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Sample records for maastrichtian dinosaurian assemblages

  1. Calcareous nannofossil evidence for the existence of the Gulf Stream during the late Maastrichtian

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    Watkins, D.K.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Upper Maastrichtian calcareous nannofossil assemblages, from eight cores on the South Carolina Coastal Plain (onshore set) and three deep sea drilling sites from the continental slope and abyssal hills (offshore set), were analyzed by correlation and principal component analysis to examine the ancient surface water thermal structure. In addition, a temperature index derived from independently published paleobiogeographic information was applied to the sample data. All three methods indicate a strong separation of the samples into onshore and offshore sets, with the offshore data set exhibiting significantly warmer paleotemperatures. The great disparity between these two sample sets indicates that there was a strong thermal contrast between the onshore and offshore surface water masses that persisted throughout the late Maastrichtian despite evident shortterm changes in fertility, productivity, and community structure. This suggests the Gulf Stream was present as a major oceanographic feature during the late Maastrichtian. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. The Maastrichtian flora of the Amaam Lagoon area (Northeastern Russia)

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    Moiseeva, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Maastrichtian Koryak flora from the Amaam Lagoon area is comprehensively studied with reference to available data on the stratigraphy of the study area and age assessment of the flora-bearing deposits. In the Koryak flora 32 species of plant fossils are identified and systematically described in the work. The established traits of the Koryak floristic assemblage are used to correlate it with the other assemblages close in age from different localities of Northeastern RNortheastern Russiaussia and Alaska. The results of correlation and taxonomic revision of plant fossils from the upper part of the Prince Creek Formation, Northern Alaska show that in the Anadyr-Koryak and Northern Alaska circum-Pacific regions the Koryak stage of flora development and the respective phytostratigraphic horizon (upper Maastrichtian-Selandian), of key significance for interregional correlation of continental deposits, are distinguishable. Floristic changes recorded in the northern circum-Pacific regions across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary suggest that the evolution of vegetation was gradual, controlled by climatic change, evolutionary factors and plant migration. These results are inconsistent with the postulated global significance of the ecological crisis at that time.

  3. The impact of the Maastrichtian cooling on the marine nutrient regime -- Evidence from midlatitudinal calcareous nannofossils

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    Linnert, Christian; Engelke, Julia; Wilmsen, Markus; Mutterlose, Jörg

    2016-06-01

    The latest Campanian-earliest Maastrichtian interval is well known as a period of intense climate cooling. This cooling caused a distinctive bipolar biogeographic distribution of calcareous nannofossil assemblages: High-latitude settings were dominated by newly evolving endemic taxa, former cosmopolitan species disappeared at the same time, and equatorial communities experienced an invasion of cool water taxa. The impact of this cooling on northern midlatitude assemblages is, however, less well known. In order to overcome this gap we studied the Kronsmoor section (northwest Germany). This section provides a continuous upper Campanian -- lower Maastrichtian succession with moderately to well preserved nannofossils. Uppermost Campanian assemblages are dominated by Prediscosphaera cretacea; other common taxa include Prediscosphaera stoveri, Watznaueria barnesiae, and Micula staurophora. The lower Maastrichtian is characterized by lower numbers of P. cretacea and frequent Kamptnerius magnificus, Arkhangelskiella cymbiformis, and Cribrosphaerella ehrenbergii. These changes reflect, in part, the Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary cooling since some successful taxa (e.g., K. magnificus) are related to cool surface waters. Other shifts in the nannofossil communities were perhaps the result of a changing nutrient regime. Stronger latitudinal gradients may have increased wind velocities and thus the eolian input of ferruginous dust required by N-fixing bacteria. The enhanced high-latitude deep water formation probably changed the bottom water environment in disfavor of denitrificating organisms. A decline of chemical weathering and fluviatile transport may have reduced the amount of bioavailable phosphate. These processes led to an increased nitrate and a decreased phosphate content shifting the nutrient regime from nitrate toward phosphate limitation.

  4. Dinosaurian growth patterns and rapid avian growth rates.

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    Erickson, G M; Rogers, K C; Yerby, S A

    2001-07-26

    Did dinosaurs grow in a manner similar to extant reptiles, mammals or birds, or were they unique? Are rapid avian growth rates an innovation unique to birds, or were they inherited from dinosaurian precursors? We quantified growth rates for a group of dinosaurs spanning the phylogenetic and size diversity for the clade and used regression analysis to characterize the results. Here we show that dinosaurs exhibited sigmoidal growth curves similar to those of other vertebrates, but had unique growth rates with respect to body mass. All dinosaurs grew at accelerated rates relative to the primitive condition seen in extant reptiles. Small dinosaurs grew at moderately rapid rates, similar to those of marsupials, but large species attained rates comparable to those of eutherian mammals and precocial birds. Growth in giant sauropods was similar to that of whales of comparable size. Non-avian dinosaurs did not attain rates like those of altricial birds. Avian growth rates were attained in a stepwise fashion after birds diverged from theropod ancestors in the Jurassic period.

  5. Revision of the Maastrichtian-Palaeocene charophyte biostratigraphy of the Fontllonga reference section (southern Pyrenees, Catalonia, Spain)

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    Vicente, A.; Villalba-Breva, S.; Ferrandez-Cañadell, C.; Martin-Closa

    2016-07-01

    The Fontllonga section is one of the best-known stratigraphic sections wordwide for the study of charophyte biostratigraphy of the Maastrichtian and lower Palaeocene. An updated proposal for the charophyte biostratigraphy of this section is presented after summarizing previous knowledge. The zone of Peckichara cancellata allows the upper Campanian–lowermost Maastrichtian to be characterised in the base of the section (La Maçana Formation). The Microchara punctata biozone represents most of the Maastrichtian (Figuerola Formation). Within this biozone, a Clavator ultimus subzone is proposed to improve characterisation of the lower and middle Maastrichtian. Both the upper and lower boundaries of the Microchara punctata biozone proposed in previous studies are modified based on new occurrences of the index species. A charophyte assemblage belonging to the Dughiella bacillaris biozone is reported for the first time from the middle of the section (Perauba Complex) and provides an age for this unit ranging from the upper Danian to lower Thanetian. A foraminifer assemblage found in the basal marine deposits above the non-marine succession of the Fontllonga section provides new biostratigraphic data to locate the upper boundary of the non-marine succession at least within the upper Thanetian. (Author)

  6. The first Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian dinosaur footprints from Transylvania (Romania

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    Matei Vremir

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available An Uppermost Cretaceous (Maastrichtian site exposing dinosaur footprints is reported from the Sebes̡ area (Transylvanian Depression. This is the first dinoturbated layer discovered in our country, containing also numerous bones belonging to various dinosaurs. The track-site is located near Lancrăm village and provides only two quite well preserved footprints (one track. The medium sized (FL = 23,3 cm; FW = 17,8 cm; pace = 103 cm; ST = 200 cm plantigrad-tridactyle footprints belong to Ornithopedoidei, according to their morphology. An assignment to the Iguanodontichnus CASAMIQUELA & FASOLA, 1968 group seems to be appropriate (tentatively, associated to the “Rhabdodon” iguanodontian dinosaur. The importance of this discovery lies in the stratigraphical significance, confirming the Uppermost Cretaceous age of these dinosaur-bearing continental deposits exposed between Sebes̡ and Alba-Iulia (as well as the autochthon/ paraautochon status of some vertebrate assemblages identified there, which previously were considered Oligocene or even Miocene. Additional data regarding size, speed and locomotion of the Transylvanian Iguanodontian ”Rhabdodon” dinosaurs are added.

  7. Campano-Maastrichtian foraminifera from onshore sediments in the Rio del Rey Basin, Southwest Cameroon

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    Njoh, Oliver Anoh; Victor, Obiosio; Christopher, Agyingi

    2013-03-01

    Campanian-Maastrichtian marine sediments outcrop in five genetically linked sedimentary basins along the West African coast in the Gulf of Guinea, from the Douala Basin in Cameroon to the Anambra Basin in Nigeria. These sediments in the more centrally located Rio del Rey Basin have been the least studied. Therefore, the geologic history of this region has merely been speculative. The Rio del Rey Basin like the adjacent Niger Delta is producing hydrocarbon from the offshore Tertiary sedimentary interval in which all studies have been focused, neglecting the onshore Cretaceous sediments. Outcrops in the basin are rare, small and highly weathered. Samples from some of these sediments have yielded a few Planktonic and dominantly benthonic foraminiferal assemblages. The long-ranging heterohelix and hedbergellids characterized the planktics while the species Afrobolivina afra which is a well known diagnostic taxon for Campanian-Maastrichtian sediments in West African basins clearly dominate the benthic assemblage. Its occurrence in association with other Upper Cretaceous forms such as Bolivina explicata, Praebulimina exiqua, Gabonita lata, Ammobaculites coprolithiformis amongst others, formed the basis on which this age was assigned to the sediments sampled from the Rio del Rey Basin. Hence, this work has undoubtedly established the much needed link in this regional geologic history and correlates these sediments with the Logbaba and Nkporo Formations in the Douala Basin in Cameroon and the southeastern Nigerian Sedimentary Basins. Thus, these units were all deposited during this same geologic period and probably controlled by the same geologic event.

  8. Upper Cretaceous woods from the Olmos Formation (late Campanian-early Maastrichtian), Coahuila, Mexico.

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    Estrada-Ruiz, Emilio; Martínez-Cabrera, Hugo I; Cevallos-Ferriz, Sergio R S

    2010-07-01

    The Olmos Formation was part of a system of deltas that existed in the southern portion of the Western Interior of North America during the Campanian-Maastrichtian. The paleofloristic composition from the northern portions of the Epicontinental Sea is relatively well known, but less intensive exploration in the south has precluded more detailed floristic comparison across the entire latitudinal span of the Sea. The Olmos Formation flora, with more than 100 different leaf morphotypes so far recognized and several wood types, has the most diverse Cretaceous fossil plant assemblage in Mexico and represents a valuable opportunity for comparative studies. • The fossil woods here described were collected in the Coahuila State, Mexico. The samples were studied using standard thin section technique and identified by comparison with fossil and extant material. • We described four new genera (Olmosoxylon, cf. Lauraceae; Coahuiloxylon, ?Anacardiaceae, ?Burseraceae; Muzquizoxylon, Cornaceae; and Wheeleroxylon, Malvaceae s.l.) and three xylotypes of angiosperms. • Some of the genera present in the Olmos Formation such as Javelinoxylon and Metcalfeoxylon have been described from geologic units in the USA (San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Big Bend National Park, Texas), suggesting similarity in the taxonomic composition of the floras that inhabited southern portions of the western margin of the Campanian-Maastrichtian Epicontinental Sea. Other species, however, have only been reported for the Olmos Formation, indicating some degree of local floristic differentiation among the assemblages that inhabited the southern portion of the Western Interior.

  9. MAASTRICHTIAN TO EOCENE CALCAREOUS NANNOFOSSIL BIOSTRATIGRAPHY FROM THE TABIAGO SECTION, BRIANZA AREA, NORTHERN ITALY

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    FABRIZIO TREMOLADA

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphic investigations have been carried out on samples collected from the Tabiago section, Brianza, northern Italy. This section records early Maastrichtian (CC23b nannofossil zone to early Eocene (NP10 nannofossil zone calcareous nannofossil assemblages. The Cretaceous-Tertiary transition is characterized by major changes in sedimentation rates and two likely stratigraphic gaps. The Cretaceous Brenno Formation was deposited with a high sedimentation rate (~20 m/m.y., whilst the Tabiago Formation of Paleogene age records a drastic decrease (~10 m/m.y.. The absence of the CC26 zonal marker Micula prinsii may indicate a stratigraphic hiatus or an extremely condensed level in the latest Maastrichtian. However, only two samples have been collected and analyzed in this interval due to low exposure of the outcrop, and the absence of M. prinsii could be the result of diagenetic overprint or insufficient sampling. A stratigraphic hiatus or a very condensed interval corresponds to the upper part of NP1 nannofossil zone and PƒÑ foraminiferal Zone and P1a Subzone in the early Paleocene. The poor exposure of the outcrop prevents to precisely locate the zonal boundaries between NP4 and NP5 and between NP9 and NP10 and impedes the documentation of possible further stratigraphic gaps or condensed intervals.    

  10. Upper Campanian-Maastrichtian chronostratigraphy of the Skælskør-1 core, Denmark

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    Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph; Anderskouv, Kresten; Bjerager, Morten

    2015-01-01

    nannofossil Watznaueria barnesiae and the cool-water Kamptnerius magnificus highlight the following past changes in sea-surface temperatures (SSTs): relatively warm late Campanian SSTs, cooling across the Campanian-Maastrichtian boundary and through the early Maastrichtian, warming across the early......-late Maastrichtian transition, cooling in the late Maastrichtian, intense warming in the latest Maastrichtian chron C29r, followed by a very short episode of cooling immediately before the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary. The late Campanian-Maastrichtian evolution in sea water temperatures inferred from the Danish...

  11. Oldest known dinosaurian nesting site and reproductive biology of the Early Jurassic sauropodomorph Massospondylus.

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    Reisz, Robert R; Evans, David C; Roberts, Eric M; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Yates, Adam M

    2012-02-14

    The extensive Early Jurassic continental strata of southern Africa have yielded an exceptional record of dinosaurs that includes scores of partial to complete skeletons of the sauropodomorph Massospondylus, ranging from embryos to large adults. In 1976 an incomplete egg clutch including in ovo embryos of this dinosaur, the oldest known example in the fossil record, was collected from a road-cut talus, but its exact provenance was uncertain. An excavation program at the site started in 2006 has yielded multiple in situ egg clutches, documenting the oldest known dinosaurian nesting site, predating other similar sites by more than 100 million years. The presence of numerous clutches of eggs, some of which contain embryonic remains, in at least four distinct horizons within a small area, provides the earliest known evidence of complex reproductive behavior including site fidelity and colonial nesting in a terrestrial vertebrate. Thus, fossil and sedimentological evidence from this nesting site provides empirical data on reproductive strategies in early dinosaurs. A temporally calibrated optimization of dinosaurian reproductive biology not only demonstrates the primary significance of the Massospondylus nesting site, but also provides additional insights into the initial stages of the evolutionary history of dinosaurs, including evidence that deposition of eggs in a tightly organized single layer in a nest evolved independently from brooding.

  12. The ornithologist Alfred Russel Wallace and the controversy surrounding the dinosaurian origin of birds.

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    Ibrahim, Nizar; Kutschera, Ulrich

    2013-12-01

    Over many years of his life, the British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) explored the tropical forests of Malaysia, collecting numerous specimens, including hundreds of birds, many of them new to science. Subsequently, Wallace published a series of papers on systematic ornithology, and discovered a new species on top of a volcano on Ternate, where he wrote, in 1858, his famous essay on natural selection. Based on this hands-on experience, and an analysis of an Archaeopteryx fossil, Wallace suggested that birds may have descended from dinosaurian ancestors. Here, we describe the "dinosaur-bird hypothesis" that originated with the work of Thomas H. Huxley (1825-1895). We present the strong evidence linking theropod dinosaurs to birds, and briefly outline the long and ongoing controversy around this concept. Dinosaurs preserving plumage, nesting sites and trace fossils provide overwhelming evidence for the dinosaurian origin of birds. Based on these recent findings of paleontological research, we conclude that extant birds indeed descended, with some modifications, from small, Mesozoic theropod dinosaurs. In the light of Wallace's view of bird origins, we critically evaluate recent opposing views to this idea, including Ernst Mayr's (1904-2005) arguments against the "dinosaur-bird hypothesis", and document that this famous ornithologist was not correct in his assessment of this important aspect of vertebrate evolution.

  13. Stratigraphy of the type Maastrichtian – a synthesis

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    Jagt, J.W.M.; Jagt-Yazykova, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    A synthesis of the stratigraphy of the Maastrichtian Stage in its extended type area, that is, southern Limburg (the Netherlands), and adjacent Belgian and German territories, is presented with a brief historical overview. Quarrying activities at the large quarry complex of ENCI-HeidelbergCement

  14. Stratigraphy of the type Maastrichtian – a synthesis

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    Jagt, J.W.M.; Jagt-Yazykova, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    A synthesis of the stratigraphy of the Maastrichtian Stage in its extended type area, that is, southern Limburg (the Netherlands), and adjacent Belgian and German territories, is presented with a brief historical overview. Quarrying activities at the large quarry complex of ENCI-HeidelbergCement Gro

  15. Stratigraphy of the type Maastrichtian – a synthesis

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    Jagt, J.W.M.; Jagt-Yazykova, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    A synthesis of the stratigraphy of the Maastrichtian Stage in its extended type area, that is, southern Limburg (the Netherlands), and adjacent Belgian and German territories, is presented with a brief historical overview. Quarrying activities at the large quarry complex of ENCI-HeidelbergCement Gro

  16. Comparative evolutionary analyses of beta globin gene in eutherian, dinosaurian and neopterygii taxa

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    Gauri Awasthi, Garima Srivastava & Aparup Das

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Comparative genomics and evolutionary analyses of conserved genes have enabled usto understand the complexity of genomes of closely related species. For example: -globin gene present inhuman hemoglobin is one such gene that has experienced many genetic changes in many related taxa andproduced more than 600 variants. One of the variant, HBS causes sickle-cell anemia in humans but offersprotection against severe malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum. In the present study, we characterized andperformed evolutionary comparative analyses of the -globin gene in different related and unrelated taxa tohave a comprehensive view of its evolution.Methods: DNA and protein sequences of -globin gene were downloaded from NCBI and characterized in detailin nine eutherian (Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, Macaca mulatta, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Bostaurus, Canis familiaris, Equus caballus, Oryctolagus cuniculus, a dinosaurian (Gallus gallus and a neopterygii(Danio rerio taxa. Three more eutherian (Papio anubis, Ovis aries and Sus scrofa taxa were included for ananalysis at the protein level but not included at the gene level owing to lack of genomic information. Computationaland phylogenetic analyses were performed using evolutionary comparative approach.Results: Results of comparative and phylogenetic analyses revealed less conservation of genetic architecture of-globin compared to its protein architecture in all eutherian taxa. Both dinosaurian and neopterygii taxa servedas outgroups and varied at gene and protein levels.Interpretation & conclusion: Most remarkably, all primates from eutherian taxa including P. anubis showedonly nine codon position differences and an absolute similarity between H. sapiens and P. troglodytes. Absoluteconservation of coding region in Equus caballus (horse was observed. The results were discussed with aninference on the role of evolutionary forces in maintaining such close similarities

  17. First evidence of dinosaurian secondary cartilage in the post-hatching skull of Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (Dinosauria, Ornithischia.

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    Alida M Bailleul

    Full Text Available Bone and calcified cartilage can be fossilized and preserved for hundreds of millions of years. While primary cartilage is fairly well studied in extant and fossilized organisms, nothing is known about secondary cartilage in fossils. In extant birds, secondary cartilage arises after bone formation during embryonic life at articulations, sutures and muscular attachments in order to accommodate mechanical stress. Considering the phylogenetic inclusion of birds within the Dinosauria, we hypothesized a dinosaurian origin for this "avian" tissue. Therefore, histological thin sectioning was used to investigate secondary chondrogenesis in disarticulated craniofacial elements of several post-hatching specimens of the non-avian dinosaur Hypacrosaurus stebingeri (Ornithischia, Lambeosaurinae. Secondary cartilage was found on three membrane bones directly involved with masticatory function: (1 as nodules on the dorso-caudal face of a surangular; and (2 on the bucco-caudal face of a maxilla; and (3 between teeth as islets in the alveolar processes of a dentary. Secondary chondrogenesis at these sites is consistent with the locations of secondary cartilage in extant birds and with the induction of the cartilage by different mechanical factors - stress generated by the articulation of the quadrate, stress of a ligamentous or muscular insertion, and stress of tooth formation. Thus, our study reveals the first evidence of "avian" secondary cartilage in a non-avian dinosaur. It pushes the origin of this "avian" tissue deep into dinosaurian ancestry, suggesting the creation of the more appropriate term "dinosaurian" secondary cartilage.

  18. Gastropods Associated with Fossil Traces from Yacoraite Formation (Maastrichtian-Danian), and its Paleoenvironmental Significance, Jujuy,Northwestern Argentina

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    Carlos A. C(O)NSOLE GONELLA; Miguel GRIFFIN; Florencio G. ACE(N)OLAZA

    2009-01-01

    We present results tending to characterize the new records of invertebrates from the Yacoraite Formation (Maastrichtian-Danian). The fossils reported come from two stratigraphic sections exposed in the surroundings of Maimara and Jueya, province of Jujuy, northwestern Argentina. The selection was based on geological and paleontological evidence. The recovered fossils include gastropods and invertebrate fossil traces, including Planolites, Skolithos and Gastrochanoelites ichnogenns. As result of our review, we discussed the possibility of assigning the analyzed gastropods to the family Zygopleuridae (gene. et. sp. indet.), as an approximation to the taxonomic resolution of this fossil fauna. The trace fossils were assigned to the archetypical Glossifungites ichnofacies. The study of the fossil assemblage allowed us to defme a shallow depositional environment, characteristic of a marine context with high-energy conditions.

  19. The lower Maastrichtian Hivdskud succession, Møns Klint, Denmark

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    Jelby, M.E.; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph; Surlyk, Finn;

    2014-01-01

    with the cored boreholes Stevns-1 (Denmark) and ODP Site 762C (Indian Ocean). Hvidskud encompasses the 405 kyr eccentricity cycles Ma40513 – Ma40511 within magnetochron C31r. A sedimentation rate of 5.0 cm kyr-1 can be inferred from correlation to geochronological tie-points in ODP 762C, suggesting an age of ~70...... Maastrichtian in north-western Europe. Information on palaeo-seawater temperatures can be drawn from oxygen isotope records obtained from bulk rock samples and 24 micromorphic brachiopod specimens (Terebratulina faujasii). The brachiopod data show a clear diagenetic trend but point to an upper range...

  20. The lower Maastrichtian Hivdskud succession, Møns Klint, Denmark

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    Jelby, M.E.; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph; Surlyk, Finn

    2014-01-01

    with the cored boreholes Stevns-1 (Denmark) and ODP Site 762C (Indian Ocean). Hvidskud encompasses the 405 kyr eccentricity cycles Ma40513 – Ma40511 within magnetochron C31r. A sedimentation rate of 5.0 cm kyr-1 can be inferred from correlation to geochronological tie-points in ODP 762C, suggesting an age of ~70...... Maastrichtian in north-western Europe. Information on palaeo-seawater temperatures can be drawn from oxygen isotope records obtained from bulk rock samples and 24 micromorphic brachiopod specimens (Terebratulina faujasii). The brachiopod data show a clear diagenetic trend but point to an upper range...

  1. Strange Assemblage

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    David Robert Cole

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper contends that the power of Deleuze & Guattari’s (1988 notion of assemblage as theorised in 1000 Plateaus can be normalised and reductive with reference to its application to any social-cultural context where an open system of dynamic and fluid elements are located. Rather than determining the assemblage in this way, this paper argues for an alternative conception of ‘strange assemblage’ that must be deliberately and consciously created through rigorous and focused intellectual, creative and philosophical work around what makes assemblages singular. The paper will proceed with examples of ‘strange assemblage’ taken from a film by Peter Greenaway (A Zed and 2 Noughts; the film ‘Performance’; educational research with Sudanese families in Australia; the book, Bomb Culture by Jeff Nuttall (1970; and the band Hawkwind. Fittingly, these elements are themselves chosen to demonstrate the concept of ‘strange assemblage’, and how it can be presented. How exactly the elements of a ‘strange assemblage’ come together and work in the world is unknown until they are specifically elaborated and created ‘in the moment’. Such spontaneous methodology reminds us of the 1960s ‘Happenings’, the Situationist International and Dada/Surrealism. The difference that will be opened up by this paper is that all elements of this ‘strange assemblage’ cohere in terms of a rendering of ‘the unacceptable.'

  2. Global aspects of dinosaur distribution and evolution

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    Sues, H.

    1988-02-01

    Late Jurassic dinosaurian assemblages show close taxonomic correspondence over wide geographical ranges. Presently available if meager evidence suggests that this is also the case for Early Cretaceous communities. Cretaceous dinosaurian assemblages of Campanian and Maastrichtian age show considerable geographical differentiation but also some wide-ranging genera. Northern Hemisphere terrestrial ecosystems were dominated by hadrosaurs and ceratopsians, both herbivores with advanced capabilities for oral food-processing, whereas Southern Hemisphere biota were characterized by the abundance of titanosaurid sauropods, which relied on gut processing. Very close taxonomic similarities exist between the Campanian and early Maastrichtian dinosaurian assemblages of Mongolia and western North America, which, in part, is matched by similarities among other tetrapods such as mammals. Endemic dinosaurs in the Southern Hemisphere appear to reflect major changes in continental configuration. Some evidence exists for interchange of fuanal elements between North and South America. In absence of late Maastrichtian dinosaurian assemblages from most regions, scenarios concerning the terminal Cretaceous extinction of the Dinosauria should be regarded with caution because they are exclusively based on the conditions in western North America.

  3. An astronomical time scale for the Maastrichtian at the Zumaia and Sopelana sections (Basque country, northern Spain)

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    Batenburg, Sietske J.; Gale, Andy S.; Sprovieri, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The rhythmically bedded limestone–marl alternations in the coastal cliffs of Sopelana and Zumaia in the Basque country, northern Spain, permit testing and refining of existing Maastrichtian chronologies (latest Cretaceous). The recently established astronomical time scale for the late Maastrichtian...

  4. Maastrichtian sedimentation and palaeoenvironments of the Saratov Volga region

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    Iakovishina, Elena; Blinova, Irina; Kopaevich, Ludmila; Vishnevskaya, Valentina; Bordunov, Sergey

    2016-04-01

    The Saratov Volga region was a shallow-marine epicontinental basin North-Eastern shelf zone of the Tethys Ocean in the Maastrichtian. The basis for the modeling conditions of sedimentation was the detection mineral composition of rocks, as well as the contents of various chemical elements in rocks in three reference sections: Lower Bannovka, quarries "Bolshevik" and "Kommunar". Rocks of quarries "Bolshevik" and "Kommunar" characterized by quartz-calcite mineral association. The main rock-forming mineral is calcite, small amounts in rocks contain quartz. Other mineral composition characterized section Lower Bannovka. At the base of the section in the rock marked the presence of the opal. The source of silica are radiolarians. Favorable conditions for the existence of which is cold deep water enriched with SiO2. Above the section marked authigenic glauconite, which are confined to zones of skip in sedimentation.Further up begins to dominate the accumulation of calcite with rich bentic foraminifera. Clay minerals in rocks of the section Lower Bannovka presented montmorillonite and illite. The relationship of chemical elements and their alkali modules allow to detail the conditions of sedimentation. The ratio of Fe/Mn in them varies from 44 to 5729. Higher values are characteristic of glauconite sandstones. Up the section marked decrease in the Ti/Zr, indicating that the increase in the distance from the source area to the place of deposition. The similarity values of the ratio Ti/Zr samples indicates a community source area. Sedimentation Model revealed the impact of the PreUral strait connecting Tethys and Paleoarktic. Through the Strait of deep cold water saturated with SiO2, penetrated into the of the Saratov Volga region, were accumulated clay. The closing of the PreUral Strait changed the conditions of sedimentation, the associated fall in sea levels due to global cooling reflected in the crisis of radiolarians, increase in the number of glauconite. Subsequent

  5. Ray-finned fishes (Osteichthyes, Actinopterygii) from the type Maastrichtian, the Netherlands and Belgium

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    Friedman, M.

    2012-01-01

    Ray-finned fishes are a diverse, but understudied, component of the Maastrichtian marine fauna of the southeast Netherlands (Limburg) and northeast Belgium (Liège-Limburg). The most extensive reviews of fishes from these uppermost Cretaceous deposits were made in the early and mid-Twentieth Century,

  6. Bio-magnetochronology for the upper Campanian-Maastrichtian from the Gubbio area, Italy

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    Gardin, Silvia; Galbrun, Bruno; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph

    2012-01-01

    A new bio-chronostratigraphic framework is presented for the upper Campanian - Maastrichtian pelagic sediments of the Gubbio area (Bottaccione and Contessa Highway sections, Italy). New planktonic foraminiferal (FO of P. hantkeninoides), calcareous nannofossil (FO of M. prinsii, base acme of M. m...

  7. Lower Maastrichtian cyclostratigraphy of the Bidart section (Basque Country, SW France)

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    Husson, Dorothée; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph; Galbrun, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Cyclostratigraphic analysis of the Maastrichtian limestone-marl alternations of Bidart (SW France) allows the hypothesis of orbital control on lithological cycles to be evaluated. Magnetic Susceptibility (MS), oxygen and carbon isotope measurements, sampled at a high resolution, are analyzed using...

  8. Type specimens of Maastrichtian fossils in the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leloux, J.

    2002-01-01

    The type specimens of Maastrichtian invertebrate fossils from Limburg, The Netherlands, present in the National Museum of Natural History, Leiden, are listed. The Upper Cretaceous plant type specimens from Limburg of Miquel that were once part of the Staring collection present in the Palaeobotanical

  9. Cretaceous Bryozoa from the Campanian and Maastrichtian of the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains, United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, P.D.; McKinney, F.K.

    2006-01-01

    The Late Cretaceous bryozoan fauna of North America has been severely neglected in the past. In this preliminary study based on museum material and a limited amount of fieldwork, we describe a total of 128 Campanian-Maastrichtian bryozoan species from Delaware, New Jersey, North Carolina, South

  10. Coniacian-maastrichtian calcareous nannofossil biostratigraphy and carbon-isotope stratigraphy in the Zagros Basin (Iran)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmjooei, Mohammad Javad; Thibault, Nicolas; Kani, Anoshiravan

    2014-01-01

    , White Fall, Kingsdown, Michel Dean, Haven Brow, Horseshoe Bay, Buckle, Hawks Brow, Santonian/Campanian boundary (SCBE) and Campanian/Maastrichtian boundary (CMBE) events. Correlation to a recently proposed global δ13C stack for the Late Cretaceous points to a major mismatch of this compilation...

  11. Bio-magnetochronology for the upper Campanian-Maastrichtian from the Gubbio area, Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardin, Silvia; Galbrun, Bruno; Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph

    2012-01-01

    A new bio-chronostratigraphic framework is presented for the upper Campanian - Maastrichtian pelagic sediments of the Gubbio area (Bottaccione and Contessa Highway sections, Italy). New planktonic foraminiferal (FO of P. hantkeninoides), calcareous nannofossil (FO of M. prinsii, base acme of M...

  12. A multidisciplinary approach to digital mapping of dinosaurian tracksites in the Lower Cretaceous (Valanginian–Barremian) Broome Sandstone of the Dampier Peninsula, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Jorg M.; Zlot, Robert; Poropat, George; Bosse, Michael; Salisbury, Steven W.

    2017-01-01

    The abundant dinosaurian tracksites of the Lower Cretaceous (Valanginian–Barremian) Broome Sandstone of the Dampier Peninsula, Western Australia, form an important part of the West Kimberley National Heritage Place. Previous attempts to document these tracksites using traditional mapping techniques (e.g., surface overlays, transects and gridlines combined with conventional photography) have been hindered by the non-trivial challenges associated with working in this area, including, but not limited to: (1) the remoteness of many of the tracksites; (2) the occurrence of the majority of the tracksites in the intertidal zone; (3) the size and complexity of many of the tracksites, with some extending over several square kilometres. Using the historically significant and well-known dinosaurian tracksites at Minyirr (Gantheaume Point), we show how these issues can be overcome through the use of an integrated array of remote sensing tools. A combination of high-resolution aerial photography with both manned and unmanned aircraft, airborne and handheld high-resolution lidar imaging and handheld photography enabled the collection of large amounts of digital data from which 3D models of the tracksites at varying resolutions were constructed. The acquired data encompasses a very broad scale, from the sub-millimetre level that details individual tracks, to the multiple-kilometre level, which encompasses discontinuous tracksite exposures and large swathes of coastline. The former are useful for detailed ichnological work, while the latter are being employed to better understand the stratigraphic and temporal relationship between tracksites in a broader geological and palaeoecological context. These approaches and the data they can generate now provide a means through which digital conservation and temporal monitoring of the Dampier Peninsula’s dinosaurian tracksites can occur. As plans for the on-going management of the tracks in this area progress, analysis of the 3D data

  13. Maastrichtian-aged lithostratigraphic patterns in the European tethys: Implications for sea level change and end-Cretaceous extinction patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, P.; Macleod, K.G. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Thirteen Maastrichtian-aged stratigraphic sections from a variety of sites spanning the ancient Tethys ocean in Western and Eastern Europe and Northern Africa have been measured in this study. The similarity in lithologies between even geographically separated localities allows refined lithostratigraphic correlation; individual members first defined from Bay of Biscay sections can now be recognized through all sections. The sections are found in the Bay of Biscay and Basque region of France and Spain (Sopelana, Zumaya, Hendaye, Bidart, Tercis, Pamplona;) southern Spain (Caravaca, Agost); northern Africa (El Kef); and Eastern Europe (Georgia). All of the sections are dominated by limestones in the Lower Maastrichtian, and marls or limestone-marl rhythmites in the Upper Maastrichtian. A conspicuous, massive limestone, usually 10 to 15 m thick, is found in all sections at the top of the Lower Maastrichtian; it is invariably overlain by a thicker unit composed entirely of marl. The thick limestone contains the last body fossils of the genus Inoceramus, and occurs just beneath the first occurrence of foraminifera diagnostic of the Abathomphalus mayaroensis Zone of Late Maastrichtian age. The dramatic shift in lithology lies at or just beneath the boundary between the Lower and Upper Maastrichtian, and may have been caused by one of the most rapid and profound sea level changes of the Cretaceous Period. The sea-level change may be a causal factor in the mid-Maastrichtian extinction which affected the Inoceramidae and other mollusks, such as the rudistid bivalves and ammonites, and certainly is one of the dominant factors in forming the sequence of lithologies found in the Maastrichtian Stage of Tethys.

  14. Affects and assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    affects and assemblages produce subjective feelings and emotions (Pile 2009) Recently, urban experience designs and events aim at evoking affects through affects and assemblages. A Danish example is the Carlsberg city in Copenhagen another is The High line in Chelsea, New York (Samson 2011). Thus...

  15. First occurrence of Mosasauridae (Squamata in the Maastrichtian (latest Cretaceous of Alicante (Valencia Community, Eastern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardet, Nathalie

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the mosasaurid genus Prognathodon is known worldwide during the latest Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian, we report here its first occurrence in the Eastern area of the Iberian Peninsula. It was previously known from coeval levels of the Basque Country. The specimen from Castalla (Alicante corresponds to a pterygoid tooth. Though it cannot be precisely determined at the specific level, the tooth belongs to a Prognathodon species with 'slender' teeth such as P. compressidens, P. sectorius and P. mosasauroides, all known in the Campanian-Maastrichtian of Europe, or P. kianda from the Maastrichtian of Angola.Aunque el genero de mosasaurio Prognathodon esta conocido mundialmente durante el Cretácico final (Campaniense-Maastrichtiense, damos a conocer su primera occurencia en el Levante Español. Previamente ya se conocía en niveles contemporáneos del País Vasco. El especimen de Castalla corresponde a un diente del pterigoides. Aunque no se puede identificar a nivel especifico, el diente pertenece a una especie de Prognathodon con dientes 'delgados' como P. compressidens, P. sectorius y P. mosasauroides, del Campaniense-Maastrichtiense de Europa, o P. kianda del Maastrichtiense de Angola.

  16. Two unusual new dinoflagellate cyst genera from the Bunde Borehole, Maastrichtian type area, southern Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkhuis; Klinkenberg; Williams; Fensome

    2000-06-01

    Maastrichtian and Danian deposits from the Bunde Borehole in the Maastrichtian type area contain the morphologically unusual dinoflagellate species Spumadinium felderorum gen. et sp. nov. and Lasagniella herngreenii gen. et sp. nov., both of which have archeopyles formed by the loss of several paraplates. In S. felderorum the paraplates forming the operculum or opercular pieces appear to be the third and fourth precingulars (3"-4") plus the first and second anterior intercalaries (1a-2a). This suggests that Spumadinium, although having a wall resembling some cribroperidinioids, is a cladopyxiinean. L. herngreenii is unique in having up to eight wall layers, separated and supported by buttresses. The archeopyle is also a combination type but formed by loss of one apical (3'), three anterior intercalary (1a-3a) and three precingular (3"-5") paraplates. Thus, Lasagniella is assignable to the Peridiniales. The distinctive morphology and restricted ranges of the two genera make them useful stratigraphic markers for the Upper Maastrichtian-Danian.

  17. Inoceramid stratigraphy and depositional architecture of the Campanian and Maastrichtian of the Miechów Synclinorium (southern Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkowska, Agata

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic evolution of the Campanian and Maastrichtian (Upper Cretaceous) of the Miechow Synclinorium is presented. Through chronostratigraphic analysis, the geometry of the Campanian and Maastrichtian of the area is interpreted, while microfacies analysis allowed determination of some of the paleoenvironmental parameters (rate of sedimentation, bottom condition and terrigenous input). The chronostratigraphy is based on inoceramid biostratigraphy. Nine inoceramid zones are recognized: Sphenoceramus patootensiformis, Sphaeroceramus sarumensis-Cataceramus dariensis and `Inoceramus' azerbaydjanensis-`Inoceramus' vorhelmensis, `Inoceramus' tenuilineatus, Sphaeroceramus pertenuiformis, `Inoceramus' inkermanensis and `Inoceramus' costaecus- `Inoceramus' redbirdensis (Campanian); Endocostea typica and Trochoceramus radiosus (Maastrichtian). Five unconformities (isochronous in the study area) represented by horizons of slower sedimentation rate, were recognized. They correlate with eustatic sea-level changes, well recorded in European successions (Jarvis et al. 2002, 2006; Niebuhr et al. 2011). Unconformity horizons allow six alloformations to be distinguished. The thickness of particular chronostratigraphic units within the Campanian and Lower Maastrichtian increases progressively toward the axis of the Danish-Polish Trough, which indicates that the inversion of the trough could not have started before the Late Maastrichtian.

  18. The Campanian - Maastrichtian (Late Cretaceous) climate transition linked to a global carbon cycle perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, S.; Friedrich, O.; Gale, A. S.

    2009-04-01

    The Late Cretaceous was a period of long-term climate cooling succeeding the extreme warmth of the mid-Cretaceous greenhouse world. The cooling is mainly considered as a result of changes in ocean circulation due to plate movements resulting in progressive deep-water exchange between the deep oceanic basins and a parallel drop in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In Campanian - Maastrichtian times, pronounced climate cooling is documented between 71 - 69 Ma, when distinct changes in foraminiferal oxygen and carbon isotope data at a global scale indicate substantial deep-water cooling and reduced rates of organic carbon burial. The causal mechanisms of this cooling period, however, are poorly understood to date. While some authors suggest mainly oceanographic changes, others supposed an ephemeral glaciation related to a eustatic sea-level fall. Mainly, the relative timing of oceanic oxygen and carbon isotope changes to eustatic sea-level changes is not proven yet. Likewise, the influence of plate tectonic changes as the opening of gateways or the subduction of mid-ocean ridges and/or of orbital forcing is poorly understood. A principle objection beside the sparse available data is the low temporal resolution of biostratigraphic zonations. Here, we present carbon isotope stratigraphies from Campanian-Maastrichtian Boundary sites in the Boreal and Tethyan shelf seas of Europe and from Shatsky Rise in the tropical Pacific in order to improve the resolution of stratigraphic correlation. Prominent features at that time are two negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) in the late Campanian and earliest Maastrichtian, which are well documented in the Lägerdorf-Kronsmoor section in N-Germany and the Campanian-Maastrichtian Boundary Stratotype at Tercis in SW France. These new carbon isotope records correlate well with the carbon isotope reference curve from the English Chalk (Jarvis et al., 2002, 2006). The new carbon isotope record at Site 305 in the tropical

  19. Nannoplankton Assemblage Succession Throughout Cretaceous/ Tertiary Boundary in the “P” Well Section, Santos Basin, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panuju Panuju

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v6i1.115The massive change in calcareous nannoplankton assemblages throughout Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T boundary (65.5 M.a. has been illustrated by several authors. The diverse and abundant assemblage disappears suddenly above the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. This event is related to the most dramatic environmental changes in the Earth's history due to the catastrophic events, those are meteorite impact (Chicxulub and supervolcano eruption (Deccan occurring at the end of Cretaceous. The succeeding age was a time of rapid evolution of nannoplankton during Paleocene. A quantitative method analysis of nannoplankton throughout Maastrichtian to Paleocene of “P” well section, Santos Basin, Brazil, indicated that the nannoplankton assemblages abruptly decrease in diversity and abundance and mostly change in species composition. The various complex shapes of species at Maastrichtian also underwent changing to simple plain shapes and small at Paleocene. The sedimentary section ranges from the top of zone CC23 (Coccolith Cretaceous 23 to NP9 (Nannoplankton Paleogen 9. It is bounded by the Last Occurrence (LO of Tranolithus pachelosus at the base and Fasciculithus tympaniformis at the top. The biostratigraphic discontinuity characterized by the absence of zone CC26 to NP4 is an indicator for the presence of an unconformity at K/T boundary within analyzed section. The Cretaceous nannoplankton assemblages are dominated by Genera Watznaueria, Micula, Arkhangelskiella, Cribrosphaerella, Eiffellithus, Predicosphaera, and Retecapsa, whilst the Paleocene assemblages are dominated by Genera Toweius, Ericsonia, and Coccolithus. Survivor Cretaceous species recovered into Tertiary sediments consist of Braarudosphaera bigelowii, Biscutum melaniae, Neocrepidolithus neocrassus, Placozygus sigmoides, Cyclagelosaphaera reinhardtii, Markalius inversus, and Scapolithus fossilis.

  20. Affects and assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Kristine

    the paper raises the questions where to locate aesthetics when planners and architects wishes to design for aesthetical experiences and sensations rather than formal objects. The paper will proceed through a brief outline of the recent notion of assemblage and affect in urban studies, planning theory...... as a ‘throwntogetherness’ (Massey 2005) or assemblage (Farias & Bender 2010) of perspectives bridging for instance the social and cultural experienced space investigated by the geographer and urban sociologist with the material and formal aesthetics of the architect and urban planner.......Affects and assemblages are Deleuzian Guattarian notions related to aesthetics and spatial territories. In recent urban geography and urban studies these notions are increasingly gaining more impact (Amin & Thrift 2002, Pile 2008, Farías & Bender 2010, Andersen & Harrison 2010, Thrift 2008). What...

  1. A deep-time CO2 barometer based on triple oxygen isotope compositions of dinosaurian eggshell carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H.; Passey, B. H.; Montanari, S.; Levin, N.; Li, S.

    2013-12-01

    Photochemical reactions in the stratosphere lead to mass independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes: oxygen exchange among O2, O3, and CO2 produces 17O-enriched O3 and CO2, and 17O-depleted O2. This effect increases with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration, and thus the 17O anomaly of O2, Δ17O (O2), is reflective of pCO2. Animals incorporate this signal into body water via respiration, and minerals such as bioapatite and eggshell calcite forming in equilibrium with body water can preserve the signal for millions of years. We contribute to the development of this new pCO2 barometer by developing analytical methods for high-precision triple oxygen isotope analysis of carbonates, by developing an ecophysiological model of body water triple oxygen isotopes, and by applying the method to eggshell from modern birds and late Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) dinosaur eggshells. Our findings include the following: (1) If animal ecophysiology and climatic context are perfectly known, the sensitivity of Δ17O (body water) to atmospheric CO2 is on the order of 0.01 ‰ per 100 ppm CO2; our analytical precision is ~ 0.01 ‰, thus ultimately permitting sub -100 ppm - level pCO2 reconstructions. (2) However, the effect of ecophysiology and climate can lead to a range in Δ17O (body water) of about 0.15 ‰ for animals living under the same Δ17O (O2); this prediction, confirmed by analyses of eggshells and body water of modern birds, translates to an apparent pCO2 range of about 1500 ppm. (3) Animals that are highly dependent on unevaporated free surface water ('drinking water') and live in humid climates have Δ17O (body water) signals that mimic low pCO2, whereas animals that consume primarily evaporated water (e.g., leaf water) and living in arid environments have Δ17O (body water) signals that mimic high pCO2. (4) There is an upper limit to this 'evaporation / aridity' effect mimicking high pCO2, so Δ17O (fossil eggshell) can be modeled assuming such upper

  2. First evidence of Hadrosauropodus in Gondwana (Yacoraite Formation, Maastrichtian-Danian), northwestern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Martínez, Ignacio; de Valais, Silvina; Cónsole-Gonella, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Uppermost Cretaceous (Campanian-Maastrichtian) large ornithopod tracks are scarce in Gondwana. This record is limited to few citations in the northern Argentina, Peru and possibly Bolivia, although their ichnological affinities are still under discussion. Recently, a new vertebrate tracksite with large ornithopod tracks has been found in the Maimará locality, Jujuy province, Argentina, from the Yacoraite Formation (Maastrichtian-Danian). The best preserved track is characterized by having large and bilobed heel impression and wide and short digit impressions with blunt claw marks. This record represents the unambiguous record of large ornithopod tracks in Gondwana in the Uppermost Cretaceous, and its features allow classifying it as Hadrosauropodus. Previously, this ichnotaxon had exclusively Laurasian distribution. Therefore, this record is the first evidence of Hadrosauropodus from Gondwana expanding the geographic range of this ichnogenus. A member of Hadrosauridae is reinforced as possible trackmaker of the Hadrosauropodus tracks. Uppermost Cretaceous hadrosaurid dinosaurs are scarce in Gondwana, being the record limited to Patagonia, La Pampa province and Antarctica. Therefore, the Maimará tracks increase the knowledge of this kind of dinosaur from Gondwana.

  3. Integrated biostratigraphy of the Santonian through Maastrichtian (Upper Cretaceous) of extra-Carpathian Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walaszczyk, Ireneusz; Dubicka, Zofia; Olszewska-Nejbert, Danuta; Remin, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    The biostratigraphic importance, current zonations, and potential for the recognition of the standard chronostratigraphic boundaries of five palaeontological groups (benthic foraminifers, ammonites, belemnites, inoceramid bivalves and echinoids), critical for the stratigraphy of the Santonian through Maastrichtian (Upper Cretaceous) of extra-Carpathian Poland, are presented and discussed. The summary is based on recent studies in selected sections of southern Poland (Nida Synclinorium; Puławy Trough including the Middle Vistula River composite section; and Mielnik and Kornica sections of south-eastern Mazury-Podlasie Homocline) and of western Ukraine (Dubivtsi). The new zonation based on benthic forams is presented for the entire interval studied. Zonations for ammonites, belemnites and inoceramid bivalves are compiled. All stage boundaries, as currently defined or understood, may easily be constrained or precisely located with the groups discussed: the base of the Santonian with the First Occurrence (FO) of the inoceramid Cladoceramus undulatoplicatus; the base of the Campanian with the Last Occurrence (LO) of the crinoid Marsupites testudinarius and approximated by the range of the foraminifer Stensioeina pommerana; and the base of the Maastrichtian approximated by the FO of the inoceramid bivalve Endocostea typica and the FO of the belemnite Belemnella vistulensis. The positions of substage boundaries, as currently understood, are constrained in terms of the groups discussed.

  4. The surveillant assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, K D; Ericson, R V

    2000-12-01

    George Orwell's 'Big Brother' and Michel Foucault's 'panopticon' have dominated discussion of contemporary developments in surveillance. While such metaphors draw our attention to important attributes of surveillance, they also miss some recent dynamics in its operation. The work of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari is used to analyse the convergence of once discrete surveillance systems. The resultant 'surveillant assemblage' operates by abstracting human bodies from their territorial settings, and separating them into a series of discrete flows. These flows are then reassembled in different locations as discrete and virtual 'data doubles'. The surveillant assemblage transforms the purposes of surveillance and the hierarchies of surveillance, as well as the institution of privacy.

  5. Did tropical rainforest vegetation exist during the Late Cretaceous? New data from the late Campanian to early Maastrichtian Olmos Formation, Coahuila, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, G. R.; Estrada-Ruiz, E.; Cevallos-Ferriz, S. S.

    2008-12-01

    A major problem in paleobotany and paleoclimatology is the origin of modern tropical and paratropical rainforests. Studies of leaf macrofossils, beginning with those of Wolfe and Upchurch, have suggested that tropical and paratropical (i.e., megathermal) rainforests with dominant angiosperms are of Cenozoic origin, and that comparable vegetation was either absent or greatly restricted during the Late Cretaceous. Earth System modeling studies, in contrast, predict the existence of megathermal rainforest vegetation during the mid- and Late Cretaceous, though with less areal extent than during the Late Cenozoic and Recent. Megathermal climate with year-round precipitation is simulated along the paleoequator and along the northern margin of the Tethys Ocean, and tends to occur in highly focused regions, in contrast to the more latitudinally zoned pattern of the Recent. Low-resolution climatic indicators, such as the distribution of coals and tree fern spores, are consistent with evidence from climate modeling for megathermal wet climates during the Late Cretaceous, and by extension megathermal rainforest vegetation. However, corroborative data from plant macrofossil assemblages is needed, because the physiognomy of leaves and woods directly reflects plant adaptation to the environment and can estimate climate independently of the generic and familial affinities of the paleoflora. Newly collected plant macrofossil assemblages from the late Campian to early Maastrichtian Olmos Formation of Coahuila, Mexico, provide evidence for megathermal rainforest vegetation on the northern margin of the Tethys Ocean at approximately 35 degrees paleolatitude. The newly collected leaf flora is 72 percent entire- margined and has abundant palms, features typical of modern megathermal rainforests. Thirty percent of the species have large leaves, and 50 percent of the species have drip tips, features indicative of wet conditions. Simple and multiple regression functions based on the

  6. Assemblages of Patient Safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balatsas Lekkas, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    This thesis identifies how design processes emerge during the use of devices in healthcare, by attending to assemblages where contingencies of risk and harm co-exist with the contribution of healthcare professionals to the safe care of patients. With support from the field of Science and Technology...

  7. Upper Campanian–Maastrichtian nannofossil biostratigraphy and high-resolution carbon-isotope stratigraphy of the Danish Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph; Harlou, Rikke; Schovsbo, Niels

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution carbon isotope stratigraphy of the upper Campanian – Maastrichtian is recorded in the Boreal Realm from a total of 1968 bulk chalk samples of the Stevns-1 core, eastern Denmark. Isotopic trends are calibrated by calcareous nannofossil bio-events and are correlated with a lower-res...

  8. Columactinastraea anthonii sp. nov. (Scleractinia, Astrocoeniina), a new coral species from the Maastrichtian (Upper Cretaceous) of The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leloux, J.

    2003-01-01

    Only four cerioid species of scleractinian corals have been described from the Maastrichtian in its type area; the montlivaltiid Isastrea angulosa (Goldfuss, 1826), and the astrocoeniids Actinastrea goldfussi d’Orbigny, 1849, A. faujasi (Quenstedt, 1881) and Columastrea fallax Umbgrove, 1925. A lect

  9. Palynology of the Upper Maastrichtian, Danish Central Graben. M-10X (Dan Field), E-5X (Tyra SE Field)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schioeler, P.

    2004-07-01

    A biostratigraphic and palynofacies analysis of a closely-spaced sample succession from cored sections through the Maastrichtian to Danian chalks in the wells M-10X and E-5X shows that the Maastrichtian part of the cores correlate with the Upper Maastrichtian Isabelidinium cooksoniae to Palynodinium grallator dinoflagellate Zones. The base of the core from M-10X is biostratigraphically somewhat lower than that of the E-5X core. Due to the absence of dinoflagellates from samples above the P. grallator Zone the uppermost Maastrichtian to Danian interval could not be correlated to any dinoflagellate zones. The chalks were deposited in a relatively stable, low-productivity, oligotrophic, marine environment relatively far from terrestrial source areas. The lower two-thirds of the cores, from core base to the basal P. grallator Zone was deposited under stable marine conditions during a slight and gradual sea-level lowering with a sea-level minimum reached at the base of the P. grallator Zone. Throughout this interval, productivity was in an overall decline from a maximum near the base of the M-10X core, in the basal Palaeocystodinium denticulatum Zone, to a minimum in the Hystrichostrogylon borisii and basal P. grallator Zones. Sea level rose abruptly again in the lower part of the P. grallator Zone and remained high to the top of that zone. A productivity rise followed this sea-level rise. The second sea-level high was possibly punctuated by a second, short-lived sea-level lowering that took place in the middle part of the P. grallatorZone. Based on correlation with the Maastrichtian type section in the ENCI Quarry, Limburg, The Netherlands, the sea-level low at the base of the P. grallator Zone can be correlated with the sequence boundary at the Horizon van Kanne in the ENCI Quarry section and dated to 65.5 Ma. (au)

  10. Marine macrofossil communities in the uppermost Maastrichtian chalk of Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas; Surlyk, Finn

    2014-01-01

    growth of small-sized bryozoans governed by nutrient-rich currents from the south. The macrofauna of this member is of very high density and richness, yet species composition is similar to that of the mound-bedded lower Sigerslev Member. The bryozoan thickets of the two members are accompanied by a rich...... in the similarly mound-bedded lower Sigerslev Member. The number of polychaete species is also greater in the Højerup Member. The faunal differences reflect the shallower-water setting and a higher influx of food during deposition of the latter unit. The final Maastrichtian benthic macrofossil community at Stevns......–Paleogene boundary, and the study thereby corroborates the increasingly dominant view of a very abrupt faunal turnover at the K/Pg boundary....

  11. Fashion, Mediations & Method Assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie; Jespersen, Astrid Pernille

    , respectively. The paper thus takes on aesthetics and the social in a manner closely related to a core argument of STS - namely that the scientific fact, and the social processes of constructing, distributing, and using that fact, are co-constructed (Callon, 1986; Latour, 1993). The paper thus contributes......, it is an important ambition of this paper to go into a methodological discussion of how "that which effectively happens" can be approached. To this end, the paper will combine Hennion's term of the "mediator" with John Laws methodological term of "method assemblages". Method assemblages is a suggested as a way...... of handling multiple, fluid realities with multiple, fluid methods. Empirically, the paper works with mediation in fashion - that is efforts the active shaping of relations between producer and consumer through communication, marketing and PR. Fashion mediation is by no means simple, but organise complex...

  12. FCJ-177 Television Assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Rizzo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Television has become a multiplatform medium that houses content on a number of different sites and devices that encourage new forms of engagement. This new digital environment has transformed television from a closed system, where programmes are transmitted to a television set for viewers to tune into, to an open system that produces new television connections and configurations. Drawing on the work of Deleuze and Guattari, Latour and current media theorists, this essay turns to the concept of assemblages for theorising this new interactive multiplatform television environment. Thinking about multiplatform television through the concept of assemblages offers a means of exploring how television devices, texts and media are reconfigured or modified so as to display new functionalities and capacities. It also enables us to consider the way television culture can be deterritorialised and reterritorialised through new connections and in doing so introduce new qualities such as interactivity and reciprocal determination.

  13. THE SEQUENCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF CRETACEOUS NON-MARINE GASTROPOD ASSEMBLAGES IN CHINA%中国非海相白垩纪腹足类组合序列和分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘华璋

    2012-01-01

    Four assemblages of Cretaceous non-marine gastropodas are recognized in China. These assemblages are: 1) the Probaicalia vitimensis-Ptychostylus-Reesidella robusta (operculum fossil) Assemblage from the Valangin- ian-Barremian Stage; 2) the Bellamya clavilithiformis-Mesocoshliopa cretacea-Zaptychius costatus-Brotiopsis Assem- blage from the Aptian-Albian Stage, which can be divided into two sub-assemlages on the basis of biogeographical differentiation (the Brotiopsis sub-assemblage and the Bellamya clavilithiformis-Mesocoshliopa cretacea-Zaptychius costatus sub-assemblage); 3) the Mesolanistes-nanxion gensis assemblage from the Middle-Upper Maastrichtian-Coniacian Stage, which can also be divided into two sub-assemblages ( the Mesolanistes ziziformis sub-assemblage probably of Coniacian Stage and, the Mesolanistes-nanxiongensis sub-assemblage of the Middle-Upper Maastrichtian-Coniacian age); and 4) the Palaeoancylus nanxiongensis assemblage from the uppermost Maastrichtian Stage.%中国白垩纪非海相腹足类可划分为4个组合:1)早白垩世凡兰吟期-巴列姆期Probaicaliavitimen.sis—Ptychostylus-口盖化石Reesidellarobusta组合;2)早白垩世阿普特期一阿尔必期Bellamyaclavilithi—formis-Mesocoshliopacretacea-Zaptychiuscostatus-Brotiopsis组合,由于环境的不同,这一组合可分为2个亚组合:Brotiopsis亚组合和Bellamyaclavilithiformis-Mesocoshliopacretacea-Zaptychiuscostatus亚组合;3)晚白垩世科尼亚克期一中马斯特里赫特晚期Mesolanistesnanxiongensis组合,由于产出的层位不同,这一组合又可分为2个亚组合Mesolanistes ziziformis亚组合和Mesolanistes—nanxiongensis亚组合;4)晚白垩世马斯特里赫特期最晚期Palaeoancylusnanxiongensi组合。

  14. Late Maastrichtian-Early Paleocene sea level and climate changes in the Antioch Church Core (Alabama, Gulf of Mexico margin, USA): A multi-proxy approach

    OpenAIRE

    Schulte, Peter; Speijer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The Antioch Church core from central Alabama, spanning the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-P) boundary, was investigated by a multi-proxy approach to study paleoenvironmental and sea level hanges within the wellconstrained sequence stratigraphic setting of the Gulf of Mexico margin. The Antioch Church core comprises the Maastrichtian calcareous nannoplankton Zone CC25 and the Danian Zones NP1 to NP4 corresponding to the Maastrichtian planktonic foraminifera Zones CF3 and the Danian Zones P1a to P2....

  15. Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey`s Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

  16. Natural gas accumulations in low-permeability Tertiary, and Cretaceous (Campanian and Maastrichtian) rock, Uinta Basin, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouch, T.D.; Wandrey, C.J.; Pitman, J.K.; Nuccio, V.F.; Schmoker, J.W.; Rice, D.D.; Johnson, R.C.; Dolton, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report characterizes Upper Cretaceous Campanian and Maastrichtian, and lower Tertiary gas-bearing rocks in the Uinta Basin with special emphasis on those units that contain gas in reservoirs that have been described as being tight. The report was prepared for the USDOE whose Western Tight Gas Sandstone Program cofunded much of this research in conjunction with the US Geological Survey's Evolution of Sedimentary Basins, and Onshore Oil and Gas Programs. (VC)

  17. Geodynamic Evolution of Northeastern Tunisia During the Maastrichtian-Paleocene Time: Insights from Integrated Seismic Stratigraphic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Oussama; Inoubli, Mohamed Hédi; Sebei, Kawthar; Amiri, Adnen; Boussiga, Haifa; Nasr, Imen Hamdi; Salem, Abdelhamid Ben; Elabed, Mahmoud

    2016-12-01

    The Maastrichtian-Paleocene El Haria formation was studied and defined in Tunisia on the basis of outcrops and borehole data; few studies were interested in its three-dimensional extent. In this paper, the El Haria formation is reviewed in the context of a tectono-stratigraphic interval using an integrated seismic stratigraphic analysis based on borehole lithology logs, electrical well logging, well shots, vertical seismic profiles and post-stack surface data. Seismic analysis benefits from appropriate calibration with borehole data, conventional interpretation, velocity mapping, seismic attributes and post-stack model-based inversion. The applied methodology proved to be powerful for charactering the marly Maastrichtian-Paleocene interval of the El Haria formation. Migrated seismic sections together with borehole measurements are used to detail the three-dimensional changes in thickness, facies and depositional environment in the Cap Bon and Gulf of Hammamet regions during the Maastrichtian-Paleocene time. Furthermore, dating based on their microfossil content divulges local and multiple internal hiatuses within the El Haria formation which are related to the geodynamic evolution of the depositional floor since the Campanian stage. Interpreted seismic sections display concordance, unconformities, pinchouts, sedimentary gaps, incised valleys and syn-sedimentary normal faulting. Based on the seismic reflection geometry and terminations, seven sequences are delineated. These sequences are related to base-level changes as the combination of depositional floor paleo-topography, tectonic forces, subsidence and the developed accommodation space. These factors controlled the occurrence of the various parts of the Maastrichtian-Paleocene interval. Detailed examinations of these deposits together with the analysis of the structural deformation at different time periods allowed us to obtain a better understanding of the sediment architecture in depth and the delineation of

  18. Maastrichtian-Early Eocene litho-biostratigraphy and palægeography of the northern Gulf of Suez region, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibner, C.; Marzouk, A. M.; Kuss, J.

    2001-02-01

    The Maastrichtian-Lower Eocene sediments on both sides of the northern Gulf of Suez can be subdivided into eight formal formations (including one group) and one informal formation that are described in detail. These lithostratigraphic units reflect three different environmental regimes of deposition or non-deposition. The first regime is characterised by uplift and erosion or non-deposition resulting mostly from the uplift of the Northern Galala/Wadi Araba structure, a branch of the Syrian Arc Foldbelt. The shallow water carbonate platform and slope deposits of the Late Campanian-Maastrichtian St Anthony Formation and the Paleocene-Lower Eocene Southern Galala and Garra Formations represent the second regime and are found north and south of the Northern Galala/Wadi Araba High. The third regime is represented by basinal chalks, marls and shales of the Maastrichtian Sudr Formation and of the Paleocene-Eocene Dakhla, Tarawan and Esna Formations, the Dakhla/Tarawan/Esna informal formation and the Thebes Group. The distribution and lateral interfingering of the above mentioned environmental regimes reflect different vertical movements, changing basin morphology, sea level changes and progradation of shallow water sediments and is illustrated on 11 palæogeographic maps.

  19. Detailed correlation and astronomical forcing within the Upper Maastrichtian succession in the Basque Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinares-Turell, J.; Pujalte, V.; Stoykova, K.; Elorza, J.

    2013-06-01

    We have undertaken a comprehensive, integrated, cyclo-magneto stratigraphic analysis and study of the calcareous nanno fossils of the Upper Maastrichtian hemi pelagic succession in three sections of the Basque Basin (Zumaia, Sopelana and Hendaia). The sections were correlated at bed-by-bed scale through careful analysis of the lithological stacking pattern and significant sedimentary features. For spectral analysis we used an available high-resolution carbonate proxy record spanning 64 m of section below the K/Pg (Cretaceous/ Palaeogene) boundary at Zumaia containing 72 precession-related limestone-marl couplets. The continuous wavelet spectrum helped to determine and visualize the orbital forcing at both the short ({approx}100-ky) and long (405-ky) eccentricity band. We applied bandpass Gaussian filters to the carbonate record to extract the relevant periodicities and provide a cycle-numbering scheme starting at the K/Pg boundary. The full hierarchy of precession cycles and eccentricity-related bundles is then extended toward the base of the section in question, which contains a total of 33 short eccentricity-related bundles, thus spanning more than 3 Ma. The chron C31r/ C31n boundary (estimated to occur at {approx}3.08 Ma below the K/Pg boundary) in the lower part of the succession was determined unambiguously in all three sections studied although the C30n/C29r reversal could not be determined due to a pervasive reverse magnetization acting on the purplish lithologies in the upper part of the succession. Relevant calcareous plankton bio events could be accurately placed on the cyclo-magneto stratigraphic template. The cyclo stratigraphic framework also allowed us to estimate the duration of previously defined sea-level-related 3rd-order depositional sequences in the basin, which appear to be strongly paced by the long-term 1.2 My obliquity amplitude modulating cycle. This is an outstanding feature in the Maastrichtian greenhouse period, during which continental

  20. A dromaeosaur from the Maastrichtian of James Ross Island and the Late Cretaceous Antarctic dinosaur fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Judd A.; Martin, James E.; Reguero, Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    The recovery of material of a small theropod from the Early Maastrichtian, Cape Lamb Member of the Snow Hill Island Formation is an unusual occurrence from primarily marine sediments. The pedal morphology of the specimen that includes a Metatarsal II with a lateral expansion caudal to Metatarsal III, a third metatarsal that is proximally narrow and distally wide, a Metatarsal III with a distal end that is incipiently ginglymoidal and a second pedal digit with sickle-like ungual are all diagnostic of a theropod that belongs to the family of predatory dinosaurs, the Dromaeosauridae. Yet this Antarctic dromaeosaur retains plesiomorphic features in its ankle and foot morphology. As new dromaeosaur species are being recovered from the mid-Cretaceous of South America and the retention of primitive characters in the Antarctic dromaeosaur, a new biogeographic hypothesis on dromaeosaur distribution has been generated. Gondwanan dromaeosaurs are not North America immigrants into South America and Antarctica; rather they are the relicts of a cosmopolitan dromaeosaur distribution, which has been separated by the vicariant break up of Pangea and created an endemic clade of dromaeosaurs in Gondwana.

  1. Sedimentary facies of Maastrichtian to Danian deposits in Amur River area, Russian Far East

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shigeyuki Suzuki; Abdul R. Ashraf; Hakuyu Okada

    2004-01-01

    Sedimentary facies of the Tsagayan Formation is distributed in the eastern Zeya-Bureya Basin has been analyzed. The formation is of the Maastrichtian to Danian in age and characterized by the cyclicity of the fining-upwards successions. Analysis of environmental changes during the K/T boundary is the focus of this study. Five facies have been identified: Facies A, thick and laterally extensive coarse-grained to medium-grained sandstone units, interpreted as channelfill deposits; Facies B, parallel-laminated to massive mudstone units interpreted as interchannel lakes and flood plain deposits; Facies C, sheet-like medium-grained to fine-grained sandstones interpreted as crevasse splay deposits;Facies D, coal to coaly mudstone beds interpreted as deposits ofpeatlands; Facies E, very poorly sorted sandy mudstone beds interpreted as debris flow deposits. Fluvial environments with the low-relief flat topography was inferred. A channel transported large volumes of clasts, and a flood basin with interchannel lakes and peatlands was deciphered. Any distinct change of sedimentary environments has not been identified throughout the Tsagayan Formation (including the K/T boundary). However, two beds of debris flow deposits were identified. The one occurs at the uppermost part of the lower Tsagayan Subformation and contains dinosaur fossils. The other is intercalated in the upper Tsagayan Subformation.

  2. DESCRIPTION OF AN EARLY ONTOGENETIC EVOLUTIONARY STEP IN LEPIDORBITOIDES (LEPIDORBITOIDES BISAMBERGENSIS ASYMMETRICA, EARLY MAASTRICHTIAN (CENTRAL TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ERCAN ÖZCAN

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Lepidorbitoides bisambergensis is characterised by having a ‘quadriserial’ embryo without any chamberlet directly arising from the deuteroconch and is a very diagnostic and common species in Lower Maastrichtian flysch successions in Anatolia. Some populations of this species present an early ontogenetic morphologic feature which is characterised by distinctly asymmetric early chamber arrangement recognised in the horizontal sections. This asymmetry is mainly caused by the pronounced difference in the size of auxiliary chamberlets which rest on both, protoconch and deuteroconch and also enhanced by the development of unequal number of chamberlets in the series arising from these auxiliary chamberlets on the protoconchal side. These asymmetric specimens are commonly identified in stratigraphic horizons below the symmetric ones after the introduction of a new auxiliary chamberlet and progressively replaced by symmetric ones in the younger populations. Asymmetric "quadriserial" specimens representing the early phylogenetic stage of L. bisambergensis described in the stratigraphic horizons corresponding to G. havanensis and G. aegyptiaca (? zones are thought to deserve a particular taxonomic status and are attributed to Lepidorbitoides bisambergensis asymmetrica Özcan & Özkan-Altiner, 1999a. 

