all medicines in child-proof bottles and out ...

  2. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  3. Extracellular Calcium and Magnesium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    i cellular and neuronal metabolism and functions. The objective of ... as having preeclampsia or eclampsia, in the same age range. ... Booking status Number (n) ("/o) Number (n) (%). Booked 7 ... is influx of calcium ions into the cell leacling to.

  4. Calcium aluminate in alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Arzu

    The properties of ceramic materials are determined not only by the composition and structure of the phases present, but also by the distribution of impurities, intergranular films and second phases. The phase distribution and microstructure both depend on the fabrication techniques, the raw materials used, the phase-equilibrium relations, grain growth and sintering processes. In this dissertation research, various approaches have been employed to understand fundamental phenomena such as grain growth, impurity segregation, second-phase formation and crystallization. The materials system chosen was alumina intentionally doped with calcium. Atomic-scale structural analyses of grain boundaries in alumina were carried on the processed samples. It was found that above certain calcium concentrations, CA6 precipitated as a second phase at all sintering temperatures. The results also showed that abnormal grain growth can occur after precipitation and it is not only related to the calcium level, but it is also temperature dependent. In order to understand the formation mechanism of CA6 precipitates in calcium doped alumina samples, several studies have been carried out using either bulk materials or thin films The crystallization of CA2 and CA6 powders has been studied. Chemical processing techniques were used to synthesize the powders. It was observed that CA2 powders crystallized directly, however CA6 powders crystallized through gamma-Al 2O3 solid solution. The results of energy-loss near-edge spectrometry confirmed that gamma-Al2O3 can dissolve calcium. Calcium aluminate/alumina reaction couples have also been investigated. All reaction couples were heat treated following deposition. It was found that gamma-Al2O3 was formed at the interface as a result of the interfacial reaction between the film and the substrate. gamma-Al 2O3 at the interface was stable at much higher temperatures compared to the bulk gamma-Al2O3 formed prior to the CA6 crystallization. In order to

  5. Antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdy, Zaleha Abdullah; Basri, Hashimah; Md Isa, Zaleha; Ahmad, Shuhaila; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Mohd Amin, Rahmah

    2014-04-01

    To determine the adequacy of antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia, and the influencing factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among postnatal women who delivered in two tertiary hospitals. Data were collected from antenatal cards, hospital documents and diet recall on daily milk and calcium intake during pregnancy. SPSS version 19.0 was used for statistical analyses. A total of 150 women were studied. The total daily calcium intake was 834 ± 43 mg (mean ± standard error of the mean), but the calcium intake distribution curve was skewed to the right with a median intake of 725 mg daily. When calcium intake from milk and calcium supplements was excluded, the daily dietary calcium intake was only 478 ± 25 mg. Even with inclusion of milk and calcium supplements, more than a third (n=55 or 36.7%) of the women consumed less than 600 mg calcium in their daily diet. The adequacy of daily calcium intake was not influenced by maternal age, ethnicity, income or maternal job or educational status as well as parity. The daily dietary calcium intake of the Malaysian antenatal population is far from adequate without the addition of calcium supplements and milk. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...

  7. Bioceramics of calcium orthophosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V

    2010-03-01

    A strong interest in use of ceramics for biomedical applications appeared in the late 1960's. Used initially as alternatives to metals in order to increase a biocompatibility of implants, bioceramics have become a diverse class of biomaterials, presently including three basic types: relatively bioinert ceramics, bioactive (or surface reactive) and bioresorbable ones. Furthermore, any type of bioceramics could be porous to provide tissue ingrowth. This review is devoted to bioceramics prepared from calcium orthophosphates, which belong to the categories of bioresorbable and bioactive compounds. During the past 30-40 years, there have been a number of major advances in this field. Namely, after the initial work on development of bioceramics that was tolerated in the physiological environment, emphasis was shifted towards the use of bioceramics that interacted with bones by forming a direct chemical bond. By the structural and compositional control, it became possible to choose whether the bioceramics of calcium orthophosphates was biologically stable once incorporated within the skeletal structure or whether it was resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics, which is able to regenerate bone tissues, has been developed. Current biomedical applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics include replacements for hips, knees, teeth, tendons and ligaments, as well as repair for periodontal disease, maxillofacial reconstruction, augmentation and stabilization of the jawbone, spinal fusion and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Potential future applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics will include drug-delivery systems, as well as they will become effective carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and/or various types of cells for tissue engineering purposes.

  8. Liposomal co-entrapment of CD40mAb induces enhanced IgG responses against bacterial polysaccharide and protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Hatzifoti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibody against CD40 is effective in enhancing immune responses to vaccines when chemically conjugated to the vaccine antigen. Unfortunately the requirement for chemical conjugation presents some difficulties in vaccine production and quality control which are compounded when multivalent vaccines are required. We explore here an alternative to chemical conjugation, involving the co-encapsulation of CD40 antibody and antigens in liposomal vehicles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anti-mouse CD40 mAb or isotype control mAb were co-entrapped individually in cationic liposomal vehicles with pneumococcal polysaccharides or diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. Retention of CD40 binding activity upon liposomal entrapment was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. After subcutaneous immunization of BALB/c female mice, anti-polysaccharide and DT/TT responses were measured by ELISA. Simple co-encapsulation of CD40 antibody allowed for the retention of CD40 binding on the liposome surface, and also produced vaccines with enhanced imunogenicity. Antibody responses against both co-entrapped protein in the form of tetanus toxoid, and Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide, were enhanced by co-encapsulation with CD40 antibody. Surprisingly, liposomal encapsulation also appeared to decrease the toxicity of high doses of CD40 antibody as assessed by the degree of splenomegaly induced. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Liposomal co-encapsulation with CD40 antibody may represent a practical means of producing more immunogenic multivalent vaccines and inducing IgG responses against polysaccharides without the need for conjugation.

  9. Quantitative definition and monitoring of the host cell protein proteome using iTRAQ - a study of an industrial mAb producing CHO-S cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiverton, Lesley M; Evans, Caroline; Pandhal, Jagroop; Landels, Andrew R; Rees, Byron J; Levison, Peter R; Wright, Phillip C; Smales, C Mark

    2016-08-01

    There are few studies defining CHO host cell proteins (HCPs) and the flux of these throughout a downstream purification process. Here we have applied quantitative iTRAQ proteomics to follow the HCP profile of an antibody (mAb) producing CHO-S cell line throughout a standard downstream purification procedure consisting of a Protein A, cation and anion exchange process. We used both 6 sample iTRAQ experiment to analyze technical replicates of three samples, which were culture harvest (HCCF), Protein A flow through and Protein A eluate and an 8 sample format to analyze technical replicates of four sample types; HCCF compared to Protein A eluate and subsequent cation and anion exchange purification. In the 6 sample iTRAQ experiment, 8781 spectra were confidently matched to peptides from 819 proteins (including the mAb chains). Across both the 6 and 8 sample experiments 936 proteins were identified. In the 8 sample comparison, 4187 spectra were confidently matched to peptides from 219 proteins. We then used the iTRAQ data to enable estimation of the relative change of individual proteins across the purification steps. These data provide the basis for application of iTRAQ for process development based upon knowledge of critical HCPs. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. lmmunofiuorescent Labeling of Human HepG2 Cells with CdTe Quantum Dot Probe Conjugated with Anti-pan CK MAb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUI Yu-jie; ZHANG Gui-zhen; WANG Qian; WANG Ya-li; WU Mei; DU Zhen-wu; ZHANG Jie; JIANG Ri-hua

    2011-01-01

    A relatively sensitive, specific, and photostable method for the detection of cytokeratin of cancer cells via conjugation with cadmium telluride quantum dots(CdTe QDs) was described. Water soluble CdTe QDs were conjugated to anti-pan-cytokeratin(CK) monoclonal antibody(MAb) through coupling reagent [1-ethyi-3-(3-dimethylamino propyl)carbodiimide, EDC] and the conjugates were purified by dialysis. The expression of pan CK protein in HepG2 cells was observed by immunocytochemistry and direct immunofluorescence via QDs-Ab conjugates respectively. Fluorescence intensity and photostability of QDs were compared with those of FITC(fiuorescein isothiocyanate). The results show that the QDs-Ab conjugates recognized specifically pan CK protein in HepG2 cells. Compared with FITC, CdTe QDs had higher brightness and photostability without obvious photobleaching under continuous exciting light illumination for 30 min and after the placement at room temperature for 3 d. The results indicate that conjugates of CdTe quantum dot with anti-pan CK MAb can be used for labeling cancer cells derived from epithelial tissues, which provides the basis for the detection of circulating tumor cells(CTCs).

  11. Elucidating the Weak Protein-Protein Interaction Mechanisms behind the Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation of a mAb Solution by Different Types of Additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoliang; Wang Co-First, Shujing; Tian, Zhou; Zhang, Ning; Sheng, Han; Dai, Weiguo; Qian, Feng

    2017-07-25

    Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) has long been observed during the physical stability investigation of therapeutic protein formulations. The buffer conditions and the presence of various excipients are thought to play important roles in the formulation development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). In this study, the effects of several small-molecule excipients (histidine, alanine, glycine, sodium phosphate, sodium chloride, sorbitol and sucrose) with diverse physical-chemical properties on LLPS of a model IgG1 (JM2) solutions were investigated by multiple techniques, including UV-vis spectroscopy, circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry/fluorimetry, size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering. The LLPS of JM2 was confirmed to be a thermodynamic equilibrium process with no structural changes or irreversible aggregation of proteins. Phase diagrams of various JM2 formulations were constructed, suggesting that the phase behavior of JM2 was dependent on the solution pH, ionic strength and the presence of other excipients such as glycine, alanine, sorbitol and sucrose. Furthermore, we demonstrated that for this mAb, the interaction parameter (kD) determined at low protein concentration appeared to be a good predictor for the occurrence of LLPS at high concentration. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Systemic administration of Abeta mAb reduces retinal deposition of Abeta and activated complement C3 in age-related macular degeneration mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Catchpole

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of legal blindness in the Western world. There are effective treatments for the vascular complications of neo-vascular AMD, but no effective therapies are available for the dry/atrophic form of the disease. A previously described transgenic CFH-gene deficient mouse model, (cfh-/-, shows hallmarks of early AMD. The ocular phenotype has been further analysed to demonstrate amyloid beta (Aβ rich basement membrane deposits associated with activated complement C3. Cfh-/- mice were treated systemically in both prophylactic and therapeutic regimes with an anti-Aβ monoclonal antibody (mAb, 6F6, to determine the effect on the cfh-/- retinal phenotype. Prophylactic treatment with 6F6 demonstrated a dose dependent reduction in the accumulation of both Aβ and activated C3 deposition. A similar reduction in the retinal endpoints could be seen after therapeutic treatment. Serum Aβ levels after systemic administration of 6F6 show accumulation of Aβ in the periphery suggestive of a peripheral sink mechanism. In summary, anti-Aβ mAb treatment can partially prevent or reverse ocular phenotypes of the cfh-/- mouse. The data support this therapeutic approach in humans potentially modulating two key elements in the pathogenesis of AMD - Aβ and activated, complement C3.

  13. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  14. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradleigh eHocking

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact fruit development, physical traits and disease susceptibility through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to ripening and the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g. blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples. This review works towards an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved

  15. Synthesis of calcium superoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rewick, R. T.; Blucher, W. G.; Estacio, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    Efforts to prepare Ca(O2) sub 2 from reactions of calcium compounds with 100% O3 and with O(D-1) atoms generated by photolysis of O3 at 2537 A are described. Samples of Ca(OH) sub 2, CaO, CaO2, Ca metal, and mixtures containing suspected impurities to promote reaction have been treated with excess O3 under static and flow conditions in the presence and absence of UV irradiation. Studies with KO2 suggest that the superoxide anion is stable to radiation at 2537 A but reacts with oxygen atoms generated by the photolysis of O3 to form KO3. Calcium superoxide is expected to behave in an analogous.

  16. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  17. Calcium, essential for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Victoria, Emilio

    2016-07-12

    Calcium (Ca) is the most abundant mineral element in our body. It accounts for about 2% of body weight. The functions of calcium are: a) functions skeletal and b) regulatory functions. Bone consists of a protein matrix that mineralizes mainly with calcium (the most abundant), phosphate and magnesium, for it is essential an adequate dietary intake of Ca, phosphorus and vitamin D. The ionic Ca (Ca2+) is essential to maintain and / or perform different specialized functions of, virtually, all body cells cellular. Because of its important functions Ca2+ must be closely regulated, keeping plasma concentrations within narrow ranges. For this reason there is an accurate response against hypocalcemia or hypercalcemia in which the parathormone, calcitriol, calcitonin and vitamin K are involved. Ca intakes in the Spanish population are low in a significant percentage of the older adult’s population, especially in women. The main source of Ca in the diet is milk and milk derivatives. Green leafy vegetables, fruits and legumes can be important sources of Ca in a Mediterranean dietary pattern. The bioavailability of dietary Ca depends on physiological and dietary factors. Physiological include age, physiological status (gestation and lactation) Ca and vitamin D status and disease. Several studies relate Ca intake in the diet and various diseases, such as osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity.

  18. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  19. Calcium antagonists and vasospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F B

    1990-04-01

    A critical review of the clinical data supports the conclusion that nimodipine decreases the severity of neurologic deficits and improves outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The mechanisms by which mortality and morbidity are reduced are still controversial. First, the frequency of vasospasm is not altered (Figs. 5 and 6). Second, the consistent reversal of vasospasm once present has not been demonstrated either angiographically or by noninvasive cerebral blood flow studies. These observations suggest that there is either modification of microcirculatory flow (i.e., dilation of pial conducting vessels or decreased platelet aggregation) or a direct neuronal protective effect. As suggested previously, support for either mechanism is not resolute, and further investigation is necessary. Currently, nimodipine has been the most thoroughly investigated calcium antagonist both from an experimental and clinical perspective. Oral administration has had few reported complications. Therefore, the benefit/risk ratio clearly supports the prophylactic use of this calcium antagonist in patients of all clinical grades after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Evidence also indicates that starting nimodipine after the onset of delayed ischemic deficits is of benefit. Finally, it can be predicted that in the future additional calcium antagonists with more selective vascular or neuronal effects will be developed for use in neurologic disorders.

  20. Specific Binding of 17D3 Anti-pZP mAb to Porcine and Human Zona Pellucida but not to Other Tissue Antigens Identified by ABC Immunohistochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To characterize the binding effects of 1 7D3 anti-pZP monoclonal antibody (mAb) on porcine and human ZP, ovary and other important tissues Methods The 1 7D3 anti-pZP mAb was produced by immunizing mouse with porcine zona pellucida and hybridoma and monoclonal antibody preparation. An ABCimmunohistochemistry was used to evaluate reaction of mAb 17D3pZP to porcine and human ZP antigens as well as important human tissue antigens.Results mAb 1 7D3pZP specifically bound to porcine and human ZP antigen, but not to other cells of ovaries and other important human tissue antigens.Conclusion 17D3 anti-pZP mAb can recognize porcine and human ZP antigen without cross-reaction with other human tissue antigens including ovary, so it may further help us to abstract and purify corresponding target antigen and settle basis for producing human ZP contraceptive vaccine.

  1. Calcium signalling and calcium channels: evolution and general principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2014-09-15

    Calcium as a divalent cation was selected early in evolution as a signaling molecule to be used by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Its low cytosolic concentration likely reflects the initial concentration of this ion in the primordial soup/ocean as unicellular organisms were formed. As the concentration of calcium in the ocean subsequently increased, so did the diversity of homeostatic molecules handling calcium. This includes the plasma membrane channels that allowed the calcium entry, as well as extrusion mechanisms, i.e., exchangers and pumps. Further diversification occurred with the evolution of intracellular organelles, in particular the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, which also contain channels, exchanger(s) and pumps to handle the homeostasis of calcium ions. Calcium signalling system, based around coordinated interactions of the above molecular entities, can be activated by the opening of voltage-gated channels, neurotransmitters, second messengers and/or mechanical stimulation, and as such is all-pervading pathway in physiology and pathophysiology of organisms.

  2. Elemental calcium intake associated with calcium acetate/calcium carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rosamund J; Copley, J Brian

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcium-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binders have similar efficacy in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia; however, calcium-based binders may be associated with hypercalcemia, vascular calcification, and adynamic bone disease. Scope A post hoc analysis was carried out of data from a 16-week, Phase IV study of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who switched to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy from baseline calcium acetate/calcium carbonate monotherapy. Of the intent-to-treat population (N=2520), 752 patients with recorded dose data for calcium acetate (n=551)/calcium carbonate (n=201) at baseline and lanthanum carbonate at week 16 were studied. Elemental calcium intake, serum phosphate, corrected serum calcium, and serum intact parathyroid hormone levels were analyzed. Findings Of the 551 patients with calcium acetate dose data, 271 (49.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day at baseline, and 142 (25.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) serum phosphate levels were 6.1 (5.89, 6.21) mg/dL at baseline and 6.2 (6.04, 6.38) mg/dL at 16 weeks; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.3 (9.16, 9.44) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Of the 201 patients with calcium carbonate dose data, 117 (58.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day, and 76 (37.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% CI) serum phosphate levels were 5.8 (5.52, 6.06) mg/dL at baseline and 5.8 (5.53, 6.05) mg/dL at week 16; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.7 (9.15, 10.25) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Conclusion Calcium acetate/calcium carbonate phosphate binders, taken to control serum phosphate levels, may result in high levels of elemental calcium intake. This may lead to complications related to calcium balance. PMID:28182142

  3. High-throughput screening techniques for rapid PEG-based precipitation of IgG4 mAb from clarified cell culture supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knevelman, Carol; Davies, Jim; Allen, Lee; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel J

    2010-01-01

    Locating optimal protein precipitation conditions for complex biological feed materials is problematic. This article describes the application of a series of high-throughput platforms for the rapid identification and selection of conditions for the precipitation of an IgG(4) monoclonal antibody (mAb) from a complex feedstock using only microliter quantities of material. The approach uses 96-microwell filter plates combined with high-throughput analytical methods and a method for well volume determination for product quantification. The low material, time and resource requirements facilitated the use of a full factorial Design of Experiments (DoE) for the rapid investigation into how critical parameters impact the IgG(4) precipitation. To aid the DoE, a set of preliminary range-finding studies were conducted first. Data collected through this approach describing Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) precipitation of the IgG(4) as a function of mAb concentration, precipitant concentration, and pH are presented. Response surface diagrams were used to explore interactions between parameters and to inform selection of the most favorable conditions for maximum yield and purification. PEG concentrations required for maximum yield and purity were dependant on the IgG(4) concentration; however, concentrations of 14 to 20% w/v, pH 6.5, gave optimal levels of yield and purity. Application of the high-throughput approach enabled 1,155 conditions to be examined with less than 1 g of material. The level of insights gained over such a short time frame is indicative of the power of microwell experimentation in allowing the rapid identification of appropriate processing conditions for key bioprocess operations. Copyright 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers

  4. Production of different glycosylation variants of the tumour-targeting mAb H10 in Nicotiana benthamiana: influence on expression yield and antibody degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Raffaele; Donini, Marcello; Villani, Maria Elena; Brunetti, Patrizia; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Paul, Matthew; Ma, Julian K-C; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2012-10-01

    We previously described the expression of a tumour-targeting antibody (mAb H10) in Nicotiana benthamiana by vacuum-agro-infiltration and the remarkable yields of highly pure protein achieved. The objective of the present work was to investigate different strategies for transient overexpression of the mAb H10 in which glycan configuration was modulated and assess how these strategies affect the accumulation yield and stability of the antibody. To this aim, three procedures have been assayed: (1) Site-directed mutagenesis to abolish the glycosylation site; (2) endoplasmic reticulum retention (C-terminal SEKDEL fusion) to ensure predominantly high-mannose type glycans; and (3) expression in a N. benthamiana RNAi down-regulated line in which β1,2-xylosyltransferase and α1,3-fucosyltransferase gene expression is silenced. The three antibody variants (H10-Mut) (H10-SEKDEL) (H10(XylT/FucT)) were transiently expressed, purified and characterised for their glycosylation profile, expression/purification yield and antibody degradation pattern. Glycosylation analysis of H10(XylT/FucT) demonstrated the absence of plant complex-type sugars, while H10-SEKDEL, although substantially retained in the ER, revealed the presence of β1,2-xylose and α1,3-fucose residues, indicating a partial escape from the ER retrieval system. Antibody accumulation and purification yields were not enhanced by ER retention. All H10 antibody glyco-forms revealed greater degradation compared to the original, resulting mostly in the formation of Fab fragments. In the case of aglycosylated H10-Mut, more than 95% of the heavy chain was cleaved, confirming the pivotal role of the sugar moiety in protein stability. Identification of possible 'fragile' sites in the H10 antibody hinge region could be of general interest for the development of new strategies to reduce antibody degradation and increase the yield of intact IgGs in plants.

  5. Life-cycle and cost of goods assessment of fed-batch and perfusion-based manufacturing processes for mAbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnak, Phumthep; Allmendinger, Richard; Ramasamy, Sri V; Lettieri, Paola; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel J

    2016-09-01

    Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is an environmental assessment tool that quantifies the environmental impact associated with a product or a process (e.g., water consumption, energy requirements, and solid waste generation). While LCA is a standard approach in many commercial industries, its application has not been exploited widely in the bioprocessing sector. To contribute toward the design of more cost-efficient, robust and environmentally-friendly manufacturing process for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), a framework consisting of an LCA and economic analysis combined with a sensitivity analysis of manufacturing process parameters and a production scale-up study is presented. The efficiency of the framework is demonstrated using a comparative study of the two most commonly used upstream configurations for mAb manufacture, namely fed-batch (FB) and perfusion-based processes. Results obtained by the framework are presented using a range of visualization tools, and indicate that a standard perfusion process (with a pooling duration of 4 days) has similar cost of goods than a FB process but a larger environmental footprint because it consumed 35% more water, demanded 17% more energy, and emitted 17% more CO2 than the FB process. Water consumption was the most important impact category, especially when scaling-up the processes, as energy was required to produce process water and water-for-injection, while CO2 was emitted from energy generation. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the perfusion process can be made more environmentally-friendly than the FB process if the pooling duration is extended to 8 days. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1324-1335, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Biotechnology Progress published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  6. Life‐cycle and cost of goods assessment of fed‐batch and perfusion‐based manufacturing processes for mAbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnak, Phumthep; Allmendinger, Richard; Ramasamy, Sri V.; Lettieri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Life‐cycle assessment (LCA) is an environmental assessment tool that quantifies the environmental impact associated with a product or a process (e.g., water consumption, energy requirements, and solid waste generation). While LCA is a standard approach in many commercial industries, its application has not been exploited widely in the bioprocessing sector. To contribute toward the design of more cost‐efficient, robust and environmentally‐friendly manufacturing process for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), a framework consisting of an LCA and economic analysis combined with a sensitivity analysis of manufacturing process parameters and a production scale‐up study is presented. The efficiency of the framework is demonstrated using a comparative study of the two most commonly used upstream configurations for mAb manufacture, namely fed‐batch (FB) and perfusion‐based processes. Results obtained by the framework are presented using a range of visualization tools, and indicate that a standard perfusion process (with a pooling duration of 4 days) has similar cost of goods than a FB process but a larger environmental footprint because it consumed 35% more water, demanded 17% more energy, and emitted 17% more CO2 than the FB process. Water consumption was the most important impact category, especially when scaling‐up the processes, as energy was required to produce process water and water‐for‐injection, while CO2 was emitted from energy generation. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the perfusion process can be made more environmentally‐friendly than the FB process if the pooling duration is extended to 8 days. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1324–1335, 2016 PMID:27390260

  7. Aeroallergen analyses and their clinical relevance. I. Immunochemical quantification of allergens by RAST-inhibition, Mab-ELISA, basophil histamine release, and counter current immuno electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, C R; Abrahamsen, L; Stahl Skov, P; Johansen, N; Poulsen, L K

    1991-10-01

    The aim was to compare IgE and IgG4 RAST-inhibition assay (RI), monoclonal antibody ELISA (Mab-ELISA), counter current immuno electrophoresis (CCIE) and histamine release from basophil leukocytes (HR) for allergen quantification with special reference to aeroallergen detection. As components of indoor aeroallergens, cat, dog, and Derm. pter. allergen extracts were selected for the experiments. To evaluate unspecific interference, these allergens were compared mutually and with Cladosporium herbarum. Allergen extracts in varying dilutions were mixed with crushed glass fibre filter materials, eluted, recovered by centrifugation, and allergen concentration quantified by the assays. Equal sensitivity was found for both IgE- and IgG4-RI assaying cat allergen (in the range 5-50 SQ-U/ml) and dog allergen (in the range 10(2)-10(3) SQ-U/ml). The IgG4-RI assaying Derm. pter. was more sensitive (50 SQ-U/ml) than IgE-RI (2*10(3) SQ-U/ml). The ranges of allergen detection limits for the Mab-ELISA were equal for cat and Derm. pter. (10-10(2) SQ-U/ml). The range of allergen detection limits for CCIE, assaying dog were 10(4)-10(5) SQ-U/ml. The ranges of allergen detection limits for HR were equal for cat and Derm. pter. (10-10(2) SQ-U/ml), and 10(2)-10(3) SQ-U/ML for dog. Because of cross-reactivity, a minor degree of interference was observed in the IgE-RI and the HR test for the highest concentration of cat and dog allergens.

  8. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K Jaiswal

    2001-09-01

    Calcium is among the most commonly used ions, in a multitude of biological functions, so much so that it is impossible to imagine life without calcium. In this article I have attempted to address the question as to how calcium has achieved this status with a brief mention of the history of calcium research in biology. It appears that during the origin and early evolution of life the Ca2+ ion was given a unique opportunity to be used in several biological processes because of its unusual physical and chemical properties.

  9. Calcium Phosphate Biomaterials: An Update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Current calcium phosphate (CaP) biomaterials for bone repair, substitution, augmentation and regeneration include hydroxyapatite ( HA ) from synthetic or biologic origin, beta-tricalcium phosphate ( β-TCP ) , biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), and are available as granules, porous blocks, components of composites (CaP/polymer) cements, and as coatings on orthopedic and dental implants. Experimental calcium phosphate biomaterials include CO3- and F-substituted apatites, Mg-and Zn-substituted β-TCP, calcium phosphate glasses. This paper is a brief review of the different types of CaP biomaterials and their properties such as bioactivity, osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity.

  10. Cardiovascular Effects of Calcium Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R. Reid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcium supplements reduce bone turnover and slow the rate of bone loss. However, few studies have demonstrated reduced fracture incidence with calcium supplements, and meta-analyses show only a 10% decrease in fractures, which is of borderline statistical and clinical significance. Trials in normal older women and in patients with renal impairment suggest that calcium supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. To further assess their safety, we recently conducted a meta-analysis of trials of calcium supplements, and found a 27%–31% increase in risk of myocardial infarction, and a 12%–20% increase in risk of stroke. These findings are robust because they are based on pre-specified analyses of randomized, placebo-controlled trials and are consistent across the trials. Co-administration of vitamin D with calcium does not lessen these adverse effects. The increased cardiovascular risk with calcium supplements is consistent with epidemiological data relating higher circulating calcium concentrations to cardiovascular disease in normal populations. There are several possible pathophysiological mechanisms for these effects, including effects on vascular calcification, vascular cells, blood coagulation and calcium-sensing receptors. Thus, the non-skeletal risks of calcium supplements appear to outweigh any skeletal benefits, and are they appear to be unnecessary for the efficacy of other osteoporosis treatments.

  11. Calcium measurement methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rightly stressed by prof. Wolfgang Walz in the Preface to the series Neuromethods series, the “careful application of methods is probably the most important step in the process of scientific inquiry”. Thus, I strongly suggest to all those interested in calcium signaling and especially to the new-comers in the hot topic of neuroscience (which has so much space even in science-society debate for its implications in legal issues and in the judge-decision process to take profit from this so well edited book. I am saying this since prof. Verkhratsky and prof. Petersen......

  12. A 44 bp intestine-specific hermaphrodite-specific enhancer from the C. elegans vit-2 vitellogenin gene is directly regulated by ELT-2, MAB-3, FKH-9 and DAF-16 and indirectly regulated by the germline, by daf-2/insulin signaling and by the TGF-β/Sma/Mab pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goszczynski, Barbara; Captan, Vasile V; Danielson, Alicia M; Lancaster, Brett R; McGhee, James D

    2016-05-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans vitellogenin genes are transcribed in the intestine of adult hermaphrodites but not of males. A 44-bp region from the vit-2 gene promoter is able largely to reconstitute this tissue-, stage- and sex-specific-expression. This "enhancer" contains a binding site for the DM-domain factor MAB-3, the male-specific repressor of vitellogenesis, as well as an activator site that we show is the direct target of the intestinal GATA factor ELT-2. We further show that the enhancer is directly activated by the winged-helix/forkhead-factor FKH-9, (whose gene has been shown by others to be a direct target of DAF-16), by an unknown activator binding to the MAB-3 site, and by the full C. elegans TGF-β/Sma/Mab pathway acting within the intestine. The vit-2 gene has been shown by others to be repressed by the daf-2/daf-16 insulin signaling pathway, which so strongly influences aging and longevity in C. elegans. We show that the activity of the 44 bp vit-2 enhancer is abolished by loss of daf-2 but is restored by simultaneous loss of daf-16. DAF-2 acts from outside of the intestine but DAF-16 acts both from outside of the intestine and from within the intestine where it binds directly to the same non-canonical target site that interacts with FKH-9. Activity of the 44 bp vit-2 enhancer is also inhibited by loss of the germline, in a manner that is only weakly influenced by DAF-16 but that is strongly influenced by KRI-1, a key downstream effector in the pathway by which germline loss increases C. elegans lifespan. The complex behavior of this enhancer presumably allows vitellogenin gene transcription to adjust to demands of body size, germline proliferation and nutritional state but we suggest that the apparent involvement of this enhancer in aging and longevity "pathways" could be incidental.

  13. Myeloablative radioimmunotherapy with {sup 188}Re-CD66mAb before stem cell transplantation. No increase of proinflammatory cytokine levels of TNF-{alpha}; Myeloablative Radioimmuntherapie mit {sup 188}Re-CD66mAb vor Stammzelltransplantation. Kein Anstieg proinflammatorischer Zytokinspiegel von TNF-{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutschler, J.; Reske, S.N. [Universitaetsklinik Ulm (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Steinbach, G. [Universitaetsklinik Ulm (Germany). Abt. Klinische Chemie; Bunjes, D. [Universitaetsklinik Ulm (Germany). Medizinische Klinik III; Buchmann, I. [Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2009-07-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) serum levels may increase due to intensive conditioning regimes with high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation (TBI) before stem cell transplantation. This increases the risk for developing acute graft versus host disease (aGvHD) after stem cell transplantation. In this prospective study we investigated the influence of radioimmunotherapy with {sup 188}Re-CD-66-mAb on changes on TNF-{alpha} serum levels. Patients, methods: In 18 patients we measured TNF-{alpha} before and up to 96 hours after radioimmunotherapy, in 2 patients in addition following TBI, in 9 patients also following chemotherapy. For measuring TNF-{alpha} we used an automated immunochemiluminescence assay (Immulite 1000 DPC Biermann, Bad Nauheim). The mean follow up period to record incidence of aGVHD was 100 days after stem cell transplantation. Compared to the basal levels before, the levels of TNF-{alpha} after conditioning with {sup 188}Re-CD-66-mAb did not increase significantly and remained in the physiological range. In contrast, these initial physiological cytokine levels increased and became pathological following 48 h after total body irradiation (13.2 {+-} 6.6 pg/ml) and chemotherapy (10.8 {+-} 15.7 pg/ml). In our study we found a low incidence of aGvHD (22.2%, n = 4/18). Conclusion: These results demonstrate that additional conditioning therapy with {sup 188}Re-CD-66-mAb does not increase proinflammatory cytokine levels of TNF-{alpha}. This finding may indicate that additive radioimmunotherapy may not be a significant factor for increasing the rate of conditioning- associated aGvHD. (orig.)

  14. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    , localized changes in Ca(o)(2+) within the ECF can originate from several mechanisms, including fluxes of calcium ions into or out of cellular or extracellular stores or across epithelium that absorb or secrete Ca(2+). In any event, the CaR and other receptors/sensors for Ca(o)(2+) and probably for other extracellular ions represent versatile regulators of numerous cellular functions and may serve as important therapeutic targets.

  15. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may... information required by the Act, the following: (1) The name of the additive “calcium chloride double salt of...

  16. Calcium channels and migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrobon, Daniela

    2013-07-01

    Missense mutations in CACNA1A, the gene that encodes the pore-forming α1 subunit of human voltage-gated Ca(V)2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels, cause a rare form of migraine with aura (familial hemiplegic migraine type 1: FHM1). Migraine is a common disabling brain disorder whose key manifestations are recurrent attacks of unilateral headache that may be preceded by transient neurological aura symptoms. This review, first, briefly summarizes current understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that are believed to underlie migraine headache, migraine aura and the onset of a migraine attack, and briefly describes the localization and function of neuronal Ca(V)2.1 channels in the brain regions that have been implicated in migraine pathogenesis. Then, the review describes and discusses i) the functional consequences of FHM1 mutations on the biophysical properties of recombinant human Ca(V)2.1 channels and native Ca(V)2.1 channels in neurons of knockin mouse models carrying the mild R192Q or severe S218L mutations in the orthologous gene, and ii) the functional consequences of these mutations on neurophysiological processes in the cerebral cortex and trigeminovascular system thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of migraine, and the insights into migraine mechanisms obtained from the functional analysis of these processes in FHM1 knockin mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium channels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Calcium electroporation in three cell lines; a comparison of bleomycin and calcium, calcium compounds, and pulsing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gissel, Hanne; Hojman, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroporation with calcium (calcium electroporation) can induce ATP depletion-associated cellular death. In the clinical setting, the cytotoxic drug bleomycin is currently used with electroporation (electrochemotherapy) for palliative treatment of tumors. Calcium electroporation...... offers several advantages over standard treatment options: calcium is inexpensive and may readily be applied without special precautions, as is the case with cytostatic drugs. Therefore, details on the use of calcium electroporation are essential for carrying out clinical trials comparing calcium...

  18. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download ... also helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin ...

  19. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D do I Need? Amounts of calcium are ...

  20. Mammary-Specific Ablation of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor During Lactation Alters Maternal Calcium Metabolism, Milk Calcium Transport, and Neonatal Calcium Accrual

    OpenAIRE

    Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; VanHouten, Joshua; Dann, Pamela; Bikle, Daniel; Chang, Wenhan; Brown, Edward; Wysolmerski, John

    2013-01-01

    To meet the demands for milk calcium, the lactating mother adjusts systemic calcium and bone metabolism by increasing dietary calcium intake, increasing bone resorption, and reducing renal calcium excretion. As part of this adaptation, the lactating mammary gland secretes PTHrP into the maternal circulation to increase bone turnover and mobilize skeletal calcium stores. Previous data have suggested that, during lactation, the breast relies on the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) to coordinate ...

  1. Vitamin D and Intestinal Calcium Absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Porta, Angela; Mady, Leila J.; Seth, Tanya

    2011-01-01

    The principal function of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis is to increase calcium absorption from the intestine. Calcium is absorbed by both an active transcellular pathway, which is energy dependent, and by a passive paracellular pathway through tight junctions. 1,25Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) the hormonally active form of vitamin D, through its genomic actions, is the major stimulator of active intestinal calcium absorption which involves calcium influx, translocation of calcium throu...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the...

  3. Evolution of the Calcium Paradigm: The Relation between Vitamin D, Serum Calcium and Calcium Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borje E. Christopher Nordin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is the index disease for calcium deficiency, just as rickets/osteomalacia is the index disease for vitamin D deficiency, but there is considerable overlap between them. The common explanation for this overlap is that hypovitaminosis D causes malabsorption of calcium which then causes secondary hyperparathyroidism and is effectively the same thing as calcium deficiency. This paradigm is incorrect. Hypovitaminosis D causes secondary hyperparathyroidism at serum calcidiol levels lower than 60 nmol/L long before it causes malabsorption of calcium because serum calcitriol (which controls calcium absorption is maintained until serum calcidiol falls below 20 nmol/L. This secondary hyperparathyroidism, probably due to loss of a “calcaemic” action of vitamin D on bone first described in 1957, destroys bone and explains why vitamin D insufficiency is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Vitamin D thus plays a central role in the maintenance of the serum (ionised calcium, which is more important to the organism than the preservation of the skeleton. Bone is sacrificed when absorbed dietary calcium does not match excretion through the skin, kidneys and bowel which is why calcium deficiency causes osteoporosis in experimental animals and, by implication, in humans.