  3. An age-calibrated record of upper Campanian – Maastrichtian climate change in the Boreal Realm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph; Schovsbo, Niels; Harlou, Rikke;

    nannofossil chalk is in agreement with planktic biotic events of the latest Cretaceous and matches well with climatic trends of intermediate- and deep-waters from other oceanic basins recorded through benthic foraminiferal d18O (Barrera and Savin, 1999). However, most planktic foraminiferal d18O data do......The latest Cretaceous climate of the Boreal Realm was recorded through high-resolution bulk carbon- and oxygen-stable isotopes and a nannofossil temperature index (NTI) on the Stevns-1 core (Denmark) which recovered 456 m of upper Campanian to basal Danian chalk with ~100% recovery and an excellent...... temperatures (SSTs) in the Boreal Realm. Three warming events punctuate the overall cooling trend of the latest Cretaceous: (1) the late Campanian climatic optimum (73.9–71.6 Ma) is characterized by maximum SSTs of 20°C, (2) the mid-Maastrichtian warming (69.7–68 Ma) is characterized by stable SSTs around 17°C...

  4. Multivariate analysis of calcareous nanno fossils and stable isotopic ({delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C) in the upper Campanian - lower Maastrichtian of the Campos Basin, Brazil; Analise multivariada em nanofosseis calcarios e isotopos estaveis ({delta}{sup 18}O e {delta}{sup 13}C) do Campaniano superior - Maastrichtiano inferior na Bacia de Campos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Veiga de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Gerencia de Bioestratigrafia e Paleoecologia]. E-mail: lcveiga@petrobras.com.br; Rodrigues, Rene; Lemos, Valesca Brasil

    2005-05-01

    Qualitative analysis in calcareous nanno fossils is a powerful tool for bio stratigraphic uses, principally in identification of bio zones and determination of relative age. But quantitative studies must be applied for pale oceanographic applications and high resolution bio stratigraphy. In order to better understand the relationships between the different species of nanno fossils, new methodologies and non-traditional correlation tools were tested on a 18 m upper Campanian - lower Maastrichtian core from Campos Basin. Multiple regression helped to determine the best counting method. Watznaueria barnesae and Micula decussata dominate the fossil assemblage and have inverse abundances to each other. Both were opportunist species in competition for nutrients. Q mode factorial analysis (57 samples, 19 variables) was applied to the same core and shows that two factors explain 99.2% of the total variance of the micro fossil assemblage. The first factor represents 83.6% and the second factor only 15.6% of the total variance. The former is associated with Watznaueria barnesae, Cribrosphaerella ehrenbergii and Stradneria crenulata, which represent the original population of nano plankton. The latter factor is associated with Micula decussata, which is believed to represent the effect of solution at the sediment water interface. Both factors were used to develop a dissolution-sea level curve for nanno fossils. When combined with oxygen and carbon isotopes, this curve clearly shows that higher dissolution occurred during the late Campanian - early Maastrichtian time when {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 13} C and TOC all had lower values. These correlations indicate a strong link between high sea levels, high temperatures and lower amount of continental organic debris. (author)

  5. Calcareous nannofossils from the Boreal upper Campanian-Maastrichtian Chalk of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph

    2010-01-01

    , the Rordal-1 borehole and the Rordal quarry section, North Jylland. The moderately-preserved nannofossil assemblages consist of a total of 138 species, comprising several rarely-documented species. several species that were recently described from lower latitudes, two new species of heterococcolith...

  6. A new Arctic hadrosaurid from the Prince Creek Formation (lower Maastrichtian of northern Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotsugu Mori

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Liscomb bonebed in the Price Creek Formation of northern Alaska has produced thousands of individual bones of a saurolophine hadrosaurid similar to Edmontosaurus; however, the specific identity of this taxon has been unclear, in part because the vast majority of the remains represent immature individuals. In this study, we address the taxonomic status of the Alaskan material through a comparative and quantitative morphological analysis of juvenile as well several near adult-sized specimens with particular reference to the two known species of Edmontosaurus, as well as a cladistic analysis using two different matrices for Hadrosauroidea. In the comparative morphological analysis, we introduce a quantitative method using bivariate plots to address ontogenetic variation. Our comparative anatomical analysis reveals that the Alaskan saurolophine possesses a unique suite of characters that distinguishes it from Edmontosaurus, including a premaxillary circumnarial ridge that projects posterolaterally without a premaxillary vestibular promontory, a shallow groove lateral to the posterodorsal premaxillary foramen, a relatively narrow jugal process of the postorbital lacking a postorbital pocket, a relatively tall maxilla, a relatively gracile jugal, a more strongly angled posterior margin of the anterior process of the jugal, wide lateral exposure of the quadratojugal, and a short symphyseal process of the dentary. The cladistic analyses consistently recover the Alaskan saurolophine as the sister taxon to Edmontosaurus annectens + Edmontosaurus regalis. This phylogenetic assessment is robust even when accounting for ontogenetically variable characters. Based on these results, we erect a new taxon, Ugrunaaluk kuukpikensis gen. et sp. nov. that contributes to growing evidence for a distinct, early Maastrichtian Arctic dinosaur community that existed at the northernmost extent of Laramidia during the Late Cretaceous.

  7. Depositional Settings of the basal López de Bertodano Formation, Maastrichtian, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.B. Olivero

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In Snow Hill and Seymour islands the lower Maastrichtian, basal part of the L ópez de Bertodano Formation, rests on a high relief, erosive surface elaborated in the underlying Snow Hill Island Formation. Mudstone-dominated beds with inclined heterolithic stratification dominate the basal strata of the López de Bertodano Formation. They consist of rhythmical alternations of friable sandy- and clayeymudstone couplets, with ripple cross lamination, mud drapes, and flaser bedding. They are characterized by a marked lenticular geometry, reflecting the filling of tide-influenced channels of various scales and paleogeographic positions within a tide-dominated embayment or estuary. Major, sand-rich channel fills, up to 50-m thick, bounded by erosive surfaces probably represent inlets, located on a more central position in the estuary. Minor channel fills, 1- to 3-m thick, associated with offlapping packages with inclined heterolithic stratification probably represent the lateral accretion of point bars adjacent to migrating tidal channels in the upper estuary. Both types of channel fills bear relatively abundant marine fauna, are intensively bioturbated, and are interpreted as a network of subtidal channels. In southwestern Snow Hill Island, the minor offlapping packages have scarce marine fossils and bear aligned depressions interpreted as poor preserved dinosaur footprints. They represent the lateral accretion of point bars adjacent to intertidal creeks, probably located on the fringes of a mud-dominated estuary or embayment. The basal unconformity was produced by subaerial erosion; hence the inferred estuarine settings are consistent with the beginning of a new transgressive sedimentary cycle.

  8. Paleoenvironmental signals and paleoclimatic condition of the Early Maastrichtian oil shales from Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Douaa; Wagreich, Michael; Zaki, Rafat; Mohamed, Ramadan S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Early Maastrichtian oil shales are hosted in the Duwi Formation of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt. The examined member represents up to 20% of the total Duwi Formation. This interval is mainly composed of siliciclastic facies, phosphorites facies and carbonate facies. Oil shales microfacies is mainly composed of smectite, kaolinite, calcite, fluorapatite, quartz and pyrite. They are enriched in a number of major elements and trace metals in particular Ca, P, V, Ni, Cr, Sr, Zn, Mo, Nb, U and Y compared to the post-Archaean Australian shale (PAAS). Chondrite-normalized REEs patterns of oil shales for the studied area display light rare earth elements enrichment relatively to heavy rare earth elements with negative Ce/Ce* and Eu/Eu* anomalies. The most remarkable indicators for redox conditions are enrichments of V, Mo, Ni, Cr, U content and depletion of Mn content. Besides, V/V+Ni, V/Ni, U/Th, Ni/Co, authigentic uranium ratios with presence of framboidal shape of pyrite and its size are reflecting the deposition of these shales under marine anoxic to euxinic environmental conditions. Additionally, the ratio of Strontium (Sr) to Barium (Ba) Sr/Ba reflected highly saline water during deposition. Elemental ratios critical to paleoclimate and paleoweathering (Rb /Sr, Al2O3/TiO2), CIA values, binary diagram between (Al2O3+K2O+Na2O) and SiO2 and types of clay minerals dominated reflect warm to humid climate conditions prevailing during the accumulation of these organic-rich petroleum source rocks.

  9. On the origin of laminated-bioturbated chalk cycles in the Upper Maastrichtian, Danish Central Graben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ineson, J.R.; Buchardt, B.; Lassen, S.; Rasmussen, J.A.; Schovsbo, N.H.; Schioeler, P.; Sheldon, E.; Surlyk, F.

    2004-07-01

    Metre-scale laminated-bioturbated chalk cycles form a characteristic motif in the lower levels of the Upper Maastrichtian chalks in the Dan Field area, southern Danish Central Graben. They have most recently been interpreted in the literature to reflect cycles of relative oxygenation on the sea floor, the laminated half-cycles recording poorly oxygenated conditions. Sedimentological, isotopic, palynofacies and palaeoecological (nannofossils, dinoflagellates, foraminifers) analysis was undertaken of a close suite of samples across a composite cyclic interval to investigate the validity of this interpretation and the possible factors controlling periodic variation in bottom-water ventilation. The data from benthic organisms clearly demonstrate a hostile sea-floor environment and outline a cyclicity in bottom water conditions that parallels, yet is lightly out of phase with, the laminated-bioturbated cycles. Interestingly, the planktonic foraminiferal data suggest that during periods with the most hostile bottom water conditions, the upper water masses were relatively stable whereas slight amelioration at the sea floor coincided with stressed, changeable conditions in the surface waters. Data from palynofacies and dinoflagellate analysis indicate a low productivity, oligotrophic setting and no evidence of relative sea-level variation in phase with the cycles is observed. Similarly, the calcareous plankton show no indications of major productivity peaks related to the onset of lamination in the sediment; conversely, minor peaks in productivity indicators in the nannofossil dataset correlate with the transition from laminated to bioturbated chalk i.e. are the result, rather than the cause of oxygen deprivation at the sea floor. On the basis of these data, it is proposed that these short-term cycles were probably controlled by cyclic variations in mean wind stress resulting in the alternation of a weakly stratified shelf sea, in which local dysoxia developed in

  10. Bournonia excavata (D’Orbigny from the Campanian-Maastrichtian of Stranice (north-east of Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Caffau

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The rudist fauna of Stranice, in the north-east of Slovenia, has been studied for a long time thanks to the good preservation-state of the specimens found in the calcareous breccias from Campanian-Maastrichtian. The presence of Bournonia excavata (d’Orbignyat Stranice is reported for the first time in this work. The specimen described in this paper is compared with other specimens from other carbonate platform deposits, previously described by different authors. In addition, a complete individual with both valves ofRadiolites angeiodes (Lapeirouse is described.

  11. Biometric analysis of the Arkhangelskiella group in the upper Campanian-Maastrichtian of the stevns-1 borehole, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph

    2010-01-01

    The taxonomy of the calcareous nannofossil Arkhangelskiella is revised using the results of a biometric analysis performed on 599 specimens from various stratigraphic levels throughout the upper Campanian-Maastrichtian of the Stevns-1 borehole, Denmark. Combined qualitative labelling and biometric...... in the coccolith length and in the rim width, and that the central opening is an important additional parameter allowing distinction between the different morphogroups. Biometric analysis shows, however, that the morphogroups are strongly overlapping on all measured parameters. Therefore, the three distinct...

  12. Astronomical calibration of upper Campanian–Maastrichtian carbon isotope events and calcareous plankton biostratigraphy in the Indian Ocean (ODP Hole 762C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thibault, Nicolas Rudolph; Husson, Dorothée; Harlou, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    An integrated framework of magnetostratigraphy, calcareous microfossil bio-events, cyclostratigraphy and d13C stratigraphy is established for the upper Campanian–Maastrichtian of ODP Hole 762C (Exmouth Plateau, Northwestern Australian margin). Bulk-carbonate d13C events and nannofossil bio-events...

  13. Seagrass stems with attached roots from the type area of the Maastrichtian Stage (NE Belgium, SE Netherlands) : Morphology, anatomy, and ecological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ham, R.W.J.M.; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, J.H.A.; Jagt, J.W.M.; Indeherberge, L.; Meuris, R.; Deckers, M.J.M.; Renkens, S.; Laffineur, J.

    2017-01-01

    Seagrasses are the only seed plants to have invaded marine environments successfully. Seagrass fossils are both rare and have received scant attention so far. However, among the limited number of plant fossils from marine strata in the Maastrichtian type area, remains of seagrasses are relatively co

  14. Seagrass stems with attached roots from the type area of the Maastrichtian Stage (NE Belgium, SE Netherlands) : Morphology, anatomy, and ecological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ham, R.W.J.M.; van Konijnenburg-van Cittert, J.H.A.; Jagt, J.W.M.; Indeherberge, L.; Meuris, R.; Deckers, M.J.M.; Renkens, S.; Laffineur, J.

    Seagrasses are the only seed plants to have invaded marine environments successfully. Seagrass fossils are both rare and have received scant attention so far. However, among the limited number of plant fossils from marine strata in the Maastrichtian type area, remains of seagrasses are relatively

  15. The chronostratigraphic framework of the South-Pyrenean Maastrichtian succession reappraised: Implications for basin development and end-Cretaceous dinosaur faunal turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fondevilla, Víctor; Dinarès-Turell, Jaume; Oms, Oriol

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of the end-Cretaceous terrestrial ecosystems and faunas outside of North America is largely restricted to the European Archipelago. The information scattered in this last area can only be integrated in a chronostratigraphic framework on the basis of robust age constraints and stratigraphy. Therefore, we have revisited the puzzling age calibration of the sedimentary infilling from the Isona sector in the Tremp syncline (South-Central Pyrenees), an area renowned for its rich Maastrichtian dinosaur fossil record. Aiming to shed light to existing controversial age determinations, we carried out a new magnetostratigraphic study along the ~ 420 m long Orcau and Nerets sections of that area. Our results reveal that most of the succession correlates to the early Maastrichtian (mostly chron C31r) in accordance to ages proposed by recent planktonic foraminifera biostratigraphy. The resulting chronostratigraphic framework of the entire Maastrichtian basin recorded in the Tremp syncline shows that a significant sedimentary hiatus of about 3 My characterizes most of the late Maastrichtian in the study area. This hiatus, related to an abrupt migration of the basin depocenter, is temporally close to similar hiatuses, decreases in sedimentary rates and facies shifts recorded in other southwestern European areas. The present chronologic framework sets the basis for a thorough assessment of end-Cretaceous terrestrial faunal turnover and extinction patterns, and the establishment of a more rigorous Pyrenean basin evolution analysis.

  16. Sedimentology of the Upper Maastrichtian chalk, Danish Central Graben. M-10X (Dan Field), E-5X (Tyra SE Field) facies and core logs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ineson, J.R.

    2004-07-01

    Based on detailed logs presented here at 1:10, the cored Upper Maastrichtian succession of the M-10X (Dan Field) and E-5X (Tyra SE Field) wells in the southern Danish Central Graben is subdivided into eight lithofacies and five ichnofabrics. The dominant bioturbated or laminated chalk mudstones and subordinate sparse skeletal wackestones are largely the result of pelagic carbonate production, sedimented by suspension settling and small volume, low density turbidity currents. Evidence of winnowing/reduced sedimentation rates is yielded by rare incipient hardgrounds; a well-developed mature hardground profile is developed at the Cretaceous-Danian boundary (the ''Maastrichtian hardground''). Rare marl laminae are recorded and a discrete marly chalk bed associated with an interval of finegrained skeletal chalk wackestones near the top of the Maastrichtian is recognised in both wells. Comparison between the two wells demonstrates that the m-scale laminated-bioturbated chalk cycles described from the Dan Field area are both stratigraphically and areally restricted; this has implications for both cyclostratigraphic correlation and reconstruction of depositional environments and Late Maastrichtian evolution of the Danish Central Graben. (au)

  17. Migrated hydrocarbons in exposure of Maastrichtian nonmarine strata near Saddle Mountain, lower Cook Inlet, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePain, D.L.; Lillis, P.G.; Helmold, K.P.; Stanley, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Magoon and others (1980) described an 83-meter- (272-foot-) thick succession of Maastrichtian (Upper Cretaceous) conglomerate, sandstone, mudstone, and coal exposed on the south side of an unnamed drainage, approximately 3 kilometers (1.8 miles) east of Saddle Mountain in lower Cook Inlet (figs. 1 and 2). The initial significance of this exposure was that it was the first reported occurrence of nonmarine rocks of this age in outcrop in lower Cook Inlet, which helped constrain the Late Cretaceous paleogeography of the area and provided important information on the composition of latest Mesozoic sandstones in the basin. The Saddle Mountain section is thought to be an outcrop analog for Upper Cretaceous nonmarine strata penetrated in the OCS Y-0097 #1 (Raven) well, located approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) to the south–southeast in Federal waters (fig. 1). Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) drilled the Raven well in 1980 and encountered oil-stained rocks and moveable liquid hydrocarbons between the depths of 1,760 and 3,700 feet. Completion reports on file with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, and prior to 2010, U.S. Minerals Management Service) either show flow rates of zero or do not mention flow rates. A fluid analysis report on file with BOEM suggests that a wireline tool sampled some oil beneath a 2,010-foot diesel cushion during the fl ow test of the 3,145–3,175 foot interval, but the recorded fl ow rate was still zero (Kirk Sherwood, written commun., January 9, 2012). Further delineation and evaluation of the apparent accumulation was never performed and the well was plugged and abandoned. As part of a 5-year comprehensive evaluation of the geology and petroleum systems of the Cook Inlet forearc basin, the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys obtained a research permit from the National Park Service to access the relatively poorly understood

  18. Trace fossils of a cyclic chalk-marl succession; the upper Maastrichtian Rørdal Member, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Bodil Wesenberg; Surlyk, Finn; Bromley, Richard Granville

    2011-01-01

    Trace fossils from an upper Maastrichtian cyclic chalk–marl succession, the Rørdal Member, exposed in the Rørdal quarry, Denmark, are analysed in order to test whether the changes in substrate lithology exerted any control over the ichnodiversity, tiering complexity, and density of the infauna....... Ichnofabric A is found only in chalk samples and shows a poor preservation of trace fossils, whereas ichnofabric C is found in a few chalk and all marl samples and comprises a very dense, diverse and well preserved ichnofauna representing a high tiering complexity. Ichnofabric B represents an intermediate...... situation between ichnofabrics A and C and occurs in chalk samples immediately adjacent to marl beds. The observed changes in ichnofabrics between chalk and marl are related to the amount of clay in the samples and the differences in the occurrence of trace fossils are interpreted as due to differences...

  19. Differential early diagenetic low-Mg calcite cementation and rhythmic hardground development in Campanian-Maastrichtian chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molenaar, Nicolaas; J.J.P., Zijlstra

    1997-01-01

    The Campanian-Maastrichtian limestones in the south of the Netherlands are well-sorted fine-grained mudstones and silt- to fine sand-sized bioclastic grainstones. These limestones show a distinct lithological cyclicity manifested by fining-upward grain-size cycles with calcite-cemented layers...... and differences in the degree of early diagenesis. Cemented layers and hardgrounds are the result of differential early marine calcite cementation. In these limestones early calcite cementation cannot be explained by the supply of cementing materials from saturated seawater, An alternative model for early marine...... calcite cementation is proposed, in which early calcite cementation occurred within the sediment at some distance below the seafloor as a result of organic matter degradation and internal redistribution of bioclastic carbonate. Bacterial organic matter degradation caused dissolution of relatively unstable...

  20. Public Sphere as Digital Assemblage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka

    the 1990s onwards digitalization brought concepts of network and complexity into the theoretical discourse. This relational turn changed the social ontology of the public sphere into a dynamic and complex system, erasing the division between the fields of reality (the world), representation (discourse...... theories. Drawing from Deleuze & Guattari (1987), Bennett (2010), and Latour (2004) in order to imagine post-human assemblages of public sphere, this paper argues for a relational ontology that emphasizes the complex interactions of political assemblages. Empirically, it draws from the author’s studies......Normative theories of public sphere have struggled with the topic of materiality. The historical narrative of the ‘public sphere’ situated the phenomenon in specific spaces, where practices (public deliberation) and language (discourse) constructed political agencies, and further publics. From...

  1. The Blake Nose Cretaceous-Paleogene (Florida Atlantic margin, ODP Leg 171B): an exemplar record of the Maastrichtian-Danian transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellier, J.-P.; Marca, S.; Norris, R.D.; Kroon, D.; Klaus, A.; Alexander, I.T.; Bardot, L.P.; Barker, C.E.; Blome, C.D.; Clarke, L.J.; Erbacher, J.; Faul, K.L.; Holmes, M.A.; Huber, B.T.; Katz, M.E.; MacLeod, K.G.; Martinez-Ruiz, F. C.; Mita, I.; Nakai, M.; Ogg, J.G.; Pak, D.K.; Pletsch, T.K.; ,; Shackleton, N.J.; Smit, J.; Ussler, W.; Watkins, D.K.; Widmark, J.; Wilson, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    During ODP Leg 171B, devoted to the analysis of the Blake Plateau margin in front of Florida, 16 holes have been drilled in 5 distinct sites. The sites have documented a sedimentary succession ranging in age from Aptian to Eocene. Emphasis has been put on critical periods, comprising the Paleocene-Eocene transition, the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary which has been cored in excellent conditions, the middle Maastrichtian extinctions and the Albian anoxic episodes.

  2. High-resolution foraminiferal biostratigraphy of Upper Maastrichtian to basal Danian strata, Danish Central Graben. M-10X (Dan Field), E-5X (Tyra SE Field)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassen, S.; Rasmussen, J.A.

    2004-07-01

    Benthic and planktic foraminiferids from the Upper Maastrichtian to Lower Danian part of the wells M-10X and E-5X were thoroughly analysed with the aim to establish a detailed biostratigraphic framework for the southern part of the Danish Central Graben area. The Upper Maastrichtian sediments correlate with Zone FCS23, which includes the subzones FCS23a and FCS23b. The faunal evidence show that the FCS23a Subzone extends to a lower stratigraphic level in M-1 0X than in E-5X. Additional microfaunal events makes it possible to enhance the biostratigraphic resolution within the Upper Maastrichtian interval. The K-T boundary is characterised by a hardground, which marks the presence of a basal Danian hiatus in both wells. This hiatus spans the Danian zones PO and Pa in M-1 0X, and P0, Pa and P1 a in E5-X. The lower part of the overlying Danian sediments correlates with Subzone P1a and P1b in M-10X and Subzone P1 b and P1c in E-5X. (au)

  3. A Maastrichtian microbial reef and associated limestones in the Roca Formation of Patagonia (Neuquén Province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Kiessling

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe a small microbial reef and associated limestones occurring in a Maastrichtian transgressive succession of mixed carbonate-siliciclastic lithologies at Sierra Huantraico near Chos Malal (Neuquén, Argentina. Strontium isotope data suggest that the reef is of earliest Maastrichtian age. The small reef (0.8 m thick, 2 m wide is mostly composed of peloidal bindstone, dense stromatolite-cement crusts and thrombolite. Except for some ostracods, no metazoan fossils were found in the reef structure, although the majority of peloids are fecal pellets, probably of larger crustaceans. Small foraminifers with calcite tests and probable green algae have also been noted. Sedimentological data and fossils within and immediately above the reef suggest that the reef was formed in a transgressive systems tract under freshwater to brackish-water conditions. Limestones above the reef are serpulid-bryozoan packstones and intraclast-ooid grainstones. These limestones yield a mixture of typical non-tropical (common serpulids and bryozoans and typical tropical aspects (common dasycladaceans and ooids. This mosaic is explained by salinity fluctuations, which in our case dominate over temperature in determining the grain associations. Wir beschreiben ein kleines mikrobielles Riff, das in der Sierra Hunatraico (Neuquén, Argentinien in einer transgressiven, gemischt siliziklastisch-kalkigen Abfolge gefunden wurde. Nach Strontiumisotopen-Datierung ist das Riff in das unterste Maastrichtium zu stellen. Das kleine Riff (0,8 m Mächtigkeit, 2 m Breite besteht überwiegend aus peloidalem Bindstone, dichten Stromatolith-Zement-Krusten und Thrombolith. Mit Ausnahme von Ostrakoden konnten keine Metazoen in der Riffstruktur nachgewiesen werden, obwohl die Mehrzahl der Peloide als Kotpillen zu interpretieren sind, die vermutlich auf größere Krebse zurückgehen. Kleine Foraminiferen und mögliche Grünalgen sind die einzigen zusätzlich nachweisbaren Eukaryoten

  4. A new ceratopsian dinosaur from the Javelina Formation (Maastrichtian) of West Texas and implications for chasmosaurine phylogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Steven L.; Lehman, Thomas M.

    2013-07-01

    Bravoceratops polyphemus gen. et sp. nov. is a large chasmosaurine ceratopsid from the lowermost part of the Javelina Formation (early Maastrichtian) of Big Bend National Park, TX, USA. B. polyphemus has a distinctive narrow snout, a long fenestrate frill, and a fan-shaped median parietal bar with a midline epiparietal on its posterior margin, as well as a symmetrical depression on its dorsal surface at the nexus of the parietal rami. This depression is interpreted to be the attachment point for a second midline epiparietal. This parietal morphology is distinct from that exhibited by Anchiceratops or Pentaceratops. The posterior midline epiparietal in B. polyphemus and its bifurcated quadratojugal-squamosal joint are features shared with the most derived chasmosaurines, Torosaurus and Triceratops. The combination of primitive and derived traits exhibited by B. polyphemus, and its stratigraphic position, is compatible with the gradual transition from basal, to intermediate, to derived chasmosaurines observed throughout the western interior of North America, and with phylogenetic analysis, which suggests that Bravoceratops may be closely related to Coahuilaceratops.

  5. Fish assemblages in southern California kelp forests.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a point file of fish assemblages calculated from diver surveys in kelp forests in Southern California. Visual census data was combined for two separate...

  6. Predictions of mineral assemblages in planetary interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that mineral compatibilities in the model system CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 can be applied to deduce the mineral assemblages expected in planetary interiors and their variation with depth. In general, the available estimates of bulk composition of the terrestrial planets suggest that the terrestrial planets can be divided into two groups based on their predicted mineral assemblages. The terrestrial, Venusian, and lunar bulk compositions are expected to display the following sequence of mineral assemblages with increasing pressure: plagioclase lherzolite, spinel lherzolite, and garnet lherzolite. The sequences expected in Martian and Mercurian are different: spinel-plagioclase wehrlite, spinel lherzolite, and spinel-garnet wehrlite. These assemblages have a major influence on the compositions of liquids produced by melting of these planetary interiors, on the solidus temperatures, and thus on the nature of planetary differentiation and the types of magmas extruded at planetary surfaces.

  7. Giardia duodenalis genetic assemblages and hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyworth Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Techniques for sub-classifying morphologically identical Giardia duodenalis trophozoites have included comparisons of the electrophoretic mobility of enzymes and of chromosomes, and sequencing of genes encoding β-giardin, triose phosphate isomerase, the small subunit of ribosomal RNA and glutamate dehydrogenase. To date, G. duodenalis organisms have been sub-classified into eight genetic assemblages (designated A–H. Genotyping of G. duodenalis organisms isolated from various hosts has shown that assemblages A and B infect the largest range of host species, and appear to be the main (or possibly only G. duodenalis assemblages that undeniably infect human subjects. In at least some cases of assemblage A or B infection in wild mammals, there is suggestive evidence that the infection had resulted from environmental contamination by G. duodenalis cysts of human origin.

  8. A new species of Allodaposuchus (Eusuchia, Crocodylia from the Maastrichtian (Late Cretaceous of Spain: phylogenetic and paleobiological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Blanco

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Late Cretaceous is a keystone period to understand the origin and early radiation of Crocodylia, the group containing all extant lineages of crocodilians. Among the taxa described from the latest Cretaceous of Europe, the genus Allodaposuchus is one of the most common but also one of the most controversial. However, because of its fragmentary record, several issues regarding its phylogenetic emplacement and its ecology remain unsolved or unknown. The discovery of a single specimen attributed to Allodaposuchus, represented by both cranial and postcranial remains, from the Casa Fabà site (Tremp Basin, NE Spain in the lower red unit of the Tremp Fm. (early Maastrichtian, Late Cretaceous offers a unique opportunity to deepen in the phylogenetic relationships of the group and its ecological features.Methods. The specimen is described in detail, and CT scan of the skull is performed in order to study the endocranial morphology as well as paratympanic sinuses configuration. In addition, myological and phylogenetic analyses are also carried out on the specimen for to shed light in ecological and phylogenetic issues, respectively.Results. The specimen described herein represents a new species, Allodaposuchus hulki sp. nov., closely related to the Romanian A. precedens. The CT scan of the skull revealed an unexpected paratympanic sinuses configuration. Allosaposuchus hulki exhibits an “anterodorsal tympanic sinus” not observed in any other extant or extinct crocodilian. The caudal tympanic recesses are extremely enlarged, and the expanded quadratic sinus seems to be connected to the middle-ear channel. Phylogenetic analyses confirm the emplacement of the informal taxonomic group ‘Allodaposuchia’ at the base of Crocodylia, being considered the sister group of Borealosuchus and Planocraniidae.Discussion. Although this is a preliminary hypothesis, the unique paratympanic configuration displayed by A. hulki suggests that it could

  9. Microhabitat influence on larval fish assemblages within ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined larval and juvenile fish assemblage structure in relation to microhabitat variables within the St. Louis River estuary, a drowned river mouth of Lake Superior. Fish were sampled in vegetated beds throughout the estuary, across a gradient of vegetation types and densities (including disturbed, preserved and post-restoration sites). Canonical correspondence analysis, relating species abundances to environmental variables revealed that plant species richness, turbidity and aquatic plant cover were most influential in structuring assemblages. Results from this microhabitat analysis at this crucial life stage has potential to inform wetland restoration efforts within the St. Louis River and other Great Lake coastal wetlands. not applicable

  10. First dinosaurs from Saudi Arabia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P Kear

    Full Text Available Dinosaur remains from the Arabian subcontinent are exceedingly rare, and those that have been documented manifest indeterminate affinities. Consequently the discovery of a small, but diagnostic, accumulation of elements from Campanian-Maastrichtian (~ 75 Ma deposits in northwestern Saudi Arabia is significant because it constitutes the first taxonomically identifiable dinosaur material described from the Arabian Peninsula. The fossils include a series of possible lithostrotian titanosaur caudal vertebrae, and some isolated theropod marginal teeth that share unique character states and metric parameters (analyzed using multivariate statistical methods with derived abelisaurids - this is the first justifiable example of a non-avian carnivorous dinosaur clade from Arabia. The recognition of titanosaurians and abelisaurids from Saudi Arabia extends the palaeogeographical range of these groups along the entire northern Gondwanan margin during the latest Cretaceous. Moreover, given the extreme paucity of coeval occurrences elsewhere, the Saudi Arabian fossils provide a tantalizing glimpse into dinosaurian assemblage diversity within the region.

  11. Paleoenvironmental interpretation of an ancient Arctic coastal plain: Integrated paleopedology and palynology from the Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Prince Creek Formation, North Slope, Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, P. J.; Flaig, P. P.; Fiorillo, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Cretaceous (Early Maastrichtian), dinosaur-bearing Prince Creek Formation, North Slope, Alaska, records high-latitude, alluvial sedimentation and soil formation on a low-lying, coastal plain during a greenhouse phase in Earth history. This study combines outcrop observations, micromorphology, geochemistry, and palynological analyses of paleosols in order to reconstruct local paleoenvironments of weakly developed, high-latitude coastal plain soils. Sediments of the Prince Creek Fm. include quartz- and chert-rich sandstone channels, and floodplains containing organic-rich siltstone and mudstone, carbonaceous shale, coal and ashfall deposits. Vertically stacked horizons of blocky-to-platy, drab-colored mudstone and siltstone with carbonaceous root-traces and mottled aggregates alternating with sandy units indicate that the development of compound and cumulative, weakly-developed soils on floodplains alternated with overbank alluviation and deposition on crevasse splay complexes on floodplains . Soil formation occurred on levees, point bars, crevasse splays and along the margins of floodplain lakes, ponds, and swamps. Soil-forming processes were interrupted by repeated deposition of sediment on top of soil profiles by flooding of nearby channels. Alluviation is evidenced by thin (fern and moss spores, projectates, age-diagnostic Wodehouseia edmontonicola, hinterland bisaccate pollen and pollen from lowland trees, shrubs, and herbs indicate an Early Maastrichtian age for these sediments. Large and small theropods, hadrosaurs, pachycephalosaurs, and ceratopsians, as well as fishes and fossil mammals have been found as well. Paleosols are similar to modern aquic subgroups of Entisols and Inceptisols and, in more distal locations, potential acid sulfate soils. Integration of pedogenic processes and palynology suggests that these high latitude floodplains were influenced by seasonally(?) fluctuating water table levels on a coastal plain governed by a near polar light

  12. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Upper Maastrichtian-Middle Eocene Clay - Rich Volcano - Sedimentary Units from South-Eastern of Elazıg Basin (Eastern Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkoca, Dicle Bal; Daş, Burhan

    2017-04-01

    Clay-rich Hazar-Maden volcano-sediments were deposited along the southern branch of the Neotethys Ocean margin during Upper Maastrichtian - Middle Eocene times. Mineralogy and geochemistry of Hatunkoy section from the south - easthern of Elazıg were studied by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), ICP-AES, ICP-MS. The Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous Guleman Ophiolites, Upper Maastrichtian - Middle Eocene Hazar Group, the Middle Eocene Maden Group, Pliocene-Quaternary alluvial deposits are situated in the study area. The Guleman Ophiolites are composed of dunite, harzburgite with podiform chromite, alternating dunite-wherlite, clinopyroxenite banded gabbro, quartz gabbro/diorite or plagiogranite and volcanites. The Hazar Group consists of limestone and interbedded shale and sandstone. The Maden Group has a complex lithology consisting of limestones, red-green clayey limestones, sandstone, agglomerate, tuffs, reddish mudstone and basaltic-andesitic pillow lavas. Mineralogy and geochemistry of Hazar and Maden Group samples are similar in Hatunkoy section. All samples consist of clay minerals (chlorite, illite), calcite, quartz, and feldspar. SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, K2O contents show that samples are convenient with Fe shales and shales. The ratios of Zr/TiO2, Th/Sc, Zr/Sc, Y/Ni-Cr/V, Al/(Al+Fe+Mn) show dominance of neutral-basic volcanism in the area. Rare earth elements (REE) concentrations of samples are normalized to chondrite values and it is determined that low light rare earth elements (LREEs) are enriched in comparison to high rare earth elements (HREEs), and the absence of Eu anomalies shows that our samples are generally neutral-basic in composition. REE of samples were compared with North American shale composite (NASC), European shale (ES) and Post-Archean Australian shale (PAAS). Elements are not in concurrence with these compositions. Key Words:Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Volcano sedimentary Units, Eastern Turkey.

  13. Mangrove macrobenthos: Assemblages, services, and linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. Y.

    2008-02-01

    Macrobenthic assemblages are relatively poorly known compared to other components of the mangrove ecosystem. Tropical mangroves support macrobenthic biodiversity resources yet to be properly documented and interpreted. Some methodological challenges, such as the generally high spatial heterogeneity and complexity of the habitat, evidently reduce sampling efficiency and accuracy, while also leaving some microhabitats under-sampled. Macrobenthic assemblage structure seems to be influenced by local environmental conditions, such as hydroperiod, organic matter availability and sediment characteristics. Brachyurans, gastropods and oligochaetes dominate in the sediment, with the former two groups also common on hard surfaces provided by tree trunks, while insects and arachnids inhabit the canopy. Traditionally, studies of mangrove macrobenthos have focused on assemblage structure or the biology of individual species, but more complex inter-specific interactions and the inter-relationship between habitat and the biota are recently being addressed. Brachyuran crabs are the best-studied macrobenthos group, but many issues about their role in mangrove ecosystem dynamics are still controversial. Despite many species of mangrove macrobenthos being referred to as 'trophic dead ends', most serve as important links between recalcitrant mangrove organic matter and estuarine secondary production, through feeding excursion by mobile nekton during the high tide, and macrobenthos-mediated processing and exportation of organic matter. A significant difference in the standing crop biomass of forests between the Indo-west-Pacific (IWP)' and Atlantic-east-Pacific (AEP) mangroves may be related to the difference in species richness of mangrove as well as macrobenthos diversity in the two bioregions. Such differences in assemblage structure may also result in different ecosystem functioning, but the nature of the links is, however, yet to be explored. There is also a strong need for

  14. Hydrological controls on glacially exported microbial assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubnick, Ashley; Kazemi, Sina; Sharp, Martin; Wadham, Jemma; Hawkings, Jon; Beaton, Alexander; Lanoil, Brian

    2017-05-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) exports approximately 400 km3 of freshwater annually to downstream freshwater and marine ecosystems. These meltwaters originate in a wide range of well-defined habitats that can be associated with very different physical environments within the ice sheet, ranging from oxygenated surface environments that are exposed to light and supplied with nutrients from atmospheric/aeolian sources to subglacial environments that are permanently dark, isolated from the atmosphere, and potentially anoxic. Hydrological conditions in the latter likely favor prolonged rock-water contact. The seasonally evolving hydrological system that drains meltwaters from the GrIS connects these distinct microbial habitats and exports the microbes contained within them to downstream ecosystems. The microbial assemblages exported in glacier meltwater may have an impact on downstream ecosystem function and development. We explored how the seasonal development of a glacial drainage system influences the character of microbial assemblages exported from the GrIS by monitoring the seasonal changes in hydrology, water chemistry, and microbial assemblage composition of meltwaters draining from a glacier in southwest Greenland. We found that the microbial assemblages exported in meltwaters varied in response to glacier hydrological flow path characteristics. Whether or not meltwaters passed through the subglacial environment was the first-order control on the composition of the microbial assemblages exported from the glacier, while water source (i.e., supraglacial or extraglacial) and subglacial residence times were second-order controls. Glacier hydrology therefore plays a fundamental role in determining the microbial exports from glaciated watersheds.

  15. Seasonality and Paleoecology of the Late Cretaceous Multi-Taxa Vertebrate Assemblage of “Lo Hueco” (Central Eastern Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Laura; Barroso-Barcenilla, Fernando; Cambra-Moo, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Isotopic studies of multi-taxa terrestrial vertebrate assemblages allow determination of paleoclimatic and paleoecological aspects on account of the different information supplied by each taxon. The late Campanian-early Maastrichtian “Lo Hueco” Fossil-Lagerstätte (central eastern Spain), located at a subtropical paleolatitude of ~31°N, constitutes an ideal setting to carry out this task due to its abundant and diverse vertebrate assemblage. Local δ18OPO4 values estimated from δ18OPO4 values of theropods, sauropods, crocodyliforms, and turtles are close to δ18OH2O values observed at modern subtropical latitudes. Theropod δ18OH2O values are lower than those shown by crocodyliforms and turtles, indicating that terrestrial endothermic taxa record δ18OH2O values throughout the year, whereas semiaquatic ectothermic taxa δ18OH2O values represent local meteoric waters over a shorter time period when conditions are favorable for bioapatite synthesis (warm season). Temperatures calculated by combining theropod, crocodyliform, and turtle δ18OH2O values and gar δ18OPO4 have enabled us to estimate seasonal variability as the difference between mean annual temperature (MAT, yielded by theropods) and temperature of the warmest months (TWMs, provided by crocodyliforms and turtles). ΔTWMs-MAT value does not point to a significantly different seasonal thermal variability when compared to modern coastal subtropical meteorological stations and Late Cretaceous rudists from eastern Tethys. Bioapatite and bulk organic matter δ13C values point to a C3 environment in the “Lo Hueco” area. The estimated fractionation between sauropod enamel and diet is ~15‰. While waiting for paleoecological information yielded by the ongoing morphological study of the “Lo Hueco” crocodyliforms, δ13C and δ18OCO3 results point to incorporation of food items with brackish influence, but preferential ingestion of freshwater. “Lo Hueco” turtles showed the lowest δ13C and δ18OCO3

  16. CORRELATION OF LATE CRETACEOUS CONTINENTAL VERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES IN MIDDLE AND CENTRAL ASIA%中亚与亚洲中部晚白垩世的陆生脊椎动物组合对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. AVERIANOV; H.D.SUES

    2012-01-01

    The relative stratigraphic positions of the better-known assemblages of Late Cretaceous continental vertebrates from Middle and Central Asia are assessed by parsimony analysis of the presence/absence of 26 proposed bio- stratigraphic marker taxa. The oldest assemblage in the region is Khodzhakul from the Kyzylkum Desert of Uzbekistan (early Cenomanian). The next stage includes assemblages from the lower and upper parts of the Bayn Shire Formation of the eastern Gobi Desert, Mongolia (Cenomanian to Santonian). The Iren Dabasu fauna from Inner Mongolia, China, clusters with the Turonian-Santonian faunas from Middle Asia based on the shared presence of the trionychid turtle Khunnuchelys and is likely Santonian in age. Three Middle Asian assemblages (Bissekty, Yalovach, and Bostobe) are endemic in the presence of two crocodyliform taxa (Kansajsuchus and Tadzhikosuchus) but share another crocodyliform (Shamosuchus) with the Gobi assemblages. The Campanian-Maastrichtian assemblages from the Gobi Desert cluster with coeval North American faunas. The Campanian vertebrate assemblages from the Djadokhta and Barun Goyot for- mations are highly endemic, reflecting semi-arid paleoenvironments. The assemblage from the Nemegt Formation, which existed under more mesic conditions, is similar in composition to those from other fluvial depositional environ- ments (Bissekty, Iren Dabasu, and North American Judithian and Lancian assemblages). The presence of the crested hadrosaurine Saurolophus supports a Maastrichtian age for the Nemegt assemblage. Three Gobi assemblages (Djadokhta, Barun Goyot, and Nemegt) are grouped together based on the shared presence of the endemic turtle Mongolemys and parvicursorine theropods. The Campanian to Maastrichtian assemblages of Central Asia and North America differ from the older assemblages in Asia in the presence of derived Tyrannosauridae, Pachycephalosauria, and Hadrosauridae. In Middle Asia, continental vertebrate

  17. [Proceedings of the 5th Symposium on Mesozoic and Cenozoic Decapod Crustaceans, Krakow, Poland, 2013: A tribute to Pál Mihály Müller / R.H.B. Fraaije, M. Hyžný, J.W.M. Jagt, M. Krobicki & B.W.M. van Bakel (eds.)]: Decapod crustacean ‘odds and ends’ from the Maastrichtian type area (southeast Netherlands, northeast Belgium)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagt, J.W.M.; Fraaije, R.H.B.; Bakel, van B.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Strata of latest Cretaceous (late Maastrichtian) and earliest Paleogene (early Paleocene) age in the (extended) type area of the Maastrichtian Stage are comparatively rich in decapod crustaceans. Particularly common are chelae of the callianassoid Mesostylus faujasi (Desmarest, 1822), followed by ca

  18. Miura Tubes and Assemblages: Theory and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipov, Evgueni; Paulino, Glaucio; Tachi, Tomohiro

    2015-03-01

    Origami systems inspired from the Miura-ori pattern are rigid and flat foldable meaning that they can fold completely by deforming only about prescribed fold lines. We investigate origami tubes and assemblages constructed from Miura-ori inspired sheets and use eigenvalue analyses to study their stiffness characteristics. A simplified bar model is used to model the stretching and shear of the flat panel segments and rotational hinges are used to simulate the bending stiffness of the panels and prescribed fold lines. We discuss the small to large deformation bending of thin sheets and show an improved method to estimate stiffness when modeling origami structures. The tube assemblages show interesting behaviors that make them suitable for applications in science and engineering.

  19. Consumer–brand assemblages in advertising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrisgaard, Sofie Møller; Kjeldgaard, Dannie; Bengtson, Anders

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses how the use of tattoos in advertising renders diverse brand–consumer assemblages visible. In considering advertising practitioners as professionals of entanglement, the paper emphasizes the embeddedness of practitioners’ use of tattoo symbolism in institutionalized marketing...... systems and in the cultural history of tattooing. In accordance with recent emphasis on the importance of material devices for understanding contemporary sociality, this paper presents a semiotic analysis of a convenience sample of advertisements depicting tattoos. Tattoos are productive for the study...... of brand–consumer assemblages because they are situated on the human skin, which is a mediator between the individual and the socio-material world. Furthermore, tattoos reproduce discourses of both mainstream fashion and deviant subcultural identification, which imbue tattoo symbolism with communicative...

  20. Teosinte inflorescence phytolith assemblages mirror Zea taxonomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P Hart

    Full Text Available Molecular DNA analyses of the New World grass (Poaceae genus Zea, comprising five species, has resolved taxonomic issues including the most likely teosinte progenitor (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays. However, archaeologically, little is known about the use of teosinte by humans both prior to and after the domestication of maize. One potential line of evidence to explore these relationships is opaline phytoliths produced in teosinte fruit cases. Here we use multidimensional scaling and multiple discriminant analyses to determine if rondel phytolith assemblages from teosinte fruitcases reflect teosinte taxonomy. Our results indicate that rondel phytolith assemblages from the various taxa, including subspecies, can be statistically discriminated. This indicates that it will be possible to investigate the archaeological histories of teosinte use pending the recovery of appropriate samples.

  1. Teosinte inflorescence phytolith assemblages mirror Zea taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, John P; Matson, R G; Thompson, Robert G; Blake, Michael

    2011-03-30

    Molecular DNA analyses of the New World grass (Poaceae) genus Zea, comprising five species, has resolved taxonomic issues including the most likely teosinte progenitor (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis) of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays). However, archaeologically, little is known about the use of teosinte by humans both prior to and after the domestication of maize. One potential line of evidence to explore these relationships is opaline phytoliths produced in teosinte fruit cases. Here we use multidimensional scaling and multiple discriminant analyses to determine if rondel phytolith assemblages from teosinte fruitcases reflect teosinte taxonomy. Our results indicate that rondel phytolith assemblages from the various taxa, including subspecies, can be statistically discriminated. This indicates that it will be possible to investigate the archaeological histories of teosinte use pending the recovery of appropriate samples.

  2. User Assemblages in Design: An Ethnographic Study

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents an ethnographic study of the role of users in user-centered design. It is written from the perspective of science and technology studies, in particular developments in actor-network theory, and draws on the notion of the assemblage from the work of Deleuze and Guattari. The data for this thesis derives from a six-month field study of the routine discourse and practices of user-centered designers working for a multinational microprocessor manufacturer. The central argument...

  3. Littoral zone fish assemblages of northern Cayuga Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Fish assemblages from northern Cayuga Lake were examined for patterns in temporal structure. Fish assemblages changed significantly between seasons. Bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), bluntnose minnow (Pimephales notatus), and smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) formed the basis for most assemblages, but the spring assemblage was dominated by common carp (Cyprinus carpio). Correlations between community structure and abiotic factors were identified. Ten abiotic factors strongly influenced species assemblages, including phosphorus concentration, but could not fully explain differences between assemblages. Results indicate that the seasonal pattern of fish assemblage structure and abundance of fish that tend to feed in the water column were related to the annual cycle of productivity in the lake and behavioral adaptations of the fish.

  4. PLEISTOCENE BATHYAL MOLLUSCAN ASSEMBLAGES FROM SOUTHERN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ITALO DI GERONIMO

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Four Pleistocene bathyal molluscan assemblages from southern Italy (Calabria and Messina area were studied. One hundred and thirty-six species were recorded. Twenty-four were classified and described in detail and thirty-five were illustrated. The following new combinations are pro posed: Solariella marginulata (Philippi, 1844, Iphitus tenuisculptus (Seguenza, 1876, Benthomangelia tenuicostata (Seguenza, 1879, Chrysallida microscalaria (Seguenza, 1876, Ennucula corbuloides (Seguenza, 1877, Ennucula rotundata (Seguenza, 1877, Thestyleda cuspidata (Philippi, 1844, Katadesmia confusa (Seguenza, 1877, Austrotindaria pusio (Philippi, 1844, Austrotindaria salicensis (Seguenza, 1877. Comments concerning the taxonomy of Fissurisepta Seguenza, 1862, Solariella Wood, 1842, Ennucula Iredale, 1931, Thestyleda Iredale, 1929, Ledella Verrill & Bush, 1897, Yoldiella Verrill & Bush, 1897, Bathyspinula Filatova, 1958, Katadesmia Dall, 1908, Austrotindaria Fleming, 1948 and Cadulus Philippi, 1844 are included. The assemblages are dominated by nuculoids and fit the general compositional pattern of the deep-sea molluscan communities. A paleodepth of 500-600 m is inferred for two assemblages, whereas a greater depth, pro bably not exceeding 1,000 m, is suggested for the other two. Taxonomic affinities with northeast Atlantic and more generally with World Ocean deep-sea molluscan faunas are remarkable. The Plio-Quaternary evolution of the deep Mediterranean benthos is discussed.    

  5. Depositional Settings of the basal López de Bertodano Formation, Maastrichtian, Antarctica Ambientes de depositación de la parte basal de la Formación López de Bertodano, Maastrichtiano, Antártida

    OpenAIRE

    E.B. Olivero; J.J. Ponce; C.A. Marsicano; D.R. Martinioni

    2007-01-01

    In Snow Hill and Seymour islands the lower Maastrichtian, basal part of the L ópez de Bertodano Formation, rests on a high relief, erosive surface elaborated in the underlying Snow Hill Island Formation. Mudstone-dominated beds with inclined heterolithic stratification dominate the basal strata of the López de Bertodano Formation. They consist of rhythmical alternations of friable sandy- and clayeymudstone couplets, with ripple cross lamination, mud drapes, and flaser bedding. They are charac...

  6. Carbon and oxygen isotopic variation in Upper Maastrichtian chalk, Danish Central Graben. M-10X (Dan Field), E-5X (Tyra SE Field)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schovsbo, N.H.; Buchardt, B.

    2004-07-01

    The chemostratigraphic potential of the carbon isotopic variation in Upper Maastrichtian chalk has been evaluated based on 143 bulk chalk samples from the M-10X and E-5X wells. The wells are situated 30 km apart and are located in the Dan and Tyra SE oil and gas fields, respectively. Samples were taken each metre to record the stratigraphic variation. In addition, an interval in the M-10X well was sampled on a decimetre scale to resolve the link between {delta}{sup 13}C- and {delta}{sup 18}0-isotopic variation and lithology. Across three laminated to bioturbated chalk cycles, the m-scale variation in {delta}{sup 13}C is 0.1 %o. In the middle cycle, more negative {delta}{sup 13}C values were measured in the laminated chalk compared to bioturbated chalk. These more negative {delta}{sup 13}C values are interpreted to reflect early diagenetic cement characterised by light {delta}{sup 13}C values that formed as a response to a semiclosed pore-water environment. No consistent trend was observed in the other cycles. The laminated interval is here weakly developed and possibly reflects a depositional environment characterised by a more open pore-water system that did not allow a diagenetic component to form. The m-scale variation in {delta}{sup 18}0 values amounts to 0.5 %o and shows no apparent relationship to lithology. A chemostratigraphic correlation between the wells is presented. The correlation is consistent with the established biostratigraphy based on nannofossils, pelagic foraminifers and dinoflagellates. The chemostratigraphy was established based on the m-scale variation in {delta}{sup 13}C values and consists of seven units; the chemostratigraphy thus allows a high degree of stratigraphical resolution in the uppermost Maastrichtian interval. Moreover, the combined chemo- and biostratigraphic framework confirms the stratigraphic significance of the logbased porosity markers that form the basis of the cyclostratigraphic correlation system proposed. The recorded

  7. Sothi-Siswal Ceramic Assemblage: A Reappraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas Garge

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Harappan evidences in Chautan valley has a unique ceramic tradition. In the light of recent plethora of knowledge as well as against the background of the studies conducted by A. Ghosh, J.S. Nigam, Katy Frenchman, Suraj Bhan & Madhu Bala, we will have to not only reclassify the Sothi-Siswal ceramic assemblage but also alter basic nomenclatures and concepts involve in it. It will give us deep insight in to the process of evolution of Early Harappan cultures vis-à-vis the dynamic of regional cultural complexes.

  8. Nonlinear sequential laminates reproducing hollow sphere assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idiart, Martín I.

    2007-07-01

    A special class of nonlinear porous materials with isotropic 'sequentially laminated' microstructures is found to reproduce exactly the hydrostatic behavior of 'hollow sphere assemblages'. It is then argued that this result supports the conjecture that Gurson's approximate criterion for plastic porous materials, and its viscoplastic extension of Leblond et al. (1994), may actually yield rigorous upper bounds for the hydrostatic flow stress of porous materials containing an isotropic, but otherwise arbitrary, distribution of porosity. To cite this article: M.I. Idiart, C. R. Mecanique 335 (2007).

  9. Habitat Specialization in Tropical Continental Shelf Demersal Fish Assemblages

    OpenAIRE

    Ben M Fitzpatrick; Euan S Harvey; Heyward, Andrew J.; Twiggs, Emily J.; Jamie Colquhoun

    2012-01-01

    The implications of shallow water impacts such as fishing and climate change on fish assemblages are generally considered in isolation from the distribution and abundance of these fish assemblages in adjacent deeper waters. We investigate the abundance and length of demersal fish assemblages across a section of tropical continental shelf at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to identify fish and fish habitat relationships across steep gradients in depth and in different benthic habitat types. ...

  10. A new species of Ischyodus (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Callorhynchidae) from Upper Maastrichtian Shallow marine facies of the Fox Hills and Hell Creek Formations, Williston basin, North Dakota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoganson, J.W.; Erickson, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A new species of chimaeroid, Ischyodus rayhaasi sp. nov., is described based primarily upon the number and configuration of tritors on palatine and mandibular tooth plates. This new species is named in honour of Mr Raymond Haas. Fossils of I. rayhaasi have been recovered from the Upper Maastrichtian Fox Hills Formation and the Breien Member and an unnamed member of the Hell Creek Formation at sites in south-central North Dakota and north-central South Dakota, USA. Ischyodus rayhaasi inhabited shallow marine waters in the central part of the Western Interior Seaway during the latest Cretaceous. Apparently it was also present in similar habitats at that time in the Volga region of Russia. Ischyodus rayhaasi is the youngest Cretaceous species Ischyodus known to exist before the Cretaceous/Tertiary extinction, and the species apparently did not survive that event. It was replaced by Ischyodus dolloi, which is found in the Paleocene Cannonball Formation of the Williston Basin region of North Dakota and is widely distributed elsewhere. ?? The Palaeontological Association.

  11. Teeth of Abelisauridae and Carcharodontosauridae cf. (Theropoda, Dinosauria from the Campanian-Maastrichtian Presidente Prudente Formation (Southwestern São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furtado, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Isolated theropod teeth referable to Abelisauridae indet., and Carcharodontosauridae cf., from the Campanian-Maastrichtian Presidente Prudente Formation of the western São Paulo State, Brazil, are described. They are compared to the Late Cretaceous Gondwanan theropod dinosaur teeth and their affinities are discussed. These teeth are significant because carnivorous dinosaur remains are poorly known from the Late Cretaceous beds of Western São Paulo State except for a few isolated elements.Se describen dientes aislados de terópodos referidos a Abelisauridae indet. y Carcharodontosauridae cf., procedentes de la Formación Presidente Prudente del Campaniano-Maastrichtiano, en el oeste del estado de San Pablo, Brasil. Los materiales son comparados con dientes de dinosaurios gondwánicos del Cretácico tardío, y cuyas afinidades son aquí discutidas. Estos dientes de dinosaurios carnívoros son significativos debido a que su presencia es pobremente conocida en el Cretácico tardío del oeste del estado del San Pablo, excepto por unos pocos huesos.

  12. Amphibian, reptilian, and avian remains from the Fox Hills Formation (Maastrichtian): Shoreline and estuarine deposits of the Pierre Sea in south-central North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoganson, J.W.; Erickson, J.M.; Holland, F.D.

    2007-01-01

    Although vertebrate fossils, except for fish, are not common in the Maastrichtian Fox Hills Formation, amphibian, reptilian, and avian remains have been recovered at several localities in south-central North Dakota from shoreline facies of the retreating Pierre-Fox Hills seaway. This mixed fauna of aquatic, terrestrial, and marine taxa provides insight into the composition of coastal communities and habitats at the interface between the Hell Creek delta and the Western Interior Seaway. The delta-platform aquatic paleocommunity is represented by the efficient swimming salamanders Opistho- trition kayi and Lisserpeton bairdi, the carnivorous soft-shelled turtle "Aspideretes" sensu lato, the underwater piscivorous predator Champsosaurus laramiensis, and the large, predatory crocodile IBorealosuchus. Terrestrial areas were inhabited by the tortoise-like Basilemys and the predatory dinosaurs Tyrannosaurus and cf. Saurornit- holestes. Birds occupied niches in the warm-temperate to subtropical, forested delta platform and shoreline areas. These nonmarine taxa in the Fox Hills Formation indicate that the geographic range of these animals extended to shoreline areas of the Western Interior Seaway. The toxochelyid turtle Lophochelys and the ambush predators Mosasaurus dekayi and IPlioplatecarpus resided in the shallow marine and estuarine habitats. These taxa and marine fish taxa reported earlier indicate that normal marine conditions in south- central North Dakota persisted into the latest Late Cretaceous in comparison with coeval Hell Creek Formation sites more distal from the Western Interior Seaway. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America. All rights reserved.

  13. Techniques de formage et d'assemblage

    CERN Document Server

    Favre, G; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2004-01-01

    Les sections Techniques d'Assemblage du groupe EST/MF et Brasage du groupe EST/SM ont été groupées en un seul service dans un but de rationalisation accrue des ressources et méthodes. Ce service dispose de nombreux moyens : soudure et découpe LASER (YAG, 350 W), soudure par faisceau d'électrons (deux installations, 35 et 7.5 kW), équipements TIG orbital, jet line, MIG, soudure plasma, boîte à gants, portique de soudage trois axes multiprocédés, presses plieuses, rouleuses, moyens de repoussage, alimentation à induction 12 kW et divers fours sous vide et à air. Le service est composé de 17 personnes dont la polyvalence est encouragée. Les activités de la section seront décrites à travers quelques exemples significatifs récents, notamment : l'assemblage des amenées de courant HTS, la réalisation des chambres LSS, des tubes HET, d'enveloppes céramiques pour détecteurs PET-HPD, le brasage de RFQ, la soudure du Barrel d'ATLAS ou encore le soudage des lignes de thermalisation du toroïde d'AT...

  14. Prevalence of Giardia duodenalis assemblages and sub-assemblages in symptomatic patients from Damascus city and its suburbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skhal, Dania; Aboualchamat, Ghalia; Al Mariri, Ayman; Al Nahhas, Samar

    2017-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is one of the most important human enteric parasites worldwide and is endemic throughout the world with a vast range of mammalian hosts. However, there is limited information on the prevalent genetic variability of G. duodenalis in Syria. This study aimed to evaluate the predominance of G. duodenalis assemblages/sub-assemblages causing humans infection in the city of Damascus and its suburbs. 40 symptomatic giardiasis patients were recruited in this study. Fecal samples were genotyped using PCR/RFLP assay targeting the β-giardin and glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) genes. HaeIII, BspL1 and RsaI restriction enzymes were used to differentiate between G. duodenalis assemblages/sub-assemblages. Our data showed that 65% of isolates were of assemblage A; 45% belonged to sub-assemblage AII and 20% to sub-assemblage AI. Assemblage B was detected in 27.5% of isolates; 12.5% fit in sub-assemblage BIV, 5% fit in sub-assemblage BIII and 10.5% fit in Discordant genotype BIII/BIV. Mixed genotypes (AII+BIII and AI+BIV) were identified in 3 isolates (7.5%). Significant correlation was found between Giardia AII sub-assemblage and weight loss symptom (P-value=0.05) as well as between contact with domestic animals (cats, P-value=0.027). Moreover, a significant correlation was found between sub-assemblage AI and livestock breeding (P-value=0.000). In conclusion genotyping of human Giardia duodenalis isolates suggests anthroponotic transmission for the route of infection in Damascus and its suburbs. Further studies are needed to screen a wide geographic areas in Syria and to estimate the prevalence of G. duodenalis infection in our population.

  15. Genetic exchange within and between assemblages of Giardia duodenalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasek-Nesselquist, Erica; Welch, David Mark; Thompson, Richard Christopher Andrew; Steuart, Robert F; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2009-01-01

    Meiotic sex evolved early in the history of eukaryotes. Giardia duodenalis (syn. Giardia lamblia, Giardia intestinalis), a parasitic protist belonging to an early diverging lineage of eukaryotes, shows no cytological or physiological evidence of meiotic or sexual processes. Recent molecular analyses challenge the idea that G. duodenalis is a strictly clonal organism by providing evidence of recombination between homologous chromosomes within one subgroup (Assemblage A) of this species as well as genetic transfer from one subgroup to another (Assemblage A-B). Because recombination is not well documented and because it is not known whether the observed inter-assemblage transfer represents true reciprocal genetic exchange or a non-sexual process, we analyzed genic sequences from all major subgroups (Assemblages A-G) of this species. For all assemblages, we detected molecular signatures consistent with meiotic sex or genetic exchange, including low levels of heterozygosity, as indicated by allelic sequence divergence within isolates, and intra- and inter-assemblage recombination. The identification of recombination between assemblages suggests a shared gene pool and calls into question whether it is appropriate to divide the genetically distinct assemblages of G. duodenalis into a species complex.

  16. RNA assemblages orchestrate complex cellular processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Heidi Theil; Christiansen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs are monocistronic, and therefore mechanisms exist that coordinate the synthesis of multiprotein complexes in order to obtain proper stoichiometry at the appropriate intracellular locations. RNA-binding proteins containing low-complexity sequences are prone to generate liquid...... droplets via liquid-liquid phase separation, and in this way create cytoplasmic assemblages of functionally related mRNAs. In a recent iCLIP study, we showed that the Drosophila RNA-binding protein Imp, which exhibits a C-terminal low-complexity sequence, increases the formation of F-actin by binding to 3......' untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding components participating in F-actin biogenesis. We hypothesize that phase transition is a mechanism the cell employs to increase the local mRNA concentration considerably, and in this way synchronize protein production in cytoplasmic territories, as discussed...

  17. Phylogenetic and functional diversity in large carnivore assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalerum, F

    2013-06-07

    Large terrestrial carnivores are important ecological components and prominent flagship species, but are often extinction prone owing to a combination of biological traits and high levels of human persecution. This study combines phylogenetic and functional diversity evaluations of global and continental large carnivore assemblages to provide a framework for conservation prioritization both between and within assemblages. Species-rich assemblages of large carnivores simultaneously had high phylogenetic and functional diversity, but species contributions to phylogenetic and functional diversity components were not positively correlated. The results further provide ecological justification for the largest carnivore species as a focus for conservation action, and suggests that range contraction is a likely cause of diminishing carnivore ecosystem function. This study highlights that preserving species-rich carnivore assemblages will capture both high phylogenetic and functional diversity, but that prioritizing species within assemblages will involve trade-offs between optimizing contemporary ecosystem function versus the evolutionary potential for future ecosystem performance.

  18. Meiofaunal assemblages associated with native and non-indigenous macroalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, Puri; Sousa-Pinto, Isabel; Rubal, Marcos

    2016-07-01

    Meiofauna is a useful tool to detect effects of different disturbances; however, its relevance in the frame of biological invasions has been almost fully neglected. Meiofaunal assemblages associated with the invasive macroalga Sargassum muticum were studied and compared with those associated with two native macroalgae (Bifurcaria bifurcata and Chondrus crispus). We used a linear mixed model to determine the influence of habitat size (i.e. macroalgal biomass) in shaping meiofaunal assemblages. Results showed that habitat size (i.e. macroalgal biomass) shaped meiofaunal assemblages influencing its abundance, richness and structure. However, the identity of macroalga (i.e. species) appears also to play a significant role, particularly the differences of complexity among the studied species may shape their meiofaunal assemblages. Finally, the invasive macroalga appears to influence positively species richness. Our results highlight the need of including different faunal components to achieve a comprehensive knowledge on effects of invasive macroalgae and that meiofaunal assemblages may be a valuable tool to examine them.

  19. No correlation between the diversity and productivity of assemblages: evidence from the phytophage and predator assemblages in various cotton agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Men, XingYuan; Ge, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Biodiversity research has shown that primary productivity increases with plant species number, especially in many experimental grassland systems. Here, we assessed the correlation between productivity and diversity of phytophages and natural enemy assemblages associated with planting date and intercropping in four cotton agroecosystems. Twenty-one pairs of data were used to determine Pearson correlations between species richness, total number of individuals, diversity indices and productivity for each assemblage every five days from 5 June to 15 September 2012. At the same trophic level, the productivity exhibited a significant positive correlation with species richness of the phytophage or predator assemblage. A significant correlation was found between productivity and total number of individuals in most cotton fields. However, no significant correlations were observed between productivity and diversity indices (including indices of energy flow diversity and numerical diversity) in most cotton fields for either the phytophage or the predator assemblages. Species richness of phytophage assemblage and total individual numbers were significantly correlated with primary productivity. Also, species richness of natural enemy assemblage and total number of individuals correlated with phytophage assemblage productivity. A negative but not significant correlation occurred between the indices of numerical diversity and energy flow diversity and lower trophic-level productivity in the cotton-phytophage and phytophage-predator assemblages for most intercropped cotton agroecosystems. Our results clearly showed that there were no correlations between diversity indices and productivity within the same or lower trophic levels within the phytophage and predator assemblages in cotton agroecosystems, and inter-cropped cotton fields had a stronger ability to support the natural enemy assemblage and potentially to reduce phytophages.

  20. Faceless sex: glory holes and sexual assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Dave; O'Byrne, Patrick; Murray, Stuart J

    2010-10-01

    According to our previous research, the use of glory holes in public venues such as saunas and bathhouses is very popular. The popularity of glory holes is due in part to the anonymous sex that these architectural elements allow. This post-structuralist theoretical reflection seeks to understand the specific nature of anonymous public sex among bathhouse patrons, focusing on the links between desire-architecture-place-sexual practices. Drawing on interviews with glory hole users gathered during an ethnographic research project in bathhouses, this essay goes beyond traditional public health discourse to offer an original perspective on anonymous public sex. Utilizing the philosophy of Deleuze and Guattari's concepts of assemblages and machines, we re-theorize glory hole sex--what we call 'faceless sex'--and rethink the ways that desire is imbricated with our understanding of architecture, place, and public. Finally, we reflect upon the particular ethical challenges that are posed by these particular sexual practices, and ask whether a post-structuralist ethic might be possible.

  1. Climatic influence on a marine fish assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attrill, Martin J; Power, Michael

    2002-05-16

    Understanding the fluctuations in marine fish stocks is important for the management of fisheries, and attempts have been made to demonstrate links with oceanographic and climatic variability, including the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The NAO has been correlated with a range of long-term ecological measures, including certain fish stocks. Such environmental influences are most likely to affect susceptible juveniles during estuarine residency, as estuaries are critical juvenile nursery or over-wintering habitats. Here we show that, during a 16-year period, climatic forcing (by means of the NAO) is consistently the most important parameter explaining variation in assemblage composition, abundance and growth of juvenile marine fish during estuarine residency. A possible mechanism for the effect of the NAO is a temperature differential between estuarine and marine waters that allows fish to facultatively exploit optimal thermal habitats. The connection has potentially important implications for the size and numbers of individuals recruited to the fishery, for understanding and predicting the composition of juvenile fish stocks using estuaries, and for the appropriate conservation of estuarine systems in relation to fish stocks.

  2. Coralligenous habitat: patterns of vertical distribution of macroalgal assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Piazzi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates patterns of distribution of macroalgal coralligenous assemblages in relation to depth and evaluates the role of different environmental conditions on these patterns. Two depths (30 and 40 m were investigated off small islands and off continental coasts in order to select two different environmental conditions. Results showed differences between depths in the structure of assemblages around islands, while along the continental coasts these patterns were not evident. Moreover, differences between assemblages related to different environmental conditions were more evident in the shallower zone of distribution of the coralligenous habitat. This correlative study did not allow us to identify any cause-effect relationship, but patterns we detected agree with those of other studies, suggesting that alterations in the environmental conditions may be the cause of the decrease in differences among assemblages developing at different depths and may lead to a higher spatial homogenization and an impoverishment of the whole subtidal system.

  3. Large River Monitoring Forum Fish Assemblage Database 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Large River Monitoring Forum compiled fish assemblage data for five large rivers in the U.S. as a part of a coordinated effort to compare and contract river...

  4. Global assemblages and structural models of International Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corry, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Rather than consigning assemblages to the micro-politics of international relations, the chapter argues that assemblages can also be seen to play a role in the ‘grand’ structures of international relations. Structural IR theory normally only considers how subjects are ordered – hierarchically......, anarchically, in core-periphery relations or in terms of networks. However, not only subjects but also assemblages – the bringing together of previously unconnected elements into novel constellations – play a critical role in structuring international relations. More specifically, one sub......-category of assemblages – those constructed as malleable and governable which I call ‘governance-objects’ – is central to structure in international relations. The chapter begins with standard definitions of what structures are – patterns of interaction between elements – and briefly covers the range of models currently...

  5. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages help to understand carbonate mound evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüggeberg, A.; Dorschel, B.; Dullo, C.; Hebbeln, D.; Freiwald, A.

    2003-04-01

    On- and off-mound sediment cores from Propeller Mound (Porcupine Seabight) were analysed for their benthic foraminiferal assemblages. Benthic foraminifera from the off-mound position show three different assemblages describing the Holocene, Oxygen Isotope Stage (OIS) 2 and late OIS 3. The Holocene assemblage is dominated by Uvigerina mediterranea, Trifarina angulosa, Melonis barleeanum, Hyalinea balthica, Bulimina marginata. These species are related to a higher supply of organic material. The glacial assemblage shows high abundances of Cassidulina teretis, C. reniforme, Globocassidulina subglobosa, and Cibicidoides kullenbergi, implying cold bottom waters and a reduced productivity. The lower part of late OIS 3 is dominated by Elphidium excavatum, which is displaced continuously by very high abundances of C. teretis towards the transition of OIS3/2. E. excavatum, a shallow shelf species generally reported from above 200 m water depth, and high amounts of sediment supplied to the core site points to shelf erosion related to sea level lowering (approx. 50 m). Towards OIS 2 the system returns to normal background sedimentation pattern. We transferred the established off-mound assemblages onto the on-mound core, in which the sediment sequence is incomplete characterised by numerous hiatuses. The Holocene assemblage describes almost the complete core with relative abundances of >20%, interrupted only by three sections with slightly higher amounts of the glacial assemblage, which are not comparable to abundances of >70% of the glacial assemblage found in the off-mound core. These results are in conjunction with stable oxygen isotope data indicating only interstadial values, assuming peak glacial and interglacial sediments to be removed from the mound. Another assemblage described for the on-mound core is dominated by Discanomalina coronata, Gavelinopsis translucens, Planulina ariminensis, Cibicides lobatulus and to a lower degree by Hyrrokkin sarcophaga. These species

  6. Quantifying Assemblage Turnover and Species Contributions at Ecologic Boundaries

    OpenAIRE

    Hayek,Lee-Ann C.; Brent Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify i...

  7. Copepod assemblages in a highly complex hydrographic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berasategui, A. D.; Menu Marque, S.; Gómez-Erache, M.; Ramírez, F. C.; Mianzan, H. W.; Acha, E. M.

    2006-02-01

    Community structure and diversity patterns of planktonic copepods were investigated for the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean between 34 and 41°S. Our objectives were (1) to define copepod assemblages, (2) to accurately identify their association to different water masses/hydrodynamic regimes, (3) to characterize the assemblages in terms of their community structure, and (4) to test if frontal boundaries between water masses separate copepod assemblages. Biogeographic patterns were investigated using multivariate analysis (cluster and ANOSIM analyses). Biodiversity patterns were examined using different univariate indexes (point species richness and taxonomic distinctness). Five regions of similar copepod assemblages were defined for our study area each one corresponding to different environments (freshwater, estuarine, continental shelf, Malvinas and Brazil current assemblages). These assemblages have major community structure differences. In spite of the complex oceanographic scenario of our study area, that can lead us to expect a pattern of copepod communities with diffuse boundaries, we found a strong spatial correspondence between these limits and the presence of permanent frontal structures.

  8. DETECTION AND COMPARISON OF GIARDIAVIRUS (GLV) FROM DIFFERENT ASSEMBLAGES OF GIARDIA DUODENALIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five assemblages of Giardia were identified from cysts in cattle, dog, cat, sheep, and reindeer feces using ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequencing. Assemblage A was present in cattle and reindeer feces, Assemblages C and D were present in dog feces, Assemblage E was present in cattle and sheep feces, and ...

  9. The Miocene carnivore assemblage of Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koufos, G. D.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Miocene carnivore assemblage of Greece includes a great number of taxa, described in numerous articles since the first decades of the 19th Century. The present article is a revision of all these taxa, providing information about their history, localities, age, as well as their stratigraphic distribution and palaeoenvironment. The Early/Middle Miocene carnivore record of Greece is poor as the available fossiliferous sites and material are rare. However, the Late Miocene one is quite rich, including numerous taxa. The Miocene localities with carnivores and their age are given in a stratigraphic table covering the European Mammal zones from MN 4 to MN 13. The type locality, holotype, and some historical and morphological remarks are given for each taxon. Several carnivore taxa were erected from Greek material and new photos of their holotypes are given. The stratigraphic distribution of the Greek carnivore taxa indicates that they are covering the time span from ~19.0-5.3Ma. The majority of the Miocene taxa (Adcrocuta, Hyaenictitherium, Plioviverrops, Protictitherium, Ictitherium, Indarctos, Dinocrocuta, Promephitis disappeared at the end of Miocene. The composition of the Early/Middle Miocene carnivore assemblage of Greece includes mainly viverrids (Lophocyon, Euboictis, while the hyaenids, percrocutids, felids and mustelids are very few. On the contrary the Late Miocene assemblage is richer, including more subfamilies and species; the hyaenids and mustelids dominate, while the viverrids are absent. The Late Miocene carnivore guild structure is similar to that of the modern Serengeti, indicating a relatively open, savannah-like environment.

    La asociación de carnívoros miocenos de Grecia incluye un gran número de taxones, descritos en numerosos artículos desde las primeras décadas del siglo XIX. El presente artículo supone un esfuerzo de síntesis de todos estos taxones, suministrando información sobre su

  10. Factors influencing riverine fish assemblages in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David S.; Richards, Todd A.; Levin, Sara B.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, and the Massachusetts Department of Fish and Game, conducted an investigation of fish assemblages in small- to medium-sized Massachusetts streams. The objective of this study was to determine relations between fish-assemblage characteristics and anthropogenic factors, including impervious cover and estimated flow alteration, relative to the effects of environmental factors, including physical-basin characteristics and land use. The results of this investigation supersede those of a preliminary analysis published in 2010. Fish data were obtained for 669 fish-sampling sites from the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife fish-community database. A review of the literature was used to select fish metrics - species richness, abundance of individual species, and abundances of species grouped on life history traits - responsive to flow alteration. The contributing areas to the fish-sampling sites were delineated and used with a geographic information system to determine a set of environmental and anthropogenic factors that were tested for use as explanatory variables in regression models. Reported and estimated withdrawals and return flows were used together with simulated unaltered streamflows to estimate altered streamflows and indicators of flow alteration for each fish-sampling site. Altered streamflows and indicators of flow alteration were calculated on the basis of methods developed in a previous U.S. Geological Survey study in which unaltered daily streamflows were simulated for a 44-year period (water years 1961-2004), and streamflow alterations were estimated by use of water-withdrawal and wastewater-return data previously reported to the State for the 2000-04 period and estimated domestic-well withdrawals and septic-system discharges. A variable selection process, conducted using principal

  11. [Diversity and stability of arthropod assemblage in tea orchard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigen; Xiong, Jinjun; Huang, Mingdu; Gu, Dejiu

    2004-05-01

    Two tea orchards, simplex tea orchard with weeds removed manually or by herbicides (STO) and complex tea orchard with the weed Hedyotis uncinella (CTO), each with an area of 0. 4 hm2, were established in 1995 in Yingde Hongxing Tea Plantation, Guangdong Province. The primary eigenvalues, species richness index (R), assemblage diversity index (H'), evenness index (J) and species concentration index (C) of arthropod assemblage were employed and compared to assess the efficacy of STO and CTO on the diversity and stabilityof arthropod assemblage. Stability indexes Ss/Si and Sn/Sp and variation coefficient of diversity index ds/dm were utilized as well. The results demonstrated that the R of arthropod assemblage in CTO ranged from 4 to 8, with the highest of 7.7403, while that in STO varied mainly between 4 to 6. The average R of arthropod assemblage in CTO was 5.4672 +/- 0.3483, higher than that in STO (4.8809 +/- 0.3175). The H' of arthropod in CTO (3.8535 +/- 0.1232) was higher, in contrast to the value in STO (3.4654 +/- 0.1856). The J in CTO was higher, while the species concentration index (C) was lower, in comparison to STO. The stability indexes Ss/Si and Sn/Sp of CTO were greater than those of STO, while the ds/dm in CTO (0.1107) was lower than that in STO (0.1855). All these indicated that the diversity of arthropod assemblage was better preserved in CTO, and the assemblage in CTO was more stable.

  12. Public sphere as assemblage: the cultural politics of roadside memorialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Elaine

    2013-09-01

    This paper investigates contemporary academic accounts of the public sphere. In particular, it takes stock of post-Habermasian public sphere scholarship, and acknowledges a lively and variegated debate concerning the multiple ways in which individuals engage in contemporary political affairs. A critical eye is cast over a range of key insights which have come to establish the parameters of what 'counts' as a/the public sphere, who can be involved, and where and how communicative networks are established. This opens up the conceptual space for re-imagining a/the public sphere as an assemblage. Making use of recent developments in Deleuzian-inspired assemblage theory - most especially drawn from DeLanda's (2006) 'new philosophy of society' - the paper sets out an alternative perspective on the notion of the public sphere, and regards it as a space of connectivity brought into being through a contingent and heterogeneous assemblage of discursive, visual and performative practices. This is mapped out with reference to the cultural politics of roadside memorialization. However, a/the public sphere as an assemblage is not simply a 'social construction' brought into being through a logic of connectivity, but is an emergent and ephemeral space which reflexively nurtures and assembles the cultural politics (and political cultures) of which it is an integral part. The discussion concludes, then, with a consideration of the contribution of assemblage theory to public sphere studies. (Also see Campbell 2009a). © London School of Economics and Political Science 2013.

  13. Quantifying assemblage turnover and species contributions at ecologic boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Lee-Ann C; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI) identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs) separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD) Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA.

  14. Quantifying assemblage turnover and species contributions at ecologic boundaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee-Ann C Hayek

    Full Text Available Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA.

  15. Crab death assemblages from Laguna Madre and vicinity, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotnick, R.E.; McCarroll, S. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (USA)); Powell, E. (Texas A M Univ., College Station (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Crabs are a major component of modern marine ecosystems, but are only rarely described in fossil assemblages. Studies of brachyuran taphonomy have examined either the fossil end-products of the taphonomic process or the very earliest stages of decay and decomposition. The next logical step is the analysis of modern crab death assemblages; i.e., studies that examine taphonomic loss in areas where the composition of the living assemblage is known. The authors studied crab death assemblages in shallow water sediments at several localities in an near Laguna Madre, Texas. Nearly every sample examined contained some crab remains, most commonly in the form of isolated claws (dactyl and propodus). A crab fauna associated with a buried grass bed contained abundant remains of the xanthid crab Dyspanopeus texanus, including carapaces, chelipeds, and thoraxes, as well as fragments of the portunid Callinectes sapidus and the majiid Libinia dubia. Crab remains may be an overlooked portion of many preserved benthic assemblages, both in recent and modern sediments.

  16. Quantifying Assemblage Turnover and Species Contributions at Ecologic Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Lee-Ann C.; Wilson, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Not all boundaries, whether stratigraphical or geographical, are marked by species-level changes in community composition. For example, paleodata for some sites do not show readily discernible glacial-interglacial contrasts. Rather, the proportional abundances of species can vary subtly between glacials and interglacials. This paper presents a simple quantitative measure of assemblage turnover (assemblage turnover index, ATI) that uses changes in species' proportional abundances to identify intervals of community change. A second, functionally-related index (conditioned-on-boundary index, CoBI) identifies species contributions to the total assemblage turnover. With these measures we examine benthonic foraminiferal assemblages to assess glacial/interglacial contrasts at abyssal depths. Our results indicate that these measures, ATI and CoBI, have potential as sequence stratigraphic tools in abyssal depth deposits. Many peaks in the set of values of ATI coincide with terminations at the end of glaciations and delineate peak-bounded ATI intervals (PATIs) separated by boundaries that approximate to glacial terminations and to transgressions at neritic depths. These measures, however, can be used to evaluate the assemblage turnover and composition at any defined ecological or paleoecological boundary. The section used is from Ocean Drilling Program (OPD) Hole 994C, drilled on the Blake Ridge, offshore SE USA. PMID:24130679

  17. Phytolith assemblages in grasses native to central Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Lucrecia; Distel, Roberto A

    2004-12-01

    Phytolith reference collections are a prerequisite for accurate interpretation of soil phytolith assemblages aimed at reconstructing past vegetation. In this study a phytolith reference collection has been developed for several grasses native to central Argentina: Poa ligularis, Piptochaetium napostaense, Stipa clarazii, Stipa tenuis, Stipa tenuissima, Stipa eriostachya, Stipa ambigua, Stipa brachychaeta, Pappophorum subbulbosum, Digitaria californica, Bothriochloa edwardsiana and Aristida subulata. For each species, phytoliths present in the leaf blades were classified into 47 morphotypes, and their relative frequency determined by observing 300-400 phytoliths per sample (n = 5). Data were analyzed by complete linkage cluster analysis, using the Morisita Index as measure of association. The results showed differentiation among phytolith assemblages at species level or at plant functional type level. Cluster analysis separated C3 from C4 species and palatable from non-palatable species. This study highlights the possibility of reconstructing past vegetation in central Argentina grasslands through the analysis of soil phytolith assemblages.

  18. A common tendency for phylogenetic overdispersion in mammalian assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Natalie; Rodríguez, Jesús; Purvis, Andy

    2008-09-07

    Competition has long been proposed as an important force in structuring mammalian communities. Although early work recognized that competition has a phylogenetic dimension, only with recent increases in the availability of phylogenies have true phylogenetic investigations of mammalian community structure become possible. We test whether the phylogenetic structure of 142 assemblages from three mammalian clades (New World monkeys, North American ground squirrels and Australasian possums) shows the imprint of competition. The full set of assemblages display a highly significant tendency for members to be more distantly related than expected by chance (phylogenetic overdispersion). The overdispersion is also significant within two of the clades (monkeys and squirrels) separately. This is the first demonstration of widespread overdispersion in mammal assemblages and implies an important role for either competition between close relatives where traits are conserved, habitat filtering where distant relatives share convergent traits, or both.

  19. Habitat specialization in tropical continental shelf demersal fish assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben M Fitzpatrick

    Full Text Available The implications of shallow water impacts such as fishing and climate change on fish assemblages are generally considered in isolation from the distribution and abundance of these fish assemblages in adjacent deeper waters. We investigate the abundance and length of demersal fish assemblages across a section of tropical continental shelf at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to identify fish and fish habitat relationships across steep gradients in depth and in different benthic habitat types. The assemblage composition of demersal fish were assessed from baited remote underwater stereo-video samples (n = 304 collected from 16 depth and habitat combinations. Samples were collected across a depth range poorly represented in the literature from the fringing reef lagoon (1-10 m depth, down the fore reef slope to the reef base (10-30 m depth then across the adjacent continental shelf (30-110 m depth. Multivariate analyses showed that there were distinctive fish assemblages and different sized fish were associated with each habitat/depth category. Species richness, MaxN and diversity declined with depth, while average length and trophic level increased. The assemblage structure, diversity, size and trophic structure of demersal fishes changes from shallow inshore habitats to deeper water habitats. More habitat specialists (unique species per habitat/depth category were associated with the reef slope and reef base than other habitats, but offshore sponge-dominated habitats and inshore coral-dominated reef also supported unique species. This suggests that marine protected areas in shallow coral-dominated reef habitats may not adequately protect those species whose depth distribution extends beyond shallow habitats, or other significant elements of demersal fish biodiversity. The ontogenetic habitat partitioning which is characteristic of many species, suggests that to maintain entire species life histories it is necessary to protect corridors of

  20. Environmental characteristics drive variation in Amazonian understorey bird assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Juliana; Magnusson, William E; Anderson, Marti J; Schlegel, Martin; Pe'er, Guy; Henle, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Tropical bird assemblages display patterns of high alpha and beta diversity and, as tropical birds exhibit strong habitat specificity, their spatial distributions are generally assumed to be driven primarily by environmental heterogeneity and interspecific interactions. However, spatial distributions of some Amazonian forest birds are also often restricted by large rivers and other large-scale topographic features, suggesting that dispersal limitation may also play a role in driving species' turnover. In this study, we evaluated the effects of environmental characteristics, topographic and spatial variables on variation in local assemblage structure and diversity of birds in an old-growth forest in central Amazonia. Birds were mist-netted in 72 plots distributed systematically across a 10,000 ha reserve in each of three years. Alpha diversity remained stable through time, but species composition changed. Spatial variation in bird-assemblage structure was significantly related to environmental and topographic variables but not strongly related to spatial variables. At a broad scale, we found bird assemblages to be significantly distinct between two watersheds that are divided by a central ridgeline. We did not detect an effect of the ridgeline per se in driving these patterns, indicating that most birds are able to fly across it, and that differences in assemblage structure between watersheds may be due to unmeasured environmental variables or unique combinations of measured variables. Our study indicates that complex geography and landscape features can act together with environmental variables to drive changes in the diversity and composition of tropical bird assemblages at local scales, but highlights that we still know very little about what makes different parts of tropical forest suitable for different species.

  1. Habitat specialization in tropical continental shelf demersal fish assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Ben M; Harvey, Euan S; Heyward, Andrew J; Twiggs, Emily J; Colquhoun, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The implications of shallow water impacts such as fishing and climate change on fish assemblages are generally considered in isolation from the distribution and abundance of these fish assemblages in adjacent deeper waters. We investigate the abundance and length of demersal fish assemblages across a section of tropical continental shelf at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to identify fish and fish habitat relationships across steep gradients in depth and in different benthic habitat types. The assemblage composition of demersal fish were assessed from baited remote underwater stereo-video samples (n = 304) collected from 16 depth and habitat combinations. Samples were collected across a depth range poorly represented in the literature from the fringing reef lagoon (1-10 m depth), down the fore reef slope to the reef base (10-30 m depth) then across the adjacent continental shelf (30-110 m depth). Multivariate analyses showed that there were distinctive fish assemblages and different sized fish were associated with each habitat/depth category. Species richness, MaxN and diversity declined with depth, while average length and trophic level increased. The assemblage structure, diversity, size and trophic structure of demersal fishes changes from shallow inshore habitats to deeper water habitats. More habitat specialists (unique species per habitat/depth category) were associated with the reef slope and reef base than other habitats, but offshore sponge-dominated habitats and inshore coral-dominated reef also supported unique species. This suggests that marine protected areas in shallow coral-dominated reef habitats may not adequately protect those species whose depth distribution extends beyond shallow habitats, or other significant elements of demersal fish biodiversity. The ontogenetic habitat partitioning which is characteristic of many species, suggests that to maintain entire species life histories it is necessary to protect corridors of connected habitats

  2. Environmental characteristics drive variation in Amazonian understorey bird assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, William E.; Anderson, Marti J.; Schlegel, Martin; Pe’er, Guy; Henle, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Tropical bird assemblages display patterns of high alpha and beta diversity and, as tropical birds exhibit strong habitat specificity, their spatial distributions are generally assumed to be driven primarily by environmental heterogeneity and interspecific interactions. However, spatial distributions of some Amazonian forest birds are also often restricted by large rivers and other large-scale topographic features, suggesting that dispersal limitation may also play a role in driving species’ turnover. In this study, we evaluated the effects of environmental characteristics, topographic and spatial variables on variation in local assemblage structure and diversity of birds in an old-growth forest in central Amazonia. Birds were mist-netted in 72 plots distributed systematically across a 10,000 ha reserve in each of three years. Alpha diversity remained stable through time, but species composition changed. Spatial variation in bird-assemblage structure was significantly related to environmental and topographic variables but not strongly related to spatial variables. At a broad scale, we found bird assemblages to be significantly distinct between two watersheds that are divided by a central ridgeline. We did not detect an effect of the ridgeline per se in driving these patterns, indicating that most birds are able to fly across it, and that differences in assemblage structure between watersheds may be due to unmeasured environmental variables or unique combinations of measured variables. Our study indicates that complex geography and landscape features can act together with environmental variables to drive changes in the diversity and composition of tropical bird assemblages at local scales, but highlights that we still know very little about what makes different parts of tropical forest suitable for different species. PMID:28225774

  3. Revised Stratigraphy of The Nallıhan-Dudaş (Beypazarı) Area and Significance of the Campanian-Maastrichtian Reef Occurrences Based on the Foraminiferal and Rudist Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görmüş, Muhittin; Sami Us, Muhammed; Özer, Sacit; Tekin, Erdoǧan; Akpınar, Serap; Kabakcı, Büşra

    2016-04-01

    Transgressive to regressive succession of the Cretaceous Period and Cretaceous Paleogene boundary from the Nallıhan-Beypazarı area have significant data to interpret the past geological history of northwestern Turkey. In the literature, main scientific differences are seen on the formation/lithodem names, their ages, contact relations and environmental interpretations. In the study, a revision has been made for a proper stratigraphy of the area. For the revised stratigraphy, the obtained results from our field and laboratory works and the literature information were used. The following stratigraphy were established from basement to top: the Permo-Triassic aged Sekli metamorphics, Jurassic to lower Cretaceous Soǧukçam formation, Campanian to Maastrichtian aged Dereköy Group-Haremiköy conglomerates, Çeǧiköy reefs, Nardin formation (Seben formation), Taraklı formation; the Paleogene aged Kızılçay group including Kızılbayır formation, Karaköy volcanoclastics, Selvipınar limestone, the Miocene-Pliocene terrestrial sediments, Çoraklar formation, Hırka formation, Akpınar formation, Çayırhan formation, Teke volkanics, Bozbelen formation, Kirmir formation. The main unconformities are between Jura and Campanian, Maastrichtian and Paleogene, Eocene and Miocene times. Among the geological units, the Çeǧiköy reefs having rich rudist fauna overlie the Haremiköy conglomerates in both sides at the north-Yeşilyurt village and at the south-Gökçeöz village. Another outcrop, Emincik is between two mentioned villages. Biohermal reefs mainly includes very rich rudists up to 40 centimetres in size around the Yeşilköy such as: Pironaea polystyla, Vaccinites loftusi, Hippurites sublaevis. Larger foraminifera Orbitoides medius, O. apiculatus, Siderolites calcitrapoides, Pseodosiderolites vidali are also common in the fore reef areas. Around the Gökçeöz at the south part, the identified rudists are as follows: Vaccinites sp., Hippurites aff. sublaevis

  4. Light-dependant biostabilisation of sediments by stromatolite assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Paterson

    Full Text Available For the first time we have investigated the natural ecosystem engineering capacity of stromatolitic microbial assemblages. Stromatolites are laminated sedimentary structures formed by microbial activity and are considered to have dominated the shallows of the Precambrian oceans. Their fossilised remains are the most ancient unambiguous record of early life on earth. Stromatolites can therefore be considered as the first recognisable ecosystems on the planet. However, while many discussions have taken place over their structure and form, we have very little information on their functional ecology and how such assemblages persisted despite strong eternal forcing from wind and waves. The capture and binding of sediment is clearly a critical feature for the formation and persistence of stromatolite assemblages. Here, we investigated the ecosystem engineering capacity of stromatolitic microbial assemblages with respect to their ability to stabilise sediment using material from one of the few remaining living stromatolite systems (Highborne Cay, Bahamas. It was shown that the most effective assemblages could produce a rapid (12-24 h and significant increase in sediment stability that continued in a linear fashion over the period of the experimentation (228 h. Importantly, it was also found that light was required for the assemblages to produce this stabilisation effect and that removal of assemblage into darkness could lead to a partial reversal of the stabilisation. This was attributed to the breakdown of extracellular polymeric substances under anaerobic conditions. These data were supported by microelectrode profiling of oxygen and calcium. The structure of the assemblages as they formed was visualised by low-temperature scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser microscopy. These results have implications for the understanding of early stromatolite development and highlight the potential importance of the evolution of photosynthesis in the

  5. Climate mediates the effects of disturbance on ant assemblage structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Heloise; Sanders, Nathan J.; Dunn, Robert R.; Watson, Simon; Photakis, Manoli; Abril, Silvia; Andersen, Alan N.; Angulo, Elena; Armbrecht, Inge; Arnan, Xavier; Baccaro, Fabricio B.; Bishop, Tom R.; Boulay, Raphael; Castracani, Cristina; Del Toro, Israel; Delsinne, Thibaut; Diaz, Mireia; Donoso, David A.; Enríquez, Martha L.; Fayle, Tom M.; Feener, Donald H.; Fitzpatrick, Matthew C.; Gómez, Crisanto; Grasso, Donato A.; Groc, Sarah; Heterick, Brian; Hoffmann, Benjamin D.; Lach, Lori; Lattke, John; Leponce, Maurice; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Longino, John; Lucky, Andrea; Majer, Jonathan; Menke, Sean B.; Mezger, Dirk; Mori, Alessandra; Munyai, Thinandavha C.; Paknia, Omid; Pearce-Duvet, Jessica; Pfeiffer, Martin; Philpott, Stacy M.; de Souza, Jorge L. P.; Tista, Melanie; Vasconcelos, Heraldo L.; Vonshak, Merav; Parr, Catherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have focused on the impacts of climate change on biological assemblages, yet little is known about how climate interacts with other major anthropogenic influences on biodiversity, such as habitat disturbance. Using a unique global database of 1128 local ant assemblages, we examined whether climate mediates the effects of habitat disturbance on assemblage structure at a global scale. Species richness and evenness were associated positively with temperature, and negatively with disturbance. However, the interaction among temperature, precipitation and disturbance shaped species richness and evenness. The effect was manifested through a failure of species richness to increase substantially with temperature in transformed habitats at low precipitation. At low precipitation levels, evenness increased with temperature in undisturbed sites, peaked at medium temperatures in disturbed sites and remained low in transformed sites. In warmer climates with lower rainfall, the effects of increasing disturbance on species richness and evenness were akin to decreases in temperature of up to 9°C. Anthropogenic disturbance and ongoing climate change may interact in complicated ways to shape the structure of assemblages, with hot, arid environments likely to be at greatest risk. PMID:25994675

  6. Relationships between structural complexity, coral traits, and reef fish assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Emily S.; Graham, Nicholas A. J.; Januchowski-Hartley, Fraser A.; Nash, Kirsty L.; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Wilson, Shaun K.

    2017-06-01

    With the ongoing loss of coral cover and the associated flattening of reef architecture, understanding the links between coral habitat and reef fishes is of critical importance. Here, we investigate whether considering coral traits and functional diversity provides new insights into the relationship between structural complexity and reef fish communities, and whether coral traits and community composition can predict structural complexity. Across 157 sites in Seychelles, Maldives, the Chagos Archipelago, and Australia's Great Barrier Reef, we find that structural complexity and reef zone are the strongest and most consistent predictors of reef fish abundance, biomass, species richness, and trophic structure. However, coral traits, diversity, and life histories provided additional predictive power for models of reef fish assemblages, and were key drivers of structural complexity. Our findings highlight that reef complexity relies on living corals—with different traits and life histories—continuing to build carbonate skeletons, and that these nuanced relationships between coral assemblages and habitat complexity can affect the structure of reef fish assemblages. Seascape-level estimates of structural complexity are rapid and cost effective with important implications for the structure and function of fish assemblages, and should be incorporated into monitoring programs.

  7. Learning in the "Platform Society": Disassembling an Educational Data Assemblage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ben

    2017-01-01

    Schools are increasingly involved in diverse forms of student data collection. This article provides a sociotechnical survey of a data assemblage used in education. ClassDojo is a commercial platform for tracking students' behaviour data in classrooms and a social media network for connecting teachers, students, and parents. The hybridization of…

  8. Nestedness of snake assemblages on islands of an inundated lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanping WANG; Xi WANG; Ping DING

    2012-01-01

    Nestedness is a pattern frequently reported for faunal assemblages in fragmented systems.Although nestedness has been documented for a wide range of taxa,it is rarely tested in snake assemblages.To arrive at robust generalizations about processes and mechanisms structuring island biotas,it is important to examine under-represented taxa such as snakes for the insights they may offer.We tested for the existence of nestedness and underlying causal mechanisms using snake data collected on islands in the Thousand Island Lake,China.We used the line-transect method to survey snake occupancy and abundance on 20 islands during two breeding seasons in 2009 and 2010.We used the recently developed metric WNODF to estimate nestedness.We used Spearman rank correlations to examine the associations of nestedness and habitat variables (area,isolation,and habitat diversity) as well as life-history traits (body size,clutch size,geographical range size and area requirement) related to species extinction and immigration tendencies.Snake assemblages were significantly nested and were shaped by extinction processes mediated through area effects and habitat nestedness.The nestedness of snake assemblages was not due to passive sampling or selective colonization.From a conservation viewpoint,our results indicate that we should protect both the largest island with the most species-rich community and habitat-rich islands to maximize the number of species preserved.

  9. Elk herbivory alters small mammal assemblages in high elevation drainages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Elliott W.R.; Maron, John L.; Martin, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Heavy herbivory by ungulates can substantially alter habitat, but the indirect consequences of habitat modification for animal assemblages that rely on that habitat are not well studied. This is a particularly important topic given that climate change can alter plant–herbivore interactions.

  10. Temporal variability in epifaunal assemblages associated with temperate gorgonian gardens

    KAUST Repository

    Dias, I.M.

    2015-10-19

    The present study is one of the few that investigate the temporal variability of epifaunal assemblages associated with coral species, particularly the octocorals Eunicella gazella and Leptogorgia lusitanica in south Portugal. The results suggest time rather than colony size as a primary driver of the ecological patterns of these assemblages, which were dominated by amphipods, molluscs and polychaetes. Temporal variability was linked to changes in environmental parameters, namely temperature, chlorophyll a and particulate organic carbon. Hence, temporal variability must be taken into account for the design of future biodiversity assessment studies, as different patterns may be observed depending on the sampling time. Associated epifaunal assemblages were consistently dominated by resident species (i.e. species present in all sampling periods) and a peak of rare species was observed in the transition from spring to summer following the increase of seawater temperature. Turnover was particularly high in the transition between the spring and summer periods. In both hosts, turnover was higher in the small sized colonies, which generally harboured less diverse and less abundant assemblages which also differed from those inhabiting larger size colonies. The high levels of diversity associated with gorgonian colonies highlights the need for the conservation of this priority habitat.

  11. Temporal variability in epifaunal assemblages associated with temperate gorgonian gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, I M; Cúrdia, J; Cunha, M R; Santos, M N; Carvalho, S

    2015-12-01

    The present study is one of the few that investigate the temporal variability of epifaunal assemblages associated with coral species, particularly the octocorals Eunicella gazella and Leptogorgia lusitanica in south Portugal. The results suggest time rather than colony size as a primary driver of the ecological patterns of these assemblages, which were dominated by amphipods, molluscs and polychaetes. Temporal variability was linked to changes in environmental parameters, namely temperature, chlorophyll a and particulate organic carbon. Hence, temporal variability must be taken into account for the design of future biodiversity assessment studies, as different patterns may be observed depending on the sampling time. Associated epifaunal assemblages were consistently dominated by resident species (i.e. species present in all sampling periods) and a peak of rare species was observed in the transition from spring to summer following the increase in seawater temperature. Turnover was particularly high in the transition between the spring and summer periods. In both hosts, turnover was higher in the small sized colonies, which harboured less diverse and less abundant assemblages that also differed from those inhabiting larger size colonies. The high levels of diversity associated with gorgonian colonies highlight the need for the conservation of this priority habitat.

  12. The assemblage of compliance in psychiatric case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodwin, Paul

    2010-08-01

    In the post-asylum era, case managers perform much of the face-to-face work of pharmaceutical compliance for people with severe and persistent mental illness. Their work demands careful orchestration of the assemblage of compliance, including the actual medications, the ideology of biopsychiatry, the division of professional labor, and certain mundane tools. Ethnographic vignettes from an Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) team show how case managers use this assemblage in their everyday routines, but also how it undercuts key elements of the original ACT mission. Reflecting its roots in the deinstitutionalization movement, the ACT model gives case managers limitless responsibilities for clients' lives, but then narrowly defines their role as the prosthetic extension of psychiatric authority. To produce compliance, case managers depend on the medication cassette, analyzed here as a human/non-human hybrid woven into their ordinary work. The medication cassette has pre-scripted uses that enlist clinicians in biopsychiatric thinking and also silently impose compliant behavior on clients. The elements in the assemblage of compliance depend on each other, but they do not form a seamless whole, as evidenced by the dilemmas and micropolitics of the clinical front-line. Theoretical notions of assemblages and technologies of compliance, drawn from science and technology studies, illuminate a core conundrum of practice in psychiatric case management.

  13. Shikarpur lithic assemblage: New questions regarding Rohri chert blade production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charusmita Gadekar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent excavations at Shikarpur, a fortified Harappan site situated near the Gulf of Kuchchh in Gujarat, Western India, brought to light a large collection of Rohri chert blades.  Chert found in the Rohri hill near Sukkur in Sindh, central Pakistan is distinctive and easily identifiable. The wide distribution of standardized Rohri chert blades is often regarded as a testimony to the Harappan efficiency in long distance trade and craft production.  The possibility of localized production of Rohri chert blades in Gujarat is often negated due to the constraints of raw-material availability.  The absence of Rohri chert working debitage from most of the sites in Gujarat, has lent support to this position. The Shikarpur Rohri blade assemblage however incorporates more than 650 blades, a large fluted blade-core and a few Rohri chert debitage.  These have led the excavators to suggest that some of the blades found at Shikarpur were locally produced from raw materials brought to the site from the Rohri hills.  Typo-technological features of the Rohri chert assemblage from Shikarpur have been analysed in this background. These along with metrical features of the assemblage are compared with Rohri chert assemblages from other major Harappan sites in the region to check the validity of the proposed ‘limited local production’.

  14. Assessing the Mess: Challenges to Assemblage Theory and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beighton, Chris

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the Deleuzian concept of "assemblage" in educational research in the context of Teacher Education (TE) for the "continuing education" or "Lifelong Learning" sector. Drawing on Deleuze's creative approach to analysis, it draws a portrait of practice which identifies problems and successes in…

  15. Demersal Assemblages on the Soft Bottoms off the Catalan-Levante Coast of the Spanish Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano García-Rodríguez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of 255 bottom trawl samples obtained in annual experimental surveys (2007–2010 along the western Mediterranean shows the existence of five well-defined demersal assemblages that follow a depth distribution: (a upper shelf assemblages, including two assemblages differentiated by the type of substrate (sand-muddy and terrigenous muddy bottoms; (b a middle shelf assemblage; (c an upper slope assemblage; (d a middle slope assemblage. Faunally, they are dominated by fish (37% of 452 total species, followed by crustaceans (22%, molluscs (17%, echinoderms (9%, and other invertebrates (15%. The assemblages identified showed major alterations on the shelf and shelf edge and less pronounced ones on the upper and middle slope. The average diversity values were more or less high, evidencing the high species richness in the western Mediterranean. The identified assemblages may facilitate future multispecies fisheries management based on an ecosystem approach.

  16. The Liana assemblage of a Congolian rainforest : diversity, structure and dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ewango Ekokinya, Corneille

    2010-01-01

    Key words: Liana assemblage, species composition, community, dynamics, canopy openness, Manniophyton fulvum, functional traits, population density, pervasive change. This study analyzes the diversity, composition, and dynamics of the liana assemblage of the Ituri rain forest in northeastern DR Con

  17. Nematode assemblages in the rhizosphere of spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) depended on fertilisation and plant growth phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette Vestergård

    2004-01-01

    rhizosphere; nitrogen and phosphorus fertilisation; nematode assemblages; plant parasites; barley......rhizosphere; nitrogen and phosphorus fertilisation; nematode assemblages; plant parasites; barley...

  18. Protocol for Monitoring Fish Assemblages in Pacific Northwest National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenkman, Samuel J.; Connolly, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    Rivers and streams that drain from Olympic, Mount Rainier, and North Cascades National Parks are among the most protected corridors in the lower 48 States, and represent some of the largest tracts of contiguous, undisturbed habitat throughout the range of several key fish species of the Pacific Northwest. These watersheds are of high regional importance as freshwater habitat sanctuaries for native fish, where habitat conditions are characterized as having little to no disturbance from development, channelization, impervious surfaces, roads, diversions, or hydroelectric projects. Fishery resources are of high ecological and cultural importance in Pacific Northwest National Parks, and significantly contribute to economically important recreational, commercial, and tribal fisheries. This protocol describes procedures to monitor trends in fish assemblages, fish abundance, and water temperature in eight rivers and five wadeable streams in Olympic National Park during summer months, and is based on 4 years of field testing. Fish assemblages link freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. They also serve as focal resources of national parks and are excellent indicators of ecological conditions of rivers and streams. Despite the vital importance of native anadromous and resident fish populations, there is no existing monitoring program for fish assemblages in the North Coast and Cascades Network. Specific monitoring objectives of this protocol are to determine seasonal and annual trends in: (1) fish species composition, (2) timing of migration of adult fish, (3) relative abundance, (4) age and size structure, (5) extent of non-native and hatchery fish, and (6) water temperature. To detect seasonal and annual trends in fish assemblages in reference sites, we rely on repeated and consistent annual sampling at each monitoring site. The general rationale for the repeated sampling of reference sites is to ensure that we account for the high interannual variability in fish

  19. Assemblage time series reveal biodiversity change but not systematic loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornelas, Maria; Gotelli, Nicholas J; McGill, Brian; Shimadzu, Hideyasu; Moyes, Faye; Sievers, Caya; Magurran, Anne E

    2014-04-18

    The extent to which biodiversity change in local assemblages contributes to global biodiversity loss is poorly understood. We analyzed 100 time series from biomes across Earth to ask how diversity within assemblages is changing through time. We quantified patterns of temporal α diversity, measured as change in local diversity, and temporal β diversity, measured as change in community composition. Contrary to our expectations, we did not detect systematic loss of α diversity. However, community composition changed systematically through time, in excess of predictions from null models. Heterogeneous rates of environmental change, species range shifts associated with climate change, and biotic homogenization may explain the different patterns of temporal α and β diversity. Monitoring and understanding change in species composition should be a conservation priority.

  20. A new Lower Triassic ichthyopterygian assemblage from Fossil Hill, Nevada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil P. Kelley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a new ichthyopterygian assemblage from Lower Triassic horizons of the Prida Formation at Fossil Hill in central Nevada. Although fragmentary, the specimens collected so far document a diverse fauna. One partial jaw exhibits isodont dentition with blunt tipped, mesiodistally compressed crowns and striated enamel. These features are shared with the Early Triassic genus Utatsusaurus known from coeval deposits in Japan and British Columbia. An additional specimen exhibits a different dentition characterized by relatively small, rounded posterior teeth resembling other Early Triassic ichthyopterygians, particularly Grippia. This Nevada assemblage marks a southward latitudinal extension for Early Triassic ichthyopterygians along the eastern margin of Panthalassa and indicates repeated trans-hemispheric dispersal events in Early Triassic ichthyopterygians.

  1. Hybrid carbon nanostructure assemblage for high performance pseudo-capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Mishra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of novel nanocomposites for pseudo-capacitors with high capacitance and energy density is the spotlight of current energy research. In the present work, hybrid carbon nanostructure assemblage of graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes has been used as carbon support to nanostructured RuO2 and polyaniline for high energy supercapacitors. Maximum specific capacitances of 110, 235 and 440 F g−1 at the voltage sweep rate of 10 mV s−1 and maximum energy densities of 7, 12.5 and 20.5 Wh kg−1 were observed for carbon assemblage and its RuO2 and polyanilne decorated nanocomposites, respectively, with 1M H2SO4 as electrolyte.

  2. Conceptualizing Autoethnography as Assemblage: Accounts of Occupational Therapy Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Denshire PhD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on theoretical work within ethnography and poststructuralism, this article discusses a conceptualization of autoethnography as assemblage. The concept of assemblage includes but goes beyond the literal bringing together of a range of heterogeneous elements in different modalities to offer different perspectives on a phenomenon. It challenges and displaces boundaries between the individual and the social through a focus on practice, which offers a new ontology of the social. These ideas are illustrated through excerpts from an autoethnographic study of an occupational therapist working with young people in a Sydney children's hospital in the mid-1980s. The article makes visible a material, relational, and affective landscape of remembered practice. Through successive displacements of the self as the primary site of experience and meaning, we seek to contribute new understandings about the potential for autoethnography to engage with professional practice as a space of multiplicity.

  3. Giardia duodenalis sub-Assemblage of animal and human origin in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversa, Donato; Otranto, Domenico; Milillo, Piermarino; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Giangaspero, Annunziata; Di Cesare, Angela; Paoletti, Barbara

    2012-12-01

    In order to evaluate infection occurrence and the potential zoonotic role of horse isolates of Giardia duodenalis, 431 individual fecal samples were genetically characterized by PCR tests -coupled sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Thirty-seven (8.6%) animals resulted infected by different Assemblage. The presence of sub-Assemblage was assessed by characterizing the β-giardin gene for 16 of the 37 positive horses. Ten isolates showed 99.6% to 100% homology with the sub-Assemblage described as B1-2 and B1-6, three Assemblage A showed 99.8% homology with sub-Assemblage A1, while one Assemblage E displayed 98.8% homology with sub-Assemblage E3. Furthermore, one isolate characterized as Assemblage A showed 99.6% homology with the sub-Assemblage B1-2 and one characterized as E was 100% identical with sub-Assemblage B1-6. These results demonstrate the presence of both animal and human sub-Assemblage of G. duodenalis in horses from Italy. Epidemiological and sanitary implications are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterizing lentic freshwater fish assemblages using multiple sampling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jesse R.; Quist, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing fish assemblages in lentic ecosystems is difficult, and multiple sampling methods are almost always necessary to gain reliable estimates of indices such as species richness. However, most research focused on lentic fish sampling methodology has targeted recreationally important species, and little to no information is available regarding the influence of multiple methods and timing (i.e., temporal variation) on characterizing entire fish assemblages. Therefore, six lakes and impoundments (48–1,557 ha surface area) were sampled seasonally with seven gear types to evaluate the combined influence of sampling methods and timing on the number of species and individuals sampled. Probabilities of detection for species indicated strong selectivities and seasonal trends that provide guidance on optimal seasons to use gears when targeting multiple species. The evaluation of species richness and number of individuals sampled using multiple gear combinations demonstrated that appreciable benefits over relatively few gears (e.g., to four) used in optimal seasons were not present. Specifically, over 90 % of the species encountered with all gear types and season combinations (N = 19) from six lakes and reservoirs were sampled with nighttime boat electrofishing in the fall and benthic trawling, modified-fyke, and mini-fyke netting during the summer. Our results indicated that the characterization of lentic fish assemblages was highly influenced by the selection of sampling gears and seasons, but did not appear to be influenced by waterbody type (i.e., natural lake, impoundment). The standardization of data collected with multiple methods and seasons to account for bias is imperative to monitoring of lentic ecosystems and will provide researchers with increased reliability in their interpretations and decisions made using information on lentic fish assemblages.

  5. Temporal variation in fish assemblage composition on a tidal flat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry L. Spach

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Annual variation in the fish assemblage characteristics on a tidal flat was studied in coastal Paraná, in southern Brazil. Fish were collected between August 1998 and July 1999, during the diurnal high tide and diurnal and nocturnal low tide of the syzygial (full moon and quadrature (waning moon tides, to characterize temporal change in assemblage composition. A total of 64,265 fish in 133 species were collected. The average number of species and individuals, biomass, species richness, diversity (mass and equitability varied significantly over time . The dissimilarity of the assemblage was greatest in August, September and October in contrast with the period from November to January, with the lowest dissimilarity. The combined action of water temperature, salinity and wind intensity had a great influence over the structure of the fish assemblage.Os peixes de uma planície de maré da praia Balneário de Pontal do Sul, Paraná, foram coletados, na preamar diurna e na baixa-mar diurna e noturna das marés de sizígia e de quadratura, visando caracterizar as mudanças temporais entre agosto de 1998 e julho de 1999. As coletas totalizaram 64.265 peixes de 133 espécies. Foram observadas diferenças significativas na captura média em número de espécies e de peixes, peso total e nos índices de riqueza, diversidade (H' peso e eqüitatividade entre os meses de coleta. A dissimilaridade da ictiofauna foi maior entre os meses de agosto, setembro e outubro em comparação com o período de novembro a janeiro. A ação combinada da temperatura da água, salinidade e intensidade do vento, influenciaram mais sobre a estrutura da assembléia de peixes.

  6. A common tendency for phylogenetic overdispersion in mammalian assemblages

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Natalie; RODRIGUEZ, JESUS; Purvis, Andy

    2008-01-01

    PUBLISHED Competition has long been proposed as an important force in structuring mammalian communities. Although early work recognised that competition has a phylogenetic dimension, only with recent increases in the availability of phylogenies have true phylogenetic investigations of mammalian community structure become possible. We test whether the phylogenetic structure of 142 assemblages from three mammalian clades (New World monkeys, North American ground squirrels and Australasian po...

  7. Historic changes in fish assemblage structure in midwestern nonwadeable rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Timothy P.; Quist, Michael C.; Pierce, Clay L.

    2014-01-01

    Historical change in fish assemblage structure was evaluated in the mainstems of the Des Moines, Iowa, Cedar, Wapsipinicon, and Maquoketa rivers, in Iowa. Fish occurrence data were compared in each river between historical and recent time periods to characterize temporal changes among 126 species distributions and assess spatiotemporal patterns in faunal similarity. A resampling procedure was used to estimate species occurrences in rivers during each assessment period and changes in species occurrence were summarized. Spatiotemporal shifts in species composition were analyzed at the river and river section scale using cluster analysis, pairwise Jaccard's dissimilarities, and analysis of multivariate beta dispersion. The majority of species exhibited either increases or declines in distribution in all rivers with the exception of several “unknown” or inconclusive trends exhibited by species in the Maquoketa River. Cluster analysis identified temporal patterns of similarity among fish assemblages in the Des Moines, Cedar, and Iowa rivers within the historical and recent assessment period indicating a significant change in species composition. Prominent declines of backwater species with phytophilic spawning strategies contributed to assemblage changes occurring across river systems.

  8. Correspondence between zooplankton assemblages and the Estuary Environment Classification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena-Moya, Paloma; Duggan, Ian C.

    2017-01-01

    We tested whether variability in zooplankton assemblages was consistent with the categories of estuarine environments proposed by the 'Estuary Environment Classification' system (EEC) (Hume et al., 2007) across a variety of North Island, New Zealand, estuaries. The EEC classifies estuaries in to eight categories (A to F) based primarily on a combination of three abiotic controlling factors: ocean forcing, river forcing and basin morphometry. Additionally, we tested whether Remane's curve, which predicts higher diversities of benthic macrofauna and high and low salinities, can be applied to zooplankton assemblages. We focused on three of the eight EEC categories (B, D and F), which covered the range of estuaries with river inputs dominating (B) to ocean influence dominating (F). Additionally, we included samples from river (FW) and sea (MW) to encompass the entire salinity range. Zooplankton assemblages varied across the categories examined in accordance with a salinity gradient predicted by the EEC. Three groups of zooplankton were distinguishable: the first formed by the most freshwater categories, FW and B, and dominated by rotifers (primarily Bdelloidea) and estuarine copepods (Gladioferans pectinatus), a second group formed by categories D and F, of intermediate salinity, dominated by copepods (Euterpina acutifrons), and a final group including the purely marine category MW and dominated also by E. acutifrons along with other marine taxa. Zooplankton diversity responded to the salinity gradient in a manner expected from Remane's curve. The results of this study support others which have shown salinity to be the main factor driving zooplankton community composition and diversity.

  9. Effects of a brine discharge over soft bottom Polychaeta assemblage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilar-Ruso, Yoana del [Dpto. de Ciencias del Mar y Biologia Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, Campus de San Vicente del Raspeig, Ap. 99, E-03080, Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: yoana.delpilar@ua.es; Ossa-Carretero, Jose Antonio de la; Gimenez-Casalduero, Francisca; Sanchez-Lizaso, Jose Luis [Dpto. de Ciencias del Mar y Biologia Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, Campus de San Vicente del Raspeig, Ap. 99, E-03080, Alicante (Spain)

    2008-11-15

    Desalination is a growing activity that has introduced a new impact, brine discharge, which may affect benthic communities. Although the role of polychaetes as indicators to assess organic pollution is well known, their tolerance to salinity changes has not been examined to such a great extent. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of brine discharge over soft bottom polychaete assemblage along the Alicante coast (Southeast Spain) over a two year period. Changes in the polychaete assemblage was analysed using univariate and multivariate techniques. We compared a transect in front of the discharge with two controls. At each transect we sampled at three depths (4, 10 and 15 m) during winter and summer. We have observed different sensitivity of polychaete families to brine discharges, Ampharetidae being the most sensitive, followed by Nephtyidae and Spionidae. Syllidae and Capitellidae showed some resistance initially, while Paraonidae proved to be a tolerant family. - The Polychaete assemblage is affected by the brine discharge of the Alicante desalination plant and we detect different sensitivity levels in polychaete families to brine impact.

  10. PCBs in the fish assemblage of a southern European estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Joana; Pato, Pedro; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando C.; Pardal, Miguel A.

    2013-02-01

    The Mondego estuary fish assemblage was studied for the accumulation of PCBs. Three sampling stations were visited along an estuarine salinity gradient, and, in total, 15 species were collected. Analysis of PCBs revealed no significant differences among the sampling stations, although differences were observed among the fish assemblages. Fish assemblages could be divided into three groups. The first group comprised those with higher concentration (more than 10 ng g- 1, dw), included the species Gobius niger, Sardina pilchardus, Anguilla anguilla, Pomatoschistus microps, Chelidonichthys lucerna and Liza ramada; the second group with medium concentration (5-10 ng g- 1, dw), included the species Pomatoschistus minutus, Dicentrarchus labrax, Atherina presbyter, Chelon labrosus, Diplodus vulgaris, Platichthys flesus and Cilata mustela; and a third group with low concentration (less than 5 ng g- 1, dw), included the species Solea solea and Callionymus lyra. A positive correlation was found between lipid content and PCB concentrations. To evaluate the influence of the residence time of species on the accumulation of PCBs, species were divided into two groups: species that spend more than 3 years in the estuary, and species that spend less than 3 years in the estuary. Species that spend more than 3 years in the estuary presented higher concentrations than species that spend less than 3 years in the estuary. CBs 138 and 153 had higher concentration, and tended to increase with time spent in the estuary.

  11. Temporal changes of a macrobenthic assemblage in harsh lagoon sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Como, Serena; Magni, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    An opportunistic macrobenthic assemblage was studied from 2001 to 2003 in a central area of the Cabras lagoon (western Sardinia, Italy), known to be affected by environmental disturbances (i.e. organic over-enrichment of sediments, and episodic events of hypoxia/anoxia and sulphide development). We identified recurrent seasonal changes in this macrobenthic assemblage, with a general impoverishment in summer and a recovery in winter/spring. The nereids Neanthes succinea and Hediste diversicolor were found to replace the spionid Polydora ciliata as the most dominant species in the summer for 3 consecutive years. Occasional, unsynchronized appearances of small-sized deposit feeders, such as Tubificidae, Capitella cf. capitata, chironomid larvae and Hydrobia spp., were observed in winter/spring. We suggest that these changes are driven by the interplay of environmental conditions (worse in summer) with numerous biotic factors. This includes different tolerance levels of taxa to low oxygen concentrations and sulphides, variability in larval supply and post-larval transport, as well as competition for space and food between and within different functional groups, and facilitation through animal bioturbation and sediment reoxidation. A conceptual model is proposed to demonstrate how environmental conditions and biotic interactions may control the benthic assemblage in such a harsh lagoon environment.

  12. Macromolecular Assemblage in the Design of a Synthetic AIDS Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defoort, Jean-Philippe; Nardelli, Bernardetta; Huang, Wolin; Ho, David D.; Tam, James P.

    1992-05-01

    We describe a peptide vaccine model based on the mimicry of surface coat protein of a pathogen. This model used a macromolecular assemblage approach to amplify peptide antigens in liposomes or micelles. The key components of the model consisted of an oligomeric lysine scaffolding to amplify peptide antigens covalently 4-fold and a lipophilic membrane-anchoring group to further amplify noncovalently the antigens many-fold in liposomal or micellar form. A peptide antigen derived from the third variable domain of glycoprotein gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), consisting of neutralizing, T-helper, and T-cytotoxic epitopes, was used in a macromolecular assemblage model (HIV-1 linear peptide amino acid sequence 308-331 in a tetravalent multiple antigen peptide system linked to tripalmitoyl-S-glycerylcysteine). The latter complex, in liposome or micelle, was used to immunize mice and guinea pigs without any adjuvant and found to induce gp120-specific antibodies that neutralize virus infectivity in vitro, elicit cytokine production, and prime CD8^+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes in vivo. Our results show that the macromolecular assemblage approach bears immunological mimicry of the gp120 of HIV virus and may lead to useful vaccines against HIV infection.

  13. Giardia Assemblages A and B in Diarrheic Patients: A Comparative Study in Egyptian Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Basha, Noussa R; Zaki, Mayssa M; Hassanin, Omayma M; Rehan, Mohamed K; Omran, Dalia

    2016-02-01

    Giardia duodenalis is considered the most common intestinal parasite in humans worldwide. Children are especially affected, with more severe consequences than adults. The present study was designed to determine the distribution of assemblages A and B Giardia infection in children and adults, with the use of light microscopy and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) as diagnostic procedures, and to investigate its associations with clinical and epidemiological data collected from children and adult groups. This cross-sectional study was conducted from October 2012 to October 2013 by collecting fecal samples from 200 children and 200 adults complaining of diarrhea. Samples were subjected to parasitological examination by direct wet smear and formol-ether methods. Genotyping of G. doudenalis samples was conducted by PCR-RFLP analysis. Giardia duodenalis infection caused by assemblages A and B was identified in 60 samples, 34 from children and 26 from adults. Assemblage B was detected in 38 patients (63.34%), and assemblage A was detected in 22 patients (36.66%). Assemblage A was significantly more frequent in children with age range 2-8 yr, and assemblage B was higher in children with age range 6-16 yr old. Diarrhea frequency/day and recurrences per month affected patients infected with assemblage A (P value Giardia assemblages A and B were identified in children and adults, assemblage A infected younger children more frequently and was more closely related to severe clinical manifestations than assemblage B.

  14. The Marica Slump: anatomy of a Maastrichtian gravity mass flow deposit, Santos Basin; O Escorregamento Marica: anatomia de um deposito de fluxo gravitacional de massa do Maastrichtiano, Bacia de Santos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlotto, Marco Antonio; Rodrigues, Luiz Felipe [Petrobras E e P, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao. Interpretacao e Avaliacao das Bacias da Costa Sul], Emails: carlotto@petrobras.com.br, lfrodrigues@petrobras.com.br

    2009-11-15

    A Maastrichtian gravitational mass transport complex (MTC) in the northern sector of the Santos Basin is revealed by tri dimensional deep water seismic data. The deposition of the Marica MTC was conditioned by elongated depressions controlled by N-S salt diapirs. An extensive W-E oriented salt wall to the south of the Marica MTC worked as a barrier to the gravitational flow originated on the north-northeast shelf. Seismic sections, structural maps and seismic attributes (e.g. edge detection) allowed the identification of the main constitutive elements of proximal (proximal escarpments), translational (top and basal surfaces, lateral escarpments, coherent blocks) and distal domains (ramp and frontal thrusts). Probably, the main trigger mechanism was the sedimentary overburden caused by high sedimentary rates related to the deltaic sedimentation on the shelf. Also, gas escape is considered as a possible secondary trigger mechanism. The catastrophic character of the mass flow could be responsible for provoking later gravitational flows resulting in the deposition of turbidity sandstones that overlay the Marica MTC. (author)

  15. Temporal Assemblage Turnovers of Foraminiferal Communities from the Caribbean, United Kingdom and Mediterranean regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costelloe, Ashleigh; Wilson, Brent

    2016-04-01

    Temporal assemblage turnovers of intertidal foraminiferal communities were quantitatively determined using the assemblage turnover index (ATI), and contributing species were identified using the conditioned on-boundary index (CoBI). The live foraminiferal communities were examined as metacommunities (all stations) and assemblages (groups of stations defined by cluster analysis) over one and two year periods at Caroni Swamp, Claxton Bay (E Trinidad), Cowpen Marsh (NE England) and Bay of Cádiz (SW Spain). Major assemblage turnovers (when ATI > x + σ) of the Caroni Swamp metacommunity and assemblages coincided with seasonal changes from dry to wet conditions in 2011 and 2012. The abundant species (Ammonia tepida, Ammotium salsum, Arenoparella mexicana, Trochammina advena, Trochammina laevigata and Trochammina inflata) contributed the most to assemblage turnovers but showed no preference to either dry or wet conditions. At Claxton Bay major assemblage turnovers of the metacommunity and mid assemblage coincided with seasonal change and calcareous species (A. tepida and Triloculina oblonga) increased during wet conditions and decreased during dry conditions, while agglutinated species (T. advena and A. salsum) fluctuated oppositely. At Cowpen Marsh major assemblage turnovers of the metacommunity coincided with the start of summer and winter. Assemblages at higher elevations (mainly Jadammina macrescens and Haplophragmoides spp.) were responsible for the summer turnover, while the winter turnover was led by the assemblage at lower elevations (mainly Haynesina germanica, Elphidium earlandi, Elphidium williamsoni, Elphidium excavatum and Quinqueloculina spp.). At Bay of Cádiz, the foraminiferal assemblage at a tidal height of 1.5 to 1.7 m above the hydrographic zero was examined within three separate plots, and the seasonal occurrence of assemblage turnovers differed between plots. Thus, replicate samples and multiple plots may be necessary to overcome spatial

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL OF NANNOPLANKTON AND FORAMINIFERA ASSEMBLAGES IN MADURA WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Isnaniawardhani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nannoplankton is widely used for determining age of sediments following the other microorganism foraminifera since the late 1960s; and it was started being used for marine geography study in the year of 1984. This topic interests to be done in Indonesia as one of the tropic region. The research covered a study about environment using nannoplankton and it is compared with the same study using foraminifera. Methods of the study include: (1 collecting secondary data and samples; (2 collecting field data record; (3 laboratory analyses upon sediment samples to determine the content of nannoplankton and foraminifera (micropaleontology analyses, the texture and composition of minerals (by means of grain size, petrology megascopic and microscopic analyses (4 intergrating all of the analyses result. Madura waters can be divided into four zones, among all : (I inner shelf (water depth less than 30 m in Madura Strait, (II inner shelf in open marine north of Madura, (III outer shelf (water depth 30 to 80 m in Madura Strait, and (IV outer shelf in open marine north of Madura. Inner shelf in the Madura Strait (Zone I is characterized by less than 1% sediment of nannoplankton (are made up of Gephyrocapsa oceanica; rare assemblages of benthic foraminifera only (Ammonia spp., arenaceous carbonate test taxa such as : Ammobaculites spp., Textularia agglutinans, Haplophragmoides spp., and milliolidae. Inner shelf open marine north of Madura (Zone II yielded few nannoplankton assemblages, dominated by Gephyrocapsa oceanica with low number of Emiliania huxleyi, Helicosphaera carteri, H. pavimentum, H. walichii and Pontosphaera spp; common foraminifera assemblages consist of rare planktic Globigerinoides ruber, G. trilobus sacculiferus, G. conglobatus with one or two dominant benthic (Elphidium spp, Ammonia spp., Pseudorotalia spp., Asterorotalia spp.. Outer shelf of Madura Strait (Zone III assigned by common nannoplankton assemblages, dominated by Gephyrocapsa

  17. Taming Distraction: The Second Screen Assemblage, Television and the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Stauff

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that television’s resilience in the current media landscape can best be understood by analyzing its role in a broader quest to organize attention across different media. For quite a while, the mobile phone was considered to be a disturbance both for watching television and for classroom teaching. In recent years, however, strategies have been developed to turn the second screen’s distractive potential into a source for intensified, personalized and social attention. This has consequences for television’s position in a multimedia assemblage: television’s alleged specificities (e.g. liveness become mouldable features, which are selectively applied to guide the attention of users across different devices and platforms. Television does not end, but some of its traditional features do only persist because of its strategic complementarity with other media; others are re-adapted by new technologies thereby spreading televisual modes of attention across multiple screens. The article delineates the historical development of simultaneous media use as a ‘problematization’—from alternating (and competitive media use to multitasking and finally complementary use of different media. Additionally, it shows how similar strategies of managing attention are applied in the ‘digital classroom’. While deliberately avoiding to pin down, what television is, the analysis of the problem of attention allows for tracing how old and new media features are constantly reshuffled. This article combines three arguments: (1 the second screen is conceived of as both a danger to attention and a tool to manage attention. (2 To organize attention, the second screen assemblage modulates the specific qualities of television and all the other devices involved. (3 While being a fragile and often inconsistent assemblage, the second screen spreads its dynamics—and especially the problem of attention—far beyond television, e.g. into the realm of

  18. Variation in Symbiodinium ITS2 Sequence Assemblages among Coral Colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stat, Michael; Bird, Christopher E.; Pochon, Xavier; Chasqui, Luis; Chauka, Leonard J.; Concepcion, Gregory T.; Logan, Dan; Takabayashi, Misaki; Toonen, Robert J.; Gates, Ruth D.

    2011-01-01

    Endosymbiotic dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium are fundamentally important to the biology of scleractinian corals, as well as to a variety of other marine organisms. The genus Symbiodinium is genetically and functionally diverse and the taxonomic nature of the union between Symbiodinium and corals is implicated as a key trait determining the environmental tolerance of the symbiosis. Surprisingly, the question of how Symbiodinium diversity partitions within a species across spatial scales of meters to kilometers has received little attention, but is important to understanding the intrinsic biological scope of a given coral population and adaptations to the local environment. Here we address this gap by describing the Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence assemblages recovered from colonies of the reef building coral Montipora capitata sampled across Kāne'ohe Bay, Hawai'i. A total of 52 corals were sampled in a nested design of Coral Colony(Site(Region)) reflecting spatial scales of meters to kilometers. A diversity of Symbiodinium ITS2 sequences was recovered with the majority of variance partitioning at the level of the Coral Colony. To confirm this result, the Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence diversity in six M. capitata colonies were analyzed in much greater depth with 35 to 55 clones per colony. The ITS2 sequences and quantitative composition recovered from these colonies varied significantly, indicating that each coral hosted a different assemblage of Symbiodinium. The diversity of Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence assemblages retrieved from individual colonies of M. capitata here highlights the problems inherent in interpreting multi-copy and intra-genomically variable molecular markers, and serves as a context for discussing the utility and biological relevance of assigning species names based on Symbiodinium ITS2 genotyping. PMID:21246044

  19. Variation in Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence assemblages among coral colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Stat

    Full Text Available Endosymbiotic dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium are fundamentally important to the biology of scleractinian corals, as well as to a variety of other marine organisms. The genus Symbiodinium is genetically and functionally diverse and the taxonomic nature of the union between Symbiodinium and corals is implicated as a key trait determining the environmental tolerance of the symbiosis. Surprisingly, the question of how Symbiodinium diversity partitions within a species across spatial scales of meters to kilometers has received little attention, but is important to understanding the intrinsic biological scope of a given coral population and adaptations to the local environment. Here we address this gap by describing the Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence assemblages recovered from colonies of the reef building coral Montipora capitata sampled across Kāne'ohe Bay, Hawai'i. A total of 52 corals were sampled in a nested design of Coral Colony(Site(Region reflecting spatial scales of meters to kilometers. A diversity of Symbiodinium ITS2 sequences was recovered with the majority of variance partitioning at the level of the Coral Colony. To confirm this result, the Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence diversity in six M. capitata colonies were analyzed in much greater depth with 35 to 55 clones per colony. The ITS2 sequences and quantitative composition recovered from these colonies varied significantly, indicating that each coral hosted a different assemblage of Symbiodinium. The diversity of Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence assemblages retrieved from individual colonies of M. capitata here highlights the problems inherent in interpreting multi-copy and intra-genomically variable molecular markers, and serves as a context for discussing the utility and biological relevance of assigning species names based on Symbiodinium ITS2 genotyping.