  4. Rapid desensitization of mice with anti-FcγRIIb/FcγRIII mAb safely prevents IgG-mediated anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodoun, Marat V; Kucuk, Zeynep Yesim; Strait, Richard T; Krishnamurthy, Durga; Janek, Kevin; Clay, Corey D; Morris, Suzanne C; Finkelman, Fred D

    2013-12-01

    Stimulatory IgG receptors (FcγRs) on bone marrow-derived cells contribute to the pathogenesis of several autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Monoclonal antibodies that block FcγRs might suppress these diseases, but they can induce anaphylaxis. We wanted to determine whether a rapid desensitization approach can safely suppress IgG/FcγR-mediated anaphylaxis. Mice were injected with serially increasing doses of 2.4G2, a rat mAb that blocks the inhibitory FcγR, FcγRIIb, and the stimulatory receptor, FcγRIII. Rectal temperature was used to detect the development of anaphylaxis. Passive and active IgG-mediated anaphylaxis were evaluated in mice that had been rapidly desensitized with 2.4G2 or mock-desensitized in mice in which monocyte/macrophages, basophils, or neutrophils had been depleted or desensitized and in mice in which FcγRI, FcγRIII, and/or FcγRIV had been deleted or blocked. Rapid desensitization with 2.4G2 prevented 2.4G2-induced shock and completely suppressed IgG-mediated anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization of ovalbumin-sensitized mice with 2.4G2 was safer and more effective than rapid desensitization with ovalbumin. 2.4G2 treatment completely blocked FcγRIII and removed most FcγRI and FcγRIV from nucleated peripheral blood cells. Because IgG(2a)-mediated anaphylaxis was partially FcγRI and FcγRIV dependent, the effects of 2.4G2 on FcγRI and FcγRIV were probably crucial for its complete inhibition of IgG(2a)-mediated anaphylaxis. IgG(2a)-mediated anaphylaxis was partially inhibited by depletion or desensitization of monocyte/macrophages, basophils, or neutrophils. IgG-mediated anaphylaxis can be induced by ligation of FcγRI, FcγRIII, or FcγRIV on monocycte/macrophages, basophils, or neutrophils and can be safely suppressed by rapid desensitization with anti-FcγRII/RIII mAb. A similar approach may safely suppress other FcγR-dependent immunopathology. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  5. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizzozero, Julien, E-mail: julien.bizzozero@gmail.com; Scrivener, Karen L.

    2015-10-15

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction.

  6. Development of a MAb-based immunoassay for the simultaneous determination of O,O-diethyl and O,O-dimethyl organophosphorus pesticides in vegetable and fruit samples pretreated with QuEChERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fengchun; Hu, Chunyan; Wang, Huimin; Zhao, Longyu; Yang, Zhengyou

    2015-12-01

    To develop a broad-specificity immunoassay for organophosphorus pesticides (OPs), a broad-specificity monoclonal antibody (MAb) for OPs against a generic hapten, O,O-diethyl O-(3-carboxyphenyl) phosphorothioate with the carboxy group in the meta position of the benzene ring, was produced. Eight haptens were prepared and covalently attached to ovalbumin (OVA) for use as coating antigens, and the optimum coating antigen was selected. Then, a sensitive and broadly class selective competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA) based on the MAb and the optimum coating antigen (hapten H-OVA, possessing an O,O-dimethyl generic structure and linked through a linear spacer arm) was developed and optimized. The MAb developed in this study showed quite different cross-reactivity and selectivity compared to previously produced anti-OPs broad-specificity MAbs. Specifically, the MAb showed high and uniform sensitivity to seven O,O-diethyl OPs and six O,O-dimethyl OPs. With the optimum ciELISA, the IC50 values of the 13 OPs were determined as 23.1∼151.2 ng mL(-1). The average IC50 and coefficient of variation (CV) for the IC50 values of the 13 OPs were 74.6 ng mL(-1) and 33.9%, respectively. For the recovery study, a QuEChERS approach based on dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) was implemented to decrease the matrix effects of vegetable and fruit samples. The recoveries of six representative OPs from the spiked samples ranged from 89.4 to 135.5%; the CV ranged from 3.5 to 15.7%. The ciELISA was also applied to real samples, followed by confirmation with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) analysis. The results demonstrated that the ciELISA is suitable for monitoring OP contamination in vegetable and fruit samples.

  7. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  8. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-09

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  9. Immunoreactivity of the 14F7 Mab (Raised against N-Glycolyl GM3 Ganglioside as a Positive Prognostic Factor in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rancés Blanco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Therefore, numerous studies are focusing on the assessment of other biological and molecular prognostic factors in these tumors. We evaluated the relationship between 14F7 Mab reactivity, pathological features, DNA-content and S-phase fraction (SPF, and their impact in the survival of NSCLC patients. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry optical microscopy assays as well as DNA content and SPF measuring using flow cytometry were performed. The 14F7 reactivity was widely observed in NSCLC sections, no depending of the clinicopathological characteristics. We also obtained differences in the intensity of reaction with 14F7 as well as in the SPF between diploid and aneuploid carcinomas. Patients with diploid tumors showing higher SPF and 14F7 reaction joint to a low mitotic index displayed higher survival rates. Our results are in agreement with the assumption of the possible positive prognostic value of 14F7 staining in NSCLC.

  10. Gevokizumab, an anti-IL-1β mAb for the potential treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiler, Janina; McDermott, Michael F

    2010-12-01

    The inflammatory cytokine IL-1β has an essential role in the innate immune response. High levels of IL-1β have been implicated in the development of many diseases, including type 1 and 2 diabetes (T1D and T2D), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and cardiovascular disease. XOMA is developing gevokizumab (XOMA-052), an IgG2 humanized mAb against human IL-1β, for the potential treatment of these diseases. Gevokizumab has a high affinity for IL-1β and a long t1/2, which would allow for once-monthly dosing and offer a considerable advantage for patients over agents requiring more frequent dosing. Data from preclinical studies and clinical trials suggest that gevokizumab is a potentially effective and well-tolerated treatment for the indicated diseases. At the time of publication, phase II clinical trials were ongoing in patients with T1D, T2D and RA, with the T2D trials assessing key cardiovascular markers. Following promising data from a recent pilot trial, XOMA was also planning a phase I/II trial of gevokizumab for the potential treatment of uveitis in patients with the vasculitic inflammatory disorder Behçet's disease and the autoinflammatory conditions familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome and Muckle-Wells syndrome.

  11. The Role of Biosphere Reserves in Environmental Education and Training = Le Role des reserves de la biosphere dans l'education et la formation environnementales. Report of the Unesco/MAB Symposium Held During the Unesco/UNEP International Congress on Environmental Education and Training (Moscow, USSR, August 17-21, 1987). Report 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, George, Ed.

    Environmental education and training have been key elements of Unesco's Program on Man and the Biosphere (MAB) since its inception in 1971. The MAB Program is an intergovernmental program of research, training, demonstration and distribution of information, aimed at providing the scientific background and the trained personnel to deal with…

  12. The Role of Biosphere Reserves in Environmental Education and Training = Le Role des reserves de la biosphere dans l'education et la formation environnementales. Report of the Unesco/MAB Symposium Held During the Unesco/UNEP International Congress on Environmental Education and Training (Moscow, USSR, August 17-21, 1987). Report 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, George, Ed.

    Environmental education and training have been key elements of Unesco's Program on Man and the Biosphere (MAB) since its inception in 1971. The MAB Program is an intergovernmental program of research, training, demonstration and distribution of information, aimed at providing the scientific background and the trained personnel to deal with…

  13. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005.... Calcium alginate is prepared by the neutralization of purified alginic acid with appropriate pH...

  14. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canillas, M.; Pena, P.; Aza, A.H. de; Rodriguez, M.A.

    2017-07-01

    The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies. (Author)

  15. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion......Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most...

  16. Calcium Orthophosphate Cements and Concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are a bioactive and biodegradable grafting material in the form of a powder and a liquid. Both phases form after mixing a viscous paste that after being implanted, sets and hardens within the body as either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA or brushite, sometimes blended with unreacted particles and other phases. As both CDHA and brushite are remarkably biocompartible and bioresorbable (therefore, in vivo they can be replaced with newly forming bone, calcium orthophosphate cements represent a good correction technique for non-weight-bearing bone fractures or defects and appear to be very promising materials for bone grafting applications. Besides, these cements possess an excellent osteoconductivity, molding capabilities and easy manipulation. Furthermore, reinforced cement formulations are available, which in a certain sense might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The concepts established by calcium orthophosphate cement pioneers in the early 1980s were used as a platform to initiate a new generation of bone substitute materials for commercialization. Since then, advances have been made in the composition, performance and manufacturing; several beneficial formulations have already been introduced as a result. Many other compositions are in experimental stages. In this review, an insight into calcium orthophosphate cements and concretes, as excellent biomaterials suitable for both dental and bone grafting application, has been provided.

  17. Calcium affects on vascular endpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Vaishali B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is one of the most abundant minerals in the body and its metabolism is one of the basic biologic processes in humans. Although historically linked primarily to bone structural development and maintenance, calcium is now recognized as a key component of many physiologic pathways necessary for optimum health including cardiovascular, neurological, endocrine, renal, and gastrointestinal systems. A recent meta-analysis published in August 2011 showed a potential increase in cardiovascular events related to calcium supplementation. The possible mechanism of action of this correlation has not been well elucidated. This topic has generated intense interest due to the widespread use of calcium supplements, particularly among the middle aged and elderly who are at the most risk from cardiac events. Prior studies did not control for potential confounding factors such as the use of statins, aspirin or other medications. These controversial results warrant additional well-designed studies to investigate the relationship between calcium supplementation and cardiovascular outcomes. The purpose of this review is to highlight the current literature in regards to calcium supplementation and cardiovascular health; and to identify areas of future research.

  18. Factors affecting calcium balance in Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jing; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Ailing; Du, Weijing; Wang, Xiaoyan; Hu, Xiaoqi; Ma, Guansheng

    2010-01-01

    Chinese dietary reference intakes (DRIs) for calcium were developed mainly from studies conducted amongst Caucasians, yet a recent review showed that reference calcium intakes for Asians are likely to be different from those of Caucasians (Lee and Jiang, 2008). In order to develop calcium DRIs for Chinese adolescents, it is necessary to explore the characteristics and potential influencing factors of calcium metabolic balance in Chinese adolescents. A total of 80 students (15.1+/-0.8 years) were recruited stratified by gender from a 1-year calcium supplementation study. Subjects were randomly designed to four groups and supplemented with calcium carbonate tablets providing elemental calcium at 63, 354, 660, and 966 mg/day, respectively. Subjects consumed food from a 3-day cycle menu prepared by staff for 10 days. Elemental calcium in samples of foods, feces, and urine was determined in duplicates by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The total calcium intake ranged from 352 to 1323 mg/day. The calcium apparent absorption efficiency and retention in boys were significantly higher than that in girls (68.7% vs. 46.4%, 480 mg/day vs. 204 mg/day, PCalcium retention increased with calcium intakes, but did not reach a plateau. Calcium absorption efficiency in boys increased with calcium intake up to 665 mg/day, and decreased after that. In girls, calcium absorption efficiency decreased with calcium intake. Calcium absorption efficiency increased within 1 year after first spermatorrhea in boys, but decreased with pubertal development in girls. Sex, calcium intake, age, and pubertal development were the most important determinants of calcium absorption (R(2)=0.508, Pcalcium intake, age, and pubertal development are important factors for calcium retention and absorption during growth, which should be considered for the development of calcium DRIs for Chinese adolescents.

  19. The antiatherogenic potential of calcium antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, D B

    1988-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an arterial disease characterized by focal accumulation of collagen, elastin, lipids, and calcium at sites associated with macrophage infiltration and altered smooth muscle metabolic function. Studies in several types of animal models, especially cholesterol-fed rabbits, have shown that calcium competitors, calcium chelators, anticalcifying agents, and calcium channel blockers can reduce the accumulation of atherogenic lesion components and thus apparently decrease the progression of lesions. Although there are some conflicting data in the animal model studies using calcium channel antagonists, as a result of differences in experimental designs, it is now apparent that several classes of calcium channel blockers inhibit the progression of early arterial lesions induced by cholesterol feeding. The dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers appear to be more potent antiatherosclerotic agents than other classes of calcium channel antagonists. Several mechanisms involving regulation of endothelial cell, smooth muscle cell, and macrophage metabolic functions may be responsible for the calcium channel blocker effects on early lesion progression. For example, recent studies in cell culture model systems suggest that calcium channel blockers may significantly alter activities that regulate lipoprotein-derived cholesterol accumulation by cells. Some of these activities are independent of calcium flux across voltage-operated calcium channels. Thus, calcium channel blockers may reduce the progression of atherogenic lesions by a combination of decreasing calcium accumulation within arterial wall cells and by altering calcium-independent metabolic activities.

  20. Mitochondrial calcium uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George S B; Boyman, Liron; Chikando, Aristide C; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Lederer, W J

    2013-06-25

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) uptake into the mitochondrial matrix is critically important to cellular function. As a regulator of matrix Ca(2+) levels, this flux influences energy production and can initiate cell death. If large, this flux could potentially alter intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) signals. Despite years of study, fundamental disagreements on the extent and speed of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake still exist. Here, we review and quantitatively analyze mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake fluxes from different tissues and interpret the results with respect to the recently proposed mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) candidate. This quantitative analysis yields four clear results: (i) under physiological conditions, Ca(2+) influx into the mitochondria via the MCU is small relative to other cytosolic Ca(2+) extrusion pathways; (ii) single MCU conductance is ∼6-7 pS (105 mM [Ca(2+)]), and MCU flux appears to be modulated by [Ca(2+)]i, suggesting Ca(2+) regulation of MCU open probability (P(O)); (iii) in the heart, two features are clear: the number of MCU channels per mitochondrion can be calculated, and MCU probability is low under normal conditions; and (iv) in skeletal muscle and liver cells, uptake per mitochondrion varies in magnitude but total uptake per cell still appears to be modest. Based on our analysis of available quantitative data, we conclude that although Ca(2+) critically regulates mitochondrial function, the mitochondria do not act as a significant dynamic buffer of cytosolic Ca(2+) under physiological conditions. Nevertheless, with prolonged (superphysiological) elevations of [Ca(2+)]i, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake can increase 10- to 1,000-fold and begin to shape [Ca(2+)]i dynamics.

  1. Dopaminergic regulation of dendritic calcium: fast multisite calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Oikonomou, Katerina D; Short, Shaina M; Antic, Srdjan D

    2013-01-01

    Optimal dopamine tone is required for the normal cortical function; however it is still unclear how cortical-dopamine-release affects information processing in individual cortical neurons. Thousands of glutamatergic inputs impinge onto elaborate dendritic trees of neocortical pyramidal neurons. In the process of ensuing synaptic integration (information processing), a variety of calcium transients are generated in remote dendritic compartments. In order to understand the cellular mechanisms of dopaminergic modulation it is important to know whether and how dopaminergic signals affect dendritic calcium transients. In this chapter, we describe a relatively inexpensive method for monitoring dendritic calcium fluctuations at multiple loci across the pyramidal dendritic tree, at the same moment of time (simultaneously). The experiments have been designed to measure the amplitude, time course and spatial extent of action potential-associated dendritic calcium transients before and after application of dopaminergic drugs. In the examples provided here the dendritic calcium transients were evoked by triggering the somatic action potentials (backpropagation-evoked), and puffs of exogenous dopamine were applied locally onto selected dendritic branches.

  2. Formation of calcium complexes by borogluconate in vitro and during calcium borogluconate infusion in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farningham, D A

    1985-07-01

    The effect of borogluconate on plasma calcium fractions was studied in vitro and in vivo in sheep. In vitro calcium chloride was more effective in raising ionised plasma calcium than calcium borogluconate. Sodium borate or gluconate added to blood caused only small decreases in blood ionised calcium. However, together, a synergistic reduction in ionised calcium was observed. Following calcium borogluconate infusions into sheep, total plasma calcium rose primarily because of an increase in the unionised ultrafiltrable fraction. Other changes observed following the infusion were hypercalciuria, decreased glomerular filtration rate and acidosis. Sodium borogluconate administered subcutaneously lowered total plasma calcium. This probably resulted from enhanced calcium excretion. It is suggested that since the anionic component of calcium solutions alters the availability and retention of calcium, it is likely to affect clinical efficacy significantly.

  3. Calcium wave of tubuloglomerular feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2006-08-01

    ATP release from macula densa (MD) cells into the interstitium of the juxtaglomerular (JG) apparatus (JGA) is an integral component of the tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) mechanism that controls the glomerular filtration rate. Because the cells of the JGA express a number of calcium-coupled purinergic receptors, these studies tested the hypothesis that TGF activation triggers a calcium wave that spreads from the MD toward distant cells of the JGA and glomerulus. Ratiometric calcium imaging of in vitro microperfused isolated JGA-glomerulus complex dissected from rabbits was performed with fluo-4/fura red and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Activation of TGF by increasing tubular flow rate at the MD rapidly produced a significant elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in extraglomerular mesangial cells (by 187.6 +/- 45.1 nM) and JG renin granular cells (by 281.4 +/- 66.6 nM). Subsequently, cell-to-cell propagation of the calcium signal at a rate of 12.6 +/- 1.1 microm/s was observed upstream toward proximal segments of the afferent arteriole and adjacent glomeruli, as well as toward intraglomerular elements including the most distant podocytes (5.9 +/- 0.4 microm/s). The same calcium wave was observed in nonperfusing glomeruli, causing vasoconstriction and contractions of the glomerular tuft. Gap junction uncoupling, an ATP scavenger enzyme cocktail, and pharmacological inhibition of P(2) purinergic receptors, but not adenosine A(1) receptor blockade, abolished the changes in [Ca(2+)](i) and propagation of the calcium wave. These studies provided evidence that both gap junctional communication and extracellular ATP are integral components of the TGF calcium wave.

  4. [Calcium metabolism characteristics in microgravity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'ev, A I; Larina, I M; Morukov, B V

    1999-06-01

    The results of research of calcium exchange parameters at cosmonauts taken part in long space flights (SF) onboard of orbital stations "SALUT" and "MIR" within 1978-1998 were generalized. The analysis of data received during observation of 44 cosmonauts (18 of them have taken part in long SF twice) was done. The observation was carried out before and after SF by duration 30-438 days. The content of a total calcium in blood serum was increased basically by the increase of its ionized fraction after flights of moderate (3-6 months) and large duration (6-14 months) along with the significant increase of PTH and decrease of calcitonin levels. The content of osteocalcin after SF was increased. Three cosmonauts participated in research of calcium kinetics using stable isotopes before, in time and after a 115-day SF. Reduction of intestinal absorption, excretion through a gastrointestinal tract, and increase of calcium excretion with urine were marked in time of SF. In early postflight period a level of intestinal absorption, on the average, was much lower than in SF, and the calcium removal through intestine was increased. Both renal and intestinal excretion of calcium were not normalized in 3.5-4.5 months after end of SF. Increase of resorbtive processes in bone tissues which induced negative bone balance during flight was observed in all test subjects, proceeding from estimations of speed of the basic calcium flows made on the basis of mathematical modeling. The conclusion about decrease in speed of bone tissue remodeling and strengthening of its resorption proves to be true by data of research of biochemical and endocrine markers.

  5. Calcium supplement: humanity's double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyaratavej, Narong; Buranasinsup, Shutipen

    2011-10-01

    The principle aim of the present study is to investigate the dark side of calcium, pollutions in calcium preparation especially lead (Pb), mercury (Hg) and cadmium (Cd). The collected samples were the different calcium salts in the market and 18 preparations which were classified into 3 groups: Calcium carbonate salts, Chelated calcium and natural-raw calcium. All samples were analyzed for lead, cadmium and mercury by inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique, in house method based on AOAC (2005) 999.10 by ICP-MS. The calcium carbonate and the natural-raw calcium in every sample contained lead at 0.023-0.407 mg/kg of calcium powder. Meanwhile, the natural-raw calcium such as oyster, coral and animal bone showed amount of lead at 0.106-0.384 mg/kg with small amounts of mercury and cadmium. The chelated calcium such as calcium gluconate, calcium lactate and calcium citrate are free of lead.

  6. Crystal structure of the complex mAb 17.2 and the C-terminal region of Trypanosoma cruzi P2β protein: implications in cross-reactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Pizarro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Chronic Chagas' Heart Disease possess high levels of antibodies against the carboxyl-terminal end of the ribosomal P2ß protein of Trypanosoma cruzi (TcP2ß. These antibodies, as well as the murine monoclonal antibody (mAb 17.2, recognize the last 13 amino acids of TcP2ß (called the R13 epitope: EEEDDDMGFGLFD and are able to cross-react with, and stimulate, the ß1 adrenergic receptor (ß1-AR. Indeed, the mAb 17.2 was able to specifically detect human β1-AR, stably transfected into HEK cells, by flow cytometry and to induce repolarisation abnormalities and first degree atrioventricular conduction block after passive transfer to naïve mice. To study the structural basis of this cross-reactivity, we determined the crystal structure of the Fab region of the mAb 17.2 alone at 2.31 Å resolution and in complex with the R13 peptide at 1.89 Å resolution. We identified as key contact residues on R13 peptide Glu3, Asp6 and Phe9 as was previously shown by alanine scanning. Additionally, we generated a model of human β1-AR to elucidate the interaction with anti-R13 antibodies. These data provide an understanding of the molecular basis of cross-reactive antibodies induced by chronic infection with Trypanosoma cruzi.

  7. Serial coupling of ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography to determine aggregation levels in mAbs in the presence of a proteinaceous excipient, recombinant human serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbjerg, Paul Luigi Gargani; Caspersen, Mikael Bjerg; Cook, Ken; Van De Weert, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Aggregation levels of therapeutic proteins may be difficult to determine in mixtures containing other proteinaceous excipients. We performed a feasibility study of using serial coupling of an anion exchange and size exclusion column to determine the aggregation levels of four different model monoclonal antibodies (mAb) mixed with the model proteinaceous excipient recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA). For three of the four mAbs suitable elution conditions could be established. From the limitations imposed by the pI of the rHSA, the pI of the mAb and the nature of the columns used, it was possible to propose a set of general conditions that allows quantification of the aggregation level of a therapeutic protein in the presence of a proteinaceous excipient: The excipient protein and protein of interest should differ in pI by a minimum of 0.5 units, and the pI of the protein of interest should not be higher than ca. 8.5.

  8. The effect of variable calcium and very low calcium diets on human calcium metabolism. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of a very low calcium diet, with variable high and low protein intake, on the dynamics of calcium metabolism and the mechanism of calciuretics, are examined. The experiment, using male subjects, was designed to study the role of intestinal calcium absorption on urinary calcium excretion, and the rate of production of endogeneously secreted calcium in the gastrointestinal tract. The study showed an average of 70% fractional absorption rate during very low calcium intake, and that a decrease in renal tubular reabsorption of calcium is responsible for calciuretic effects of high protein intake. The study also indicates that there is a tendency to develop osteoporosis after long periods of low calcium intake, especially with a concurrent high protein intake.

  9. Vitamin D and intestinal calcium absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Porta, Angela; Mady, Leila J; Seth, Tanya

    2011-12-05

    The principal function of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis is to increase calcium absorption from the intestine. Calcium is absorbed by both an active transcellular pathway, which is energy dependent, and by a passive paracellular pathway through tight junctions. 1,25Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) the hormonally active form of vitamin D, through its genomic actions, is the major stimulator of active intestinal calcium absorption which involves calcium influx, translocation of calcium through the interior of the enterocyte and basolateral extrusion of calcium by the intestinal plasma membrane pump. This article reviews recent studies that have challenged the traditional model of vitamin D mediated transcellular calcium absorption and the crucial role of specific calcium transport proteins in intestinal calcium absorption. There is also increasing evidence that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) can enhance paracellular calcium diffusion. The influence of estrogen, prolactin, glucocorticoids and aging on intestinal calcium absorption and the role of the distal intestine in vitamin D mediated intestinal calcium absorption are also discussed.

  10. The effect of calcium gluconate and other calcium supplements as a dietary calcium source on magnesium absorption in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonan, O; Takahashi, R; Yasui, H; Watanuki, M

    1997-01-01

    The effects of commercially available calcium supplements (calcium carbonate, calcium gluconate, oyster shell preparation and bovine bone preparation) and gluconic acid on the absorption of calcium and magnesium were evaluated for 30 days in male Wistar rats. There were no differences in the apparent absorption ratio of calcium among rats fed each calcium supplement; however, the rats fed the calcium gluconate diet had a higher apparent absorption ratio of magnesium than the rats fed the other calcium supplements. Dietary gluconic acid also more markedly stimulated magnesium absorption than the calcium carbonate diet, and the bone (femur and tibia) magnesium contents of rats fed the gluconic acid diet were significantly higher than those of the rats fed the calcium carbonate diet. Furthermore, the weight of cecal tissue and the concentrations of acetic acid and butyric acid in cecal digesta of rats fed the calcium gluconate diet or the gluconic acid diet were significantly increased. We speculate that the stimulation of magnesium absorption in rats fed the calcium gluconate diet is a result of the gluconic acid component and the effect of gluconic acid on magnesium absorption probably results from cecal hypertrophy, magnesium solubility in the large intestine and the effects of volatile fatty acids on magnesium absorption.

  11. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry eSamigullin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 рА and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 µM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  12. Calcium fertilization increases the concentration of calcium in sapwood and calcium oxalate in foliage of red spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle; Jon H. Connolly; Rakesh Minocha; Jody Jellison

    2009-01-01

    Calcium cycling plays a key role in the health and productivity of red spruce forests in the northeastern US. A portion of the flowpath of calcium within forests includes translocation as Ca2+ in sapwood and accumulation as crystals of calcium oxalate in foliage. Concentrations of Ca in these tree tissues have been used as markers of...

  13. Calcium release from experimental dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okulus, Zuzanna; Buchwald, Tomasz; Voelkel, Adam

    2016-11-01

    The calcium release from calcium phosphate-containing experimental dental restorative materials was examined. The possible correlation of ion release with initial calcium content, solubility and degree of curing (degree of conversion) of examined materials was also investigated. Calcium release was measured with the use of an ion-selective electrode in an aqueous solution. Solubility was established by the weighing method. Raman spectroscopy was applied for the determination of the degree of conversion, while initial calcium content was examined with the use of energy-dispersive spectroscopy. For examined materials, the amount of calcium released was found to be positively correlated with solubility and initial calcium content. It was also found that the degree of conversion does not affect the ability of these experimental composites to release calcium ions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanism of store-operated calcium entry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devkanya Dutta

    2000-12-01

    Activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/IP3 signalling pathway results in a rapid release of calcium from its intracellular stores, eventually leading to depletion of these stores. Calcium store depletion triggers an influx of extracellular calcium across the plasma membrane, a mechanism known as the store-operated calcium entry or capacitative calcium entry. Capacitative calcium current plays a key role in replenishing calcium stores and activating various physiological processes. Despite considerable efforts, very little is known about the molecular nature of the capacitative channel and the signalling pathway that activates it. This review summarizes our current knowledge about store operated calcium entry and suggests possible hypotheses for its mode of activation.

  15. The ins and outs of mitochondrial calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Toren; Menazza, Sara; Holmström, Kira M; Parks, Randi J; Liu, Julia; Sun, Junhui; Liu, Jie; Pan, Xin; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2015-05-22

    Calcium is thought to play an important role in regulating mitochondrial function. Evidence suggests that an increase in mitochondrial calcium can augment ATP production by altering the activity of calcium-sensitive mitochondrial matrix enzymes. In contrast, the entry of large amounts of mitochondrial calcium in the setting of ischemia-reperfusion injury is thought to be a critical event in triggering cellular necrosis. For many decades, the details of how calcium entered the mitochondria remained a biological mystery. In the past few years, significant progress has been made in identifying the molecular components of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex. Here, we review how calcium enters and leaves the mitochondria, the growing insight into the topology, stoichiometry and function of the uniporter complex, and the early lessons learned from some initial mouse models that genetically perturb mitochondrial calcium homeostasis.

  16. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and calcium sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrgan, Monija; Nielsen, Sanne; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a lifelong, benign autosomal dominant disease characterized by hypercalcemia, normal to increased parathyroid hormone level, and a relatively low renal calcium excretion. Inactivation of the calcium-sensing receptor in heterozygous patients results in...

  17. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Health Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download ... also helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin ...

  18. Decalcification of calcium polycarbophil in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, T; Saito, T; Takahara, E; Nagata, O; Tamai, I; Tsuji, A

    1997-03-01

    The in vivo decalcification of calcium polycarbophil was examined. The decalcification ratio of [45Ca]calcium polycarbophil in the stomach after oral dosing to rats was more than 70% at each designated time and quite closely followed in the in vitro decalcification curve, indicating that the greater part of the calcium ion is released from calcium polycarbophil under normal gastric acidic conditions. The residual radioactivity in rat gastrointestine was nearly equal to that after oral administration of either [45Ca]calcium chloride + polycarbophil. The serum level of radioactivity was nearly equal to that after oral dosing of [45Ca]calcium lactate. These results indicate that the greater part of orally administered calcium polycarbophil released calcium ions to produce polycarbophil in vivo.

  19. Calcium regulation in endosymbiotic organelles of plants

    OpenAIRE

    Bussemer, Johanna; Vothknecht, Ute C.; Chigri, Fatima

    2009-01-01

    In plant cells calcium-dependent signaling pathways are involved in a large array of biological processes in response to hormones, biotic/abiotic stress signals and a variety of developmental cues. This is generally achieved through binding of calcium to diverse calcium-sensing proteins, which subsequently control downstream events by activating or inhibiting biochemical reactions. Regulation by calcium is considered as a eukaryotic trait and has not been described for prokaryotes. Neverthele...

  20. Variable efficacy of calcium carbonate tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrin, S M; Goldstein, S J; Shangraw, R F; Raja, R M

    1989-12-01

    Orally administered calcium carbonate tablets are commonly prescribed as a calcium supplement and for their phosphate-binding effects in renal failure patients. Two cases are reported in which a commercially available brand of calcium carbonate tablets appeared to be ineffective. Formal investigation of the bioavailability of this product revealed it to have impaired disintegration and dissolution and a lack of clinical efficacy. Recommendations that will enable physicians to avoid prescribing and pharmacists to avoid dispensing ineffective calcium carbonate tablets are proposed.

  1. Calcium channel blockers and Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Tan; Yulin Deng; Hong Qing

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by two pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofi-brillary tangles. In addition, calcium homeostasis is disrupted in the course of human aging. Recent research shows that dense plaques can cause functional alteration of calcium signals in mice with Alzheimer's disease. Calcium channel blockers are effective therapeutics for treating Alzheimer's disease. This review provides an overview of the current research of calcium channel blockers in-volved in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

  2. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  3. 21 CFR 582.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium ascorbate. 582.3189 Section 582.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL....3189 Calcium ascorbate. (a) Product. Calcium ascorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  4. 21 CFR 182.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium ascorbate. 182.3189 Section 182.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Calcium ascorbate. (a) Product. Calcium ascorbate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 582.7187 - Calcium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 582.7187 Section 582.7187 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium alginate. (a) Product. Calcium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  6. Lactulose stimulates calcium absorption in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, E.G.H.M. van den; Muijs, T.; Dokkum, W. van; Schaafsma, G.

    1999-01-01

    Animal studies have indicated that calcium absorption is increased by lactulose, a synthetic disaccharide. Therefore, the influence of lactulose on calcium absorption was measured in postmenopausal women who may benefit from the possible enhancing effect of lactulose on calcium absorption. Twelve

  7. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.5217 Section 582.5217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  8. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  9. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  10. Abnormalities of serum calcium and magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neonatal hypocalcemia is defined as a total serum calcium concentration of <7 mg/dL or an ionized calcium concentration of <4 mg/dL (1mmol/L). In very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, ionized calcium values of 0.8 to 1 mmol/L are common and not usually associated with clinical symptoms. In larger in...

  11. Acute calcium homeostasis in MHS swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, G G; Morrell, D F; Brain, V; Jaros, G G

    1987-07-01

    To elucidate a pathogenesis for the reduction in bone calcium content observed in MHS individuals, we studied the acute calcium homeostasis of MHS swine. This was achieved by the serial measurement, with a calcium selective electrode, of calcium transients in Landrace MHS (five) and control Landrace/large white cross MH negative (five) swine following IV bolus injection of calcium gluconate 0.1 mmol X kg-1--a dose which induced an acute 45 per cent increase in plasma ionised calcium. Experimental animals were anaesthetised with ketamine 10 mg X kg-1 IM, thiopentone (intermittent divided doses) 15-25 mg X kg-1 (total) IV and N2O/O2 (FIO2 0.3) by IPPV to maintain a normal blood gas, acid/base state. The plasma ionised calcium decay curve observed in MHS swine did not differ from that of control normal swine. Further it was noted that the induced acute rise in plasma ionised calcium failed to trigger the MH syndrome in any MHS swine. It is concluded that the mechanisms of acute calcium homeostasis in MHS swine are normal. An explanation for the reduction in bone calcium content observed in MHS individuals must be sought, therefore, through study of the slow long-term component of the calcium regulatory process. In addition, the conventional strictures placed on the use, in MHS patients, of calcium gluconate are called in question.

  12. 21 CFR 582.6219 - Calcium phytate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phytate. 582.6219 Section 582.6219 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium phytate. (a) Product. Calcium phytate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  13. Multifaceted Role of Calcium in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarode, Gargi S; Sarode, Sachin C; Patil, Shankargouda

    2017-01-01

    Role of calcium in bone remodeling and tooth remineral-ization is well known. However, calcium also plays a very imperative role in many biochemical reactions, which are essential for normal functioning of cells. The calcium associated tissue homeostasis encompasses activities like proliferation, cell death, cell motility, oxygen, and nutrient supply.

  14. Lactulose stimulates calcium absorption in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, E.G.H.M. van den; Muijs, T.; Dokkum, W. van; Schaafsma, G.

    1999-01-01

    Animal studies have indicated that calcium absorption is increased by lactulose, a synthetic disaccharide. Therefore, the influence of lactulose on calcium absorption was measured in postmenopausal women who may benefit from the possible enhancing effect of lactulose on calcium absorption. Twelve po

  15. Predictive value of derived calcium figures based on the measurement of ionised calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, M D; Dryburgh, F J; Fyffe, J A; Jenkins, A S

    1981-03-01

    The algorithms used in this hospital to assess calcium status are calculated ionised serum calcium and the serum calcium concentration adjusted for albumin. In order to establish their clinical usefulness, they were compared with the ionised calcium concentration measured on the Nova 2 instrument in patients with various calcium and protein abnormalities. Good correlation was found between the measured and calculated values. The predictive values for the calculated results and for total serum calcium concentrations are presented. In this series, the derived values were useful in predicting the serum ionised calcium concentration of the patients studied.

  16. Calcium Orthophosphate-Based Bioceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Various types of grafts have been traditionally used to restore damaged bones. In the late 1960s, a strong interest was raised in studying ceramics as potential bone grafts due to their biomechanical properties. A bit later, such synthetic biomaterials were called bioceramics. In principle, bioceramics can be prepared from diverse materials but this review is limited to calcium orthophosphate-based formulations only, which possess the specific advantages due to the chemical similarity to mammalian bones and teeth. During the past 40 years, there have been a number of important achievements in this field. Namely, after the initial development of bioceramics that was just tolerated in the physiological environment, an emphasis was shifted towards the formulations able to form direct chemical bonds with the adjacent bones. Afterwards, by the structural and compositional controls, it became possible to choose whether the calcium orthophosphate-based implants remain biologically stable once incorporated into the skeletal structure or whether they were resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of regenerative bioceramics was developed and such formulations became an integrated part of the tissue engineering approach. Now calcium orthophosphate scaffolds are designed to induce bone formation and vascularization. These scaffolds are often porous and harbor different biomolecules and/or cells. Therefore, current biomedical applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics include bone augmentations, artificial bone grafts, maxillofacial reconstruction, spinal fusion, periodontal disease repairs and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Perspective future applications comprise drug delivery and tissue engineering purposes because calcium orthophosphates appear to be promising carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and various types of cells.

  17. Apical entry channels in calcium-transporting epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ji-Bin; Brown, Edward M; Hediger, Matthias A

    2003-08-01

    The identification of the apical calcium channels CaT1 and ECaC revealed the key molecular mechanisms underlying apical calcium entry in calcium-transporting epithelia. These channels are regulated directly or indirectly by vitamin D and dietary calcium and undergo feedback control by intracellular calcium, suggesting their rate-limiting roles in transcellular calcium transport.