  20. Variation in Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence assemblages among coral colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stat, Michael; Bird, Christopher E; Pochon, Xavier; Chasqui, Luis; Chauka, Leonard J; Concepcion, Gregory T; Logan, Dan; Takabayashi, Misaki; Toonen, Robert J; Gates, Ruth D

    2011-01-05

    Endosymbiotic dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium are fundamentally important to the biology of scleractinian corals, as well as to a variety of other marine organisms. The genus Symbiodinium is genetically and functionally diverse and the taxonomic nature of the union between Symbiodinium and corals is implicated as a key trait determining the environmental tolerance of the symbiosis. Surprisingly, the question of how Symbiodinium diversity partitions within a species across spatial scales of meters to kilometers has received little attention, but is important to understanding the intrinsic biological scope of a given coral population and adaptations to the local environment. Here we address this gap by describing the Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence assemblages recovered from colonies of the reef building coral Montipora capitata sampled across Kāne'ohe Bay, Hawai'i. A total of 52 corals were sampled in a nested design of Coral Colony(Site(Region)) reflecting spatial scales of meters to kilometers. A diversity of Symbiodinium ITS2 sequences was recovered with the majority of variance partitioning at the level of the Coral Colony. To confirm this result, the Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence diversity in six M. capitata colonies were analyzed in much greater depth with 35 to 55 clones per colony. The ITS2 sequences and quantitative composition recovered from these colonies varied significantly, indicating that each coral hosted a different assemblage of Symbiodinium. The diversity of Symbiodinium ITS2 sequence assemblages retrieved from individual colonies of M. capitata here highlights the problems inherent in interpreting multi-copy and intra-genomically variable molecular markers, and serves as a context for discussing the utility and biological relevance of assigning species names based on Symbiodinium ITS2 genotyping.

  1. Taming Distraction: The Second Screen Assemblage, Television and the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Stauff

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that television’s resilience in the current media landscape can best be understood by analyzing its role in a broader quest to organize attention across different media. For quite a while, the mobile phone was considered to be a disturbance both for watching television and for classroom teaching. In recent years, however, strategies have been developed to turn the second screen’s distractive potential into a source for intensified, personalized and social attention. This has consequences for television’s position in a multimedia assemblage: television’s alleged specificities (e.g. liveness become mouldable features, which are selectively applied to guide the attention of users across different devices and platforms. Television does not end, but some of its traditional features do only persist because of its strategic complementarity with other media; others are re-adapted by new technologies thereby spreading televisual modes of attention across multiple screens. The article delineates the historical development of simultaneous media use as a ‘problematization’—from alternating (and competitive media use to multitasking and finally complementary use of different media. Additionally, it shows how similar strategies of managing attention are applied in the ‘digital classroom’. While deliberately avoiding to pin down, what television is, the analysis of the problem of attention allows for tracing how old and new media features are constantly reshuffled. This article combines three arguments: (1 the second screen is conceived of as both a danger to attention and a tool to manage attention. (2 To organize attention, the second screen assemblage modulates the specific qualities of television and all the other devices involved. (3 While being a fragile and often inconsistent assemblage, the second screen spreads its dynamics—and especially the problem of attention—far beyond television, e.g. into the realm of

  2. Mnemiopsis leidyi Gut Harbors Seasonally Variant and Commensal Microbial Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariita, R. M.; Hossain, M. J.; Liles, M. R.; Moss, A.

    2016-02-01

    Studies have shown that with widespread use of antibiotics in human and domestic animal populations, antibiotic resistance becomes increasingly common in the environment. Estuaries provide ideal conditions for acquisition and dissemination of drug resistance genes because they serve as sinks for pollution. This study aimed to identify M. leidyi microbial diversity and richness and their potential to act as vectors for antibiotic resistance determinants (ARDs). M. leidyi, although native to study area are highly invasive. Metagenomic analyses indicate that there are temporal variations of bacterioplankton assemblages in M. leidyi gut. Overall, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria are the most abundant phyla. Despite the temporal dynamics in the microbial assemblages in M. leidyi gut, they seem to retain Propionibacterium acnes (gut microbiota in some insects) and select proteobacteria across all seasons. The results contradict previous studies that suggest that M. leidyi does not have constant a microbiota, but only seasonally variant microbial assemblages. Here we reveal the presence of M. leidyi gut ARDs in winter and summer, probably because of the ctenophores' positive geotaxis during rough surface conditions. Genes responsible for resistance to fluoroquinolones, multidrug resistance efflux pumps, mercuric reductase, copper homeostasis and blaR1 genes were observed. This is the first study to demonstrate that M. leidyi harbors constant microbiota and provides a baseline for understanding M. leidyi gut microbial and ARDs ecology. It also suggests that M. leidyi bacterial taxonomic and functional dynamics is influenced by season. Funding: Alabama EPSCoR GRSP fellowship, AU-CMB fellowship, NSF EPS-1158862, USDA-Hatch 370225-310100 (AGM, ML).

  3. Habitat relationships with fish assemblages in minimally disturbed Great Plains regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, John R.; Paukert, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of local environmental influences on the structure of fish assemblages were evaluated from 159 sites in two regions of the Great Plains with limited anthropogenic disturbance. These regions offered an opportunity to evaluate the structure and variation of streams and fish assemblages within the Great Plains. We used canonical correspondence analyses to determine the influence of environmental conditions on species abundances, species occurrences and assemblage characteristics. Analysis of regions separately indicated that similar environmental factors structured streams and fish assemblages, despite differences in environmental conditions and species composition between regions. Variance in fish abundance and assemblage characteristics from both regions was best explained by metrics of stream size and associated metrics (width, depth, conductivity and instream cover). Our results provide a framework and reference for conditions and assemblage structure in North American prairie streams.

  4. Spatial and temporal variability of mobile macro-invertebrate assemblages associated to coralligenous habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. BEDINI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to investigate patterns of spatial and temporal variability of mobile macroinvertebrate assemblages associated to coralligenous habitat. A multi-factorial sampling design was used to test the hypotheses that the structure of assemblages and their spatial and temporal variability changed in relation to substrate inclination. Moreover, macroalgae and sessile macro-invertebrates were also investigated in order to detect eventual relationship between sessile and mobile assemblages. A total of 236 mobile macro-invertebrate taxa were identified, among them 2 Platyhelminthes, 4 Sipuncula, 6 Nemertea, 27 Mollusca, 86 Annelida, 103 Arthropoda, 8 Echinodermata. Results of the study showed that mobile macro-invertebrate assemblages of coralligenous habitat were little influenced by the inclination of substrate and by the morphology of sessile organisms, as patterns of variation were different between the two assemblages. Mobile macro-invertebrate assemblages changed among sampling dates within one year period and they showed high variability at the spatial scale examined.

  5. Unbiased Cultural Transmission in Time-Averaged Archaeological Assemblages

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Unbiased models are foundational in the archaeological study of cultural transmission. Applications have as- sumed that archaeological data represent synchronic samples, despite the accretional nature of the archaeological record. I document the circumstances under which time-averaging alters the distribution of model predictions. Richness is inflated in long-duration assemblages, and evenness is "flattened" compared to unaveraged samples. Tests of neutrality, employed to differentiate biased and unbiased models, suffer serious problems with Type I error under time-averaging. Finally, the time-scale over which time-averaging alters predictions is determined by the mean trait lifetime, providing a way to evaluate the impact of these effects upon archaeological samples.

  6. The succession of late Palaeozoic and Triassic plant assemblages of eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xingxue, Li; Xiuyuan, Wu

    This is a study dealing with the succession of the megafloras or plant assemblages of China's eastern part, ranging from the early Devonian to later Triassic. The plant assemblages in ascending order are as follows: 1. In the three floras formerly recognized for the early, middle and late Devonian, the latter two are here revised as the Protolepidodendron flora and the Leptophloeum-Archaeopteris flora, respectively. 2. Since the two-fold system of the Carboniferous has been currently accepted in China and the mid-Carboniferous boundary in NW China is drawn at the top of the Tsingyuan Formation (s.s.), the latest plant assemblage of the Lower Carboniferous is better named the Eleutherophyllum waldenburgense-Linopteris densissima-Pecopteris aspera Assemblage and its corresponding plant assemblage in SE China being tentatively named the Paripteris gigantea-Karinopteris acuta f. obtusa Assemblage. Moreover, recent studies on the Penchi flora of north China reveal that some typical Cathaysian elements, e.g. Lepidodendron posthumii, Tingia spp., occurred in the Penchi Formation, of which the plant assemblage is revised as the Paripteris gigantea-Linopteris neuropteroides-Conchophyllum richthofeni Assemblage, known probably as the first assemblage assigned to the early Cathaysian flora in east Asia. 3. The latest Permian (Tartarian) of north China is represented by the Ullmannia bronnii-Yuania magnifolia Assemblage based on recent studies of the flora of the Shihchienfeng (Sunjiagou) Formation. 4. Recent studies on the early Triassic flora in north China disclose that the flora may be named the Pleuromeia flora, which can be subdivided into the early Triassic Pl. jiaochengensis assemblage and the late early Triassic Pl. sternbergii Assemblage. In addition, problems about the correlation for some of the representative formations and their palaeophytogeographical regions are also discussed.

  7. Differences in stability of seed-associated microbial assemblages in response to invasion by phytopathogenic microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Samir Rezki; Claire Campion; Beatrice Iacomi-Vasilescu; Anne Preveaux; Youness Toualbia; Sophie Bonneau; Martial Briand; Emmanuelle Laurent; Gilles Hunault; Philippe Simoneau; Marie-Agnès Jacques; Matthieu Barret

    2016-01-01

    Seeds are involved in the vertical transmission of microorganisms from one plant generation to another and consequently act as reservoirs for the plant microbiota. However, little is known about the structure of seed-associated microbial assemblages and the regulators of assemblage structure. In this work, we have assessed the response of seed associated microbial assemblages of Raphanus sativus to invading phytopathogenic agents, the bacterial strain Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xc...

  8. Influential environmental gradients and spatiotemporal patterns of fish assemblages in the unimpounded Upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barko, V.A.; Palmer, M.W.; Herzog, D.P.; Ickes, B.S.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated variation of fish assemblages in response to environmental factors using Long Term Resource Monitoring Program data. Data were collected from 1993 to 2000 from five physical habitats in the unimpounded upper Mississippi River. We captured 89 species composing 18 families. Of these, 26% were fluvial specialists, 25% were fluvial dependent and 49% were generalists. The numerically dominant component of the adult fish assemblage (species accounting for >10% of total catch) accounted for 50% of the assemblage and was comprised of only three species: gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum; 25%), common carp (Cyprinus carpio, 15%) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, 10%). The dominant component of the YOY fish assemblage was comprised of only two species, which accounted for 76% of the total catch: freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens; 39%) and gizzard shad (37%). We used a cross-validation multivariate approach to explore how adult and young-of-the-year (YOY) assemblages varied with respect. to physical habitat and environmental gradients. Furthermore, we were interested how the fish assemblages changed over time. Partial canonical correspondence analyses (pCCA) demonstrated significant effects of physical habitats. Such effects differed between young-of-the-year and adult fishes. The four main environmental gradients influencing overall assemblage structure for both age groups were river elevation, water velocity, conductivity, and depth of gear deployment. Morisita's index revealed similar adult assemblage structure over time. However, the YOY assemblage present in 1995 was dissimilar from assemblages present during the other years. We speculate this is a lag effect from the backwater spawning episodes (floodpulse) that occurred with the 500-y flood in 1993. Shannon-Weiner diversity and Camargo's evenness indices were low, but stable across years for the adult assemblage, but varied across years for the YOY assemblage.

  9. Temporal changes in taxonomic and functional diversity of fish assemblages downstream from mountaintop mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Chambers, Douglas B.

    2014-01-01

    Mountaintop mining (MTM) affects chemical, physical, and hydrological properties of receiving streams, but the long-term consequences for fish-assemblage structure and function are poorly understood. We sampled stream fish assemblages using electrofishing techniques in MTM exposure sites and reference sites within the Guyandotte River basin, USA, during 2010–2011. We calculated indices of taxonomic diversity (species richness, abundance, Shannon diversity) and functional diversity (functional richness, functional evenness, functional divergence) to compare exposure and reference assemblages between seasons (spring and autumn) and across years (1999–2011). We based temporal comparisons on 2 sites that were sampled during 1999–2001 by Stauffer and Ferreri (2002). Exposure assemblages had lower taxonomic and functional diversity than reference assemblages or simulated assemblages that accounted for random variation. Differences in taxonomic composition between reference and exposure assemblages were associated with conductivity and aqueous Se concentrations. Exposure assemblages had fewer species, lower abundances, and less biomass than reference assemblages across years and seasons. Green Sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus) and Creek Chub (Semotilus atromaculatus) became numerically dominant in exposure assemblages over time because of their persistence and losses of other taxa. In contrast, species richness increased over time in reference assemblages, a result that may indicate recovery from drought. Mean individual biomass increased as fish density decreased and most obligate invertivores were apparently extirpated at MTM exposure sites. Effects of MTM were not related to physical-habitat conditions but were associated with water-quality variables, which may limit quality and availability of benthic macroinvertebrate prey. Simulations revealed effects of MTM that could not be attributed to random variation in fish assemblage structure.

  10. Population-based analyses of Giardia duodenalis is consistent with the clonal assemblage structure

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Giardia duodenalis is a common protozoan parasite of humans and animals. Genetic characterization of single loci indicates the existence of eight groups called assemblages, which differ in their host distribution. Molecular analyses challenged the idea that G. duodenalis is a strictly clonal diplomonad by providing evidence of recombination within and between assemblages. Particularly, inter-assemblage recombination events would complicate the interpretation of multi-locus...

  11. Seasonal dynamics of fish assemblages on breakwaters and natural rocky reefs in a temperate estuary: consistent assemblage differences driven by sub-adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Ashley M; Booth, David J

    2013-01-01

    Development of infrastructure around cities is rapidly increasing the amount of artificial substrate (termed artificial reef, 'AR') in coastal marine habitats. However, effects of ARs on marine communities remain unknown, because it is unclear whether ARs can maintain similar communities to natural reefs. We investigated whether well-established (> 30 years old) breakwaters could consistently approximate fish assemblages on interspersed rocky reefs in a temperate estuary over 6 consecutive seasons using regular visual surveys between June 2009 (winter) and November 2010 (spring). We examined whether assemblage differences between reef types were driven by differences in juvenile recruitment, or were related to differences in older life-stages. Assemblages on both reef types were dominated by juveniles (61% of individuals) and sub-adults (34% of individuals). Seasonal fluctuations in assemblage parameters (species richness, diversity, sub-adult abundance) were similar between reef types, and levels of species diversity and assemblage composition were generally comparable. However, abundance and species richness were consistently higher (1.9-7.6 and 1.3-2.6 times, respectively) on breakwaters. These assemblage differences could not be explained by differences in juvenile recruitment, with seasonal patterns of recruitment and juvenile species found to be similar between reef types. In contrast, abundances of sub-adults were consistently higher (1.1-12 times) at breakwaters, and assemblage differences appeared to be driven by this life-stage. Our results indicate that breakwaters in temperate estuaries are capable of supporting abundant and diverse fish assemblages with similar recruitment process to natural reefs. However, breakwaters may not approximate all aspects of natural assemblage structure, with differences maintained by a single-life stage in some cases.

  12. Effects of hydrologic connectivity on aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages in different marsh types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Ryong; King, Sammy L.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrologic connectivity can be an important driver of aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Its effects on aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages in coastal marshes, however, are relatively poorly studied. We evaluated the effects of lateral hydrologic connectivity (permanently connected ponds: PCPs; temporary connected ponds: TCPs), and other environmental variables on aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages and functional feeding groups (FFGs) in freshwater, brackish, and saline marshes in Louisiana, USA. We hypothesized that (1) aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages in PCPs would have higher assemblage metric values (density, biomass, Shannon-Wiener diversity) than TCPs and (2) the density and proportional abundance of certain FFGs (i.e. scrapers, shredders, and collectors) would be greater in freshwater marsh than brackish and saline marshes. The data in our study only partially supported our first hypothesis: while freshwater marsh PCPs had higher density and biomass than TCPs, assemblage metric values in saline TCPs were greater than saline PCPs. In freshwater TCPs, long duration of isolation limited access of macroinvertebrates from adjacent water bodies, which may have reduced assemblage metric values. However, the relatively short duration of isolation in saline TCPs provided more stable or similar habitat conditions, facilitating higher assemblage metric values. As predicted by our second hypothesis, freshwater PCPs and TCPs supported a greater density of scrapers, shredders, and collectors than brackish and saline ponds. Aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages seem to be structured by individual taxa responses to salinity as well as pond habitat attributes.

  13. Effects of reef proximity on the structure of fish assemblages of unconsolidated substrata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur L Schultz

    Full Text Available Fish assemblages of unconsolidated sedimentary habitats on continental shelves are poorly described when compared to those of hard substrata. This lack of data restricts the objective management of these extensive benthic habitats. In the context of protecting representative areas of all community types, one important question is the nature of the transition from reefal to sedimentary fish assemblages. We addressed this question using Baited Remote Underwater Videos (BRUVs to assess fish assemblages of sedimentary habitats at six distances from rocky reefs (0, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 m at four sites in subtropical eastern Australia. Distance from reef was important in determining fish assemblage structure, and there was no overlap between reef sites and sedimentary sites 400 m from reef. While there was a gradient in assemblage structure at intermediate distances, this was not consistent across sites. All sites, however, supported a mixed 'halo' assemblage comprising both reef and sediment species at sampling stations close to reef. BRUVs used in conjunction with high-resolution bathymetric and backscatter spatial data can resolve differences in assemblage structure at small spatial scales (10s to 100s of metres, and has further application in unconsolidated habitats. Unless a 'reef halo' assemblage is being examined, a minimum of 200 m but preferably 400 m distance from any hard substrate is recommended when designing broader-scale assessments of fish assemblages of sedimentary habitats.

  14. Macroalgal assemblages of disturbed coastal detritic bottoms subject to invasive species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Judith C.; Verlaque, Marc

    2009-04-01

    Characteristic flora and fauna that are highly sensitive to disturbances colonize coastal detritic bottoms in the Mediterranean Sea. In the present study, a comparison of the assemblage composition and colonization by invasive macroalgae was made between two coastal detritic macrophyte assemblages, one dominated by rhodoliths (free-living non-geniculate Corallinales) and the other dominated by fleshy algae, in an area that has been exposed to important levels of anthropogenic disturbance, mainly pollution (including changed sedimentation regimes) in the recent past (bay of Marseilles, France). In comparison with less strongly impacted Mediterranean regions, the macrophyte assemblages in the bay of Marseilles were characteristic in terms of species identity and richness of coastal detritic macrophyte assemblages. However, extremely low species abundance (cover) was observed. As far as invasive species were concerned, Caulerpa racemosa var. cylindracea was only abundant in the rhodolith assemblage whereas the two invasive Rhodophyta Asparagopsis armata and Womersleyella setacea were mainly found in the fleshy algae assemblage. The seasonality observed in the Rhodolith assemblage seemed to be related to the development of C. racemosa var. cylindracea and did not follow the typical pattern of other Mediterranean assemblages. This study represents the first study of coastal detritic assemblages invaded by C. racemosa var. cylindracea.

  15. Autumn ichthyoplankton assemblage in the Yangtze Estuary shaped by environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the response of the ichthyoplankton community to environmental changes in the Yangtze Estuary using canonical correspondence analysis. Ichthyoplankton community and environmental data were recorded during the autumns of 1998, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2007 and 2009. Among the ichthyoplankton, the dominant larval and juvenile families were the Engraulidae, Gobiidae and Salangidae, and the most common eggs were from Trichiurus lepturus. The ichthyoplankton was identified via canonical correspondence analysis to three assemblages: an estuary assemblage dominated by Chaeturichthys stigmatias, a coastal assemblage dominated by Engraulis japonicus and Stolephorus commersonii, and an offshore assemblage dominated by Trichiurus lepturus. Regarding environmental factors in the Yangtze Estuary, suspended matter and surface seawater salinity were the main factors influencing the distributions of the different assemblages, while sediment from the Yangtze River during the rainy season and chlorophyll a were the principle drivers of the annual variances in the distribution of ichthyoplankton assemblages. Our aims in this study were to provide detailed characterizations of the ichthyoplankton assemblage in the autumns of seven years, examine the long-term dynamics of autumn ichthyoplankton assemblages, and evaluate the influence of environmental factors on the spatial distribution and inter-annual variations of ichthyoplankton assemblages associated with the Yangtze Estuary.

  16. Autumn ichthyoplankton assemblage in the Yangtze Estuary shaped by environmental factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shude

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the response of the ichthyoplankton community to environmental changes in the Yangtze Estuary using canonical correspondence analysis. Ichthyoplankton community and environmental data were recorded during the autumns of 1998, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2007 and 2009. Among the ichthyoplankton, the dominant larval and juvenile families were the Engraulidae, Gobiidae and Salangidae, and the most common eggs were from Trichiurus lepturus. The ichthyoplankton was identified via canonical correspondence analysis to three assemblages: an estuary assemblage dominated by Chaeturichthys stigmatias, a coastal assemblage dominated by Engraulis japonicus and Stolephorus commersonii, and an offshore assemblage dominated by Trichiurus lepturus. Regarding environmental factors in the Yangtze Estuary, suspended matter and surface seawater salinity were the main factors influencing the distributions of the different assemblages, while sediment from the Yangtze River during the rainy season and chlorophyll a were the principle drivers of the annual variances in the distribution of ichthyoplankton assemblages. Our aims in this study were to provide detailed characterizations of the ichthyoplankton assemblage in the autumns of seven years, examine the long-term dynamics of autumn ichthyoplankton assemblages, and evaluate the influence of environmental factors on the spatial distribution and inter-annual variations of ichthyoplankton assemblages associated with the Yangtze Estuary. PMID:27114877

  17. Sporopollen Assemblages from the Cretaceous Yimin Formation of the Hailar Basin, Inner Mongolia, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Chuanbiao; QIAO Xiuyun; XU Yanbin; SUN Yuewu; REN Yanguang; JIN Yudong; GAO Ping; LIU Tongyan

    2005-01-01

    Three sporopollen assemblages are recognized for the first time from the Cretaceous Yimin Formation in the Hailar Basin of eastern Inner Mongolia.They are (in ascending order): the Impardecispora-AequitriraditesClavatipollenites assemblage; the Triporoletes-Pilosisporites-Asteropollis assemblage; and the AppendicisporitesAsteropollis-Tricolpites assemblage,distributed in Members 1,2 and 3 of the Yimin Formation respectively.Recognition of this biostratigraphic sequence is very important for the division and correlation of the Yimin Formation in the basin.Meanwhile,the age of the Yimin Formation is considered to be Barremian to Early Albian based on the palynological data.

  18. "Controlling ourselves, by ourselves": risk assemblages on Malaysia's assembly lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, the Malaysian government has identified factories as high risk for HIV and AIDS. Signaling epidemiological concerns over the rising rates of HIV among factory workers, a significant proportion of whom are women, the label also appeared to reconstitute stereotypes of factory women as dangerously sexual and of factories as immoral spaces. Drawing on ethnographic research in the export processing zones of Penang, Malaysia in the mid-1990s, I examine the meanings and experiences of HIV risk among factory women themselves. Data were analyzed using discourse and grounded theory methods, the former to identify women's multiple modes of rationalizing HIV risks, and the latter to theorize the sources and significance of women's HIV risk assemblages. The heuristic of assemblages as localized knowledge spaces helped to show that biomedical and socioreligious risk lexica operated not as fixed epistemological categories but as situational resources in women's risk scripts. Overall, women desired multiple risk knowledges to help them "control themselves by themselves," a project of reflexive self-shaping mediated by the diverse and discordant discourses of gender, ethnicity, and modernity in Malaysia that shaped how HIV risks were engendered and experienced.

  19. Messy entanglements: research assemblages in heart transplantation discourses and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shildrick, Margrit; Carnie, Andrew; Wright, Alexa; McKeever, Patricia; Jan, Emily Huan-Ching; De Luca, Enza; Bachmann, Ingrid; Abbey, Susan; Dal Bo, Dana; Poole, Jennifer; El-Sheikh, Tammer; Ross, Heather

    2017-09-28

    The paper engages with a variety of data around a supposedly single biomedical event, that of heart transplantation. In conventional discourse, organ transplantation constitutes an unproblematised form of spare part surgery in which failing biological components are replaced by more efficient and enduring ones, but once that simple picture is complicated by employing a radically interdisciplinary approach, any biomedical certainty is profoundly disrupted. Our aim, as a cross-sectorial partnership, has been to explore the complexities of heart transplantation by explicitly entangling research from the arts, biosciences and humanities without privileging any one discourse. It has been no easy enterprise yet it has been highly productive of new insights. We draw on our own ongoing funded research with both heart donor families and recipients to explore our different perceptions of what constitutes data and to demonstrate how the dynamic entangling of multiple data produces a constitutive assemblage of elements in which no one can claim priority. Our claim is that the use of such research assemblages and the collaborations that we bring to our project breaks through disciplinary silos to enable a fuller comprehension of the significance and experience of heart transplantation in both theory and practice. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Coastal Upwelling Drives Intertidal Assemblage Structure and Trophic Ecology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl J Reddin

    Full Text Available Similar environmental driving forces can produce similarity among geographically distant ecosystems. Coastal oceanic upwelling, for example, has been associated with elevated biomass and abundance patterns of certain functional groups, e.g., corticated macroalgae. In the upwelling system of Northern Chile, we examined measures of intertidal macrobenthic composition, structure and trophic ecology across eighteen shores varying in their proximity to two coastal upwelling centres, in a hierarchical sampling design (spatial scales of >1 and >10 km. The influence of coastal upwelling on intertidal communities was confirmed by the stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N of consumers, including a dominant suspension feeder, grazers, and their putative resources of POM, epilithic biofilm, and macroalgae. We highlight the utility of muscle δ15N from the suspension feeding mussel, Perumytilus purpuratus, as a proxy for upwelling, supported by satellite data and previous studies. Where possible, we used corrections for broader-scale trends, spatial autocorrelation, ontogenetic dietary shifts and spatial baseline isotopic variation prior to analysis. Our results showed macroalgal assemblage composition, and benthic consumer assemblage structure, varied significantly with the intertidal influence of coastal upwelling, especially contrasting bays and coastal headlands. Coastal topography also separated differences in consumer resource use. This suggested that coastal upwelling, itself driven by coastline topography, influences intertidal communities by advecting nearshore phytoplankton populations offshore and cooling coastal water temperatures. We recommend the isotopic values of benthic organisms, specifically long-lived suspension feeders, as in situ alternatives to offshore measurements of upwelling influence.

  1. Life history theory predicts fish assemblage response to hydrologic regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, Meryl C; Olden, Julian D

    2012-01-01

    The hydrologic regime is regarded as the primary driver of freshwater ecosystems, structuring the physical habitat template, providing connectivity, framing biotic interactions, and ultimately selecting for specific life histories of aquatic organisms. In the present study, we tested ecological theory predicting directional relationships between major dimensions of the flow regime and life history composition of fish assemblages in perennial free-flowing rivers throughout the continental United States. Using long-term discharge records and fish trait and survey data for 109 stream locations, we found that 11 out of 18 relationships (61%) tested between the three life history strategies (opportunistic, periodic, and equilibrium) and six hydrologic metrics (two each describing flow variability, predictability, and seasonality) were statistically significant (P history strategies, with 82% of all significant relationships observed supporting predictions from life history theory. Specifically, we found that (1) opportunistic strategists were positively related to measures of flow variability and negatively related to predictability and seasonality, (2) periodic strategists were positively related to high flow seasonality and negatively related to variability, and (3) the equilibrium strategists were negatively related to flow variability and positively related to predictability. Our study provides important empirical evidence illustrating the value of using life history theory to understand both the patterns and processes by which fish assemblage structure is shaped by adaptation to natural regimes of variability, predictability, and seasonality of critical flow events over broad biogeographic scales.

  2. Niche partitioning and species coexistence in a Neotropical felid assemblage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bitetti, Mario S.; De Angelo, Carlos D.; Di Blanco, Yamil E.; Paviolo, Agustín

    2010-07-01

    Carnivores have been used as a model to understand the effects of competition in community structure. Behavioral mechanisms that facilitate species coexistence have been poorly explored and may explain the lack of community-wide morphological character displacement in some carnivore assemblages. We use the results of large-scale and intensive camera-trap surveys conducted in the Atlantic Forest of NE Argentina between 2003 and 2008 to describe the spatial patterns of detection and the daily pattern of records of the six wild cat species present in the region (jaguar Panthera onca, puma Puma concolor, ocelot Leopardus pardalis, jaguarundi Puma yagouaroundi, margay Leopardus wiedii, and oncilla Leopardus tigrinus). We use these patterns to generate hypotheses about behavioral differences that may facilitate species coexistence. The larger species were more frequently recorded in the better-protected areas, probably as a result of anthropogenic effects (poaching of cats and their prey). Competitive release from ocelots and jaguarundis may explain why the oncilla and the margay showed the opposite pattern. Morphologically similar species had the most contrasting activity patterns: the margay was exclusively nocturnal and the jaguarundi diurnal. The other species were cathemeral, but alternated their peaks of activity in relation to the relative order of their body weights. The contrasting temporal patterns observed and the ability of pumas and oncillas to adjust their activity patterns to local conditions may facilitate the coexistence of these cat species and explain the lack of character displacement in this assemblage.

  3. Influence of landscape structure on reef fish assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grober-Dunsmore, R.; Frazer, T.K.; Beets, J.P.; Lindberg, W.J.; Zwick, P.; Funicelli, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    Management of tropical marine environments calls for interdisciplinary studies and innovative methodologies that consider processes occurring over broad spatial scales. We investigated relationships between landscape structure and reef fish assemblage structure in the US Virgin Islands. Measures of landscape structure were transformed into a reduced set of composite indices using principal component analyses (PCA) to synthesize data on the spatial patterning of the landscape structure of the study reefs. However, composite indices (e.g., habitat diversity) were not particularly informative for predicting reef fish assemblage structure. Rather, relationships were interpreted more easily when functional groups of fishes were related to individual habitat features. In particular, multiple reef fish parameters were strongly associated with reef context. Fishes responded to benthic habitat structure at multiple spatial scales, with various groups of fishes each correlated to a unique suite of variables. Accordingly, future experiments should be designed to test functional relationships based on the ecology of the organisms of interest. Our study demonstrates that landscape-scale habitat features influence reef fish communities, illustrating promise in applying a landscape ecology approach to better understand factors that structure coral reef ecosystems. Furthermore, our findings may prove useful in design of spatially-based conservation approaches such as marine protected areas (MPAs), because landscape-scale metrics may serve as proxies for areas with high species diversity and abundance within the coral reef landscape. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  4. The effects of seasonally variable dragonfly predation on butterfly assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiitsaar, Anu; Kaasik, Ants; Teder, Tiit

    2013-01-01

    Where predation is seasonally variable, the potential impact of a predator on individual prey species will critically depend on phenological synchrony of the predator with the prey. Here we explored the effects of seasonally variable predation in multispecies assemblages of short-lived prey. The study was conducted in a landscape in which we had previously demonstrated generally high, but spatially and seasonally variable dragonfly-induced mortality in adult butterflies. In this system, we show that patterns of patch occupancy in butterfly species flying during periods of peak dragonfly abundance are more strongly associated with spatial variation in dragonfly abundance than patch occupancy of species flying when dragonfly density was low. We provide evidence indicating that this differential sensitivity of different butterfly species to between-habitat differences in dragonfly abundance is causally tied to seasonal variation in the intensity of dragonfly predation. The effect of dragonfly predation could also be measured at the level of whole local butterfly assemblages. With dragonfly density increasing, butterfly species richness decreased, and butterfly species composition tended to show a shift toward a greater proportion of species flying during periods of off-peak dragonfly abundance.

  5. Pollen assemblages as paleoenvironmental proxies in the Florida Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, D.A.; Weimer, L.M.; Riegel, W.L.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of 170 pollen assemblages from surface samples in eight vegetation types in the Florida Everglades indicates that these wetland sub-environments are distinguishable from the pollen record and that they are useful proxies for hydrologic and edaphic parameters. Vegetation types sampled include sawgrass marshes, cattail marshes, sloughs with floating aquatics, wet prairies, brackish marshes, tree islands, cypress swamps, and mangrove forests. The distribution of these vegetation types is controlled by specific environmental parameters, such as hydrologic regime, nutrient availability, disturbance level, substrate type, and salinity; ecotones between vegetation types may be sharp. Using R-mode cluster analysis of pollen data, we identified diagnostic species groupings; Q-mode cluster analysis was used to differentiate pollen signatures of each vegetation type. Cluster analysis and the modern analog technique were applied to interpret vegetational and environmental trends over the last two millennia at a site in Water Conservation Area 3A. The results show that close modern analogs exist for assemblages in the core and indicate past hydrologic changes at the site, correlated with both climatic and land-use changes. The ability to differentiate marshes with different hydrologic and edaphic requirements using the pollen record facilitates assessment of relative impacts of climatic and anthropogenic changes on this wetland ecosystem on smaller spatial and temporal scales than previously were possible. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  6. Pollen assemblages as paleoenvironmental proxies in the Florida Everglades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, D A.; Weimer, L M.; Riegel, W L.

    2001-04-01

    Analysis of 170 pollen assemblages from surface samples in eight vegetation types in the Florida Everglades indicates that these wetland sub-environments are distinguishable from the pollen record and that they are useful proxies for hydrologic and edaphic parameters. Vegetation types sampled include sawgrass marshes, cattail marshes, sloughs with floating aquatics, wet prairies, brackish marshes, tree islands, cypress swamps, and mangrove forests. The distribution of these vegetation types is controlled by specific environmental parameters, such as hydrologic regime, nutrient availability, disturbance level, substrate type, and salinity; ecotones between vegetation types may be sharp. Using R-mode cluster analysis of pollen data, we identified diagnostic species groupings; Q-mode cluster analysis was used to differentiate pollen signatures of each vegetation type. Cluster analysis and the modern analog technique were applied to interpret vegetational and environmental trends over the last two millennia at a site in Water Conservation Area 3A. The results show that close modern analogs exist for assemblages in the core and indicate past hydrologic changes at the site, correlated with both climatic and land-use changes. The ability to differentiate marshes with different hydrologic and edaphic requirements using the pollen record facilitates assessment of relative impacts of climatic and anthropogenic changes on this wetland ecosystem on smaller spatial and temporal scales than previously were possible.

  7. Studies of Cystoseira assemblages in Northern Atlantic Iberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Fernández, Alicia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Iberian Peninsula contains 24 specific and infraespecific taxa of the genus Cystoseira, but only 6 inhabit in Northern Iberia: C. baccata, C. foeniculacea, C. humilis var. myriophylloides, C. nodicaulis, C. tamariscifolia, and C. usneoides. The Cystoseira assemblages exhibit a complex structure and stratification that allows the presence of a large associate biota and a rich epiphytic flora. Although in the Mediterranean Sea several species have been analyzed in depth, the Atlantic ones are less studied. A revision of the literature (1931-2014 and grey information was made to know the diversity of the North Atlantic Iberian Cystoseira assemblages. The community of C. baccata harbors the biggest number of species (215, followed by C. tamariscifolia (162 and C. usneoides (126, whereas the community with fewest species was the C. foeniculacea one (34. More than 70 species were present in the majority of the Cystoseira assemblages. In this article, are revised also environmental issues in the Cystoseira assemblages, as pollution and anthropogenic pressures or disturbances that cause regression in their communities, and effects of biological invasions by non-native species. As a conclusion, it will necessary to study the Cystoseira assemblage in depth, starting by research of C. baccata along Northern Iberia, as it is an exclusive and widely distributed Atlantic species with very scarce information concerning its role in structuring the communities.La Península Ibérica contiene 24 táxones del género Cystoseira, pero sólo 6 habitan en las costas del norte: C. baccata, C. foeniculacea, C. humilis var. myriophylloides, C. nodicaulis, C. tamariscifolia y C. usneoides. Las comunidades de Cystoseira muestran una estructura compleja debido a su estratificación, lo que permite el desarrollo de una amplia biota asociada y una gran riqueza de flora epífita. Aunque diversas especies mediterráneas han sido analizadas en profundidad, las atl

  8. Preliminary results in larger benthic foraminifera assemblage in a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate platform from the Upper Cretaceous of the External Prebetic Domain (Valencia province, SE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Salcedo, Raquel; Vicedo, Vicent

    2016-04-01

    areas such as the Pyrenees (S France and NE Spain) or Salento (SE Italy) regions. The Pinet section measures about 150 m, with coarsening upward sequences consisting, from bottom to top: 56 m of fine sandstones; 25 m with several coarsening upward, well-stratified limestones; 36 m with fine to coarse dolomitic sandstones intercalated with calcarenites; 15 m with fine and well-stratified limestones and, 20 m of dolomitic massive limestone at the top. Finally, the stratigraphical succession is completed by continental deposits. An abundant content of lamellar-perforate foraminifera (siderolitids, orbitoidiforms, clypeorbids) and agglutinated foraminifera (dicyclinids) has been identified in the preliminary studies. From bottom to top, in the fine sandstone deposits abundant specimens identified as Praesiderolites sp. occur. The coarsening upward limestones provide Praesiderolites sp., Pseudosiderolites sp., "Orbitoides" cf. concavatus, Orbitoides spp., Lepidorbitoides campaniensis and Sirtina cf. orbitoidiformis. The calcaretinic deposits contain rounded bioclastic fauna with Orbitoides spp. and cf. Wannierina. The fine limestones display abundant ostracods, miliolids and Dicyclina sp. and there are wackestone limestones deposits with carophytes at the top of the sequence. No larger benthic foraminifera have been identified in the massive dolomitic limestone. The results obtained after a first analysis, considering the LBF assemblage, indicate that the Pinet section deposits can be dated as earliest to middle Late Campanian, contrarily to the Campanian-Maastrichtian age suggested by previous studies.

  9. Framboidal and idiomorphic pyrite in the upper Maastrichtian sedimentary rocks at Gabal Oweina, Nile Valley, Egypt: Formation processes, oxidation products and genetic implications to the origin of framboidal pyrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Mamdouh F.; El Goresy, Ahmed

    2012-08-01

    The upper Maastrichtian organic-rich sediments studied at Gabal Oweina, Egypt, are moderately enriched in syngenetic and diagenetic pyrite. Pyrite occurs mostly as layers or bands, group of lamina, lenses, diagenetic intercalated pockets, burrow fills and disseminated individual pyrite framboids and crystals within the host sediments. The pyritic thin bands and lamina consist mostly of unconsolidated to compact-oriented pyrite (oriented along the bedding planes) in gypsiferous-clayey matrix and less common as poorly oriented pyrite crystallites. In several cases, pyrite crystals of the latter type depict zoning, fracturing and micro-concretions. Pyritic burrow fills are composed mainly of pyrite, phosphatic ooids, microfossils, glauconitic grains, poorly graphitized carbon and native sulfur. Pyrite replaces minerals other than gypsum, sulfur or carbon. It also replaces microfossils thus turning some of the phosphatic ooids and microfossils to pyritized pseudomorphs. None of the studied phosphate ooids or framboids contains any mackinawite, pyrrhotite or greigite. Based on the microscopic and SEM observations of the micro-textures of disseminated pyrite found at Gabal Oweina section, four morphological forms of primary pyrite could be identified: (1) Grouped multiple-framboids; (2) Individual framboids; (3) Pyrite idiomorphic crystal overgrowths on framboids and (4) Single and aggregates of euhedral pyrite crystals. The multiple-framboid formation may have emerged from three successive processes: nucleation and growth of individual aggregates of the microcrystals to form combined micro-framboids (the growth of framboids); and followed by grouping of the several pyrite framboids. Direct pyrite nucleation (shell formation), crystallization, and aggregation processes might complete a single framboid. The disseminated single and aggregated euhedral pyrite crystals bear evidence indicating that their formation was via nucleation and growth of pyrite crystallites and

  10. Recovery of macrobenthic assemblages following experimental sand burial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J. Barrón

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was supported by a fund provided by the Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología (UNAM and a fund provided to Celia Olabarria in 2004 and 2005 by the University of Vigo for overseas short stays.AbstractPeriodic inundation by sand is a very common feature of rocky coasts throughout the world. Even so, there have been few direct observations or experiments to investigate the role of sediments on intertidal rocky shores. We designed a field experiment in Mazatlán Bay, Mexico, to test the initial impact and subsequent recovery of intertidal macrobenthic assemblages exposed to sand burial at two sites of varying wave exposure. Both sites supported different natural assemblages. Treatment plots for the addition of sediment and control plots (50 × 50 cm, separated by at least 1.5 m, were randomly placed across the mid-water tidal level. The initial response of the resident macrobenthos and the subsequent recolonization was monitored over a period of 95 days. The main effect of sediment deposition at both sites was mortality and removal of biota due to smothering. The recovery process was rapid and may in part have been the result of the mechanism by which the small, disturbed patches were recolonized. Most of the invertebrates colonized the patches as adults; several seaweeds exhibited vegetative growth as the major mechanism of colonization (e.g., Ulva lactuca Linnaeus, 1753, Amphiroa valonioides Yendo, 1902 and Chaetomorpha antennina (Borgensen Kutzing, 1849. The rate of recovery varied between the sites, however. Recovery of species numbers proceeded quickly at the sheltered site (day 7, but took 95 days at the exposed site. In contrast, biomass reached control levels by day 45 at the sheltered site, but already by day 15 at the exposed site. By day 95, the assemblages recovered to 83.5% and 81% similarity with the controls at the sheltered and exposed sites respectively. Although differences in wave exposure could be very

  11. Isotopic characteristics of canopies in simulated leaf assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Heather V.; Patzkowsky, Mark E.; Wing, Scott L.; Parker, Geoffrey G.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Freeman, Katherine H.

    2014-11-01

    The geologic history of closed-canopy forests is of great interest to paleoecologists and paleoclimatologists alike. Closed canopies have pronounced effects on local, continental and global rainfall and temperature patterns. Although evidence for canopy closure is difficult to reconstruct from the fossil record, the characteristic isotope gradients of the "canopy effect" could be preserved in leaves and proxy biomarkers. To assess this, we employed new carbon isotopic data for leaves collected in diverse light environments within a deciduous, temperate forest (Maryland, USA) and for leaves from a perennially closed canopy, moist tropical forest (Bosque Protector San Lorenzo, Panamá). In the tropical forest, leaf carbon isotope values range 10‰, with higher δ13Cleaf values occurring both in upper reaches of the canopy, and with higher light exposure and lower humidity. Leaf fractionation (Δleaf) varied negatively with height and light and positively with humidity. Vertical 13C enrichment in leaves largely reflects changes in Δleaf, and does not trend with δ13C of CO2 within the canopy. At the site in Maryland, leaves express a more modest δ13C range (∼6‰), with a clear trend that follows both light and leaf height. Using a model we simulate leaf assemblage isotope patterns from canopy data binned by elevation. The re-sampling (bootstrap) model determined both the mean and range of carbon isotope values for simulated leaf assemblages ranging in size from 10 to over 1000 leaves. For the tropical forest data, the canopy's isotope range is captured with 50 or more randomly sampled leaves. Thus, with a sufficient number of fossil leaves it is possible to distinguish isotopic gradients in an ancient closed canopy forest from those in an open forest. For very large leaf assemblages, mean isotopic values approximate the δ13C of carbon contributed by leaves to soil and are similar to observed δ13Clitter values at forested sites within Panamá, including the

  12. Identification and mapping of bottom fish assemblages in Davis Strait and southern Baffin Bay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ole A; Hvingel, Carsten; Møller, P. R.;

    2005-01-01

    multinomial logit model was then applied to calculate vectors of probabilities defining the likelihood of each haul belonging to each of the seven clusters. The spatial distribution of the conditional probabilities for each cluster (assemblage) was mapped by means of a geostatistical tool. Each assemblage...

  13. Assemblage Organization in Stream Fishes: Effects of Enviromental Variation and Interspecific Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary D. Grossman; Robert E. Ratajczak; Maurice Crawford; Mary C. Freeman

    1998-01-01

    We assessed the relative importance of environmental variation, interspecific competition for space, and predator abundance on assemblage structure and microhabitat use in a stream fish assemblage inhabiting Coweeta Creek, North Carolina, USA. Our study encompassed a l0-yr time span (1983-1992) and included some of the highest and lowest flows in the last 58 years. We...

  14. Citizenship agendas, urban governance and social housing in the Netherlands: An assemblage approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.

    2015-01-01

    This article combines recent conceptualizations of citizenship beyond the nation state with new perspectives on governance assemblages comprising both state and non-state actors. Focusing on Dutch social housing, this study explores how such governance assemblages produce agendas that attempt to sha

  15. Changes in dominance patterns in upper Carboniferous plant-fossil assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, Hermann W.; Thomson, Margaret C.

    1982-12-01

    Upper Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian) terrestrial clastic rocks from North America and Europe contain compression-impression plant-fossil assemblages that represent the remains of plant communities that grew on floodplains, levees, and other clastic facies of fluvial and deltaic lowlands. Quantitative analysis of 66 plant-fossil assemblages spanning the entire late Carboniferous demonstrates that before the middle of the Westphalian D Stage the majority of plant-fossil assemblages are dominated by pteridosperms and sphenopsids. Lycopods and cordaites dominate only a few assemblages counted. Ferns do not dominate any assemblages. These findings contrast sharply with the dominance of lycopods reported by others from coal swamps of the same time interval. Above the middle of the Westphalian D, however, one-third of the compression-impression assemblages counted are dominated by ferns. The change in dominance pattern in compression-impression plant-fossil assemblages occurs half a stage earlier than the previously reported change from lycopod-dominated to fern-dominated assemblages at the Westphalian-Stephanian boundary in coal swamps. A trend toward dryer climate during Westphalian D apparently influenced plants growing on better-drained alluvial soils earlier than those growing on water-logged soils of contemporaneous coal swamps. *Present address: Room 108 Math.-Geology Building, University of Minnesota, Duluth, Minnesota 55812

  16. Lions as Bone Accumulators? Paleontological and Ecological Implications of a Modern Bone Assemblage from Olduvai Gorge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaza, Mari Carmen; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Yravedra, José; Baquedano, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Analytic models have been developed to reconstruct early hominin behaviour, especially their subsistence patterns, revealed mainly through taphonomic analyses of archaeofaunal assemblages. Taphonomic research is used to discern which agents (carnivores, humans or both) generate the bone assemblages recovered at archaeological sites. Taphonomic frameworks developed during the last decades show that the only large-sized carnivores in African biomes able to create bone assemblages are leopards and hyenas. A carnivore-made bone assemblage located in the short-grassland ecological unit of the Serengeti (within Olduvai Gorge) was studied. Taphonomic analyses of this assemblage including skeletal part representation, bone density, breakage patterns and anatomical distribution of tooth marks, along with an ecological approach to the prey selection made by large carnivores of the Serengeti, were carried out. The results show that this bone assemblage may be the first lion-accumulated assemblage documented, although other carnivores (namely spotted hyenas) may have also intervened through postdepositional ravaging. This first faunal assemblage potentially created by lions constitutes a new framework for neotaphonomic studies. Since lions may accumulate carcasses under exceptional circumstances, such as those documented at the site reported here, this finding may have important consequences for interpretations of early archaeological and paleontological sites, which provide key information about human evolution. PMID:27144649

  17. Lunch Time at the Child Care Centre: Neoliberal Assemblages in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nxumalo, Fikile; Pacini-Ketchabaw, Veronica; Rowan, Mary Caroline

    2011-01-01

    In this article we interrogate neoliberal assemblages within the context of eating and feeding practices in early childhood education. We consider how neoliberal assemblages are enacted and created through multiple linkages between micro and macro regulations and policies, and everyday food routines. We attend to the embodied intensities, desires…

  18. Intra-Diegetic Cameras as Cinematic Actor Assemblages in Found Footage Horror Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødje, Kjetil

    2017-01-01

    This article proposes a reconceptualization of the term “actor” within motion pictures and presents the argument that “acting” is a matter of distributed agency performed by heterogeneous assemblages. What constitutes an actor is what I will label as a “cinematic actor assemblage,” a term that co...

  19. THE SEVEN PRINCIPELS OF USEFUL INNOVATION OF SOCIO-MATERIAL ASSEMBLAGES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjørnehøj, Gitte; Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    2017-01-01

    . That the need for innovations now extends beyond administration into more complex social areas, calls for taking the theory of technology as social-material assemblages serious, and ponder; how can innovation towards these assemblages be understood and what aspects characterizes this innovation in complex...

  20. Petrogenesis of opaque assemblages in the Ningqiang carbonaceous chondrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HSU; WeiBiao

    2007-01-01

    Numerous round to oblate opaque assemblages (OAs) are found in chondrules and matrix of the Ningqiang carbonaceous chondrite. They are mainly composed of Ni-rich metal,magnetite,Fe,Ni-sulfides,with minor amounts of phosphate,phosphoran-olivine,pyroxene and trace amounts of nano-sized platinum-group metal alloys. The mineralogy of Ningqiang OAs is very similar to that of OAs previously reported in Ca,Al-rich inclusions of CV chondrites. Being a rare mineral phase in nature,phosphoran-olivine is thought to form by nonequilibrium reactions between P-bearing molten metal and olivine crystals during rapid cooling. Its occurrence in Ningqiang OAs indicates that the precursor of OAs was locally produced during chondrule formation,rather than directly condensed from the solar nebula as previously thought. The petrographic and mineralogical characteristics of Ningqiang OAs reveal that OAs formed by low temperature alterations of pre-existing homogeneous alloys within chondrules on a planetary body.

  1. Description of viral assemblages associated with the Gorgonia ventalina holobiont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, I.; Brown, J. M.; Burge, C. A.; Couch, C. S.; LaBarre, B. A.; Mouchka, M. E.; Naito, M.; Harvell, C. D.

    2012-06-01

    The diversity and function of viruses in coral holobionts has only recently received attention. The non-reef building gorgonian octocoral, Gorgonia ventalina, is a major constituent of Caribbean reefs. We investigated viral communities associated with G. ventalina tissues to understand their role in gorgonian ecology. Pyrosequencing was used to prepare a total of 514,632 sequence reads of DNA- and RNA-based mixed-community viral genomes (metaviromes). RNA viral assemblages were comprised of primarily unidentifiable reads, with most matching host transcripts and other RNA metaviromes. DNA metaviromes were similar between healthy and diseased tissues and comprised of contiguous sequences (contigs) that matched primarily metazoan and bacterial proteins. Only ~5% of contigs matched viral proteins that were primarily cyanophage and viruses of Chlorella and Ostreococcus. Our results confirm that DNA and RNA viruses comprise a component of the gorgonian holobiont, suggesting that they may play a role in the ecology of G. ventalina.

  2. Petrogenesis of opaque assemblages in the Ningqiang carbonaceous chondrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying; HUA Xin; HSU WeiBiao

    2007-01-01

    Numerous round to oblate opaque assemblages (OAs) are found in chondrules and matrix of the Ningqiang carbonaceous chondrite. They are mainly composed of Ni-rich metal, magnetite, Fe,Ni-sulfides, with minor amounts of phosphate, phosphoran-olivine, pyroxene and trace amounts of nano-sized platinum-group metal alloys. The mineralogy of Ningqiang OAs is very similar to that of OAs previously reported in Ca, Al-rich inclusions of CV chondrites. Being a rare mineral phase in nature,phosphoran-olivine is thought to form by nonequilibrium reactions between P-bearing molten metal and olivine crystals during rapid cooling. Its occurrence in Ningqiang OAs indicates that the precursor of OAs was locally produced during chondrule formation, rather than directly condensed from the solar nebula as previously thought. The petrographic and mineralogical characteristics of Ningqiang OAs reveal that OAs formed by low temperature alterations of pre-existing homogeneous alloys within chondrules on a planetary body.

  3. The (Big Data-security assemblage: Knowledge and critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Aradau

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Snowden revelations and the emergence of ‘Big Data’ have rekindled questions about how security practices are deployed in a digital age and with what political effects. While critical scholars have drawn attention to the social, political and legal challenges to these practices, the debates in computer and information science have received less analytical attention. This paper proposes to take seriously the critical knowledge developed in information and computer science and reinterpret their debates to develop a critical intervention into the public controversies concerning data-driven security and digital surveillance. The paper offers a two-pronged contribution: on the one hand, we challenge the credibility of security professionals’ discourses in light of the knowledge that they supposedly mobilize; on the other, we argue for a series of conceptual moves around data, human–computer relations, and algorithms to address some of the limitations of existing engagements with the Big Data-security assemblage.

  4. Identification of Giardia lamblia Assemblage E in Humans Points to a New Anthropozoonotic Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantinatti, Maria; Bello, Alexandre R; Fernandes, Octavio; Da-Cruz, Alda M

    2016-10-15

    Giardia lamblia is a pathogen transmitted by water and food that causes infection worldwide. Giardia genotypes are classified into 8 assemblages (A-H). Assemblages A and B are detected in humans, but they are potentially zoonotic because they infect other mammalian hosts. Giardia in samples from 44 children was genotyped. Conserved fragments of the genes encoding β-giardin and glutamate dehydrogenase were sequenced and their alignment were carried out with sequences deposited in GenBank. As expected for Rio de Janeiro, the majority of samples were related to assemblage A. Surprisingly, assemblage E was detected in 15 samples. Detection of assemblage E in humans suggests a new zoonotic route of Giardia transmission. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Bleaching response of coral species in the context of assemblage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Timothy D.; DuBois, Emily; Goldberg, Scott J.; Backman, Vadim; Marcelino, Luisa A.

    2017-06-01

    Caribbean coral reefs are declining due to a mosaic of local and global stresses, including climate change-induced thermal stress. Species and assemblage responses differ due to factors that are not easily identifiable or quantifiable. We calculated a novel species-specific metric of coral bleaching response, taxon- α and - β, which relates the response of a species to that of its assemblages for 16 species over 18 assemblages. By contextualizing species responses within the response of their assemblages, the effects of environmental factors are removed and intrinsic differences among taxa are revealed. Most corals experience either a saturation response, overly sensitive to weak stress ( α > 0) but under-responsive compared to assemblage bleaching ( β bleaching ( β > 1). This metric may help reveal key factors of bleaching susceptibility and identify species as targets for conservation.

  6. Genome-wide analyses of recombination suggest that Giardia intestinalis assemblages represent different species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feifei; Jerlström-Hultqvist, Jon; Andersson, Jan O

    2012-10-01

    Giardia intestinalis is a major cause of waterborne enteric disease in humans. The species is divided into eight assemblages suggested to represent separate Giardia species based on host specificities and the genetic divergence of marker genes. We have investigated whether genome-wide recombination occurs between assemblages using the three available G. intestinalis genomes. First, the relative nonsynonymous substitution rates of the homologs were compared for 4,009 positional homologs. The vast majority of these comparisons indicate genetic isolation without interassemblage recombinations. Only a region of 6 kbp suggests genetic exchange between assemblages A and E, followed by gene conversion events. Second, recombination-detecting software fails to identify within-gene recombination between the different assemblages for most of the homologs. Our results indicate very low frequency of recombination between the syntenic core genes, suggesting that G. intestinalis assemblages are genetically isolated lineages and thus should be viewed as separated Giardia species.

  7. The role of depth in regulating water quality and fish assemblages in oxbow lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Daniel B.; Miranda, Leandro E.; Kroger, Robert; Andrews, Caroline S.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated water quality and fish assemblages in deep (> 3.0 m; N = 7) and shallow (water temperatures. Conversely, deeper lakes were represented by higher visibility, stable oxygen levels, and cooler water temperatures. Fish assemblages in shallow lakes were dominated by tolerant, small-bodied fishes and those able to breathe atmospheric oxygen. Deeper lakes had a greater representation of predators and other large-bodied fishes. Our evaluation suggests fish assemblages are reflective of oxbow lakes water quality, which is shaped by depth. Understanding the interactions between depth, water quality, and fish assemblages may facilitate development of effective management plans for improving conditions necessary to sustain diverse fish assemblages in agriculturally dominated basins.

  8. Seasonal variability of morphospaces in a subtropical fish assemblage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Correia Siliprandi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Morphological characters of fishes are essential to evaluate the functional structure of assemblages, being morphological differences indicative of distinct ecological and adaptive strategies. The ecomorphology using morphospaces analyzes the structure of a fish assemblage through the values of intervals between homologous points positioned in anatomical structures of organisms phylogenetically related. These intervals can be quantified by morphogeometric and multivariate analyses. Seasonally during 2013-2014, standardized images were obtained from fishes sampled in Araça Bay, São Sebastião District, Brazil, using nine fishing gears which were grouped to verify the species occurrence variation. Qualitative approach (presence/absence data was used to carry out morphological analyses. A total of 27 landmarks and semilandmarks with anatomical, ecological and taxonomical meaning were positioned in species images of the left profile. Consensus figures were made embedding the intraspecific variability. Uniform components of the shape variation (RWs were generated. To build morphospaces, the first eight RWs were considered (explain more than 95% of the total morphological variability and were defined using Convex Hull. The RWs were also used to calculate the Morphological Richness (MR, Morphological Disparity (MD and Morphogeometric Index (EMI. The MD indicates the morphospace size and showed greater values in summer (0.051 and winter (0.047 as MR, related to the higher number of species (MRsummer=7.93; MRwinter=8.65. During all the year, the Araça Bay presents high diversity of fishes. Nevertheless, winter and summer seasons reached the highest diversity, periods when horizontal mobile fishes with elongated shapes arrive to the region, implying an increase of morphological diversity and shape’s redundancy (represented by the lowest values of EMI: winter=0.120; summer=0.123.

  9. Charonosaurus jiayinensis n.g., n.sp.,a lambeosaurine dinosaur from the Late Maastrichtian of northeastern ChinaCharonosaurus jiayinensis n.g., n.sp., un dinosaure lambéosauriné du Maastrichtien supérieur du Nord-Est de la Chine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godefroit, Pascal; Zan, Shuqin; Jin, Liyong

    2000-06-01

    Large bonebeds have been excavated in the Late Maastrichian Yuliangze Formation near Jiayin (Heilongjang Province, northeastern China). The greatest part of the discovered fossils belong to a new lambeosaurine dinosaur, Charonosaurus jiayinensis n.g., n.sp. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 33 cranial, dental and postcranial characters, indicates that this new taxon may be closer to Parasaurolophus than any other known Lambeosaurinae. The Late Maastrichtian dinosaur faunas currently known in northeastern Asia are dominated by Lambeosaurinae, although these dinosaurs are not represented any more in synchronous North American and European localities.

  10. An empirical, hierarchical typology of tree species assemblages for assessing forest dynamics under global change scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanza, Jennifer K; Coulston, John W; Wear, David N

    2017-01-01

    The composition of tree species occurring in a forest is important and can be affected by global change drivers such as climate change. To inform assessment and projection of global change impacts at broad extents, we used hierarchical cluster analysis and over 120,000 recent forest inventory plots to empirically define forest tree assemblages across the U.S., and identified the indicator and dominant species associated with each. Cluster typologies in two levels of a hierarchy of forest assemblages, with 29 and 147 groups respectively, were supported by diagnostic criteria. Groups in these two levels of the hierarchy were labeled based on the top indicator species in each, and ranged widely in size. For example, in the 29-cluster typology, the sugar maple-red maple assemblage contained the largest number of plots (30,068), while the butternut-sweet birch and sourwood-scarlet oak assemblages were both smallest (6 plots each). We provide a case-study demonstration of the utility of the typology for informing forest climate change impact assessment. For five assemblages in the 29-cluster typology, we used existing projections of changes in importance value (IV) for the dominant species under one low and one high climate change scenario to assess impacts to the assemblages. Results ranged widely for each scenario by the end of the century, with each showing an average decrease in IV for dominant species in some assemblages, including the balsam fir-quaking aspen assemblage, and an average increase for others, like the green ash-American elm assemblage. Future work should assess adaptive capacity of these forest assemblages and investigate local population- and community-level dynamics in places where dominant species may be impacted. This typology will be ideal for monitoring, assessing, and projecting changes to forest communities within the emerging framework of macrosystems ecology, which emphasizes hierarchies and broad extents.

  11. Viral assemblage composition in Yellowstone acidic hot springs assessed by network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Benjamin; Wirth, Jennifer F; Mazurie, Aurélien; Young, Mark J

    2015-10-01

    Understanding of viral assemblage structure in natural environments remains a daunting task. Total viral assemblage sequencing (for example, viral metagenomics) provides a tractable approach. However, even with the availability of next-generation sequencing technology it is usually only possible to obtain a fragmented view of viral assemblages in natural ecosystems. In this study, we applied a network-based approach in combination with viral metagenomics to investigate viral assemblage structure in the high temperature, acidic hot springs of Yellowstone National Park, USA. Our results show that this approach can identify distinct viral groups and provide insights into the viral assemblage structure. We identified 110 viral groups in the hot springs environment, with each viral group likely representing a viral family at the sub-family taxonomic level. Most of these viral groups are previously unknown DNA viruses likely infecting archaeal hosts. Overall, this study demonstrates the utility of combining viral assemblage sequencing approaches with network analysis to gain insights into viral assemblage structure in natural ecosystems.

  12. Saproxylic Beetle Assemblage Selection as Determining Factor of Species Distributional Patterns: Implications for Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-López, A; Galante, E; Micó, E

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the distributional patterns of saproxylic beetles is essential for conservation biology due to the relevance of this fauna in the maintenance of ecological processes and the endangerment of species. The complex community of saproxylic beetles is shaped by different assemblages that are composed of species linked by the microhabitats they use. We evaluate how different the species distribution patterns that are obtained can be, depending on the analyzed assemblage and to what extent these can affect conservation decisions. Beetles were sampled using hollow emergence and window traps in three protected areas of the Iberian Peninsula. Species richness, composition, and diversity turnover were analyzed for each sampling method and showed high variation depending on the analyzed assemblage. Beta diversity was clearly higher among forests for the assemblage captured using window traps. This method collects flying insects from different tree microhabitats and its captures are influenced by the forest structuring. Within forests, the assemblages captured by hollow emergence traps, which collect the fauna linked to tree hollows, showed the largest turnover of species, as they are influenced by the characteristics of each cavity. Moreover, the selection of the forest showing the highest species richness strongly depended on the studied assemblage. This study demonstrates that differences in the studied assemblages (group of species co-occurring in the same habitat) can also lead to significant differences in the identified patterns of species distribution and diversity turnover. This fact will be necessary to take into consideration when making decisions about conservation and management.

  13. Differences in stability of seed-associated microbial assemblages in response to invasion by phytopathogenic microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Rezki

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Seeds are involved in the vertical transmission of microorganisms from one plant generation to another and consequently act as reservoirs for the plant microbiota. However, little is known about the structure of seed-associated microbial assemblages and the regulators of assemblage structure. In this work, we have assessed the response of seed-associated microbial assemblages of Raphanus sativus to invading phytopathogenic agents, the bacterial strain Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc 8004 and the fungal strain Alternaria brassicicola Abra43. According to the indicators of bacterial (16S rRNA gene and gyrB sequences and fungal (ITS1 diversity employed in this study, seed transmission of the bacterial strain Xcc 8004 did not change the overall composition of resident microbial assemblages. In contrast seed transmission of Abra43 strongly modified the richness and structure of fungal assemblages without affecting bacterial assemblages. The sensitivity of seed-associated fungal assemblage to Abra43 is mostly related to changes in relative abundance of closely related fungal species that belong to the Alternaria genus. Variation in stability of the seed microbiota in response to Xcc and Abra43 invasions could be explained by differences in seed transmission pathways employed by these micro-organisms, which ultimately results in divergence in spatio-temporal colonization of the seed habitat.

  14. Differences in stability of seed-associated microbial assemblages in response to invasion by phytopathogenic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezki, Samir; Campion, Claire; Iacomi-Vasilescu, Beatrice; Preveaux, Anne; Toualbia, Youness; Bonneau, Sophie; Briand, Martial; Laurent, Emmanuelle; Hunault, Gilles; Simoneau, Philippe; Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Barret, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Seeds are involved in the vertical transmission of microorganisms from one plant generation to another and consequently act as reservoirs for the plant microbiota. However, little is known about the structure of seed-associated microbial assemblages and the regulators of assemblage structure. In this work, we have assessed the response of seed-associated microbial assemblages of Raphanus sativus to invading phytopathogenic agents, the bacterial strain Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) 8004 and the fungal strain Alternaria brassicicola Abra43. According to the indicators of bacterial (16S rRNA gene and gyrB sequences) and fungal (ITS1) diversity employed in this study, seed transmission of the bacterial strain Xcc 8004 did not change the overall composition of resident microbial assemblages. In contrast seed transmission of Abra43 strongly modified the richness and structure of fungal assemblages without affecting bacterial assemblages. The sensitivity of seed-associated fungal assemblage to Abra43 is mostly related to changes in relative abundance of closely related fungal species that belong to the Alternaria genus. Variation in stability of the seed microbiota in response to Xcc and Abra43 invasions could be explained by differences in seed transmission pathways employed by these micro-organisms, which ultimately results in divergence in spatio-temporal colonization of the seed habitat.

  15. Processes of benthic foraminiferal fossil assemblage formation on the continental slope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubere, P. (Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb (United States))

    1991-03-01

    Theoretical analysis of benethic foraminiferal fossil assemblage formation shows that the assemblage eventually preserved in the sediments is an integrated result of species' test production rate, microhabitat behavior, and biogeochemical processes that control the probability of species' test preservation. The biogeochemical processes that influence test preservation in slope sediments are controlled by the flux of organic carbon to the sea-bed and the botton water oxygen concentration. These variables also affect the depth of the biotic habitation zone in the sediments. Therefore, organic carbon flux and bottom water oxygen content should be reflected in benthic foraminiferal fossil assemblages for both ecologic and taphonomic reasons. An integrated study of fossil assemblage generation was conducted on the Gulf of Mexico continental slope using box cores collected along depth transects across the oxygen minimum, and using live and dead assemblage analysis combined with {sup 210}Pb measurements to quantify biotic activity in the sediments and pore water nutrient and metals analysis to quantify biogeochemical processes acting in the sediment habitation zone. The results show that the size of the habitation zone and live standing stock are influenced by organic carbon flux and oxygen supply to the sea-bed. The fossil assemblage is created progressively through the upper 10-20 cm of sediment and biologichemically driven test destruction (taphonomic process) is important in determining the assemblage that enters the geologic record.

  16. Influence of a large dam on the longitudinal patterns of fish assemblages in Qingyi Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xiao-Yun; Lu, Zhi; Yan, Yun-Zhi; Chen, Yi-Feng; Jia, Yin-Tao

    2014-09-01

    Using seasonally collected data (2009-2010) from 15 sampling sites that represent first- to fifth-order streams within the Qingyi watershed, we examined the spatio-temporal patterns of fish assemblages along two longitudinal gradients to explore the effects of a large dam on fish assemblages at the watershed scale. No significant variation was observed in either species richness or assemblage structure across seasons. Species richness significantly varied according to stream order and gradient. Dam construction appeared to decrease species richness upstream substantially, while a significant decrease between gradients only occurred within fourth-order streams. Along the gradient without the large dam, fish assemblage structures presented distinct separation between two neighboring stream orders, with the exception of fourth-order versus fifth-order streams. However, the gradient disrupted by a large dam displayed the opposite pattern in the spatial variation of fish assemblages related with stream orders. Significant between-gradient differences in fish assemblage structures were only observed within fourth-order streams. Species distributions were determined by local habitat environmental factors, including elevation, substrate, water depth, current discharge, wetted width, and conductivity. Our results suggested that dam construction might alter the longitudinal pattern in fish species richness and assemblage structure in Qingyi Stream, despite the localized nature of the ecological effect of dams.