  18. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization.

  19. Calcium regulation in endosymbiotic organelles of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussemer, Johanna; Vothknecht, Ute C; Chigri, Fatima

    2009-09-01

    In plant cells calcium-dependent signaling pathways are involved in a large array of biological processes in response to hormones, biotic/abiotic stress signals and a variety of developmental cues. This is generally achieved through binding of calcium to diverse calcium-sensing proteins, which subsequently control downstream events by activating or inhibiting biochemical reactions. Regulation by calcium is considered as a eukaryotic trait and has not been described for prokaryotes. Nevertheless, there is increasing evidence indicating that organelles of prokaryotic origin, such as chloroplasts and mitochondria, are integrated into the calcium-signaling network of the cell. An important transducer of calcium in these organelles appears to be calmodulin. In this review we want to give an overview over present data showing that endosymbiotic organelles harbour calcium-dependent biological processes with a focus on calmodulin-regulation.

  20. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX....... Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon......)-sensitive fast Na(+) spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers...

  1. Store-operated calcium signaling in neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Regina A; Lowell, Clifford A

    2015-10-01

    Calcium signals in neutrophils are initiated by a variety of cell-surface receptors, including formyl peptide and other GPCRs, FcRs, and integrins. The predominant pathway by which calcium enters immune cells is termed SOCE, whereby plasma membrane CRAC channels allow influx of extracellular calcium into the cytoplasm when intracellular ER stores are depleted. The identification of 2 key families of SOCE regulators, STIM calcium "sensors" and ORAI calcium channels, has allowed for genetic manipulation of SOCE pathways and provided valuable insight into the molecular mechanism of calcium signaling in immune cells, including neutrophils. This review focuses on our current knowledge of the molecules involved in neutrophil SOCE and how study of these molecules has further informed our understanding of the role of calcium signaling in neutrophil activation.

  2. Drosophila mushroom body Kenyon cells generate spontaneous calcium transients mediated by PLTX-sensitive calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M; Su, Hailing; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2005-07-01

    Spontaneous calcium oscillations in mushroom bodies of late stage pupal and adult Drosophila brains have been implicated in memory consolidation during olfactory associative learning. This study explores the cellular mechanisms regulating calcium dynamics in Kenyon cells, principal neurons in mushroom bodies. Fura-2 imaging shows that Kenyon cells cultured from late stage Drosophila pupae generate spontaneous calcium transients in a cell autonomous fashion, at a frequency similar to calcium oscillations in vivo (10-20/h). The expression of calcium transients is up regulated during pupal development. Although the ability to generate transients is a property intrinsic to Kenyon cells, transients can be modulated by bath application of nicotine and GABA. Calcium transients are blocked, and baseline calcium levels reduced, by removal of external calcium, addition of cobalt, or addition of Plectreurys toxin (PLTX), an insect-specific calcium channel antagonist. Transients do not require calcium release from intracellular stores. Whole cell recordings reveal that the majority of voltage-gated calcium channels in Kenyon cells are PLTX-sensitive. Together these data show that influx of calcium through PLTX-sensitive voltage-gated calcium channels mediates spontaneous calcium transients and regulates basal calcium levels in cultured Kenyon cells. The data also suggest that these calcium transients represent cellular events underlying calcium oscillations in the intact mushroom bodies. However, spontaneous calcium transients are not unique to Kenyon cells as they are present in approximately 60% of all cultured central brain neurons. This suggests the calcium transients play a more general role in maturation or function of adult brain neurons.

  3. Calcium channel antagonists in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosioni, E; Borghi, C

    1989-02-01

    The clinical usefulness of calcium entry-blockers for the treatment of high blood pressure is related to their capacity to act upon the primary hemodynamic derangement in hypertension: the increased peripheral vascular resistance. They can be used alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents for the treatment of various forms of hypertensive disease. The calcium entry-blockers appear to be the most useful agents for the treatment of hypertension in the elderly and for the treatment of hypertension associated with ischemic heart disease, pulmonary obstructive disease, peripheral vascular disease, and supraventricular arrhythmias. They are effective in reducing blood pressure in pregnancy-associated hypertension and must be considered as first-line therapy for the treatment of hypertensive crisis.

  4. The calcium-alkali syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo, Mariangeli; Fenves, Andrew Z.; Emmett, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The milk-alkali syndrome was a common cause of hypercalcemia, metabolic alkalosis, and renal failure in the early 20th century. It was caused by the ingestion of large quantities of milk and absorbable alkali to treat peptic ulcer disease. The syndrome virtually vanished after introduction of histamine-2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors. More recently, a similar condition called the calcium-alkali syndrome has emerged as a common cause of hypercalcemia and alkalosis. It is usually caused b...

  5. Calcium phosphate polymer hybrid materials

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) is of strong interest to the medical field because of its potential for bone repair, gene transfection, etc.1-3 Nowadays, the majority of the commercially available materials are fabricated via “classical” materials science approaches, i.e. via high temperature or high pressure approaches, from rather poorly defined slurries, or from organic solvents.3,4 Precipitation of inorganics with (polymeric) additives from aqueous solution on the other hand enables the synthesis...

  6. CCN3 and calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chang Long

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The CCN family of genes consists presently of six members in human (CCN1-6 also known as Cyr61 (Cystein rich 61, CTGF (Connective Tissue Growth Factor, NOV (Nephroblastoma Overexpressed gene, WISP-1, 2 and 3 (Wnt-1 Induced Secreted Proteins. Results obtained over the past decade have indicated that CCN proteins are matricellular proteins, which are involved in the regulation of various cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, adhesion and migration. The CCN proteins have recently emerged as regulatory factors involved in both internal and external cell signaling. CCN3 was reported to physically interact with fibulin-1C, integrins, Notch and S100A4. Considering that, the conformation and biological activity of these proteins are dependent upon calcium binding, we hypothesized that CCN3 might be involved in signaling pathways mediated by calcium ions. In this article, we review the data showing that CCN3 regulates the levels of intracellular calcium and discuss potential models that may account for the biological effects of CCN3.

  7. Store-Operated Calcium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakriya, Murali; Lewis, Richard S

    2015-10-01

    Store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) are a major pathway for calcium signaling in virtually all metozoan cells and serve a wide variety of functions ranging from gene expression, motility, and secretion to tissue and organ development and the immune response. SOCs are activated by the depletion of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), triggered physiologically through stimulation of a diverse set of surface receptors. Over 15 years after the first characterization of SOCs through electrophysiology, the identification of the STIM proteins as ER Ca(2+) sensors and the Orai proteins as store-operated channels has enabled rapid progress in understanding the unique mechanism of store-operate calcium entry (SOCE). Depletion of Ca(2+) from the ER causes STIM to accumulate at ER-plasma membrane (PM) junctions where it traps and activates Orai channels diffusing in the closely apposed PM. Mutagenesis studies combined with recent structural insights about STIM and Orai proteins are now beginning to reveal the molecular underpinnings of these choreographic events. This review describes the major experimental advances underlying our current understanding of how ER Ca(2+) depletion is coupled to the activation of SOCs. Particular emphasis is placed on the molecular mechanisms of STIM and Orai activation, Orai channel properties, modulation of STIM and Orai function, pharmacological inhibitors of SOCE, and the functions of STIM and Orai in physiology and disease.

  8. Kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate formation from tricalcium aluminate, calcium sulfate and calcium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xuerun, E-mail: xuerunli@163.com; Zhang, Yu; Shen, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdshen@njut.edu.cn; Wang, Qianqian; Pan, Zhigang

    2014-01-15

    The formation kinetics of tricalcium aluminate (C{sub 3}A) and calcium sulfate yielding calcium sulfoaluminate (C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$) and the decomposition kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate were investigated by sintering a mixture of synthetic C{sub 3}A and gypsum. The quantitative analysis of the phase composition was performed by X-ray powder diffraction analysis using the Rietveld method. The results showed that the formation reaction 3Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} + CaSO{sub 4} → Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}(SO{sub 4}) + 6CaO was the primary reaction < 1350 °C with and activation energy of 231 ± 42 kJ/mol; while the decomposition reaction 2Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}(SO{sub 4}) + 10CaO → 6Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} + 2SO{sub 2} ↑ + O{sub 2} ↑ primarily occurred beyond 1350 °C with an activation energy of 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. The optimal formation region for C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$ was from 1150 °C to 1350 °C and from 6 h to 1 h, which could provide useful information on the formation of C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$ containing clinkers. The Jander diffusion model was feasible for the formation and decomposition of calcium sulfoaluminate. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} were the diffusive species in both the formation and decomposition reactions. -- Highlights: •Formation and decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate were studied. •Decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate combined CaO and yielded C{sub 3}A. •Activation energy for formation was 231 ± 42 kJ/mol. •Activation energy for decomposition was 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. •Both the formation and decomposition were controlled by diffusion.

  9. —Part I. Interaction of Calcium and Copper-Calcium Alloy with Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaikov, Yurii P.; Batukhtin, Victor P.; Shurov, Nikolay I.; Ivanovskii, Leonid E.; Suzdaltsev, Andrey V.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the interaction between calcium and molten CaCl2 and the solubility of calcium in this melt, depending on the calcium content in the copper-calcium alloy that comes in contact with the molten CaCl2. The negative influence of the dissolved calcium on the current efficiency was verified. The negative effects of moisture and CaO impurities on the calcium current efficiency were demonstrated. The dependence of the current efficiency and the purity of the metal obtained by the electrolysis conditions were studied in a laboratory electrolyzer (20 to 80 A).

  10. Autogenous vein graft thrombosis following exposure to calcium-free solutions (calcium paradox).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozick, J H; Farnsworth, P; Montefusco, C M; Parsonnet, V; Ruigrok, T J; Zimmerman, A N

    1981-01-01

    The morphological and functional effects of calcium-free and calcium-containing solutions on canine jugular vein intima were examined under conditions which closely resemble those techniques currently employed in peripheral vascular and aortocoronary bypass surgery. Veins that had been exposed only to calcium-containing solutions remained patent for the duration of the experimental period. Vein perfusion with a calcium-free solution, however, resulted in disruption of the jugular vein intima once calcium ions were reintroduced. Autogenous as a femoral arterial graft became thrombosed within 60 minutes. It is therefore suggested that vein grafts of autogenous origin be irrigated with calcium-containing solutions to prevent intimal damage and thrombosis.

  11. Calcium channel as a potential anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriazhev, L

    2009-11-01

    Anticancer treatment in modern clinical practices includes chemotherapy and radiation therapy with or without surgical interventions. Efficiency of both methods varies greatly depending on cancer types and stages. Besides, chemo- and radiotherapy are toxic and damaging that causes serious side effects. This fact prompts the search for alternative methods of antitumor therapy. It is well known that prolonged or high increase of intracellular calcium concentration inevitably leads to the cell death via apoptosis or necrosis. However, stimulation of cell calcium level by chemical agents is hardly achievable because cells have very sophisticated machinery for maintaining intracellular calcium in physiological ranges. This obstacle can be overridden, nevertheless. It was found that calcium channels in so called calcium cells in land snails are directly regulated by extracellular calcium concentration. The higher the concentration the higher the calcium intake is through the channels. Bearing in mind that extracellular/intracellular calcium concentration ratio in human beings is 10,000-12,000 fold the insertion of the channel into cancer cells would lead to fast and uncontrollable by the cells calcium intake and cell death. Proteins composing the channel may be extracted from plasma membrane of calcium cells and sequenced by mass-spectrometry or N-terminal sequencing. Either proteins or corresponding genes could be used for targeted delivery into cancer cells.

  12. The Role of Calcium in Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, C. D.; Sanchez, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Calcium requirements may vary throughout the lifespan. During the growth years and up to age 25 to 30, it is important to maximize dietary intake of calcium to maintain positive calcium balance and achieve peak bone mass, thereby possibly decreasing the risk of fracture when bone is subsequently lost. Calcium intake need not be greater than 800 mg/day during the relatively short period of time between the end of bone building and the onset of bone loss (30 to 40 years). Starting at age 40 to 50, both men and women lose bone slowly, but women lose bone more rapidly around the menopause and for about 10 years after. Intestinal calcium absorption and the ability to adapt to low calcium diets are impaired in many postmenopausal women and elderly persons owing to a suspected functional or absolute decrease in the ability of the kidney to produce 1,25(OH)2D2. The bones then become more and more a source of calcium to maintain critical extracellular fluid calcium levels. Excessive dietary intake of protein and fiber may induce significant negative calcium balance and thus increase dietary calcium requirements. Generally, the strongest risk factors for osteoporosis are uncontrollable (e.g., sex, age, and race) or less controllable (e.g., disease and medications). However, several factors such as diet, physical activity, cigarette smoking, and alcohol use are lifestyle related and can be modified to help reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

  13. Vitamin D-enhanced duodenal calcium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongdee, Kannikar; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2015-01-01

    For humans and rodents, duodenum is a very important site of calcium absorption since it is exposed to ionized calcium released from dietary complexes by gastric acid. Calcium traverses the duodenal epithelium via both transcellular and paracellular pathways in a vitamin D-dependent manner. After binding to the nuclear vitamin D receptor, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] upregulates the expression of several calcium transporter genes, e.g., TRPV5/6, calbindin-D9k, plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase1b, and NCX1, thereby enhancing the transcellular calcium transport. This action has been reported to be under the regulation of parathyroid-kidney-intestinal and bone-kidney-intestinal axes, in which the plasma calcium and fibroblast growth factor-23 act as negative feedback regulators, respectively. 1,25(OH)2D3 also modulates the expression of tight junction-related genes and convective water flow, presumably to increase the paracellular calcium permeability and solvent drag-induced calcium transport. However, vitamin D-independent calcium absorption does exist and plays an important role in calcium homeostasis under certain conditions, particularly in neonatal period, pregnancy, and lactation as well as in naturally vitamin D-impoverished subterranean mammals.

  14. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bading Hilmar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events.

  15. Fortification of all-purpose wheat-flour tortillas with calcium lactate, calcium carbonate, or calcium citrate is acceptable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchik-Cerpovicz, Joelle E; McKemie, Rebecca J

    2007-03-01

    Fortification helps provide adequate nutrients for individuals not meeting daily needs. Foods may be fortified with calcium to assist individuals with lactose intolerance and others preferring not to consume traditional forms of dairy. This study examined the quality of all-purpose wheat-flour tortillas fortified with calcium lactate, calcium carbonate, or calcium citrate. These tortillas were compared to similarly prepared nonfortified flour tortillas (control) and commercial nonfortified flour tortillas. Calcium-fortified tortillas contained 114 mg elemental calcium per standard serving (48 g tortilla), an 8.6-fold increase compared to nonfortified tortillas. Moisture contents and rollabilities of all tortillas were similar. Consumers (N=87) evaluated each tortilla in duplicate using a hedonic scale and reported liking the appearance, texture, flavor, aftertaste, and overall acceptability of all tortillas. However, the appearance of control tortillas was preferred over commercial tortillas (P<0.01), whereas the aftertaste of commercial tortillas or those fortified with calcium carbonate was preferred over the control (P<0.05). Despite these differences, consumers were equally willing to purchase both fortified and nonfortified tortillas, suggesting that appearance and aftertaste may not influence willingness to purchase. Overall, this study shows that fortification of flour tortillas with various forms of calcium is a feasible alternative calcium source.

  16. Altered calcium signaling in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Yapa, Kunsala T D S; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-10-01

    It is the nature of the calcium signal, as determined by the coordinated activity of a suite of calcium channels, pumps, exchangers and binding proteins that ultimately guides a cell's fate. Deregulation of the calcium signal is often deleterious and has been linked to each of the 'cancer hallmarks'. Despite this, we do not yet have a full understanding of the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with cancer. Such an understanding could aid in guiding the development of therapies specifically targeting altered calcium signaling in cancer cells during tumorigenic progression. Findings from some of the studies that have assessed the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with tumorigenesis and/or processes important in invasion and metastasis are presented in this review. The potential of new methodologies is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  17. Calcium levels during the initiation of labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papandreou, Lampros; Chasiotis, Georgios; Seferiadis, Konstantinos; Thanasoulias, Nikos C; Dousias, Vasilis; Tsanadis, Georgios; Stefos, Theodor

    2004-07-15

    To investigate the physiological role of calcium in the labor process. Eighty-eight term healthy pregnant women who gave birth to normal healthy neonates participated in our study. We compared calcium levels between pregnant women who had normal delivery and those who underwent scheduled cesarean section. The control group consisted of pregnant women with gestation > or =37 weeks without contractions. The groups were compared with respect to calcium levels: (a) in maternal blood serum; (b) in blood serum of the neonates and mothers; and (c) in blood serum between neonates. Significantly higher calcium levels were found in the group of pregnant women who delivered vaginally compared to those who delivered by scheduled cesarean section and those of the control group. We assume that the increased calcium levels during the first stage of labor are involved with a possible role of calcium in the mechanism of initiation of labor.

  18. Induced calcium carbonate precipitation using Bacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifan, Mostafa; Samani, Ali Khajeh; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-12-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation is an emerging process for the production of self-healing concrete. This study was aimed to investigate the effects and optimum conditions on calcium carbonate biosynthesis. Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus sphaericus, yeast extract, urea, calcium chloride and aeration were found to be the most significant factors affecting the biomineralization of calcium carbonate. It was noticed that the morphology of microbial calcium carbonate was mainly affected by the genera of bacteria (cell surface properties), the viscosity of the media and the type of electron acceptors (Ca(2+)). The maximum calcium carbonate concentration of 33.78 g/L was achieved at the optimum conditions This value is the highest concentration reported in the literature.

  19. Overbased Calcium sulfonate Detergent Technology Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qing-gao; MUIR Ronald J.

    2009-01-01

    Overbased calcium sulfonate is used widely as detergent in automotive and marine lubricants, as well as various industrial oil applications. In this paper, the process to produce overbased calcium sulfonate is overviewed. The sulfonate structure and molecular weight and its molecular weight distribution, the enclosed calcium carbonate nanoparticle size and crystalline structure, properties of the carrier oil, all influence its properties, such as stability, viscosity, and detergency of the system.

  20. Synthesis of Calcium Silicate (Casio3) Using Calcium Fluoride, Quartz and Microbes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    B. Gopal Krishna; M. Jagannadha Rao

    2015-01-01

    .... In this paper, synthesis of calcium silicate (CaSiO3) using calcium fluoride (CaF2) and quartz (SiO2) under microbial environment in a laboratory is being adopted to produce the required material...

  1. [Calcium carbide of different crystal formation synthesized by calcium carbide residue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong-yuan; Kang, Ming; Jiang, Cai-rong; Tu, Ming-jing

    2006-04-01

    To recycle calcium carbide residue effectively, calcium carbide of different crystal form, including global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide was synthesized. Both the influence of pretreatment in the purity of calcium carbide, and the influence of temperatures of carbonization reaction, release velocity of carbon dioxide in the apparition of calcium carbide of different crystal form were studied with DTA-TG and SEM. The result shows that calcium carbide residue can take place chemistry reaction with ammonia chlorinate straight. Under the condition that pH was above 7, the purity of calcium carbide was above 97%, and the whiteness was above 98. Once provided the different temperatures of carbonization reaction and the proper release velocity of carbon dioxide, global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide were obtained.

  2. Finding of Optimal Calcium Ion Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiki, Keisuke; Azuma, Hiroki; Yoshioka, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Araki, Tsutomu

    We have investigated the fluorescence lifetime properties of 8 calcium ion probes, calcium-green-1, calcium green-2, calcium green-5N, calcium orange, oregon green 488 BAPTA-6F, fluo-3, fluo-4, and fluo-5N. We found that the decay time of calcium green-5N varied more sensitively with calcium concentration than calcium green-1 which was known to be a highly sensitive probe. We have also found that the center of observable range of calcium concentration by fluorescence lifetime measurement is lower than that by fluorescence intensity measurement.

  3. Osteoblasts detect pericellular calcium concentration increase via neomycin-sensitive voltage gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuanhao; Kishore, Vipuil; Fites, Kateri; Akkus, Ozan

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the detection of critically loaded or micro-damaged regions of bone by bone cells are still a matter of debate. Our previous studies showed that calcium efflux originates from pre-failure regions of bone matrix and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts respond to such efflux by an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration. The mechanisms by which the intracellular calcium concentration increases in response to an increase in the pericellular calcium concentration are unknown. Elevation of the intracellular calcium may occur via release from the internal calcium stores of the cell and/or via the membrane bound channels. The current study applied a wide range of pharmaceutical inhibitors to identify the calcium entry pathways involved in the process: internal calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER, inhibited by thapsigargin and TMB-8), calcium receptor (CaSR, inhibited by calhex), stretch-activated calcium channel (SACC, inhibited by gadolinium), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC, inhibited by nifedipine, verapamil, neomycin, and ω-conotoxin), and calcium-induced-calcium-release channel (CICRC, inhibited by ryanodine and dantrolene). These inhibitors were screened for their effectiveness to block intracellular calcium increase by using a concentration gradient induced calcium efflux model which mimics calcium diffusion from the basal aspect of cells. The inhibitor(s) which reduced the intracellular calcium response was further tested on osteoblasts seeded on mechanically loaded notched cortical bone wafers undergoing damage. The results showed that only neomycin reduced the intracellular calcium response in osteoblasts, by 27%, upon extracellular calcium stimulus induced by concentration gradient. The inhibitory effect of neomycin was more pronounced (75% reduction in maximum fluorescence) for osteoblasts seeded on notched cortical bone wafers loaded mechanically to damaging load levels. These results imply that the increase in

  4. Calcium binding proteins and calcium signaling in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Delfina C; Guragain, Manita; Patrauchan, Marianna

    2015-03-01

    With the continued increase of genomic information and computational analyses during the recent years, the number of newly discovered calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) in prokaryotic organisms has increased dramatically. These proteins contain sequences that closely resemble a variety of eukaryotic calcium (Ca(2+)) binding motifs including the canonical and pseudo EF-hand motifs, Ca(2+)-binding β-roll, Greek key motif and a novel putative Ca(2+)-binding domain, called the Big domain. Prokaryotic CaBPs have been implicated in diverse cellular activities such as division, development, motility, homeostasis, stress response, secretion, transport, signaling and host-pathogen interactions. However, the majority of these proteins are hypothetical, and only few of them have been studied functionally. The finding of many diverse CaBPs in prokaryotic genomes opens an exciting area of research to explore and define the role of Ca(2+) in organisms other than eukaryotes. This review presents the most recent developments in the field of CaBPs and novel advancements in the role of Ca(2+) in prokaryotes.

  5. Mechanical Properties of a Calcium Dietary Supplement, Calcium Fumarate Trihydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shijing; Henke, Sebastian; Wharmby, Michael T; Yeung, Hamish H-M; Li, Wei; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2015-12-07

    The mechanical properties of calcium fumarate trihydrate, a 1D coordination polymer considered for use as a calcium source for food and beverage enrichment, have been determined via nanoindentation and high-pressure X-ray diffraction with single crystals. The nanoindentation studies reveal that the elastic modulus (16.7-33.4 GPa, depending on crystallographic orientation), hardness (1.05-1.36 GPa), yield stress (0.70-0.90 GPa), and creep behavior (0.8-5.8 nm/s) can be rationalized in view of the anisotropic crystal structure; factors include the directionality of the inorganic Ca-O-Ca chain and hydrogen bonding, as well as the orientation of the fumarate ligands. High-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show a bulk modulus of ∼ 20 GPa, which is indicative of elastic recovery intermediate between small molecule drug crystals and inorganic pharmaceutical ingredients. The combined use of nanoindentation and high-pressure X-ray diffraction techniques provides a complementary experimental approach for probing the critical mechanical properties related to tableting of these dietary supplements.

  6. Altered calcium signaling following traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Thomas Weber

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell death and dysfunction after traumatic brain injury (TBI is caused by a primary phase, related to direct mechanical disruption of the brain, and a secondary phase which consists of delayed events initiated at the time of the physical insult. Arguably, the calcium ion contributes greatly to the delayed cell damage and death after TBI. A large, sustained influx of calcium into cells can initiate cell death signaling cascades, through activation of several degradative enzymes, such as proteases and endonucleases. However, a sustained level of intracellular free calcium is not necessarily lethal, but the specific route of calcium entry may couple calcium directly to cell death pathways. Other sources of calcium, such as intracellular calcium stores, can also contribute to cell damage. In addition, calcium-mediated signal transduction pathways in neurons may be perturbed following injury. These latter types of alterations may contribute to abnormal physiology in neurons that do not necessarily die after a traumatic episode. This review provides an overview of experimental evidence that has led to our current understanding of the role of calcium signaling in death and dysfunction following TBI.

  7. Regulation of cardiomyocyte autophagy by calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Soni; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Criollo, Alfredo; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; García, Lorena; Morselli, Eugenia; Cifuentes, Mariana; Quest, Andrew F G; Hill, Joseph A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2016-04-15

    Calcium signaling plays a crucial role in a multitude of events within the cardiomyocyte, including cell cycle control, growth, apoptosis, and autophagy. With respect to calcium-dependent regulation of autophagy, ion channels and exchangers, receptors, and intracellular mediators play fundamental roles. In this review, we discuss calcium-dependent regulation of cardiomyocyte autophagy, a lysosomal mechanism that is often cytoprotective, serving to defend against disease-related stress and nutrient insufficiency. We also highlight the importance of the subcellular distribution of calcium and related proteins, interorganelle communication, and other key signaling events that govern cardiomyocyte autophagy. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. The remodeling transient and the calcium economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloia, J F; Arunabh-Talwar, S; Pollack, S; Yeh, J K

    2008-07-01

    The remodeling transient describes a change in bone mass that lasts one remodeling cycle following an intervention that disturbs the calcium economy. We demonstrated the transient in a study of the response of bone density to calcium/vitamin D3 supplementation and show the hazards of misinterpretation if the transient is not considered. The remodeling transient describes a change in bone mass that lasts for one remodeling cycle following an intervention that disturbs the calcium economy. We report an intervention with calcium and vitamin D supplementation in 208 postmenopausal African-American women where the remodeling transient was considered a priori in the study design. Both groups (calcium alone vs. calcium + 20 microg (800 IU) vitamin D3) were ensured a calcium intake in excess of 1200 mg/day. There were no differences between the two groups in changes in BMD over time. These BMD changes were therefore interpreted to reflect increased calcium intake in both groups but not any influence of vitamin D. A transient increase in bone mineral density was observed during the first year of study, followed by a decline. The remodeling period was estimated at about 9 months, which is similar to histomorphometric estimates. It is problematic to draw conclusions concerning interventions that influence the calcium economy without considering the remodeling transient in study design. Studies of agents that effect bone remodeling must be carried out for at least two remodeling cycles and appropriate techniques must be used in data analysis.

  9. Disease causing mutations of calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzon, Nancy M; Beam, Kurt G

    2008-01-01

    Calcium ions play an important role in the electrical excitability of nerve and muscle, as well as serving as a critical second messenger for diverse cellular functions. As a result, mutations of genes encoding calcium channels may have subtle affects on channel function yet strongly perturb cellular behavior. This review discusses the effects of calcium channel mutations on channel function, the pathological consequences for cellular physiology, and possible links between altered channel function and disease. Many cellular functions are directly or indirectly regulated by the free cytosolic calcium concentration. Thus, calcium levels must be very tightly regulated in time and space. Intracellular calcium ions are essential second messengers and play a role in many functions including, action potential generation, neurotransmitter and hormone release, muscle contraction, neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, calcium-dependent gene expression, synaptic plasticity and cell death. Calcium ions that control cell activity can be supplied to the cell cytosol from two major sources: the extracellular space or intracellular stores. Voltage-gated and ligand-gated channels are the primary way in which Ca(2+) ions enter from the extracellular space. The sarcoplasm reticulum (SR) in muscle and the endoplasmic reticulum in non-muscle cells are the main intracellular Ca(2+) stores: the ryanodine receptor (RyR) and inositol-triphosphate receptor channels are the major contributors of calcium release from internal stores.

  10. Sintering of calcium phosphate bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, E

    2013-04-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics have become of prime importance for biological applications in the field of bone tissue engineering. This paper reviews the sintering behaviour of these bioceramics. Conventional pressureless sintering of hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, a reference compound, has been extensively studied. Its physico-chemistry is detailed. It can be seen as a competition between two thermally activated phenomena that proceed by solid-state diffusion of matter: densification and grain growth. Usually, the objective is to promote the first and prevent the second. Literature data are analysed from sintering maps (i.e. grain growth vs. densification). Sintering trajectories of hydroxyapatite produced by conventional pressureless sintering and non-conventional techniques, including two-step sintering, liquid phase sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, ultrahigh pressure, microwave and spark plasma sintering, are presented. Whatever the sintering technique may be, grain growth occurs mainly during the last step of sintering, when the relative bulk density reaches 95% of the maximum value. Though often considered very advantageous, most assisted sintering techniques do not appear very superior to conventional pressureless sintering. Sintering of tricalcium phosphate or biphasic calcium phosphates is also discussed. The chemical composition of calcium phosphate influences the behaviour. Similarly, ionic substitutions in hydroxyapatite or in tricalcium phosphate create lattice defects that modify the sintering rate. Depending on their nature, they can either accelerate or slow down the sintering rate. The thermal stability of compounds at the sintering temperature must also be taken into account. Controlled atmospheres may be required to prevent thermal decomposition, and flash sintering techniques, which allow consolidation at low temperature, can be helpful.

  11. Heart failure drug digitoxin induces calcium uptake into cells by forming transmembrane calcium channels

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Digitoxin and other cardiac glycosides are important, centuries-old drugs for treating congestive heart failure. However, the mechanism of action of these compounds is still being elucidated. Calcium is known to potentiate the toxicity of these drugs, and we have hypothesized that digitoxin might mediate calcium entry into cells. We report here that digitoxin molecules mediate calcium entry into intact cells. Multimers of digitoxin molecules also are able to form calcium channels in pure plan...

  12. The Role of Calcium in Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    Osteoporosis results from several factors. Calcium deficiency is only one, and high calcium intake will prevent only those cases in which calcium is the limiting factor. Calcium cannot reverse, but only arrest, bone loss. A high calcium intake for every member of the population is advocated. (Author/MT)

  13. Calcium imaging perspectives in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchiswamy, Chidananda Nagamangala; Malnoy, Mickael; Occhipinti, Andrea; Maffei, Massimo E

    2014-03-04

    The calcium ion (Ca2+) is a versatile intracellular messenger. It provides dynamic regulation of a vast array of gene transcriptions, protein kinases, transcription factors and other complex downstream signaling cascades. For the past six decades, intracellular Ca2+ concentration has been significantly studied and still many studies are under way. Our understanding of Ca2+ signaling and the corresponding physiological phenomenon is growing exponentially. Here we focus on the improvements made in the development of probes used for Ca2+ imaging and expanding the application of Ca2+ imaging in plant science research.

  14. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure.......149 Ryd, respectively, relative to the s band, give the best possible agreement. Under increasing pressure the s and p electrons are found to transfer into the d band, and Ca undergoes metal-semimetal-metal electronic transitions. Calculations of the bandstructure and the electronic pressure, including...

  15. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tingling in the fingers, convulsions, and abnormal heart rhythms that can lead to death if not corrected. ... that includes weight-bearing physical activity (such as walking and running). Osteoporosis is a disease of the ...

  16. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for dinner. Create mini-pizzas by topping whole-wheat English muffins or bagels with pizza sauce and ... Fitness Center Vitamin D Smart Supermarket Shopping Lactose Intolerance Vitamins and Minerals Vitamin Chart Mineral Chart Food ...

  17. Testosterone increases urinary calcium excretion and inhibits expression of renal calcium transport proteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsu, Y.J.; Dimke, H.; Schoeber, J.P.H.; Hsu, S.C.; Lin, S.H.; Chu, P.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Although gender differences in the renal handling of calcium have been reported, the overall contribution of androgens to these differences remains uncertain. We determined here whether testosterone affects active renal calcium reabsorption by regulating calcium transport proteins. Male mice had hig

  18. 76 FR 51991 - Determination That PENTETATE CALCIUM TRISODIUM (Trisodium Calcium Diethylenetriaminepentaacetate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-19

    ... new drug applications (ANDAs) for PENTETATE CALCIUM TRISODIUM (Ca-DTPA) solution for intravenous or... ANDA that does not refer to a listed drug. PENTETATE CALCIUM TRISODIUM (Ca-DTPA) solution for... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That PENTETATE CALCIUM TRISODIUM...

  19. Effect of lowering dietary calcium intake on fractional whole body calcium retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson-Hughes, B.; Stern, D.T.; Shipp, C.C.; Rasmussen, H.M.

    1988-07-01

    Although fractional calcium absorption is known to vary inversely with calcium intake, the extent and timing of individual hormonal and calcium absorption responses to altered calcium intake have not been defined. We measured fractional whole body retention of orally ingested /sup 47/Ca, an index of calcium absorption, in nine normal women after they had eaten a 2000-mg calcium diet for 8 weeks and a 300-mg calcium diet for 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. After the diet change, serum intact PTH (32.2% increase; P = 0.005), serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-(OH)2D; 43.8% increase; P = 0.003), and fractional whole body calcium retention (42.8% increase; P = 0.004) increased within 1 week. Although the PTH and calcium retention responses remained fairly constant throughout the low calcium intake period, serum 1,25-(OH)2D concentrations declined toward baseline after week 1. Thus, the late increase in calcium retention may have resulted from calcium absorption that was independent of 1,25-(OH)2D stimulation.

  20. Protein intake and calcium absorption – Potential role of the calcium sensor receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietary protein induces calcium excretion but the source of this calcium is unclear. Evidence from short-term studies indicates that protein promotes bone resorption, but many epidemiologic studies do not corroborate this. Evidence is also mixed on weather protein promotes calcium absorption. Stud...

  1. Short communication: Urinary oxalate and calcium excretion by dogs and cats diagnosed with calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijcker, J.C.; Kummeling, A.; Hagen-Plantinga, E.A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urine concentrations of oxalate and calcium play an important role in calcium oxalate (CaOx) urolith formation in dogs and cats, with high excretions of both substances increasing the chance of CaOx urolithiasis. In 17 CaOx-forming dogs, urine calcium:creatinine ratio (Ca:Cr) was found

  2. Calcium signaling in pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apáti, Ágota; Pászty, Katalin; Erdei, Zsuzsa; Szebényi, Kornélia; Homolya, László; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2012-04-28

    Pluripotent stem cells represent a new source of biological material allowing the exploration of signaling phenomena during normal cell development and differentiation. Still, the calcium signaling pathways and intracellular calcium responses to various ligands or stress conditions have not been sufficiently explored as yet in embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells and in their differentiated offspring. This is partly due to the special culturing conditions of these cell types, the rapid morphological and functional changes in heterogeneous cell populations during early differentiation, and methodological problems in cellular calcium measurements. In this paper, we review the currently available data in the literature on calcium signaling in pluripotent stem cells and discuss the potential shortcomings of these studies. Various assay methods are surveyed for obtaining reliable data both in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells and in specific, stem cell-derived human tissues. In this paper, we present the modulation of calcium signaling in human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and in their derivates; mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells and cardiac tissues using the fluorescent calcium indicator Fluo-4 and confocal microscopy. LPA, trypsin and angiotensin II were effective in inducing calcium signals both in HUES9 and MSCl cells. Histamine and thrombin induced calcium signal exclusively in the MSCl cells, while ATP was effective only in HUES9 cells. There was no calcium signal evoked by GABA, even at relatively high concentrations. In stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes a rapid increase in the beating rate and an increase of the calcium signal peaks could be observed after the addition of adrenaline, while verapamil led to a strong decrease in cellular calcium and stopped spontaneous contractions in a relaxed state.

  3. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louiza B Thomsen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A TTX-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none tetrodotoxin (TTX -sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than one second affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette.

  4. Optical control of calcium-regulated exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Serra, Mercè; Trauner, Dirk; Llobet, Artur; Gorostiza, Pau

    2013-03-01

    Neurons signal to each other and to non-neuronal cells as those in muscle or glands, by means of the secretion of neurotransmitters at chemical synapses. In order to dissect the molecular mechanisms of neurotransmission, new methods for directly and reversibly triggering neurosecretion at the presynaptic terminal are necessary. Here we exploit the calcium permeability of the light-gated channel LiGluR in order to reversibly manipulate cytosolic calcium concentration, thus controlling calcium-regulated exocytosis. Bovine chromaffin cells expressing LiGluR were stimulated with light. Exocytic events were detected by amperometry or by whole-cell patch-clamp to quantify membrane capacitance and calcium influx. Amperometry reveals that optical stimulation consistently triggers exocytosis in chromaffin cells. Secretion of catecholamines can be adjusted between zero and several Hz by changing the wavelength of illumination. Differences in secretion efficacy are found between the activation of LiGluR and native voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Our results show that the distance between sites of calcium influx and vesicles ready to be released is longer when calcium influx is triggered by LiGluR instead of native VGCCs. LiGluR activation directly and reversibly increases the intracellular calcium concentration. Light-gated calcium influx allows for the first time to control calcium-regulated exocytosis without the need of applying depolarizing solutions or voltage clamping in chromaffin cells. LiGluR is a useful tool to study the secretory mechanisms and their spatiotemporal patterns in neurotransmission, and opens a window to study other calcium-dependent processes such as muscular contraction or cell migration.