  17. Historical changes in Nebraska's lotic fish assemblages: Implications of anthropogenic alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher D.; Fischer, Jesse R.; Quist, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The plains of midwestern North America have undergone significant anthropogenic alterations following European settlement with consequent effects to lotic fish assemblage structure. We examined trends in fish assemblage structure and function in Nebraska's lotic systems using site-specific, presence-absence data from historical (1939–1940) and contemporary surveys (2003–2005; n  =  183). Shifts in fish assemblage structure were characterized by declines of specialist species (e.g., western silvery minnow Hybognathus argyritis) and increases in nonnative, sport, and generalist species (e.g., common carp Cyprinus carpio). Our research illustrates differences between historical and contemporary surveys for both taxonomic and functional metrics. Changes in fish assemblage structure were correlated with a contemporary measure of anthropogenic alteration (Human Threat Index; HTI) and were most pronounced for large-scale threats (i.e., watershed HTI, overall HTI). The HTI is a composite index of cumulative anthropogenic alterations experienced by a stream system and was used to investigate broad-scale implications of anthropogenic activity on fish assemblage structure. Fish assemblages among sites were more similar in contemporary surveys than in historical surveys, such changes might indicate a homogenization of the fish assemblages. Losses of native species and increases in introduced species have occurred in Nebraska's lotic systems across a broad temporal span and shifts are likely related to high levels of human perturbation.

  18. C9.A/14 steelwork joints de poutres par plaque frontale : assemblages par gousset

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Les Tables de résistances ultimes des assemblages boulonnés par plaque frontale et par gousset, complétées par une description des modèles de calcul et des exemples d’application, ont pour but de faciliter la tâche de l'ingénieur et du constructeur. Cette première partie C9.A/14 contient les chapitres suivants: - Joints de poutres par plaque frontale en acier S235 et S355 - Assemblages par gousset en acier S235 et S355 Les Tables contiennent des données relatives à la géométrie ainsi que les valeurs de calcul correspondantes des résistances ultimes des assemblages ; elles remplacent le chapitre « Assemblages par plaques frontales et boulons HR » des anciennes Tables C9.1 de 1983 / 2002. Le calcul de ces assemblages par plaque frontale est basé sur les hypothèses du modèle de la méthode des composants décrite dans la norme SN EN 1993-1-8. Les vérifications sont effectuées selon la norme SIA 263:2013. Les assemblages par gousset remplacent les assemblages par double cornière, (telle...

  19. Effects of habitat structure and tidal height on epifaunal assemblages associated with macroalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacabelos, Eva; Olabarria, Celia; Incera, Mónica; Troncoso, Jesús S.

    2010-09-01

    Patterns of distribution and abundance of epifauna often differ markedly among macroalgal species. The hypotheses tested were that (1) assemblages of mobile epifauna associated with Laminaria ochroleuca and Sargassum muticum differed because they have different structure, and (2) assemblages of mobile epifauna associated with S. muticum differed between heights on the shore because tidal height affects physical and biological conditions. We also investigated the effect of epiphytic biomass on the composition of epifaunal assemblages. Hypotheses were tested with measuring and manipulative experiments using natural and artificial algae, and by measuring uni- and multivariate assemblage descriptors. The results indicated that epifaunal assemblages associated with natural L. ochroleuca and S. muticum differed, but only differences in epifaunal densities were likely to be related to the structure of algae since all other variables did not clearly differ between the two algae. Although structure might play an important role, other factors need to be taken into account and further experimental tests are necessary. Epifaunal assemblages associated with S. muticum did vary depending on the height on the shore, but inconsistently over time in the case of natural algae. In addition, epifaunal densities of natural algae were positively related to biomass of epiphytes in both species. Time of sampling, epiphytic load and height on the shore were the most important factors in structuring epifaunal assemblages rather than complexity of the host algae.

  20. Larval Fish Assemblages, Environment and Circulation in a Semienclosed Sea (Gulf Of California).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguero, M.; Sánchez-Velasco, L.; Lavín, M.; Marinone, G.

    2007-05-01

    Fish larvae and hydrographic data collected in the Gulf of California in December 2002 are used to describe the larval fish assemblages and to explore their relationships with environmental variables. The Bray-Curtis dissimilarity index defined three larval fish assemblages, whose goeographical distribution coincided with three areas defined by Principal Component Analysis of the environmental variables. The affinity of most of the species with the environmental characteristics of their areas of distribution could be interpreted as an indication that spawning occurred inside those areas. However, it is not known when the spawning took place, and the fast currents in the Gulf could rapidly disperse eggs and larvae. Since transport and retention is best studied from a Lagrangian point of view, the currents from a 3D numerical model were used to track large numbers of particles released in the different larval fish assemblage areas. Particle-tracking and connectivity matrices can help in assessing larval fish retention in seas that, like the Gulf of California, have well defined circulation patterns. On time scales around 30 days, retention occurred for the North assemblage in the Upper Gulf, for the Channel- Central assemblage in the anticyclone over the Norhern Gulf and in Ballenas Channel, and for the South assemblage in the eddy over San Pedro Mártir basin and in the shallow zone off the peninsula. Therefore, the Lagrangian analysis revealed that the observed larval fish assemblages have a permanency long enough to allow the larve to remain in a favorable environment until they develop motility.

  1. Aquatic insect assemblages associated with subalpine stream segment types in relict glaciated headwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Joshua S.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Bolton, Susan M.; Weekes, Anne A.; Gara, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    1. Aquatic habitats and biotic assemblages in subalpine headwaters are sensitive to climate and human impacts. Understanding biotic responses to such perturbations and the contribution of high-elevation headwaters to riverine biodiversity requires the assessment of assemblage composition among habitat types. We compared aquatic insect assemblages among headwater stream segment types in relict glaciated subalpine basins in Mt. Rainier National Park, Washington, USA. 2. Aquatic insects were collected during summer and autumn in three headwater basins. In each basin, three different stream segment types were sampled: colluvial groundwater sources, alluvial lake inlets, and cascade-bedrock lake outlets. Ward's hierarchical cluster analysis revealed high β diversity in aquatic insect assemblages, and non-metric multidimensional scaling indicated that spatial and temporal patterns in assemblage composition differed among headwater stream segment types. Aquatic insect assemblages showed more fidelity to stream segment types than to individual basins, and the principal environmental variables associated with assemblage structure were temperature and substrate. 3. Indicator species analyses identified specific aquatic insects associated with each stream segment type. Several rare and potentially endemic aquatic insect taxa were present, including the recently described species, Lednia borealis (Baumann and Kondratieff). 4. Our results indicate that aquatic insect assemblages in relict glaciated subalpine headwaters were strongly differentiated among stream segment types. These results illustrate the contribution of headwaters to riverine biodiversity and emphasise the importance of these habitats for monitoring biotic responses to climate change. Monitoring biotic assemblages in high-elevation headwaters is needed to prevent the potential loss of unique and sensitive biota.

  2. Structure of molluscan assemblages in sheltered intertidal unconsolidated environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Regina Denadai

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The molluscan macrofauna from 13 oceanic sheltered intertidal unconsolidated environments and its relationship with abiotic factors were studied in order to establish the degree of species richness and to understand the role environment plays in structuring such assemblages. Four distinct intertidal habitat types were recognized based on molluscan assemblage descriptors (diversity, richness and density and abiotic characteristics. The mean grain size (in phy units and the beach slope showed a negative relationship with the diversity, richness and density. Coarser sediments were favorable to molluscan fauna in the study areas, contrasting the well-known negative effect of this type of sand on fauna in typical oceanic beaches. The low-tide terraces, typical from tide-dominated areas, and the presence of physical (rocky fragments and biogenic (gravel structures, were also associated to the higher values of richness. The high richness in the study area as a whole seemed to be a direct consequence of its environmental heterogeneity, once it was composed by quite distinct habitat types.A malacofauna de 13 ambientes oceânicos, protegidos, entremarés e não-consolidados e sua relação com os fatores abióticos foram estudados com o intuito de conhecer a riqueza de espécies e compreender o papel dos fatores abióticos na estruturação das associações. Quatro tipos distintos de ambiente entremarés foram reconhecidos com base nos descritores da comunidade (diversidade, riqueza e densidade e nas características abióticas. O tamanho médio do grão de areia (em phy e a inclinação da praia mostraram uma relação negativa com a diversidade, riqueza e densidade. Sedimentos grossos foram favoráveis à fauna de moluscos nas áreas estudadas, contrastando o bem conhecido efeito negativo deste tipo de areia sobre a fauna em praias oceânicas típicas. Os terraços de maré baixa, típicos de áreas dominadas pela maré, e a presença de estruturas

  3. PERMIAN FUSULINID ASSEMBLAGES AND STRATIGRAPHY OF THE TRANSCAUCASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ERNST JA LEVEN

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available The Permian sequence of the Transcaucasia, which comprises the Davaly, Asni, Gnishik, Arpa, Khachik, and Akhura Formations, is described. A precise dating of the formations based on the analysis of fusulinid assemblages is also provided. The Davaly Formation corresponds to the Bolorian Stage of the Lower Permian (Cisuralian; the Asni Formation corresponds to the Kubergandian Stage, and to the lower half of the Murgabian Stage of the Middle Permian (Guadalupian; the Gnishik Formation corresponds approximately to the upper half of the Murgabian Stage; and the Arpa and Khachik Formations represent the entire Midian Stage of the Middle Permian. Only the uppermost Chanakhchy Beds of the Khachik Formation are referred to the upper series of the Permian (Lopingian, based on the latest proposal of the International Subcommission on Permian Stratigraphy concerning series boundaries. The Akhura Formation encompasses the Dzhulfian and Dorashamian Stages of the Upper Permian. Refined correlations between the Permian sequence of the Transcaucasia and the most complete Permian sequences of the Tethyan region (Central Iran, southestern Pamirs, South China, Japan are presented. The transgressive overlapping of the Permian deposits is recorded in these areas, similar to the Transcaucasia. Although the transgression began during the Bolorian, it reached the widest extent in the Kubergandian and therefore, in most sections the transgressive series begins with deposits of Kubergandian age. The Middle and Upper Permian deposits of the Transcaucasia, Iran, and southern Turkey belonged to a single carbonate platform. Similar extensive carbonate platforms are recorded in the southern parts of Afghanistan and China. A change in the sedimentary regime was recorded in all these platforms at the boundary between the Guadalupian and Lopingian epochs. The Guadalupian time was marked by the intensive accumulation of biolitithic and detrital limestones produced by benthic

  4. Vertical stratification of the termite assemblage in a neotropical rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roisin, Yves; Dejean, Alain; Corbara, Bruno; Orivel, Jerôme; Samaniego, Mirna; Leponce, Maurice

    2006-08-01

    The importance of termites as decomposers in tropical forests has long been recognized. Studies on the richness and diversity of termite species and their ecological function have flourished in more recent times, but these have been mostly conducted in a thin stratum within a standing man's reach. Our aims were to evaluate the specific richness and composition of the termite assemblage in the canopy of a tropical rainforest and to determine its originality with respect to the sympatric ground-level fauna. We conducted systematic searches for canopy termites, together with conventional sampling of the sympatric ground-level fauna, in the San Lorenzo forest, Panama. We hypothesized that (1) the canopy accommodates two categories of wood-feeding termites (long-distance foragers and small-colony "one-piece" species) and possibly soil-feeders in suspended soil-like habitats; (2) due to the abundance of soil-feeders, the overall diversity of the ground fauna is higher than that of the canopy; (3) differences in microclimate and resource accessibility favour vertical stratification among wood-feeders. Sixty-three canopy samples yielded ten species of termites, all wood-feeders. Five of these were not found at ground level, although a total of 243 ground samples were collected, representing 29 species. In addition to long-distance foragers (Microcerotermes and Nasutitermes spp.) and small-colony termites (mostly Kalotermitidae), the canopy fauna included Termes hispaniolae, a wood-feeding Termitidae from an allegedly soil-feeding genus, living in large dead branches. Soil-feeders were absent from the canopy, probably because large epiphytes were scarce. As predicted, the ground fauna was much richer than that of the canopy, but the species richness of both habitats was similar when only wood-feeders were considered. Vertical stratification was strongly marked among wood-feeders, as all common species, apart from the arboreal-nesting Microcerotermes arboreus, could

  5. Contrasting patterns of phylogenetic assemblage structure along the elevational gradient for major hummingbird clades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parra, Juan L.; Rahbek, Carsten; McGuire, Jimmy A.

    2011-01-01

    a variety of published and non-published sources. For the entire family and each of the major hummingbird clades (hermits, emeralds, mangoes, coquettes and brilliants) we quantified the phylogenetic structure of each assemblage using the net relatedness index (NRI). This index calculates the standardized...... relatives away from the elevation of origin at the family level and for assemblages of mangoes and brilliants. The opposite pattern was found for assemblages of coquettes and emeralds. For the hermits, variation in phylogenetic structure was not explained by elevation. Clades with high levels of feeding...

  6. Mineral assemblages and oxygen and sulphur fugacities in natural water-rock interaction processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amore, F.; Gianelli, G.

    1984-04-01

    Several mineral assemblages capable of buffering oxygen and sulphur fugacity and theoretical calculations were used to determine the fugacities of these two gas species over a temperature range between 150° and 350°C. Computed values were compared with those calculated from the composition of the geothermal fluids of Larderello, Travale, Bagnore and Piancastagnaio (Italy), The Geysers (USA) and Cerro Prieto (Mexico). The possible hydrothermal mineral assemblages that best fit the field data are those containing minerals frequently found in many geothermal fields: epidote, chlorite, K-feldspar, quartz and pyrite. These assemblages can be used in place of the classical buffers based on iron oxides and sulphides.

  7. Solidification in a Supercomputer: From Crystal Nuclei to Dendrite Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuta, Yasushi; Ohno, Munekazu; Takaki, Tomohiro

    2015-08-01

    Thanks to the recent progress in high-performance computational environments, the range of applications of computational metallurgy is expanding rapidly. In this paper, cutting-edge simulations of solidification from atomic to microstructural levels performed on a graphics processing unit (GPU) architecture are introduced with a brief introduction to advances in computational studies on solidification. In particular, million-atom molecular dynamics simulations captured the spontaneous evolution of anisotropy in a solid nucleus in an undercooled melt and homogeneous nucleation without any inducing factor, which is followed by grain growth. At the microstructural level, the quantitative phase-field model has been gaining importance as a powerful tool for predicting solidification microstructures. In this paper, the convergence behavior of simulation results obtained with this model is discussed, in detail. Such convergence ensures the reliability of results of phase-field simulations. Using the quantitative phase-field model, the competitive growth of dendrite assemblages during the directional solidification of a binary alloy bicrystal at the millimeter scale is examined by performing two- and three-dimensional large-scale simulations by multi-GPU computation on the supercomputer, TSUBAME2.5. This cutting-edge approach using a GPU supercomputer is opening a new phase in computational metallurgy.

  8. Edge effect on carabid assemblages along forest-grass transects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Magura

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available During 1997 and 1998, we have tested the edge-effect for carabids along oak-hornbeam forest-grass transects using pitfall traps in Hungary. Our hypothesis was that the diversity of carabids will be higher in the forest edge than in the forest interior. We also focused on the characteristic species of the habitats along the transects and the relationships between their distribution and the biotic and abiotic factors.

    Our results proved that there was a significant edge effect on the studied carabid communities: the Shannon diversity increased significantly along the transects from the forest towards the grass. The diversity of the carabids were significantly higher in the forest edge and in the grass than in the forest interior. The carabids of the forest, the forest edge and the grass are separated from each other by principal coordinates analysis and by indicator species analysis (IndVal, suggesting that each of the three habitats has a distinct species assemblages. There were 5 distinctive groups of carabids: 1 habitat generalists, 2 forest generalists, 3 species of the open area, 4 forest edge species, and 5 forest specialists. It was demonstrated by multiple regression analyses, that the relative air moisture, temperature of the ground, the cover of leaf litter, herbs, shrubs and canopy cover, abundance of the carabids’ preys are the most important factors determining the diversity and spatial pattern of carabids along the studied transects.

  9. Pollinator-mediated assemblage processes in California wildflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe Runquist, R; Grossenbacher, D; Porter, S; Kay, K; Smith, J

    2016-05-01

    Community assembly is the result of multiple ecological and evolutionary forces that influence species coexistence. For flowering plants, pollinators are often essential for plant reproduction and establishment, and pollinator-mediated interactions may influence plant community composition. Here, we use null models and community phylogenetic analyses of co-occurrence patterns to determine the role of pollinator-mediated processes in structuring plant communities dominated by congeners. We surveyed three species-rich genera (Limnanthes, Mimulus and Clarkia) with centres of diversity in the Sierra Nevada of California. Each genus contains species that co-flower and share pollinators, and each has a robust phylogeny. Within each genus, we surveyed 44-48 communities at three spatial scales, measured floral and vegetative traits and tested for segregation or aggregation of: (i) species, (ii) floral traits (which are likely to be influenced by pollinators), and (iii) vegetative traits (which are likely affected by other environmental factors). We detected both aggregation and segregation of floral traits that were uncorrelated with vegetative trait patterns; we infer that pollinators have shaped the community assembly although the mechanisms may be varied (competition, facilitation, or filtering). We also found that mating system differences may play an important role in allowing species co-occurrence. Together, it appears that pollinators influence community assemblage in these three clades.

  10. Participating Technologies? Nonhuman Others and Socio-Material Assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina

    2015-01-01

    This talk takes up the conversation analytical understanding of participation and combines it with the idea of technical agency developed in actor-network theory (Latour 2005). Rather than depicting nonhumans as objects of human actions, actor-network theory understands actions as socio-material ......This talk takes up the conversation analytical understanding of participation and combines it with the idea of technical agency developed in actor-network theory (Latour 2005). Rather than depicting nonhumans as objects of human actions, actor-network theory understands actions as socio......-material assemblages of humans and nonhumans that form actions. Thus nonhumans become participants of social actions. But, actor-network theory misses the moment-by-moment development of practices, which, for example, can be seen in workplace studies (Luff, Hindmarsh, & Heath 2001) and does not distinguish different......? The discussion will be based on the analysis of video-recordings from two data-sets that show different ways of how technologies take part in interactions. The focus is set on the participation framework of the situation and the construction of a participation status of the technology. The first example shows...

  11. Response of neotropical bat assemblages to human land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Rodrigo; Badano, Ernesto I; Moreno, Claudia E

    2013-10-01

    Neotropical bats are sensitive to human-induced habitat changes, and some authors believe bats can be used as bioindicators. In the literature, however, the results are disparate. Some results show bat diversity deceases as disturbance increases, whereas others indicate no effect. Determining the general response patterns of bats when they encounter different degrees of human-induced disturbance across the Neotropics would help to determine their usefulness as bioindicators. In a series of meta-analyses, we compared the occurrence frequency of bat species between well-preserved forests and human-use areas. We obtained data through an extensive review of published peer-reviewed articles, theses, and reports. The overall effect size indicated that human-use areas harbored more bat species than well-preserved forests. Different response patterns emerged when meta-analyses were conducted separately by family, feeding habit, vegetation stratum, and conservation status. Our results suggest that bat assemblages display strong responses to forest loss and land-use change and that the direction and magnitude of these responses depends on the bat group under study and the type of disturbance. Our results are consistent with the idea that bats are useful for assessing the effects of habitat changes in the Neotropics. However, with our meta-analyses we could not detect fine differences in bat feeding habits, especially within Phyllostomidae, or elucidate the effect of landscape configuration. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  12. Abyssal hills: Influence of topography on benthic foraminiferal assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoudis, Paris V.; Bett, Brian J.; Gooday, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Abyssal plains, often thought of as vast flat areas, encompass a variety of terrains including abyssal hills, features that constitute the single largest landscape type on Earth. The potential influence on deep-sea benthic faunas of mesoscale habitat complexity arising from the presence of abyssal hills is still poorly understood. To address this issue we focus on benthic foraminifera (testate protists) in the >150-μm fraction of Megacorer samples (0-1 cm layer) collected at five different sites in the area of the Porcupine Abyssal Plain Sustained Observatory (NE Atlantic, 4850 m water depth). Three sites are located on the tops of small abyssal hills (200-500 m elevation) and two on the adjacent abyssal plain. We examined benthic foraminiferal assemblage characteristics (standing stock, diversity, composition) in relation to seafloor topography (hills vs. plain). Density and rarefied diversity were not significantly different between the hills and the plain. Nevertheless, hills do support a higher species density (i.e. species per unit area), a distinct fauna, and act to increase the regional species pool. Topographically enhanced bottom-water flows that influence food availability and sediment type are suggested as the most likely mechanisms responsible for these differences. Our findings highlight the potential importance of mesoscale heterogeneity introduced by relatively modest topography in regulating abyssal foraminiferal diversity. Given the predominance of abyssal hill terrain in the global ocean, we suggest the need to include faunal data from abyssal hills in assessments of abyssal ecology.

  13. Carbon constrains fungal endophyte assemblages along the timberline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Teng; Weisenhorn, Pamela; Gilbert, Jack A; Ni, Yingying; Sun, Ruibo; Shi, Yu; Chu, Haiyan

    2016-09-01

    The alpha diversity of foliar fungal endophytes (FEs) in leaves of Betula ermanii in a subalpine timberline ecotone on Changbai Mountain, China increased with elevation. There were also significant differences in beta diversity along the elevation gradient. Among the environmental variables analysed, leaf carbon significantly increased with elevation, and was the most significant environmental factor that constrained the alpha and beta diversity in the FE communities. Tree height and the cellulose, lignin, and carbon/nitrogen ratio of the leaves also affected the FE assemblages. When controlled for the effects of elevation, leaf carbon was still the main driver of changes in evenness, Shannon diversity and FE community composition. The results offered clues of the carbon acquisition strategy of the foliar FEs across this cold terrain. There was strong multicollinearity between both annual precipitation and temperature, with elevation (|Pearson r| > 0.986), so the effects of these climatic variables were impossible to separate; however, they may play key roles, and the direct effects of both warrant further investigation. As pioneer decomposers of leaf litter, variations in diversity and community composition of FE measured here may feedback and influence carbon cycling and dynamics in these forest ecosystems.

  14. Local and regional rarity in a diverse tropical fish assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hercos, A P; Sobansky, M; Queiroz, H L; Magurran, A E

    2013-01-22

    Because most species in an ecological assemblage are rare, much of the species richness we value is due to taxa with few individuals or a restricted distribution. It has been apparent since the time of ecological pioneers such as Bates and Darwin that tropical systems have disproportionately large numbers of rare species, yet the distribution and abundance patterns of these species remain largely unknown. Here, we examine the diversity of freshwater fish in a series of lakes in the Amazonian várzea, and relate relative abundance, both as numbers of individuals and as biomass, to the occurrence of species in space and time. We find a bimodal relationship of occurrence that distinguishes temporally and spatially persistent species from those that are infrequent in both space and time. Logistic regression reveals that information on occurrence helps distinguish those species that are rare in this locality but abundant elsewhere, from those that are rare throughout the region. These results form a link between different approaches used to evaluate commonness and rarity. In doing so, they provide a tool for identifying species of high conservation priority in poorly documented but species rich localities.

  15. Vesicle-metal-sulfide assemblages from the Chelyabinsk meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronikov, A.; Lauretta, D.; Hill, D.; Andronikova, I.

    2014-07-01

    On February 15, 2013, an ET object entered the Earth's atmosphere over the Russian city of Chelyabinsk. It entered at a preatmospheric velocity of 18.6 km/sec at the angle of 17--20°. The bolide responsible for this event was estimated to be 17-20 m in diameter and had a mass of ˜10 Ktons; the ensuing airburst occurred at an altitude >20 km and released a total energy of ˜440 kT [1,2]. The Chelyabinsk meteorite is an equilibrated LL5 ordinary chondrite, shock stage S4, and weathering grade WG0 similar to other LL5 falls [1,2]. Our studied sample is an impact melt breccia consisting of shock-darkened chondrite clasts (SDC) and vesicular impact melt lithology (IML). The SDC have recrystallized textures and contain barred- and porphyritic-olivine, porphyritic-olivine-pyroxene and radial-pyroxene chondrules in the intrachondrule matrix. A dense network of thin fractures in the SDC is filled up with opaque minerals [cf. 3]. Metals in the SDC are kamacite (4.7--8.5 % Ni), taenite (21.4--33.5 % Ni), and martensite (14.5--18.6 % Ni). The IML consists mostly of tiny (bearing troilite (62.2--64.2 % Fe; 35.2--37.2 % S; 3000--5000 ppm Ni), with rare pentlandite (41.2--48.6 % Fe, 33.2--34.3 % S, 19.4--23.9 % Ni). The presence of abundant vesicles in the IML indicates strong heating and volatilization. Since no other phase except for sulfide-metal assemblages were observed to fill up vesicles, the likely source of volatiles is S vapor formed by vaporization of FeS during impact melting [cf. 4]. Molten metal and sulfide coalesced into droplets of metal-sulfide liquids forming eventually sulfide-metal assemblages. A notable compositional difference is observed between sulfides not containing metals and those with metals. The metal-free sulfides display higher concentrations of such elements as Ni, Co, Ga, Ge, As, Mo, Ru, Pd, Sn, Sb, Te, Au, and Hg, and lower amounts of Cu than their metal-bearing counterparts. The metal-free sulfides may represent loci of former ''parental'' Fe

  16. Coexistence in a multispecies assemblage of eagles in central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzner, T.E.; Bragin, E.A.; Knick, S.T.; Smith, A.T.

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated factors that permit species coexistence in an exceptional assemblage of similar raptor species at the Naurzum Zapovednik (a national nature reserve) in north-central Kazakhstan. White-tailed Sea-Eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla), Imperial Eagle (Aquila heliaca), Golden Eagle (A. chrysaetos), and Steppe Eagle (A. nipalensis) all breed at the Zapovednik. Steppe Eagle use of nesting resources was distinct from that of tree-nesting species. We evaluated differences in nest tree and nest habitat characteristics, nest dimensions and positions, and nest spacing among the three forest-dwelling eagle species to distinguish between the effects of inter- and intraspecific resource limitations on species coexistence. Although the different species bred in similar habitat and sometimes reused other species' nests, the dimensions, positions and locations of their nests often differed. These differences did not appear to result from interspecific competition. Nest spacing trends were also species specific; Imperial Eagles generally nested farther from other eagle nests than did Golden Eagles and White-tailed Sea-Eagles. Intraspecific variation in habitat, physical characteristics, and spacing patterns of Imperial Eagle nests was extensive throughout the nature reserve. Although interspecific partitioning of nesting habitat may allow coexistence of ground-nesting Steppe Eagles, interspecific competition did not appear to be a primary determinant of the use of nest habitat, space, or nests by tree-nesting species. Rather, interspecific effects appeared secondary to intraspecific effects in determining coexistence of tree-nesting eagles at this site.

  17. Simplification of arboreal marsupial assemblages in response to increasing urbanization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Isaac

    Full Text Available Arboreal marsupials play an essential role in ecosystem function including regulating insect and plant populations, facilitating pollen and seed dispersal and acting as a prey source for higher-order carnivores in Australian environments. Primarily, research has focused on their biology, ecology and response to disturbance in forested and urban environments. We used presence-only species distribution modelling to understand the relationship between occurrences of arboreal marsupials and eco-geographical variables, and to infer habitat suitability across an urban gradient. We used post-proportional analysis to determine whether increasing urbanization affected potential habitat for arboreal marsupials. The key eco-geographical variables that influenced disturbance intolerant species and those with moderate tolerance to disturbance were natural features such as tree cover and proximity to rivers and to riparian vegetation, whereas variables for disturbance tolerant species were anthropogenic-based (e.g., road density but also included some natural characteristics such as proximity to riparian vegetation, elevation and tree cover. Arboreal marsupial diversity was subject to substantial change along the gradient, with potential habitat for disturbance-tolerant marsupials distributed across the complete gradient and potential habitat for less tolerant species being restricted to the natural portion of the gradient. This resulted in highly-urbanized environments being inhabited by a few generalist arboreal marsupial species. Increasing urbanization therefore leads to functional simplification of arboreal marsupial assemblages, thus impacting on the ecosystem services they provide.

  18. Multi-regional synthesis of temporal trends in biotic assemblages in streams and rivers of the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew P.; Brasher, Anne M.D.; Keenen, Jonathan G.

    2013-01-01

    Biotic assemblages in aquatic ecosystems are excellent integrators and indicators of changing environmental conditions within a watershed. Therefore, temporal changes in abiotic environmental variables often can be inferred from temporal changes in biotic assemblages. Algae, macroinvertebrate, and fish assemblage data were collected from 91 sampling sites in 4 geographic regions (northeastern/north-central, southeastern, south-central, and western), collectively encompassing the continental United States, from 1993 to 2009 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program. This report uses a multivariate approach to synthesize temporal trends in biotic assemblages and correlations with relevant abiotic parameters as a function of biotic assemblage, geographic region, and land use. Of the three groups of biota, algal assemblages had temporal trends at the greatest percentage of sites. Of the regions, a greater percentage of sites in the northeastern/north-central and western regions had temporal trends in biotic assemblages. In terms of land use, a greater percentage of watersheds draining agricultural, urban, and undeveloped areas had significant temporal changes in biota, as compared to watersheds with mixed use. Correlations between biotic assemblages and abiotic variables indicate that, in general, macroinvertebrate assemblages correlated with water quality and fish assemblages correlated with physical habitat. Taken together, results indicate that there are regional differences in how individual biotic assemblages (algae, macroinvertebrates, and fish) respond to different abiotic drivers of change.

  19. Mollusc life and death assemblages on a tropical rocky shore as proxies for the taphonomic loss in a fossil counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Mehlin; Surlyk, Finn

    2013-01-01

    species from the rocky shore and the associated sandy pocket beaches, and only a few exotic species from other, completely different habitats are present. The environmental fidelity between the life and death assemblage is thus high, with the majority of species from the death assemblage representing......Comparison of a modern rocky shore mollusc life assemblage from Thailand with the associated death assemblage, and interpretation of the fossilization potential of the latter, are used to investigate the fidelity in reconstruction of ancient analogues. The fauna from the death assemblage represents...... the intertidal to shallow subtidal rocky shore environment, from which the life assemblage was sampled, and the associated sandy beach environment. The life assemblage should in principle have a high fossilization potential because only two out of 67 species are without a calcareous shell, but it actually has...

  20. ANALYSIS OF MACROINVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGES IN RELATION TO ENVIRONMENTAL GRADIENTS IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using redundancy analysis (RDA) and canonical correspondence analysis (CCA), we assessed relationships among chemical and physical characteristics and macroinvertebrate assemblages at stream sites sampled by the Regional Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (R-EMAP) in...

  1. Partitioning taxonomic diversity of aquatic insect assemblages and functional feeding groups in Neotropical Savanna headwater streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological diversity can be divided into: alpha (α, local), beta (β, difference in assemblage composition among locals), and gamma (γ, total diversity). We assessed the partitioning of taxonomic diversity of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT) and of ...

  2. The dynamics of a Mediterranean coralligenous sponge assemblage at decennial and millennial temporal scales

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marco Bertolino; Gabriele Costa; Mirko Carella; Riccardo Cattaneo-Vietti; Carlo Cerrano; Maurizio Pansini; Gianluca Quarta; Lucio Calcagnile; Giorgio Bavestrello

    2017-01-01

    This paper concerns the changes occurred over both decennial and millennial spans of time in a sponge assemblage present in coralligenous biogenic build-ups growing at 15 m depth in the Ligurian Sea...

  3. Landform-Sediment Assemblages Units of the Upper Mississippi River Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Wisconsinan and Holocene Landform-Sediment Assemblages of the Upper Mississippi River Valley. Knowledge of the spatial distribution of natural and cultural resources...

  4. Coral reef fish assemblages along a disturbance gradient in the northern Persian Gulf: A seasonal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazilou, Amir; Shokri, Mohammad Reza; Gladstone, William

    2016-04-30

    Seasonal dynamics of coral reef fish assemblages were assessed along a gradient of potential anthropogenic disturbance in the Northern Persian Gulf. Overall, the attributes of coral reef fish assemblages showed seasonality at two different levels: seasonal changes irrespective of the magnitude of disturbance level (e.g. species richness), and seasonal changes in response to disturbance level (e.g. total abundance and assemblage composition). The examined parameters mostly belonged to the second group, but the interpretation of the relationship between patterns of seasonal changes and the disturbance level was not straightforward. The abundance of carnivorous fishes did not vary among seasons. SIMPER identified the family Nemipteridae as the major contributor to the observed spatiotemporal variations in the composition of coral reef fish assemblages in the study area.

  5. Effects of immune supplementation and immune challenge on bacterial assemblages in the avian cloaca

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matson, K.D.; Versteegh, M.A.; Velde, van der M.; Tieleman, B.I.

    2015-01-01

    Relationships between avian physiology and bacterial assemblages in the cloaca are poorly understood. We used molecular techniques to analyze cloacal swabs from pigeons that were subjected to two immunological manipulations: lysozyme supplementation and endotoxin challenge. From the swabs, we derive

  6. Aquatic bacterial assemblage variability in the supra littoral zone of Appledore Island, Gulf of Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, Joseph L; Neuharth-Keusch, Dani; Hewson, Ian

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the abundance and assemblage variability of bacteria in 10 spatially distinct freshwater pools on Appledore Island, Gulf of Maine. Assemblages were strongly heterogeneous between pools separated by even short distances. To gain insight into factors that may lead to the establishment of novel assemblages, we conducted an ecosystem-open choromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) enrichment experiment within mesocosms inoculated with a standardized microbial community and observed patterns of their composition over time. Assemblages were strongly divergent from each other in composition after only 3 days of incubation. Divergence among mesocosms was significantly higher with increasing levels of CDOM. CDOM addition initially had a strong positive impact on bacterial operation taxonomic unit (OTU) richness and negative impact on bacterial OTU evenness, but no impact on total bacterial abundance, suggesting that factors controlling abundance are decoupled from those influencing overall composition. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional diversity of macrobenthic assemblages decreases in response to sewage discharges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gusmao, Joao B.; Brauko, Kalina M.; Eriksson, Britas K.; Lana, Paulo C.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the effects of sewage discharge on a subtropical estuary by comparing the functional diversity of intertidal macroinvertebrate assemblages in contaminated with non-contaminated reference areas. Functional structure was assessed using biological traits analysis (BTA) and four multivariate

  8. Foraminiferal assemblages and organic carbon relationship in benthic marine ecosystem of Western Indian Continental Shelf

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Nigam, R.

    Foraminiferal assemblages in the sediment and their relation to organic carbon have been studied in selected nearshore areas on the west coast, namely, Gulf of Kutch, Bombay-Daman sector, Vengurla-Dabhol sector, Cola Bay and Karwar. Study reveals...

  9. Asian longhorned beetle complicates the relationship between taxonomic diversity and pest vulnerability in street tree assemblages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Urban foresters routinely emphasise the importance of taxonomic diversity to reduce the vulnerability of tree assemblages to invasive pests, but it is unclear to...

  10. Herbaceous forage and selection patterns by ungulates across varying herbivore assemblages in a South African savanna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treydte, A.C.; Baumgartner, S.; Heitkonig, I.M.A.; Grant, C.C.; Getz, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Herbivores generally have strong structural and compositional effects on vegetation, which in turn determines the plant forage species available. We investigated how selected large mammalian herbivore assemblages use and alter herbaceous vegetation structure and composition in a southern African sav

  11. Ecological quality assessment in the Eastern Mediterranean combining live and dead molluscan assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshno, Yael; Benjamini, Chaim; Edelman-Furstenberg, Yael

    2016-03-15

    The EU directive to quantify ecological quality by deviation from pre-impacted conditions often fails to be implemented because past information is usually incomplete or missing. Molluscan death assemblages, representing long-term accumulation of shells on the sea floor, average out short-term variability and can serve as a baseline for quality assessment. AMBI, Bentix and Shannon-Wiener indices were calculated for live and dead assemblages from polluted and control stations on the highly oligotrophic Levantine shallow shelf of Israel. Bentix successfully tracked deterioration over time, from moderate EcoQS in the dead to poor in the live assemblage. Additional modification of the ecological classification of species by scoring the naturally abundant Corbula gibba as pollution-sensitive improved the utility of the Bentix index in monitoring in this part of the Mediterranean. This adjustment of Bentix, and use of death assemblages for an ecological baseline, should therefore be incorporated in monitoring for compliance with EU directives.

  12. Stratigraphy, foraminiferal assemblages and paleoenvironments in the Late Cretaceous of the Upper Magdalena Valley, Colombia (part I)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Luis S.

    1997-03-01

    The present work focuses on the Cretaceous record (Middle Albian-Maastrichtian) of the Upper Magdalena Valley (UMV), with a scope that covers facies and biofacies. The nomenclatural scheme previously stated for the Girardot-Guataqui area is here extended and proposed for all the basin, the following fomational units being characterized in detail. The Hondita Formation (Middle Albian-late Turonian), placed on top of the Caballos Formation, is separated from the Lomagorda Formation (late Turonian-early Santonian) by a chert interval within a succession of predominantly dark shales deposited in outer shelf environments. The Olini Group (early Santonian-late Campanian) presents two conspicuous chert units (Lidita Inferior and Superior) overlain by the Nivel de Lutitas y Arenas (early Maastrichtian). The sandstones of La Tabla and finally the mudstones of the Seca Formation (Maastrichtian) represent diverse littoral environments of the end of the Cretaceous. In the UMV, the Cretaceous system attains approximately 1350 m of thickness. Within the paleogeographic scenario, the drowning of the basin and of the adjacent Central Cordillera during most of the Late Cretaceous enabled upwelling currents and the development of widespread pelagic sediments. These sediments graded to shallower water deposits towards the south of the basin. In the Upper Cretaceous, four sequences of second order can be identified. The longer cycle begins at the base of the Hondita Formation and exhibits the maximum flooding in the Cenomanian condensed section of this unit. Following this cycle, three successive sudden sea level drops mark the boundaries of complete sequences, each comprising well developed lowstand, transgressive and highstand system tracts. After the last cycle was completed, the basin was uplifted and rocks of the Seca Formation were cannibalized by fluvial processes during the Tertiary. An angular unconformity that truncates this unit represents the uppermost sequence boundary of

  13. Anthropogenic disturbance and environmental associations with fish assemblage structure in two nonwadeable rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, T. P.; Quist, Michael; Pierce, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    Nonwadeable rivers are unique ecosystems that support high levels of aquatic biodiversity, yet they have been greatly altered by human activities. Although riverine fish assemblages have been studied in the past, we still have an incomplete understanding of how fish assemblages respond to both natural and anthropogenic influences in large rivers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations between fish assemblage structure and reach-scale habitat, dam, and watershed land use characteristics. In the summers of 2011 and 2012, comprehensive fish and environmental data were collected from 33 reaches in the Iowa and Cedar rivers of eastern-central Iowa. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was used to evaluate environmental relationships with species relative abundance, functional trait abundance (e.g. catch rate of tolerant species), and functional trait composition (e.g. percentage of tolerant species). On the basis of partial CCAs, reach-scale habitat, dam characteristics, and watershed land use features explained 25.0–81.1%, 6.2–25.1%, and 5.8–47.2% of fish assemblage variation, respectively. Although reach-scale, dam, and land use factors contributed to overall assemblage structure, the majority of fish assemblage variation was constrained by reach-scale habitat factors. Specifically, mean annual discharge was consistently selected in nine of the 11 CCA models and accounted for the majority of explained fish assemblage variance by reach-scale habitat. This study provides important insight on the influence of anthropogenic disturbances across multiple spatial scales on fish assemblages in large river systems.

  14. Response of Macroarthropod Assemblages to the Loss of Hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), a Foundation Species

    OpenAIRE

    Baiser, Benjamin H.; Record, Sydne; Ellison, Aaron M.; Tara E. Sackett; Bewick, Sharon; Nathan J Sanders

    2011-01-01

    In eastern North American forests, eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) is a foundation species. As hemlock is lost from forests due to the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) and pre-emptive salvage logging, the structure of assemblages of species associated with hemlock is expected to change. We manipulated hemlock canopy structure at hectare scales to investigate the effects of hemlock death on assemblages of ants, beetles, and spiders in a New England forest. Relative to refere...

  15. Distribution of soil testate amoeba assemblages along catenas in the northern taiga zone (Karelia, Russia)

    OpenAIRE

    Tsyganov, Andrey; Embulaeva, Elena; Mazei, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    Topography is one of the main factors, which regulate composition and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. However, the relationships between topography and soil protozoa remain poorly understood. We studied the distribution of testate amoeba assemblages in soil biotopes located at various topographic positions along two topographical gradients (catenas) in a forest site in the north taiga zone (Karelia, Russia). The variation in testate amoeba assemblages was estimated using univariate ass...

  16. Aquatic assemblages of the highly urbanized Santa Ana River Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L.R.; Burton, C.A.; Belitz, K.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the structure of periphyton, benthic macroinvertebrate, and fish assemblages and their associations with environmental variables at 17 sites on streams of the highly urbanized Santa Ana River basin in Southern California. All assemblages exhibited strong differences between highly urbanized sites in the valley and the least-impacted sites at the transition between the valley and undeveloped mountains. Results within the urbanized area differed among taxa. Periphyton assemblages were dominated by diatoms (>75% of total taxa). Periphyton assemblages within the urbanized area were not associated with any of the measured environmental variables, suggesting that structure of urban periphyton assemblages might be highly dependent on colonization dynamics. The number of Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, and Plecoptera (EPT) taxa included in macroinvertebrate assemblages ranged from 0 to 6 at urbanized sites. Benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages had significant correlations with several environmental variables within the urban area, suggesting that stream size and permanence were important determinants of distribution among the species able to survive conditions in urban streams. Only 4 of 16 fish species collected were native to the drainage. Fish assemblages of urbanized sites included two native species, arroyo chub Gila orcuttii and Santa Ana sucker Catostomus santaanae, at sites that were intermediate in coefficient of variation of bank-full width, depth, bed substrate, and water temperature. Alien species dominated urbanized sites with lesser or greater values for these variables. These results suggest that urban streams can be structured to enhance populations of native fishes. Continued study of urban streams in the Santa Ana River basin and elsewhere will contribute to the basic understanding of ecological principles and help preserve the maximum ecological value of streams in highly urbanized areas.

  17. Predominance of Giardia lamblia assemblage A among iron deficiency anaemic pre-school Egyptian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Eman M; Zaki, Wafaa M; Ahmed, Shahira A; Almatary, Amal M; Nemr, Nader I; Hussein, Abdalla M

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal parasites and nutritional deficiency can coexist and influence each other. This study aimed to clarify the association between Giardia genotypes and presence of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) among pre-school Egyptian children. Two groups (IDA and non-anaemic) of giardiasis children (44/group) were selected according to their recovery response after treatment of giardiasis. Each group included 24 and 20 gastrointestinal symptomatic and asymptomatic, respectively. Giardia human genotypes were performed by intergenic spacer (IGS) gene based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with high-resolution melting curve (HRM). PCR/HRM proved that Tms of assemblage A and B ranged from 79.31 ± 0.29 to 84.77 ± 0.31. In IDA patients, assemblages A and B were found among 40/44 (90.9 %) and 4/44 (9.1 %), respectively, while in non-anaemic patients, assemblages A and B were found in 10/44 (22.7 %) and 32/44 (72.7 %), respectively, beside two (4.6 %) cases had mixed infection. The difference was statistically significant. No significant relation was found between symptomatic or asymptomatic assemblages and IDA as assemblage A was found in 21/24 (87.5 %) and 19/20 (95 %) of symptomatic and asymptomatic, respectively, while 3/24 (12.5 %) and 1/20 (5 %) of assemblage B were symptomatic was asymptomatic, respectively. A significant relation was found between assemblage A subtypes distribution among IDA patients as AI and AII were detected on 23 (52.3 %) and 16 (36.4 %) of patients, respectively, while one case (2.3 %) had mixed infection. In conclusion, assemblage A is predominant among IDA giardiasis children suggesting its role in enhancing the occurrence of IDA while B has a protective role.

  18. Characterization of lysogens in bacterioplankton assemblages of the southern California borderland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Ian; Fuhrman, Jed A

    2007-05-01

    Viruses cause significant mortality of marine microorganisms; however, their role in shaping the composition of microbial assemblages has not been fully elucidated. Because viruses may form lysogenic relationships with their hosts, temperate viruses may influence bacterial assemblage structures through direct lysis of hosts when induced by environmental stimuli or by homoimmunity (i.e., immunity to closely related viruses). We investigated the components of bacterioplankton assemblages that bore prophage using the lysogenic induction agent mitomycin C. Seawater was collected at two locations (the San Pedro Ocean Time Series Station and in the Santa Barbara Channel) in the Southern California Borderland and amended with mitomycin C. After 24-h incubation, the community structure of bacterioplankton was compared with unamended controls using automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis. The addition of mitomycin C to seawater had effects on the community structure of bacterioplankton, stimulating detectable overall diversity and richness of fingerprints and causing the assemblages within incubations to become different to control assemblages. Most negatively impacted operational taxonomic units (OTU) in mitomycin C-amended incubations individually comprised a large fraction of total amplified DNA in initial seawater (5.3-23.3% of amplified DNA fluorescence) fingerprints, and data suggest that these include organisms putatively classified as members of the gamma-Proteobacteria, SAR11 cluster, and Synechococcus groups. The stimulation of assemblage richness by induction of lysogens, and the reduction in the contribution to total DNA of common OTU (and concomitant increase in rare OTU), suggests that temperate phage have the potential to strongly influence the diversity of bacterioplankton assemblages. Because lysogenic OTU may also be resistant to closely related lytic (i.e., free-living) viruses, the impact of lytic virioplankton on assemblages may only be pronounced

  19. A new phyllopod bed-like assemblage from the Burgess Shale of the Canadian Rockies

    OpenAIRE

    Caron, Jean-Bernard; Gaines, Robert; Aria, Cédric; Mangano, Gabriela; Streng, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Burgess Shale-type fossil assemblages provide the best evidence of the ‘Cambrian explosion’. Here we report the discovery of an extraordinary new soft-bodied fauna from the Burgess Shale. Despite its proximity (ca. 40km) to Walcott’s original locality, the Marble Canyon fossil assemblage is distinct, and offers new insights into the initial diversification of metazoans, their early morphological disparity, and the geographic ranges and longevity of many Cambrian taxa. The arthropod-dominated ...

  20. Spatial and temporal variation of fish assemblages in a subtropical small stream of the Huangshan Mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhi YAN,Shan HE, Ling CHU, Xiuying XIANG, Yanju JIA, Juan TAO, Yifeng CHEN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variation of fish assemblages were investigated seasonally from May 2007 to February 2008 across 11 study sites in a subtropical small stream, the Puxi Stream, of the Huangshan Mountain. Along the longitudinal gradient from headwater to downstream, fish species richness and abundance increased gradually, but then decreased significantly at the lower reaches. The highest species richness and abundance were observed in August and the lowest in February. Based on analysis of similarities (ANOSIM, fish assemblages were significantly different in spatial variation but not in temporal variation. Although differences were observed both among sites and among stream orders, the lower R value in order-variation suggested stream order was not the optimal factor explaining the spatial variation of fish assemblages. In addition, dam construction did not significantly alter fish assemblages in the sites adjacent to and immediately downstream to dams. Using cluster analysis and non-metric Multi Dimensional Scaling analysis (NMS, assemblages were separated into three groups at a Bray-Curtis similarity value of 42%: the upper, middle and lower groups. Following analysis of similarity percentages of species contributions (SIMPER, shifts in occurrence or abundance of S. curriculus, Z. platypus, R. bitterling and A. fasciatus contributed most to the differences amongst the three groups. Standard Deviation Redundancy Analysis (RDA suggested that habitat structure (such as elevation, substrate, and flow velocity contributed to the spatial and temporal pattern of fish assemblages in the Puxi Stream. In conclusion, the fish assemblages in Puxi Stream presented significant spatial but not temporal variation. Human disturbance has perhaps induced the decrease in species diversity in the lower reaches. However, no significant change was observed for fish assemblages in sites far from and immediately downstream from low-head dams [Current Zoology 56 (6

  1. Macrozoobenthic assemblages in relation to environments of the Yangtze-isolated lakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baozhu PAN; Haijun WANG; Hongzhu WANG; Zhaoyin WANG

    2012-01-01

    Eutrophication can shift lakes from a clear, macrophyte-dominated state state, and different habitat to a turbid, algae-dominated condition supports different fauna. Macrozoobenthos are good indicators of water environment, and studies on macrozoobenthic assemblage characteristics can help us to know which state a lake is in, thus provide the basis for its eutrophication control. In this study, a systematic investigation on macrozoobenthos was conducted in 17 Yangtze-isolated lakes to explore the macroecological laws of macrozoobenthic assemblages. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) revealed that variance of benthic assemblage structure occurred in two types of lakes. In macrophytic lakes, altogether 51 taxa of macrozoobenthos were identified. The average density and biomass of total macrozoobenthos were 2231 individuals, m2 and 1.69 g dry weight.m-2, respec- tively. Macrozoobenthic assemblage was characterized by dominance of scrapers (i.e. gastropods). In algal lakes, altogether 20 taxa of macrozoobenthos were identified. The average density and biomass of total macrozoobenthos were 2814 individuals.m~2 and 1.38g dry weight.m-2, respectively. Macrozoobenthic assemblage was character- ized by dominance of collector-gatherers (i.e. oligo- chaetes). Wet biomass of submersed macrophytes (BMac) and phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentration (Chla) were demonstrated as the key factor structuring macro- zoobenthic assemblages in macrophytic and algal lakes, respectively.

  2. Population-based analyses of Giardia duodenalis is consistent with the clonal assemblage structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Katsuhisa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giardia duodenalis is a common protozoan parasite of humans and animals. Genetic characterization of single loci indicates the existence of eight groups called assemblages, which differ in their host distribution. Molecular analyses challenged the idea that G. duodenalis is a strictly clonal diplomonad by providing evidence of recombination within and between assemblages. Particularly, inter-assemblage recombination events would complicate the interpretation of multi-locus genotyping data from field isolates: where is a host infected with multiple Giardia genotypes or with a single, recombined Giardia genotype. Methods Population genetic analyses on the single and multiple-locus level on an extensive dataset of G. duodenalis isolates from humans and animals were performed. Results Our analyses indicate that recombination between isolates from different assemblages are apparently very rare or absent in the natural population of Giardia duodenalis. At the multi-locus level, our statistical analyses are more congruent with clonal reproduction and can equally well be explained with the presence of multiple G. duodenalis genotypes within one field isolate. Conclusions We conclude that recombination between G. duodenalis assemblages is either very rare or absent. Recombination between genotypes from the same assemblage and genetic exchange between the nuclei of a single cyst needs further investigation.

  3. Coral reef fish assemblages at Clipperton Atoll (Eastern Tropical Pacific and their relationship with coral cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora M. Ricart

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Clipperton Atoll, one of the most isolated coral reefs worldwide, is of great scientific interest due to its geomorphology and high levels of endemism. This study explored the reef fish assemblage structure of Clipperton Atoll and its relationship with live coral cover. Nine stations were sampled at three sites and three depths (6, 12 and 20 m around the reef, measuring fish species richness and biomass and hermatypic coral cover (at genus level. We evaluated variation in species richness, biomass and diversity of fish assemblages among sites and depths, as well as the relationship between the entire fish assemblage composition and live coral cover. The results showed that species richness and biomass were similar among sites, but differed across depths, increasing with depth. In contrast, diversity differed among sites but not among depths. Multivariate analyses indicated that fish assemblage composition differed among sites and depths in relation to changes in cover of coral of the genera Pocillopora, Porites, Pavona and Leptoseris, which dominate at different depths. The results showed that fish species richness and diversity were low at Clipperton Atoll and that, in isolated coral reefs with a low habitat heterogeneity and low human disturbance, live coral cover has a significant influence on the spatial variation of the reef fish assemblages. This study highlights the importance of coral habitat structure in shaping coral reef fish assemblages.

  4. Comparative analysis of different survey methods for monitoring fish assemblages in coastal habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Duncan G.L.; McIver, Reba; Schmidt, Allison L.; Thériault, Marie-Hélène; Boudreau, Monica; Courtenay, Simon C.; Lotze, Heike K.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are among the most productive yet increasingly threatened marine ecosystems worldwide. Particularly vegetated habitats, such as eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds, play important roles in providing key spawning, nursery and foraging habitats for a wide range of fauna. To properly assess changes in coastal ecosystems and manage these critical habitats, it is essential to develop sound monitoring programs for foundation species and associated assemblages. Several survey methods exist, thus understanding how different methods perform is important for survey selection. We compared two common methods for surveying macrofaunal assemblages: beach seine netting and underwater visual census (UVC). We also tested whether assemblages in shallow nearshore habitats commonly sampled by beach seines are similar to those of nearby eelgrass beds often sampled by UVC. Among five estuaries along the Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, our results suggest that the two survey methods yield comparable results for species richness, diversity and evenness, yet beach seines yield significantly higher abundance and different species composition. However, sampling nearshore assemblages does not represent those in eelgrass beds despite considerable overlap and close proximity. These results have important implications for how and where macrofaunal assemblages are monitored in coastal ecosystems. Ideally, multiple survey methods and locations should be combined to complement each other in assessing the entire assemblage and full range of changes in coastal ecosystems, thereby better informing coastal zone management. PMID:27018396

  5. Comparative analysis of different survey methods for monitoring fish assemblages in coastal habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Duncan G L; Eddy, Tyler D; McIver, Reba; Schmidt, Allison L; Thériault, Marie-Hélène; Boudreau, Monica; Courtenay, Simon C; Lotze, Heike K

    2016-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are among the most productive yet increasingly threatened marine ecosystems worldwide. Particularly vegetated habitats, such as eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds, play important roles in providing key spawning, nursery and foraging habitats for a wide range of fauna. To properly assess changes in coastal ecosystems and manage these critical habitats, it is essential to develop sound monitoring programs for foundation species and associated assemblages. Several survey methods exist, thus understanding how different methods perform is important for survey selection. We compared two common methods for surveying macrofaunal assemblages: beach seine netting and underwater visual census (UVC). We also tested whether assemblages in shallow nearshore habitats commonly sampled by beach seines are similar to those of nearby eelgrass beds often sampled by UVC. Among five estuaries along the Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, our results suggest that the two survey methods yield comparable results for species richness, diversity and evenness, yet beach seines yield significantly higher abundance and different species composition. However, sampling nearshore assemblages does not represent those in eelgrass beds despite considerable overlap and close proximity. These results have important implications for how and where macrofaunal assemblages are monitored in coastal ecosystems. Ideally, multiple survey methods and locations should be combined to complement each other in assessing the entire assemblage and full range of changes in coastal ecosystems, thereby better informing coastal zone management.

  6. Origin of an assemblage massively dominated by carnivorans from the miocene of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, M Soledad; Alberdi, M Teresa; Azanza, Beatriz; Silva, Pablo G; Morales, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Carnivoran-dominated fossil sites provide precious insights into the diversity and ecology of species rarely recovered in the fossil record. The lower level assemblage of Batallones-1 fossil site (Late Miocene; Madrid Basin, Spain) has yielded one of the most abundant and diversified carnivoran assemblage ever known from the Cenozoic record of mammals. A comprehensive taphonomic study is carried out here in order to constrain the concentration mode of this remarkable assemblage. Another distinctive feature of Batallones-1 is that the accumulation of carnivoran remains took place in the context of a geomorphological landform (cavity formation through a piping process) practically unknown in the generation of fossil sites. Two characteristics of the assemblage highly restrict the probable causes for the accumulation of the remains: (1) the overwhelming number of carnivorans individuals; and (2) the mortality profiles estimated for the four most abundant taxa do not correspond to the classic mortality types but rather were the consequence of the behavior of the taxa. This evidence together with other taphonomic data supports the hypothesis that carnivoran individuals actively entered the cavity searching for resources (food or water) and were unable to exit. The scarcity of herbivores implies that the shaft was well visible and avoided by these taxa. Fossil bones exhibit a very good preservation state as a consequence of their deposition in the restricted and protective environment of the chamber. Batallones-1 had another assemblage (upper level assemblage) that was dominated by herbivore remains and that potentially corresponded to the final stages of the cavity filling.

  7. Vertical differences in species turnover and diversity of amphipod assemblages associated with coralline mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, M.; Tanaka, M. O.; Flores, A. A. V.; Leite, F. P. P.

    2016-11-01

    Environmental gradients are common in rocky shore habitats and may determine species spatial distributions at different scales. In this study, we tested whether environmental filtering affects amphipod assemblages inhabiting coralline algal mats at different vertical heights in southeastern Brazil. Samples obtained from the upper and lower zones of the infralittoral fringe were used to estimate mat descriptors (algal mass, sediment retention, organic matter contents, grain size and sediment sorting) and describe amphipod assemblages (abundance, species richness and diversity indices). Coralline algal mats and amphipod assemblages were similar between intertidal zones in several aspects. However, a more variable retention of sediment (positively related to algal mass), together with the accumulation of larger grains lower on the shore, likely provide higher habitat heterogeneity that hosts generally more diverse (both α- and β-diversity, as well as higher species turnover) amphipod assemblages in the lower intertidal zone. Poorer assemblages in the upper intertidal zone are dominated by omnivores, while carnivorous species are more often found in richer assemblages in the lower intertidal zone, as predicted by traditional niche theory.

  8. Reptile assemblage response to restoration of fire-suppressed longleaf pine sandhills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, David A; Smith, Lora L; Conner, L M; Litt, Andrea R; Provencher, Louis; Hiers, J Kevin; Pokswinski, Scott; Guyer, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Measuring the effects of ecological restoration on wildlife assemblages requires study on broad temporal and spatial scales. Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) forests are imperiled due to fire suppression and subsequent invasion by hardwood trees. We employed a landscape-scale, randomized-block design to identify how reptile assemblages initially responded to restoration treatments including removal of hardwood trees via mechanical methods (felling and girdling), application of herbicides, or prescribed burning alone. Then, we examined reptile assemblages after all sites experienced more than a decade of prescribed burning at two- to thee-year return intervals. Data were collected concurrently at reference sites chosen to represent target conditions for restoration. Reptile assemblages changed most rapidly in response to prescribed burning, but reptile assemblages at all sites, including reference sites, were generally indistinguishable by the end of the study. Thus, we suggest that prescribed burning in longleaf pine forests over long time periods is an effective strategy for restoring reptile assemblages to the reference condition. Application of herbicides or mechanical removal of hardwood trees provided no apparent benefit to reptiles beyond what was achieved by prescribed fire alone.

  9. Relationship between assemblages of mycorrhizal fungi and bacteria on grass roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Brajesh K; Nunan, Naoise; Ridgway, Karyn P; McNicol, Jim; Young, J Peter W; Daniell, Tim J; Prosser, James I; Millard, Peter

    2008-02-01

    Soils support an enormous microbial diversity, but the ecological drivers of this diversity are poorly understood. Interactions between the roots of individual grass species and the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and bacteria in their rhizoplane were studied in a grazed, unimproved upland pasture. Individual root fragments were isolated from soil cores, DNA extracted and used to identify plant species and assess rhizoplane bacterial and AM fungal assemblages, by amplifying part of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene, followed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. For the first time we showed that AM fungal and bacterial assemblages are related in situ and that this relationship occurred at the community level. Principal coordinate analyses of the data show that the AM fungi were a major factor determining the bacterial assemblage on grass roots. We also report a strong influence of the composition of the plant community on AM fungal assemblage. The bacterial assemblage was also influenced by soil pH and was spatially structured, whereas AM fungi were influenced neither by the bacteria nor by soil pH. Our study shows that linkages between plant roots and their microbial communities exist in a complex web of interactions that act at individual and at community levels, with AM fungi influencing the bacterial assemblage, but not the other way round.

  10. Estimation of the size of molluscan larval settlement using the death assemblage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, E. N.; Cummins, H.; Stanton, R. J.; Staff, G.

    1984-04-01

    The death assemblage is an important source of information about temporal variability in community composition. The living community and the short-term death assemblage have been studied at a sandy-bottom station in the Laguna Madre, Texas. Abundance peaks of living species are usually followed by long-term abundance increases of the same species in the death assemblage. This phenomenon provides a tool for investigating between-sampling-occasion events in the preservable component of the living community. Given a six-week sampling regimen, approximately 90% of all individuals settle, live and die during the period between consecutive sampling occasions and are not collected alive. Thus, larval settlements are consistently underestimated by about 90% from data on the living community. Comparisons of year-to-year variability in settlement and survivorship of settled individuals in the youngest age classes may be considerably in error. Better estimations of actual settlement and survivorship can be made from the death assemblage provided that the rate of taphonomic loss can be quantified. The rate of taphonomic loss can be expressed as the species' half-life, the time required for the destruction of 50% of the individuals that were added to the death assemblage following settlement. Half-lives for the smallest size classes in the death assemblage at this site are about 100 days.

  11. Patterns of Spatial Variation of Assemblages Associated with Intertidal Rocky Shores: A Global Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Miloslavich, Patricia; Palomo, Gabriela; Iken, Katrin; Konar, Brenda; Pohle, Gerhard; Trott, Tom; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Herrera, César; Hernández, Alejandra; Sardi, Adriana; Bueno, Andrea; Castillo, Julio; Klein, Eduardo; Guerra-Castro, Edlin; Gobin, Judith; Gómez, Diana Isabel; Riosmena-Rodríguez, Rafael; Mead, Angela; Bigatti, Gregorio; Knowlton, Ann; Shirayama, Yoshihisa

    2010-01-01

    Assemblages associated with intertidal rocky shores were examined for large scale distribution patterns with specific emphasis on identifying latitudinal trends of species richness and taxonomic distinctiveness. Seventy-two sites distributed around the globe were evaluated following the standardized sampling protocol of the Census of Marine Life NaGISA project (www.nagisa.coml.org). There were no clear patterns of standardized estimators of species richness along latitudinal gradients or among Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs); however, a strong latitudinal gradient in taxonomic composition (i.e., proportion of different taxonomic groups in a given sample) was observed. Environmental variables related to natural influences were strongly related to the distribution patterns of the assemblages on the LME scale, particularly photoperiod, sea surface temperature (SST) and rainfall. In contrast, no environmental variables directly associated with human influences (with the exception of the inorganic pollution index) were related to assemblage patterns among LMEs. Correlations of the natural assemblages with either latitudinal gradients or environmental variables were equally strong suggesting that neither neutral models nor models based solely on environmental variables sufficiently explain spatial variation of these assemblages at a global scale. Despite the data shortcomings in this study (e.g., unbalanced sample distribution), we show the importance of generating biological global databases for the use in large-scale diversity comparisons of rocky intertidal assemblages to stimulate continued sampling and analyses. PMID:21179546

  12. Effects of hydrologic connectivity and environmental nariables on nekton assemblage in a coastal marsh system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Ryong; King, Sammy L.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrologic connectivity and environmental variation can influence nekton assemblages in coastal ecosystems. We evaluated the effects of hydrologic connectivity (permanently connected pond: PCP; temporary connected pond: TCP), salinity, vegetation coverage, water depth and other environmental variables on seasonal nekton assemblages in freshwater, brackish, and saline marshes of the Chenier Plain, Louisiana, USA. We hypothesize that 1) nekton assemblages in PCPs have higher metrics (density, biomass, assemblage similarity) than TCPs within all marsh types and 2) no nekton species would be dominant across all marsh types. In throw traps, freshwater PCPs in Fall (36.0 ± 1.90) and Winter 2009 (43.2 ± 22.36) supported greater biomass than freshwater TCPs (Fall 2009: 9.1 ± 4.65; Winter 2009: 8.3 ± 3.42). In minnow traps, saline TCPs (5.9 ± 0.85) in Spring 2009 had higher catch per unit effort than saline PCPs (0.7 ± 0.67). Our data only partially support our first hypothesis as freshwater marsh PCPs had greater assemblage similarity than TCPs. As predicted by our second hypothesis, no nekton species dominated across all marsh types. Nekton assemblages were structured by individual species responses to the salinity gradient as well as pond habitat attributes (submerged aquatic vegetation coverage, dissolved oxygen, hydrologic connectivity).

  13. The influence of finfish aquaculture on benthic fish and crustacean assemblages in Fitzgerald Bay, South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Jason E; Williams, Kane

    2015-01-01

    The influence of sea-cage aquaculture on wildfish assemblages has received little attention outside of Europe. Sea-cage aquaculture of finfish is a major focus in South Australia, and while the main species farmed is southern bluefin tuna (Thunnus maccoyii), there is also an important yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi) industry. Yellowtail kingfish aquaculture did not appear to have any local or regional effects on demersal assemblages (primarily fish, but also some crustaceans) surveyed by baited remote underwater video (BRUV) in Fitzgerald Bay. We did, however, detect small scale spatial variations in assemblages within the bay. The type of bait used strongly influenced the assemblage recorded, with significantly greater numbers of fish attracted to deployments where sardines were used as the bait to compared to those with no bait. The pelleted feed used by the aquaculture industry was just as attractive as sardines at one site, and intermediate between sardines and no bait at the other. There was significant temporal variability in assemblages at both farm sites and one control site, while the second control site was temporally stable (over the 9 weeks of the study). Overall, the results suggested that aquaculture was having little if any impact on the abundance and assemblage structure of the demersal macrofauna in Fitzgerald Bay.

  14. Three decades of recurrent declines and recoveries in corals belie ongoing change in fish assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, T.; Galzin, R.; Kulbicki, M.; Lison de Loma, T.; Claudet, J.

    2016-03-01

    Coral reefs are increasingly being altered by a myriad of anthropogenic activities and natural disturbances. Long-term studies offer unique opportunities to understand how multiple and recurrent disturbances can influence coral reef resilience and long-term dynamics. While the long-term dynamics of coral assemblages have been extensively documented, the long-term dynamics of coral reef fish assemblages have received less attention. Here, we describe the changes in fish assemblages on Tiahura reef, Moorea, from 1979 to 2011. During this 33-yr period, Tiahura was exposed to multiple disturbances (crown-of-thorns seastar outbreaks and cyclones) that caused recurrent declines and recoveries of coral cover and changes in the dominant coral genera. These shifts in coral composition were associated with long-term cascading effects on fish assemblages. The composition and trophic structure of fish assemblages continuously shifted without returning to their initial composition, whereas fish species richness remained stable, albeit with a small increase over time. We detected nonlinear responses of fish density when corals were most degraded. When coral cover dropped below 10 % following a severe crown-of-thorns sea star outbreak, the density of most fish trophic groups sharply decreased. Our study shows that historical contingency may potentially be an important but largely underestimated factor explaining the contemporary structure of reef fish assemblages and suggests that temporal stability in their structure and function should not necessarily be the target of management strategies that aim at increasing or maintaining coral reef resilience.