  5. An Intracellular Calcium Oscillations Model Including Mitochondrial Calcium Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiao-Min; LIU Zeng-Rong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Calcium is a ubiquitous second messenger. Mitochondria contributes significantly to intracellular Ca2+ dynamics.The experiment of Kaftan et al. [J. Biol. Chem. 275(2000) 25465] demonstrated that inhibiting mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake can reduce the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration oscillations of gonadotropes. By considering the mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling we develop a three-variable model of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations based on the models of Atri et al. [Biophys. J. 65 (1993) 1727] and Falcke et al. [Biophys. J. 77 (1999) 37]. The model reproduces the fact that mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling increases the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations, which accords with Kaftan's results. Moreover the model predicts that when the mitochondria overload with Ca2+, the cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations vanish, which may trigger apoptosis.

  6. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.;

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article...

  7. Elements from chlorine to calcium nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Wunibald

    1968-01-01

    Nuclear Tables: Part II Nuclear Reactions, Volume 3: The Elements from Chlorine to Calcium contains tabulations of the nuclear reaction values of elements chlorine, argon, potassium, and calcium. These tabulations provide the calculated Q-values of the elements and their isotopes. This book will be of value to general chemistry researchers.

  8. Calcium, snails, and birds: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mänd

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that wild birds breeding in acidified areas have difficulties with obtaining sufficient calcium for their eggshells, and that the cause of it is the shortage of land snails. Many birds have to search for Ca-rich snail shells on a daily basis during egg production. Molluscs depend on litter calcium, which has decreased due to acidification of the environment. Calcium limitation may be a widespread phenomenon also in non-acidified, naturally Ca-poor areas. The problem is that while in the latter areas the time for development of specific adaptations may have been sufficient, then in acidified areas, on the contrary, calcium shortage is a recent phenomenon. Therefore, since the extent of calcium limitation in non-acidified areas is hard to derive from observational data, experimental approach is needed. We provide experimental evidence that specific calcium deficit does affect reproductive traits also in the birds breeding in naturally base-poor habitats. Our study was conducted in a heterogeneous woodland area in Estonia containing deciduous forest patches as well as base-poor pine forest with low snail abundance. Ca supplementation, using snail shell and chicken eggshell fragments, was carried out for pied flycatchers and great tits. Extra calcium affected positively several reproductive traits like egg volume and eggshell thickness, start of breeding, and fledglings’ parameters. The negative relationship between calcium availability and lay-date suggests that birds adjust their breeding tactics to conditions of Ca deficiency, for example, by postponing laying.

  9. Calcium Impact on Milk Gels Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutina, Glykeria

    to be formed. In addition the low amount of micellar calcium caused a more compact gel structure with many protein aggregates. The results of this study highlighted the importance of calcium for the formation of acid, calcium and rennet gels. The content and the interactions of calcium with proteins during...... salts. The perturbation of calcium equilibria by these factors will affect the final properties of acid, calcium and rennet milk gels. By decreasing the pH from 6.0 to 5.2 (acid gels), the calcium equilibrium was significantly affected by temperature (4, 20, 30, 40 oC), and different combinations...... of temperature and pH may result in different final structure properties in dairy products such as cheese. A significant amount of calcium remained in the micelles between pH 4.8 and 4.6, this can contribute to the final strength of acid milk gels, such as in yogurt or in cream cheeses. After the gelation point...

  10. Adding calcium improves lithium ferrite core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessoff, H.

    1969-01-01

    Adding calcium increases uniformity of grain growth over a wide range of sintering temperatures and reduces porosity within the grain. Ferrite cores containing calcium have square hysteresis loops and high curie temperatures, making them useful in coincident current memories of digital electronic computers.

  11. Oligofructose stimulates calcium absorption in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, E.G.H.M. van den; Muys, T.; Dokkum, W. van; Schaafsma, G.

    1999-01-01

    Background: In rats, nondigestible oligosaccharides stimulate calcium absorption. Recently, this effect was also found in human subjects. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate whether consumption of 15 g oligofructose/d stimulates calcium absorption in male adolescents. Design: Tw

  12. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  13. Simulating complex calcium-calcineurin signaling network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, J.; Kaandorp, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding of processes in which calcium signaling is involved is of fundamental importance in systems biology and has many applications in medicine. In this paper we have studied the particular case of the complex calcium-calcineurin-MCIP-NFAT signaling network in cardiac myocytes, the understan

  14. Bespuiten met calcium kan neusrot voorkomen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandstra, G.B.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2000-01-01

    Oorzaak van neusrot bij paprika is een calciumtekort in de vrucht. Een bespuiting met calcium vlak na de bloei heeft een zeer gunstig effect. In bijgaande tabel gegevens over het effect van spuiten met calcium op het optreden van neusrot bij paprika

  15. Calcium Impact on Milk Gels Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutina, Glykeria

    , a sudden solubilization of micellar calcium was observed at 50 oC and 60 oC, which revealed an interesting role of calcium during acidification at elevated temperatures. After enrichment of milk with calcium D-lactobionate, the added calcium was distributed between the micellar and serum milk phase at pH 6.......6-6.0, but at pH 5.7-5.4 the added calcium remained mainly in the serum milk phase. The importance of pH for the distribution of the added calcium between the micellar and serum milk phase may affect bioavailability from enriched products and the distribution should be taken into consideration when designing new......Calcium is one of the several elements that can be found in milk distributed between the micellar and the serum milk phase. Calcium is important from a nutritional point of view, but its contribution to the functional and structural properties of dairy products has only recently been...

  16. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüdiger, Sten, E-mail: sten.ruediger@physik.hu-berlin.de

    2014-01-10

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  17. Rates of calcium carbonate removal from soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Protz, R.

    1988-01-01

    Mean annual rates of calcium carbonate removal from soils in a subarctic climate estimated from data on two chronosequences of calcareous storm ridges, appeared to be relatively constant through time. Concentrations of dissolved calcium carbonate in the soil solution in the study sites calculated

  18. Calcium Orthophosphates in Nature, Biology and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. These materials are of the special significance because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and dear antlers and pathological (i.e. those appearing due to various diseases calcified tissues of mammals. Due to a great chemical similarity with the biological calcified tissues, many calcium orthophosphates possess remarkable biocompatibility and bioactivity. Materials scientists use this property extensively to construct artificial bone grafts that are either entirely made of or only surface-coated with the biologically relevant calcium orthophosphates. For example, self-setting hydraulic cements made of calcium orthophosphates are helpful in bone repair, while titanium substitutes covered by a surface layer of calcium orthophosphates are used for hip joint endoprostheses and as tooth substitutes. Porous scaffolds made of calcium orthophosphates are very promising tools for tissue engineering applications. In addition, technical grade calcium orthophosphates are very popular mineral fertilizers. Thus ere calcium orthophosphates are of great significance for humankind and, in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided.

  19. Precipitation and Solubility of Calcium Hydrogenurate Hexahydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić-Ivančić, V; Füredi-Milhofer, H; Brničević, N; Marković, M

    1992-01-01

    Solid phases formed in the quaternary system: uric acid-calcium hydroxide -hydrochloric acid-water aged for 2 months at 310 K were studied to determine conditions for calcium hydrogenurate hexahydrate, Ca(C5H3N4O)2 · 6H2O precipitation. The precipitates were identified by chemical and thermogravimetric analyses, x-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. In the precipitation diagram the concentration region in which calcium hydrogenurate hexahydrate precipitated as a single solid phase was established. The solubility of calcium hydrogenurate hexahydrate was investigated in the pH range from 6.2 to 10.1 at different temperatures. The total soluble and ionic concentration of calcium (atomic absorption spectroscopy and Ca-selective electrode), total urate concentration (spectrophotometry), and pH were determined in equilibrated solutions. The data are presented in the form of tables and chemical potential diagrams. By using these data the thermodynamic solubility products of calcium hydrogenurate hexahydrate, Ks = a(Ca(2+)) · a(2)(C5H3N4O3(-)), were determined: [Formula: see text]The formation of calcium hydrogenurate hexahydrate crystals in urinary tract of patients with pathologically high concentrations of calcium and urates (hypercalciuria and hyperuricosiuria) is possible.

  20. Calcium and caffeine interaction in increased calcium balance in ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Tavares da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the effects of caffeine intake associated with inadequate or adequate calcium intake in laparotomized or ovariectomized rats by means of the calcium balance. Forty adults Wistar rats were ovariectomized or laparotomized. METHODS: The animals (n=40 were randomly placed in eight groups receiving the AIN-93 diet with 100% or 50% of the recommended calcium intake with or without added caffeine (6mg/kg/day. The animals were kept in individuals metabolic cages at a temperature of 24°±2ºC, light/dark cycles of 12/12 hours, and deionized water available ad libitum. On the 8th week of the experiment, food consumption was measured and 24-hour urine and 4-day feces were collected to determine calcium balance [Balance=Ca intake-(Urinary Ca+Fecal Ca]. RESULTS: Animals with adequate calcium intake presented higher balances and rates of calcium absorption and retention (p<0.05 than those with inadequate calcium intake, regardless of caffeine intake (p<0.05. Caffeine intake did not affect urinary calcium excretion but increased balance (p<0.05 in the groups with adequate calcium intake. CONCLUSION: Adequate calcium intake attenuated the negative effects of estrogen deficiency and improved calcium balance even in the presence of caffeine.

  1. Calcium Forms,Subcelluar Distribution and Ultrastructure of Pulp Cells as Influenced by Calcium Deficiency in Apple (Malus pumila) Fruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-hui; ZHOU Wei

    2004-01-01

    Calcium in Red Fuji and Starkrimson apples during storage were fractionated by sequent extracting. Localization and distribution of calcium and influence of calcium nutrition on cell ultrastructure were observed by transmission electron microscopy combined with in situ precipitation of calcium with an improved method of potassium pyroantimonate technique. Results indicated that spraying calcium solution on surface of young fruits increased contents of calcium in all forms. During storage, contents of soluble calcium and pectic calcium declined and thosein calcium phosphate, calcium oxalate and calcium silicate increased. Calcium contents of Red Fuji in all forms were higher than those of Starkrimson, indicating that calcium accumulating capability of Red Fuji fruits preceded that of Starkrimson. Under transmission electron microscopy, calcium antimonite precipitates (CaAP) was mainly distributed in cell wall, tonoplast, nuclear membrane and nucleoplasm,much more CaAP deposited in vacuole. Calcium deficiency during storage leads to decrease of CaAP in locations mentioned above, disappearance of compartmentation, and entrance of CaAP to cytoplasm. Transformation from soluble calcium and pectic calcium to calcium phosphate,oxalate and damages of biomembranes structuraly and functionally resulted from calcium deficiency during storage were the crucial causation of physiological disorder.

  2. Calcium-sensing receptor: a key target for extracellular calcium signaling in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L Jones

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Though both clinicians and scientists have long recognized the influence of extracellular calcium on the function of muscle and nervous tissue, recent insights reveal that the mechanisms allowing changes in extracellular calcium to alter cellular excitability have been incompletely understood. For many years the effects of calcium on neuronal signaling were explained only in terms of calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels and biophysical charge screening. More recently however, it has been recognized that the calcium-sensing receptor is prevalent in the nervous system and regulates synaptic transmission and neuronal activity via multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the multiplicity of mechanisms by which changes in extracellular calcium alter neuronal signaling and propose that multiple mechanisms are required to describe the full range of experimental observations.

  3. Process for the preparation of calcium superoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballou, E. V.; Wood, P. C.; Wydeven, T. J.; Spitze, L. A. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Calcium superoxide is prepared in high yields by spreading a quantity of calcium peroxide diperoxyhydrate on the surface of a container, positioning said container in a vacuum chamber on a support structure through which a coolant fluid can be circulated, partially evacuating said vacuum chamber, allowing the temperature of the diperoxyhydrate to reach the range of about 0 to about 40 C; maintaining the temperature selected for a period of time sufficient to complete the disproproriation of the diperoxyhydrate to calcium superoxide, calcium hydroxide, oxygen, and water; constantly and systematically removing the water as it is formed by sweeping the reacting material with a current of dry inert gas and/or by condensation of said water on a cold surface; backfilling the chamber with a dry inert gas; and finally, recovering the calcium superoxide produced.

  4. The calcium and vitamin D controversy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Areas of the world where vitamin D levels are low for months of the year and intakes of calcium are high have a high prevalence of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. This suggests a public health message of avoiding calcium supplements and increasing vitamin D intake. No message could be more...... welcome as vitamin D can be given as a bolus while calcium must be taken daily and may be poorly tolerated. This approach is based on no evidence from intervention studies. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) suggest that vitamin D given with calcium elicits a small reduction in fracture risk and deaths....... This has not been demonstrated for D given alone. The cardiovascular safety of calcium and vitamin D (CaD) supplements is difficult to ascertain due to weaknesses in RCT designs and adjudication that cannot be remedied by subanalysis. Moreover, no major new RCTs are in process to provide better evidence...

  5. [Calcium and vitamin D in osteology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amling, M; Barvencik, F

    2015-06-01

    Calcium homeostasis is of paramount physiological and pathophysiological importance in health and disease. This article focuses on the skeletal relevance of calcium and vitamin D in daily clinical practice. Against the background of an endemic vitamin D deficiency in Germany and the increasing number of patients with drug-induced (proton pump inhibitor) enteral calcium uptake problems, it is of critical importance to understand that a vitamin D level of > 30 µg/l (> 75 nmol/l) is required for intact skeletal mineralization and that furthermore, a physiological gastric acid production is essential for a normal enteral uptake of calcium from foodstuffs. Therefore, a guideline-conform handling of vitamin D and calcium substitution is required not only for patients with rheumatoid diseases but also for any osteological therapy.

  6. Calcium ion currents mediating oocyte maturation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosti Elisabetta

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During maturation, the last phase of oogenesis, the oocyte undergoes several changes which prepare it to be ovulated and fertilized. Immature oocytes are arrested in the first meiotic process prophase, that is morphologically identified by a germinal vesicle. The removal of the first meiotic block marks the initiation of maturation. Although a large number of molecules are involved in complex sequences of events, there is evidence that a calcium increase plays a pivotal role in meiosis re-initiation. It is well established that, during this process, calcium is released from the intracellular stores, whereas less is known on the role of external calcium entering the cell through the plasma membrane ion channels. This review is focused on the functional role of calcium currents during oocyte maturation in all the species, from invertebrates to mammals. The emerging role of specific L-type calcium channels will be discussed.

  7. Application of Calcium Phosphate Materials in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabr S. Al-Sanabani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate materials are similar to bone in composition and in having bioactive and osteoconductive properties. Calcium phosphate materials in different forms, as cements, composites, and coatings, are used in many medical and dental applications. This paper reviews the applications of these materials in dentistry. It presents a brief history, dental applications, and methods for improving their mechanical properties. Notable research is highlighted regarding (1 application of calcium phosphate into various fields in dentistry; (2 improving mechanical properties of calcium phosphate; (3 biomimetic process and functionally graded materials. This paper deals with most common types of the calcium phosphate materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate which are currently used in dental and medical fields.

  8. Calcium-imaging with Fura-2 in isolated cerebral microvessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Jörg; Jensen, Claus V.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, cytoplasmic free calcium, Fura-2 fluorescence, image analysis, blood-brain barrier......Neuropathology, cytoplasmic free calcium, Fura-2 fluorescence, image analysis, blood-brain barrier...

  9. Diagnosis and assessment of skeletal related disease using calcium 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillegonds, Darren J [Oakland, CA; Vogel, John S [San Jose, CA; Fitzgerald, Robert L [Encinitas, CA; Deftos, Leonard J [Del Mar, CA; Herold, David [Del Mar, CA; Burton, Douglas W [San Diego, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of determining calcium metabolism in a patient comprises the steps of administering radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca to the patient, allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and reaction of the radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca by the patient, obtaining a sample of the radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca from the patient, isolating the calcium content of the sample in a form suitable for precise measurement of isotopic calcium concentrations, and measuring the calcium content to determine parameters of calcium metabolism in the patient.

  10. A literatura como resistência política: traços neorrealistas na produção literária do Movimento dos Atingidos por Barragens (MAB)

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Alves Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Este trabalho busca analisar as relações existentes entre as produções literárias do inicio do século XX, com o surgimento da corrente neo-realista, e a literatura produzida pelo Movimento dos Atingidos por Barragens (MAB), como manifestação de resistência à cultura elitista, no que tange ao espaço das criações artísticas. Para tanto, discute-se a característica do neo-realismo como expressão literária definidora dos aspectos sociais e políticos representados nas obras da época. Analisa-se, t...

  11. Calcium-sensitive immunoaffinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken L; Lindhardt Madsen, Kirstine; Skjoedt, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Immunoaffinity chromatography is a powerful fractionation technique that has become indispensable for protein purification and characterization. However, it is difficult to retrieve bound proteins without using harsh or denaturing elution conditions, and the purification of scarce antigens...... to homogeneity may be impossible due to contamination with abundant antigens. In this study, we purified the scarce, complement-associated plasma protein complex, collectin LK (CL-LK, complex of collectin liver 1 and kidney 1), by immunoaffinity chromatography using a calcium-sensitive anti-collectin-kidney-1 m...... chromatography was superior to the traditional immunoaffinity chromatographies and resulted in a nine-fold improvement of the purification factor. The technique is applicable for the purification of proteins in complex mixtures by single-step fractionation without the denaturation of eluted antigens...

  12. Identification of epitope recognized by mAb 15 A11 sepecific against cartilage oli-gomeric matrix protein%COMP特异性单抗15 A11的表位特征研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑞玲; 韩冬; 韩魏巍; 邓灵福; 袁永泽; 熊丽; 刘德立; 耿辉

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To identify the epitope of mAb15A11 which is specific against RA associated autoantigen cartilage oligomeric matrix protein ( COMP ).Methods: A filamentous phage library displaying random linear dodecapeptides was used to mapping the epitope of mAb15A11.After three rounds of screenings,40 phage clones were selected at random and sequenced.The specificity of phages was confirmed by enzyme immunoassays.Homology search by ClustalW2 and structure analysis by PyMol to identified the epitope amino acid sequence.Western blot analysis of COMP and ELISA analysis of COMP-derived peptides were used to confirm epitope′s characterization.Results: After repeated screenings using bio-panning method, 2 clones were identified, which interacted specifically with mAb 15A11.Homology search did not find succession consensus sequence within COMP molecular,which indicated that the epitope was not linear.PyMol Structure analysis identified the rationality of conformational epitope.Western blot analysis and ELISA of EDTA-treated COMP further prove an conformational structure of the epitope recognized by mAb 15A11.ELISA analysis of COMP-derived peptides demonstrated both disulfide bonds between 229 C-243 C and 237 C-253 C and every epitope amino acid of 232 G,238 H,240 H,241 A,244 V,247 R and 251 R were essential to the binding of mAb 15A11 with COMP.Conclusion: In this study, the potential B cell antigentic epitopes of mAb 15A11 was identified by phage display library.The epitope amino acids sequence and char-acterization were also recognized.It may have important theoretical value for the study of reaction mechanism of COMP antibody and antigen and may also show application significance in the detection of rheumatoid arthritis.%目的:鉴定RA相关自身抗原COMP的一株特异性单克隆抗体15A11的表位特征。方法:选用随机十二肽噬菌体库对mAb 15A11进行三轮筛选,随机挑取40个单噬菌斑,提取DNA,测序;ELISA检测

  13. Fast kinetics of calcium signaling and sensor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shen; Reddish, Florence; Zhuo, You; Yang, Jenny J

    2015-08-01

    Fast calcium signaling is regulated by numerous calcium channels exhibiting high spatiotemporal profiles which are currently measured by fluorescent calcium sensors. There is still a strong need to improve the kinetics of genetically encoded calcium indicators (sensors) to capture calcium dynamics in the millisecond time frame. In this review, we summarize several major fast calcium signaling pathways and discuss the recent developments and application of genetically encoded calcium indicators to detect these pathways. A new class of genetically encoded calcium indicators designed with site-directed mutagenesis on the surface of beta-barrel fluorescent proteins to form a pentagonal bipyramidal-like calcium binding domain dramatically accelerates calcium binding kinetics. Furthermore, novel genetically encoded calcium indicators with significantly increased fluorescent lifetime change are advantageous in deep-field imaging with high light-scattering and notable morphology change.

  14. Relationship of calcium absorption with 25(OH)D and calcium intake in children with rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Tom D; Abrams, Steven A

    2010-11-01

    Nutritional rickets has long been considered a disease caused by vitamin D deficiency, but recent data indicate that inadequate dietary calcium intake is an important cause of rickets, particularly in tropical countries. Children with rickets due to calcium deficiency do not have very low 25(OH)D concentrations, and serum 1,25(OH)(2) D values are markedly elevated. Studies of Nigerian children with rickets demonstrated they have high fractional calcium absorption. A high-phytate diet was demonstrated to increase calcium absorption compared with the fasting state, and enzymatic dephytinization did not significantly improve calcium absorption. When given vitamin D, children with rickets have a marked increase in 1,25(OH)(2) D concentrations without any change in fractional calcium absorption. No positive relationship was found between fractional calcium absorption and serum 25(OH)D concentrations in children on low-calcium diets. More research is needed to understand the interaction between calcium and vitamin D and the role of vitamin D in calcium absorption.

  15. Elasticity of calcium and calcium-sodium amphiboles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. Michael; Abramson, Evan H.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of single-crystal elastic moduli under ambient conditions are reported for nine calcium to calcium-sodium amphiboles that lie in the composition range of common crustal constituents. Velocities of body and surface acoustic waves measured by Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering (ISLS) were inverted to determine the 13 moduli characterizing these monoclinic samples. Moduli show a consistent pattern: C33 > C22 > C11 and C23 > C12 > C13 and C44 > C55 ∼ C66 and for the uniquely monoclinic moduli, |C35| ≫ C46 ∼ |C25| > |C15| ∼ 0. Most of the compositionally-induced variance of moduli is associated with aluminum and iron content. Seven moduli (C11C12C13C22C44C55C66) increase with increasing aluminum while all diagonal moduli decrease with increasing iron. Three moduli (C11, C13 and C44) increase with increasing sodium and potassium occupancy in A-sites. The uniquely monoclinic moduli (C15C25 and C35) have no significant compositional dependence. Moduli associated with the a∗ direction (C11C12C13C55 and C66) are substantially smaller than values associated with structurally and chemically related clinopyroxenes. Other moduli are more similar for both inosilicates. The isotropically averaged adiabatic bulk modulus does not vary with iron content but increases with aluminum content from 85 GPa for tremolite to 99 GPa for pargasite. Increasing iron reduces while increasing aluminum increases the isotropic shear modulus which ranges from 47 GPa for ferro-actinolite to 64 GPa for pargasite. These results exhibit far greater anisotropy and higher velocities than apparent in earlier work. Quasi-longitudinal velocities are as fast as ∼9 km/s and (intermediate between the a∗- and c-axes) are as slow as ∼6 km/s. Voigt-Reuss-Hill averaging based on prior single crystal moduli resulted in calculated rock velocities lower than laboratory measurements, leading to adoption of the (higher velocity) Voigt bound. Thus, former uses of the upper Voigt bound can

  16. Calcium intake and calcium deficiency in toddlers in a slum population of Bhubaneswar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonali Kar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: When considering their children's nutrition, parents often think more about fat grams, carbs, and calories, and forget about calcium, a mineral that is important to help build strong and healthy bones and collagen structures like teeth. The RDI recommendation for 1-3 years is minimum 400mg/day. Calcium is selectively present in milk and milk products besides vegetables like spinach and fruits like orange. The current study was undertaken in the urban field practice area of KIMS that caters to a slum population of nearly 20,000. Aims & Objectives: To assess the knowledge of mothers regarding calcium rich foods and its deficiency and their sociodemographic conditions; to assess the average intake of Calcium using the 7 day recall method; to find the prevalence of possible calcium deficiency in the study population ie 1-3 years of age. Methods: All the mothers with children in the age group 1-3 years were recruited in the study after due informed consent, the final sample being nearly 284. The male female child ratio was 56:44. Mostly women i.e. 83% had some formal education and out of the total nearly 65% had heard never heard of calcium and of those who had heard only 30% could say that milk was the best source of calcium. Result: Average daily Calcium intake was poor i.e. 288mg/d which was worse for the female child 233mg/d. Teeth eruption defects or infections and bone deformities were taken as a proxy for calcium deficiency and were detected in 69.2% and 32% respectively. Diarrhea and skin infections were more in those whose calcium intake was less than 220mg/d which was mildly significant. Conclusion: The study suggests more emphasis on dietary calcium intake and probably recommend calcium supplements for the socioeconomically compromised class who probably cannot afford dietary sources of calcium

  17. Effect of calcium intake on urinary oxalate excretion in calcium stone-forming patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishiura J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary calcium lowers the risk of nephrolithiasis due to a decreased absorption of dietary oxalate that is bound by intestinal calcium. The aim of the present study was to evaluate oxaluria in normocalciuric and hypercalciuric lithiasic patients under different calcium intake. Fifty patients (26 females and 24 males, 41 ± 10 years old, whose 4-day dietary records revealed a regular low calcium intake (<=500 mg/day, received an oral calcium load (1 g/day for 7 days. A 24-h urine was obtained before and after load and according to the calciuria under both diets, patients were considered as normocalciuric (NC, N = 15, diet-dependent hypercalciuric (DDHC, N = 9 or diet-independent hypercalciuric (DIHC, N = 26. On regular diet, mean oxaluria was 30 ± 14 mg/24 h for all patients. The 7-day calcium load induced a significant decrease in mean oxaluria compared to the regular diet in NC and DIHC (20 ± 12 vs 26 ± 7 and 27 ± 18 vs 32 ± 15 mg/24 h, respectively, P<0.05 but not in DDHC patients (22 ± 10 vs 23 ± 5 mg/24 h. The lack of an oxalate decrease among DDHC patients after the calcium load might have been due to higher calcium absorption under higher calcium supply, with a consequent lower amount of calcium left in the intestine to bind with oxalate. These data suggest that a long-lasting regular calcium consumption <500 mg was not associated with high oxaluria and that a subpopulation of hypercalciuric patients who presented a higher intestinal calcium absorption (DDHC tended to hyperabsorb oxalate as well, so that oxaluria did not change under different calcium intake.

  18. Vitamin D, calcium homeostasis and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldurthy, Vaishali; Wei, Ran; Oz, Leyla; Dhawan, Puneet; Jeon, Yong Heui; Christakos, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and microarchitecture deterioration of bone tissue, leading to enhanced bone fragility and consequent increase in fracture risk. Evidence is accumulating for an important role of calcium deficiency as the process of aging is associated with disturbed calcium balance. Vitamin D is the principal factor that maintains calcium homeostasis. Increasing evidence indicates that the reason for disturbed calcium balance with age is inadequate vitamin D levels in the elderly. In this article, an overview of our current understanding of vitamin D, its metabolism, and mechanisms involved in vitamin D-mediated maintenance of calcium homeostasis is presented. In addition, mechanisms involved in age-related dysregulation of 1,25(OH)2D3 action, recommended daily doses of vitamin D and calcium, and the use of vitamin D analogs for the treatment of osteoporosis (which remains controversial) are reviewed. Elucidation of the molecular pathways of vitamin D action and modifications that occur with aging will be an active area of future research that has the potential to reveal new therapeutic strategies to maintain calcium balance. PMID:27790378

  19. Lead removal in rats using calcium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenko, Olga V; Sgrebneva, Marina N; Kiselev, Vladimir I; Khotimchenko, Yuri S

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure, even at low levels, causes a variety of health problems. The aims of this study were to investigate the tissue distribution of lead in the bodies of rats, to evaluate lead removal from the internal organs and bones using calcium alginate in doses of 500, 200 and 100 mg/kg per day for 28 days and to assess the impact of calcium alginate on the level of essential elements. Lead (Pb), calcium (Ca), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) levels in the blood, hearts, kidneys, livers and femurs of the experimental animals were measured using mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. The results revealed that lead acetate exposure increased the levels of Pb in the blood and organs of the animals and significantly reduced contents of Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn. Treatment with calcium alginate in dose 500 mg/kg contributed to significant decreases in the amount of lead in the kidney, heart and bones of animals and a slight increase in the content of essential elements in the liver, kidneys and heart, although these changes were not significant. Decreasing of lead was not significant in the internal organs, bones and blood of animals treated with calcium alginate 200 and 100 mg/kg. Consequently, calcium alginate dose of 500 mg/kg more efficiently removes lead accumulated in the body. Calcium alginate does not have negative effect on level of essential elements quite the contrary; reducing the levels of lead, calcium alginate helps normalize imbalances of Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu and Zn. The results of this study suggest that calcium alginate may potentially be useful for the treatment and prevention of heavy metal intoxications.

  20. Calcium Signaling Is Required for Erythroid Enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölwer, Christina B; Pase, Luke B; Russell, Sarah M; Humbert, Patrick O

    2016-01-01

    Although erythroid enucleation, the property of erythroblasts to expel their nucleus, has been known for 7ore than a century, surprisingly little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing this unique developmental process. Here we show that similar to cytokinesis, nuclear extrusion requires intracellular calcium signaling and signal transduction through the calmodulin (CaM) pathway. However, in contrast to cytokinesis we found that orthochromatic erythroblasts require uptake of extracellular calcium to enucleate. Together these functional studies highlight a critical role for calcium signaling in the regulation of erythroid enucleation.

  1. Calcium Signaling Is Required for Erythroid Enucleation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina B Wölwer

    Full Text Available Although erythroid enucleation, the property of erythroblasts to expel their nucleus, has been known for 7ore than a century, surprisingly little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing this unique developmental process. Here we show that similar to cytokinesis, nuclear extrusion requires intracellular calcium signaling and signal transduction through the calmodulin (CaM pathway. However, in contrast to cytokinesis we found that orthochromatic erythroblasts require uptake of extracellular calcium to enucleate. Together these functional studies highlight a critical role for calcium signaling in the regulation of erythroid enucleation.

  2. Coronary artery calcium score: current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Priscilla Ornellas; Andrade, Joalbo; Monção, Henry

    2017-01-01

    The coronary artery calcium score plays an Important role In cardiovascular risk stratification, showing a significant association with the medium- or long-term occurrence of major cardiovascular events. Here, we discuss the following: protocols for the acquisition and quantification of the coronary artery calcium score by multidetector computed tomography; the role of the coronary artery calcium score in coronary risk stratification and its comparison with other clinical scores; its indications, interpretation, and prognosis in asymptomatic patients; and its use in patients who are symptomatic or have diabetes. PMID:28670030

  3. Dysbalance of astrocyte calcium under hyperammonemic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Haack

    Full Text Available Increased brain ammonium (NH4(+/NH3 plays a central role in the manifestation of hepatic encephalopathy (HE, a complex syndrome associated with neurological and psychiatric alterations, which is primarily a disorder of astrocytes. Here, we analysed the influence of NH4(+/NH3 on the calcium concentration of astrocytes in situ and studied the underlying mechanisms of NH4(+/NH3-evoked calcium changes, employing fluorescence imaging with Fura-2 in acute tissue slices derived from different regions of the mouse brain. In the hippocampal stratum radiatum, perfusion with 5 mM NH4(+/NH3 for 30 minutes caused a transient calcium increase in about 40% of astrocytes lasting about 10 minutes. Furthermore, the vast majority of astrocytes (∼ 90% experienced a persistent calcium increase by ∼ 50 nM. This persistent increase was already evoked at concentrations of 1-2 mM NH4(+/NH3, developed within 10-20 minutes and was maintained as long as the NH4(+/NH3 was present. Qualitatively similar changes were observed in astrocytes of different neocortical regions as well as in cerebellar Bergmann glia. Inhibition of glutamine synthetase resulted in significantly larger calcium increases in response to NH4(+/NH3, indicating that glutamine accumulation was not a primary cause. Calcium increases were not mimicked by changes in intracellular pH. Pharmacological inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels, sodium-potassium-chloride-cotransporters (NKCC, the reverse mode of sodium/calcium exchange (NCX, AMPA- or mGluR5-receptors did not dampen NH4(+/NH3-induced calcium increases. They were, however, significantly reduced by inhibition of NMDA receptors and depletion of intracellular calcium stores. Taken together, our measurements show that sustained exposure to NH4(+/NH3 causes a sustained increase in intracellular calcium in astrocytes in situ, which is partly dependent on NMDA receptor activation and on release of calcium from intracellular stores. Our study

  4. Calcium: A Nutrient Deserving a Special Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Whiting

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest in calcium has continued since the 1980s when its role in promoting bone growth and retention was established in clinical trials of children and postmenopausal women. The human nutrition functions now attributed to calcium have expanded beyond bone health to include other conditions such as body weight maintenance. While most efforts have been focused on the findings that dietary intakes are low, there are emerging data on safety concerns of excess amounts. This Special Issue on calcium nutrition, spanning the lifecycle from critically ill neonates through to older adults, has been written by some of the leading researchers in this field.

  5. Calcium signaling in physiology and pathophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-ping CHENG; Sheng WEI; Li-ping WEI; Alexei VERKHRATSKY

    2006-01-01

    Calcium ions are the most ubiquitous and pluripotent cellular signaling molecules that control a wide variety of cellular processes.The calcium signaling system is represented by a relatively limited number of highly conserved transporters and channels,which execute Ca2+ movements across biological membranes and by many thousands of Ca2+-sensitive effectors.Molecular cascades,responsible for the generation of calcium signals,are tightly controlled by Ca2+ ions themselves and by genetic factors,which tune the expression of different Ca2+-handling molecules according to adaptational requirements.Ca2+ ions determine normal physiological reactions and the development of many pathological processes.

  6. Thermochemistry of calcium oxide and calcium hydroxide in fluoride slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Mitchell, A.

    1990-08-01

    Calcium oxide activity in binary CaF2-CaO and ternary CaF2-CaO-Al2O3 and CaF2-CaO-SiO2 slags has been determined by CO2-slag equilibrium experiments at 1400 °C. The carbonate ca-pacity of these slags has also been computed and compared with sulfide capacity data available in the literature. The similarity in trends suggests the possibility of characterizing carbonate capacity as an alternative basicity index for fluoride-base slags. Slag-D2O equilibrium experi-ments are performed at 1400°C with different fluoride-base slags to determine water solubility at two different partial pressures of D2O, employing a new slag sampling technique. A novel isotope tracer detection technique is employed to analyze water in the slags. The water solubility data found show higher values than the previous literature data by an order of magnitude but show a linear relationship with the square root of water vapor partial pressure. The activity of hydroxide computed from the data is shown to be helpful in estimating water solubility in in-dustrial electroslag remelting (ESR) slags.

  7. Calcium acetate versus calcium carbonate as phosphorus binders in patients on chronic haemodialysis: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, T; Nielsen, C; Andersen, S P; Behrens, J K; Sodemann, B; Kornerup, H J

    1993-01-01

    The first reported double-blind cross-over comparison between the phosphorus binders calcium carbonate and calcium acetate was undertaken in 15 stable patients on chronic maintenance haemodialysis. Detailed registration of diet and analysis of the protein catabolic rate suggested an unchanged phosphorus intake during the study. It was found that predialytic serum phosphate concentration was significantly decreased by 0.11 mmol/l (0.34 mg/dl) (P = 0.021, 95% confidence limits 0.02-0.21 mmol/l; 0.06-0.65 mg/dl) during calcium acetate treatment. The calcium phosphate product was insignificantly decreased during treatment with calcium acetate whereas we could not exclude the possibility that calcium concentration had increased.

  8. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  9. Hydrolytic conversion of amorphous calcium phosphate into apatite accompanied by sustained calcium and orthophosphate ions release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xufeng; Chen, Siqian; Tian, Feng; Wang, Lizhen; Feng, Qingling; Fan, Yubo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the calcium and orthophosphate ions release during the transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) to hydroxyapatite (HA) in aqueous solution. The ACP is prepared by a wet chemical method and further immersed in the distilled water for various time points till 14d. The release of calcium and orthophosphate ions is measured with calcium and phosphate colorimetric assay kits, respectively. The transition of ACP towards HA is detected by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results indicate that the morphological conversion of ACP to HA occurs within the first 9h, whereas the calcium and orthophosphate ions releases last for over 7d. Such sustained calcium and orthophosphate ions release is very useful for ACP as a candidate material for hard tissue regeneration.

  10. Calcium absorption from fortified ice cream formulations compared with calcium absorption from milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hee, Regine M; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S M J E; Rietveld, Anton G; Wilkinson, Joy E; Quail, Patricia J; Berry, Mark J; Dainty, Jack R; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2009-05-01

    Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fortified ice cream formulation that is lower in fat than regular ice cream and could provide a useful source of additional dietary calcium. Calcium absorption from two different ice cream formulations was determined in young adults and compared with milk. Sixteen healthy volunteers (25 to 45 years of age), recruited from the general public of The Netherlands, participated in a randomized, reference-controlled, double-blind cross-over study in which two test products and milk were consumed with a light standard breakfast on three separate occasions: a standard portion of ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a low level (3%) of butter fat, ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a typical level (9%) of coconut oil, and reduced-fat milk (1.7% milk fat) (200 mL). Calcium absorption was measured by the dual-label stable isotope technique. Effects on calcium absorption were evaluated by analysis of variance. Fractional absorption of calcium from the 3% butterfat ice cream, 9% coconut oil ice cream, and milk was 26%+/-8%, 28%+/-5%, and 31%+/-9%, respectively, and did not differ significantly (P=0.159). Results indicate that calcium bioavailability in the two calcium-fortified ice cream formulations used in this study is as high as milk, indicating that ice cream may be a good vehicle for delivery of calcium.

  11. Astrocyte calcium signaling: the third wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargani, Narges; Attwell, David

    2016-02-01

    The discovery that transient elevations of calcium concentration occur in astrocytes, and release 'gliotransmitters' which act on neurons and vascular smooth muscle, led to the idea that astrocytes are powerful regulators of neuronal spiking, synaptic plasticity and brain blood flow. These findings were challenged by a second wave of reports that astrocyte calcium transients did not mediate functions attributed to gliotransmitters and were too slow to generate blood flow increases. Remarkably, the tide has now turned again: the most important calcium transients occur in fine astrocyte processes not resolved in earlier studies, and new mechanisms have been discovered by which astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i is raised and exerts its effects. Here we review how this third wave of discoveries has changed our understanding of astrocyte calcium signaling and its consequences for neuronal function.

  12. Relating a calcium indicator signal to the unperturbed calcium concentration time-course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abarbanel Henry DI

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optical indicators of cytosolic calcium levels have become important experimental tools in systems and cellular neuroscience. Indicators are known to interfere with intracellular calcium levels by acting as additional buffers, and this may strongly alter the time-course of various dynamical variables to be measured. Results By investigating the underlying reaction kinetics, we show that in some ranges of kinetic parameters one can explicitly link the time dependent indicator signal to the time-course of the calcium influx, and thus, to the unperturbed calcium level had there been no indicator in the cell.

  13. Morphological Investigation of Calcium Carbonate during Ammonification-Carbonization Process of Low Concentration Calcium Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaigang Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine calcium carbonate is a widely used cheap additive. The research is conducted in low degree supersaturation solution in order to study the polymorphic phases’ change and its factors of the calcium carbonate precipitate in the ammonification-carbonization process of the solution with calcium. Fine particles of calcium carbonate are made in the solution containing 0.015 mol/L of Ca2+. Over 98% of the calcium carbonate precipitate without ammonification resembles the morphology of calcite, while the introduction of ammonia can benefit the formation of vaterite. It was inferred that the main cause should be serious partial oversaturation or steric effects. Ammonia also helps to form the twin spherical calcium carbonate. However, particles formed in the process of ammonification-carbonization in solution with low concentration degree of calcium are not even with a scale of the particle diameter from 5 to 12 μm. Inorganic salts, alcohol, or organic acid salts have significant controlling effect on the particle diameter of calcium carbonate and can help to decrease the particle diameter to about 3 μm. Anionic surfactants can prevent the conglobation of calcium carbonate particles and shrink its diameter to 500 nm–1 μm.

  14. Synthesis of calcium hydroxyapatite from calcium carbonate and different orthophosphate sources: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham Minh, Doan, E-mail: doan.phamminh@mines-albi.fr [Universite de Toulouse, Mines Albi, CNRS, Centre RAPSODEE, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi cedex 09 (France); Lyczko, Nathalie; Sebei, Haroun; Nzihou, Ange [Universite de Toulouse, Mines Albi, CNRS, Centre RAPSODEE, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi cedex 09 (France); Sharrock, Patrick [Universite de Toulouse, SIMAD, IUT Paul Sabatier, Avenue Georges Pompidou, 81104 Castres (France)

    2012-08-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcium hydroxyapatite was synthesized from CaCO{sub 3} and four orthophosphates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} led to the complete precipitation of orthophosphate species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} was also the most efficient for calcium dissolution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reaction pathway was dissolution-precipitation accompanied by agglomeration step. - Abstract: The synthesis of calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca-HA) starting from calcium carbonate and different orthophosphate sources, including orthophosphoric acid, potassium, sodium and ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphates, was investigated under ambient conditions. The reaction started with calcium carbonate dissolution in an acid medium, followed by rapid precipitation of calcium cations with orthophosphate species to form calcium phosphate based particles which were in the size range of 0.4-1 {mu}m. These particles then agglomerated into much larger ones, up to 350 {mu}m in diameter (aggregates). These aggregates possessed an unstable porous structure which was responsible for the porosity of the final products. The highest specific surface area and pore volume were obtained with potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate. On the other hand, orthophosphoric acid led to the highest dissolution of calcium carbonate and the complete precipitation of orthophosphate species. Under ambient conditions, calcium phosphate based solid products of low crystallinity were formed. Different intermediates were identified and a reaction pathway proposed.

  15. Diagnosis and clinical manifestations of calcium pyrophosphate and basic calcium phosphate crystal deposition diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ea, Hang-Korng; Lioté, Frédéric

    2014-05-01

    Basic calcium phosphate and pyrophosphate calcium crystals are the 2 main calcium-containing crystals that can deposit in all skeletal tissues. These calcium crystals give rise to numerous manifestations, including acute inflammatory attacks that can mimic alarming and threatening differential diagnoses, osteoarthritis-like lesions, destructive arthropathies, and calcific tendinitis. Awareness of uncommon localizations and manifestations such as intraspinal deposition (eg, crowned dens syndrome, tendinitis of longus colli muscle, massive cervical myelopathy compression) prevents inappropriate procedures and cares. Coupling plain radiography, ultrasonography, computed tomography, and synovial fluid analysis allow accurate diagnosis by directly or indirectly identifying the GRAAL of microcrystal-related symptoms.

  16. Transport of calcium in seedlings and cuttings of mung bean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broadbent, W.

    1984-01-01

    At germination, a very small proportion of stored calcium is mobilized to the axis in the absence of exogenous supplies of calcium. There is no evidence for transport in phloem since exported calcium does not enter the seedling root. /sup 45/Calcium is not redistributed when applied to cotyledons at germination of leaves of seedlings. A subsequent large addition of unlabelled calcium promotes a small redistribution from leaves. Triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), applied to leaves, leads to a small reduction in calcium accumulation but does not effect redistribution. Auxin is without effect and auxin plus TIBA promotes accumulation. These results are discussed in relation to possible extracellular binding sites for calcium.

  17. ERp57 modulates mitochondrial calcium uptake through the MCU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingquan; Shi, Weikang; Guo, Yu; Chai, Zhen

    2014-06-01

    ERp57 participates in the regulation of calcium homeostasis. Although ERp57 modulates calcium flux across the plasma membrane and the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, its functions on mitochondria are largely unknown. Here, we found that ERp57 can regulate the expression of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) and modulate mitochondrial calcium uptake. In ERp57-silenced HeLa cells, MCU was downregulated, and the mitochondrial calcium uptake was inhibited, consistent with the effect of MCU knockdown. When MCU was re-expressed in the ERp57 knockdown cells, mitochondrial calcium uptake was restored. Thus, ERp57 is a potent regulator of mitochondrial calcium homeostasis.

  18. Calcium signaling in neocortical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlén, Per; Fritz, Nicolas; Smedler, Erik; Malmersjö, Seth; Kanatani, Shigeaki

    2015-04-01

    The calcium ion (Ca(2+) ) is an essential second messenger that plays a pivotal role in neurogenesis. In the ventricular zone (VZ) of the neocortex, neural stem cells linger to produce progenitor cells and subsequently neurons and glial cells, which together build up the entire adult brain. The radial glial cells, with their characteristic radial fibers that stretch from the inner ventricular wall to the outer cortex, are known to be the neural stem cells of the neocortex. Migrating neurons use these radial fibers to climb from the proliferative VZ in the inner part of the brain to the outer layers of the cortex, where differentiation processes continue. To establish the complex structures that constitute the adult cerebral cortex, proliferation, migration, and differentiation must be tightly controlled by various signaling events, including cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling. During development, cells regularly exhibit spontaneous Ca(2+) activity that stimulates downstream effectors, which can elicit these fundamental cell processes. Spontaneous Ca(2+) activity during early neocortical development depends heavily on gap junctions and voltage dependent Ca(2+) channels, whereas later in development neurotransmitters and synapses exert an influence. Here, we provide an overview of the literature on Ca(2+) signaling and its impact on cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation in the neocortex. We point out important historical studies and review recent progress in determining the role of Ca(2+) signaling in neocortical development.

  19. Calcium Imaging of Sonoporation of Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabens, David; Aehle, Matthew; Steyer, Grant; Kourennyi, Dmitri; Deng, Cheri X.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound mediated delivery of compounds is a relatively recent development in drug delivery and gene transfection techniques. Due to the lack of methods for real-time monitoring of sonoporation at the cellular level, the efficiency of drug/gene delivery and sonoporation associated side effects, such as the loss of cell viability and enhanced apoptosis, have been studied only through post US exposure analyses, requiring days for cell incubation. Furthermore, because microporation appears to be transient in nature, it was not possible to correlate transfection with microporation on an individual cellular basis. By studying the role of calcium in the cell and using fluorescent calcium imaging to study sonoporation it is possible to quantify both cell porosity and sonoporation side effects. Since both post sonoporation cell survival and delivery efficiency are related to the dynamic process of the cell membrane poration, calcium imaging of sonoporation will provide important knowledge to obtain improved understanding of sonoporation mechanism. Our experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of calcium imaging of sonoporation in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. We have measured the changes in the intracellular calcium concentration using Fura-2, a fluorescent probe, which indicate influx or flow of Calcium across the cell membrane. Analysis of data identified key aspects in the dynamic sonoporation process including the formation of pores in the cell membrane, and the relative temporal duration of the pores and their resealing. These observations are obtained through the analysis of the rate the calcium concentration changes within the cells, making it possible to visualize membrane opening and repair in real-time through such changes in the intracellular calcium concentration.

  20. Gel time of calcium acrylate grouting material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩同春

    2004-01-01

    Calcium acrylate is a polymerized grout, and can polymerize in an aqueous solution. The polymerization reaction utilizes ammonium persulfate as a catalyst and sodium thiosulfate as the activator. Based on the theory of reaction kinetics, this study on the relation between gel time and concentration of activator and catalyst showed that gel time of calcium acrylate is inversely proportional to activator and catalyst concentration. A formula of gel time is proposed, and an example is provided to verify the proposed formula.

  1. Is Excess Calcium Harmful to Health?

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Robin M.; Ebeling, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    Most current guidelines recommend that older adults and the elderly strive for a total calcium intake (diet and supplements) of 1,000 to 1,300 mg/day to prevent osteoporosis and fractures. Traditionally, calcium supplements have been considered safe, effective and well tolerated, but their safety has recently been questioned due to potential adverse effects on vascular disease which may increase mortality. For example, the findings from a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (current...

  2. Physical Properties of Acidic Calcium Phosphate Cements

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The gold standard for bone replacement today, autologous bone, suffers from several disadvantages, such as the increased risk of infection due to the need for two surgeries. Degradable synthetic materials with properties similar to bone, such as calcium phosphate cements, are a promising alternative. Calcium phosphate cements are suited for a limited amount of applications and improving their physical properties could extend their use into areas previously not considered possible. For example...

  3. Evaluation of quick disintegrating calcium carbonate tablets

    OpenAIRE

    Fausett, Hector; Gayser, Charles; Dash, Alekha K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop a rapidly disintegrating calcium carbonate (CC) tablet by direct compression and compare it with commercially available calcium tablets. CC tablets were formulated on a Carver press using 3 different forms of CC direct compressed granules (Cal-Carb 4450®, Cal-Carb 4457®, and Cal-Carb 4462®). The breaking strength was measured using a Stokes-Monsanto hardness tester. The disintegration and dissolution properties of the tablets were studied using...

  4. Rickets induced by calcium or phosphate depletion.

    OpenAIRE

    Abugassa, S.; Svensson, O.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effects of calciopenia and phosphopenia on longitudinal growth, skeletal mineralization, and development of rickets in young Sprague-Dawley rats. At an age of 21 days, two experimental groups were given diets containing 0.02% calcium or 0.02% phosphorus; otherwise the diets were nutritionally adequate. After 7, 14, and 21 days, five animals from each group were randomly chosen. The animals were anaesthetized and blood samples were drawn for analysis of calcium, phosphorus, and ...

  5. Fractal aspects of calcium binding protein structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isvoran, Adriana [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)], E-mail: aisvoran@cbg.uvt.ro; Pitulice, Laura [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania); Craescu, Constantin T. [INSERM U759/Institute Curie-Recherche, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Batiment 112, 91405 Orsay (France); Chiriac, Adrian [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)

    2008-03-15

    The structures of EF-hand calcium binding proteins may be classified into two distinct groups: extended and compact structures. In this paper we studied 20 different structures of calcium binding proteins using the fractal analysis. Nine structures show extended shapes, one is semi-compact and the other 10 have compact shapes. Our study reveals different fractal characteristics for protein backbones belonging to different structural classes and these observations may be correlated to the physicochemical forces governing the protein folding.

  6. Understanding calcium dynamics experiments and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malchow, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Intracellular Calcium is an important messenger in living cells. Calcium dynamics display complex temporal and spatial structures created by the concentration patterns which are characteristic for a nonlinear system operating far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Written as a set of tutorial reviews on both experimental facts and theoretical modelling, this volume is intended as an introduction and modern reference in the field for graduate students and researchers in biophysics, biochemistry and applied mathematics.

  7. [Bone and Nutrition. Vitamin D independent calcium absorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Ritsuko

    2015-07-01

    Vitamin D endocrine system is required for normal calcium and bone homeostasis. Trans-epithelial calcium absorption is initiated with calcium entry into the intestinal epithelial cells from luminal fluid through calcium permeable channels, and those expressions are strongly supported by vitamin D action. On the other hands, dietary treatment, mineral supplementation or restriction, successfully improves intestinal calcium absorption in global vitamin D receptor knock-out (VDR KO) mice, though vitamin D dependent active transport pathway is lacking. Dietary rescue of intestinal calcium absorption provided a positive calcium balance in this mouse model, and suggested that the major role of vitamin D function on calcium homeostasis was considered to be intestinal active absorption. To elucidate the entire process of intestinal calcium absorption, vitamin D independent calcium transport system was characterized into either trans-cellular or para-cellular process.

  8. Analytical models of calcium binding in a calcium channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jinn-Liang [Department of Applied Mathematics, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Eisenberg, Bob [Department of Molecular Biophysics and Physiology, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

    2014-08-21

    The anomalous mole fraction effect of L-type calcium channels is analyzed using a Fermi like distribution with the experimental data of Almers and McCleskey [J. Physiol. 353, 585 (1984)] and the atomic resolution model of Lipkind and Fozzard [Biochemistry 40, 6786 (2001)] of the selectivity filter of the channel. Much of the analysis is algebraic, independent of differential equations. The Fermi distribution is derived from the configuration entropy of ions and water molecules with different sizes, different valences, and interstitial voids between particles. It allows us to calculate potentials and distances (between the binding ion and the oxygen ions of the glutamate side chains) directly from the experimental data using algebraic formulas. The spatial resolution of these results is comparable with those of molecular models, but of course the accuracy is no better than that implied by the experimental data. The glutamate side chains in our model are flexible enough to accommodate different types of binding ions in different bath conditions. The binding curves of Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} for [CaCl{sub 2}] ranging from 10{sup −8} to 10{sup −2} M with a fixed 32 mM background [NaCl] are shown to agree with published Monte Carlo simulations. The Poisson-Fermi differential equation—that includes both steric and correlation effects—is then used to obtain the spatial profiles of energy, concentration, and dielectric coefficient from the solvent region to the filter. The energy profiles of ions are shown to depend sensitively on the steric energy that is not taken into account in the classical rate theory. We improve the rate theory by introducing a steric energy that lumps the effects of excluded volumes of all ions and water molecules and empty spaces between particles created by Lennard-Jones type and electrostatic forces. We show that the energy landscape varies significantly with bath concentrations. The energy landscape is not constant.

  9. Is Excess Calcium Harmful to Health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin M. Daly

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Most current guidelines recommend that older adults and the elderly strive for a total calcium intake (diet and supplements of 1,000 to 1,300 mg/day to prevent osteoporosis and fractures. Traditionally, calcium supplements have been considered safe, effective and well tolerated, but their safety has recently been questioned due to potential adverse effects on vascular disease which may increase mortality. For example, the findings from a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (currently published in abstract form only revealed that the use of calcium supplements was associated with an ~30% increased risk of myocardial infarction. If high levels of calcium are harmful to health, this may alter current public health recommendations with regard to the use of calcium supplements for preventing osteoporosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the latest information from human observational and prospective studies, randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses related to the effects of calcium supplementation on vascular disease and related risk factors, including blood pressure, lipid and lipoprotein levels and vascular calcification.

  10. Self-Setting Calcium Orthophosphate Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are bioactive and biodegradable grafting bioceramics in the form of a powder and a liquid. After mixing, both phases form pastes, which set and harden forming either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite or brushite. Since both of them are remarkably biocompartible, bioresorbable and osteoconductive, self-setting calcium orthophosphate formulations appear to be promising bioceramics for bone grafting. Furthermore, such formulations possess excellent molding capabilities, easy manipulation and nearly perfect adaptation to the complex shapes of bone defects, followed by gradual bioresorption and new bone formation. In addition, reinforced formulations have been introduced, which might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The discovery of self-setting properties opened up a new era in the medical application of calcium orthophosphates and many commercial trademarks have been introduced as a result. Currently such formulations are widely used as synthetic bone grafts, with several advantages, such as pourability and injectability. Moreover, their low-temperature setting reactions and intrinsic porosity allow loading by drugs, biomolecules and even cells for tissue engineering purposes. In this review, an insight into the self-setting calcium orthophosphate formulations, as excellent bioceramics suitable for both dental and bone grafting applications, has been provided.

  11. Oyster shell calcium induced parotid swelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthiah Palaniappan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59 year old female consumer was started on therapy with oyster shell calcium in combination with vitamin D3 and she presented with swelling below the ear, after two doses. She stopped the drug by herself and the swelling disappeared in one day. She started the drug one day after recovery and again she developed the swelling. She was advised to stop the drug with a suggestion to take lemon to enhance parotid secretion and the swelling subsided. Calcium plays major role in salivary secretion and studies have shown reduced parotid secretion in rats, deficient of vitamin D. But in humans involvement of calcium and vitamin D3 in parotid secretion is unknown. However, the patient had no history of reaction though she had previously taken vitamin D3 with calcium carbonate which was not from oyster shell. Hence, we ruled out vitamin D3 in this reaction and suspecting oyster shell calcium as a culprit. This adverse drug reaction (ADR was assessed using World Health Organization (WHO causality assessment, Naranjo′s and Hartwig severity scales. As per WHO causality assessment scale, the ADR was classified as "certain". This reaction was analyzed as per Naranjo′s algorithm and was classified as probable. According to Hartwig′s severity scale the reaction was rated as mild. Our case is an example of a mild but rare adverse effect of oyster shell calcium carbonate which is widely used.

  12. The use of size-defined DNA-functionalized calcium phosphate nanoparticles to minimise intracellular calcium disturbance during transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Sebastian; Kovtun, Anna; Dietzel, Irmgard D; Epple, Matthias; Heumann, Rolf

    2009-12-01

    Calcium phosphate-based transfection methods are frequently used to transfer DNA into living cells. However, it has so far not been studied in detail to what extend the different transfection methods lead to a net calcium uptake. Upon subsequent resolution of the calcium phosphate, intracellular free ionic calcium-surges could result, inducing as side effect various physiological responses that may finally result in cell death. Here we investigated the overall calcium uptake by the human bladder carcinoma cell line T24 during the standard calcium phosphate transfection method and also during transfection with custom-made calcium phosphate/DNA nanoparticles by isotope labelling with (45)calcium. (45)Calcium uptake was strongly increased after 7h of standard calcium phosphate transfection but not if the transfection was performed with calcium phosphate nanoparticles. Time lapse imaging microscopy using the calcium-sensitive dye Fura-2 revealed large transient increases of the intracellular free calcium level during the standard calcium phosphate transfection but not if calcium phosphate nanoparticles were used. Consistently, the viability of cells transfected by calcium phosphate/DNA nanoparticles was not changed, in remarkable contrast to the standard method where considerable cell death occurred.

  13. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathleen M; Martin, Berdine R; Wastney, Meryl E; McCabe, George P; Moe, Sharon M; Weaver, Connie M; Peacock, Munro

    2013-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus, reduce phosphorus retention, and prevent negative calcium balance; however, data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance during CKD to support this. Here, we studied eight patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 36 ml/min) who received a controlled diet with or without a calcium carbonate supplement (1500 mg/day calcium) during two 3-week balance periods in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over design. All feces and urine were collected during weeks 2 and 3 of each balance period and fasting blood, and urine was collected at baseline and at the end of each week. Calcium kinetics were determined using oral and intravenous (45)calcium. Patients were found to be in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on the placebo. Calcium carbonate supplementation produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance, suggesting soft-tissue deposition. Fasting blood and urine biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. Thus, the positive calcium balance produced by calcium carbonate treatment within 3 weeks cautions against its use as a phosphate binder in patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD, if these findings can be extrapolated to long-term therapy.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The biomineral calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO4·2H2O), known as brushite, is a malleable material that both grows and dissolves faster than most other calcium minerals, including other calcium phosphate phases, calcium carbonates and calcium oxalates. Within the body, this ready formation and dissolution can play a role in certain diseases, such as kidney stone and plaque formation. However, these same properties, along with brushite’s excellent biocompatibility, can be used to gr...

  15. Factors to consider in the selection of a calcium supplement.

    OpenAIRE

    Shangraw, R F

    1989-01-01

    Calcium supplements are widely used, yet many questions remain as to the absorption of various calcium salts. Because the solubility of many calcium salts is dependent upon pH, the type of salt used, the condition of the patient, and the time of administration should be considered. Studies show that many calcium supplements on the market today do not meet standards of quality established in the "U.S. Pharmacopeia" (USP). Consumers must be discerning about the products they purchase. Calcium s...

  16. Effect of combining different calcium concentration dialysate on calcium balance in peritoneal dialysis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hui-ping; WU Bei; LU Li-xia; QIAO Jie; WU Xiang-lan; WANG Mei

    2012-01-01

    Background Calcium and phosphorus metabolic disturbance are common in dialysis patients and associated with increased morbidity and mortality.Therefore,maintaining the balance of calcium and phosphate metabolism and suitable intact parathyroid hormone(iPTH)level has become the focus of attention.We investigated the effects of different peritoneal dialysate calcium concentrations on calcium phosphate metabolism and iPTH in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis(CAPD)patients.Methods Forty stable CAPD patients with normal serum calcium were followed for six months of treatment with 1.25 mmol/L calcium dialysate(DCa1.25,PD4,22 patients)or a combination of 1.75 mmol/L calcium dialysate(DCa1.75,PD2)and PD4(18 patients)twice a day respectively.Total serum calcium(after albumin correction),serum phosphorus,iPTH,alkaline phosphatase(ALP)and blood pressure were recorded before and 1,3 and 6 months after treatment commenced.Results No significant difference was found in baseline serum calcium,phosphorus between the two patient groups,but the levels of iPTH were significantly different.No significant changes were found in the dosage of calcium carbonate and active vitamin D during 6 months.In the PD4 group,serum calcium level at the 1st,3rd,6th months were significantly lower than the baseline(P<0.05).There was no significant difference in serum phosphorus after 6 months treatment.iPTH was significantly higher(P<0.001)at the 1st,3rd,and 6th months compared with the baseline.No differences were seen in ALP and blood pressure.In the PD4+PD2 group,no significant changes in serum calcium,phosphorus,iPTH,ALP and BP during the 6-month follow-up period.Conclusions Treatment with 1.25 mmol/L calcium dialysate for six months can decrease serum calcium,increase iPTH,without change in serum phosphorus,ALP,and BP.The combining of PD4 and PD2 can stabilize the serum calcium and avoid fluctuations in iPTH levels.

  17. Expanding the neuron's calcium signaling repertoire: intracellular calcium release via voltage-induced PLC and IP3R activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Ryglewski

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal calcium acts as a charge carrier during information processing and as a ubiquitous intracellular messenger. Calcium signals are fundamental to numerous aspects of neuronal development and plasticity. Specific and independent regulation of these vital cellular processes is achieved by a rich bouquet of different calcium signaling mechanisms within the neuron, which either can operate independently or may act in concert. This study demonstrates the existence of a novel calcium signaling mechanism by simultaneous patch clamping and calcium imaging from acutely isolated central neurons. These neurons possess a membrane voltage sensor that, independent of calcium influx, causes G-protein activation, which subsequently leads to calcium release from intracellular stores via phospholipase C and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activation. This allows neurons to monitor activity by intracellular calcium release without relying on calcium as the input signal and opens up new insights into intracellular signaling, developmental regulation, and information processing in neuronal compartments lacking calcium channels.

  18. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: Double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in post-menopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (C...

  19. Calcium sensing receptors and calcium oscillations: calcium as a first messenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitwieser, Gerda E

    2006-01-01

    Calcium sensing receptors (CaR) are unique among G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) since both the first (extracellular) and second (intracellular) messengers are Ca(2+). CaR serves to translate small fluctuations in extracellular Ca(2+) into intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations. In many cells and tissues, CaR also acts as a coincidence detector, sensing both changes in extracellular Ca(2+) plus the presence of various allosteric activators including amino acids, polyamines, and/or peptides. CaR oscillations are uniquely shaped by the activating agonist, that is, Ca(2+) triggers sinusoidal oscillations while Ca(2+) plus phenylalanine trigger transient oscillations of lower frequency. The distinct oscillation patterns generated by Ca(2+)versus Ca(2+) plus phenylalanine are the results of activation of distinct signal transduction pathways. CaR is a member of Family C GPCRs, having a large extracellular agonist binding domain, and functioning as a disulfide-linked dimer. The CaR dimer likely can be driven to distinct active conformations by various Ca(2+) plus modulator combinations, which can drive preferential coupling to divergent signaling pathways. Such plasticity with respect to both agonist and signaling outcomes allows CaR to uniquely contribute to the physiology of organs and tissues where it is expressed. This chapter will examine the structural features of CaR, which contribute to its unique properties, the nature of CaR-induced intracellular Ca(2+) signals and the potential role(s) for CaR in development and differentiation.

  20. Calcium homeostasis in barley aleurone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.L.

    1990-02-21

    Under the auspices of the Department of Energy we investigated calcium homeostasis in aleurone cells of barley. This investigation was initiated to explore the role played by extracellular Ca{sup 2+} in gibberellic acid (GA)-induced synthesis and secretion of hydrolases in the aleurone layer. We have focused our attention on four topics that relate to the role of Ca{sup 2+} in regulating the synthesis of {alpha}-amylase. First, we determined the stoichiometry of Ca{sup 2+} binding to the two principal classes of barley {alpha}-amylase and examined some of the biochemical and physical properties of the native and Ca{sup 2+}-depleted forms of the enzyme. Second, since {alpha}-amylase is a Ca{sup 2+} containing metalloenzyme that binds one atom of Ca{sup 2+} per molecule, we developed methods to determine the concentration of Ca{sup 2+} in the cytosol of the aleurone cell. We developed a technique for introducing Ca{sup 2+}-sensitive dyes into aleurone protoplasts that allows the measurement of Ca{sup 2+} in both cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Third, because the results of our Ca{sup 2+} measurements showed higher levels of Ca{sup 2+} in the ER than in the cytosol, we examined Ca{sup 2+} transport into the ER of control and GA-treated aleurone tissue. And fourth, we applied the technique of patch-clamping to the barley aleurone protoplast to examine ion transport at the plasma membrane. Our results with the patch-clamp technique established the presence of K{sup +} channels in the plasma membrane of the aleurone protoplast, and they showed that this cell is ideally suited for the application of this methodology for studying ion transport. 34 refs.

  1. The calcium-sensing receptor regulates mammary gland parathyroid hormone–related protein production and calcium transport

    OpenAIRE

    VanHouten, Joshua; Dann, Pamela; McGeoch, Grace; Brown, Edward M.; Krapcho, Karen; Neville, Margaret; Wysolmerski, John J

    2004-01-01

    The transfer of calcium from mother to milk during lactation is poorly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that parathyroid hormone–related protein (PTHrP) production and calcium transport in mammary epithelial cells are regulated by extracellular calcium acting through the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). The CaR becomes expressed on mammary epithelial cells at the transition from pregnancy to lactation. Increasing concentrations of calcium, neomycin, and a calcimimetic compound suppre...

  2. PTHrP regulation and calcium balance in sea bream (Sparus auratus L.) under calcium constraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, W.; Bevelander, G.S.; Hang, X.; Lu, W.; Guerreiro, P.M.; Spanings, T.; Canario, A.V.; Flik, G.

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile gilthead sea bream were exposed to diluted seawater (2.5 per thousand salinity; DSW) for 3 h or, in a second experiment, acclimated to DSW and fed a control or calcium-deficient diet for 30 days. Branchial Ca(2+) influx, drinking rate and plasma calcium levels were assessed. Sea bream

  3. Eggshell powder, a comparable or better source of calcium than purified calcium carbonate: Piglet studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, A.; Beelen, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Powdered chicken eggshells might be an interesting and widely available source of calcium. In two studies using piglets we determined the digestibility of calcium from different diets. The first study compared casein-based diets with CaCO3 (CasCC) or eggshell powder (CasES). The second study compare

  4. Eggshell powder, a comparable or better source of calcium than purified calcium carbonate: Piglet studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, A.; Beelen, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Powdered chicken eggshells might be an interesting and widely available source of calcium. In two studies using piglets we determined the digestibility of calcium from different diets. The first study compared casein-based diets with CaCO3 (CasCC) or eggshell powder (CasES). The second study

  5. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY: TREATMENT IS WITH CALCIUM CARBONATE OR CALCIUM CITRATE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARETTA, Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso; CAMBI, Maria Paula Carlini; RODRIGUES, Arieli Luz; MENDES, Silvana Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    Background : Bariatric surgery, especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, can cause serious nutritional complications arising from poor absorption of essential nutrients. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is one such complications that leads to increased parathyroid hormone levels due to a decrease in calcium and vitamin D, which may compromise bone health. Aim : To compare calcium carbonate and calcium citrate in the treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Method : Patients were selected on the basis of their abnormal biochemical test and treatment was randomly done with citrate or calcium carbonate. Results : After 60 days of supplementation, biochemical tests were repeated, showing improvement in both groups. Conclusion : Supplementation with calcium (citrate or carbonate) and vitamin D is recommended after surgery for prevention of secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:26537273

  6. The physiological role of mitochondrial calcium revealed by mice lacking the mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xin; Liu, Jie; Nguyen, Tiffany; Liu, Chengyu; Sun, Junhui; Teng, Yanjie; Fergusson, Maria M; Rovira, Ilsa I; Allen, Michele; Springer, Danielle A; Aponte, Angel M; Gucek, Marjan; Balaban, Robert S; Murphy, Elizabeth; Finkel, Toren

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial calcium has been postulated to regulate a wide range of processes from bioenergetics to cell death. Here, we characterize a mouse model that lacks expression of the recently discovered mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Mitochondria derived from MCU(-/-) mice have no apparent capacity to rapidly uptake calcium. Whereas basal metabolism seems unaffected, the skeletal muscle of MCU(-/-) mice exhibited alterations in the phosphorylation and activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, MCU(-/-) mice exhibited marked impairment in their ability to perform strenuous work. We further show that mitochondria from MCU(-/-) mice lacked evidence for calcium-induced permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. The lack of PTP opening does not seem to protect MCU(-/-) cells and tissues from cell death, although MCU(-/-) hearts fail to respond to the PTP inhibitor cyclosporin A. Taken together, these results clarify how acute alterations in mitochondrial matrix calcium can regulate mammalian physiology.

  7. Calcium ferrite formation from the thermolysis of calcium tris (maleato) ferrate(III)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B S Randhawa; Kamaljeet Sweety

    2000-08-01

    For preparing calcium ferrite, calcium tris (maleato) ferrate(III) precursor was prepared by mixing aqueous solutions of iron(III) maleate, calcium maleate and maleic acid. Various physico-chemical techniques i.e. TG, DTG, DTA, Mössbauer, XRD, IR etc have been used to study the decomposition behaviour from ambient to 900°C and ferrite formation. Three consecutive decomposition steps leading to the formation of -Fe2O3 and calcium carbonate have been observed at various stages of thermolysis. In the final stage the ferrite, Ca2Fe2O5, is obtained as a result of solid state reaction between -Fe2O3 and calcium carbonate at 788°C, a temperature much lower than for ceramic method. The results have been compared with those of the oxalate precursor.

  8. THERMAL DEGRADATION AND FLAME RETARDANCY OF CALCIUM ALGINATE FIBERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-shan Kong; Bing-bing Wang; Quan Ji; Yan-zhi Xia; Zhao-xia Guo; Jian Yu

    2009-01-01

    Calcium alginate fibers were prepared by wet spinning of sodium alginate into a coagulating bath containing calcium chloride. The thermal degradation and flame retardancy of calcium alginate fibers were investigated with thermal gravimetry (TG), X-ray diffraction (XRD), limiting oxygen index (LOI) and cone calorimeter (CONE). The results show that calcium alginate fibers are inherently flame retardant with a LOI value of 34, and the heat release rate (HRR), total heat release (THR), CO and CO_2 concentrations during combustion are much lower compared with those of viscose fibers. Calcium carbonate and calcium oxide were formed during thermal degradation of calcium alginate fibers at different temperatures. The shape of calcium alginate fibers is well kept after LOI test. The rigid combustion residue char acts as an effective barrier to the outward diffusion of flame and heat. The combustion process and flame retardant mechanism of calcium alginate fibers are also discussed.

  9. Role of mitochondria and network connectivity in intercellular calcium oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Dokukina, I V; Grachev, E A; Gunton, J D; Dokukina, Irina V.; Gracheva, Maria E.; Grachev, Eugene A.; Gunton, James D.

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria are large-scale regulators of cytosolic calcium under normal cellular conditions. In this paper we model the complex behavior of mitochondrial calcium during the action of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate on a single cell and find results that are in good agreement with recent experimental studies. We also study the influence of the cellular network connectivity on intercellular signalling via gap junction diffusion. We include in our model the dependence of the junctional conductivity on the cytosolic calcium concentrations in adjacent cells. We consider three different mechanisms of calcium wave propagation through gap junctions: via calcium diffusion, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion, and both calcium and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion. We show that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion is the mechanism of calcium wave propagation and that calcium diffusion is the mechanism of synchronization of cytosolic calcium oscillations in adjacent cells. We also study the role of different to...

  10. Role of calcium in gravity perception of plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael L.

    1986-01-01

    Calcium ions may play a key role in linking graviperception by the root cap to the asymmetric growth which occurs in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Application of calcium-chelating agents to the root cap inhibits gravitropic curvature without affecting growth. Asymmetric application of calcium to one side of the root cap induces curvature toward the calcium source, and gravistimulation induces polar movement of applied (Ca-45)(2+) across the root cap toward the lower side. The action of calcium may be linked to auxin movement in roots since: (1) auxin transport inhibitors interfere both with gravitropic curvature and graviinduced polar calcium movement and (2) asymmetric application of calcium enhances auxin movement across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Indirect evidence indicates that the calcium-modulated regulator protein, calmodulin, may be involved in either the transport or action of calcium in the gravitropic response mechanism of roots.