  15. Fish stomach contents in benthic macroinvertebrate assemblage assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TH. Tupinambás

    for studies that only sample fish assemblages to evaluate aquatic ecosystem impacts. Therefore, this approach can be useful to amplify assessments of human impacts, and to incorporate additional bioindicators.

  16. Can global weed assemblages be used to predict future weeds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Morin

    Full Text Available Predicting which plant taxa are more likely to become weeds in a region presents significant challenges to both researchers and government agencies. Often it is done in a qualitative or semi-quantitative way. In this study, we explored the potential of using the quantitative self-organising map (SOM approach to analyse global weed assemblages and estimate likelihoods of plant taxa becoming weeds before and after they have been moved to a new region. The SOM approach examines plant taxa associations by analysing where a taxon is recorded as a weed and what other taxa are recorded as weeds in those regions. The dataset analysed was extracted from a pre-existing, extensive worldwide database of plant taxa recorded as weeds or other related status and, following reformatting, included 187 regions and 6690 plant taxa. To assess the value of the SOM approach we selected Australia as a case study. We found that the key and most important limitation in using such analytical approach lies with the dataset used. The classification of a taxon as a weed in the literature is not often based on actual data that document the economic, environmental and/or social impact of the taxon, but mostly based on human perceptions that the taxon is troublesome or simply not wanted in a particular situation. The adoption of consistent and objective criteria that incorporate a standardized approach for impact assessment of plant taxa will be necessary to develop a new global database suitable to make predictions regarding weediness using methods like SOM. It may however, be more realistic to opt for a classification system that focuses on the invasive characteristics of plant taxa without any inference to impacts, which to be defined would require some level of research to avoid bias from human perceptions and value systems.

  17. Differential assemblage of functional units in paddy soil microbiomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongkyu Kim

    , they both exclusively expressed homologous genes encoding methanol dehydrogenase. Our metatranscriptomic analysis suggests that paddy soil microbiomes act as complex, functionally coordinated assemblages whose taxonomic composition is governed by the prevailing habitat factors and their hierarchical importance for community succession.

  18. Dendrobium protoplast co-culture promotes phytochemical assemblage in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Abitha; Pujari, Ipsita; Shetty, Vasudeep; Joshi, Manjunath B; Rai, Padmalatha S; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Babu, Vidhu Sankar

    2017-07-01

    The present study is intended to analyze the occurrence of potent, low produce, naturally occurring stilbenes in protoplasts of wild species and hybrids of Dendrobium. The wild species selected for the study was Dendrobium ovatum, endemic to Western Ghats of India. Protoplasts were isolated from leaves and tepal tissues of all the species and were cultured purely to generate homofusants and cross-cultured to raise heterofusants. Phytochemical composition of protoplast culture with atypical and pure microcolonies was performed using mass spectrometry. Enzyme cocktail of 4% pectinase together with 2% cellulase displayed the highest competence for protoplast isolations. Maximum protoplast density of 30.11 × 10(4)/ml was obtained from D. ovatum leaves in 2 h. Subcellular features such as the presence of partially formed cell wall, the position of the nucleus, chloroplast density, colony existence, and integrity of the plasma membrane were analyzed. Among the pure and cross-cultured protoplasts, the number of heterofusants and homofusants formed were enumerated. The spectral feature extraction of the mass spectrometry indicated the presence of five phenolic marker compounds, viz., tristin, confusarin, gigantol, moscatilin, and resveratrol, some of them in pure and others in assorted protoplast cultures raised from Dendrobium leaves and tepals. The study demonstrated that protoplast fusion technique enabled phytochemical assemblage in vitro as stilbenes tend to get restricted either in a tissue or species specific manner. This is the first report showing the presence of resveratrol, moscatilin, tristin, gigantol, and confusarin in wild and hybrid species from cultured Dendrobium protoplasts in vitro.

  19. Eco-cities as an Assemblage of Worlding Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zack Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Eco-cities are gaining attention in policy and academic circles over the past few years. Yet they pose difficulties as objects of study since they have been diversely defined and implemented. This paper argues that eco-cities are better understood as an assemblage of worlding practices. Combining these two concepts foregoes the emphasis on the eco-city’s physical structures and focuses more on its policy environment and its relations with other locations. The case study being examined is the Philippine’s Clark Green, the country’s first eco-city project. Its main proponent is an independent government agency, the Bases Conversion and Development Authority (BCDA, tasked with developing former military locations for civilian uses. Their vision is to create a world-class project built by international stakeholders in order to elevate the status of the Philippines and the Filipinos. They have chosen to emulate the Songdo International Business District in South Korea as their benchmark model. Not only are they adopting the ideas of a smart city but also similar strategies to enter the international education and logistics industries. The paper will show how the BCDA uses the eco-city idea as a tool to enter various national and international discourses that extend beyond the project’s geographical boundaries. Yet the strategies and visions of an independent government-owned corporation are tempered by challenges from local stakeholders, conflicting national priorities, and failures from similar policies applied elsewhere. The paper highlights the need for worlding projects to be embedded in their own national context for greater policy coordination.

  20. Next generation sequencing reveals the hidden diversity of zooplankton assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope K Lindeque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zooplankton play an important role in our oceans, in biogeochemical cycling and providing a food source for commercially important fish larvae. However, difficulties in correctly identifying zooplankton hinder our understanding of their roles in marine ecosystem functioning, and can prevent detection of long term changes in their community structure. The advent of massively parallel next generation sequencing technology allows DNA sequence data to be recovered directly from whole community samples. Here we assess the ability of such sequencing to quantify richness and diversity of a mixed zooplankton assemblage from a productive time series site in the Western English Channel. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Plankton net hauls (200 µm were taken at the Western Channel Observatory station L4 in September 2010 and January 2011. These samples were analysed by microscopy and metagenetic analysis of the 18S nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene using the 454 pyrosequencing platform. Following quality control a total of 419,041 sequences were obtained for all samples. The sequences clustered into 205 operational taxonomic units using a 97% similarity cut-off. Allocation of taxonomy by comparison with the National Centre for Biotechnology Information database identified 135 OTUs to species level, 11 to genus level and 1 to order, <2.5% of sequences were classified as unknowns. By comparison a skilled microscopic analyst was able to routinely enumerate only 58 taxonomic groups. CONCLUSIONS: Metagenetics reveals a previously hidden taxonomic richness, especially for Copepoda and hard-to-identify meroplankton such as Bivalvia, Gastropoda and Polychaeta. It also reveals rare species and parasites. We conclude that Next Generation Sequencing of 18S amplicons is a powerful tool for elucidating the true diversity and species richness of zooplankton communities. While this approach allows for broad diversity assessments of plankton it may

  1. Can Global Weed Assemblages Be Used to Predict Future Weeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Louise; Paini, Dean R.; Randall, Roderick P.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting which plant taxa are more likely to become weeds in a region presents significant challenges to both researchers and government agencies. Often it is done in a qualitative or semi-quantitative way. In this study, we explored the potential of using the quantitative self-organising map (SOM) approach to analyse global weed assemblages and estimate likelihoods of plant taxa becoming weeds before and after they have been moved to a new region. The SOM approach examines plant taxa associations by analysing where a taxon is recorded as a weed and what other taxa are recorded as weeds in those regions. The dataset analysed was extracted from a pre-existing, extensive worldwide database of plant taxa recorded as weeds or other related status and, following reformatting, included 187 regions and 6690 plant taxa. To assess the value of the SOM approach we selected Australia as a case study. We found that the key and most important limitation in using such analytical approach lies with the dataset used. The classification of a taxon as a weed in the literature is not often based on actual data that document the economic, environmental and/or social impact of the taxon, but mostly based on human perceptions that the taxon is troublesome or simply not wanted in a particular situation. The adoption of consistent and objective criteria that incorporate a standardized approach for impact assessment of plant taxa will be necessary to develop a new global database suitable to make predictions regarding weediness using methods like SOM. It may however, be more realistic to opt for a classification system that focuses on the invasive characteristics of plant taxa without any inference to impacts, which to be defined would require some level of research to avoid bias from human perceptions and value systems. PMID:23393591

  2. Late Maastrichtian chalk mounds, Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Damholt, Tove; Surlyk, Finn

    2007-01-01

    and the depositional architecture indicates a complex and   dynamic environment. The depositional style seems to be controlled by the interplay and relative importance of two end-member processes; those that were purely physical and related to the interaction between available grain sizes and hydrodynamics, and those...

  3. Late Maastrichtian chalk mounds, Stevns Klint, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderskouv, Kresten; Damholt, Tove; Surlyk, Finn

    -member processes: those that were purely physical and related to the interaction between available grain sizes and hydrodynamics, and those that were largely biological and associated with benthic growth and sediment trapping mainly by bryozoans. The succession was deposited on the upper part of the flank of a 3...

  4. Astronomical calibration of the Maastrichtian (Late Cretaceous)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husson, Dorothée; Galbrun, Bruno; Laskar, Jacques;

    2011-01-01

    Recent improvements to astronomical modeling of the Solar System have contributed to important refinements of the Cenozoic time scale through astronomical calibration of sedimentary series. We extend this astronomical calibration into the Cretaceous, on the base of the 405 ka orbital eccentricity......, with the presence of cycles corresponding to forcing by precession, obliquity and orbital eccentricity variations. Identification of these cycles leads to the definition of a detailed cyclostratigraphic frame covering nearly 8 Ma, from the upper Campanian to the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary. Durations...

  5. Vertebrate assemblages from the early Late Cretaceous of southeastern Morocco: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavin, L.; Tong, H.; Boudad, L.; Meister, C.; Piuz, A.; Tabouelle, J.; Aarab, M.; Amiot, R.; Buffetaut, E.; Dyke, G.; Hua, S.; Le Loeuff, J.

    2010-07-01

    Fossils of vertebrates have been found in great abundance in the continental and marine early Late Cretaceous sediments of Southeastern Morocco for more than 50 years. About 80 vertebrate taxa have so far been recorded from this region, many of which were recognised and diagnosed for the first time based on specimens recovered from these sediments. In this paper, we use published data together with new field data to present an updated overview of Moroccan early Late Cretaceous vertebrate assemblages. The Cretaceous series we have studied encompasses three Formations, the Ifezouane and Aoufous Formations, which are continental and deltaic in origin and are often grouped under the name "Kem Kem beds", and the Akrabou Formation which is marine in origin. New field observations allow us to place four recognised vertebrate clusters, corresponding to one compound assemblage and three assemblages, within a general temporal framework. In particular, two ammonite bioevents characterise the lower part of the Upper Cenomanian ( Calycoceras guerangeri Zone) at the base of the Akrabou Formation and the upper part of the Lower Turonian ( Mammites nodosoides Zone), that may extend into the Middle Turonian within the Akrabou Formation, and allow for more accurate dating of the marine sequence in the study area. We are not yet able to distinguish a specific assemblage that characterises the Ifezouane Formation when compared to the similar Aoufous Formation, and as a result we regard the oldest of the four vertebrate "assemblages" in this region to be the compound assemblage of the "Kem Kem beds". This well-known vertebrate assemblage comprises a mixture of terrestrial (and aerial), freshwater and brackish vertebrates. The archosaur component of this fauna appears to show an intriguingly high proportion of large-bodied carnivorous taxa, which may indicate a peculiar trophic chain, although collecting biases alter this palaeontological signal. A small and restricted assemblage, the

  6. Depositional Settings of the basal López de Bertodano Formation, Maastrichtian, Antarctica Ambientes de depositación de la parte basal de la Formación López de Bertodano, Maastrichtiano, Antártida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.B. Olivero

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In Snow Hill and Seymour islands the lower Maastrichtian, basal part of the L ópez de Bertodano Formation, rests on a high relief, erosive surface elaborated in the underlying Snow Hill Island Formation. Mudstone-dominated beds with inclined heterolithic stratification dominate the basal strata of the López de Bertodano Formation. They consist of rhythmical alternations of friable sandy- and clayeymudstone couplets, with ripple cross lamination, mud drapes, and flaser bedding. They are characterized by a marked lenticular geometry, reflecting the filling of tide-influenced channels of various scales and paleogeographic positions within a tide-dominated embayment or estuary. Major, sand-rich channel fills, up to 50-m thick, bounded by erosive surfaces probably represent inlets, located on a more central position in the estuary. Minor channel fills, 1- to 3-m thick, associated with offlapping packages with inclined heterolithic stratification probably represent the lateral accretion of point bars adjacent to migrating tidal channels in the upper estuary. Both types of channel fills bear relatively abundant marine fauna, are intensively bioturbated, and are interpreted as a network of subtidal channels. In southwestern Snow Hill Island, the minor offlapping packages have scarce marine fossils and bear aligned depressions interpreted as poor preserved dinosaur footprints. They represent the lateral accretion of point bars adjacent to intertidal creeks, probably located on the fringes of a mud-dominated estuary or embayment. The basal unconformity was produced by subaerial erosion; hence the inferred estuarine settings are consistent with the beginning of a new transgressive sedimentary cycle.En las islas Snow Hill y Seymour, la Formación López de Bertodano apoya en relación de discordancia erosiva de gran relieve sobre la Formación Snow Hill Island. La parte basal, Maastrichtiano inferior, de la Formación López de Bertodano está dominada

  7. Mafic sill/dykes intruding into late Maastrichtian-early Paleocene calciclastic units, NE-Turkey: Petrographical and geochemical features of latest magmatic activity before collision in the eastern Sakarya zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Faruk; Oǧuz, Simge; Karsli, Orhan; Kandemir, Raif; Şen, Cüneyt; Uysal, İbrahim

    2017-04-01

    We present here new petrographical, mineralogical and whole-rock geochemical data for mafic sill/dykes intruding into late Maastrichtian-early Paleocene calciclastic units in the Düzköy (Trabzon) and Cankurtaran (Artvin) areas (NE Turkey) of the eastern Sakarya zone (ESZ) in order to decipher the latest magmatic activity in the final stage of subduction-related magmatism of the ESZ. U-Pb zircon dating for the mafic sill/dykes in the region yielded ages varying from 83.6 to 78.5Ma (i.e. Early Campanian). Mafic sill/dykes consist of mostly basalts and lesser basaltic-andesites with komatiitic basalts. Most of the dyke samples display aphyric to porphyritic texture with phenocrysts of plagioclase (mostly replaced by calcite), clinopyroxene (partly uralized), olivine (almost serpentinized), and amphibole (partly chloritized). Based on the MgO, Nb and Zr contents with Nb/Y ratio, the mafic dykes from Düzköy area are mainly classified as two subgroups (basalts and basaltic andesites) while those of Cankurtaran can be divided into three different groups (low- and high-Nb normal basalts and komatitic basalts). Düzköy basaltic dykes have higher MgO (3.8-7.8%) and lower Nb (3-4ppm) and Zr (53-62ppm) contents with Nb/Y ratio (˜0.2) than those of Düzköy basaltic-andesitic dykes (MgO: ˜1.8%, Nb: 6-15ppm, Zr: 106-145ppm, Nb/Y: 0.3-0.6). On the other hand, Cankurtaran mafic sill/dykes have relatively high MgO contents (˜4-20%). These sill/dykes with 15-20% of MgO and group 1 and 4.0-4.4% for group 2), Nb (3-14ppm for group 1 and 19-21ppm for group 2), Zr (94-111ppm for group 1 and 125-140ppm for group 2) contents, and Nb/Y ratio (˜0.2-0.8 for group 1 and (˜1.0-1.2 for group 2). Although the studied mafic sill/dykes have generally subalkaline composition, they show a geochemical character changing from mostly tholeiitic to rarely calc-alkaline and show typical features of late Cretaceous subduction-related magmatic rocks as in the ESZ. On the chondrite-normalized REE

  8. Temporal Beta Diversity of Bird Assemblages in Agricultural Landscapes: Land Cover Change vs. Stochastic Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baselga, Andrés; Bonthoux, Sébastien; Balent, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Temporal variation in the composition of species assemblages could be the result of deterministic processes driven by environmental change and/or stochastic processes of colonization and local extinction. Here, we analyzed the relative roles of deterministic and stochastic processes on bird assemblages in an agricultural landscape of southwestern France. We first assessed the impact of land cover change that occurred between 1982 and 2007 on (i) the species composition (presence/absence) of bird assemblages and (ii) the spatial pattern of taxonomic beta diversity. We also compared the observed temporal change of bird assemblages with a null model accounting for the effect of stochastic dynamics on temporal beta diversity. Temporal assemblage dissimilarity was partitioned into two separate components, accounting for the replacement of species (i.e. turnover) and for the nested species losses (or gains) from one time to the other (i.e. nestedness-resultant dissimilarity), respectively. Neither the turnover nor the nestedness-resultant components of temporal variation were accurately explained by any of the measured variables accounting for land cover change (r(2)turnover and 13% of sites for nestedness-resultant dissimilarity. Taken together, our results suggest that land cover change in this agricultural landscape had little impact on temporal beta diversity of bird assemblages. Although other unmeasured deterministic process could be driving the observed patterns, it is also possible that the observed changes in presence/absence species composition of local bird assemblages might be the consequence of stochastic processes in which species populations appeared and disappeared from specific localities in a random-like way. Our results might be case-specific, but if stochastic dynamics are generally dominant, the ability of correlative and mechanistic models to predict land cover change effects on species composition would be compromised.

  9. Patterns of benthic assemblages invaded and non-invaded by Grateloupia turuturu across rocky intertidal habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Cristiano; Araújo, Rita; Bertocci, Iacopo

    2016-09-01

    Intertidal benthic assemblages invaded and non-invaded by the introduced Asian red alga Grateloupia turuturu were compared at a rocky shore along the NW coast of Portugal. The structure of whole assemblages, the total richness of taxa and the abundance of individual taxa were examined as response variables in two different habitats (rock pools and emergent rock), two shore levels (low and mid intertidal) and two dates of sampling (June 2013 and June 2014). Invaded and non-invaded assemblages differed consistently across habitats and shore levels. Such differences were driven by 13 (with the green alga genus Ulva, the red alga Chondrus crispus and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis driving the total dissimilarity) out of the total 37 taxa identified. Individual taxa revealed idiosyncratic patterns, in several cases (C. crispus, M. galloprovincialis, articulated coralline algae of the genus Corallina and the crustose sporophyte of the red alga Mastocarpus stellatus) there were differences in the abundance of a taxon between invaded and non-invaded assemblages varying with levels of some other experimental factors. The total number of taxa was higher in invaded compared to non-invaded assemblages for each combination of habitat and shore level. Patterns of invasion by G. turuturu along the Portuguese continental coast were recently described in terms of its temporal and spatial distribution, but never examined in terms of differences between invaded and non-invaded assemblages. Such information is very limited for other geographic areas where this species is recorded out of its native range of distribution. Therefore, the present study provides a new contribution to the understanding of modifications of native assemblages associated with the invasion of G. turuturu, opening avenues of research aimed at specifically examining the factors and processes likely responsible for the invasion dynamics and success of this species.

  10. Changes in Nannoplankton Assemblages during the recovery of the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, J. A.; Bralower, T. J.; Self-Trail, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The recovery interval of the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) presents an opportunity to examine how organisms adapt to environmental change after a rapid global warming event. Calcareous nannoplankton survived the PETM, but we lack an understanding of how long it took for assemblages to adapt to a changing climate and the millennial-scale changes in their ecology. Here, we present the first high-resolution record of nannoplankton community change during the PETM recovery using a global data set (United States Geological Survey (USGS) Wilson Lake core, USGS Cam-Dor core, Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 690, 1265, and 1209) to assess millennial-scale assemblage change across space and time. Preliminary multivariate analyses on assemblage changes at Wilson Lake demonstrate that within 20,000 years after the onset, the structure of nannoplankton communities shifts from an assemblage dominated by warm eutrophic specialists to one dominated by eutrophic low salinity specialists. In the late recovery, ubiquitous taxa dominate assemblages, suggesting that the shelf environment became favorable for generalists. The latest part of the recovery is marked by a slight increase in oligotrophic specialists, indicating that the shelf became less eutrophic into the early Eocene. Overall, these analyses suggest that assemblages changed rapidly in response to cooling and changing ocean circulation during the early recovery of the PETM. Future analyses will build on these data by comparing assemblage change from other PETM coastal and open ocean sites. These analyses will help us better understand the spatial and temporal changes of nannoplankton communities on a global scale, lessons that can inform how nannoplankton will respond to future climate change.

  11. Juvenile bottlenecks and salinity shape grey mullet assemblages in Mediterranean estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Luis; Hereu, Bernat; Torras, Xavier

    2008-05-01

    Previous research has suggested that competitive bottlenecks may exist for the Mediterranean grey mullets (Osteichthyes, Mugilidae) at the fry stage with the exotic Cyprinus carpio (Osteichthyes, Cyprinidae) playing a central role. As a consequence, the structure of grey mullet assemblages at later stages is thought to reflect previous competition as well as differences in osmoregulatory skills. This paper tests that hypothesis by examining four predictions about the relative abundance of five grey mullet species in 42 Western Mediterranean estuary sites from three areas (Aiguamolls de l'Empordà, Ebro Delta and Minorca) differing in the salinity level and occurrence of C. carpio. Field data confirmed the predictions as: (1) Liza aurata and Mugil cephalus were scarce everywhere and never dominated the assemblage; (2) Liza saliens dominated the assemblage where the salinity level was higher than 13; (3) Liza ramado always dominated the assemblage where the salinity level was lower than 13 and C. carpio was present; and (4) Chelon labrosus dominated the assemblage only where the salinity level was lower than 13 and C. carpio was absent. The catch per unit effort of C. labrosus of any size was smaller in the presence of C. carpio than where it had not been introduced, which is in agreement with the juvenile competitive bottleneck hypothesis. Discriminant analysis confirmed that the assemblage structure was linked to the salinity level and the occurrence of C. carpio for both early juveniles and late juveniles as well as adults. The data reported here reveal that the structure of grey mullet assemblages inhabiting Mediterranean estuaries is determined by salinity and competitive interactions at the fry stage.

  12. Species richness and trait composition of butterfly assemblages change along an altitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leingärtner, Annette; Krauss, Jochen; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2014-06-01

    Species richness patterns along altitudinal gradients are well-documented ecological phenomena, yet very little data are available on how environmental filtering processes influence the composition and traits of butterfly assemblages at high altitudes. We have studied the diversity patterns of butterfly species at 34 sites along an altitudinal gradient ranging from 600 to 2,000 m a.s.l. in the National Park Berchtesgaden (Germany) and analysed traits of butterfly assemblages associated with dispersal capacity, reproductive strategies and developmental time from lowlands to highlands, including phylogenetic analyses. We found a linear decline in butterfly species richness along the altitudinal gradient, but the phylogenetic relatedness of the butterfly assemblages did not increase with altitude. Compared to butterfly assemblages at lower altitudes, those at higher altitudes were composed of species with larger wings (on average 9%) which laid an average of 68% more eggs. In contrast, egg maturation time in butterfly assemblages decreased by about 22% along the altitudinal gradient. Further, butterfly assemblages at higher altitudes were increasingly dominated by less widespread species. Based on our abundance data, but not on data in the literature, population density increased with altitude, suggesting a reversed density-distribution relationship, with higher population densities of habitat specialists in harsh environments. In conclusion, our data provide evidence for significant shifts in the composition of butterfly assemblages and for the dominance of different traits along the altitudinal gradient. In our study, these changes were mainly driven by environmental factors, whereas phylogenetic filtering played a minor role along the studied altitudinal range.

  13. Differences in the structure of copepod assemblages in four tropical estuaries: Importance of pollution and the estuary hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Adriana V; Dias, Cristina O; Bonecker, Sérgio L C

    2017-02-15

    We examined the relationship between pollution and structure of copepod assemblages in estuaries, using sampling standardization of salinity range to reduce the effects of "Estuarine Quality Paradox". Copepod assemblages were analyzed in four Southeast Brazilian estuaries with different water quality levels and different hydrodynamic characteristics. The pollution negatively impacted the descriptors of the assemblage structure. The distribution of structure of copepod assemblages also showed a main separation trend between the most polluted estuaries and those less polluted. Temperature was the main factor affecting the assemblage structuring in the four estuaries. This factor acted in synergism with the effects of pollution impact and physical characteristics of the estuaries on the structure of copepod assemblages, supporting the potential vulnerability of coastal environments due to nutrient enrichment associated with climate change. Our study demonstrated the importance of sampling standardization of the salinity range in estuaries for reliable analysis of pollution effects on biota. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Morphological features of Triassic and Late Cretaceous high-latitude radiolarian assemblages (comparative analysis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragin, Nikita; Bragina, Liubov

    2010-05-01

    High-latitude radiolarian assemblages of Mesozoic represent particular interest for Boreal-Tethyan correlation of Mesozoic as well as for their paleobiogeography. Radiolarians are the only planktonic protists that present both in low- and high-latitude Mesozoic sections, therefore they have high importance. The aim of this work is to distinguish common and different features of Triassic and Late Cretaceous high-latitude assemblages of Radiolaria during their comparative analysis. We use material from Triassic of Omolon Massif (NE Siberia) (Bragin, Egorov, 2001) and Kotel'nyi Island (Arctic) (Bragin, Bragina, 2009; Bragin, in press) and Late Cretaceous of Western Siberia (Amon, 2000) and Kamchatka Peninsula (Vishnevskaya, 2005; Bragina, 1991). The main trends of radiolarian assemblages from these sections are: quantitative domination of some taxa, presence of characteristic high-latitude taxa that are absent or very rare in low-latitude regions, and relatively low taxonomic diversity with absence of many high taxa and many morphotypes. We made following conclusions after comparative analysis: 1. Triassic assemblages are dominated by morphotypes with bipolar main spines (Pseudostylosphaera and similar forms), and by pylomate forms (Glomeropyle). Genus Glomeropyle has bipolar distribution pattern and it is typically high-latitude taxon. Late Cretaceous assemblages are dominated by forms with bipolar three-bladed main spines (Amphisphaera, Protoxiphotractus, Stylosphaera), by prunoid morphotypes (Amphibrachium, Prunobrachium), discoid spongy forms (Orbiculiforma, Spongodiscus) by three-rayed (Paronaella, Spongotripus), four-rayed (Crucella, Histiastrum) and multirayed stauraxon forms (Pentinastrum, Multastrum). Pylomate forms (Spongopyle) are present in the Late Cretaceous high-latitude assemblages but not so common. 2. Spherical forms with spines that possess apophyses (Kahlerosphaera, Dumitricasphaera) are common for Triassic high-latitude areas, but not present in

  15. Immunodominant proteins α-1 giardin and β-giardin are expressed in both assemblages A and B of Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliziani, Constanza; Merino, María C; Rivero, María R; Hellman, Ulf; Pistoresi-Palencia, María C; Rópolo, Andrea S

    2011-10-19

    To date, eight assemblages of Giardia lamblia have been described, but only assemblages A and B are known to infect humans. Despite the fact that the genomic, biological, and clinical differences found between these two assemblages has raised the possibility that they may be considered different species, there is relatively limited information on their phenotypic differences. In the present study, we developed monoclonal antibodies against alpha-1 and beta giardin, two immunodominant proteins produced during G. lamblia infection, and studied their expression and localization in WB (assemblage A) and GS trophozoites (assemblage B). The polyclonal antibodies generated against WB trophozoites, particularly those recognizing intracellular proteins as well as the proteins present at the plasma membrane (variable-specific surface proteins), showed cross-reactivity with intracellular proteins in GS trophozoites. The use of monoclonal antibodies against beta giardin indicated ventral disc localization, particularly at the periphery in WB trophozoites. Interestingly, although beta giardin was also restricted to the ventral disc in GS trophozoites, the pattern of localization clearly differed in this assemblage. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies against alpha-1 giardin showed plasma membrane localization in both assemblages with the bare area of GS trophozoites also being distinguished. Moreover, the same localization at the plasma membrane was observed in Portland-1 (Assemblage A) and in P15 (Assemblage E) trophozoites. We found differences in localization of the beta giardin protein between assemblages A and B, but the same pattern of localization of alpha-1 giardin in strains from Assemblages A, B and E. These findings reinforce the need for more studies based on phenotypic characteristics in order to disclose how far one assemblage is from the other.

  16. Influence of environmental factors on fish assemblages in streams of the Elbe and Oder basins

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    Luboš Kůra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of environmental parameters on changes in the structure of fish assemblages were studied in the Elbe and the Odra basin. Research was done at 819 sites surveyed in the field during the period 1993-2007. The impact of 46 factors derived from the maps through a GIS was tested as well as the impact of 10 factors recognized in the field. To evaluate the influence of these factors the indirect (DCA and direct (CCA multivariate cluster analysis were used. Analyses were performed with data on presence-absence and relative abundance of each species. DCA well reflects changes in assemblages in the longitudinal profile of streams. CCA refers to a significant influence of regional and temporal variability and influence of individual factors. The fish assemblages are best characterized by distance from the source location, stream slope, altitude of locality, representation of arable land in the basin, number of ponds in the sub-basin above the locality, type of waters (salmonid or cyprinid, and water temperature (the only of the parameters of the field. The analyzed factors better reflect the variability in fish assemblages of the Odra than of Elbe river basin. The analysis showed good practical efficiency of processing information from a large sample of data from ichthyological surveys. The tools of GIS and the use of statistical methods make possible to characterize basic ecological requirements of most species and specify conditions determining specific composition of fish assemblages.

  17. Scaling the relative dominance of exogenous drivers in structuring desert small mammal assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Daniela; Ojeda, Ricardo A.

    2015-11-01

    Assemblage patterns could be primarily generated by two types of drivers: exogenous (such as environmental and climatic factors) and endogenous (interactions such as competition, predation, mutualism or herbivory). The most widely accepted hypothesis states that at smaller scales (such as patch scale), interspecific interactions are the major drivers structuring communities, whereas at larger regional scales, factors such as climate, topography and soil act as ecological filters that determine assemblage composition. The general aim of this paper is to compare different exogenous drivers in terms of their relative dominance in structuring desert small mammal communities across a range of spatial scales, from patch to regional, and compare them with previous results on endogenous drivers. Our results show that as spatial scale increases, the explanatory power of exogenous factors also increases, e.g. from 17% at the patch scale (i.e. abundance) to 99% at the regional scale (i.e. diversity). Moreover, environmental drivers vary in type and strength depending on the community estimator across several spatial scales. On the other hand, endogenous drivers such as interspecific interactions are more important at the patch scale, diminishing in importance towards the regional scale. Therefore, the relative importance of exogenous versus endogenous drivers affects small mammal assemblage structure at different spatial scales. Our results fill up a knowledge gap concerning ecological drivers of assemblage structure at intermediate spatial scales for Monte desert small mammals, and highlight the importance of dealing with multi-causal factors in explaining ecological patterns of assemblages.

  18. Phytolith assemblages and systematic associations in grassland species of the South-eastern Pampean plains, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Honaine, Mariana; Zucol, Alejandro F; Osterrieth, Margarita L

    2006-12-01

    Phytolith descriptions of South American plant species are scarce. This knowledge is crucial for the interpretation of the fossil phytolith record of a region. In this study phytolith assemblages and systematic relationships of the main grasses and Asteraceae species of Paspalum quadrifarium grassland are described. Phytoliths from leaves of Poaceae and Asteraceae species were extracted by using a calcination technique. For each species, 350-400 phytoliths were counted and the relative frequency of each morphotype was calculated. Phytolith assemblages were subject to principal components analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (Morisita index). PCA and cluster analysis showed family (Poaceae vs. Asteraceae) and subfamily (within Poaceae) differentiation. Exceptions to general trends described for other species were detected. Floristic variants of Paspalum quadrifarium grassland can be separated by their phytolith assemblages. The study provides a reference collection of phytolith assemblages of the main Poaceae and Asteraceae species of Paspalum quadrifarium grassland and describes some phytolith morphotypes/systematic relationships useful for the analysis of fossil phytolith assemblages of the Pampean region.

  19. Avian Assemblages at Bird Baths: A Comparison of Urban and Rural Bird Baths in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Gráinne P; Parsons, Holly; Davis, Adrian; Coleman, Bill R; Jones, Darryl N; Miller, Kelly K; Weston, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Private gardens provide habitat and resources for many birds living in human-dominated landscapes. While wild bird feeding is recognised as one of the most popular forms of human-wildlife interaction, almost nothing is known about the use of bird baths. This citizen science initiative explores avian assemblages at bird baths in private gardens in south-eastern Australia and how this differs with respect to levels of urbanisation and bioregion. Overall, 992 citizen scientists collected data over two, four-week survey periods during winter 2014 and summer 2015 (43% participated in both years). Avian assemblages at urban and rural bird baths differed between bioregions with aggressive nectar-eating species influenced the avian assemblages visiting urban bird baths in South Eastern Queensland, NSW North Coast and Sydney Basin while introduced birds contributed to differences in South Western Slopes, Southern Volcanic Plains and Victorian Midlands. Small honeyeaters and other small native birds occurred less often at urban bird baths compared to rural bird baths. Our results suggest that differences between urban versus rural areas, as well as bioregion, significantly influence the composition of avian assemblages visiting bird baths in private gardens. We also demonstrate that citizen science monitoring of fixed survey sites such as bird baths is a useful tool in understanding large-scale patterns in avian assemblages which requires a vast amount of data to be collected across broad areas.

  20. Stable isotope analyses of web-spinning spider assemblages along a headwater stream in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean P; Cuevas, Elvira; Ramírez, Alonso

    2015-01-01

    Web-spinning spiders that inhabit stream channels are considered specialists of aquatic ecosystems and are major consumers of emerging aquatic insects, while other spider taxa are more commonly found in riparian forests and as a result may consume more terrestrial insects. To determine if there was a difference in spider taxa abundance between riverine web-spinning spider assemblages within the stream channel and the assemblages 10 m into the riparian forest, we compared abundances for all web-spinning spiders along a headwater stream in El Yunque National Forest in northeast Puerto Rico. By using a nonmetric dimensional scaling (NMDS) abundance analysis we were able to see a clear separation of the two spider assemblages. The second objective of the study was to determine if aquatic insects contributed more to the diet of the spider assemblages closest to the stream channel and therefore stable isotope analyses of δ (15)N and δ (13)C for web-spinning spiders along with their possible prey were utilized. The results of the Bayesian mixing model (SIAR) however showed little difference in the diets of riverine (0 m), riparian (10 m) and upland (25 m) spiders. We found that aquatic insects made up ∼50% of the diet for web-spinning spiders collected at 0 m, 10 m, and 25 m from the stream. This study highlights the importance of aquatic insects as a food source for web-spinning spiders despite the taxonomic differences in assemblages at different distances from the stream.

  1. Stable isotope analyses of web-spinning spider assemblages along a headwater stream in Puerto Rico

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    Sean P. Kelly

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Web-spinning spiders that inhabit stream channels are considered specialists of aquatic ecosystems and are major consumers of emerging aquatic insects, while other spider taxa are more commonly found in riparian forests and as a result may consume more terrestrial insects. To determine if there was a difference in spider taxa abundance between riverine web-spinning spider assemblages within the stream channel and the assemblages 10 m into the riparian forest, we compared abundances for all web-spinning spiders along a headwater stream in El Yunque National Forest in northeast Puerto Rico. By using a nonmetric dimensional scaling (NMDS abundance analysis we were able to see a clear separation of the two spider assemblages. The second objective of the study was to determine if aquatic insects contributed more to the diet of the spider assemblages closest to the stream channel and therefore stable isotope analyses of δ15N and δ13C for web-spinning spiders along with their possible prey were utilized. The results of the Bayesian mixing model (SIAR however showed little difference in the diets of riverine (0 m, riparian (10 m and upland (25 m spiders. We found that aquatic insects made up ∼50% of the diet for web-spinning spiders collected at 0 m, 10 m, and 25 m from the stream. This study highlights the importance of aquatic insects as a food source for web-spinning spiders despite the taxonomic differences in assemblages at different distances from the stream.

  2. Morphological diversity at different spatial scales in a Neotropical bat assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Fabricio; Arita, Héctor T

    2014-10-01

    The morphology of species can be used to represent their ecological position and infer potential processes determining the structure of species assemblages. This ecomorphological approach has been widely applied to the study of bat assemblages which mainly focuses on a single spatial scale and particular guilds. We extended such an ecomorphological approach to a multi-scale analysis of a Neotropical bat assemblage and its constituent guilds (aerial and gleaning insectivores, frugivores, and nectarivores) to describe their structure at different spatial scales and determine the relative importance of inter-specific competition, habitat filtering, or stochastic processes shaping such structures. We measured the occupied morphological space (size) defined by wing and skull morphology independently and the nearest-neighbour distance (structure) among species within these spaces at each spatial scale. Observed patterns were compared with random expectations derived from null models for statistical inference. When controlling for species richness and regional sampling effects in the null models, we did not find a significant effect of spatial scale in the morphological structure of the studied bat assemblage and guilds. Morphological structure followed the same patterns across scales as those expected from random drawings of sample size alone. Similar results were obtained regardless of morphological complex (wing and skull) and guilds. At both the assemblage and guild levels, bat morphological structure seems to be determined by regional, abiotic processes (e.g. habitat filtering) shaping the composition and organization of the species pool.

  3. Fish assemblage relationships with physical characteristics and presence of dams in three eastern Iowa rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Clay; Nicholas L. Ahrens,; Anna K. Loan-Wilsey,; Gregory A. Simmons,; Gregory T. Gelwicks,

    2013-01-01

    Fish assemblages in rivers of the Midwestern United States are an important component of the region's natural resources and biodiversity. We characterized the physical environment and presence of dams in a series of reaches in three eastern Iowa rivers tributary to the Mississippi River and related these characteristics to the fish assemblages present. Some physical characteristics were similar among the 12 study reaches, whereas others differed substantially. We found a total of 68 species across the 12 study reaches; 56 in the Turkey River, 51 in the Maquoketa River and 50 in the Wapsipinicon River. Seventeen species could be described as ‘downstream-distributed’; 15 being found only in the lowest reach of one or more rivers and the other two being found only in the lowest reaches or two or more contiguous reaches including the lowest reach. Two species could be described as ‘upstream-distributed’, being found only in an uppermost reach. Non-metric multidimensional scaling ordination illustrated similarities among reaches, and five physical variables were significantly correlated with assemblage similarities. Catchment area and number of dams between reaches and the Mississippi River were strongly correlated with assemblage similarities, but the directions of their effects were opposite. Catchment area and number of dams were confounded. The collective evidence to date suggests that the pervasiveness of dams on rivers significantly alters fish assemblages, making underlying patterns of species change and relationships with naturally varying and human-influenced physical characteristics along a river's course difficult to discern.

  4. Megafloral assemblage similar to Karharbari biozone from Talchir Coalfield of Mahanadi Basin, Orissa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K.J.; Goswami, S.; Chandra, S. [Birbal Sahni Institute of Paleobotany, Lucknow (India)

    2006-08-15

    A rich collection of plant megafossils have been studied from the rocks of Karharbari Formation (Early Permian=Lower Artinskian) at South Balanda Colliery (Latitude 20 degrees 56' Longitude 85 degrees 14'), Talchir Coalfield, Angul district, Orissa. The lower Gondwana rocks in this coalfield have been represented by Talchir, Karharbari, Barakar, Barren Measures and the Kamthi Formations (in ascending order) representing earliest Permian to Late Permian. Palaeobotanical studies have been extensively carried out in the past by a number of workers in almost all the Lower Gondwana formations except the Karharbari Formation. Megafloral assemblage has been recovered for the first time from Karharbari sediments of the Lower Gondwana deposits in this coalfield. The specimens are preserved as impressions and compressions on blackish grey fine-grained shales of the South Balanda Colliery exposed just above the carbonaceous shales. The lowermost coal seam i.e. seam no. 1/Karharbari seam of this coalfield exists below the above-mentioned two shale bands. The megafloral assemblage consists of Phyllotheca westensis, Noeggerathiopsis hislopii, Euryphyllum whittianum, E. maithyi, Macrotaeniopteris feddeni, Buriadia heterophylla, Glossopteris browniana, G. communis, Gangamopteris cyclopleroides and Surangephyllum elongatum. The genus Buriadia dominates the total assemblage (about 80%). The assemblage has been compared thoroughly with the known megafloral assemblages of Karharbari Formation.

  5. Rare species contribute disproportionately to the functional structure of species assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Rafael P; Zuanon, Jansen; Villéger, Sébastien; Williams, Stephen E; Baraloto, Christopher; Fortunel, Claire; Mendonça, Fernando P; Mouillot, David

    2016-04-13

    There is broad consensus that the diversity of functional traits within species assemblages drives several ecological processes. It is also widely recognized that rare species are the first to become extinct following human-induced disturbances. Surprisingly, however, the functional importance of rare species is still poorly understood, particularly in tropical species-rich assemblages where the majority of species are rare, and the rate of species extinction can be high. Here, we investigated the consequences of local and regional extinctions on the functional structure of species assemblages. We used three extensive datasets (stream fish from the Brazilian Amazon, rainforest trees from French Guiana, and birds from the Australian Wet Tropics) and built an integrative measure of species rarity versus commonness, combining local abundance, geographical range, and habitat breadth. Using different scenarios of species loss, we found a disproportionate impact of rare species extinction for the three groups, with significant reductions in levels of functional richness, specialization, and originality of assemblages, which may severely undermine the integrity of ecological processes. The whole breadth of functional abilities within species assemblages, which is disproportionately supported by rare species, is certainly critical in maintaining ecosystems particularly under the ongoing rapid environmental transitions.

  6. Examining shifts in Carabidae assemblages across a forest-agriculture ecotone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, T W; Biddinger, D J; Rohr, J R; Hulting, A G; Mortensen, D A; Fleischer, S J

    2014-02-01

    Northeastern U.S. farms are often situated adjacent to forestland due to the heterogeneous nature of the landscape. We investigated how forested areas influence Carabidae diversity within nearby crop fields by establishing transects of pitfall traps. Trapping extended across a forest-agriculture ecotone consisting of maize, an intermediate mowed grass margin, and a forest edge. Carabidae diversity was compared among the three habitats, and community and population dynamics were assessed along the transect. We used a principal response curve to examine and visualize community change across a spatial gradient. The highest levels of richness and evenness were observed in the forest community, and carabid assemblages shifted significantly across the ecotone, especially at the forest-grass interface. Despite strong ecotone effects, population distributions showed that some species were found in all three habitats and seemed to thrive at the ecotone. Based on similarity indices, carabid assemblages collected in maize adjacent to forest differed from carabid assemblages in maize not adjacent to forest. We conclude that forest carabid assemblages exhibit high degrees of dissimilarity with those found in agricultural fields and forested areas should thus be retained in agricultural landscapes to increase biodiversity at the landscape scale. However, ecotone species found at forest edges can still noticeably influence carabid community composition within neighboring agricultural fields. Further studies should determine how these shifts in carabid assemblages influence agroecosystem services in relation to ecosystem services observed in fields embedded in an agricultural matrix.

  7. A Comparative Study of Fish Assemblages Near Aquaculture, Artificial and Natural Habitats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhenhua; CHEN Yong; ZHANG Shouyu; WANG Kai; ZHAO Jing; XU Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Habitat plays a critical role in regulating fish community structure. Using the data collected from a monthly trammel net survey in Ma’an archipelago off the east coast of China, we evaluated impacts of five different habitats (artificial reefs, mussel farms, cage aquaculture, rocky reefs and soft bottom) on fish assemblages. This study suggests that artificial reefs (AR) have significantly higher species richness, abundance and diversity than mussel farms (MF) or soft bottom (SB) habitats during most seasons, and that fish taxa in the AR habitats are similar to those in the rocky reef (RR) habitats. Two different fish assemblage patterns were revealed in the study area using non-metric multidimensional scaling ordination: an assemblage dominated by reef fishes (especially by Scor-paenidae species) in AR, RR and cage aquaculture (CA) habitats and an assemblage dominated by Sciaenidae species in MF and SB habitats. We suggest that reef fishes play a key role in differentiating fish community structures in the study area. Although few dif-ferences in fish abundance and diversity were found between the CA and SB habitats, a more diverse age structure was observed in the CA habitats. A much more complex fish assemblage and enhanced population of local species were established as a result of the presence of both floating and fixed artificial structures, probably through improved survival rates.

  8. A comparative study of fish assemblages near aquaculture, artificial and natural habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenhua; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Shouyu; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Jing; Xu, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    Habitat plays a critical role in regulating fish community structure. Using the data collected from a monthly trammel net survey in Ma'an archipelago off the east coast of China, we evaluated impacts of five different habitats (artificial reefs, mussel farms, cage aquaculture, rocky reefs and soft bottom) on fish assemblages. This study suggests that artificial reefs (AR) have significantly higher species richness, abundance and diversity than mussel farms (MF) or soft bottom (SB) habitats during most seasons, and that fish taxa in the AR habitats are similar to those in the rocky reef (RR) habitats. Two different fish assemblage patterns were revealed in the study area using non-metric multidimensional scaling ordination: an assemblage dominated by reef fishes (especially by Scorpaenidae species) in AR, RR and cage aquaculture (CA) habitats and an assemblage dominated by Sciaenidae species in MF and SB habitats. We suggest that reef fishes play a key role in differentiating fish community structures in the study area. Although few differences in fish abundance and diversity were found between the CA and SB habitats, a more diverse age structure was observed in the CA habitats. A much more complex fish assemblage and enhanced population of local species were established as a result of the presence of both floating and fixed artificial structures, probably through improved survival rates.

  9. Opposing Patterns of Seasonal Change in Functional and Phylogenetic Diversity of Tadpole Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauß, Axel; Guilhaumon, François; Randrianiaina, Roger Daniel; Wollenberg Valero, Katharina C.; Vences, Miguel; Glos, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Assemblages that are exposed to recurring temporal environmental changes can show changes in their ecological properties. These can be expressed by differences in diversity and assembly rules. Both can be identified using two measures of diversity: functional (FD) and phylogenetic diversity (PD). Frog communities are understudied in this regard, especially during the tadpole life stage. We utilised tadpole assemblages from Madagascan rainforest streams to test predictions of seasonal changes on diversity and assemblage composition and on diversity measures. From the warm-wet to the cool-dry season, species richness (SR) of tadpole assemblages decreased. Also FD and PD decreased, but FD less and PD more than expected by chance. During the dry season, tadpole assemblages were characterised by functional redundancy (among assemblages—with increasing SR), high FD (compared to a null model), and low PD (phylogenetic clustering; compared to a null model). Although mutually contradictory at first glance, these results indicate competition as tadpole community assembly driving force. This is true during the limiting cool-dry season but not during the more suitable warm-wet season. We thereby show that assembly rules can strongly depend on season, that comparing FD and PD can reveal such forces, that FD and PD are not interchangeable, and that conclusions on assembly rules based on FD alone are critical. PMID:27014867

  10. Spatial versus temporal patterns in fish assemblages of a tropical estuarine coastal lake: The Ebrié Lagoon (Ivory Coast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecoutin, Jean-Marc; Richard, Emilie; Simier, Monique; Albaret, Jean-Jacques

    2005-09-01

    The fish assemblages of the Ebrié lagoon (Ivory Coast) were sampled by experimental fishing over the entire lagoon using a purse seine net. The sampling was conducted in the two main hydroclimatic seasons for this ecosystem, i.e. in the dry season (March-April) and in the wet season (August-September). The results obtained showed a fish assemblage organized around a consistently occurring group of twenty species. When analysed in terms of ecological categories, the seasonal influence led to a cycle in the assemblages from freshwater to marine around this permanent species pool, with a seasonal renewal of the assemblage. At the scale of the lagoon, there were variations in the composition of the assemblages that clearly distinguished the western part from the eastern one. The limit was situated at the Vridi canal, a wide artificial channel permanently connecting the lagoon to the sea. To the west, the assemblage was characterised by a strong spatial uniformity and low seasonal variability. To the east, the assemblage formed two different entities; one assemblage with pronounced freshwater affinities occurring in a side arm and the other assemblage with great seasonal variability under the alternating influence of seawater in the dry season and freshwater in the wet season. This part of the lagoon functioned somewhat like a typical estuary.

  11. Spatial and seasonal patterns of ichthyoplankton assemblages in the Haizhou Bay and its adjacent waters of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zengguang; Ye, Zhenjiang; Wan, Rong

    2015-12-01

    Surveys were conducted in five voyages in Haizhou Bay and its adjacent coastal area from March to December 2011 during full moon spring tides. The ichthyoplankton assemblages and the environmental factors that affect their spatial and seasonal patterns were determined. Totally 35 and 12 fish egg and larvae taxa were identified, respectively. Over the past several decades, the egg and larval species composition has significantly changed in Haizhou Bay and its adjacent waters, most likely corresponding with the alteration of fishery resources, which are strongly affected by anthropogenic activities and climate change. The Bray-Curtis dissimilarity index identified four assemblages: near-shore bay assemblage, middle bay assemblage and two closely related assemblages (near-shore/middle bay assemblage and middle/edge of bay assemblage). The primary species of each assemblage principally reflected the spawning strategies of adult fish. The near-shore bay assemblage generally occurred in near-shore bay, with depths measuring biological behavioral traits and oceanographic features, particularly the variation of local conditions within the constraint of a general reproductive strategy. The results of Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicated that both fish egg and larval abundance were positively correlated with depth, which is critical to the oceanographic features in Haizhou Bay.

  12. Effects of Climate Change and Various Grassland Management Practices on Grasshopper (Orthoptera Assemblages

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    Zoltán Kenyeres

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of different grassland management practices on Orthoptera assemblages inhabiting humid grassland areas was studied since 2003 to 2011. The examined sites were within the protected area of Balaton Uplands National Park. The physiognomy and climatic conditions of the studied habitats were similar but their land use types were significantly different. After the preliminary analyses of Nonmetric multidimensional scaling, neighbour joining clustering, and Spearman rank correlation, we examined the possible effects of such independent variables as land use (nonmanagement, mowing, grazing, microclimate (humidity and temperature, regional macroclimate (annual and monthly mean temperatures and rainfall, using General Linear Mixed Models, and canonical correlation analysis. Our results showed that the effect of grassland management practices on the organization of Orthoptera assemblages was at least as important as that of macro- and microclimate. Furthermore, grassland management could intensify the influence of several local and regional parameters. These results can help finding the most suitable type of grassland management to conserve the grasshopper assemblages.

  13. Species Assemblage and Biogeography of Japanese Protura (Hexapoda in Forest Soils

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    Minori Hashimoto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The distribution and species assembly of Japanese Protura collected from forest soils were examined using published databases and statistical analysis. We used records from 3110 sites where 71 taxa were found. The species richness of Protura ranged from one to 16 species, and TWINSPAN analysis of regional populations indicated that the northern and southern regions could be separated into distinct groups. Three major species assemblages were identified by cluster analysis from points containing more than six species. Three groups reflected historical migration from northern and western linkages to the Asian continent. The northern assemblage showed a negative correlation to winter minimum temperature and the other two assemblages exhibited relationships to precipitation and temperature. Vegetation was not responsible for proturan distribution. These results suggest that the history of Protura invasion explains the biogeography of these soil-based, small arthropods and also that climate change will induce a shift in the distribution of species irrespective of changes in vegetation type.

  14. Variation in rocky shore assemblages and abundances of key taxa along gradients of stormwater input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Chloe M; Crowe, Tasman P

    2015-04-01

    Stormwater brings freshwater and terrestrially derived contaminants into coastal systems and is predicted to increase with climate change. This study aimed to characterise variation in rocky shore assemblages in relation to stormwater pollution. Intertidal assemblages were sampled in similar habitats at a range of distances (0 m, 10 m, 20 m, 60 m, and 100 m) from stormwater outfalls on three rocky shores north of Dublin. In general, taxon richness and algal cover increased after 20 m from a stormwater outfall. Limpet population structure and condition index showed no consistent patterns among shores. Assemblage structure at or near stormwater sites differed from that at sites 100 m away. These findings, ideally supplemented by experimental research, may be used to inform stormwater management and remediation approaches.

  15. Abiotic proxies for predictive mapping of near-shore benthic assemblages: Implications for marine spatial planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Jennifer; Steneck, Robert S; Brady, Damian C

    2016-11-16

    Marine spatial planning (MSP) should assist managers in guiding human activities towards sustainable practices and in minimizing user-conflicts in our oceans. A necessary first step is to quantify spatial patterns of marine assemblages in order to understand the ecosystem's structure, function, and services. However, the large spatial scale, high economic value, and density of human activities in near-shore habitats often makes quantifying this component of marine ecosystems especially daunting. To address this challenge, we developed an assessment method that employs abiotic proxies to rapidly characterize marine assemblages in near-shore benthic environments with relatively high resolution. We evaluated this assessment method along 300 km of the State of Maine's coastal shelf (spatial extrapolations of marine assemblages in congested (heavily used) near-shore habitats. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Changes in mesophotic reef fish assemblages along depth and geographical gradients in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Atsuko; Kosaki, Randall K.; Wagner, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) extend from 30 to 150 m in depth and support diverse communities of marine organisms. We investigated changes in the structure of mesophotic reef fish assemblages (27-100 m) in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) along depth and geographical gradients using open- and closed-circuit trimix diving. There were clear changes in the assemblage structure from the southeastern to the northwestern end of the NWHI and from shallow to deep waters. Interactive effects of depth and location were also detected. MCEs in the NWHI can be treated as three regions: southeastern and mid regions primarily separated by the presence and absence, respectively, of the introduced species Lutjanus kasmira, and a northwestern region where fish assemblages are largely composed of endemic species. These spatial patterns may be explained, at least in part, by differences in temperature among the regions.

  17. Rudist and foraminifer assemblages in the Santonian-Campanian sequence of Nanos Mountain (Western Slovenia

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    Mauro Caffau

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The Santonian-Campanian limestones of Nanos Mountain are mainly characterized by wackestone-packstone with benthic foraminifers, thaumatoporellaceans and rudists. Rudists in growth position are rare and rudist congregations are found only in bouquets with less than ten individuals. Rudist shells are chaotically deposited in beds and frequently show signs of bioturbation and erosion. The analyzed sequence from Nanos Mountain testifies an inner shelf environment in a ramp-like depositional setting. In the lower part of the sequence, rudist assemblages are characterized by abundant hippuritids and radiolitids whereas benthic foraminifers are rare and poorly preserved. In the upper part of the sequence, rudist assemblages consist of abundant radiolitids and rare hippuritids. Benthic foraminifers are usually well-preserved and the presence of the Keramosphaerina tergestina (Stache is recorded. The vertical distribution of rudist and foraminifer assemblages with the presence of K. tergestina reflect sea level changes in an inner shelf environment during Santonian-Campanian.

  18. Environmental influence on coprophagous Scarabaeidae (Insecta, Coleoptera) assemblages in the Pantanal of Mato Grosso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissiani, A S O; Sousa, W O; Santos, G B; Ide, S; Battirola, L; Marques, M I

    2015-11-01

    Here we examine assemblage structure of coprophagous Scarabaeidae (dung beetles) in the Pantanal of the state of Mato Grosso with respect to flooding regimes, soil texture, leaf litter volume and tree dominance in native and exotic pastures. Samples were collected along 30 transects of 250 m in length in a 5×5 km grid (25 km2). Five pitfalls baited with human feces were placed in each transect. A total of 1692 individuals in 19 species were captured, the majority in the subfamily Scarabaeinae and Aphodiinae. Assemblages were influenced by the duration of flooding and leaf litter volume. None of the other habitat variables was correlated with species richness. Cultivated pastures with exotic grasses were unimportant for composition of the assemblages of beetles. These results indicate that duration of flooding is the most important regulating force in this community.

  19. Fish diversity and assemblage structure in Ken River of Panna landscape, central India

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    J.A. Johnson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fish diversity and assemblage structure in relation to habitat variables were studied in 15 sites in Panna landscape, central India. The sampling was performed between February-April 2009. Fifty species of fishes belonging to 32 genera, 15 families and four orders were recorded from the study area. Cyprinids were the dominant assemblage members in all study streams (abundance ranges from 56.6-94.5 %. The cyprinid Devario aequipinnatus and the snakehead Channa gachua had highest local dominance (80% each in Panna landscape. High Shannon and Margalef’s diversity was recorded in Madla region of Ken River. Similarity cluster analysis explained the study sites along Ken River (Gahrighat, Magradabri and Madla had similar faunal assemblage. Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA was performed to study the species association with a set of environmental variables. The CCA revealed that cyprinid abundance was associated with stream order, deeper habitat, flow and water temperature.

  20. Climate change effects on North American inland fish populations and assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Abigail J.; Myers, Bonnie; Chu, Cindy; Eby, Lisa A.; Falke, Jeffrey A.; Kovach, Ryan P.; Krabbenhoft, Trevor J.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Lyons, John; Paukert, Craig P.; Whitney, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Climate is a critical driver of many fish populations, assemblages, and aquatic communities. However, direct observational studies of climate change impacts on North American inland fishes are rare. In this synthesis, we (1) summarize climate trends that may influence North American inland fish populations and assemblages, (2) compile 31 peer-reviewed studies of documented climate change effects on North American inland fish populations and assemblages, and (3) highlight four case studies representing a variety of observed responses ranging from warmwater systems in the southwestern and southeastern United States to coldwater systems along the Pacific Coast and Canadian Shield. We conclude by identifying key data gaps and research needs to inform adaptive, ecosystem-based approaches to managing North American inland fishes and fisheries in a changing climate.

  1. Spatial variation in the structure of fish assemblages in the Vaalbos National Park, South Africa

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    I.A. Russell

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Fish assemblages were sampled at nine sites in the lower Vaal River in the Vaalbos National Park and adjacent properties. A total of 1543 fish from 10 species was recorded. Ordination revealed spatial variation in assemblage structure, with the distinction primarily between communities in rapids and deep pools. Flow velocity, depth and percentage cover were important determinants offish assemblage structure. The length frequency distribution of abundant species indicated successful recruitment. Several differences in the species compliment compared to earlier studies were evident, including high abundance of Barbus paludinosus and Austro^lanis sclateri, and the absence of Barbus anoplus. The length-mass relationships of large cyprmids indicated long-term declines in the physical condition of fish.

  2. A new phyllopod bed-like assemblage from the Burgess Shale of the Canadian Rockies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Jean-Bernard; Gaines, Robert R; Aria, Cédric; Mángano, M Gabriela; Streng, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Burgess Shale-type fossil assemblages provide the best evidence of the 'Cambrian explosion'. Here we report the discovery of an extraordinary new soft-bodied fauna from the Burgess Shale. Despite its proximity (ca. 40 km) to Walcott's original locality, the Marble Canyon fossil assemblage is distinct, and offers new insights into the initial diversification of metazoans, their early morphological disparity, and the geographic ranges and longevity of many Cambrian taxa. The arthropod-dominated assemblage is remarkable for its high density and diversity of soft-bodied fossils, as well as for its large proportion of new species (22% of total diversity) and for the preservation of hitherto unreported anatomical features, including in the chordate Metaspriggina and the arthropod Mollisonia. The presence of the stem arthropods Misszhouia and Primicaris, previously known only from the early Cambrian of China, suggests that the palaeogeographic ranges and longevity of Burgess Shale taxa may be underestimated.

  3. Farming-up coastal fish assemblages through a massive aquaculture escape event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Guedes, Kilian; Sanchez-Jerez, Pablo; Benjumea, María E; Brito, Alberto

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the changes on the mean trophic level of fish assemblages across different spatiotemporal scales, before and after a massive escape event occurred off La Palma (Canary Islands), which resulted in the release of 1.5 million fish (mostly Dicentrarchus labrax) into the wild. The presence of escaped fish altered significantly the mean trophic level of fish assemblages in shallow coastal waters. This alteration was exacerbated by the massive escape. A nearby marine protected area buffered the changes in mean trophic level but exhibited the same temporal patterns as highly fished areas. Moreover, escaped fish exploited natural resources according to their total length and possibly, time since escapement. New concerns arise as a "farming up" process is detected in shallow coastal fish assemblages where marine aquaculture is established.

  4. Relationship between 'live' and dead benthic foraminiferal assemblages in the abyssal NE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanoudis, Paris V.; Bett, Brian J.; Gooday, Andrew J.

    2017-03-01

    Dead foraminiferal assemblages within the sediment mixed layer provide an integrated, time-averaged view of the foraminiferal fauna, while the relationship between dead and live assemblages reflects the population dynamics of different species together with taphonomic processes operating over the last few hundred years. Here, we analysed four samples for 'live' (Rose-Bengal-stained) and dead benthic foraminifera (0-1 cm sediment layer, >150 μm) from four sites in the area of the Porcupine Abyssal Plain Sustained Observatory (PAP-SO; NE Atlantic, 4850 m water depth). Two sites were located on abyssal hills and two on the adjacent abyssal plain. Our results indicate that the transition from live to dead benthic foraminiferal assemblages involved a dramatic loss of delicate agglutinated and organic-walled tests (e.g. Lagenammina, Nodellum, Reophax) with poor preservation potential, and to a lesser extent that of some relatively fragile calcareous tests (mostly miliolids), possibly a result of dissolution. Other processes, such as the transport of tests by bottom currents and predation, are unlikely to have substantially altered the composition of dead faunas. Positive live to dead ratios suggest that some species (notably Epistominella exigua and Bolivina spathulata) may have responded to recent phytodetritus input. Although the composition of live assemblages seemed to be influenced by seafloor topography (abyssal hills vs. plain), no such relation was found for dead assemblages. We suggest that PAP-SO fossil assemblages are likely to be comparable across topographically contrasting sites, and dominated by calcareous and some robust agglutinated forms with calcitic cement (e.g. Eggerella).

  5. Larval assemblages of large and medium-sized pelagic species in the Straits of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, David E.; Llopiz, Joel K.; Guigand, Cedric M.; Cowen, Robert K.

    2010-07-01

    Critical gaps in our understanding of the distributions, interactions, life histories and preferred habitats of large and medium-size pelagic fishes severely constrain the implementation of ecosystem-based, spatially structured fisheries management approaches. In particular, spawning distributions and the environmental characteristics associated with the early life stages are poorly documented. In this study, we consider the diversity, assemblages, and associated habitat of the larvae of large and medium-sized pelagic species collected during 2 years of monthly surveys across the Straits of Florida. In total, 36 taxa and 14,295 individuals were collected, with the highest diversity occurring during the summer and in the western, frontal region of the Florida Current. Only a few species (e.g. Thunnus obesus, T. alalunga, Tetrapturus pfluegeri) considered for this study were absent. Small scombrids (e.g. T. atlanticus, Katsuwonus pelamis, Auxis spp.) and gempylids dominated the catch and were orders of magnitude more abundant than many of the rare species (e.g. Thunnus thynnus,Kajikia albida). Both constrained (CCA) and unconstrained (NMDS) multivariate analyses revealed a number of species groupings including: (1) a summer Florida edge assemblage (e.g. Auxis spp., Euthynnus alleterattus, Istiophorus platypterus); (2) a summer offshore assemblage (e.g. Makaira nigricans, T. atlanticus, Ruvettus pretiosus, Lampris guttatus); (3) an ubiquitous assemblage (e.g. K. pelamis, Coryphaena hippurus, Xiphias gladius); and (4) a spring/winter assemblage that was widely dispersed in space (e.g. trachipterids). The primary environmental factors associated with these assemblages were sea-surface temperature (highest in summer-early fall), day length (highest in early summer), thermocline depth (shallowest on the Florida side) and fluorescence (highest on the Florida side). Overall, the results of this study provide insights into how a remarkable diversity of pelagic species

  6. Role of macrophyte life forms in driving periphytic microalgal assemblages in a Brazilian reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara L. Fernandes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Macrophytes play several roles in aquatic ecosystems, including the provision of habitat for many aquatic organisms, especially the periphyton. The aims of this study were to characterize the structure of periphytic microalgal assemblages on different aquatic macrophyte life forms in order to establish similarities between assemblages from nearby sampling sites. We hypothesized that i aquatic macrophytes with different life forms and morphological characteristics could differently influence the structure of the periphyton and that ii the greatest similarity in periphyton composition should be observed among macrophytes that occupy the same sampling site. The study was conducted from 2006 to 2008 in the Thomaz Osterne de Alencar reservoir (Crato City, Ceará State, Brazil and involved the taxonomic surveying of microalgae attached to five different macrophytes with the application of structural descriptors (richness, abundance, frequency, diversity and equitability. A total of 127 taxa, of which 44% belonged to the Chlorophyta, were identified. The microalgae assemblages showed high species richness on Salvinia auriculata Aubl., a free-floating macrophyte, and large abundance on Apalanthe granatensis (Humb. & Bonpl. Planch., a submerged anchored macrophyte. ANOVA indicated that periphyton significantly varied among the macrophytes investigated, and nearby sampling sites showed no structural similarities in microalgal assemblages. In general, we can conclude that the structure of periphyton assemblages is influenced by the substrate (i.e., macrophyte organ, as this can not only promote high diversity and equitability but can also be a predictor of dissimilarity in the distribution and frequency of occurrence of microalgae. These results reinforce the findings of other studies that have shown that macrophytes play an important role in structuring the periphyton assemblages.

  7. Functional redundancy patterns reveal non-random assembly rules in a species-rich marine assemblage.

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    Nicolas Guillemot

    Full Text Available The relationship between species and the functional diversity of assemblages is fundamental in ecology because it contains key information on functional redundancy, and functionally redundant ecosystems are thought to be more resilient, resistant and stable. However, this relationship is poorly understood and undocumented for species-rich coastal marine ecosystems. Here, we used underwater visual censuses to examine the patterns of functional redundancy for one of the most diverse vertebrate assemblages, the coral reef fishes of New Caledonia, South Pacific. First, we found that the relationship between functional and species diversity displayed a non-asymptotic power-shaped curve, implying that rare functions and species mainly occur in highly diverse assemblages. Second, we showed that the distribution of species amongst possible functions was significantly different from a random distribution up to a threshold of ∼90 species/transect. Redundancy patterns for each function further revealed that some functions displayed fast rates of increase in redundancy at low species diversity, whereas others were only becoming redundant past a certain threshold. This suggested non-random assembly rules and the existence of some primordial functions that would need to be fulfilled in priority so that coral reef fish assemblages can gain a basic ecological structure. Last, we found little effect of habitat on the shape of the functional-species diversity relationship and on the redundancy of functions, although habitat is known to largely determine assemblage characteristics such as species composition, biomass, and abundance. Our study shows that low functional redundancy is characteristic of this highly diverse fish assemblage, and, therefore, that even species-rich ecosystems such as coral reefs may be vulnerable to the removal of a few keystone species.

  8. Macrofauna assemblage composition and soil moisture interact to affect soil ecosystem functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, E. J.; Riutta, T.; Slade, E. M.