  11. Contracture of Slow Striated Muscle during Calcium Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Richard L.; Hein, Manfred M.

    1963-01-01

    When deprived of calcium the slow striated muscle fibers of the frog develop reversible contractures in either hypertonic or isotonic solutions. While calcium deprivation continues because of a flowing calcium-free solution the muscles relax slowly and completely. Restoration of calcium during contracture relaxes the muscle promptly to initial tension. When relaxed during calcium lack the return of calcium does not change tension and the muscle stays relaxed. When contractures are induced by solutions containing small amounts of calcium relaxation does not occur or requires several hours. The rate of tension development depends upon the rate at which calcium moves outward since the contractures develop slower in low concentrations of calcium and are absent or greatly slowed in a stagnant calcium-free solution. Withdrawal of calcium prevents the contractile responses to ACh, KCl, or electrical stimulation through the nerve. Muscles return to their original excitability after calcium is restored. Origin of the contractures is unrelated to nerve activity since they are maximal during transmission failure from calcium lack, occur in denervated muscles, and are not blocked by high concentrations of d-tubocurarine, procaine, or atropine. The experiments also indicate that the contractures do not originate from repetitive activity of muscle membranes. The findings are most simply explained by relating the outward movement of calcium as a link for initiating contraction in slow type striated muscle. PMID:14065284

  12. Codissolution of calcium hydrogenphosphate and sodium hydrogencitrate in water. Spontaneous supersaturation of calcium citrate increasing calcium bioavailability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Danielsen, Bente Pia; Garcia, André Castilho

    2017-01-01

    The sparingly soluble calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate, co-dissolving in water during dissolution of freely soluble sodium hydrogencitrate sesquihydrate as caused by proton transfer from hydrogencitrate to hydrogenphosphate, was found to form homogenous solutions supersaturated by a factor up......, as identified from FT-IR spectra, from these spontaneously formed supersaturated solutions was several hours, and the time to reach solubility equilibrium was several days. Initial calcium ion activity was found to be almost independent of the degree of supersaturation as determined electrochemically....... The supersaturated solutions had a pH around 4.7, and calcium binding to hydrogencitrate as the dominant citrate species during precipitation was found to be exothermic with a determined association constant of 357 L mol-1 at 25 °C for unit ionic strength, and δH° = -22 ± 2 kJ mol-1, δS° = -26 ± 8 J K-1 mol-1...

  13. Effects of calcium gluconate on the utilization of magnesium and the nephrocalcinosis in rats fed excess dietary phosphorus and calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonan, O; Takahashi, R; Kado, S; Nagata, Y; Kimura, H; Uchida, K; Watanuki, M

    1996-08-01

    The effects of calcium gluconate on the utilization of magnesium and nephrocalcinosis in male Wistar rats made magnesium-deficient by adding excess dietary phosphorus (1.195 g of phosphorus/100 g of diet) and calcium (1.04 g of calcium/100 g of diet) were compared with the effects of calcium carbonate. The effects of dietary magnesium concentration on the magnesium status and nephrocalcinosis were also examined. Adding excess dietary phosphorus and calcium decreased the apparent magnesium absorption ratios and the concentrations of magnesium in the serum and femur and increased the deposition of calcium in the kidney, and the low magnesium condition (0.024 g of magnesium/100 g of diet) aggravated the deposition of calcium and the low magnesium status. The apparent magnesium absorption ratios and femur magnesium concentration in the rats fed a calcium gluconate diet (an equimolar mixture of calcium gluconate and calcium carbonate was used as a source of calcium) were significantly higher than in the rats fed a calcium carbonate diet (only calcium carbonate was used as a source of calcium), irrespective of dietary magnesium concentration. Dietary calcium gluconate lessened the accumulation of calcium in the kidney and increased the serum magnesium concentration compared with dietary calcium carbonate, when the rats were fed the normal magnesium diet (0.049 g of magnesium/100 g of diet) but not the low magnesium diet. We speculate that the increased utilization of magnesium by feeding the calcium gluconate diet to a limited extent prevented the low magnesium status and the severity of nephrocalcinosis caused by adding excess dietary phosphorus and calcium.

  14. Discovery and Development of Calcium Channel Blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Théophile Godfraind

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the mid 1960s, experimental work on molecules under screening as coronary dilators allowed the discovery of the mechanism of calcium entry blockade by drugs later named calcium channel blockers. This paper summarizes scientific research on these small molecules interacting directly with L-type voltage-operated calcium channels. It also reports on experimental approaches translated into understanding of their therapeutic actions. The importance of calcium in muscle contraction was discovered by Sidney Ringer who reported this fact in 1883. Interest in the intracellular role of calcium arose 60 years later out of Kamada (Japan and Heibrunn (USA experiments in the early 1940s. Studies on pharmacology of calcium function were initiated in the mid 1960s and their therapeutic applications globally occurred in the the 1980s. The first part of this report deals with basic pharmacology in the cardiovascular system particularly in isolated arteries. In the section entitled from calcium antagonists to calcium channel blockers, it is recalled that drugs of a series of diphenylpiperazines screened in vivo on coronary bed precontracted by angiotensin were initially named calcium antagonists on the basis of their effect in depolarized arteries contracted by calcium. Studies on arteries contracted by catecholamines showed that the vasorelaxation resulted from blockade of calcium entry. Radiochemical and electrophysiological studies performed with dihydropyridines allowed their cellular targets to be identified with L-type voltage-operated calcium channels. The modulated receptor theory helped the understanding of their variation in affinity dependent on arterial cell membrane potential and promoted the terminology calcium channel blocker (CCB of which the various chemical families are introduced in the paper. In the section entitled tissue selectivity of CCBs, it is shown that characteristics of the drug, properties of the tissue, and of the stimuli are

  15. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A.;

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed...... lymph node is also reduced following a single dose of anti-C5aR, suggesting that modulation of the C5a/C5aR axis results in effects on the T cell compartment in inflammatory arthritis. In summary, these data demonstrate that blockade of C5aR leads to rapid and significant effects on arthritic disease......-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA) model to study the very early effects of a blocking, non-depleting anti-C5aR mAb on joint inflammation with treatment synchronised with disease onset, an approach not previously described. The DTHA model is a single-paw inflammatory arthritis model characterised by synchronised...

  16. The MHC class II ligand lymphocyte activation gene-3 is co-distributed with CD8 and CD3-TCR molecules after their engagement by mAb or peptide-MHC class I complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannier, S; Triebel, F

    1999-11-01

    Previous studies indicated that signaling through lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3), a MHC class II ligand, induced by multivalent anti-receptor antibodies led to unresponsiveness to TCR stimulation. Here, lateral distribution of the LAG-3 molecules and its topological relationship (mutual proximity) to the TCR, CD8, CD4, and MHC class I and II molecules were studied in the plasma membrane of activated human T cells in co-capping experiments and conventional fluorescence microscopy. Following TCR engagement by either TCR-specific mAb or MHC-peptide complex recognition in T-B cell conjugates, LAG-3 was found to be specifically associated with the CD3-TCR complex. Similarly, following CD8 engagement LAG-3 and CD8 were co-distributed on the cell surface while only a low percentage of CD4-capped cells displayed LAG-3 co-caps. In addition, LAG-3 was found to be associated with MHC class II (i.e. DR, DP and DQ) and partially with MHC class I molecules. The supramolecular assemblies described here between LAG-3, CD3, CD8 and MHC class II molecules may result from an organization in raft microdomains, a phenomenon known to regulate early events of T cell activation.

  17. Calcium And Zinc Deficiency In Preeclamptic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Ferdousi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pre-eclampsia is the most common medical complication of pregnancy associated withincreased maternal and infant mortality and morbidity. Reduced serum calcium and zinc levels arefound associated with elevated blood pressure in preeclampsia. Objective: To observe serum calciumand zinc levels in preeclamptic women. Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in theDepartment of Physiology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Shahbag, Dhaka betweenJuly 2009 to June 2010. In this study, 60 pregnant women of preeclampsia, aged 18-39 years withgestational period more than 20th weeks were included as the study (group B. For comparison ageand gestational period matched 30 normotensive pregnant women control (group A were also studied.All the subjects were selected from Obstetric and Gynae In and Out patient Department of BSMMUand Dhaka Medical College Hospital. Serum calcium was measured by Colorimetric method and serumzinc was measured by Spectrophotometric method. Data were analysed by independent sample t testand Pearson’s correlation coefficient test. Results: Mean serum calcium and zinc levels weresignificantly (p<0.001 lower in study group than those of control group. Again, serum calcium andzinc showed significant negative correlation with SBP and DBP in preeclamptic women. Conclusion:This study concludes that serum calcium and zinc deficiency may be one of the risk factor ofpreeclampsia. Therefore, early detection and supplementation to treat this deficiency may reduce theincidence of preeclampsia.

  18. Information flow through calcium binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Ji Hyun; Bialek, William

    2013-03-01

    Calcium signaling is a ubiquitous mode of biological communication, which regulates a great variety of vital processes in living systems. Such a signal typically begins with an elementary event, in which calcium ions bind to a protein, inducing a change in the protein's structure. Information can only be lost, from what was conveyed through this initial event, as the signal is further transduced through the downstream networks. In the present work we analyze and optimize the information flow in the calcium binding process. We explicitly calculate the mutual information between the calcium concentration and the states of the protein, using a simple model for allosteric regulation in a dimeric protein. The optimal solution depends on the dynamic range of the input as well as on the timescale of signal integration. According to our result, the optimizing strategy involves allowing the calcium-binding protein to be ``activated'' by a partial occupation of its sites, and tuning independently the strengths of cooperative interactions in the binding and unbinding processes.

  19. Calcium sulphate in ammonium sulphate solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, E.C.

    1905-01-01

    Calcium sulphate, at 25?? C., is two-thirds as soluble in dilute (o.i mol per liter) and twice as soluble in concentrated (3 mois per liter) ammonium sulphate solution as in water. The specific electric conductivity of concentrated ammonium sulphate solutions is lessened by saturating with calcium sulphate. Assuming that dissociation of ammonium sulphate takes place into 2NH4?? and SO4" and of calcium sulphate into Ca and SO4" only, and that the conductivity is a measure of such dissociation, the solubility of calcium sulphate in dilute ammonium sulphate solutions is greater than required by the mass-law. The conductivity of the dilute mixtures may be accurately calculated by means of Arrhenius' principle of isohydric solutions. In the data obtained in these calculations, the concentration of non-dissociated calcium sulphate decreases with increasing ammonium sulphate. The work as a whole is additional evidence of the fact that we are not yet in possession of all the factors necessary for reconciling the mass-law to the behavior of electrolytes. The measurements above described were made in the chemical laboratory of the University of Michigan.

  20. Calcium and bone disorders in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shriraam Mahadevan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant transplacental calcium transfer occurs during pregnancy, especially during the last trimester, to meet the demands of the rapidly mineralizing fetal skeleton. Similarly, there is an obligate loss of calcium in the breast milk during lactation. Both these result in considerable stress on the bone mineral homeostasis in the mother. The maternal adaptive mechanisms to conserve calcium are different in pregnancy and lactation. During pregnancy, increased intestinal absorption of calcium from the gut mainly due to higher generation of calcitriol (1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D helps in maintaining maternal calcium levels. On the other hand, during lactation, the main compensatory mechanism is skeletal resorption due to increased generation of parathormone related peptide (PTHrP from the breast. Previous studies suggest that in spite of considerable changes in bone mineral metabolism during pregnancy, parity and lactation are not significantly associated with future risk for osteoporosis. However, in India, the situation may not be the same as a significant proportion of pregnancies occur in the early twenties when peak bone mass is not yet achieved. Further, malnutrition, anemia and vitamin D deficiency are commonly encountered in this age group. This may have an impact on future bone health of the mother. It may also probably provide an opportunity for health care providers for prevention. Other metabolic bone diseases like hypoparathyroidism, hyperparathyroidism and pseudohypoparathyroidism are rarely encountered in pregnancy. Their clinical implications and management are also discussed.

  1. Primary osteoporosis prophylaxis with different calcium preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Toroptsova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess efficacy of different modes of management in women with osteopenia. Material and methods. 190 women with osteopenia of spine and/or femoral neck aged 50 to 70 years (mean 60,6±5 years were followed up during a year. Different modes of prophylaxis were applied. 59 pts of group 1 received Calcium D3 Nicomed 2 tablets a day, 25 pts of group 2 - Vitrum Osteomag 2 tablets a day, 46 pts of group 3 - calcium carbonate 2500 mg/day, 60 pts of control group received recommendations about diet and physical activity. Results. 3,5% from 114 pts examined had normal 25(OHD blood level while 23% showed deficiency of vitamin D. Mean calcium consumption with milk products was 350 mg/day. Bone mineral density (BMD significantly increased on 1,6-1% in pts older than 60 years receiving Vitrum Osteomag and Calcium D3 Nicomed respectively while younger pts did not show such changes. BMD in pts olderthan 60 years receiving calcium carbonate increased on 0,5% but this difference was not significant. Tolerability of all 3 drugs was comparable.

  2. Evaluation of quick disintegrating calcium carbonate tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fausett, H; Gayser, C; Dash, A K

    2000-07-02

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop a rapidly disintegrating calcium carbonate (CC) tablet by direct compression and compare it with commercially available calcium tablets. CC tablets were formulated on a Carver press using 3 different forms of CC direct compressed granules (Cal-Carb 4450, Cal-Carb 4457, and Cal-Carb 4462). The breaking strength was measured using a Stokes-Monsanto hardness tester. The disintegration and dissolution properties of the tablets were studied using USP methodology. The calcium concentration was determined by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the surface topography of the granules and tablets. Breaking strength of Cal-Carb 4450, Cal-Carb 4457, and Cal-Carb 4462 tablets was in the range of 7.2 to 7.7 kg, as compared with a hardness of 6.2 kg and 10 kg for the commercially available calcium tablets Citracal and Tums, respectively. The disintegration time for the tablets presented in the order earlier was 4.1, 2.1, 1.9, 2.9, and 9.7 minutes, respectively. The dissolution studies showed that all formulations released 100% of the elemental calcium in simulated gastric fluid in less than 20 minutes. In summary, this study clearly demonstrated that quick disintegrating CC tablets can be formulated without expensive effervescence technology.

  3. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Takahiro; Adams, David J.

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are a large and functionally diverse group of membrane ion channels ubiquitously expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. VGCCs contribute to various physiological processes and transduce electrical activity into other cellular functions. This chapter provides an overview of biophysical properties of VGCCs, including regulation by auxiliary subunits, and their physiological role in neuronal functions. Subsequently, then we focus on N-type calcium (Cav2.2) channels, in particular their diversity and specific antagonists. We also discuss the role of N-type calcium channels in nociception and pain transmission through primary sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons (nociceptors). It has been shown that these channels are expressed predominantly in nerve terminals of the nociceptors and that they control neurotransmitter release. To date, important roles of N-type calcium channels in pain sensation have been elucidated genetically and pharmacologically, indicating that specific N-type calcium channel antagonists or modulators are particularly useful as therapeutic drugs targeting chronic and neuropathic pain.

  4. Role of claudins in renal calcium handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Luis Negri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Paracellular channels occurring in tight junctions play a major role in transepithelial ionic flows. This pathway includes a high number of proteins, such as claudins. Within renal epithelium, claudins result in an ionic selectivity in tight junctions. Ascending thick limb of loop of Henle (ATLH is the most important segment for calcium reabsorption in renal tubules. Its cells create a water-proof barrier, actively transport sodium and chlorine through a transcellular pathway, and provide a paracellular pathway for selective calcium reabsorption. Several studies have led to a model of paracellular channel consisting of various claudins, particularly claudin-16 and 19. Claudin-16 mediates cationic paracellular permeability in ATLH, whereas claudin-19 increases cationic selectivity of claudin-16 by blocking anionic permeability. Recent studies have shown that claudin-14 promoting activity is only located in ATLH. When co-expressed with claudin-16, claudin-14 inhibits the permeability of claudin-16 and reduces paracellular permeability to calcium. Calcium reabsorption process in ATLH is closely regulated by calcium sensor receptor (CaSR, which monitors circulating Ca levels and adjusts renal excretion rate accordingly. Two microRNA, miR-9 and miR-374, are directly regulated by CaSR. Thus, miR-9 and miR-374 suppress mRNA translation for claudin-14 and induce claudin-14 decline.

  5. Portable fluorescence photometer for monitoring free calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struckmeier, Jens; Klopp, Erk; Born, Matthias; Hofmann, Martin; Tenbosch, Jochen; Jones, David B.

    2000-12-01

    We introduce a compact and portable photometric system for measurements of the calcium dynamics in cells. The photometer is designed for applications in centrifuges or in zero gravity environment and thus extremely compact and reliable. It operates with the calcium-sensitive dye Indo-1. The excitation wavelength of 345 nm is generated by frequency doubling of a laser diode. Two compact photomultiplier tubes detect the fluorescent emission. The electronics provide the sensitivity of photon counting combined with simultaneous measurement of the temperature, of air pressure, and of gravitational force. Internal data storage during the experiment is possible. A newly developed cell chamber stabilizes the cell temperature to 37.0±0.1 °C and includes a perfusion system to supply the cells with medium. The system has a modular setup providing the possibility of changing the light source and detectors for investigation of ions other than calcium. Measurements of the intracellular calcium concentration are based on a comprehensive calibration of our system. First experiments show that the calcium dynamics of osteosarcoma cells stimulated by parathyroid hormone is observable.

  6. Calcium's Role in Mechanotransduction during Muscle Development

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    Tatiana Benavides Damm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanotransduction is a process where cells sense their surroundings and convert the physical forces in their environment into an appropriate response. Calcium plays a crucial role in the translation of such forces to biochemical signals that control various biological processes fundamental in muscle development. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cells may for example result from stretch, electric and magnetic stimulation, shear stress, and altered gravity exposure. The response, mainly involving changes in intracellular calcium concentration then leads to a cascade of events by the activation of downstream signaling pathways. The key calcium-dependent pathways described here include the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation. The subsequent effects in cellular homeostasis consist of cytoskeletal remodeling, cell cycle progression, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis, all necessary for healthy muscle development, repair, and regeneration. A deregulation from the normal process due to disuse, trauma, or disease can result in a clinical condition such as muscle atrophy, which entails a significant loss of muscle mass. In order to develop therapies against such diseased states, we need to better understand the relevance of calcium signaling and the downstream responses to mechanical forces in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this review is to discuss in detail how diverse mechanical stimuli cause changes in calcium homeostasis by affecting membrane channels and the intracellular stores, which in turn regulate multiple pathways that impart these effects and control the fate of muscle tissue.

  7. Calcium acetate or calcium carbonate for hyperphosphatemia of hemodialysis patients: a meta-analysis.

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    Yong Wang

    Full Text Available High levels of serum phosphorus both at baseline and during follow-up are associated with increased mortality in dialysis patients, and administration of phosphate binders was independently associated with improved survival among hemodialysis population. Calcium-based phosphate binders are the most commonly used phosphate binders in developing countries for their relatively low costs.To compare the efficacy and safety between calcium carbonate and calcium acetate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in hemodialysis patients.PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Google scholar and Chinese databases (Wanfang, Weipu, National Knowledge Infrastructure of China were searched for relevant studies published before March 2014. Reference lists of nephrology textbooks and review articles were checked. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs and quasi-RCTs that assessed the effects and adverse events of calcium acetate and calcium carbonate in adult patients with MHD was performed using Review Manager 5.0.A total of ten studies (625 participants were included in this meta-analysis. There was insufficient data in all-cause mortality and cardiovascular events for meta-analysis. Compared with calcium carbonate group, the serum phosphorus was significantly lower in calcium acetate group after4 weeks' administration (MD -0.15 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.28 to -0.01 and after 8 weeks' administration (MD -0.25 mmol/L, 95% CI -0.40 to -0.11. There was no difference in serum calcium levels or the incidence of hypercalcemia between two groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks. No statistical difference was found in parathyroid hormone (PTH levels or serum calcium by phosphorus (Ca x P product. There was significantly higher risk of intolerance with calcium acetate treatment (RR 3.46, 95% CI 1.48 to 8.26.For hyperphosphatemia treatment, calcium acetate showed better efficacy and with a higher incidence of intolerance compared with calcium carbonate. There are insufficient data

  8. The calcium paradox - What should we have to fear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseni; Cortez, José Luís Lasso; Goissis, Gilberto; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    The calcium paradox was first mentioned in 1966 by Zimmerman et al. Thereafter gained great interest from the scientific community due to the fact of the absence of calcium ions in heart muscle cells produce damage similar to ischemia-reperfusion. Although not all known mechanisms involved in cellular injury in the calcium paradox intercellular connection maintained only by nexus seems to have a key role in cellular fragmentation. The addition of small concentrations of calcium, calcium channel blockers, and hyponatraemia hypothermia are important to prevent any cellular damage during reperfusion solutions with physiological concentration of calcium. PMID:25140476

  9. Effects of Adding Chymosin to Milk on Calcium Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ulla Kristine; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn; Mosekilde, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Calcium intake and absorption is important for bone health. In a randomized double-blind cross-over trial, we investigated effects of adding chymosin to milk on the intestinal calcium absorption as measured by renal calcium excretion and indices of calcium homeostasis. The primary outcome...... of the study was 24-h renal calcium excretion that is considered a proxy measure of the amount of calcium absorbed from the intestine. We studied 125 healthy men and women, aged 34 (25-45) years on two separate days. On each day, a light breakfast was served together with 500 ml of semi-skimmed milk to which...

  10. Preparation and characterization of calcium phosphate biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calafiori, A R; Di Marco, G; Martino, G; Marotta, M

    2007-12-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) samples have been prepared with a mixture of monocalciumphosphate monohydrate (MCPM) and calcium carbonate (CC) powders, in stechiometric moles ratio 1:2.5 to obtain a Ca/P ratio of about 1.67 typical of hydroxyapatite (HAp), with or without addition of HAp. All specimens are incubated at 30 degrees C in a steam saturated air environment for 3, 6 and 15 days respectively, afterwards dried and stored under nitrogen. The calcium phosphate samples have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers hardness test (HV), diametral compression (d.c.), strength compression, and porosity evaluation. MCPM/CC mixture has a 30% HAp final concentration and is characterized by higher porosity (amount 78%) and mechanical properties useful as filler in bone segments without high mechanical stress.

  11. Vitamin D with calcium reduces mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars; Avenell, Alison; Masud, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:Vitamin D may affect multiple health outcomes. If so, an effect on mortality is to be expected. Using pooled data from randomized controlled trials, we performed individual patient data (IPD) and trial level meta-analyses to assess mortality among participants randomized to either...... vitamin D alone or vitamin D with calcium.Subjects and Methods:Through a systematic literature search, we identified 24 randomized controlled trials reporting data on mortality in which vitamin D was given either alone or with calcium. From a total of 13 trials with more than 1000 participants each, eight......,528 randomized participants (86.8% females) with a median age of 70 (interquartile range, 62-77) yr. Vitamin D with or without calcium reduced mortality by 7% [hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88-0.99]. However, vitamin D alone did not affect mortality, but risk of death was reduced if vitamin...

  12. OSTEOPOROSIS IN CALCIUM PYROPHOSPHATE CRYSTAL DEPOSITION DISEASE

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    S A Vladimirov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the incidence of osteoporosis (OP in patients with calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease (CPCDD. Subjects and methods. Eighty patients with CPCDD were examined. Bone mineral density (BMD of the forearm, lumbar spine, and femoral neck was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Laboratory diagnosis involved determination of the blood levels of C-reactive protein, parathyroid hormone, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus and the daily urinary excretion of calcium and phosphates. Results. The patients with OP were significantly older than those with normal BMD and osteopenia. Forearm bones were the most common isolated location of OP and osteopenia. Injuries in the history, traumatic fractures, and the intake of diuretics were somewhat more common in the patients diagnosed with OP. The incidence of hyperparathyroidism did not differ significantly in the groups.

  13. How calcium makes endocytic receptors attractive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian B F; Moestrup, Søren K

    2014-01-01

    Nutrients, biological waste-products, toxins, pathogens, and other ligands for endocytosis are typically captured by multidomain receptors with multiligand specificity. Upon internalization, the receptor-ligand complex segregates, followed by lysosomal degradation of the ligand and recycling...... of the receptor. Endosomal acidification and calcium efflux lead to the essential ligand-receptor affinity switch and separation. Recent data, including crystal structures of receptor-ligand complexes, now reveal how calcium, in different types of domain scaffolds, functions in a common way as a removable...... 'lynchpin' that stabilizes favorable positioning of ligand-attractive receptor residues. In addition to explaining how calcium depletion can cause ligand-receptor dissociation, the new data add further insight into how acidification contributes to dissociation through structural changes that affect...

  14. Glial calcium signaling in physiology and pathophysioilogy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexei VERKHRASKY

    2006-01-01

    Neuronal-glial circuits underlie integrative processes in the nervous system.Function of glial syncytium is,to a very large extent,regulated by the intracellular calcium signaling system.Glial calcium signals are triggered by activation of multiple receptors,expressed in glial membrane,which regulate both Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum.The endoplasmic reticulum also endows glial cells with intracellular excitable media,which is able to produce and maintain long-ranging signaling in a form of propagating Ca2+ waves.In pathological conditions,calcium signals regulate glial response to injury,which might have both protective and detrimental effects on the nervous tissue.

  15. Thermal structural properties of calcium tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senyshyn, Anatoliy; Hoelzel, Markus [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. for Materials Science; Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz FRM-II; Hansen, Thomas [Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Vasylechko, Leonid [Lviv Polytechnic National Univ. (Ukraine). Semiconductor Electronics Dept.; Mikhailik, Vitaliy [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot (United Kingdom); Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Kraus, Hans [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Ehrenberg, Helmut [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. for Materials Science; IFW Dresden (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The results of in-situ temperature-resolved powder diffraction studies of CaWO{sub 4} scheelite using both synchrotron radiation and neutron scattering are reported. The studies performed over a broad temperature range of 5-1773 K confirm the scheelite type of structure for calcium tungstate over the whole temperature range. The anisotropy of thermal expansion in calcium tungstate as well as the rigidity of WO{sub 4} complexes have been analysed in terms of bond distances, interatomic angles and anisotropic displacement parameters. The WO{sub 4}{sup 2-} complex anions showed a remarkable robustness in the whole studied temperature range, thus pointing out that the layered structure formed by two-dimensional CsCl-type arrangements of Ca cations and WO{sub 4} complexes is the primary reason for the anisotropy of thermal expansion in calcium tungstate. (orig.)

  16. Calcium carbide poisoning via food in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Per, Hüseyin; Kurtoğlu, Selim; Yağmur, Fatih; Gümüş, Hakan; Kumandaş, Sefer; Poyrazoğlu, M Hakan

    2007-02-01

    The fast ripening of fruits means they may contain various harmful properties. A commonly used agent in the ripening process is calcium carbide, a material most commonly used for welding purposes. Calcium carbide treatment of food is extremely hazardous because it contains traces of arsenic and phosphorous. Once dissolved in water, the carbide produces acetylene gas. Acetylene gas may affect the neurological system by inducing prolonged hypoxia. The findings are headache, dizziness, mood disturbances, sleepiness, mental confusion, memory loss, cerebral edema and seizures. We report the case of a previously healthy 5 year-old girl with no chronic disease history who was transferred to our Emergency Department with an 8-h history of coma and delirium. A careful history from her father revealed that the patient ate unripe dates treated with calcium carbide.

  17. Calcium pathway machinery at fertilization in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Isabela; Wessel, Gary M

    2013-01-01

    Calcium signaling in cells directs diverse physiological processes. The calcium waves triggered by fertilization is a highly conserved calcium signaling event essential for egg activation, and has been documented in every egg tested. This activity is one of the few highly conserved events of egg activation through the course of evolution. Echinoderm eggs, as well as many other cell types, have three main intracellular Ca(2+) mobilizing messengers - IP3, cADPR and NAADP. Both cADPR and NAADP were identified as Ca(2+) mobilizing messengers using the sea urchin egg homogenate, and this experimental system, along with the intact urchin and starfish oocyte/egg, continues to be a vital tool for investigating the mechanism of action of calcium signals. While many of the major regulatory steps of the IP3 pathway are well resolved, both cADPR and NAADP remain understudied in terms of our understanding of the fundamental process of egg activation at fertilization. Recently, NAADP has been shown to trigger Ca(2+) release from acidic vesicles, separately from the ER, and a new class of calcium channels, the two-pore channels (TPCs), was identified as the likely targets for this messenger. Moreover, it was found that both cADPR and NAADP can be synthesized by the same family of enzymes, the ADP-rybosyl cyclases (ARCs). In this context of increasing amount of information, the potential coupling and functional roles of different messengers, intracellular stores and channels in the formation of the fertilization calcium wave in echinoderms will be critically evaluated.

  18. Calcium dependent magnesium uptake in myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, C P; Liu, D

    1993-01-01

    The frog myocardium maintains magnesium content at a steady state level when stimulated at 0.4Hz while being perfused with Ringer's solution containing 1 x 10(-3) M Ca2+ and 5 x 10(-7) M magnesium. When calcium is removed 43% of tissue magnesium is lost within 30 seconds or 12 beats. Restoration of calcium to the perfusion solution causes reaccumulation of magnesium from a solution containing 5 x 10(-7) M magnesium. The reaccumulation of magnesium indicates a highly selective transport system for magnesium which is dependent upon the presence of calcium. Calcium appears to reduce the leak of magnesium from the myocardium and enhances the transport of magnesium into the myocardial cell. Intracellular magnesium is a necessary cofactor for hundreds of enzymes, and is essential for protein synthesis and as an extracellular divalent cation helps to stabilize excitable membranes in conjunction with calcium. The concentration of ionized magnesium in the sarcoplasm of myocardial muscle has an average value of 1.45 mM +/- 1.37 (standard deviation), N = 19) with a range of 0.5 to 3.6 mM (1). The heart with its numerous mitochondria and high enzymatic activity is vulnerable to myocardial damage due to magnesium loss. The isolated frog ventricle conserves intracellular magnesium when perfused with Ringer's solution containing no added magnesium and maintains function for hours. The ability to conserve magnesium suggests a low permeability of the sarcolemma to magnesium and an extremely efficient inward transport system. Removal of calcium as well as magnesium from the perfusion solution causes a rapid loss of tension in the electrically driven frog ventricle (0.4) Hz.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Impairment of ciprofloxacin absorption by calcium polycarbophil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ryuji; Ueno, Kazuyuki; Imano, Hideki; Kawai, Masayuki; Kuwahara, Shiro; Tsuchishita, Yoshimasa; Yonezawa, Emi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2002-07-01

    The effect of calcium polycarbophil on the absorption of ciprofloxacin, a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, was evaluated in an in vitro and in vivo study. In the in vitro study, the release of ciprofloxacin from the cellulose membrane in the presence or absence of metal cations was measured using the dissolution test procedure. In the in vivo study, male ST Wistar rats and male volunteers were employed. First, 20 mg/kg of ciprofloxacin alone (Rat Study 1) or 20 mg/kg of ciprofloxacin in combination with 64 mg/kg of calcium chloride (Rat Study 2) was administered orally to 3 rats. Second, a volunteer study was employed and a randomized crossover design with twophases was used. In onephase, volunteers received 400 mg of ciprofloxacin alone (Study 1); in the other phase, they received 400 mg of ciprofloxacin and 1200 mg of fine calcium polycarbophil granules concomitantly (Study 2). The plasma and serum concentrations of ciprofloxacin were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The release of ciprofloxacin from the cellulose membrane in the presence of aluminum, calcium, or iron ions was slower than that in the absence of these metal ions. The AUC0-4 and Cmax in Rat Study 2 were lower than those respective values in Rat Study 1. AUC0-4 was approximately 60% lower in Rat Study 2 than Rat Study 1. In the volunteer study, the AUC0-12 and Cmax in Study 2 were lower than those respective values in Study 1. In particular, AUC0-12 was approximately 50% lowerin Study 2 than in Study 1. These findings suggest that when ciprofloxacin and calcium polycarbophil were coadministered concomitantly, a decrease of ciprofloxacin absorption was observed, and this action was caused by the formation of chelate complexes. Therefore, it seems clear that we should avoid the concomitant administration of ciprofloxacin and calcium polycarbophil.

  20. Roscovitine increases intracellular calcium release and capacitative calcium entry in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ho Sook; Chung, Sul-Hee

    2010-01-18

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), which is activated by the non-cyclin regulator p35 or p39, is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase that is implicated in many physiological and pathological processes. Here, we studied calcium signaling using the fluorescent cytosolic calcium indicator, Fura-4, in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells treated with roscovitine, a Cdk5 inhibitor. As compared to the control cells, the roscovitine-treated cells significantly potentiated intracellular calcium release by membrane depolarization (high K(+)) or through thapsigargin. In addition, roscovitine increased the magnitude of capacitative calcium entry (CCE), i.e., a calcium influx mechanism triggered by the depletion of intracellular calcium stores. Notably, roscovitine markedly slowed the rate of Ca(2+) removal from the plasma membrane. These results suggest that Cdk5 regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis and that the dysregulation of Cdk5 may contribute to disease pathogenesis by perturbing cellular Ca(2+) signaling. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Calcium-dependent calcium decay explains STDP in a dynamic model of hippocampal synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Standage

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that the direction and magnitude of synaptic plasticity depends on post-synaptic calcium flux, where high levels of calcium lead to long-term potentiation and moderate levels lead to long-term depression. At synapses onto neurons in region CA1 of the hippocampus (and many other synapses, NMDA receptors provide the relevant source of calcium. In this regard, post-synaptic calcium captures the coincidence of pre- and post-synaptic activity, due to the blockage of these receptors at low voltage. Previous studies show that under spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP protocols, potentiation at CA1 synapses requires post-synaptic bursting and an inter-pairing frequency in the range of the hippocampal theta rhythm. We hypothesize that these requirements reflect the saturation of the mechanisms of calcium extrusion from the post-synaptic spine. We test this hypothesis with a minimal model of NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity, simulating slow extrusion with a calcium-dependent calcium time constant. In simulations of STDP experiments, the model accounts for latency-dependent depression with either post-synaptic bursting or theta-frequency pairing (or neither and accounts for latency-dependent potentiation when both of these requirements are met. The model makes testable predictions for STDP experiments and our simple implementation is tractable at the network level, demonstrating associative learning in a biophysical network model with realistic synaptic dynamics.

  2. Calcium and calcium isotope changes during carbon cycle perturbations at the end-Permian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Nemanja; Zeebe, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Negative carbon and calcium isotope excursions, as well as climate shifts, took place during the most severe mass extinction event in Earth's history, the end-Permian (˜252 Ma). Investigating the connection between carbon and calcium cycles during transient carbon cycle perturbation events, such as the end-Permian, may help resolve the intricacies between the coupled calcium-carbon cycles, as well as provide a tool for constraining the causes of mass extinction. Here, we identify the deficiencies of a simplified calcium model employed in several previous studies and we demonstrate the importance of a fully coupled carbon-cycle model when investigating the dynamics of carbon and calcium cycling. Simulations with a modified version of the LOSCAR model, which includes a fully coupled carbon-calcium cycle, indicate that increased weathering rates and ocean acidification (potentially caused by Siberian Trap volcanism) are not capable of producing trends observed in the record, as previously claimed. Our model results suggest that combined effects of carbon input via Siberian Trap volcanism (12,000 Pg C), the cessation of biological carbon export, and variable calcium isotope fractionation (due to a change in the seawater carbonate ion concentration) represents a more plausible scenario. This scenario successfully reconciles δ13C and δ44Ca trends observed in the sediment record, as well as the proposed warming of >6oC.

  3. Characterization of Calcium Compounds in Opuntia ficus indica as a Source of Calcium for Human Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isela Rojas-Molina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of calcium compounds in cladodes, soluble dietary fiber (SDF, and insoluble dietary fiber (IDF of Opuntia ficus indica are reported. The characterization of calcium compounds was performed by using Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopy. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and titrimetric methods were used for quantification of total calcium and calcium compounds. Whewellite (CaC2O4·H2O, weddellite (CaC2O4·(H2O2.375, and calcite (CaCO3 were identified in all samples. Significant differences (P≤0.05 in the total calcium contents were detected between samples. CaC2O4·H2O content in cladodes and IDF was significantly higher (P≤0.05 in comparison to that observed in SDF, whereas minimum concentration of CaCO3 was detected in IDF with regard to CaCO3 contents observed in cladodes and SDF. Additionally, molar ratio oxalate : Ca2+ in all samples changed in a range from 0.03 to 0.23. These results support that calcium bioavailability in O. ficus indica modifies according to calcium compounds distribution.

  4. Biotic Nitrogen Enrichment Regulates Calcium Sources to Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett-Ridge, J. C.; Perakis, S. S.; Hynicka, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient in forest ecosystems that is susceptible to leaching loss and depletion. Calcium depletion can affect plant and animal productivity, soil acid buffering capacity, and fluxes of carbon and water. Excess nitrogen supply and associated soil acidification are often implicated in short-term calcium loss from soils, but the long-term role of nitrogen enrichment on calcium sources and resupply is unknown. Here we use strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) as a proxy for calcium to investigate how soil nitrogen enrichment from biological nitrogen fixation interacts with bedrock calcium to regulate both short-term available supplies and the long-term sources of calcium in montane conifer forests. Our study examines 22 sites in western Oregon, spanning a 20-fold range of bedrock calcium on sedimentary and basaltic lithologies. In contrast to previous studies emphasizing abiotic control of weathering as a determinant of long-term ecosystem calcium dynamics and sources (via bedrock fertility, climate, or topographic/tectonic controls) we find instead that that biotic nitrogen enrichment of soil can strongly regulate calcium sources and supplies in forest ecosystems. For forests on calcium-rich basaltic bedrock, increasing nitrogen enrichment causes calcium sources to shift from rock-weathering to atmospheric dominance, with minimal influence from other major soil forming factors, despite regionally high rates of tectonic uplift and erosion that can rejuvenate weathering supply of soil minerals. For forests on calcium-poor sedimentary bedrock, we find that atmospheric inputs dominate regardless of degree of nitrogen enrichment. Short-term measures of soil and ecosystem calcium fertility are decoupled from calcium source sustainability, with fundamental implications for understanding nitrogen impacts, both in natural ecosystems and in the context of global change. Our finding that long-term nitrogen enrichment increases forest reliance on atmospheric

  5. Antiatherogenic properties of calcium antagonists. State of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, D B; Heider, J G

    1989-04-17

    Atherosclerosis is an arterial disease characterized by localized accumulation of collagen, elastin, lipids, and calcium at sites associated with macrophage infiltration and altered smooth muscle metabolism. Studies in several types of animal models, especially cholesterol-fed rabbits, have shown that calcium competitors, calcium chelators, anticalcifying agents, and calcium antagonists can reduce the accumulation of atherogenic lesion components and decrease the progression of lesions. Although there are some conflicting data in the animal model studies, it is now apparent that several classes of calcium antagonists inhibit the progression of early arterial lesions induced by cholesterol-feeding in animals. The dihydropyridine class of calcium antagonists may be more potent as anti-atherosclerotic agents than the other classes. Mechanisms involving regulation of endothelial cell, smooth muscle cell, and macrophage metabolism may be responsible for the effects of calcium antagonists on early lesion progression. Recent studies in cell culture-model systems suggest that calcium antagonists may significantly alter activities that regulate lipoprotein-derived cholesterol accumulation by arterial wall cells. Some of these activities are independent of calcium flux across voltage-operated calcium channels. Thus, calcium antagonists may reduce the progression of atherogenic lesions by a combination of decreasing calcium accumulation within arterial wall cells and by altering calcium channel-independent metabolic activities, which affect lesion development.

  6. Ground-Based Detection of Exoatmospheric Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Patricio M.; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola

    2014-11-01

    Data acquired with HDS@Subaru for HD209458b is re-analyzed. A new pipeline performs an automated search for the exoatmospheric presence of several elements without any a-priori assumptions on its existence or strength. We analyzed thousands of lines in the full spectral range of this optical echelle spectrograph using a robust method to correct for the telluric contamination. We recover previous detections of Sodium and Halpha, and present the first strong detection of Calcium in an Extrasolar Atmosphere as well as the tentative detection of other elements. The Calcium detection is in disagreement with theoretical thermal-equilibrium models.

  7. Calcium and weight control-Publications summaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feride Çelebi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a public health problem. And it is known that both energy balance and nutritional factors are effective on it. The effects of dietary calcium on bone health are known however with recent studies, it has become a food item that focused on the effect on body weight control. Most epidemiyolojik studies claim that there is a relationship between long-term consumption of diary milk and milk products and the decrease of body weight and fat mass. In this article, there are different studies that support or do not support this idea. However the effect mechanism of calcium on weight control is tried to be explained.

  8. Avian eggshell formation in calcium-rich and calcium-poor habitats: Importance of snail shells and anthropogenic calcium sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graveland, J.

    1996-01-01

    Most passerines depend on the intake of calcium-rich material in addition to their normal food for proper eggshell formation and skeletal growth. A large proportion of Great Tits (Pants major) in forests on nutrient-poor soils in the Netherlands produce eggs with defective shells as a result of calc

  9. Avian eggshell formation in calcium-rich and calcium-poor habitats: Importance of snail shells and anthropogenic calcium sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graveland, J.

    1996-01-01

    Most passerines depend on the intake of calcium-rich material in addition to their normal food for proper eggshell formation and skeletal growth. A large proportion of Great Tits (Pants major) in forests on nutrient-poor soils in the Netherlands produce eggs with defective shells as a result of calc

  10. Avian eggshell formation in calcium-rich and calcium-poor habitats: Importance of snail shells and anthropogenic calcium sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graveland, J.

    1996-01-01

    Most passerines depend on the intake of calcium-rich material in addition to their normal food for proper eggshell formation and skeletal growth. A large proportion of Great Tits (Pants major) in forests on nutrient-poor soils in the Netherlands produce eggs with defective shells as a result of

  11. Calcium supplementation does not augment bone gain in young women consuming diets moderately low in calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger-Lux, M Janet; Davies, K Michael; Heaney, Robert P

    2005-10-01

    In earlier observational work, the dietary calcium:protein ratio was directly related to bone accrual in healthy postadolescent women. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that augmented calcium intake would increase postadolescent skeletal consolidation, using a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled design. We recruited 152 healthy young women (age 23.1 +/- 2.7 y, BMI 22.5 +/- 3.0 kg/m2); their usual diets, as assessed by 7-d food diaries, were low in calcium (605 +/- 181 mg/d; 15.1 +/- 4.5 mmol/d) and in the calcium:protein ratio (10.1 +/- 2.0 mg/g). The subjects were randomly assigned to supplemental calcium [500 mg calcium (12.5 mmol) as the carbonate, 3 times/d, with meals] or placebo capsules identical in appearance; all participants also took a daily multivitamin, and they were followed for up to 36 mo with bone densitometry (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) at 6-mo intervals. A total of 121 subjects remained in the study for at least 12 mo (median time in the study, 35 mo), with a mean compliance level (observed/expected tablet consumption) of 87.7%. DXA data for these 121 subjects indicated modest but significant mean rates of increase (i.e., 0.24 to 1.10%/y) in bone mineral content (BMC; total body, total hip, and lumbar spine) and in lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) but no change in total hip BMD. None of these rates of change differed by group, i.e., calcium supplementation did not have any measurable effect on bone mass accrual. By midstudy, the calcium content of the subjects' usual diets for both groups had risen by approximately 15%. The combined effect of improved intakes of dietary calcium and the small amount of calcium added by the multivitamin tablets resulted in a mean calcium intake for the control group > 800 mg (20 mmol)/d, possibly at or near the threshold beyond which additional calcium has no further effect on bone accrual.

  12. Effects of extracellular calcium on calcium transport during hyperthermia of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghileri, L J; Marcha, C; Crone-Escanyé, M C; Robert, J

    1985-08-01

    The effects of different concentrations of extracellular ion calcium on the transport of calcium by tumor cells have been studied by means of the uptake of radiocalcium. Tumor cells incubated at 45 degrees C take up 4-10 times the amount of radioactivity incorporated by cells incubated at 37 degrees C. The difference is still greater (up to 100 times) for the intracellular incorporation as assessed by elimination of the membrane-bound calcium by EGTA treatment. The possible mechanisms involved in this differential behavior are discussed.

  13. Calcium Supplements: A Risk Factor for Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Waldman T, et al. Calcium supplements and cardiovascular disease: A review. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. 2015;9:298. Reid IR. Cardiovascular effects of calcium supplements. Nutrients. 2013;5:2522. Xiao ...

  14. The effects of calcium regulation of endosperm reserve protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... The effects of steep liquor calcium ion on sorghum endosperm reserve protein mobilization were ... ularly calcium ion exerted a strong regulatory influence ... determined spectrophotometrically as ammonia using Nessler's.

  15. Hemodynamic effects of calcium gluconate administered to conscious horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, T L; Foreman, J H; Benson, G J; Thurmon, J C; Tranquilli, W J; Constable, P D; Olson, W O; Davis, L E

    1996-01-01

    Calcium gluconate was administered to conscious horses at 3 different rates (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mg/kg/min for 15 minutes each). Serum calcium concentrations and parameters of cardiovascular function were evaluated. All 3 calcium administration rates caused marked increases in both ionized and total calcium concentrations, cardiac index, stroke index, and cardiac contractility (dP/dtmax). Mean arterial pressure and right atrial pressure were unchanged; heart rate decreased markedly during calcium administration. Ionized calcium concentration remained between 54% and 57% of total calcium concentration throughout the study. We conclude that calcium gluconate can safely be administered to conscious horses at 0.1 to 0.4 mg/kg/min and that administration will result in improved cardiac function.

  16. Calcium Supplements Might Raise Older Women's Dementia Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nutrient," she said. "For example, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium all are typically looked at for their effects ... which was not originally designed to assess calcium intake," MacKay noted. "Further, the new analysis included only ...

  17. Intolerance to oral and intravenous calcium supplements in atopic eczema.

    OpenAIRE

    Devlin, J; David, T J

    1990-01-01

    Children treated with dietary restriction for food intolerance may require calcium supplementation, particularly if cows' milk and milk substitutes are not tolerated. We report two children with atopic eczema who reacted adversely to a number of calcium supplement formulations.

  18. Calcium phosphate saturation in seawater around the Andaman Island

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    Ionic product (IP) of calcium phosphate is calculated at some stations around Andaman Island. The depthwise variations of the ionic product of calcium phosphate seem to follow a normal trend with maximum saturation value between 100 to 200 m. Using...

  19. Calcium and Cancer Prevention: Strengths and Limits of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 391–401. [PubMed Abstract] Baron JA, Beach M, Mandel JS, et al. Calcium supplements and colorectal adenomas. ... 138–145. [PubMed Abstract] Baron JA, Beach M, Mandel JS, et al. Calcium supplements for the prevention ...

  20. Use of genetically-encoded calcium indicators for live cell calcium imaging and localization in virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jacob L; Ramachandran, Nina K; Utama, Budi; Hyser, Joseph M

    2015-11-15

    Calcium signaling is a ubiquitous and versatile process involved in nearly every cellular process, and exploitation of host calcium signals is a common strategy used by viruses to facilitate replication and cause disease. Small molecule fluorescent calcium dyes have been used by many to examine changes in host cell calcium signaling and calcium channel activation during virus infections, but disadvantages of these dyes, including poor loading and poor long-term retention, complicate analysis of calcium imaging in virus-infected cells due to changes in cell physiology and membrane integrity. The recent expansion of genetically-encoded calcium indicators (GECIs), including blue and red-shifted color variants and variants with calcium affinities appropriate for calcium storage organelles like the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), make the use of GECIs an attractive alternative for calcium imaging in the context of virus infections. Here we describe the development and testing of cell lines stably expressing both green cytoplasmic (GCaMP5G and GCaMP6s) and red ER-targeted (RCEPIAer) GECIs. Using three viruses (rotavirus, poliovirus and respiratory syncytial virus) previously shown to disrupt host calcium homeostasis, we show the GECI cell lines can be used to detect simultaneous cytoplasmic and ER calcium signals. Further, we demonstrate the GECI expression has sufficient stability to enable long-term confocal imaging of both cytoplasmic and ER calcium during the course of virus infections.

  1. Inulin and fructooligosaccharide affect in vitro calcium uptake and absorption from calcium-enriched gluten-free bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa-Kozak, U; Swiątecka, D; Bączek, N; Brzóska, M M

    2016-04-01

    Compromised intestinal calcium absorption affecting a deterioration of bone state is a sign of coeliac disease. Experimental calcium-fortified gluten-free bread (GFB) of improved calcium bioavailability could increase calcium content in the diets of coeliac disease patients, allowing them to obtain the amount of calcium they need for therapeutic use. Prebiotics, including inulin-type fructans (IFs) have a beneficial effect on calcium bioavailability. In the present study, the in vitro model composed of the intestinal-like Caco-2 cells and the human intestinal bacteria (Lactobacillus, Enterococcus and Enterobacteriaceae) were used to analyse the effect of inulin and fructooligosaccharide (FOS) of different chain lengths, on calcium uptake and absorption from experimental GFB. Analysed IFs, especially short-chain FOS, significantly (p < 0.05) increased cellular calcium uptake from GFB digest and stimulated the intestinal bacteria applied in the cultures to the intensive synthesis of organic acids. In particular, the concentration of butyric, valeric and lactic acids increased significantly. Similarly, in the calcium absorption experiment, IFs increased the cellular calcium retention but concomitantly reduced its content in basolateral filtrates. The results obtained suggest that the applied IFs affected differentially calcium uptake and absorption from the experimental calcium-enriched GFB, therefore a further study is needed to assess whether these observations made in vitro contribute to IF effects on calcium absorption from experimental GFB in vivo.

  2. Immunohistochemical and calcium imaging methods in wholemount rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargoy, Allison; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C; Pérez De Sevilla Müller, Luis

    2014-10-13

    In this paper we describe the tools, reagents, and the practical steps that are needed for: 1) successful preparation of wholemount retinas for immunohistochemistry and, 2) calcium imaging for the study of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) mediated calcium signaling in retinal ganglion cells. The calcium imaging method we describe circumvents issues concerning non-specific loading of displaced amacrine cells in the ganglion cell layer.

  3. Immunohistochemical and Calcium Imaging Methods in Wholemount Rat Retina

    OpenAIRE

    SARGOY, ALLISON; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C.; De Sevilla Müller, Luis Pérez

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the tools, reagents, and the practical steps that are needed for: 1) successful preparation of wholemount retinas for immunohistochemistry and, 2) calcium imaging for the study of voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) mediated calcium signaling in retinal ganglion cells. The calcium imaging method we describe circumvents issues concerning non-specific loading of displaced amacrine cells in the ganglion cell layer.

  4. Calcium Intake in Elderly Australian Women Is Inadequate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin W. Binns

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of calcium in the prevention of bone loss in later life has been well established but little data exist on the adequacy of calcium intakes in elderly Australian women. The aim of this study was to compare the dietary intake including calcium of elderly Australian women with the Australian dietary recommendation, and to investigate the prevalence of calcium supplement use in this population. Community-dwelling women aged 70–80 years were randomly recruited using the Electoral Roll for a 2-year protein intervention study in Western Australia. Dietary intake was assessed at baseline by a 3-day weighed food record and analysed for energy, calcium and other nutrients. A total of 218 women were included in the analysis. Mean energy intake was 7,140 ± 1,518 kJ/day and protein provided 19 ± 4% of energy. Mean dietary calcium intake was 852 ± 298 mg/day, which is below Australian recommendations. Less than one quarter of women reported taking calcium supplements and only 3% reported taking vitamin D supplements. Calcium supplements by average provided calcium 122 ± 427 mg/day and when this was taken into account, total calcium intake increased to 955 ± 504 mg/day, which remained 13% lower than the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR, 1,100 mg/day for women of this age group. The women taking calcium supplements had a higher calcium intake (1501 ± 573 mg compared with the women on diet alone (813 ± 347 mg. The results of this study indicate that the majority of elderly women were not meeting their calcium requirements from diet alone. In order to achieve the recommended dietary calcium intake, better strategies for promoting increased calcium, from both diet and calcium supplements appears to be needed.

  5. Calcium-sensing receptor in breast physiology and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wonnam Kim; Wysolmerski, John J.

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed in normal breast epithelial cells and in breast cancer cells. During lactation, activation of the CaSR in mammary epithelial cells increases calcium transport into milk and inhibits parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) secretion into milk and into the circulation. The ability to sense changes in extracellular calcium allows the lactating breast to actively participate in the regulation of systemic calcium and bone metabolism, and to coor...

  6. Beyond-root calcium fertilization of apple trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Słowik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigations were performed in the period 1977-1979 on the apple tree cultivar 'Fantazja', on rootstock A 2, M 7 and MM 106 on the effect of spraying with solution containing calcium on the incidence of bitter pit, breakdown, calcium content in the fruit flesh and other features of the fruits. Threefold spraying with calcium nitrate, calcium chloride or Anti-Stipp significantly limited the appearance of bitter pit and breakdown.

  7. Phosphorylation of erythrocyte membrane liberates calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, V.P.S.; Brockerhoff, H.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphorylation of permeabilized erythrocyte ghost membranes with ATP results in an increase free calcium level as measured with the help of Ca/sup 2 +/ electrode and /sup 45/Ca. This effect could not be observed in the presence of p/sup -/ chloromercuric benzoate, an inhibitor of kinases. The rise in the free calcium due to phosphorylation of the membrane was accompanied by a decrease in the level of phosphatidylinositol (PI) and an increase in phosphatidylinositolmonophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositolbisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/). These results support the proposal that an inositol shuttle, PI in equilibrium PIP in equilibrium PIP/sub 2/, operates to maintain the intracellular calcium concentration. The cation is believed to be sequestered in a cage formed by the head groups of two acidic phospholipid molecules, e.g., phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol, with the participation of both PO and fatty acid ester CO groups. When the inositol group of such a cage is phosphorylated, inter-headgroup hydrogen bonding between the lipids is broken. As a result the cage opens and calcium is released.

  8. 21 CFR 172.720 - Calcium lactobionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... additive is the calcium salt of lactobionic acid (4-(β,D-galactosido)-D-gluconic acid) produced by the... not greater than that required to accomplish the intended effect....

  9. 21 CFR 172.715 - Calcium lignosulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... of sulfonated lignin, primarily as calcium and sodium salts. (b) It is used in an amount not to exceed that reasonably required to accomplish the intended physical or technical effect when added as...

  10. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking... agent in food in an amount not in excess of that reasonably required to produce its intended effect. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food...

  11. Electrosprayed calcium phosphate coatings for biomedical purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, Sander Cornelis Gerardus

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the suitability of the Electrostatic Spray Deposition (ESD) technique was studied for biomedical purposes, i.e., deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings onto titanium substrates. Using ESD, which is a simple and cheap deposition method for inorganic and organic coatings, it wa

  12. Drying and Rehydration of Calcium Alginate Gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeker, R.; Li, L.; Fang, Y.; Appelqvist, I.; Mendes, E.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the rehydration properties of air-dried calcium alginate gel beads. Rehydration is shown to depend on alginate source (i.e. mannuronic to guluronic acid ratio) and the salt concentration in the rehydration medium. Rehydration curves are described adequately by the empirical W

  13. Glass forming ability of calcium aluminosilicate melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Mette; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The glass forming ability (GFA) of two series of calcium aluminosilicate melts is studied by measuring their viscous behavior and crystallization tendency. The first series consists of five compositions on the joining line between the eutectic point of anorthite-wollastonite-tridymite and that of...

  14. Three-dimensionally Perforated Calcium Phosphate Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Porous calcium phosphate ceramics were produced by compression molding using a special mold followed by sintering. The porous calcium phosphate ceramics have three-dimensional and penetrated open pores380-400μm in diameter spaced at intervals of 200μm. The layers of the linear penetration pores alternately lay perpendicular to pore direction. The porosity was 59%-65% . The Ca/P molar ratios of the porous calcium phosphate ceramics range from 1.5 to 1.85. A binder containing methyl cellulose was most effective for preparing the powder compact among vinyl acetate, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, stearic acid, methyl cellulose and their mixtures. Stainless steel, polystyrene, nylon and bamboo were used as the long columnar male dies for the penetrated open pores. When polystyrene, nylon and bamboo were used as the long columnar male dies, the dies were burned out during the sintering process. Using stainless steel as the male dies with the removal of the dies before heat treatment resulted in a higher level of densification of the calcium phosphate ceramic.

  15. Calcium, magnesium, and potassium in food

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biochemical and physiological functions and consequences of deficient intakes, which show the nutritional importance of calcium, magnesium and potassium for humans, are reviewed. The dietary recommendations and food sources for these essential mineral elements for humans are presented. Factors t...

  16. [Intra-cystic renal calcium milk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, B; Médart, L; Massart, J P; Collignon, L

    2015-02-01

    Intra-cystic renal calcium milk is a rare entity. The authors report a clinical case, and describe the radiographic and tomodensitometric appearances. This 50 year old patient has been followed up for more than ten years for urinary lithiasis with recurrent pain.

  17. The Thermal Decomposition of Calcium Carbonate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The thermogravimetry(TG) and derivative thermogravimetry(DTG) curves of the thermal decomposition reaction of calcium carbonate have been measured at five different heating rates. The kinetic parameters and the reaction mechanism of the reaction were evaluated from analysis of the TG and DTG curves by using the Ozawa method, the combined integral and differential methods and the reduced equations derived by us.

  18. Practical recommendations for calcium channel antagonist poisoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, S J; de Lange, D W; Donker, D W; Meulenbelt, J

    Calcium channel antagonists (CCAs) are widely used for different cardiovascular disorders. At therapeutic doses, CCAs have a favourable side effect profile. However, in overdose, CCAs can cause serious complications, such as severe hypotension and bradycardia. Patients in whom a moderate to severe

  19. Scattering lengths of calcium and barium isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammalapati, U.; Willmann, L.; Knoop, S.

    2011-01-01

    We have calculated the s-wave scattering length of all the even isotopes of calcium (Ca) and barium (Ba) in order to investigate the prospect of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). For Ca we have used an accurate molecular potential based on detailed spectroscopic data. Our calculations show that Ca

  20. Calcium intake and cows' milk free diets.

    OpenAIRE

    Devlin, J; Stanton, R H; David, T J

    1989-01-01

    In children with atopic eczema on elimination diets, the calcium intake was below the estimated requirement in 15 out of 20 who avoided cows' milk and received no milk substitute, and in three out of 26 who avoided cows' milk but were provided with a soya or casein hydrolysate formula.

  1. Effect of Ultrasound on Calcium Carbonate Crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagterveld, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Scaling comprises the formation of hard mineral deposits on process or membrane equipment and calcium carbonate is the most common scaling salt. Especially in reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems, scale formation has always been a serious limitation, causing flux decline, membrane degradation, loss

  2. Drying and Rehydration of Calcium Alginate Gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeker, R.; Li, L.; Fang, Y.; Appelqvist, I.; Mendes, E.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the rehydration properties of air-dried calcium alginate gel beads. Rehydration is shown to depend on alginate source (i.e. mannuronic to guluronic acid ratio) and the salt concentration in the rehydration medium. Rehydration curves are described adequately by the empirical

  3. Speleothem dating using Sulfur to Calcium ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Raghid

    2017-04-01

    A speleothem sample from underground water tunnel in Nablus, Palestine, showed contamination from wastewater. The young sample has low concentration of Uranium and could not be dated with uranium thorium dating method. An alternative method was used to determine the age of the sample: lamina counting coupled with Sulfur to calcium ratio peaks counting. Sulfur and Calcium concentrations were measured using SEM-EDS to have a better resolution than the CNS analyzer. Assuming seasonal growth of laminations, it was possible to determine the primarily ages. The sinter was still growing during sampling in 2011. The counting reveals 271 laminae, for seasonal growth it means 135 years. In the 1959, it was observed that there is an unexpected peak of Sulfur to calcium ratio and this peak was repeated seasonally. The sulfur peak increased as a result of diesel use in the heating system during the winter season. For the youngest 117 laminae, 59 S/Ca peaks are observed. Each two lamination layers correspond to one peak. So, it was possible to determine the age of the sample using Sulfur to Calcium ratio.

  4. Stability of calcium silicate in basic solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桂华; 李小斌; 彭志宏; 周秋生

    2003-01-01

    Mixture of CaO and SiO2 was sintered at 1 200 or 1 400 ℃ according to the mole ratio of CaO/SiO2 of 1 or 2, and then calcium silicate was leached in pure caustic or soda solution. The results indicated that calcium silicate exists much more stably in caustic solution than that in soda solution, and CaO*SiO2 is more stable than β-2CaO*SiO2 whether in caustic solution or in soda solution. The increase of sintering temperature favored the stability of calcium silicate in the leaching process. When β-2CaO*SiO2 was leached in soda solution, the increase of leaching temperature and time resulted in decomposing of more calcium silicate. And when β-2CaO*SiO2 was leached in caustic solution at high temperature, much 2CaO*SiO2*H2O but little CaO*SiO2*H2O appeared in slag.

  5. 21 CFR 582.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium sorbate. 582.3225 Section 582.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives §...

  6. 21 CFR 182.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium sorbate. 182.3225 Section 182.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3225...

  7. 21 CFR 582.3221 - Calcium propionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium propionate. 582.3221 Section 582.3221 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives §...

  8. Prevalence estimation of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) antibodies in dogs from Finland using novel dog anti-TBEV IgG MAb-capture and IgG immunofluorescence assays based on recombinant TBEV subviral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanov, Lev; Vera, Cristina Pérez; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-07-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is one of the most dangerous human neurological infections occurring in Europe and Northern parts of Asia with thousands of cases and millions vaccinated against it. The risk of TBE might be assessed through analyses of the samples taken from wildlife or from animals which are in close contact with humans. Dogs have been shown to be a good sentinel species for these studies. Serological assays for diagnosis of TBE in dogs are mainly based on purified and inactivated TBEV antigens. Here we describe novel dog anti-TBEV IgG monoclonal antibody (MAb)-capture assay which is based on TBEV prME subviral particles expressed in mammalian cells from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon as well as IgG immunofluorescence assay (IFA) which is based on Vero E6 cells transfected with the same SFV replicon. We further demonstrate their use in a small-scale TBEV seroprevalence study of dogs representing different regions of Finland. Altogether, 148 dog serum samples were tested by novel assays and results were compared to those obtained with a commercial IgG enzyme immunoassay (EIA), hemagglutination inhibition test and IgG IFA with TBEV infected cells. Compared to reference tests, the sensitivities of the developed assays were 90-100% and the specificities of the two assays were 100%. Analysis of the dog serum samples showed a seroprevalence of 40% on Åland Islands and 6% on Southwestern archipelago of Finland. In conclusion, a specific and sensitive EIA and IFA for the detection of IgG antibodies in canine sera were developed. Based on these assays the seroprevalence of IgG antibodies in dogs from different regions of Finland was assessed and was shown to parallel the known human disease burden as the Southwestern archipelago and Åland Islands in particular had considerable dog TBEV antibody prevalence and represent areas with high risk of TBE for humans.

  9. Relating a calcium indicator signal to the unperturbed calcium concentration time-course

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borst, Alexander; Abarbanel, Henry D I

    2007-01-01

    .... By investigating the underlying reaction kinetics, we show that in some ranges of kinetic parameters one can explicitly link the time dependent indicator signal to the time-course of the calcium...

  10. Free-calcium distribution and calcium pulses in rat peripheral macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanhua; Xing, Da; Tang, Yonghong; Jin, Ying

    2000-10-01

    With Laser Confocal Scanning Microscope (LCSM) system, three aspects of characteristics of free cytoplasmic calcium in rat peripheral macrophages are studied. One is the Ca2+ concentration in different area in the same cell. Second is the Ca2+ concentration in the same area in different dividing stage. Third is the feature of calcium pulses evoked by Kcl or pH changing. The results show that even in one cell, the evolution of the Ca2+ concentration is not the same in a different area. In the same area, the nucleolus Ca2+ concentration in division breaking stage is much higher than that in division stage. From the experiment phenomena, we conclude that Kcl itself can not evoke calcium pulses in the unexcitable macrophage, but the change of pH can trig calcium pulses in the same cells.

  11. Effects of calcium ion, calpains, and calcium channel blockers on retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular genetic studies have revealed many of the causative genes of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). These achievements have provided clues to the mechanisms of photoreceptor degeneration in RP. Apoptosis is known to be a final common pathway in RP and, therefore, a possible therapeutic target for photoreceptor rescue. However, apoptosis is not a single molecular cascade, but consists of many different reactions such as caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways commonly leading to DNA fractionation and cell death. The intracellular concentration of calcium ions is also known to increase in apoptosis. These findings suggest that calpains, one of the calcium-dependent proteinases, play some roles in the process of photoreceptor apoptosis and that calcium channel antagonists may potentially inhibit photoreceptor apoptosis. Herein, the effects of calpains and calcium channel antagonists on photoreceptor degeneration are reviewed.

  12. Effects of Calcium Ion, Calpains, and Calcium Channel Blockers on Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Nakazawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in molecular genetic studies have revealed many of the causative genes of retinitis pigmentosa (RP. These achievements have provided clues to the mechanisms of photoreceptor degeneration in RP. Apoptosis is known to be a final common pathway in RP and, therefore, a possible therapeutic target for photoreceptor rescue. However, apoptosis is not a single molecular cascade, but consists of many different reactions such as caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways commonly leading to DNA fractionation and cell death. The intracellular concentration of calcium ions is also known to increase in apoptosis. These findings suggest that calpains, one of the calcium-dependent proteinases, play some roles in the process of photoreceptor apoptosis and that calcium channel antagonists may potentially inhibit photoreceptor apoptosis. Herein, the effects of calpains and calcium channel antagonists on photoreceptor degeneration are reviewed.

  13. Photodissociation studies of calcium-coronene and calcium-pyrene cation clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A. C.; Buchanan, J. W.; Flynn, N. D.; Duncan, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Gas-phase cluster cations combining calcium atoms and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) coronene (C24H12) and pyrene (C16H10) are produced in a molecular beam using laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle cluster source. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry reveals the formation of clusters of the form Cax(coronene)y+ for up to x = 4 and y = 3 and Cax(pyrene)y+ for up to x = 2 and y = 3. Mass-selected photodissociation studies show that the calcium cation is the most prominent fragment for each system. Photoinduced calcium carbide formation is prominent when two or more calcium atoms are present. Additionally, there is evidence that these clusters can form sandwich structures.

  14. Mortar and concrete based on calcium sulphate binders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.J.F.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    In this study both hemi-hydrate and anhydrite are tested as calcium sulphate binders for structural mortar and concrete. The advantage of using calcium sulphates instead of cement as a binder is the fact that the production of calcium sulphate is more environmental friendly than that of cement. For

  15. RAPID ASSOCIATION OF UNCONJUGATED BILIRUBIN WITH AMORPHOUS CALCIUM-PHOSPHATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERVEERE, CN; SHOEMAKER, B; VANDERMEER, R; GROEN, AK; JANSEN, PLM; ELFERINK, RPJO

    1995-01-01

    The association of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) with amorphous calcium phosphate was studied in vitro. To this end UCB, solubilized in different micellar bile salt solutions, was incubated with freshly prepared calcium phosphate precipitate. It was demonstrated that amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)

  16. Osteoclastic resorption of biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Layrolle, P.; Barrere, F.; Bruijn, J.G.M. de; Schoonman, J.; Blitterswijk, C.A. van; Groot, K. de

    2001-01-01

    A new biomimetic method for coating metal implants enables the fast formation of dense and homogeneous calcium phosphate coatings. Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) disks were coated with a thin, carbonated, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) by immersion in a saturated solution of calcium, phosphate, magnesi

  17. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  18. 21 CFR 582.6215 - Monobasic calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monobasic calcium phosphate. 582.6215 Section 582.6215 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6215 Monobasic calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Monobasic calcium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 182.6215 - Monobasic calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Monobasic calcium phosphate. 182.6215 Section 182.6215 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....6215 Monobasic calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Monobasic calcium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  20. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B;

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  1. The sarcoplasmic calcium pump - a most efficient ion translocating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbach, W

    1977-04-21

    In contrast to the sodium-potassium transporting plasma membranes, the sarcoplasmic membranes (SR) are highly specialized structures into which only two major intrinsic proteins, a calcium transporting protein and a calcium binding protein are embedded. The calcium transporting protein is a highly asymmetric molecule. It binds two calcium ions with a very high affinity at its external, and two calcium ions with low affinity at the internal section of the molecule. ATP is bound with high afffinity to an external binding site, inducing a conformational change. When the vesicular membranes are exposed to solutions containing Ca++, Mg++ and ATP, ATP is hydrolyzed and simultaneously calcium ions are translocated from the external medium into the vesicular space. When calcium ions are translocated in the opposite direction, ATP is synthesized. The calcium-ATP ratio for ATP cleavage as well as for ATP synthesis is 2. Thus, the SR membranes can transform reversibly chemical into osmotical energy. Inward and outward movements of calcium ions are relatively slow processes connected with the appearance and disappearance of different phosphorylated intermediates. One phosphorylated intermediate is formed by phosphoryltransfer from ATP when calcium ions are present in the medium. In contrast, when calcium ions are absent from the external medium, two different intermediates can be formed by the incorporation of inorganic phosphate. Only when calcium ions present in the internal space of the vesicles are released, the incorporation of inorganic phosphate gives rise to an intermediate who phosphoryl group can be transferred to ADP.

  2. Effect of calcium chloride treatments on calcium content, anthracnose severity and antioxidant activity in papaya fruit during ambient storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Babak; Mirshekari, Amin; Yahia, Elhadi

    2016-07-01

    There have been no reports on the effects of preharvest calcium application on anthracnose disease severity, antioxidant activity and cellular changes during ambient storage of papaya, and therefore the objective of this study was to investigate these effects. Higher calcium concentrations (1.5 and 2% w/v) increased calcium concentration in the peel and pulp tissues, maintained firmness, and reduced anthracnose incidence and severity. While leakage of calcium-treated fruit was lower for 1.5 and 2% calcium treatments compared to the control, microscopic results confirmed that pulp cell wall thickness was higher after 6 days in storage, for the 2% calcium treatment compared to the control. Calcium-treated fruit also had higher total antioxidant activity and total phenolic compounds during storage. Calcium chloride, especially at higher concentrations, is effective in maintaining papaya fruit quality during ambient storage. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Evaluation of pH and calcium ion diffusion from calcium hydroxide pastes and MTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, María Del M; López, Gabriela L; Atlas, Diana; de la Casa, María L

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate changes in pH and calcium ion diffusion through root dentin from calcium hydroxide (Ca (OH) 2) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) pastes at 7, 30 and 60 days; and the relationship between pH and ion diffusion. Thirty-two human premolars were used. Crowns were sectioned and root canals instrumented and filled in with the following preparations: 1) Ca(OH) 2 + distilled water (n=7); 2) Ca(OH) 2 + 0.1% chlorhexidine gluconate (n=7); 3) MTA + distilled water (n=7); 4) MTA + 0.1% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) (n=7); 5) distilled water (n=2) (control); 6) 0.1% chlorhexidine gluconate (n=2) (control). The apex and coronary opening were sealed with IRM. Roots were placed in Eppendorf tubes with 1 ml distilled water at 37°C and 100% humidity. At baseline, 7, 30 and 60 days, pH was measured with pH meter, and calcium ion content in the solution was analyzed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA, simple linear regression analysis and Pearson's correlation test. The highest pH values were achieved with calcium hydroxide pastes at 60 days (p ≤ 0.05). Calcium ions were released in all groups. The calcium hydroxide paste with distilled water at 60 days had the highest calcium ion value (p ≤ 0.01). There was a positive correlation between calcium and pH values. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  4. Relating a calcium indicator signal to the unperturbed calcium concentration time-course

    OpenAIRE

    Abarbanel Henry DI; Borst Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Optical indicators of cytosolic calcium levels have become important experimental tools in systems and cellular neuroscience. Indicators are known to interfere with intracellular calcium levels by acting as additional buffers, and this may strongly alter the time-course of various dynamical variables to be measured. Results By investigating the underlying reaction kinetics, we show that in some ranges of kinetic parameters one can explicitly link the time dependent indicat...

  5. A comparative study of calcium absorption following a single serving administration of calcium carbonate powder versus calcium citrate tablets in healthy premenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyuan Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium is an essential mineral often taken as a daily, long-term nutritional supplement. Data suggests that once-daily dosing is important with regard to long-term compliance of both drugs and nutritional supplements. Objective: This study was undertaken to compare the bioavailability of a single serving of two calcium supplements in healthy, premenopausal women. Design: A two-period, crossover bioavailability study of a single serving of calcium citrate tablets (two tablets=500 mg calcium versus a single serving of calcium carbonate powder (one packet of powder=1,000 mg calcium was performed in healthy women aged between 25 and 45. All subjects were on a calcium-restricted diet 7 days prior to testing and fasted for 12 h before being evaluated at 0, 1, 2, and 4 h after oral administration of the test agents. Blood measurements for total and ionized calcium and parathyroid hormone were performed and adverse events were monitored. Results: Twenty-three women were evaluable with a mean age of 33.2±8.71. Results showed that administration of a single serving of a calcium carbonate powder resulted in greater absorption in total and ionized calcium versus a single serving of calcium citrate tablets at 4 h (4.25±0.21 vs. 4.16±0.16, p=0.001. There were minimal side effects and no reported serious adverse events. Conclusions: This study shows that a single serving of a calcium carbonate powder is more bioavailable than a single serving of calcium citrate tablets. This may be beneficial for long-term compliance.