    2013-02-01

    Changing climatic conditions and habitat fragmentation are predicted to alter the soil moisture conditions of temperate forests. It is not well understood how the soil macrofauna community will respond to changes in soil moisture, and how changes to species diversity and community composition may affect ecosystem functions, such as litter decomposition and soil fluxes. Moreover, few studies have considered the interactions between the abiotic and biotic factors that regulate soil processes. Here we attempt to disentangle the interactive effects of two of the main factors that regulate soil processes at small scales - moisture and macrofauna assemblage composition. The response of assemblages of three common temperate soil invertebrates (Glomeris marginata Villers, Porcellio scaber Latreille and Philoscia muscorum Scopoli) to two contrasting soil moisture levels was examined in a series of laboratory mesocosm experiments. The contribution of the invertebrates to the leaf litter mass loss of two common temperate tree species of contrasting litter quality (easily decomposing Fraxinus excelsior L. and recalcitrant Quercus robur L.) and to soil CO2 fluxes were measured. Both moisture conditions and litter type influenced the functioning of the invertebrate assemblages, which was greater in high moisture conditions compared with low moisture conditions and on good quality vs. recalcitrant litter. In high moisture conditions, all macrofauna assemblages functioned at equal rates, whereas in low moisture conditions there were pronounced differences in litter mass loss among the assemblages. This indicates that species identity and assemblage composition are more important when moisture is limited. We suggest that complementarity between macrofauna species may mitigate the reduced functioning of some species, highlighting the importance of maintaining macrofauna species richness.

  9. Comparative Biodynamics; The Form and Function of Two Living Stromatolite Assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, D. M.; Gleeson, D.; Burns, B.; Collins, L.

    2014-12-01

    Life arose very rapidly on the surface of the Earth after the conditions on the early planet stabilized. The first visible record of life is now represented by the fossilized signature of microbial communities on the surface of ancient sediments. Even at this early stage, at the onset of ecology, it is clear that the development of biofilms at the sediment-water interface would have affected the response of the surface to erosive force. The close interaction between biology and physical dynamics started early. The stabilization of the sediment will have been important in promoting the development of biogeochemical gradients, and promoting the niche segregation that drives evolution. As these microbial mat systems evolved is likely that their binding capacity changed as form and function developed. The onset of photosynthesis was a step change in this process. Studies on the biodynamics of modern Bahamian stromatolites demonstrated the importance of photosynthesis in promoting the biogenic stabilization of the carbonate (ooid) sediments by microbial assemblages derived from living stromatolites. The present study presents a comparative assessment of this work using new material from living stromatolitic assemblages from Shark Bay, Australia. Samples of stromatolites were taken and the natural microbial assemblages extracted and characterized. Microbial assemblages were incubated on the surface of clean sediment and the relative stabilization of the surface measured using the cohesive strength meter system to determine surface stability against time. Magnetic particle induction was also used to determine the relative adhesive capacity of the surfaces as assemblages developed. The results are presented and examined in contrast to the previous work on the biodynamics of modern Bahamian stromatolitic systems showing significant variation in form and function between the two different stromatolitic assemblages. The reasons for this variation are discussed.

  10. A study of the trace sulfide mineral assemblages in the Stillwater Complex, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, Hannah M.; Ferguson, Katherine M.; Lehrer, Malia L.; Boudreau, Alan E.

    2017-03-01

    The sulfide assemblages of the Stillwater Complex away from the well-studied ore zones are composed mainly of variable proportions of pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite, and ±pyrite. Excluding vein assemblages and those affected by greenschist and lower temperature alteration, the majority can be classified into two broad assemblages, defined here as pristine (multiphase, often globular in shape) or volatile-bearing (multiphase, high-temperature, volatile-rich minerals such as biotite, hornblende, or an unmixed calcite-dolomite assemblage). The volatile-bearing assemblages are mainly found within and below the J-M reef, where native copper and sphalerite are also locally present. Pristine sulfides are found throughout the stratigraphy. Both groups can be affected by apparent S loss in the form of pyrite being converted to magnetite and chalcopyrite to a Cu-Fe-oxide (delafossite), with little to no silicate alteration. An upward trend from pentlandite-rich to pyrrhotite-rich to pyrite-rich assemblages is observed in the footwall rocks in upper GN-I, and the same trend repeats from just below the reef and continues into the overlying N-II and GN-II. Modeling suggests that the sulfide Ni in the Peridotite Zone is largely controlled by silicate Ni. When taken together, observations are most readily explained by the remobilization of selected elements by a high-temperature fluid with the apparent loss of S > Cu > Ni. This could concentrate ore metals by vapor refining, eventually producing a platinum group element-enriched sulfide ore zone, such as the J-M reef.

  11. Origin of an assemblage massively dominated by carnivorans from the miocene of Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Soledad Domingo

    Full Text Available Carnivoran-dominated fossil sites provide precious insights into the diversity and ecology of species rarely recovered in the fossil record. The lower level assemblage of Batallones-1 fossil site (Late Miocene; Madrid Basin, Spain has yielded one of the most abundant and diversified carnivoran assemblage ever known from the Cenozoic record of mammals. A comprehensive taphonomic study is carried out here in order to constrain the concentration mode of this remarkable assemblage. Another distinctive feature of Batallones-1 is that the accumulation of carnivoran remains took place in the context of a geomorphological landform (cavity formation through a piping process practically unknown in the generation of fossil sites. Two characteristics of the assemblage highly restrict the probable causes for the accumulation of the remains: (1 the overwhelming number of carnivorans individuals; and (2 the mortality profiles estimated for the four most abundant taxa do not correspond to the classic mortality types but rather were the consequence of the behavior of the taxa. This evidence together with other taphonomic data supports the hypothesis that carnivoran individuals actively entered the cavity searching for resources (food or water and were unable to exit. The scarcity of herbivores implies that the shaft was well visible and avoided by these taxa. Fossil bones exhibit a very good preservation state as a consequence of their deposition in the restricted and protective environment of the chamber. Batallones-1 had another assemblage (upper level assemblage that was dominated by herbivore remains and that potentially corresponded to the final stages of the cavity filling.

  12. Bird assemblage response to restoration of fire-suppressed longleaf pine sandhills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, David A; Conner, L M; Smith, Lora L; Provencher, Louis; Hiers, J Kevin; Pokswinski, Scott; Helms, Brian S; Guyer, Craig

    2013-01-01

    The ecological restoration of fire-suppressed habitats may require a multifaceted approach. Removal of hardwood trees together with reintroduction of fire has been suggested as a method of restoring fire-suppressed longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) forests; however, this strategy, although widespread, has not been evaluated on large spatial and temporal scales. We used a landscape-scale experimental design to examine how bird assemblages in fire-suppressed longleaf pine sandhills responded to fire alone or fire following mechanical removal or herbicide application to reduce hardwood levels. Individual treatments were compared to fire-suppressed controls and reference sites. After initial treatment, all sites were managed with prescribed fire, on an approximately two- to three-year interval, for over a decade. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling ordinations suggested that avian assemblages on sites that experienced any form of hardwood removal differed from assemblages on both fire-suppressed sites and reference sites 3-4 years after treatment (i.e., early posttreatment). After >10 years of prescribed burning on all sites (i.e., late posttreatment), only assemblages at sites treated with herbicide were indistinguishable from assemblages at reference sites. By the end of the study, individual species that were once indicators of reference sites no longer contributed to making reference sites unique. Occupancy modeling of these indicator species also demonstrated increasing similarity across treatments over time. Overall, although we documented long-term and variable assemblage-level change, our results indicate occupancy for birds considered longleaf pine specialists was similar at treatment and reference sites after over a decade of prescribed burning, regardless of initial method of hardwood removal. In other words, based on the response of species highly associated with the habitat, we found no justification for the added cost and effort of fire surrogates; fire

  13. Landscape properties mediate the homogenization of bird assemblages during climatic extremes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslem, Angie; Nimmo, Dale G; Radford, James Q; Bennett, Andrew F

    2015-12-01

    Extreme weather events, such as drought, have marked impacts on biotic communities. In many regions, a predicted increase in occurrence of such events will be imposed on landscapes already heavily modified by human land use. There is an urgency, therefore, to understand the way in which the effects of such events may be exacerbated, or moderated, by different patterns of landscape change. We used empirical data on woodland-dependent birds in southeast Australia, collected during and after a severe drought, to document temporal change in the composition of bird assemblages in 24 landscapes (each 100 km2) representing a gradient in the cover of native wooded vegetation (from 60% to identity of constituent species (turnover). There was widespread loss of woodland birds in response to drought, with only partial recovery following drought-breaking rains. Region-wide, the composition of landscape assemblages became more different over time, primarily caused by turnover-related differentiation. The response of bird assemblages to drought varied between landscapes and was strongly associated with landscape properties. The extent of wooded vegetation had the greatest influence on assemblage change: landscapes with more native vegetation had more stable bird assemblages over time. However, for the component processes of richness- and turnover-related compositional change, measures of landscape productivity had a stronger effect. For example, landscapes with more riparian vegetation maintained more stable assemblages in terms of richness. These results emphasize the importance of the total extent of native vegetation, both overall cover and that occurring in productive parts of the landscape, for maintaining bird communities whose composition is resistant to severe drought. While extreme climatic events cannot be prevented, their effects can be ameliorated by managing the pattern of native vegetation in anthropogenic landscapes, with associated benefits for maintaining

  14. Origin of an Assemblage Massively Dominated by Carnivorans from the Miocene of Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, M. Soledad; Alberdi, M. Teresa; Azanza, Beatriz; Silva, Pablo G.; Morales, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Carnivoran-dominated fossil sites provide precious insights into the diversity and ecology of species rarely recovered in the fossil record. The lower level assemblage of Batallones-1 fossil site (Late Miocene; Madrid Basin, Spain) has yielded one of the most abundant and diversified carnivoran assemblage ever known from the Cenozoic record of mammals. A comprehensive taphonomic study is carried out here in order to constrain the concentration mode of this remarkable assemblage. Another distinctive feature of Batallones-1 is that the accumulation of carnivoran remains took place in the context of a geomorphological landform (cavity formation through a piping process) practically unknown in the generation of fossil sites. Two characteristics of the assemblage highly restrict the probable causes for the accumulation of the remains: (1) the overwhelming number of carnivorans individuals; and (2) the mortality profiles estimated for the four most abundant taxa do not correspond to the classic mortality types but rather were the consequence of the behavior of the taxa. This evidence together with other taphonomic data supports the hypothesis that carnivoran individuals actively entered the cavity searching for resources (food or water) and were unable to exit. The scarcity of herbivores implies that the shaft was well visible and avoided by these taxa. Fossil bones exhibit a very good preservation state as a consequence of their deposition in the restricted and protective environment of the chamber. Batallones-1 had another assemblage (upper level assemblage) that was dominated by herbivore remains and that potentially corresponded to the final stages of the cavity filling. PMID:23650542

  15. A study of the trace sulfide mineral assemblages in the Stillwater Complex, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, Hannah M.; Ferguson, Katherine M.; Lehrer, Malia L.; Boudreau, Alan E.

    2016-07-01

    The sulfide assemblages of the Stillwater Complex away from the well-studied ore zones are composed mainly of variable proportions of pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite, and ±pyrite. Excluding vein assemblages and those affected by greenschist and lower temperature alteration, the majority can be classified into two broad assemblages, defined here as pristine (multiphase, often globular in shape) or volatile-bearing (multiphase, high-temperature, volatile-rich minerals such as biotite, hornblende, or an unmixed calcite-dolomite assemblage). The volatile-bearing assemblages are mainly found within and below the J-M reef, where native copper and sphalerite are also locally present. Pristine sulfides are found throughout the stratigraphy. Both groups can be affected by apparent S loss in the form of pyrite being converted to magnetite and chalcopyrite to a Cu-Fe-oxide (delafossite), with little to no silicate alteration. An upward trend from pentlandite-rich to pyrrhotite-rich to pyrite-rich assemblages is observed in the footwall rocks in upper GN-I, and the same trend repeats from just below the reef and continues into the overlying N-II and GN-II. Modeling suggests that the sulfide Ni in the Peridotite Zone is largely controlled by silicate Ni. When taken together, observations are most readily explained by the remobilization of selected elements by a high-temperature fluid with the apparent loss of S > Cu > Ni. This could concentrate ore metals by vapor refining, eventually producing a platinum group element-enriched sulfide ore zone, such as the J-M reef.

  16. Marine dock pilings foster diverse, native cryptobenthic fish assemblages across bioregions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Simon J; Casey, Jordan M; Knowlton, Nancy; Duffy, James Emmett

    2017-09-01

    Anthropogenic habitats are increasingly prevalent in coastal marine environments. Previous research on sessile epifauna suggests that artificial habitats act as a refuge for nonindigenous species, which results in highly homogenous communities across locations. However, vertebrate assemblages that live in association with artificial habitats are poorly understood. Here, we quantify the biodiversity of small, cryptic (henceforth "cryptobenthic") fishes from marine dock pilings across six locations over 35° of latitude from Maine to Panama. We also compare assemblages from dock pilings to natural habitats in the two southernmost locations (Panama and Belize). Our results suggest that the biodiversity patterns of cryptobenthic fishes from dock pilings follow a Latitudinal Diversity Gradient (LDG), with average local and regional diversity declining sharply with increasing latitude. Furthermore, a strong correlation between community composition and spatial distance suggests distinct regional assemblages of cryptobenthic fishes. Cryptobenthic fish assemblages from dock pilings in Belize and Panama were less diverse and had lower densities than nearby reef habitats. However, dock pilings harbored almost exclusively native species, including two species of conservation concern absent from nearby natural habitats. Our results suggest that, in contrast to sessile epifaunal assemblages on artificial substrates, artificial marine habitats can harbor diverse, regionally characteristic assemblages of vertebrates that follow macroecological patterns that are well documented for natural habitats. We therefore posit that, although dock pilings cannot function as a replacement for natural habitats, dock pilings may provide cost-effective means to preserve native vertebrate biodiversity, and provide a habitat that can be relatively easily monitored to track the status and trends of fish biodiversity in highly urbanized coastal marine environments.

  17. Molecular Characterization of Giardia lamblia: First Report of Assemblage B in Human Isolates from Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Clarissa Perez; Zanini, Graziela Maria; Dias, Gisele Silva; da Silva, Sidnei; Sousa, Maria do Céu

    2016-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of giardiasis, the genetic characterization of Giardia lamblia has been poorly documented in Brazil and molecular epidemiology research has only been conducted in the last few years. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of different G. lamblia assemblages and detect mixed infections among patients with giardiasis. The cross-section survey was conducted among patients attending the FIOCRUZ in Rio de Janeiro. In order to discriminate the genetic assemblages/sub-assemblages, G. lamblia isolates were characterized by PCR-RFLP and qPCR using four loci genes (bg, gdh, tpi and orfC4). Of the 65 positive samples, 41 (63.1%) were successfully amplified by nested-PCR of bg and gdh genes. Among them, 16 were typed as sub-assemblage AII, 7 as BIII, 4 as BIV and 8 as a mixture of BIII and BIV. After the analysis by qPCR assay, a total of 55 (84.6%) samples were amplified using at least one locus: bg gene was amplified in 38 (58.5%) samples, gdh in 41 (63.1%), tpi in 39 (60%), and orfC4 in 39 (60%). Multilocus genotyping results showed that 29 (52.7%) samples belonged to Assemblage A and 26 (47.3%) samples belonged to Assemblage B. In 2011 and 2012, 20 (74.1%) samples belonged to Assemblage A and 7 (25.9%) belonged to Assemblage B. In subsequent years (2013-2015) there was a predominance of Assemblage B, 19 (67.9%) versus 9 (32.1%) Assemblage A. This is the first time that Assemblage B of G. lamblia was reported in human clinical samples from Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) and is the first report about genetic characterization using four genes. The qPCR assemblage-specific showed no mixed infections by Assemblages A and B. A switch in genetic profile over the years was observed, firstly predominance of Assemblage A and lastly of Assemblage B.

  18. Mean latitudinal range sizes of bird assemblages in six Neotropical forest chronosequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunn, Robert R.; Romdal, Tom Skovlund

    2005-01-01

    Aim The geographical range size frequency distributions of animal and plant assemblages are among the most important factors affecting large-scale patterns of diversity. Nonetheless, the relationship between habitat type and the range size distributions of species forming assemblages remains poorly...... towards more small ranged species occurs. Even relatively old secondary forests have bird species with larger average ranges than mature forests. As a consequence, conservation of secondary forests alone will miss many of the species most at risk of extinction and most unlikely to be conserved in other...

  19. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial and archaeal assemblages in the soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sonu; Batra, Navneet; Pathak, Ashish; Joshi, Amit; Souza, Leila; Almeida, Paulo; Chauhan, Ashvini

    2015-09-01

    The soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring was analyzed for bacterial and archaeal diversity using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing which revealed the presence of 18 bacterial phyla distributed across 109 families and 219 genera. Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and the Deinococcus-Thermus group were the predominant bacterial assemblages with Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota as the main archaeal assemblages in this largely understudied geothermal habitat. Several metagenome sequences remained taxonomically unassigned suggesting the presence of a repertoire of hitherto undescribed microbes in this geothermal soil-mousse econiche.

  20. Temporal Beta Diversity of Bird Assemblages in Agricultural Landscapes: Land Cover Change vs. Stochastic Processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Baselga

    Full Text Available Temporal variation in the composition of species assemblages could be the result of deterministic processes driven by environmental change and/or stochastic processes of colonization and local extinction. Here, we analyzed the relative roles of deterministic and stochastic processes on bird assemblages in an agricultural landscape of southwestern France. We first assessed the impact of land cover change that occurred between 1982 and 2007 on (i the species composition (presence/absence of bird assemblages and (ii the spatial pattern of taxonomic beta diversity. We also compared the observed temporal change of bird assemblages with a null model accounting for the effect of stochastic dynamics on temporal beta diversity. Temporal assemblage dissimilarity was partitioned into two separate components, accounting for the replacement of species (i.e. turnover and for the nested species losses (or gains from one time to the other (i.e. nestedness-resultant dissimilarity, respectively. Neither the turnover nor the nestedness-resultant components of temporal variation were accurately explained by any of the measured variables accounting for land cover change (r(2<0.06 in all cases. Additionally, the amount of spatial assemblage heterogeneity in the region did not significantly change between 1982 and 2007, and site-specific observed temporal dissimilarities were larger than null expectations in only 1% of sites for temporal turnover and 13% of sites for nestedness-resultant dissimilarity. Taken together, our results suggest that land cover change in this agricultural landscape had little impact on temporal beta diversity of bird assemblages. Although other unmeasured deterministic process could be driving the observed patterns, it is also possible that the observed changes in presence/absence species composition of local bird assemblages might be the consequence of stochastic processes in which species populations appeared and disappeared from specific

  1. Bacterial assemblages of the eastern Atlantic Ocean reveal both vertical and latitudinal biogeographic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Friedline

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial communities are recognized as major drivers of the biogeochemical processes in the oceans. However, the genetic diversity and composition of those communities is poorly understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the composition of bacterial assemblages in three different water layer habitats: surface (2–20 m, deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM; 28–90 m, and deep (100–4600 m at nine stations along the eastern Atlantic Ocean from 42.8° N to 23.7° S. The sampling of three discrete, predefined habitat types from different depths, Longhurstian provinces, and geographical locations allowed us to investigate whether marine bacterial assemblages show spatial variation and to determine if the observed spatial variation is influenced by current environmental conditions, historical/geographical contingencies, or both. The PCR amplicons of the V6 region of the 16S rRNA from 16 microbial assemblages were pyrosequenced, generating a total of 352 029 sequences; after quality filtering and processing, 257 260 sequences were clustered into 2871 normalized operational taxonomic units (OTU using a definition of 97% sequence identity. Community ecology statistical analyses demonstrate that the eastern Atlantic Ocean bacterial assemblages are vertically stratified and associated with water layers characterized by unique environmental signals (e.g., temperature, salinity, and nutrients. Genetic compositions of bacterial assemblages from the same water layer are more similar to each other than to assemblages from different water layers. The observed clustering of samples by water layer allows us to conclude that contemporary environments are influencing the observed biogeographic patterns. Moreover, the implementation of a novel Bayesian inference approach that allows a more efficient and explicit use of all the OTU abundance data shows a distance effect suggesting the influence of historical contingencies on the composition of bacterial

  2. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial and archaeal assemblages in the soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Bhatia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The soil-mousse surrounding a geothermal spring was analyzed for bacterial and archaeal diversity using 16S rRNA gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing which revealed the presence of 18 bacterial phyla distributed across 109 families and 219 genera. Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and the Deinococcus-Thermus group were the predominant bacterial assemblages with Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota as the main archaeal assemblages in this largely understudied geothermal habitat. Several metagenome sequences remained taxonomically unassigned suggesting the presence of a repertoire of hitherto undescribed microbes in this geothermal soil-mousse econiche.

  3. Connectedness of land use, nutrients, primary production, and fish assemblages in oxbow lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Andrews, Caroline S.; Kroger, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explored the strength of connectedness among hierarchical system components associated with oxbow lakes in the alluvial valley of the Lower Mississippi River. Specifically, we examined the degree of canonical correlation between land use (agriculture and forests), lake morphometry (depth and size), nutrients (total nitrogen and total phosphorus), primary production (chlorophyll-a), and various fish assemblage descriptors. Watershed (p production (p production was associated with sunfish (Centrarchidae) assemblages (p hierarchical approach can be useful in developing management and conservation plans for oxbow lakes in a region impacted by widespread landscape changes due to agriculture.

  4. Fish assemblage dynamics in a Neotropical floodplain relative to aquatic macrophytes and the homogenizing effect of a flood pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, L.C.; Bulla, C. K.; Agostinho, A. A.; Vasconcelos, L. P.; Miranda, Leandro E.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of aquatic macrophytes is a key factor in the selection of habitats by fish in floodplain lakes because these plants enhance the physical and biological complexities of aquatic habitats. The seasonal flood pulse may influence this interaction, but there is no information in the literature about the effects that flood events may have on macrophytes assemblages and its associated effects on fish assemblages. Thus, this article aimed to investigate whether species richness, evenness and similarities in fish assemblage composition differed between littoral areas vegetated with macrophytes and unvegetated areas, before and after a flood. We sampled three lakes in the floodplain of the upper Paraná River basin. Sampling was conducted before (December 2004 and January 2005) and after (early March, late March and May 2005) a flood event. Overall, species richness and evenness were higher in macrophytes-covered areas. Before the flood, the composition of fish assemblages was distinct when comparing vegetated and unvegetated areas. After the flood, the similarity in fish assemblage composition was higher, indicating a homogenization effect of floods for fish inhabiting littoral areas of floodplain lakes. After the flood, opportunistic species dominated the fish assemblages in aquatic macrophytes, apparently restructuring assemblages in the littoral, restarting a succession process. Thus, the observed homogenization effect of the flood could minimize biological interactions and could induce fish assemblages to begin a new process of structurization.

  5. Sensitivity of metrics of phylogenetic structure to scale, source of data and species pool of hummingbird assemblages along elevational gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Caro, Sebastián; Parra, Juan L; Graham, Catherine H; McGuire, Jimmy A; Cadena, Carlos Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Patterns of phylogenetic structure of assemblages are increasingly used to gain insight into the ecological and evolutionary processes involved in the assembly of co-occurring species. Metrics of phylogenetic structure can be sensitive to scaling issues and data availability. Here we empirically assess the sensitivity of four metrics of phylogenetic structure of assemblages to changes in (i) the source of data, (ii) the spatial grain at which assemblages are defined, and (iii) the definition of species pools using hummingbird (Trochilidae) assemblages along an elevational gradient in Colombia. We also discuss some of the implications in terms of the potential mechanisms driving these patterns. To explore how source of data influence phylogenetic structure we defined assemblages using three sources of data: field inventories, museum specimens, and range maps. Assemblages were defined at two spatial grains: coarse-grained (elevational bands of 800-m width) and fine-grained (1-km(2) plots). We used three different species pools: all species contained in assemblages, all species within half-degree quadrats, and all species either above or below 2000 m elevation. Metrics considering phylogenetic relationships among all species within assemblages showed phylogenetic clustering at high elevations and phylogenetic evenness in the lowlands, whereas those metrics considering only the closest co-occurring relatives showed the opposite trend. This result suggests that using multiple metrics of phylogenetic structure should provide greater insight into the mechanisms shaping assemblage structure. The source and spatial grain of data had important influences on estimates of both richness and phylogenetic structure. Metrics considering the co-occurrence of close relatives were particularly sensitive to changes in the spatial grain. Assemblages based on range maps included more species and showed less phylogenetic structure than assemblages based on museum or field inventories

  6. Sensitivity of metrics of phylogenetic structure to scale, source of data and species pool of hummingbird assemblages along elevational gradients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián González-Caro

    Full Text Available Patterns of phylogenetic structure of assemblages are increasingly used to gain insight into the ecological and evolutionary processes involved in the assembly of co-occurring species. Metrics of phylogenetic structure can be sensitive to scaling issues and data availability. Here we empirically assess the sensitivity of four metrics of phylogenetic structure of assemblages to changes in (i the source of data, (ii the spatial grain at which assemblages are defined, and (iii the definition of species pools using hummingbird (Trochilidae assemblages along an elevational gradient in Colombia. We also discuss some of the implications in terms of the potential mechanisms driving these patterns. To explore how source of data influence phylogenetic structure we defined assemblages using three sources of data: field inventories, museum specimens, and range maps. Assemblages were defined at two spatial grains: coarse-grained (elevational bands of 800-m width and fine-grained (1-km(2 plots. We used three different species pools: all species contained in assemblages, all species within half-degree quadrats, and all species either above or below 2000 m elevation. Metrics considering phylogenetic relationships among all species within assemblages showed phylogenetic clustering at high elevations and phylogenetic evenness in the lowlands, whereas those metrics considering only the closest co-occurring relatives showed the opposite trend. This result suggests that using multiple metrics of phylogenetic structure should provide greater insight into the mechanisms shaping assemblage structure. The source and spatial grain of data had important influences on estimates of both richness and phylogenetic structure. Metrics considering the co-occurrence of close relatives were particularly sensitive to changes in the spatial grain. Assemblages based on range maps included more species and showed less phylogenetic structure than assemblages based on museum or field

  7. Sensitivity of Metrics of Phylogenetic Structure to Scale, Source of Data and Species Pool of Hummingbird Assemblages along Elevational Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Caro, Sebastián; Parra, Juan L.; Graham, Catherine H.; McGuire, Jimmy A.; Cadena, Carlos Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Patterns of phylogenetic structure of assemblages are increasingly used to gain insight into the ecological and evolutionary processes involved in the assembly of co-occurring species. Metrics of phylogenetic structure can be sensitive to scaling issues and data availability. Here we empirically assess the sensitivity of four metrics of phylogenetic structure of assemblages to changes in (i) the source of data, (ii) the spatial grain at which assemblages are defined, and (iii) the definition of species pools using hummingbird (Trochilidae) assemblages along an elevational gradient in Colombia. We also discuss some of the implications in terms of the potential mechanisms driving these patterns. To explore how source of data influence phylogenetic structure we defined assemblages using three sources of data: field inventories, museum specimens, and range maps. Assemblages were defined at two spatial grains: coarse-grained (elevational bands of 800-m width) and fine-grained (1-km2 plots). We used three different species pools: all species contained in assemblages, all species within half-degree quadrats, and all species either above or below 2000 m elevation. Metrics considering phylogenetic relationships among all species within assemblages showed phylogenetic clustering at high elevations and phylogenetic evenness in the lowlands, whereas those metrics considering only the closest co-occurring relatives showed the opposite trend. This result suggests that using multiple metrics of phylogenetic structure should provide greater insight into the mechanisms shaping assemblage structure. The source and spatial grain of data had important influences on estimates of both richness and phylogenetic structure. Metrics considering the co-occurrence of close relatives were particularly sensitive to changes in the spatial grain. Assemblages based on range maps included more species and showed less phylogenetic structure than assemblages based on museum or field inventories

  8. SESAM – a new framework integrating macroecological and species distribution models for predicting spatio-temporal patterns of species assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guisan, Antoine; Rahbek, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    , and ecological assembly rules to constrain predictions of the richness and composition of species assemblages obtained by stacking predictions of individual species distributions. We believe that such a framework could prove useful in many theoretical and applied disciplines of ecology and evolution, both......Two different approaches currently prevail for predicting spatial patterns of species assemblages. The first approach (macroecological modelling, MEM) focuses directly on realized properties of species assemblages, whereas the second approach (stacked species distribution modelling, S-SDM) starts...... with constituent species to approximate the properties of assemblages. Here, we propose to unify the two approaches in a single ‘spatially explicit species assemblage modelling’ (SESAM) framework. This framework uses relevant designations of initial species source pools for modelling, macroecological variables...

  9. Predicting ecological changes on benthic estuarine assemblages through decadal climate trends along Brazilian Marine Ecoregions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino, Angelo F.; Netto, Sérgio A.; Pagliosa, Paulo R.; Barros, Francisco; Christofoletti, Ronaldo A.; Rosa Filho, José S.; Colling, André; Lana, Paulo C.

    2015-12-01

    Estuaries are threatened coastal ecosystems that support relevant ecological functions worldwide. The predicted global climate changes demand actions to understand, anticipate and avoid further damage to estuarine habitats. In this study we reviewed data on polychaete assemblages, as a surrogate for overall benthic communities, from 51 estuaries along five Marine Ecoregions of Brazil (Amazonia, NE Brazil, E Brazil, SE Brazil and Rio Grande). We critically evaluated the adaptive capacity and ultimately the resilience to decadal changes in temperature and rainfall of the polychaete assemblages. As a support for theoretical predictions on changes linked to global warming we compared the variability of benthic assemblages across the ecoregions with a 40-year time series of temperature and rainfall data. We found a significant upward trend in temperature during the last four decades at all marine ecoregions of Brazil, while rainfall increase was restricted to the SE Brazil ecoregion. Benthic assemblages and climate trends varied significantly among and within ecoregions. The high variability in climate patterns in estuaries within the same ecoregion may lead to correspondingly high levels of noise on the expected responses of benthic fauna. Nonetheless, we expect changes in community structure and productivity of benthic species at marine ecoregions under increasing influence of higher temperatures, extreme events and pollution.

  10. An "assemblage toxicity index" to improve characterization of effects of atrazine on aquatic plant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic risk assessments are made uncertain by the use of measures of effect for only one level of effect and by the use of only one percentile in sensitivity distributions for the variation of this measure of effect across an assemblage of taxa. This leaves undefined the severi...

  11. Distribution patterns of fish assemblages in an Eastern Mediterranean intermittent river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vardakas L.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution patterns of fish assemblages within streams can provide insights for river type classifications and may warrant specific conservation actions. However, there is limited knowledge of how fish assemblages assort along a longitudinal axis in Mediterranean intermittent streams. Patterns in spatial and temporal distribution of fish communities were analysed in a Mediterranean intermittent river (Evrotas River located in Southern Greece, hosting three endemic range restricted species of high conservation concern, during the period 2007−2009, with 80% of the river’s total length desiccating in the 2007 and 2008 droughts. The general trend was an increase in fish density and species richness along an upstream-downstream gradient. Fish assemblages from upstream to downstream were characterized by a decrease of the most rheophilic species (Squalius keadicus and an increase of the most stagnophilic species (Tropidophoxinellus spartiaticus. Three river segments, characterized by a high degree of homogeneity were delineated. Habitat and environmental preferences for the studied fish species were identified, with elevation and low flowing habitats being the most important environmental factors affecting fish distribution patterns. The current study provides evidence that even in an intermittent river an assemblage pattern following a longitudinal gradient can be identified, mainly due to the lack of instream barriers that allows recolonization after flow resumption.

  12. Response of an algal assemblage to nutrient enrichment and shading in a Hawaiian stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, S.H.; Brasher, A.M.D.; Smith, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of nitrate enrichment, phosphate enrichment, and light availability on benthic algae, nutrient-diffusing clay flowerpots were colonized with algae at two sites in a Hawaiian stream during spring and autumn 2002 using a randomized factorial design. The algal assemblage that developed under the experimental conditions was investigated by determining biomass (ash-free dry mass and chlorophyll a concentrations) and composition of the diatom assemblage. In situ pulse amplitude-modulated fluorometry was also used to model photosynthetic rate of the algal assemblage. Algal biomass and maximum photosynthetic rate were significantly higher at the unshaded site than at the shaded site. These parameters were higher at the unshaded site with either nitrate, or to a lesser degree, nitrate plus phosphate enrichment. Analysis of similarity of diatom assemblages showed significant differences between shaded and unshaded sites, as well as between spring and autumn experiments, but not between nutrient treatments. However, several individual species of diatoms responded significantly to nitrate enrichment. These results demonstrate that light availability (shaded vs. unshaded) is the primary limiting factor to algal growth in this stream, with nitrogen as a secondary limiting factor. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  13. Flow seasonality and fish assemblage in a tropical river, French Guiana, South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Leonardo Tejerina-Garro

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to verify the existence of a seasonal pattern of variation in the fish assemblages of a tropical river using taxonomic and functional descriptors. Fish were sampled using gillnets at two sites on the Comté River, a large-sized river 254.8 km long, flowing entirely through rainforest areas of French Guiana. Samplings were conducted every other month from August 1998 to July 2000. Four types of fish assemblage descriptors were used: the species descriptor (number of individual fish of each species in the sample; the family descriptor (number of individual fish of each family in the sample; the trophic descriptor (distribution of the fish biomass in each feeding guild and the specific maximum observed size - MOS (number of individual fish in each of four classes of MOS: 300 mm. Results point out that changes in the fish assemblage are related to water level oscillations. The role of migration seems to be weak and is limited to trophic displacements characteristic of few species. In the low-water season, characterized by weak water level oscillation, fish species and families belonging to piscivorous or aquatic invertivorous guilds were predominant, whereas in the high-water season the environment is submitted to strong variations caused by fast and large water level oscillations, and the fish assemblage was characterized by species or families with an opportunistic omnivorous diet.

  14. Diagramming Assemblages of Sex/Gender and Sexuality as Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzul, Jesse; Santavicca, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    This article explores ethico/political/ontological orientations made possible by an exploration of sex/gender and sexuality. Drawing from materialist theorists such as Karen Barad, Gilles Deleuze, and Felix Guattari, we employ the concept of assemblages to tease out the reality that our shared world is always already in a state of queer becoming.…

  15. Tropical rain-forest matrix quality affects bat assemblage structure in secondary forest patches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleut, I.; Levy-Tacher, I.; Galindo-Gonzalez, J.; Boer, de W.F.; Ramirez-Marcial, N.

    2012-01-01

    We studied Phyllostomidae bat assemblage structure in patches of secondary forest dominated by the pioneer tree Ochroma pyramidale, largely (.85%) or partially (,35%) surrounded by a matrix of tropical rain forest, to test 3 hypotheses: the highest bat diversity and richness is observed in the matri

  16. Tropical rain-forest matrix quality affects bat assemblage structure in secondary forest patches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleut, I.; Levy-Tacher, I.; Galindo-Gonzalez, J.; Boer, de W.F.; Ramirez-Marcial, N.

    2012-01-01

    We studied Phyllostomidae bat assemblage structure in patches of secondary forest dominated by the pioneer tree Ochroma pyramidale, largely (.85%) or partially (,35%) surrounded by a matrix of tropical rain forest, to test 3 hypotheses: the highest bat diversity and richness is observed in the matri

  17. Drought responses of Arrhenatherum elatius grown in plant assemblages of varying species richness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otieno, Dennis; Kreyling, Juergen; Purcell, Andrew; Herold, Nadine; Grant, Kerstin; Tenhunen, John; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Jentsch, Anke

    2012-02-01

    Evidence exists that plant community diversity influences productivity of individual members and their resistance and resilience during and after perturbations. We simulated drought within the long-term EVENT experimental site in the Ecological-Botanical Garden, University of Bayreuth to understand how Arrhenatherum elatius (L.) responds to water stress when grown in three different plant assemblages. The set up consisted of five replications for each factorial combination of drought and plant assemblages differing in functional diversity. Leaf water potential (ΨL), leaf gas exchange, natural δ13C, plant biomass and cover were measured. Imposed drought had different effects on A. elatius, depending on plant assemblage composition. Severe water stress was however, avoided by slowing down the rate of decline in ΨL, and this response was modified by community composition. High ΨL was associated with high stomatal conductance and leaf photosynthesis. Biomass production of A. elatius increased due to drought stress only in the least diverse assemblage, likely due to increased tillering and competitive advantage against neighbors in the drought-treated plants. Our results indicate that beneficial traits among plant species in a community may be responsible for the enhanced capacity to survive drought stress. Resistance to drought may, therefore, not be linked to species richness, but rather to the nature of interaction that exists between the community members.

  18. Distinct bacterial assemblages reside at different depths in Arctic multiyear sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, Ido; Charchuk, Rhianna; Lange, Benjamin; Beckers, Justin; Haas, Christian; Lanoil, Brian

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial communities in Arctic sea ice play an important role in the regulation of nutrient and energy dynamics in the Arctic Ocean. Sea ice has vertical gradients in temperature, brine salinity and volume, and light and UV levels. Multiyear ice (MYI) has at least two distinct ice layers: old fresh ice with limited permeability, and new saline ice, and may also include a surface melt pond layer. Here, we determine whether bacterial communities (1) differ with ice depth due to strong physical and chemical gradients, (2) are relatively homogenous within a layer, but differ between layers, or (3) do not vary with ice depth. Cores of MYI off northern Ellesmere Island, NU, Canada, were subsectioned in 30-cm intervals, and the bacterial assemblage structure was characterized using 16S rRNA gene pyrotag sequencing. Assemblages clustered into three distinct groups: top (0-30 cm); middle (30-150 cm); and bottom (150-236 cm). These layers correspond to the occurrence of refrozen melt pond ice, at least 2-year-old ice, and newly grown first-year ice at the bottom of the ice sheet, respectively. Thus, MYI houses multiple distinct bacterial assemblages, and in situ conditions appear to play a less important role in structuring microbial assemblages than the age or conditions of the ice at the time of formation.

  19. Breeding bird assemblages associated with stages of forest succession in large river floodplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, M.G.; McColl, L.E.; Suarez, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Floodplain forests rival all other habitat types in bird density and diversity. However, major successional changes are predicted for floodplain forests along the Mississippi River in the coming decades; young forests may replace the existing mature silver maple (Acer saccharinum L.) forests in some areas. We wanted to assess how the breeding bird community might respond to these changes. We studied stands of young forests along the middle Mississippi River, comparing the breeding bird assemblages among three stages of forest succession: shrub/scrub, young cottonwood (Populus deltoides Marshall) and willow (Salix nigra Marshall) forests, and mature silver maple dominated forests. We recorded a total of 54 bird species; the most frequently observed species were the indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea), red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), and yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus). Bird species richness differed among the habitat types, with mature forests supporting the largest number of species and the most species of management concern. The shrub/scrub and mature forest bird assemblages were distinct and shared few species, but the young forests had no identifiable bird species assemblage, sharing species found in both of the other habitat types. The bird assemblages we observed in young forests may become more prevalent as aging floodplain forests are replaced with younger stages of forest succession. Under this scenario, we would expect a temporary local decrease in bird species richness and habitat for species of management concern.

  20. Avian incubation inhibits growth and diversification of bacterial assemblages on eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shawkey, Matthew D; Firestone, Mary K; Brodie, Eoin L; Beissinger, Steven R

    2009-01-01

    Microbial infection is a critical source of mortality for early life stages of oviparous vertebrates, but parental defenses against infection are less well known. Avian incubation has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of trans-shell infection by limiting microbial growth of pathogenic bacteria on eggshells, while enhancing growth of commensal or beneficial bacteria that inhibit or competitively exclude pathogens. We tested this hypothesis by comparing bacterial assemblages on naturally incubated and experimentally unincubated eggs at laying and late incubation using a universal 16S rRNA microarray containing probes for over 8000 bacterial taxa. Before treatment, bacterial assemblages on individual eggs from both treatment groups were dissimilar to one another, as measured by clustering in non-metric dimensional scaling (NMDS) ordination space. After treatment, assemblages of unincubated eggs were similar to one another, but those of incubated eggs were not. Furthermore, assemblages of unincubated eggs were characterized by high abundance of six indicator species while incubated eggs had no indicator species. Bacterial taxon richness remained static on incubated eggs, but increased significantly on unincubated eggs, especially in several families of Gram-negative bacteria. The relative abundance of individual bacterial taxa did not change on incubated eggs, but that of 82 bacterial taxa, including some known to infect the interior of eggs, increased on unincubated eggs. Thus, incubation inhibits all of the relatively few bacteria that grow on eggshells, and does not appear to promote growth of any bacteria.

  1. Participating Technologies? Non-human Others and Socio-Material Assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krummheuer, Antonia Lina

    participation statuses within the assemblage. According to Goodwin & Goodwin (2004, p. 222) the paper understands participation as “actions demonstrating forms of involvement performed by parties within evolving structures of talk.” This perspective directs the focus towards practices and the accounts...

  2. Impacts of discarded plastic bags on marine assemblages and ecosystem functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Dannielle Senga; Boots, Bas; Blockley, David James; Rocha, Carlos; Thompson, Richard

    2015-05-05

    The accumulation of plastic debris is a global environmental problem due to its durability, persistence, and abundance. Although effects of plastic debris on individual marine organisms, particularly mammals and birds, have been extensively documented (e.g., entanglement and choking), very little is known about effects on assemblages and consequences for ecosystem functioning. In Europe, around 40% of the plastic items produced are utilized as single-use packaging, which rapidly accumulate in waste management facilities and as litter in the environment. A range of biodegradable plastics have been developed with the aspiration of reducing the persistence of litter; however, their impacts on marine assemblages or ecosystem functioning have never been evaluated. A field experiment was conducted to assess the impact of conventional and biodegradable plastic carrier bags as litter on benthic macro- and meio-faunal assemblages and biogeochemical processes (primary productivity, redox condition, organic matter content, and pore-water nutrients) on an intertidal shore near Dublin, Ireland. After 9 weeks, the presence of either type of bag created anoxic conditions within the sediment along with reduced primary productivity and organic matter and significantly lower abundances of infaunal invertebrates. This indicates that both conventional and biodegradable bags can rapidly alter marine assemblages and the ecosystem services they provide.

  3. Toward a Social Ontology for Science Education: Introducing Deleuze and Guattari's Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzul, Jesse; Kayumova, Shakhnoza

    2016-01-01

    This essay's main objective is to develop a theoretical, ontological basis for critical, social justice-oriented science education. Using Deleuze and Guattari's notion of assemblages, rhizomes, and arborescent structures, this article challenges authoritarian institutional practices, as well as the subject of these practices, and offers a way for…

  4. Experimental effects of grazers on autotrophic species assemblages across a nitrate gradient in Florida springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springs face accelerated degradation of ecosystem structure, namely in the form of autotrophic species assemblage shifts from submerged vascular macrophytes to benthic filamentous algae. Increasing nitrate concentrations have been cited as a primary driver of this shift and numeric nutrient criteria...

  5. Differential response of fish assemblages to coral reef-based seaweed farming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E James Hehre

    Full Text Available As the global demand for seaweed-derived products drives the expansion of seaweed farming onto shallow coral ecosystems, the effects of farms on fish assemblages remain largely unexplored. Shallow coral reefs provide food and shelter for highly diverse fish assemblages but are increasingly modified by anthropogenic activities. We hypothesized that the introduction of seaweed farms into degraded shallow coral reefs had potential to generate ecological benefits for fish by adding structural complexity and a possible food source. We conducted 210 transects at 14 locations, with sampling stratified across seaweed farms and sites adjacent to and distant from farms. At a seascape scale, locations were classified by their level of exposure to human disturbance. We compared sites where (1 marine protected areas (MPAs were established, (2 neither MPAs nor blast fishing was present (hence "unprotected", and (3 blast fishing occurred. We observed 80,186 fish representing 148 species from 38 families. The negative effects of seaweed farms on fish assemblages appeared stronger in the absence of blast fishing and were strongest when MPAs were present, likely reflecting the positive influence of the MPAs on fish within them. Species differentiating fish assemblages with respect to seaweed farming and disturbance were typically small but also included two key target species. The propensity for seaweed farms to increase fish diversity, abundance, and biomass is limited and may reduce MPA benefits. We suggest that careful consideration be given to the placement of seaweed farms relative to MPAs.

  6. Relative roles of grey squirrels, supplementary feeding, and habitat in shaping urban bird assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Bonnington

    Full Text Available Non-native species are frequently considered to influence urban assemblages. The grey squirrel Sciurus carolinensis is one such species that is widespread in the UK and is starting to spread across Europe; it predates birds' nests and can compete with birds for supplementary food. Using distance sampling across the urbanisation intensity gradient in Sheffield (UK we test whether urban grey squirrels influence avian species richness and density through nest predation and competition for supplementary food sources. We also assess how urban bird assemblages respond to supplementary feeding. We find that grey squirrels slightly reduced the abundance of breeding bird species most sensitive to squirrel nest predation by reducing the beneficial impact of woodland cover. There was no evidence that grey squirrel presence altered relationships between supplementary feeding and avian assemblage structure. This may be because, somewhat surprisingly, supplementary feeding was not associated with the richness or density of wintering bird assemblages. These associations were positive during the summer, supporting advocacy to feed birds during the breeding season and not just winter, but explanatory capacity was limited. The amount of green space and its quality, assessed as canopy cover, had a stronger influence on avian species richness and population size than the presence of grey squirrels and supplementary feeding stations. Urban bird populations are thus more likely to benefit from investment in improving the availability of high quality habitats than controlling squirrel populations or increased investment in supplementary feeding.

  7. Spatial and temporal dynamics of drosophilid larval assemblages associated to fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Alves da Mata

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of organisms and their resources is critical to further understanding population dynamics in space and time. Although drosophilids have been widely used as biological models, their relationship with breeding and feeding sites has received little attention. Here, we investigate drosophilids breeding in fruits in the Brazilian Savanna, in two contrasting vegetation types, throughout 16 months. Specifically, larval assemblages were compared between savannas and forests, as well as between rainy and dry seasons. The relationships between resource availability and drosophilid abundance and richness were also tested. The community (4,022 drosophilids of 23 species and 2,496 fruits of 57 plant taxa varied widely in space and time. Drosophilid assemblages experienced a strong bottleneck during the dry season, decreasing to only 0.5% of the abundance of the rainy season. Additionally, savannas displayed lower richness and higher abundance than the forests, and were dominated by exotic species. Both differences in larval assemblages throughout the year and between savannas and gallery forests are consistent with those previously seen in adults. Although the causes of this dynamic are clearly multifactorial, resource availability (richness and abundance of rotten fruits was a good predictor of the fly assemblage structure.

  8. "Peeling an onion": Layering as a methodology to understand learning as an embodied assemblage of practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Liv Kondrup

    2017-01-01

    in relation to identity and well-being afford different kinds of experiences of learning situations to students. To encompass the multilayered nature of embodied assemblages of practices I propose to look at interactions as essentially an onion, where each layers provides a particular theoretical insight...

  9. Biodiversity of macrofaunal assemblages from three Portuguese submarine canyons (NE Atlantic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cunha, M.R.; Paterson, G.L.J.; Amaro, T.; Blackbird, S.; de Stigter, H.C.; Ferreira, C.; Glover, A.; Hilário, A.; Kiriakoulakis, K.; Neal, L.; Ravara, A.; Rodrigues, C.F.; Tiago, A.; Billett, D.S.M.

    2011-01-01

    The macrofaunal assemblages from three Portuguese submarine canyons, Nazare, Cascais and Setubal were studied from samples collected at their upper (900-1000 m), middle (3200-3500 m) and lower sections (4200-4500 m) and at the adjacent open slopes (similar to 1000 m), during the HERMES cruises D297

  10. Abundance, size composition and benthic assemblages of two Mediterranean echinoids off the

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    Elzahrae Elmasry

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the variability in abundance, size composition and benthic assemblages of two echinoid species, the common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus (Lamarck, 1816 and black urchin Arbacia lixula (Linnaeus, 1758 in the Southeastern Mediterranean (SEM along the coast of Alexandria, Egypt. Four seasonal trips were made during the years 2014–2015 covering 55 km of the shore with depths ranging between 3 and 9 m. The sea urchin species composition, density and size structure and distribution were compared. The associated macrobenthic invertebrates with prominent presence and biomass were observed as well as other benthic fauna and flora associations. The present results showed that P. lividus was the dominant echinoid spatially and temporally. A. lixula showed frequent occurrence in Sidi Bishr and Sidi Gaber stations in the spring season. The most dominant size class was the medium to large-sized classes for P. lividus and large-sized classes for A. lixula. The commercial size for the edible P. lividus represented 33% of the sampled population. Furthermore, the most dominant macrobenthic assemblages beside the echinoid population were primarily oysters, sea cucumbers, and mussels. Beside these, assemblage of seaweeds (red, green, brown and crustose algae, Porifera, Cnidaria, Crustacea, other Echinodermata, Bivalvia, Gastropoda, Tunicata, Bryozoa and Annelida were found. The present study shows that the investigated area represents stable habitats for the echinoid population with rich and diversified algal assemblages as well as other potential food resources.

  11. Effects of forest conversion on the assemblages' structure of aquatic insects in subtropical regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago R.N. Bertaso

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of forest conversion to agricultural land uses on assemblages of aquatic insects were analyzed in subtropical streams. Organisms and environmental variables were collected in six low-order streams: three streams located in a forested area, and three in areas converted to agricultural land uses. We expected that the aquatic insects' assemblage attributes would be significantly affected by forest conversion, as well as by environmental variables. Streams in converted areas presented lower species richness, abundance and proportion of sensitive insect taxa. The ANOSIM test evidenced strong difference in EPT assemblage structure between streams of forested and converted areas. The ISA test evidenced several EPT genera with high specificity to streams in forested areas and only one genus related to streams in converted areas. Thus, the impacts of the conversion of forested area to agricultural land uses have significantly affected the EPT assemblages, while environmental variables were not affected. We suggest that the effects detected can be influenced by two processes related to vegetation cover: i lower input of allochthonous material, and ii increased input of fine sediments in streams draining converted areas.

  12. Lower Miocene plant assemblage with coastal-marsh herbaceous monocots from the Vienna Basin (Slovakia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaček, Zlatko; Teodoridis, Vasilis; Kováčová, Marianna; Schlögl, Ján; Sitár, Viliam

    2014-06-01

    A new plant assemblage of Cerová-Lieskové from Lower Miocene (Karpatian) deposits in the Vienna Basin (western Slovakia) is preserved in a relatively deep, upper-slope marine environment. Depositional conditions with high sedimentation rates allowed exceptional preservation of plant remains. The plant assemblage consists of (1) conifers represented by foliage of Pinus hepios and Tetraclinis salicornioides, a seed cone of Pinus cf. ornata, and by pollen of the Cupressaceae, Pinaceae, Pinus sp. and Cathaya sp., and (2) angiosperms represented by Cinnamomum polymorphum, Platanus neptuni, Potamogeton sp. and lauroid foliage, by pollen of Liquidambar sp., Engelhardia sp. and Craigia sp., and in particular by infructescences (so far interpreted as belonging to cereal ears). We validate genus and species assignments of the infructescences: they belong to Palaeotriticum Sitár, including P. mockii Sitár and P. carpaticum Sitár, and probably represent herbaceous monocots that inhabited coastal marshes, similar to the living grass Spartina. Similar infructescences occur in the Lower and Middle Miocene deposits of the Carpathian Foredeep (Slup in Moravia), Tunjice Hills (Žale in Slovenia), and probably also in the Swiss Molasse (Lausanne). This plant assemblage demonstrates that the paleovegetation was represented by evergreen woodland with pines and grasses in undergrowth, similar to vegetation inhabiting coastal brackish marshes today. It also indicates subtropical climatic conditions in the Vienna Basin (central Paratethys), similar to those implied by other coeval plant assemblages from Central Europe

  13. Ecological characterization of a tropical myxomycete assemblage--Maquipucuna Cloud Forest Reserve, Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Steven L; Schnittler, Martin; Lado, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    The assemblage of myxomycetes (plasmodial slime molds) associated with cloud forests of the Maquipucuna Cloud Forest Reserve in the western Andes was investigated. Within three study sites located along a gradient extending from 1200 to 2700 m above sea level, a clear pattern of decreasing myxomycete diversity and productivity with elevation was apparent. As such, these data conform to the pattern of "reverse diversity" for myxomycetes in the neotropics, with higher diversity for less mesic forest types than for more mesic forest types. Canonical correspondence analysis of myxomycete abundances in relation to microhabitat parameters revealed three major ecological assemblages: wood-, litter- and inflorescence-inhabiting species. All three assemblages include a number of specialized species, with the assemblage associated with litter being the most diverse and the one associated with inflorescences being the most distinctive. In addition, samples from the microhabitat represented by the cover of epiphyllic liverworts on living leaves regularly produce myxomycetes in moist chamber culture but with few sporocarps and no evidence of any specialized species. At least near ground level, bark-inhabiting (corticolous) myxomycetes are uncommon in the cloud forests sampled in the present study.

  14. Comparison of termite assemblages along a landuse gradient on peat areas in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaessen, T.; Verwer, C.; Demies, M.; Kaliang, H.; Meer, van der P.J.

    2011-01-01

    VAESSEN T, VERWER C, DEMIES M, KALIANG H & VAN DER MEER PJ. 2011. Comparison of termite assemblages along a landuse gradient on peat areas in Sarawak, Malaysia. In this study we assessed the species density and relative abundance of termites in peat land in Sarawak, Malaysia. Termites were

  15. Benthic ecological mapping of the Ayeyarwady delta shelf off Myanmar, using foraminiferal assemblages

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Panchang, R.; Nigam, R.

    covering a total area of about 2,00,000 km2 of the Ayeyarwady Continental Shelf are studied. 713 benthic species belonging to 222 genera are identified and illustrated herein. The assemblage leads to the assignment of the study-area to the Indo...

  16. Avian incubation inhibits growth and diversification of bacterial assemblages on eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Shawkey

    Full Text Available Microbial infection is a critical source of mortality for early life stages of oviparous vertebrates, but parental defenses against infection are less well known. Avian incubation has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of trans-shell infection by limiting microbial growth of pathogenic bacteria on eggshells, while enhancing growth of commensal or beneficial bacteria that inhibit or competitively exclude pathogens. We tested this hypothesis by comparing bacterial assemblages on naturally incubated and experimentally unincubated eggs at laying and late incubation using a universal 16S rRNA microarray containing probes for over 8000 bacterial taxa. Before treatment, bacterial assemblages on individual eggs from both treatment groups were dissimilar to one another, as measured by clustering in non-metric dimensional scaling (NMDS ordination space. After treatment, assemblages of unincubated eggs were similar to one another, but those of incubated eggs were not. Furthermore, assemblages of unincubated eggs were characterized by high abundance of six indicator species while incubated eggs had no indicator species. Bacterial taxon richness remained static on incubated eggs, but increased significantly on unincubated eggs, especially in several families of Gram-negative bacteria. The relative abundance of individual bacterial taxa did not change on incubated eggs, but that of 82 bacterial taxa, including some known to infect the interior of eggs, increased on unincubated eggs. Thus, incubation inhibits all of the relatively few bacteria that grow on eggshells, and does not appear to promote growth of any bacteria.

  17. The Use of Feedback Mechanisms in Interpreting the Robustness of a Neoliberal Educational Assemblage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerath, Peter; Mattheis, Allison

    2015-01-01

    This article demonstrates how using feedback mechanisms or "loops" as heuristic devices can help ethnographers explain the interior logic, robustness and contradictions within complex educational assemblages. After reviewing the use of feedback mechanisms in the natural and social sciences, particularly practice theory, the article…

  18. Diagramming Assemblages of Sex/Gender and Sexuality as Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzul, Jesse; Santavicca, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    This article explores ethico/political/ontological orientations made possible by an exploration of sex/gender and sexuality. Drawing from materialist theorists such as Karen Barad, Gilles Deleuze, and Felix Guattari, we employ the concept of assemblages to tease out the reality that our shared world is always already in a state of queer becoming.…

  19. Effect of oil palm on the Plecoptera and Trichoptera (Insecta) assemblages in streams of eastern Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paiva, Carina Kaory Sasahara; de Faria, Ana Paula Justino; Calvão, Lenize Batista; Juen, Leandro

    2017-08-01

    The production of oil palm is expected to increase in the Amazon region. However, expansion of oil palm plantation leads to significant changes in the physical structure of aquatic ecosystems, mainly through the reduction of riparian vegetation that is essential for aquatic biodiversity. Here, we evaluated the effects of oil palm on the physical habitat structure of Amazonian stream environments and assemblages of Plecoptera and Trichoptera (PT), ​both found in these streams. We compared streams sampled in oil palm plantations (n = 13) with natural forest areas ("reference" streams, n = 8), located in the eastern Amazon, Brazil. Our results showed that oil palm streams were more likely to be in close proximity to roads, had higher pH values, and higher amounts of fine substrate deposited in the channel than reference streams. Further, these environmental changes had important effects on the aquatic invertebrate assemblages, reducing the abundance and richness of PT. Nevertheless, the genera composition of the assemblages did not differ between reference and oil palm (PERMANOVA, pseudo-F (1,19) = 1.891; p = 0.111). We conclude that oil palm production has clear negative impacts on aquatic environments and PT assemblages in Amazonian streams. We recommend that oil palm producers invest more in planning of road networks to avoid the construction of roads near to the riparian vegetation. This planning can minimize impacts of oil palm production on aquatic systems in the Amazon.

  20. Cenozoic imprints on the phylogenetic structure of palm species assemblages worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissling, W Daniel; Eiserhardt, Wolf L; Baker, William J; Borchsenius, Finn; Couvreur, Thomas L P; Balslev, Henrik; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2012-05-08

    Despite long-standing interest in the origin and maintenance of species diversity, little is known about historical drivers of species assemblage structure at large spatiotemporal scales. Here, we use global species distribution data, a dated genus-level phylogeny, and paleo-reconstructions of biomes and climate to examine Cenozoic imprints on the phylogenetic structure of regional species assemblages of palms (Arecaceae), a species-rich plant family characteristic of tropical ecosystems. We find a strong imprint on phylogenetic clustering due to geographic isolation and in situ diversification, especially in the Neotropics and on islands with spectacular palm radiations (e.g., Madagascar, Hawaii, and Cuba). Phylogenetic overdispersion on mainlands and islands corresponds to biotic interchange areas. Differences in the degree of phylogenetic clustering among biogeographic realms are related to differential losses of tropical rainforests during the Cenozoic, but not to the cumulative area of tropical rainforest over geological time. A largely random phylogenetic assemblage structure in Africa coincides with severe losses of rainforest area, especially after the Miocene. More recent events also appear to be influential: phylogenetic clustering increases with increasing intensity of Quaternary glacial-interglacial climatic oscillations in South America and, to a lesser extent, Africa, indicating that specific clades perform better in climatically unstable regions. Our results suggest that continental isolation (in combination with limited long-distance dispersal) and changing climate and habitat loss throughout the Cenozoic have had strong impacts on the phylogenetic structure of regional species assemblages in the tropics.

  1. Effect of land use on mayfly assemblages structure in Neotropical headwater streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA EMILIA SIEGLOCH

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the effect of agricultural and forestry land use on the structure of mayfly assemblages in low-order streams. Twenty-nine headwater streams were investigated in the state of São Paulo. We analyzed 15 streams in pristine areas (mixed tropical rainforest, semideciduous forest and dense tropical rainforest, and 14 streams covered with sugarcane, eucalyptus and pasture. Mayfly richness obtained by rarefaction curves was higher in pristine areas (21 genera, especially in mixed and semideciduous forest when compared to land use (9 genera, where values were particularly low in sugarcane plantation (3 genera. The non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS ordination showed clear difference in mayfly assemblages between land uses and pristine areas, supported by analysis of similarity (R=0.67, p=0.001. In partial redundancy analysis (pRDA, the environmental descriptors that best explained differences in assemblage structure were Riparian, Channel and Environmental Inventory (RCE index score, percentage of fine sediment stream substrate, water pH and land elevation. Our results show that agricultural and forestry land use has a strong negative effect on the structure of mayfly assemblages. These results also support the use of mayflies as environmental indicators, as some genera were sensitive to changes in land use, while others responded to naturally occurring changes in the study area.

  2. Seasonal and interannual dynamics of diatom assemblages in Sacrower See (NE Germany): A sediment trap study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilova, E.P.; Bluszcz, P.; Heiri, O.; Cremer, H.; Ohlendorf, C.; Lotter, A.F.; Zolitschka, B.

    2008-01-01

    Diatom assemblages from sediment trap samples collected during ten intervals between October 2003 and October 2005 in Sacrower See (NE Germany) were related to limnological and meteorological data. Sacrower See is a dimictic, 38 m deep, hypertrophic lowland lake (29.5 m a.s.l.). We identified distin

  3. Record of Lower Gondwana megafloral assemblage from the Nand coalfield, Wardha Basin, Nagpur District, Maharashtra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, K.J.; Sarate, O.S.; Bhattacharya, A.P.; Goswami, S. [Birbal Sahni Institute for Paleobotany, Lucknow (India)

    2005-09-01

    A rich collection of Lower Gondwana mega-plant fossils have been recorded from the outcrops exposed along the Kharkhara Nala section in Nand coalfield, Nagpur District, Maharashtra, mapped as Lameta Formation. The Lower Gondwana rocks are deposited mainly in Nagpur, Chandrapur and Yeotmal Districts of Maharashtra. Palaeobotanical investigations (megafloral and xylotomical) so far known from Wardha Valley are mostly confined to Barakar and Kamthi Formations. Megafloral assemblage very similar to assemblage of Karharbari Formation has been recovered for the first time from the Lower Gondwana beds exposed in the Nand coalfield. The plant assemblage consists of two species of Gangamopteris, one species each of the genera Buriadia, Noeggerathiopsis and Allatocarpus along with the genus Glossopteris represented by seven species; the conifer genus Buriadia dominates the flora (17.72%) followed by Glossopteris communis (16.46%). The sediments were also investigated for the purpose of palynology but no pollen and spore types could be recovered. An Early Permian age has been assigned on the basis of overall assemblage.

  4. Lower Miocene plant assemblage with coastal-marsh herbaceous monocots from the Vienna Basin (Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvaček Zlatko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A new plant assemblage of Cerová-Lieskové from Lower Miocene (Karpatian deposits in the Vienna Basin (western Slovakia is preserved in a relatively deep, upper-slope marine environment. Depositional conditions with high sedimentation rates allowed exceptional preservation of plant remains. The plant assemblage consists of (1 conifers represented by foliage of Pinus hepios and Tetraclinis salicornioides, a seed cone of Pinus cf. ornata, and by pollen of the Cupressaceae, Pinaceae, Pinus sp. and Cathaya sp., and (2 angiosperms represented by Cinnamomum polymorphum, Platanus neptuni, Potamogeton sp. and lauroid foliage, by pollen of Liquidambar sp., Engelhardia sp. and Craigia sp., and in particular by infructescences (so far interpreted as belonging to cereal ears. We validate genus and species assignments of the infructescences: they belong to Palaeotriticum Sitár, including P. mockii Sitár and P. carpaticum Sitár, and probably represent herbaceous monocots that inhabited coastal marshes, similar to the living grass Spartina. Similar infructescences occur in the Lower and Middle Miocene deposits of the Carpathian Foredeep (Slup in Moravia, Tunjice Hills (Žale in Slovenia, and probably also in the Swiss Molasse (Lausanne. This plant assemblage demonstrates that the paleovegetation was represented by evergreen woodland with pines and grasses in undergrowth, similar to vegetation inhabiting coastal brackish marshes today. It also indicates subtropical climatic conditions in the Vienna Basin (central Paratethys, similar to those implied by other coeval plant assemblages from Central Europe

  5. Castaways can't be choosers - Homogenization of rafting assemblages on floating seaweeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutow, Lars; Beermann, Jan; Buschbaum, Christian; Rivadeneira, Marcelo M.; Thiel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    After detachment from benthic habitats, the epibiont assemblages on floating seaweeds undergo substantial changes, but little is known regarding whether succession varies among different seaweed species. Given that floating algae may represent a limiting habitat in many regions, rafting organisms may be unselective and colonize any available seaweed patch at the sea surface. This process may homogenize rafting assemblages on different seaweed species, which our study examined by comparing the assemblages on benthic and floating individuals of the fucoid seaweeds Fucus vesiculosus and Sargassum muticum in the northern Wadden Sea (North Sea). Species richness was about twice as high on S. muticum as on F. vesiculosus, both on benthic and floating individuals. In both seaweed species benthic samples were more diverse than floating samples. However, the species composition differed significantly only between benthic thalli, but not between floating thalli of the two seaweed species. Separate analyses of sessile and mobile epibionts showed that the homogenization of rafting assemblages was mainly caused by mobile species. Among these, grazing isopods from the genus Idotea reached extraordinarily high densities on the floating samples from the northern Wadden Sea, suggesting that the availability of seaweed rafts was indeed limiting. Enhanced break-up of algal rafts associated with intense feeding by abundant herbivores might force rafters to recolonize benthic habitats. These colonization processes may enhance successful dispersal of rafting organisms and thereby contribute to population connectivity between sink populations in the Wadden Sea and source populations from up-current regions.

  6. Grass assemblages and diversity of conservation areas on the coastal plain south of Maputo Bay, Mozambique

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    S. J. Siebert

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A floristic analysis of the grass species assemblages of the Licuati Forest and Maputo Elephant Reserves south of Maputo Bay, Mozambique, is presented. Sampling of grass data was undertaken in six previously described, major vegetation types. TWINSPAN divisions distinguished grass assemblages that are characteristic for these major vegetation types of the study area. The results were supported by an Indirect Gradient Analysis. Further TWINSPAN divisions of a larger Maputaland data set indicated a floristic relationship between grass assemblages of similar major vegetation types in the study area and South Africa. This relationship was supported by high similarity values (> 65%, obtained with Sorenson's Coefficient. The coefficient also indicated varying degrees of similarity between grass assemblages of different major vegetation types within the study area. A rich diversity of 115 grass species and infraspecific taxa was recorded for the study area. The Chloridoideae and Panicoideae dominate the grass diversity and the genera with the most species include Eragrostis, Panicum and Digitaria. Most grass species in the study area are perennials and have a tufted growth form, but this varies considerably between vegetation types.

  7. A multi-scaled approach to evaluating the fish assemblage structure within southern Appalachian streams USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Joseph; Peterson, James T.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable uncertainty about the relative roles of stream habitat and landscape characteristics in structuring stream-fish assemblages. We evaluated the relative importance of environmental characteristics on fish occupancy at the local and landscape scales within the upper Little Tennessee River basin of Georgia and North Carolina. Fishes were sampled using a quadrat sample design at 525 channel units within 48 study reaches during two consecutive years. We evaluated species–habitat relationships (local and landscape factors) by developing hierarchical, multispecies occupancy models. Modeling results suggested that fish occupancy within the Little Tennessee River basin was primarily influenced by stream topology and topography, urban land coverage, and channel unit types. Landscape scale factors (e.g., urban land coverage and elevation) largely controlled the fish assemblage structure at a stream-reach level, and local-scale factors (i.e., channel unit types) influenced fish distribution within stream reaches. Our study demonstrates the utility of a multi-scaled approach and the need to account for hierarchy and the interscale interactions of factors influencing assemblage structure prior to monitoring fish assemblages, developing biological management plans, or allocating management resources throughout a stream system.