  6. Carbonated beverages and urinary calcium excretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, R P; Rafferty, K

    2001-09-01

    Intake of carbonated beverages has been associated with increased fracture risk in observational studies. The usual explanation given is that one or more of the beverage constituents increase urinary calcium. We assessed the short-term effects on urinary calcium excretion of carbonated beverages of various compositions. An incomplete random block design was used to study 20-40-y-old women who customarily consumed > or =680 mL carbonated beverages daily. Four carbonated beverages were tested: 2 with caffeine and 2 without. Two contained phosphoric acid as the acidulant and 2 contained citric acid. The study included one neutral control (water) and one positive control (skim or chocolate milk). Serving size was 567 mL for the carbonated beverages and water and 340 mL for the milks. Beverages were consumed with a light breakfast after an overnight fast; no other foods were ingested until urine collection was complete. pH, titratable and total acidity, sodium, creatinine, and calcium were measured in 2-h (morning) fasting and 5-h postbeverage urine specimens. Relative to water, urinary calcium rose significantly only with the milks and the 2 caffeine-containing beverages. The excess calciuria was approximately 0.25 mmol, about the same as previously reported for caffeine alone. Phosphoric acid without caffeine produced no excess calciuria; nor did it augment the calciuria of caffeine. The excess calciuria associated with consumption of carbonated beverages is confined to caffeinated beverages. Acidulant type has no acute effect. Because the caffeine effect is known to be compensated for by reduced calciuria later in the day, we conclude that the net effect of carbonated beverage constituents on calcium economy is negligible. The skeletal effects of carbonated beverage consumption are likely due primarily to milk displacement.

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassim, Aqilah; Rachmawati, Heni

    2010-10-01

    Taking calcium supplements can reduce the risk of developing osteoporosis, but they are not readily absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Nanotechnology is expected to resolve this problem. In this study, we prepared and characterized calcium carbonate nanoparticle to improve the solubility by using bottom-up method. The experiment was done by titrating calcium chloride with sodium carbonate with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as stabilizer, using ultra-turrax. Various concentrations of calcium chloride and sodium carbonate as well as various speed of stirring were used to prepare the calcium carbonate nanoparticles. Evaluations studied were including particle size, polydispersity index (PI) and zeta potential with particle analyzer, surface morphology with scanning electron microscope, and saturated solubility. In addition, to test the ability of PVP to prevent particles growth, short stability study was performed by storing nano CaCO3 suspension at room temperature for 2 weeks. Results show that using 8000 rpm speed of stirring, the particle size tends to be bigger with the range of 500-600 nm (PI between 0.2-0.4) whereas with stirring speed of 4000 rpm, the particle size tends to be smaller with 300-400 nm (PI between 0.2-0.4). Stirring speed of 6000 rpm produced particle size within the range of 400-500 nm (PI between 0.2-0.4). SEM photograph shows that particles are monodisperse confirming that particles were physically stable without any agglomeration within 2 weeks storage. Taken together, nano CaCO3 is successfully prepared by bottom-up method and PVP is a good stabilizer to prevent the particle growth.

  8. Syntheses and Structure Determinations of Calcium Thiolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Scott; Englich, Ulrich; Noll, Bruce; Ruhlandt-Senge, Karin

    1998-09-07

    The exploration of synthetic methodologies toward heavy alkaline-earth chalcogenolates resulted in the preparation and structural characterization of a family of calcium thiolates, including [Ca(SC(6)F(5))(2)(py)(4)], 1 (py = pyridine), the separated ion-triple [Ca(18-crown-6)(NH(3))(3))][SMes](2).2THF, 2 (Mes = 2,4,6-tBu(3)C(6)H(2)), and the contact triple [Ca(18-crown-6)(SMes)(2)].THF, 3. Compound 1 was prepared by treating [Ca(N(SiMe(3))(2))(2)](2) with 4 equiv of HSC(6)F(5) under addition of pyridine. The thiolates 2 and 3 were synthesized by treatment of calcium metal dissolved in dry, liquid NH(3) under addition of 2 equiv of HSMes and crown ether or, alternatively, by the reduction of MesSSMes with calcium metal in dry, liquid ammonia. We also report two reaction products isolated during attempted calcium thiolate syntheses: [CaBr(4)(THF)(2)(&mgr;(2)-Li)(2)(THF)(4)], 4, isolated as the product of a salt elimination reaction between CaBr(2) and 2 equiv of [Li(THF)(n)()S-2,4,6-(i)()Pr(3)C(6)H(2)](m)(). [(NH(4))(py)(SC(6)F(5))], 5, was obtained as the sole product in the reaction of metallic calcium with HSC(6)F(5) in liquid ammonia under addition of pyridine. All compounds were characterized by single-crystal X-ray crystallography in addition to IR and NMR spectroscopy.

  9. Calcium channel blockers in cardiovascular pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfraind, Theophile

    2014-11-01

    This paper summarizes the pharmacological properties of calcium channel blockers (CCBs), their established therapeutic uses for cardiovascular disorders and the current improvement of their clinical effects through drug combinations. Their identification resulted from study of small molecules including coronary dilators, which were named calcium antagonists. Further experiments showed that they reduced contraction of arteries by inhibiting calcium entry and by interacting with binding sites identified on voltage-dependent calcium channels. This led to the denomination calcium channel blockers. In short-term studies, by decreasing total peripheral resistance, CCBs lower arterial pressure. By unloading the heart and increasing coronary blood flow, CCBs improve myocardial oxygenation. In long-term treatment, the decrease in blood pressure is more pronounced in hypertensive than in normotensive patients. A controversy on the safety of CCBs ended after a large antihypertensive trial (ALLHAT) sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. There are two main types of CCBs: dihydopyridine and non-dihydropyridine; the first type is vascular selective. Dihydropyrines are indicated for hypertension, chronic, stable and vasospastic angina. Non-dihydropyridines have the same indications plus antiarrythmic effects in atrial fibrillation or flutter and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. In addition, CCBs reduced newly formed coronary lesions in atherosclerosis. In order to reach recommended blood pressure goals, there is a recent therapeutic move by combination of CCBs with other antihypertensive agents particularly with inhibitors acting at the level of the renin-angiotensin system. They are also combined with statins. Prevention of dementia has been reported in hypertensive patients treated with nitrendipine, opening a way for further studies on CCBs' beneficial effect in cognitive deterioration associated with aging.

  10. The Association Between Calcium, Magnesium, and Ratio of Calcium/Magnesium in Seminal Plasma and Sperm Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong; Miao, Maohua; Chen, Jianping; Chen, Kanglian; Wu, Bin; Dai, Qi; Wang, Jian; Sun, Fei; Shi, Huijuan; Yuan, Wei

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to examine the relationships between calcium, magnesium, and calcium/magnesium ratio in semen plasma and sperm quality. It was a cross-sectional study based on a program aiming at promoting the reproductive health in less-developed areas. A total of 515 men aged between 18 and 55 years provided semen specimens at family planning clinics in Sandu County, Guizhou Province, China. Total calcium and magnesium concentrations in semen plasma were measured with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Sperm quality, including sperm motility and concentration, was evaluated by using a computer-assisted sperm analysis method. The medians of seminal plasma calcium, magnesium, and zinc concentrations were 9.61, 4.41, and 2.23 mmol/l, respectively. Calcium concentration and calcium/magnesium ratio were negatively associated with sperm concentrations (β = -0.47, P = 0.0123 for calcium; β = -0.25, P = 0.0393 for calcium/magnesium ratio) after adjusting for zinc and other covariates. In stratified analyses, the association between calcium and sperm concentrations only persisted among subjects with a calcium/magnesium ratio of ≤2.5 (β = -0.71, P = 0.0268). In the same stratum, magnesium was associated with increased sperm concentration (β = 0.73, P = 0.0386). Among subjects with a calcium/magnesium ratio of >2.5, neither calcium nor magnesium was associated with sperm concentration. In conclusion, total calcium and magnesium concentrations were associated with sperm concentration among subjects with a lower calcium/magnesium ratio. The calcium and magnesium ratio had a modifying effect on the associations of calcium and magnesium with sperm concentration.

  11. Myoscape controls cardiac calcium cycling and contractility via regulation of L-type calcium channel surface expression

    OpenAIRE

    Eden, Matthias; Meder, Benjamin; V?lkers, Mirko; Poomvanicha, Montatip; Domes, Katrin; Branchereau, M.; Marck, P.; Will, Rainer; Bernt, Alexander; Rangrez, Ashraf; Busch, Matthias; ,; Adler, Thure; Busch, Dirk H.; Antonio Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Calcium signalling plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Here we describe a cardiac protein named Myoscape/FAM40B/STRIP2, which directly interacts with the L-type calcium channel. Knockdown of Myoscape in cardiomyocytes decreases calcium transients associated with smaller Ca2+ amplitudes and a lower diastolic Ca2+ content. Likewise, L-type calcium channel currents are significantly diminished on Myoscape ablation, and downregulation of Myoscape significantly reduces cont...

  12. Heart failure drug digitoxin induces calcium uptake into cells by forming transmembrane calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arispe, Nelson; Diaz, Juan Carlos; Simakova, Olga; Pollard, Harvey B

    2008-02-19

    Digitoxin and other cardiac glycosides are important, centuries-old drugs for treating congestive heart failure. However, the mechanism of action of these compounds is still being elucidated. Calcium is known to potentiate the toxicity of these drugs, and we have hypothesized that digitoxin might mediate calcium entry into cells. We report here that digitoxin molecules mediate calcium entry into intact cells. Multimers of digitoxin molecules also are able to form calcium channels in pure planar phospholipid bilayers. These digitoxin channels are blocked by Al(3+) and La(3+) but not by Mg(2+) or the classical l-type calcium channel blocker, nitrendipine. In bilayers, we find that the chemistry of the lipid affects the kinetics of the digitoxin channel activity, but not the cation selectivity. Antibodies against digitoxin promptly neutralize digitoxin channels in both cells and bilayers. We propose that these digitoxin calcium channels may be part of the mechanism by which digitoxin and other active cardiac glycosides, such as digoxin, exert system-wide actions at and above the therapeutic concentration range.

  13. Calcium signaling and T-type calcium channels in cancer cell cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James T Taylor; Xiang-Bin Zeng; Jonathan E Pottle; Kevin Lee; Alun R Wang; Stephenie G Yi; Jennifer A S Scruggs; Suresh S Sikka; Ming Li

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of intracellular calcium is an important signaling mechanism for cell proliferation in both normal and cancerous cells. In normal epithelial cells,free calcium concentration is essential for cells to enter and accomplish the S phase and the M phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, cancerous cells can pass these phases of the cell cycle with much lower cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations, indicating an alternative mechanism has developed for fulfilling the intracellular calcium requirement for an increased rate of DNA synthesis and mitosis of fast replicating cancerous cells. The detailed mechanism underlying the altered calcium loading pathway remains unclear;however, there is a growing body of evidence that suggests the T-type Ca2+ channel is abnormally expressed in cancerous cells and that blockade of these channels may reduce cell proliferation in addition to inducing apoptosis. Recent studies also show that the expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in breast cancer cells is proliferation state dependent, i.e. the channels are expressed at higher levels during the fast-replication period, and once the cells are in a non-proliferation state, expression of this channel isminimal. Therefore, selectively blocking calcium entry into cancerous cells may be a valuable approach for preventing tumor growth. Since T-type Ca2+ channels are not expressed in epithelial cells, selective T-type Ca2+ channel blockers may be useful in the treatment of certain types of cancers.

  14. Parents' Calcium Knowledge Is Associated with Parental Practices to Promote Calcium Intake among Parents of Early Adolescent Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Carolyn W.; Rose, Angela M.; Bruhn, Christine; Cluskey, Mary; Reicks, Marla; Richards, Rickelle; Wong, Siew Sun; Boushey, Carol J.; Misner, Scottie; Olson, Beth

    2015-01-01

    The study reported here aimed to identify the relationship of parents' calcium knowledge with diet-related parental practices and determinants of calcium knowledge. A cross-sectional survey was conducted measuring parental practices, calcium knowledge, and demographics. A convenience sample of 599 racially/ethnically diverse parents of children…

  15. Effects of modulation of calcium levels and calcium fluxes on ABA- induced gene expression in barley aleurone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, R.M. van der; Visser, K.; Wang, M.

    1996-01-01

    We present data to elucidate the involvement of calcium ions in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced gene expression. Modulation of external calcium concentrations was able to affect ABA-induced specific RAB gene expression. At a constant ABA level with increasing extracellular calcium level, an increasing R

  16. Effects of modulation of calcium levels and calcium fluxes on ABA- induced gene expression in barley aleurone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, R.M. van der; Visser, K.; Wang, M.

    1996-01-01

    We present data to elucidate the involvement of calcium ions in abscisic acid (ABA)-induced gene expression. Modulation of external calcium concentrations was able to affect ABA-induced specific RAB gene expression. At a constant ABA level with increasing extracellular calcium level, an increasing R

  17. Dependency of calcium alternans on ryanodine receptor refractoriness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enric Alvarez-Lacalle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid pacing rates induce alternations in the cytosolic calcium concentration caused by fluctuations in calcium released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. However, the relationship between calcium alternans and refractoriness of the SR calcium release channel (RyR2 remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate how ryanodine receptor (RyR2 refractoriness modulates calcium handling on a beat-to-beat basis using a numerical rabbit cardiomyocyte model. We used a mathematical rabbit cardiomyocyte model to study the beat-to-beat calcium response as a function of RyR2 activation and inactivation. Bi-dimensional maps were constructed depicting the beat-to-beat response. When alternans was observed, a novel numerical clamping protocol was used to determine whether alternans was caused by oscillations in SR calcium loading or by RyR2 refractoriness. Using this protocol, we identified regions of RyR2 gating parameters where SR calcium loading or RyR2 refractoriness underlie the induction of calcium alternans, and we found that at the onset of alternans both mechanisms contribute. At low inactivation rates of the RyR2, calcium alternans was caused by alternation in SR calcium loading, while at low activation rates it was caused by alternation in the level of available RyR2s. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have mapped cardiomyocyte beat-to-beat responses as a function of RyR2 activation and inactivation, identifying domains where SR calcium load or RyR2 refractoriness underlie the induction of calcium alternans. A corollary of this work is that RyR2 refractoriness due to slow recovery from inactivation can be the cause of calcium alternans even when alternation in SR calcium load is present.

  18. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  19. C2-domain containing calcium sensors in neuroendocrine secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinheiro, Paulo S; Houy, Sébastien; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2016-01-01

    to calcium, trigger the merger of cargo-filled vesicles with the plasma membrane. Low-affinity, fast-kinetics calcium sensors of the synaptotagmin family - especially synaptotagmin-1 and synaptotagmin-2 - are the main calcium sensors for fast exocytosis triggering in many cell types. Their functions extend...... the properties and possible interplay of (some of) the major C2-domain containing calcium sensors in calcium-triggered exocytosis. This article is part of a mini review series: "Synaptic Function and Dysfunction in Brain Diseases"....

  20. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion: Insights from Genetic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine; Dimke, Henrik; Eladari, Dominique

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and inhibition of calcium transport processes within the renal tubule. The mechanisms whereby acid alters the integrity and stability of bone have been examined extensively in the published literature. Here, after briefly reviewing this literature, we consider the effects of acid on calcium transport in the renal tubule and then discuss why not all gene defects that cause renal tubular acidosis are associated with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. A comparative study of calcium absorption following a single serving administration of calcium carbonate powder versus calcium citrate tablets in healthy premenopausal women

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Haiyuan; Bua, Peter; Capodice, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Calcium is an essential mineral often taken as a daily, long-term nutritional supplement. Data suggests that once-daily dosing is important with regard to long-term compliance of both drugs and nutritional supplements.Objective: This study was undertaken to compare the bioavailability of a single serving of two calcium supplements in healthy, premenopausal women.Design: A two-period, crossover bioavailability study of a single serving of calcium citrate tablets (two tablets=500 mg...

  2. Bioavailability of calcium supplements and the effect of Vitamin D: comparisons between milk, calcium carbonate, and calcium carbonate plus vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, L; Charles, P

    1996-03-01

    Our aim was to examine a regimen for calcium supplementation because various factors seem to be important for its bioavailability, and to examine the effect of adding vitamin D to the supplement. The participants were 20 healthy women aged 28-59 y (chi: 38 y). During the 3-d periods and 1 d before, the participants were consuming a calcium and energy-balanced diet as similar to their usual daily diet as possible. The study was designed as a randomized, placebo-controlled, partly blinded crossover study divided into four periods of 3 d each: 1) three tablets containing 1000 mg CaCO3/d, 2) three tablets containing 1000 mg CaCO3 plus 5 micrograms (200 IU) vitamin D/d, 3)1 L more milk than in the usual daily diet, and 4) three placebo tablets daily. Bioavailability of the different calcium-supplement regimens were evaluated by changes in 24-h urinary excretion of calcium, phosphate, and magnesium. A significant increase in urinary calcium excretion was found during all periods of supplementation compared with the placebo period (Pcalcium in the calcium carbonate period was not significantly higher that that in the milk period, but calcium carbonate plus vitamin D resulted in significantly higher calcium excretion compared with that in the milk period. We conclude that the examined calcium carbonate regimen is at least as good a calcium supplement as milk, and that addition of 600 IU vitamin D/d promptly resulted in an increase in urinary calcium excretion after an increase in calcium absorption, even in healthy women.

  3. A comparative study of calcium absorption following a single serving administration of calcium carbonate powder versus calcium citrate tablets in healthy premenopausal women

    OpenAIRE

    Haiyuan Wang; Peter Bua; Jillian Capodice

    2014-01-01

    Background: Calcium is an essential mineral often taken as a daily, long-term nutritional supplement. Data suggests that once-daily dosing is important with regard to long-term compliance of both drugs and nutritional supplements. Objective: This study was undertaken to compare the bioavailability of a single serving of two calcium supplements in healthy, premenopausal women. Design: A two-period, crossover bioavailability study of a single serving of calcium citrate tablets (two tablets=500 ...

  4. A comparative study of calcium absorption following a single serving administration of calcium carbonate powder versus calcium citrate tablets in healthy premenopausal women

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Haiyuan; Bua, Peter; Capodice, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    Background Calcium is an essential mineral often taken as a daily, long-term nutritional supplement. Data suggests that once-daily dosing is important with regard to long-term compliance of both drugs and nutritional supplements. Objective This study was undertaken to compare the bioavailability of a single serving of two calcium supplements in healthy, premenopausal women. Design A two-period, crossover bioavailability study of a single serving of calcium citrate tablets (two tablets=500 mg ...

  5. Documenting the use of calcium supplements with oral bisphosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Ann Marie; Hamrick, Irene; Rauch, Allison; Pound, Melanie W; Shelton, Penny S

    2013-01-01

    Patients receiving an oral bisphosphonate for treatment of osteopenia or osteoporosis without adequate calcium intake are not optimally treated. Physicians prescribing bisphosphonates may not consistently document calcium supplementation recommendations. This is a retrospective chart review of osteoporotic or osteopenic outpatients with an active prescription for an oral bisphosphonate. This cross-sectional study was designed to determine the point prevalence of calcium supplementation recommendations by physicians. Academic family medicine outpatient clinics. Of the 1,229 patients with osteoporosis or osteopenia, 425 patients had an active prescription for an oral bisphosphonate and were included in the study. The active/inactive medication list and physician clinic notes in the electronic medical record were reviewed for documentation regarding calcium. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients on bisphosphonates also receiving calcium. The secondary endpoint was the identification of demographic characteristics associated with lower use of calcium. The patient sample was 94% female, 69% white, with a mean body mass index of 27, and mean age of 72 years. Of the 425 patients, 387 (91.1%) were taking calcium or had a documented recommendation for calcium supplementation. Of the demographic characteristics evaluated, only age was statistically significantly different, with an average age of 76 years in the calcium group and 66 years of age in the noncalcium group. In this study, 91% of outpatients who were prescribed a bisphosphonate also were taking calcium or had it recommended to them. The only statistically significant difference between groups was greater age for those who received calcium.

  6. Calcium imaging of cortical neurons using Fura-2 AM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto-Chang, Odmara L; Dolmetsch, Ricardo E

    2009-01-19

    Calcium imaging is a common technique that is useful for measuring calcium signals in cultured cells. Calcium imaging techniques take advantage of calcium indicator dyes, which are BAPTA-based organic molecules that change their spectral properties in response to the binding of Ca2+ ions. Calcium indicator dyes fall into two categories, ratio-metric dyes like Fura-2 and Indo-1 and single-wavelength dyes like Fluo-4. Ratio-metric dyes change either their excitation or their emission spectra in response to calcium, allowing the concentration of intracellular calcium to be determined from the ratio of fluorescence emission or excitation at distinct wavelengths. The main advantage of using ratio-metric dyes over single wavelength probes is that the ratio signal is independent of the dye concentration, illumination intensity, and optical path length allowing the concentration of intracellular calcium to be determined independently of these artifacts. One of the most common calcium indicators is Fura-2, which has an emission peak at 505 nM and changes its excitation peak from 340 nm to 380 nm in response to calcium binding. Here we describe the use of Fura-2 to measure intracellular calcium elevations in neurons and other excitable cells.

  7. Calcium-dependent mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Natalia B; Andrews, S Brian

    2010-09-01

    Calcium is an extraordinarily versatile signaling ion, encoding cellular responses to a wide variety of external stimuli. In neurons, mitochondria can accumulate enormous amounts of calcium, with the consequence that mitochondrial calcium uptake, sequestration and release play pivotal roles in orchestrating calcium-dependent responses as diverse as gene transcription and cell death. In this review, we consider the basic chemistry of calcium as a 'sticky' cation, which leads to extremely high bound/free ratios, and discuss areas of current interest or controversy. Topics addressed include methodologies for measuring local intracellular calcium, mitochondrial calcium buffering and loading capacity, mitochondrially directed spatial calcium gradients, and the role of calcium overload-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction in glutamate-evoked excitotoxic injury and neurodegeneration. Finally, we consider the relationship between delayed calcium de-regulation, the mitochondrial permeability transition and the generation of reactive oxygen species, and propose a unified view of the 'source specificity' and 'calcium overload' models of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent excitotoxicity. Non-NMDA receptor mechanisms of excitotoxicity are discussed briefly. Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS. No claim to original US government works.

  8. [Milk and milk products: food sources of calcium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré Rovira, Rosaura

    2015-04-07

    The importance of calcium in human nutrition, the mechanisms of absorption and excretion of the element, and the factors affecting them with special reference to dietary factors are described. After reviewing daily dietary intakes of calcium and the main contributors in European and Spanish population, recommended intakes in Spain, the Nordic countries and the United States are mentioned. In relation to the dietary sources of calcium it has to be noted that the value of a given food as a source of a nutrient depends on its content in the food, the bioavailability of the nutrient and the usual food consumption. The calcium contents of potential food sources of the element are reported and its value is estimated according to the potential absorbability of the calcium they contain. The benefits of milk and dairy products as sources of calcium are also highlighted. Populations such as children or elderly may require fortified foods or supplements to satisfy their high calcium needs, so some examples of the efficacy of this supplementation are discussed. It is concluded that food and drinks are the best choice to obtain calcium. Taking into account the calcium content, the usual portion size and the consumption habits milk and dairy products, nuts, green leafy vegetables and legumes can provide adequate amounts of calcium. However, milk and dairy products constitute the best dietary source thanks to the bioavailability of the calcium they contain.

  9. Research on Calcium Food Intake of Young Gymnasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the calcium food intake of young gymnasts and the relationship among calcium nutrition, exercise and bone mineral status. 13 elite young gymnasts aged 11~12 with 3 to 7 years of training experience are chosen as subjects. At the same time, 14 young students at the same age are selected as control group. Dietary survey is made to investigate their calcium and protein intakes status. The calcium intakes of young gymnasts are 515.3±218.0 mg/d, which are only 51.5% of calcium reference intakes. The BMC, bone area and BMD of young gymnasts are all significantly lower than those of young students by 23, 14 and 11%, respectively (p<0.05. It concludes that the calcium intakes of young gymnasts are lower than Chinese calcium reference intakes. The BMC and BMD of young gymnasts are lower than those of young students at the same age. Perhaps it is related to their heavy training load, the high requirement of calcium and the long-term inadequate calcium intake. Therefore, we suggest that young gymnasts can appropriate to eat more calcium rich food (milk or dairy products to improve the calcium intakes and then to add BMC and BMD.

  10. Consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars to improve dietary calcium intake of healthy women: randomized controlled feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer T Lee

    Full Text Available Calcium is an important structural component of the skeletal system. Although an adequate intake of calcium helps to maintain bone health and reduce the risk of osteoporosis, many women do not meet recommended daily intakes of calcium. Previous interventions studies designed to increase dietary intake of women have utilized primarily dairy sources of calcium or supplements. However, lactose intolerance, milk protein allergies, or food preferences may lead many women to exclude important dairy sources of dietary calcium. Therefore, we undertook a 9 week randomized crossover design trial to examine the potential benefit of including a non-dairy source of calcium in the diet of women. Following a 3 week run-in baseline period, 35 healthy women > 18 years were randomized by crossover design into either Group I or Group II. Group I added 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily (total of 400 mg calcium/day (intervention to their usual diet and Group II continued their usual diet (control. At the end of 3 weeks, diets were switched for another 3 weeks. Intakes of calcium and energy were estimated from 3-day diet and supplemental diaries. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for within group comparisons and Mann Whitney U tests were used for between group comparisons of calcium and energy intake. Dietary calcium was significantly higher during intervention (1071 mg/d when participants consumed 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily than during the baseline (720 mg/d, P <0.0001 or control diets (775 mg/d, P = 0.0001 periods. Furthermore, the addition of 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily for the 3 week intervention did not significantly increase total energy intake or result in weight gain. In conclusion, consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars significantly increased calcium intake of women. Further research examining the potential ability of fortified cereal bars to help maintain and improve bone health of women is warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  11. Excitability in a stochastic differential equation model for calcium puffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, S

    2014-06-01

    Calcium dynamics are essential to a multitude of cellular processes. For many cell types, localized discharges of calcium through small clusters of intracellular channels are building blocks for all spatially extended calcium signals. Because of the large noise amplitude, the validity of noise-approximating model equations for this system has been questioned. Here we revisit the master equations for local calcium release, examine the multiple scales of calcium concentrations in the cluster domain, and derive adapted stochastic differential equations. We show by comparison of discrete and continuous trajectories that the Langevin equations can be made consistent with the master equations even for very small channel numbers. In its deterministic limit, the model reveals that excitability, a dynamical phenomenon observed in many natural systems, is at the core of calcium puffs. The model also predicts a bifurcation from transient to sustained release which may link local and global calcium signals in cells.

  12. Treatment of calcium nephrolithiasis in the patient with hyperuricosuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arowojolu, Omotayo; Goldfarb, David S

    2014-12-01

    Nearly one-third of patients with calcium stones have hyperuricosuria. In vitro studies and clinical trials have investigated the relationship between uric acid and calcium stones, but the association between hyperuricosuria and calcium stone formation in patients is still being debated. Uric acid appears to cause salting out of calcium oxalate in human urine. However, the importance of this in vitro phenomenon to the proposed association is not supported in cross-sectional observational studies. A small placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial showed that allopurinol decreased the rate of recurrent calcium oxalate calculi in patients with hyperuricosuria and normocalciuria. An assessment of the effect of combination therapy of allopurinol with indapamide showed no additive effect. Allopurinol may have antioxidant effects that are responsible for its reducing calcium stone formation, which are independent of xanthine oxidase inhibition. In addition, a newer xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor, febuxostat, may also be effective in the prevention of calcium stones, as it reduces urinary uric acid excretion.

  13. The Function of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Neurodegenerative Disorders

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    Yajin Liao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU—a calcium uniporter on the inner membrane of mitochondria—controls the mitochondrial calcium uptake in normal and abnormal situations. Mitochondrial calcium is essential for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP; however, excessive calcium will induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Calcium homeostasis disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role and regulatory mechanism of the MCU in the development of these diseases are obscure. In this review, we summarize the role of the MCU in controlling oxidative stress-elevated mitochondrial calcium and its function in neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibition of the MCU signaling pathway might be a new target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. The Function of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yajin; Dong, Yuan; Cheng, Jinbo

    2017-01-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU)—a calcium uniporter on the inner membrane of mitochondria—controls the mitochondrial calcium uptake in normal and abnormal situations. Mitochondrial calcium is essential for the production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP); however, excessive calcium will induce mitochondrial dysfunction. Calcium homeostasis disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders. However, the role and regulatory mechanism of the MCU in the development of these diseases are obscure. In this review, we summarize the role of the MCU in controlling oxidative stress-elevated mitochondrial calcium and its function in neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibition of the MCU signaling pathway might be a new target for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:28208618

  15. Normal and Malignant Cells Exhibit Differential Responses to Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine K; Krüger, Mie B; Mangalanathan, Uma M

    2017-01-01

    tissue after calcium electroporation but decreased in skin tissue 4 hours after treatment to levels comparable with untreated controls, whereas calcium content endured at high levels in tumor tissue. Mechanistic experiments in vitro indicated that calcium influx was similar in fibroblasts and cancer...... necrosis, with a range of sensitivities observed (36%-88%) 2 days after treatment. Necrosis was induced using calcium concentrations of 100-500 mmol/L and injection volumes 20%-80% of tumor volume. Notably, only limited effects were seen in normal tissue. Calcium content increased >7-fold in tumor and skin......Calcium electroporation may offer a simple general tool for anticancer therapy. Transient permeabilization of cancer cell membranes created by applying short, high-voltage pulses in tumors enables high calcium influxes that trigger cell death. In this study, we compared the relative sensitivity...

  16. Calcium-dependent and calcium-sensitizing pathways in the mature and immature ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyman, Ronald I; Waleh, Nahid; Kajino, Hiroki; Roman, Christine; Mauray, Francoise

    2007-10-01

    Studies performed in sheep and baboons have shown that after birth, the normoxic muscle media of ductus arteriosus (DA) becomes profoundly hypoxic as it constricts and undergoes anatomic remodeling. We used isolated fetal lamb DA (pretreated with inhibitors of prostaglandin and nitric oxide production) to determine why the immature DA fails to remain tightly constricted during the hypoxic phase of remodeling. Under normoxic conditions, mature DA constricts to 70% of its maximal active tension (MAT). Half of its normoxic tension is due to Ca(2+) entry through calcium L-channels and store-operated calcium (SOC) channels. The other half is independent of extracellular Ca(2+) and is unaffected by inhibitors of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release (ryanodine) or reuptake [cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)]. The mature DA relaxes slightly during hypoxia (to 60% MAT) due to decreases in calcium L-channel-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Inhibitors of Rho kinase and tyrosine kinase inhibit both Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent DA tension. Although Rho kinase activity may increase during gestation, immature DA develop lower tensions than mature DA, primarily because of differences in the way they process Ca(2+). Calcium L-channel expression increases with advancing gestation. Under normoxic conditions, differences in calcium L-channel-mediated Ca(2+) entry account for differences in tension between immature (60% MAT) and mature (70% MAT) DA. Under hypoxic conditions, differences in both calcium L-channel-dependent and calcium L-channel-independent Ca(2+) entry, account for differences in tension between immature (33% MAT) and mature (60% MAT) DA. Stimulation of Ca(2+) entry through reverse-mode Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange or CPA-induced SOC channel activity constrict the DA and eliminate differences between immature and mature DA during both hypoxia and normoxia.

  17. Dietary Calcium Intake and Calcium Supplementation in Hungarian Patients with Osteoporosis

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    Gábor Speer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Adequate calcium intake is the basis of osteoporosis therapy—when this proves insufficient, even specific antiosteoporotic agents cannot exert their actions properly. Methods. Our representative survey analyzed the dietary intake and supplementation of calcium in 8033 Hungarian female and male (mean age: 68 years (68.01 (CI95: 67.81–68.21 patients with osteoporosis. Results. Mean intake from dietary sources was 665±7.9 mg (68.01 (CI95: 67.81–68.21 daily. A significant positive relationship could be detected between total dietary calcium intake and lumbar spine BMD (P=0.045, whereas such correlation could not be demonstrated with femoral T-score. Milk consumption positively correlated with femur (P=0.041, but not with lumbar BMD. The ingestion of one liter of milk daily increased the T-score by 0.133. Average intake from supplementation was 558±6.2 mg (68.01 (CI95: 67.81–68.21 daily. The cumulative dose of calcium—from both dietary intake and supplementation—was significantly associated with lumbar (r=0.024, P=0.049, but not with femur BMD (r=0.021, P=0.107. The currently recommended 1000–1500 mg total daily calcium intake was achieved in 34.5% of patients only. It was lower than recommended in 47.8% of the cases and substantially higher in 17.7% of subjects. Conclusions. We conclude that calcium intake in Hungarian osteoporotic patients is much lower than the current recommendation, while routinely applied calcium supplementation will result in inappropriately high calcium intake in numerous patients.

  18. Intestinal absorption and renal reabsorption of calcium throughout postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, Megan R; Alexander, R Todd

    2017-04-01

    Calcium is vital for many physiological functions including bone mineralization. Postnatal deposition of calcium into bone is greatest in infancy and continues through childhood and adolescence until peek mineral density is reached in early adulthood. Thereafter, bone mineral density remains static until it eventually declines in later life. A positive calcium balance, i.e. more calcium absorbed than excreted, is crucial to bone deposition during growth and thus to peek bone mineral density. Dietary calcium is absorbed from the intestine into the blood. It is then filtered by the renal glomerulus and either reabsorbed by the tubule or excreted in the urine. Calcium can be (re)absorbed across intestinal and renal epithelia via both transcellular and paracellular pathways. Current evidence suggests that significant intestinal and renal calcium transport changes occur throughout development. However, the molecular details of these alterations are incompletely delineated. Here we first briefly review the current model of calcium transport in the intestine and renal tubule in the adult. Then, we describe what is known with regard to calcium handling through postnatal development, and how alterations may aid in mediating a positive calcium balance. The role of transcellular and paracellular calcium transport pathways and the contribution of specific intestinal and tubular segments vary with age. However, the current literature highlights knowledge gaps in how specifically intestinal and renal calcium (re)absorption occurs early in postnatal development. Future research should clarify the specific changes in calcium transport throughout early postnatal development including mediators of these alterations enabling appropriate bone mineralization. Impact statement This mini review outlines the current state of knowledge pertaining to the molecules and mechanisms maintaining a positive calcium balance throughout postnatal development. This process is essential to achieving

  19. Ceramics based on calcium pyrophosphate nanopowders

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    Tatiana V. Safronova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Present work is aimed at the fabrication of resorbable bioceramics based on calcium pyrophosphate (CPP from the synthesized powders of amorphous hydrated calcium pyrophosphate (AHCPP. Amorphous hydratedcalcium pyrophosphate in the form of nanopowders was precipitated from Ca(NO3 2 and (NH4 4P2O7 solutions at room temperature in the presence of PO3– ions. Crystalline CPP powder was fabricated from AHCPP by its thermal decomposition at 600 °C and consisted of β- and α- phase. Small particles, with the size less than 200 nm, were formed promoting sintering of the ceramic material. The final sample, sintered at 900 °C, exhibits microstructure with submicron grains, apparent density of 87% of theoretical density (TD and demonstrates tensile strength of 70 MPa.

  20. Calcium/thionyl chloride battery technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counts, T.

    1985-12-01

    This final report documents the development efforts conducted by the Lithium Batteries Group of the Couples Department of Eagle-Picher Industries. The objective of the project was to develop calcium-thionyl chloride cell technology. The original project was divided into two main tasks. Task One was to consist of component optimization and stability studies. Once sufficiently advanced, the ongoing results of Task One were to be integrated with Task Two. Task Two was to consist of demonstration of an optimized primary cell. In July, 1983, the program was redirected. Task Two was split, with effort to be directed toward both the original primary cell and toward a high discharge rate reserve configuration cell. Additional electrolyte salts were to be evaluated as a means of improving the storability of the active calcium-thionyl chloride cell.