  8. Asian longhorned beetle complicates the relationship between taxonomic diversity and pest vulnerability in street tree assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban foresters routinely emphasise the importance of taxonomic diversity to reduce the vulnerability of tree assemblages to invasive pests, but it is unclear to what extent diversity reduces vulnerability to polyphagous (i.e. generalist) pests. Drawing on field data from seven c...

  9. Different surrounding landscapes may result in different fish assemblages in East African seagrass beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorenbosch, M.; Grol, M.G.G.; Nagelkerken, I.; Velde, G. van der

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have considered how seagrass fish assemblages are influenced by surrounding habitats. This information is needed for a better understanding of the connectivity between tropical coastal ecosystems. To study the effects of surrounding habitats on the composition, diversity and densities of

  10. Presence of riparian vegetation increases biotic condition of fish assemblages in two Brazilian reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cop Ferreira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The riparian vegetation in lakes and reservoirs is source of course wood structures such as trunks and branches and is used as sheltering, spawning and foraging habitats for fishes. The reduction of these submerged structures can thus, affect the composition and structure of fish assemblages in reservoirs. Aim To evaluate the influence of riparian vegetation on the biotic condition of fish assemblage by adapting the Reservoir Fish Assemblage Index (RFAI to two reservoirs in the Upper Paranapanema river basin, São Paulo State, Brazil. Methods The RFAI was adapted from metrics related to the functional characteristics and composition of fish assemblages through a protocol of metric selection and validation, and to its response to the presence of riparian vegetation. Results The final RFAI was composed by nine metrics, been lower in sites without riparian vegetation as consequence of the predominance of larger individuals and the percent of piscivorous and detritivorous fishes. Conclusions These results suggest that increasing shore habitat complexity in reservoirs by maintaining riparian vegetation increases fish biotic integrity.

  11. Clay minerals assemblage in the Neogene fluvial succession of the Pishin Belt, Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasi, Aimal Khan; Kassi, Akhtar Muhammad; Friis, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    and metasedimentary successions. The source of kaolinite seems to be pedogenic or lateritic. The clay minerals assemblage in mudstones and sandstones of the Dasht Murgha group, Malthanai formation and Bostan formation appears to have been derived from the nearby-exposed Pre-Miocence mafic/ultramafic rocks...

  12. Zooplankton assemblages in montane lakes and ponds of Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, G.L.; Hoffman, R.; McIntire, C.D.; Lienkaemper, G.; Samora, B.

    2009-01-01

    Water quality and zooplankton samples were collected during the ice-free periods between 1988 and 2005 from 103 oligotrophic montane lakes and ponds located in low forest to alpine vegetation zones in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA. Collectively, 45 rotifer and 44 crustacean taxa were identified. Most of the numerically dominant taxa appeared to have wide niche breadths. The average number of taxa per lake decreased with elevation and generally increased as maximum lake depths increased (especially for rotifers). With one exception, fish presence/absence did not explain the taxonomic compositions of crustacean zooplankton assemblages. Many rotifer species were common members of zooplankton assemblages in montane lakes and ponds in western North America, whereas the crustacean taxa were common to some areas of the west, but not others. Constraints of the environmental variables did not appear to provide strong gradients to separate the distributions of most zooplankton species. This suggests that interspecific competitive interactions and stochastic processes regulate the taxonomic structures of the zooplankton assemblages at the landscape level. Crustacean species that had broad niche breadths were associated with different rotifer taxa across the environmental gradients. Studies of zooplankton assemblages need to address both crustacean and rotifer taxa, not one or the other.

  13. Morphological assembly mechanisms in Neotropical bat assemblages and ensembles within a landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Claudia E; Arita, Héctor T; Solis, Leonor

    2006-08-01

    Empirical studies on bat assemblages have shown that richness is not appreciably influenced by local processes such as ecological interactions. However, most of these studies have been done in large areas that include high heterogeneity, and they analyse all bat species within such areas, and thus they may be not reflecting local but supra-community conditions. We followed an ecomorphological approach to assess how bat assemblages of species from the families Phyllostomidae and Mormoopidae, and ensembles of frugivorous bats, are assembled in local habitats within a single landscape. We measured the volume of the space defined by wing morphology and quantified the average distance between species within such a volume. Then, we related these measures to local richness. Such relationships were contrasted against relationships with random assemblages to test for statistical differences. At the ensemble level of organization, we found that the frugivorous bat morphological assembly mechanism is different from random patterns, and it corresponds to the volume-increasing model. On the other hand, bat assembly mechanisms may be ubiquitous at the assemblage level, because groups of species coexisting in a local habitat and delimited only by phylogeny include more than one ecological group with no potential to interact. Assembling processes are crucial to an understanding of species diversity in local communities, and ecomorphological analyses are very promising tools that may help in their study.

  14. Iterative evolution of sympatric seacow (Dugongidae, Sirenia assemblages during the past ~26 million years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Velez-Juarbe

    Full Text Available Extant sirenians show allopatric distributions throughout most of their range. However, their fossil record shows evidence of multispecies communities throughout most of the past ∼26 million years, in different oceanic basins. Morphological differences among co-occurring sirenian taxa suggest that resource partitioning played a role in structuring these communities. We examined body size and ecomorphological differences (e.g., rostral deflection and tusk morphology among sirenian assemblages from the late Oligocene of Florida, early Miocene of India and early Pliocene of Mexico; each with three species of the family Dugongidae. Although overlapping in several ecomorphological traits, each assemblage showed at least one dominant trait in which coexisting species differed. Fossil sirenian occurrences occasionally are monotypic, but the assemblages analyzed herein show iterative evolution of multispecies communities, a phenomenon unparalleled in extant sirenian ecology. As primary consumers of seagrasses, these communities likely had a strong impact on past seagrass ecology and diversity, although the sparse fossil record of seagrasses limits direct comparisons. Nonetheless, our results provide robust support for previous suggestions that some sirenians in these extinct assemblages served as keystone species, controlling the dominance of climax seagrass species, permitting more taxonomically diverse seagrass beds (and sirenian communities than many of those observed today.

  15. Decapod crustacean assemblages off the West coast of central Italy (western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Fanelli

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Community structure and faunal composition of decapod crustaceans off the west coast of central Italy (western Mediterranean were investigated. Samples were collected during five trawl surveys carried out from June 1996 to June 2000 from 16 to 750 m depth. Multivariate analysis revealed the occurrence of five faunistic assemblages: 1 a strictly coastal community over sandy bottoms at depths

  16. Demersal fish assemblages on seamounts and other rugged features in the northeastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrini, Andrea M.; Demopoulos, Amanda W. J.; Singer, Randal; Roa-Varon, Adela; Chaytor, Jason D.

    2017-01-01

    Recent investigations of demersal fish communities in deep (>50 m) rugged habitats have considerably increased our knowledge of the factors that influence the assemblage structure of fishes across mesophotic to deep-sea depths. Although habitat types influence deepwater fish distribution, whether different rugged seafloor features provide functionally equivalent habitat for fishes is poorly understood. In the northeastern Caribbean, numerous rugged seafloor features (e.g., seamounts, banks, canyons) punctuate insular margins, and thus create a remarkable setting in which to examine demersal fish communities across various seafloor features. Also in this region, several water masses are vertically layered in the water column, creating strong stratification layers corresponding to specific abiotic conditions. In this study, we examined differences among fish assemblages across seafloor features (e.g., seamount, canyon, bank/ridge) and water masses at depths ranging from 98 to 4060 m in the northeastern Caribbean. We conducted 26 ROV dives across 18 sites, yielding 156 species; 42% of which had not been previously recorded from particular depths or localities in the region. While fewer species were observed at seamounts than at other habitats in the NE Caribbean, assemblage structure was similar among habitat features. Thus, similar to seamount studies in other regions, seamounts in the Anegada Passage do not harbor distinct communities from other rugged, topographic features. Species assemblages, however, differed among depths, with zonation generally corresponding to water mass boundaries in the region. High species turnover occurred at depths fish biogeography.

  17. An "assemblage toxicity index" to improve characterization of effects of atrazine on aquatic plant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic risk assessments are made uncertain by the use of measures of effect for only one level of effect and by the use of only one percentile in sensitivity distributions for the variation of this measure of effect across an assemblage of taxa. This leaves undefined the severi...

  18. Ecotypes as a concept for exploring responses to climate change in fish assemblage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, G.H.; Ellis, J.R.; Payne, M.R.; Hofstede, ter R.; Pinnegar, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    How do species-rich fish assemblages respond to climate change or to other anthropogenic or environmental drivers? To explore this, a categorization concept is presented whereby species are assigned with respect to six ecotype classifications, according to biogeography, horizontal and vertical habit

  19. The scales of variability of stream fish assemblage at tributary confluences

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    István Czeglédi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tributary confluences play an important role in the dispersal of organisms, and consequently, in shaping regional scale diversity in stream networks. Despite their importance in dispersal processes, little is known about how ecological assemblages are organized in these habitats. We studied the scales of variability of stream fish assemblages over three seasons using a hierarchical sampling design, which incorporated three tributaries, three sites at the mouth of each tributary and using four sampling units at each site. We found strong scale dependent variability in species richness, composition and relative abundance. Most of the variation was accounted for by the interactive effect of season, between stream and between site effects, while habitat structure of the sampling units had a relatively minor role. Species richness showed a continuous decrease from the mainstem river in most cases, while species composition and relative abundance changed less consistently along the longitudinal profile. Consequently, we found that not only the junctions presented a strong filter on the species pool, but some species were filtered out if they passed this critical habitat bottleneck. Spatial position of the tributaries along the river also contributed to assemblage variability in the confluences. Overall, our results suggest high variability in fish assemblages across multiple scales at tributary confluences. Environmental management should take a more critical care on the filtering role of tributary confluences in species dispersal, for better understanding patterns and processes in the branches of dendritic stream networks.

  20. Comparison of termite assemblages along a landuse gradient on peat areas in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaessen, T.; Verwer, C.; Demies, M.; Kaliang, H.; Meer, van der P.J.

    2011-01-01

    VAESSEN T, VERWER C, DEMIES M, KALIANG H & VAN DER MEER PJ. 2011. Comparison of termite assemblages along a landuse gradient on peat areas in Sarawak, Malaysia. In this study we assessed the species density and relative abundance of termites in peat land in Sarawak, Malaysia. Termites were sampl

  1. Effects of summer drought on fish and macroinvertebrate assemblage properties in upland Ouachita Mountain streams, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph W. Love; Taylor M. Christopher; Melvin L. Jr. Warren

    2008-01-01

    We sampled fishes and aquatic insects monthly ( Jun.–Sept. 2002) from intermittent tributaries of the Alum Fork of the Saline River (Arkansas, U.S.A.) to quantify the response of fish and aquatic insect assemblage properties to seasonal desiccation and habitat fragmentation. We collected a total of 4219 individuals, representing 18 species of fishes and 27 families of...

  2. Large-scale patterns in morphological diversity and species assemblages in Neotropical Triatominae (Heteroptera: Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Nilda Fergnani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We analysed the spatial variation in morphological diversity (MDiv and species richness (SR for 91 species of Neotropical Triatominae to determine the ecological relationships between SR and MDiv and to explore the roles that climate, productivity, environmental heterogeneity and the presence of biomes and rivers may play in the structuring of species assemblages. For each 110 km x 110 km-cell on a grid map of America, we determined the number of species (SR and estimated the mean Gower index (MDiv based on 12 morphological attributes. We performed bootstrapping analyses of species assemblages to identify whether those assemblages were more similar or dissimilar in their morphology than expected by chance. We applied a multi-model selection procedure and spatial explicit analyses to account for the association of diversity-environment relationships. MDiv and SR both showed a latitudinal gradient, although each peaked at different locations and were thus not strictly spatially congruent. SR decreased with temperature variability and MDiv increased with mean temperature, suggesting a predominant role for ambient energy in determining Triatominae diversity. Species that were more similar than expected by chance co-occurred near the limits of the Triatominae distribution in association with changes in environmental variables. Environmental filtering may underlie the structuring of species assemblages near their distributional limits.

  3. The trophic structure and predation impact of a low latitude midwater fish assemblage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Thomas L.; Sutton, Tracey T.; Lancraft, Thomas M.

    The trophic ecology of a midwater fish assemblage was investigated in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, a regime exhibiting the principal physical-biological characteristics of oligotrophic low latitude ecosystems. In all, the diets of 164 species of midwater fishes were examined, with data for 121 being sufficient for analytical comparisons. Cluster analysis grouped the assemblage into 15 feeding guilds, with these falling into two major groups, those including zooplanktivores with largely crustacean diets, and those including predators on large prey, most of which were piscivores. Among the zooplanktivores, the principal predators were the Myctophidae, Sternoptychidae and Gonostomatidae which, respectively, consumed 31%, 27% and 14% of the food biomass eaten daily by the midwater fish assemblage. The myctophids alone accounted for 53% of the copepod and 40% of the euphausiid biomass ingested. The copepod genus Pleuromamma was especially important forage, constituting 40% of the copepod biomass consumed by the midwater fish assemblage. The Stomiidae were the dominant piscivores and accounted for 20% of the total food ingested daily and 61% of the fish eaten, with the majority of their prey being myctophids. Literature comparisons reveal that diet patterns for the eastern Gulf midwater assemblage closely resemble those for mid- to- low latitude oligotrophic regimes in general. Daily consumption of the entire assemblage is estimated at 2.5-4.3 kg C km -2 in the upper 1000 m. Four fifths of this is zooplankton while the balance is large prey, mostly fishes. The ingestion rate accounts for only 5-10% of the daily production of zooplankton, but 95% of fish daily production. While the latter is obviously an overestimate it does suggest a tighter nutritional coupling of the midwater fish assemblage with the upper trophic levels of the ecosystem than with zooplankton. Midwater fishes and shrimps, the two dominant groups of micronekton, together account for only 25% of

  4. Stable isotope and calcareous nannofossil assemblage record of the late Paleocene and early Eocene (Cicogna section)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnini, Claudia; Spofforth, David J. A.; Dickens, Gerald R.; Rio, Domenico; Pälike, Heiko; Backman, Jan; Muttoni, Giovanni; Dallanave, Edoardo

    2016-04-01

    We present records of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes, CaCO3 content, and changes in calcareous nannofossil assemblages across an 81 m thick section of upper Paleocene-lower Eocene marine sedimentary rocks now exposed along the Cicogna Stream in northeast Italy. The studied stratigraphic section represents sediment accumulation in a bathyal hemipelagic setting from approximately 57.5 to 52.2 Ma, a multi-million-year time interval characterized by perturbations in the global carbon cycle and changes in calcareous nannofossil assemblages. The bulk carbonate δ13C profile for the Cicogna section, once placed on a common timescale, resembles that at several other locations across the world, and includes both a long-term drop in δ13C and multiple short-term carbon isotope excursions (CIEs). This precise correlation of widely separated δ13C records in marine sequences results from temporal changes in the carbon composition of the exogenic carbon cycle. However, diagenesis has likely modified the δ13C record at Cicogna, an interpretation supported by variations in bulk carbonate δ18O, which do not conform to expectations for a primary signal. The record of CaCO3 content reflects a combination of carbonate dilution and dissolution, as also inferred at other sites. Our detailed documentation and statistical analysis of calcareous nannofossil assemblages show major differences before, during and after the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Other CIEs in our lower Paleogene section do not exhibit such a distinctive change; instead, these events are sometimes characterized by variations restricted to a limited number of taxa and transient shifts in the relative abundance of primary assemblage components. Both long-lasting and short-lived modifications to calcareous nannofossil assemblages preferentially affected nannoliths or holococcoliths such as Discoaster, Fasciculithus, Rhomboaster/Tribrachiatus, Sphenolithus and Zygrhablithus, which underwent distinct variations in

  5. Diversity and abundance of invertebrate epifaunal assemblages associated with gorgonians are driven by colony attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cúrdia, João; Carvalho, Susana; Pereira, Fábio; Guerra-García, José Manuel; Santos, Miguel N.; Cunha, Marina R.

    2015-06-01

    The present study aimed to explicitly quantify the link between the attributes of shallow-water gorgonian colonies (Octocorallia: Alcyonacea) and the ecological patterns of associated non-colonial epifaunal invertebrates. Based on multiple regression analysis, we tested the contribution of several attributes (colony height, width, and area, fractal dimension as a measure of colony complexity, lacunarity as a measure of the heterogeneity, and "colonial" epibiont cover) to abundance and taxonomic richness of associated assemblages. The results highlight the variation in the response of epifaunal assemblages to the gorgonian colony characteristics. The nature and intensity of the relationships were gorgonian species-dependent and varied from one taxonomic group to another. For both gorgonian species analyzed, the strongest predictor of species richness and abundance of the epifaunal assemblages was "colonial" epibiont cover, possibly due to a trophic effect (direct or indirect enhancement of food availability) combined with the surface available for colonization (species-area effect). Although structural complexity is usually indicated as the main driver for rich and abundant coral-associated assemblages, no significant relationship was observed between fractal dimension and the community descriptors; lacunarity, which reflects the sizes of the inter-branch spaces, was only linked to taxonomic richness in the assemblages associated with Leptogorgia lusitanica. The validity of the paradigm that structural complexity enhances biodiversity may be scale-dependent. In the case of gorgonians, the effect of complexity at the "garden" level may be more relevant than at the individual colony level. This reinforces the need for the conservation of gorgonian aggregation areas as a whole in order to preserve host diversity and size structure.

  6. Large-scale spatial distribution patterns of gastropod assemblages in rocky shores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Miloslavich

    Full Text Available Gastropod assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats were studied over large spatial scales to (1 describe broad-scale patterns in assemblage composition, including patterns by feeding modes, (2 identify latitudinal pattern of biodiversity, i.e., richness and abundance of gastropods and/or regional hotspots, and (3 identify potential environmental and anthropogenic drivers of these assemblages. Gastropods were sampled from 45 sites distributed within 12 Large Marine Ecosystem regions (LME following the NaGISA (Natural Geography in Shore Areas standard protocol (www.nagisa.coml.org. A total of 393 gastropod taxa from 87 families were collected. Eight of these families (9.2% appeared in four or more different LMEs. Among these, the Littorinidae was the most widely distributed (8 LMEs followed by the Trochidae and the Columbellidae (6 LMEs. In all regions, assemblages were dominated by few species, the most diverse and abundant of which were herbivores. No latitudinal gradients were evident in relation to species richness or densities among sampling sites. Highest diversity was found in the Mediterranean and in the Gulf of Alaska, while highest densities were found at different latitudes and represented by few species within one genus (e.g. Afrolittorina in the Agulhas Current, Littorina in the Scotian Shelf, and Lacuna in the Gulf of Alaska. No significant correlation was found between species composition and environmental variables (r≤0.355, p>0.05. Contributing variables to this low correlation included invasive species, inorganic pollution, SST anomalies, and chlorophyll-a anomalies. Despite data limitations in this study which restrict conclusions in a global context, this work represents the first effort to sample gastropod biodiversity on rocky shores using a standardized protocol across a wide scale. Our results will generate more work to build global databases allowing for large-scale diversity comparisons of rocky intertidal assemblages.

  7. Large-scale spatial distribution patterns of gastropod assemblages in rocky shores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Klein, Eduardo; Iken, Katrin; Weinberger, Vanessa; Konar, Brenda; Trott, Tom; Pohle, Gerhard; Bigatti, Gregorio; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Mead, Angela; Palomo, Gabriela; Ortiz, Manuel; Gobin, Judith; Sardi, Adriana; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Knowlton, Ann; Wong, Melisa; Peralta, Ana C

    2013-01-01

    Gastropod assemblages from nearshore rocky habitats were studied over large spatial scales to (1) describe broad-scale patterns in assemblage composition, including patterns by feeding modes, (2) identify latitudinal pattern of biodiversity, i.e., richness and abundance of gastropods and/or regional hotspots, and (3) identify potential environmental and anthropogenic drivers of these assemblages. Gastropods were sampled from 45 sites distributed within 12 Large Marine Ecosystem regions (LME) following the NaGISA (Natural Geography in Shore Areas) standard protocol (www.nagisa.coml.org). A total of 393 gastropod taxa from 87 families were collected. Eight of these families (9.2%) appeared in four or more different LMEs. Among these, the Littorinidae was the most widely distributed (8 LMEs) followed by the Trochidae and the Columbellidae (6 LMEs). In all regions, assemblages were dominated by few species, the most diverse and abundant of which were herbivores. No latitudinal gradients were evident in relation to species richness or densities among sampling sites. Highest diversity was found in the Mediterranean and in the Gulf of Alaska, while highest densities were found at different latitudes and represented by few species within one genus (e.g. Afrolittorina in the Agulhas Current, Littorina in the Scotian Shelf, and Lacuna in the Gulf of Alaska). No significant correlation was found between species composition and environmental variables (r≤0.355, p>0.05). Contributing variables to this low correlation included invasive species, inorganic pollution, SST anomalies, and chlorophyll-a anomalies. Despite data limitations in this study which restrict conclusions in a global context, this work represents the first effort to sample gastropod biodiversity on rocky shores using a standardized protocol across a wide scale. Our results will generate more work to build global databases allowing for large-scale diversity comparisons of rocky intertidal assemblages.

  8. Temporal variation in plankton assemblages and physicochemistry of Devils Lake, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, H.V.; Berkas, W.R.

    1998-01-01

    Seasonal and annual variation in biomass and structure of algal assemblages of hyposaline Devils Lake were examined in relation to turbidity, ambient concentrations of major ions, trace elements and nutrients, and the standing crop of herbivores. Lake level declined during the early years of study, but rose markedly in subsequent years as historically large volumes of water flowed into this hydrologically-closed basin. Winter algal assemblages were dominated (in biomass) most years by small, non-motile chlorophytes (Choricystis minor, Kirchneriella lunaris or Dunaliella sp.), or Euglena sp. in the most saline sub-basin. Spring assemblages were dominated by diatoms (Stephanodiscus cf. minutulus, Surirella peisonis, Cyclotella meneghiniana and Entomoneis paludosa were especially prominent) or chlorophytes (C. minor) until the lake level rose. C. minor abundances then declined in spring assemblages and diatoms (Stephanodiscus cf. agassizensis and S. niagarae; E. paludosa in the more saline sub-basins) dominated. The potential for nitrogen-deficient conditions for phytoplankton growth was evidenced most summers and early autumns by consistently high concentrations of reactive-P relative to inorganic-N and blooms of the N-fixing cyanophyte Aphanizomenon flos-aquae; Microcystis aeruginosa typically was a co-dominant (> 30% of biomass) in these assemblages. Pulses of diatoms (S. cf. agassizensis and C. meneghiniana) occurred in summers following unusually prolonged periods of calm weather or large water inflows. Physical (irradiance, turbulence) and chemical (major nutrients) variables were the primary factors associated with phytoplankton growth. Transparency and major nutrient concentrations accounted for more of the annual variation in phytoplankton structure than did salinity. Seasonal abundance patterns of the dominant zooplankton (the copepod Diaptomus sicilis; the cladocerans Ceriodaphnia quadrangula, Chydorus sphaericus, Daphnia pulex and Diaphanosoma birgei; and

  9. Evidence for low-grade metamorphism, hydrothermal alteration, and diagenesis on mars from phyllosilicate mineral assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlmann, B.L.; Mustard, J.F.; Clark, R.N.; Swayze, G.A.; Murchie, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    The enhanced spatial and spectral resolution provided by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has led to the discovery of numerous hydrated silicate minerals on Mars, particularly in the ancient, cratered crust comprising the southern highlands. Phases recently identified using visible/near-infrared spectra include: smectite, chlorite, prehnite, high-charge phyllosilicates (illite or muscovite), the zeolite analcime, opaline silica, and serpentine. Some mineral assemblages represent the products of aqueous alteration at elevated temperatures. Geologic occurrences of these mineral assemblages are described using examples from west of the Isidis basin near the Nili Fossae and with reference to differences in implied temperature, fluid composition, and starting materials during alteration. The alteration minerals are not distributed homogeneously. Rather, certain craters host distinctive alteration assemblages: (1) prehnite-chlorite-silica, (2) analcime-silica-Fe,Mg-smectite-chlorite, (3) chlorite-illite (muscovite), and (4) serpentine, which furthermore has been found in bedrock units. These assemblages contrast with the prevalence of solely Fe,Mg-smectites in most phyllosilicate-bearing terrains on Mars, and they represent materials altered at depth then exposed by cratering. Of the minerals found to date, prehnite provides the clearest evidence for subsurface, hydrothermal/metamorphic alteration, as it forms only under highly restricted conditions (T = 200 400??C). Multiple mechanisms exist for forming the other individual minerals; however, the most likely formation mechanisms for the characteristic mineralogic assemblages observed are, for (1) and (2), low- grade metamorphism or hydrothermal (400??C has not been found.

  10. Quantifying fish assemblages in large, offshore marine protected areas: an Australian case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A Hill

    Full Text Available As the number of marine protected areas (MPAs increases globally, so does the need to assess if MPAs are meeting their management goals. Integral to this assessment is usually a long-term biological monitoring program, which can be difficult to develop for large and remote areas that have little available fine-scale habitat and biological data. This is the situation for many MPAs within the newly declared Australian Commonwealth Marine Reserve (CMR network which covers approximately 3.1 million km2 of continental shelf, slope, and abyssal habitat, much of which is remote and difficult to access. A detailed inventory of the species, types of assemblages present and their spatial distribution within individual MPAs is required prior to developing monitoring programs to measure the impact of management strategies. Here we use a spatially-balanced survey design and non-extractive baited video observations to quantitatively document the fish assemblages within the continental shelf area (a multiple use zone, IUCN VI of the Flinders Marine Reserve, within the Southeast marine region. We identified distinct demersal fish assemblages, quantified assemblage relationships with environmental gradients (primarily depth and habitat type, and described their spatial distribution across a variety of reef and sediment habitats. Baited videos recorded a range of species from multiple trophic levels, including species of commercial and recreational interest. The majority of species, whilst found commonly along the southern or south-eastern coasts of Australia, are endemic to Australia, highlighting the global significance of this region. Species richness was greater on habitats containing some reef and declined with increasing depth. The trophic breath of species in assemblages was also greater in shallow waters. We discuss the utility of our approach for establishing inventories when little prior knowledge is available and how such an approach may inform future

  11. Riverine Landscape Patch Heterogeneity Drives Riparian Ant Assemblages in the Scioto River Basin, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagwireyi, Paradzayi; Sullivan, S Mažeika P

    2015-01-01

    Although the principles of landscape ecology are increasingly extended to include riverine landscapes, explicit applications are few. We investigated associations between patch heterogeneity and riparian ant assemblages at 12 riverine landscapes of the Scioto River, Ohio, USA, that represent urban/developed, agricultural, and mixed (primarily forested, but also wetland, grassland/fallow, and exurban) land-use settings. Using remotely-sensed and ground-collected data, we delineated riverine landscape patch types (crop, grass/herbaceous, gravel, lawn, mudflat, open water, shrub, swamp, and woody vegetation), computed patch metrics (area, density, edge, richness, and shape), and conducted coordinated sampling of surface-active Formicidae assemblages. Ant density and species richness was lower in agricultural riverine landscapes than at mixed or developed reaches (measured using S [total number of species], but not using Menhinick's Index [DM]), whereas ant diversity (using the Berger-Park Index [DBP]) was highest in agricultural reaches. We found no differences in ant density, richness, or diversity among internal riverine landscape patches. However, certain characteristics of patches influenced ant communities. Patch shape and density were significant predictors of richness (S: R2 = 0.72; DM: R2=0.57). Patch area, edge, and shape emerged as important predictors of DBP (R2 = 0.62) whereas patch area, edge, and density were strongly related to ant density (R2 = 0.65). Non-metric multidimensional scaling and analysis of similarities distinguished ant assemblage composition in grass and swamp patches from crop, gravel, lawn, and shrub as well as ant assemblages in woody vegetation patches from crop, lawn, and gravel (stress = 0.18, R2 = 0.64). These findings lend insight into the utility of landscape ecology to river science by providing evidence that spatial habitat patterns within riverine landscapes can influence assemblage characteristics of riparian arthropods.

  12. Role of Recruitment Processes in Structuring Coralligenous Benthic Assemblages in the Northern Adriatic Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbiati, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Coralligenous biogenic reefs are among the most diverse marine habitats in the Mediterranean Sea. The northern Adriatic mesophotic coralligenous outcrops host very rich and diverse epibenthic assemblages. Several studies quantified the low temporal variability and high spatial heterogeneity of these habitats, while processes driving structuring and differentiation are still poorly understood. To shed light on these processes, temporal and spatial patterns of colonisation were investigated using travertine tiles deployed on three coralligenous outcrops, corresponding to the main typologies of benthic assemblages described in previous studies. Three years after deployment, assemblages colonising travertine tiles resembled the differentiation among sites revealed by the natural assemblages in terms of major ecological groups. Processes structuring and maintaining species diversity have been explored. Pioneer species with high reproduction rate, long distance larval dispersal and fast growth (e.g. the serpulid polychaete Spirobranchus triqueter and the bivalve Anomia ephippium), were the most abundant in the early stages of recruitment on the two outcrops further away from the coast and with lower sedimentation. Their success may vary according to larval availability and environmental conditions (e.g., sedimentation rates). At these sites early-stage lasted 10–12 months, during which even species from natural substrates began colonising tiles by settlement of planktonic propagules (e.g., encrusting calcareous Rhodophyta) and lateral encroachment (e.g., sponges and ascidians). On coastal outcrop, exposed to a higher sedimentation rates, tiles were colonised by fast-growing algal turfs. Resilience of northern Adriatic coralligenous assemblages, and maintenance of their diversity, appeared largely entrusted to asexual reproduction. Exploring the mechanisms that underlie the formation and maintenance of the species diversity is crucial to improve our understanding of

  13. Riverine Landscape Patch Heterogeneity Drives Riparian Ant Assemblages in the Scioto River Basin, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paradzayi Tagwireyi

    Full Text Available Although the principles of landscape ecology are increasingly extended to include riverine landscapes, explicit applications are few. We investigated associations between patch heterogeneity and riparian ant assemblages at 12 riverine landscapes of the Scioto River, Ohio, USA, that represent urban/developed, agricultural, and mixed (primarily forested, but also wetland, grassland/fallow, and exurban land-use settings. Using remotely-sensed and ground-collected data, we delineated riverine landscape patch types (crop, grass/herbaceous, gravel, lawn, mudflat, open water, shrub, swamp, and woody vegetation, computed patch metrics (area, density, edge, richness, and shape, and conducted coordinated sampling of surface-active Formicidae assemblages. Ant density and species richness was lower in agricultural riverine landscapes than at mixed or developed reaches (measured using S [total number of species], but not using Menhinick's Index [DM], whereas ant diversity (using the Berger-Park Index [DBP] was highest in agricultural reaches. We found no differences in ant density, richness, or diversity among internal riverine landscape patches. However, certain characteristics of patches influenced ant communities. Patch shape and density were significant predictors of richness (S: R2 = 0.72; DM: R2=0.57. Patch area, edge, and shape emerged as important predictors of DBP (R2 = 0.62 whereas patch area, edge, and density were strongly related to ant density (R2 = 0.65. Non-metric multidimensional scaling and analysis of similarities distinguished ant assemblage composition in grass and swamp patches from crop, gravel, lawn, and shrub as well as ant assemblages in woody vegetation patches from crop, lawn, and gravel (stress = 0.18, R2 = 0.64. These findings lend insight into the utility of landscape ecology to river science by providing evidence that spatial habitat patterns within riverine landscapes can influence assemblage characteristics of riparian

  14. Diversity and abundance of invertebrate epifaunal assemblages associated with gorgonians are driven by colony attributes

    KAUST Repository

    Curdia, Joao

    2015-03-20

    The present study aimed to explicitly quantify the link between the attributes of shallow-water gorgonian colonies (Octocorallia: Alcyonacea) and the ecological patterns of associated non-colonial epifaunal invertebrates. Based on multiple regression analysis, we tested the contribution of several attributes (colony height, width, and area, fractal dimension as a measure of colony complexity, lacunarity as a measure of the heterogeneity, and “colonial” epibiont cover) to abundance and taxonomic richness of associated assemblages. The results highlight the variation in the response of epifaunal assemblages to the gorgonian colony characteristics. The nature and intensity of the relationships were gorgonian species-dependent and varied from one taxonomic group to another. For both gorgonian species analyzed, the strongest predictor of species richness and abundance of the epifaunal assemblages was “colonial” epibiont cover, possibly due to a trophic effect (direct or indirect enhancement of food availability) combined with the surface available for colonization (species–area effect). Although structural complexity is usually indicated as the main driver for rich and abundant coral-associated assemblages, no significant relationship was observed between fractal dimension and the community descriptors; lacunarity, which reflects the sizes of the inter-branch spaces, was only linked to taxonomic richness in the assemblages associated with Leptogorgia lusitanica. The validity of the paradigm that structural complexity enhances biodiversity may be scale-dependent. In the case of gorgonians, the effect of complexity at the “garden” level may be more relevant than at the individual colony level. This reinforces the need for the conservation of gorgonian aggregation areas as a whole in order to preserve host diversity and size structure. © 2015 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  15. Different risk factors for infection with Giardia lamblia assemblages A and B in children attending day-care centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijnacker, R; Mughini-Gras, L; Heusinkveld, M; Roelfsema, J; van Pelt, W; Kortbeek, T

    2016-12-01

    Giardia lamblia is a major cause of diarrhoea in children, especially those attending day-care centres (DCCs). Only Giardia assemblages A and B infect humans. Given the lack of assemblage-specific epidemiological data, we aimed to identify risk factors for infection by assemblages A and B in DCC attendees. During 2010-2013, 5,015 faecal samples from ≤4-year-old children attending 40 DCCs participating in laboratory surveillance in the Netherlands were tested for Giardia using RT-PCR. Giardia-positive samples were typed for identification of assemblages A and B. We compared child- and DCC-level characteristics of Giardia-positive children with those of Giardia-negative children using mixed-effects logistic regression. Overall, 226 samples (4.5 %) tested positive for Giardia, and assemblages were determined for 138 of them: 62 (45 %) were assemblage A and 76 (55 %) were B. The only risk factor for assemblage A infection was attending DCCs with indoor sandpits and cats during spring/summer (odds ratio [OR] 13.5; 95% CI 1.8-101.3). For assemblage B, risk factors were attending DCCs with dedicated diaper-changing (OR 3.6; 95% CI 1.7-7.6) and laundry (OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.1-4.9) areas. Preventing sick children from attending day-care and having cloth-towels at the DCC decreased the risk of assemblage B infection (OR 0.0; 95% CI 0.0-0.5 and OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.6 respectively). Risk factors for assemblages A and B infection in DCC-attending children were different, with assemblage B being mainly related to anthroponotic transmission, and assemblage A being related to zoonotic transmission. Given these differences, interventions to reduce the burden of childhood giardiasis cannot ignore those assemblage-specific preferred reservoirs and transmission routes.

  16. Assemblage organization in stream fishes: effects of environmental variation and interspecific interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, G.D.; Ratajczak, R.E.; Crawford, M. M.; Freeman, Mary C.

    1998-01-01

    We assessed the relative importance of environmental variation, interspecific competition for space, and predator abundance on assemblage structure and microhabitat use in a stream fish assemblage inhabiting Coweeta Creek, North Carolina, USA. Our study encompassed a ten year time span (1983-1992) and included some of the highest and lowest flows in the last 58 years. We collected 16 seasonal samples which included data on: 1) habitat availability (total and microhabitat) and microhabitat diversity, 2) assemblage structure (i.e., the number and abundances of species comprising a subset of the community), and 3) microhabitat use and overlap. We classified habitat availability data on the basis of year, season, and hydrologic period. Hydrologic period (i.e., pre-drought [PR], drought [D], and post-drought [PO]) represented the temporal location of a sample with respect to a four-year drought that occurred during the study. Hydrologic period explained a greater amount of variance in habitat availability data than either season or year. Total habitat availability was significantly greater during PO than in PR or D, although microhabitat diversity did not differ among either seasons or hydrologic periods. There were significantly fewer high-flow events (i.e., > 2.1 m3/s) during D than in either PR or PO periods. We observed a total of 16 species during our investigation, and the total number of species was significantly higher in D than in PR samples. Correlation analyses between the number of species present (total and abundant species) and environmental data yielded limited results, although the total number of species was inversely correlated with total habitat availability. A cluster analysis grouped assemblage structure samples by hydrologic period rather than season or year, supporting the contention that variation in annual flow had a strong impact on this assemblage. The drought had little effect on the numerical abundance of benthic species in this assemblage

  17. Dynamics of avian haemosporidian assemblages through millennial time scales inferred from insular biotas of the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Leticia; Latta, Steven C; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2017-06-20

    Although introduced hemosporidian (malaria) parasites (Apicomplexa: Haemosporida) have hastened the extinction of endemic bird species in the Hawaiian Islands and perhaps elsewhere, little is known about the temporal dynamics of endemic malaria parasite populations. Haemosporidian parasites do not leave informative fossils, and records of population change are lacking beyond a few decades. Here, we take advantage of the isolation of West Indian land-bridge islands by rising postglacial sea levels to estimate rates of change in hemosporidian parasite assemblages over a millennial time frame. Several pairs of West Indian islands have been connected and separated by falling and rising sea levels associated with the advance and retreat of Pleistocene continental glaciers. We use island isolation following postglacial sea-level rise, ca. 2.5 ka, to characterize long-term change in insular assemblages of hemosporidian parasites. We find that assemblages on formerly connected islands are as differentiated as assemblages on islands that have never been connected, and both are more differentiated than local assemblages sampled up to two decades apart. Differentiation of parasite assemblages between formerly connected islands reflects variation in the prevalence of shared hemosporidian lineages, whereas differentiation between islands isolated by millions of years reflects replacement of hemosporidian lineages infecting similar assemblages of avian host species.

  18. Diversity and biogeography of bacterial assemblages in surface sediments across the San Pedro Basin, Southern California Borderlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Ian; Jacobson Meyers, Myrna E; Fuhrman, Jed A

    2007-04-01

    Sediment bacteria play important roles in the biogeochemistry of ocean sediments; however, factors influencing assemblage composition have not been extensively studied. We examined extractable sediment bacterial abundance, the composition of bacterial assemblages using a high-throughput molecular fingerprinting approach, and several sediment biogeochemical parameters (organic matter content and alkaline phosphatase activity), along a 35 km transect from Point Fermin, Southern California, to Santa Catalina Island, across the approximately 900-m-deep San Pedro Basin. Automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) demonstrated that in two spatially isolated shallow (approximately < 60 m, on opposite sides of the channel) sediment environments, assemblages were more similar to each other than to deeper communities. Distinct communities existed in deeper and shallower sediments, and stations within the deep basin over 2 km apart contained remarkably similar assemblage fingerprints. The relative contribution to total amplified DNA fluorescence of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was significantly correlated to that of other OTUs in few comparisons (2.7% of total), i.e. few bacterial types were found together or apart consistently. The relative proportions within assemblages of only a few OTU were significantly correlated to measured physicochemical parameters (organic matter content and wet/dry weight ratio of sediments) or enzyme (alkaline phosphatase) activities. A low percentage of shared OTU between shallow and deep sediments, and the presence of similar, but spatially isolated assemblages suggests that bacterial OTU may be widely dispersed over scales of a few kilometres, but that environmental conditions select for particular assemblages.

  19. Effects of reconstruction of a pre-European vertebrate assemblage on ground-dwelling arachnids in arid Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvey, Colin J; Hayward, Matthew W; Gibb, Heloise

    2015-06-01

    Species loss can result in changes in assemblage structure and ecosystem function through ecological cascades. Australian vertebrate assemblages changed significantly following European colonisation, which resulted in the establishment of invasive vertebrates and the loss of native marsupials, many of which consume invertebrates. Conservation focusses on the removal of invasive carnivores and the reintroduction of regionally extinct species to fenced sites, resulting in what could be considered a reconstruction of pre-European vertebrate assemblages. In semi-arid Australian spinifex mallee ecosystems, we asked: (1) what is the effect of reconstructed pre-European vertebrate assemblages on native arachnid assemblages? and (2) what direct or indirect mechanisms (predation, disturbance and/or competition) could plausibly be responsible for these effects? We compared sites with reconstructed vertebrate assemblages with paired control sites. Arachnids were sampled using pitfall trapping and direct searching. Hypotheses regarding mechanisms were tested using scat analysis (predation) and by comparing burrow depth (disturbance) and scorpion mass (competition) between control and reconstructed sites. The dominant dune scorpion, Urodacus yaschenkoi, was less abundant and a wolf spider (Lycosa gibsoni species group) more abundant in reconstructed sites. Differences in spider assemblage composition were marginally non-significant. Scat analysis confirmed native vertebrate predation on scorpions and we found no evidence that competition or disturbance affected scorpions. We, thus, suggest that changes in spider assemblages may have resulted from ecological cascades via decreases in dune scorpions. The loss of omnivorous mammals and other changes associated with the invasion of carnivores may, therefore, have had broad-reaching consequences for native arachnid assemblages in Australian ecosystems.

  20. Variability of intertidal foraminferal assemblages in a salt marsh, Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milker, Yvonne; Horton, Benjamin P.; Nelson, Alan R.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Witter, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    We studied 18 sampling stations along a transect to investigate the similarity between live (rose Bengal stained) foraminiferal populations and dead assemblages, their small-scale spatial variations and the distribution of infaunal foraminifera in a salt marsh (Toms Creek marsh) at the upper end of the South Slough arm of the Coos Bay estuary, Oregon, USA. We aimed to test to what extent taphonomic processes, small-scale variability and infaunal distribution influence the accuracy of sea-level reconstructions based on intertidal foraminifera. Cluster analyses have shown that dead assemblages occur in distinct zones with respect to elevation, a prerequisite for using foraminifera as sea-level indicators. Our nonparametric multivariate analysis of variance showed that small-scale spatial variability has only a small influence on live (rose Bengal stained) populations and dead assemblages. The dissimilarity was higher, however, between live (rose Bengal stained) populations in the middle marsh. We observed early diagenetic dissolution of calcareous tests in the dead assemblages. If comparable post-depositional processes and similar minor spatial variability also characterize fossil assemblages, then dead assemblage are the best modern analogs for paleoenvironmental reconstructions. The Toms Creek tidal flat and low marsh vascular plant zones are dominated by Miliammina fusca, the middle marsh is dominated by Balticammina pseudomacrescens and Trochammina inflata, and the high marsh and upland–marsh transition zone are dominated by Trochamminita irregularis. Analysis of infaunal foraminifera showed that most living specimens are found in the surface sediments and the majority of live (rose Bengal stained) infaunal specimens are restricted to the upper 10 cm, but living individuals are found to depths of 50 cm. The dominant infaunal specimens are similar to those in the corresponding surface samples and no species have been found living solely infaunally. The

  1. Gold-silver-tellurium mineral assemblages in different ore styles of the Southern Urals VHMS deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikov, V. V.; Zaykov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Tesalina, S. G.; Herrington, R. J.; Buschmann, B.; Becker, K.; Petersen, S.; Orgeval, J. J.; Leistel, M.

    2003-04-01

    VMS deposits of the South Urals generally show a continuum in degradation and reworking ranging from pristine steep-sided hydrothermal sulphide mounds to deposits dominated by layered strata of clastic sulphides. Four different deposits with varying degrees of degradation in order of increased reworking: (Yaman-Kasy longrightarrow Molodezhnoe longrightarrow Alexandrinskoe longrightarrow Balta-Tau) have been ranged. The influence of sulphide mound destruction and of sea-floor alteration on mineral assemblages was investigated In the pristine Yaman-Kasy sulphide mound gold and silver occur as altaite+tellurium+hessite-stuetzite+sylvanite and later galena+native gold+pyrite assemblages in chalcopyrite+isocubanite-rich linings of former chimney conduits. Chalcopyrite-dominated conduit fragments in clastic ore facies contain native tellurium+gold intergrowths. In the weakly reworked Molodezhnoe deposit gold-silver assemblages only occur in sea-floor altered clastic sulphides on the slope of massive sulphide mounds in bornite- and tennantite-rich ores in association with Cu-Ag sulfides such as jalpaite, mckinstryite, and stromeyerite and rare Au-Ag-tellurides (petzite). The Alexandrinskoe deposit is dominated by clastic ores and here native gold and rare hessite occur together with galena in tennantite-sphalerite-dominated veins of the footwall as well as in drusy sphalerite forming conduits of vent chimneys. An assemblage of electrum+galena+tennantite was observed in secondary chalcopyrite in the outer walls of chimneys. Native gold+stromeyerite are common in bornite-rich clastic sulphides while an assemblage of Ag-sulphosalts+electrum is common in barite-rich ores. In the reworked Balta-Tau deposit Ag-sulphosalts+electrum-kustelite occur often together with tennantite+galena+barite banded ores. Gold-silver-telluride mineralisation in these VMS deposits changes with degree of reworking from Au-tellurides, and native gold+galena+pyrite in pristine sulphide mounds to

  2. The Effects of Sub-Regional Climate Velocity on the Distribution and Spatial Extent of Marine Species Assemblages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Kleisner

    Full Text Available Many studies illustrate variable patterns in individual species distribution shifts in response to changing temperature. However, an assemblage, a group of species that shares a common environmental niche, will likely exhibit similar responses to climate changes, and these community-level responses may have significant implications for ecosystem function. Therefore, we examine the relationship between observed shifts of species in assemblages and regional climate velocity (i.e., the rate and direction of change of temperature isotherms. The assemblages are defined in two sub-regions of the U.S. Northeast Shelf that have heterogeneous oceanography and bathymetry using four decades of bottom trawl survey data and we explore temporal changes in distribution, spatial range extent, thermal habitat area, and biomass, within assemblages. These sub-regional analyses allow the dissection of the relative roles of regional climate velocity and local physiography in shaping observed distribution shifts. We find that assemblages of species associated with shallower, warmer waters tend to shift west-southwest and to shallower waters over time, possibly towards cooler temperatures in the semi-enclosed Gulf of Maine, while species assemblages associated with relatively cooler and deeper waters shift deeper, but with little latitudinal change. Conversely, species assemblages associated with warmer and shallower water on the broad, shallow continental shelf from the Mid-Atlantic Bight to Georges Bank shift strongly northeast along latitudinal gradients with little change in depth. Shifts in depth among the southern species associated with deeper and cooler waters are more variable, although predominantly shifts are toward deeper waters. In addition, spatial expansion and contraction of species assemblages in each region corresponds to the area of suitable thermal habitat, but is inversely related to assemblage biomass. This suggests that assemblage distribution

  3. Discovery of the messaoudensis–trifidum acritarch assemblage (upper Tremadocian–lower Floian, Lower Ordovician in the subsurface of Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Nowak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The upper Tremadocian to lower Floian messaoudensis–trifidum acritarch assemblage was first described from the Skiddaw Group of England and subsequently from several localities on the Gondwanan margin that were positioned in high southern latitudes during the Early Ordovician. It is here reported for the first time from North Africa, from the Fezouata formations (Tremadocian to Floian in the AZ-1 borehole, southeastern Morocco. The assemblage is comparable with that from the Skiddaw Group, with Cymatiogalea deunffii, C. messaoudensis, C. velifera, Caldariola glabra glabra, Stelliferidium trifidum and Veryhachium lairdii s.l. The Moroccan assemblage indicates a late Tremadocian age.

  4. Fidelity of rocky intertidal mollusks in subtidal death assemblages to their counterpart life assemblages: a case study in San Salvador Island, Bahamas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Diego A.

    2016-04-01

    Rocky shores preserved in the geological record were rarely reported until a couple of decades ago. Even today, most of the literature focuses on bioerosional features in these high-energy environments due to their higher fossilization potential relative to shell material. Hard parts of taxa adapted to intertidal rocky shores may be preserved as allochthonous material in death assemblages (DAs) formed in adjacent shallow subtidal habitats due to lateral mixing. To test if life assemblages (LAs) of rocky intertidal mollusks (RIM) are faithfully recorded in shallow subtidal DAs, two ~30 m long transects across a proximal-distal gradient were studied on San Salvador Island, Bahamas. These transects encompass a proximal ripple field which grades into a facies dominated by green algae, and a distal ripple field. A total of 22 bulk samples, representing 155 liters of sediment, were wet-sieved with a 2-mm mesh. The samples yielded 528 RIM shells representing 15 species. Unexpectedly, abundance and compositional similarity of RIM shells to counterpart LAs sharply peaks along a belt of lag deposits of coarse sands fringing proximal ripple fields, in transition to green algae communities. These results suggest that, although a substantial transport of intertidal shells takes place in shallow subtidal environments, the signal is diluted in background sediment composition even in close proximity to the shore (30 m), and significant concentrations (loosely packed) of RIM shells in subtidal DAs might be used as a proxy to pinpoint past rocky intertidal environments.

  5. CLAY MINERAL ASSEMBLAGES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS IN SHIHEZI FORMATION FROM THE HUAIBEI COAL-BEARING STRATA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄文辉; 许光泉; 刑军

    1998-01-01

    Clay mineral assemblages in Shihezi Formation of Huaibei coal-bearing strata are determined by X-ray diffraction and Differential Thermal Analyzer, that is restated to the sedimentfaces and climatic changes in the source area, and to a lesser extent, alterations during burial diagenesis. In the Upper Shihezi Formation, the clay fraction is dominated by kaolinite in norther npart of the coal field, which was formed in alluvial sediment environment. But in the South ofHuaibei coal field, the clay mineral assemblage consists of mainly illite that reflects the influenceof sea water. The predominately kaolinite and sederite composition of the clay fraction in the lower Shihezi Formation sediments documents less relief and gentle erosion of kaolinite rich soils developing under warm source area. In the lower part of Shihezi Formation, some chlorite is detected, which suggests transformation of illite or kaolinite to chlorite under conditions of burial diagenesis.

  6. Effects of hydrocarbon pollution in the structure of macrobenthic assemblages from two large estuaries in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Manuela Zeglin; Sandrini-Neto, Leonardo; Carreira, Renato S; Camargo, Maurício G

    2017-08-05

    Changes in the structure of benthic macrofauna and its relationship with hydrocarbon contamination were determined at different spatial scales in sublittoral sediments of two large estuaries in Brazil. Guanabara Bay (GB) is a heavily polluted estuary due to the presence of a large industrial complex and high demographic density. Laranjeiras Bay (LB) lies in an Environmental Protection Area and can still be considered as preserved from human activities. Despite some spatial differences within each bay, the PAHs concentrations were significantly and consistently higher in GB, with values generally above the threshold effect levels. No signs of hydrocarbon contamination were observed in LB. Macrofauna abundance, diversity and overall assemblage structure were largely different between bays. Canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP), used to model the relationship between macrofauna and PAHs levels, indicated that this class of hydrocarbons is the main structuring factor of soft-bottom assemblages in both bays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Current status and multidecadal biogeographical changes in rocky intertidal algal assemblages: The northern Spanish coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, C.

    2016-03-01

    The biogeographic border between the Eastern and the Atlantic subregions of the Lusitanian Province situated on the west coast of Asturias (N. of Spain) has moved westwards in recent years. A comparative study, consisting in a resurvey of 20 shores sampled in 1977, covering 200 km showed a large-scale change affecting the mid and low eulittoral. Cold-temperate canopy species such as kelps (Laminaria hyperborea, Laminaria. ochroleuca and Saccorhiza polyschides), fucoids (Fucus serratus, Fucus vesiculosus and Himanthalia elongata) and Chondrus crispus have almost disappeared and replaced by warm-temperate species such as Cystoseira baccata, Cystoseira tamariscifolia, Bifurcaria bifurcata and coralline algae (Ellisolandia elongata, Lithophyllum incrustans and Mesophyllum lichenoides). The loss of canopy-species can have consequences for the assemblage, especially in the case of fucoid-dominated assemblages.

  8. Initial stresses in two-layer metal domes due to imperfections of their production and assemblage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebed Evgeniy Vasil’evich

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The process of construction of two-layer metal domes is analyzed to illustrate the causes of initial stresses in the bars of their frames. It has been noticed that it is impossible to build such structures with ideal geometric parameters because of imperfections caused by objective reasons. These imperfections cause difficulties in the process of connection of the elements in the joints. The paper demonstrates the necessity of fitting operations during assemblage that involve force fitting and yield initial stresses due to imperfections. The authors propose a special method of computer modeling of enforced elimination of possible imperfections caused by assemblage process and further confirm the method by an analysis of a concrete metal dome.

  9. Comparison of fish assemblages in two littoral habitats in a Neotropical morichal stream in Venezuela

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    Carmen G. Montaña

    Full Text Available Morichales are lowland streams in South American savannas with riparian forest dominated by the moriche palm (Mauritia flexuosa. We sampled littoral habitats from ten flooded vegetated patches (dominated by Mauritiella aculeate and six sand banks in two months of the dry season (Feb-Mar 2005 in a stream in the savannas of Apure State, Venezuela. We collected samples that compromised 12,407 individual fishes of 107 species. Small-bodied fishes (< 100 mm, representing diverse trophic and life history strategies, were abundant. The most abundant species were in the families Characidae and Cichlidae. Fish assemblages from flooded vegetated patches differed significantly from those on adjacent sand banks. High structural complexity along vegetated shoreline habitats of morichal streams likely contributes to species richness and affects assemblage composition.

  10. Temporal variation in the organization of a Neotropical assemblage of leaf-nosed bats (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro Mello, Marco Aurelio

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, I described the organization of a Neotropical bat assemblage, and tested whether this organization was variable in time. In an Atlantic Forest reserve in southeastern Brazil bats were captured monthly with mist nets over 4 years, and individuals were classified into guilds. I analyzed only leaf-nosed bats, and observed that guilds of fruit-eating bats dominated the assemblage. This pattern was repeated across months and years. However, among frugivores, canopy and understory guilds peaked during different months, but in both cases during the rainy season, while variation among habitat-opportunistic species was not explained by rainfall. The most reliable ecological service delivered by phyllostomid bats in the area is seed dispersal, although other services may be also important in particular seasons. My results suggest that the observed patterns of temporal species turnover are related to the abundance of preferred food items.

  11. Shifts in coral-assemblage composition do not ensure persistence of reef functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Filip, Lorenzo; Carricart-Ganivet, Juan P; Horta-Puga, Guillermo; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto

    2013-12-12

    Coral communities are changing rapidly worldwide through loss of coral cover and shifts in species composition. Although many reef-building corals are likely to decline, some weedy opportunistic species might increase in abundance. Here we explore whether the reshuffling of species can maintain ecosystem integrity and functioning. Using four common Caribbean reef-building coral genera we modeled rates of reef construction and complexity. We show that shifting coral assemblages result in rapid losses in coral-community calcification and reef rugosity that are independent of changes in the total abundance of reef corals. These losses are considerably higher than those recently attributed to climate change. Dominance patterns of coral assemblages seem to be the most important driver of the functioning of coral reefs and thus, the future of these ecosystems might depend not only on reductions of local and global stressors, but also on the maintenance of keystone coral species.

  12. Comparison of Terrestrial Isopod (Isopoda, Oniscidea Assemblages from Two Types of Forests from North Western Romania

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    Sára Ferenţi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2008 we compared the terrestrial isopod assemblages from two different habitats, a beech forest and a mixed beech and spruce forest, from north western Romania (Huta Certeze locality. The samples were taken from April to September using pitfall traps. We identified a total of 7 species: Ligidium germanicum, Trichoniscus sp., Hyloniscus transsilvanicus, Protracheoniscus politus, Porcellium collicola, Trachelipus difficilis and Porcellio scaber. A greater diversity and species richness were noticed in the beech forest. The poverty of species in the mixed forest was a consequence of the forest type, the anthropogenic impact and the dry environment. High surface activity of individuals was noticed in the summer months. Even if the species compositions of the two compared isopod assemblages were not identical, there weren’t statistically significant differences between them.

  13. Assemblages of Southeast-South Brazilian Coastal Systems Based on the Distribution of Fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, F. G.; Costa de Azevedo, M. C.

    2001-06-01

    Multivariate principal components analysis and cluster analysis were performed on data representing presence or absence of 498 species of juvenile and adult fish species in twenty-four coastal marine systems (bays, coastal lagoons, estuaries and coastal zones) distributed from southeast to southern Brazil. Five groups of coastal systems were identified based on fish assemblage similarity: estuaries and bays of the southeast area; an estuary of the southern area; coastal lagoons; rocky coastal zones; and the continental platform. Species assemblages for each zone were identified and used as surrogate habitat indicators to compare and contrast the groups. Stepwise multiple regression of environmental and physical variables as predictors of the number of species indicated that only ' area ' was included in the model as the most important variable explaining the variation of the number of species in these data sets. The total number of fish species increased as surface area increased.

  14. Burrow casts from the Lystrosaurus-Procolophon Assemblage-zone, Karoo Sequence, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.H. Groenewald

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available Five types of burrow casts from the Lystrosaurus- Procolophon Assemblage-zone (Palingkloof Member and Katberg Formation, Triassic, Karoo sequence. South Africa are associated with casts of desiccation cracks and red mudstone. Vertebrate remains of Lystrosaurus sp. and Procolophon sp. indicate that these animals probably made the burrows during the Triassic. It is possible that burrowing was an adaptive advantage during periods of severe and unfavourable climatic conditions. Similar burrow casts were found in the Dicynodon-Theriognathus Assemblage-zone, suggesting a burrowing habit for fauna represented in this zone. In structure, the burrow casts resemble those of Scoyenia, Thalassinoides, Histioderma, Gyrolithes and Planolites reported from Germany, France, Asia, Ireland, Spain and the United States of America.

  15. Living and dead benthic foraminiferal assemblages from bathyal environment in the Pontine Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, Letizia; Frezza, Virgilio; Ingrassia, Michela; Latino Chiocci, Francesco; Martorelli, Eleonora

    2016-04-01

    The western Pontine Archipelago (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy), located about 30 km away from the Italian Peninsula, is composed of three volcanic islands (Ponza, Palmarola and Zannone). Sedimentological and micropaleontological characterization of the infralittoral and circalittoral zones in the Pontine Archipelago was already been studied, whereas it is lacking for deeper environments. The present study shows the preliminary micropaleontological results carried out on samples collected in the bathyal zone (at 500 mwd) in the Ventotene basin. Sediment samples, high resolution multibeam bathymetry, biological and video data were acquired in order to characterise both the morphological and biological features of study area, during the research cruise "BOLLE 2014" carried out on June 2014 aboard to the R/V Urania. Sediment samples were collected with a multi-corer, that allowed sampling of the upper decimetre of the sediments column. Successively, each core was sliced horizontally every 1 cm from the top to the bottom. For micropaleontological analyses, all samples were stained with Rose Bengal to distinguish living and dead assemblages. For each interval of the core all living specimens and 200 dead benthic foraminifera were classified and counted. Diversity index (α-Fisher, Shannon indices) and Faunal Density (specimens/gr) were calculated to define the structure of the assemblage. A variable number of living benthic foraminifera (Rose Bengal-stained) were found in all core-intervals (7-155 tests), with the Faunal Density ranging from 3 to 82 specimens/gr. A total of 77 species are recognised from living benthic foraminiferal assemblages, with a range of 4-31 species found in each core-interval. The α-Fisher index ranges between 3.88 and 43.45, whereas Shannon index shows a more limited variability (1.28-2.92). Among the living foraminifera, calcareous imperforate tests are very abundant, with percentages ranging between 33.3 and 100%; perforate species are subordinate

  16. New Materials of the Shanita-Hemigordius Assemblage (Permian Foraminifers) from the Baoshan Block, Western Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiangning; JIN Xiaochi; JI Zhansheng; WANG Yizhao; YAO Jianxin; YANG Hailin

    2004-01-01

    Fossil materials of Shanita and Hemigordius from a section northeast of the Woniusi (the Woniu Temple) of Baoshan, western Yunnan are described and figured in this paper. Field investigation indicates that fossils of these two foraminifer genera are extremely abundant and form a typical Shanita-Hemigordius assemblage in the so-called "Cracked Limestone" in the Baoshan area. Preliminary study has revealed that the features of this assemblage, which includes Shanita amosi, S. chagouensis, Hemigordius renzi and H. biconcavus, are similar not only to the Shanita fauna previously reported from the Shazipo Formation in the Zhengkang area, west Yunnan, but also to those from the Permian of Burma,Thailand, Iran and Turkey.

  17. Optimal Three-Material Wheel Assemblage of Conducting and Elastic Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Cherkaev, Andrej

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new type of three material microstructures which we call wheel assemblages, that correspond to extremal conductivity and extremal bulk modulus for a composite made of two materials and an ideal material. The exact lower bounds for effective conductivity and matching laminates was found in (Cherkaev, 2009) and for anisotropic composites, in (Cherkaev, Zhang, 2011). Here, we show different optimal structures that generalize the classical Hashin-Shtrikman coated spheres (circles). They consist of circular inclusions which contain a solid central circle (hub) and radial spikes in a surrounding annulus, and (for larger volume fractions of the best material) an annulus filled with it. The same wheel assemblages are optimal for the pair of dual problems of minimal conductivity (resistivity) of a composite made from two materials and an ideal conductor (insulator), in the problem of maximal effective bulk modulus of elastic composites made from two linear elastic material and void, and the dual minimum ...

  18. A fragile assemblage: Mutant bird flu and the limits of risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoff, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    This paper examines the recent public controversy sparked by the laboratory creation of a strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza transmissible among mammals. The contours of the controversy can be understood by tracking the assemblage of actors, institutions and devices gathered together in response to the governmental problem of how to manage emerging diseases. The grouping is tenuously held together by a shared commitment to the project of 'pandemic preparedness'. However, as the controversy unfolds, it becomes clear that the main actors involved do not share a common understanding of the problem to be addressed by pandemic preparedness, and the assemblage threatens to decompose. At the center of the dispute is the question of how to assess the risks and benefits of research in a field characterized by urgency and uncertainty.

  19. Distribution of heavy metals and foraminiferal assemblages in sediments of Biscayne Bay, Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnahan, E.A.; Hoare, A.M.; Hallock, P.; Lidz, B.H.; Reich, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy-metal pollution is an issue of concern in estuaries influenced by agriculture, urban, and harbor activities. Foraminiferal assemblages have been shown to be effective indicators of pollution. Sediment samples (n = 110) from Biscayne Bay were analyzed for heavy metals, foraminiferal assemblages, and grain-size distribution. Highest Cu, Zn, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Ni concentrations were found closest to Miami and near the mouths of several canals along the western margin of the bay. Few samples exceeded limits of possible biological effects as defined by previous studies. Ammonia and Cribroelphidium, two known stress-tolerant genera, correlated positively with Cu, Zn, Hg, and Ni (r ??? 0.43). Symbiont-bearing foraminifers, Archaias, Laevipeneroplis, and Androsina, correlated negatively with Cu, Zn, Hg, and Ni (r ??? -0.26).

  20. Upper Arenigian to lower Llanvirnian acritarch assemblages from South China: a preliminary evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocke, R; Li, J; Wang, Y

    2000-12-01

    Acritarchs from the interval corresponding to the late Arenigian and early Llanvirnian in British stratigraphy have rarely been described from China, and they are documented herein for the first time. A biostratigraphic correlation of certain acritarch taxa with the Undulograptus austrodentatus graptolite Biozone, which constitutes the base of the Darriwilian Stage, is still premature for China and elsewhere. According to recent studies on different sections from South China, it appears that at least four distinctive species (Ampullula suetica, Dicrodiacrodium ancoriforme, Hoegklintia rayii nov. comb., Liliosphaeridium intermedium) may characterize an interval that corresponds to levels just below or within the Darriwilian Stage. In this context, the acritarch assemblages of the lower to upper Arenigian and of the lower Llanvirnian sequences from different localities of the Yangtze Platform are described. Four acritarch assemblages are distinguished for this time interval and their possible correlations with other areas are discussed.

  1. Compositional changes in spider (Araneae) assemblages along an urbanisation gradient near a Danish town

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horváth, R.; Elek, Zoltán; Lövei, Gabor L

    2014-01-01

    Spider (Araneae) assemblages were studied over two years by pitfall trapping along an urbanisation gradient of forested habitats (rural forest - suburban forest fragment - urban forest fragment) in a Danish town, using the Globenet protocol. During the two years, we collected 4340 individuals of 90...... species, with money spiders (Linyphiidae) and wolf spiders (Lycosidae) being most numerous. One species, Ero aphana, was new to the Danish fauna. In 2004, 45-47 species were captured in the habitats in various stages of urbanisation, while in 2005 (with a smaller collection effort), 28 (urban) - 37 (rural......) species were captured. Twenty-five percent of the collected species occurred in all habitats, but about half of them were only collected in one of the urbanisation stages. The number of shared species was the highest between the suburban and urban habitats. The highest similarities between assemblages...

  2. Fidelity of life and death molluscan assemblages from carbonate tidal flats in the Persian (Arabian) Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Diego A.; Albano, Paolo G.; Harzhauser, Mathias; Piller, Werner E.; Zuschin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Live-dead (LD) studies aim to help understand how faithfully fossil assemblages can be used to quantitatively infer the structure of the original living communities that generated them. To this purpose, LD comparisons have been conducted in different terrestrial and aquatic environments to assess how environment-specific differences in quality and intensity of taphonomic factors affect LD fidelity. In sub-tropical and tropical settings, most LD studies have focused on hard substrates or seagrass bottoms. Here we present results on molluscan assemblages from soft carbonate sediments in tidal flats of the Persian (Arabian) Gulf (Indo-West Pacific biogeographic province). We analyzed a total of 7193 mollusks collected from six sites comprising time-averaged death assemblages (DAs) and snapshot living assemblages (LAs). All analyses were performed at site and at habitat scales after correcting for sample-size differences. We found a good match in proportional abundance and a notable mismatch in species composition. In fact, species richness in DAs is 6 times larger than in LAs at site scale, and 4 times at habitat scale. Additionally, we found a good fidelity of evenness, and rank abundance of feeding guilds. Other studies have shown that molluscan DAs from subtidal carbonate environments can display lower time-averaging than those from siliciclastic environments due to high rates of shell loss to bioerosion and dissolution. For our case study of tidal flat carbonate settings, we interpret that despite temporal autocorrelation (good fidelity of proportional abundance), substantial differences in species richness and composition can be explained by early cementation, lateral mixing, intense bioturbation and moderate sedimentation rates. Our results suggest that tidal flat carbonate environments can potentially lead to a wider window of time-averaging in comparison with subtidal carbonate settings.

  3. Termite assemblages, forest disturbance and greenhouse gas fluxes in Sabah, East Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleton, P; Homathevi, R; Jones, D T; MacDonald, J A; Jeeva, D; Bignell, D E; Davies, R G; Maryati, M

    1999-11-29

    A synthesis is presented of sampling work conducted under a UK government-funded Darwin Initiative grant undertaken predominantly within the Danum Valley Conservation Area (DVCA), Sabah, East Malaysia. The project concerned the assemblage structure, gas physiology and landscape gas fluxes of termites in pristine and two ages of secondary, dipterocarp forest. The DVCA termite fauna is typical of the Sunda region, dominated by Termes-group soil-feeders and Nasutitermitinae. Selective logging appears to have relatively little effect on termite assemblages, although soil-feeding termites may be moderately affected by this level of disturbance. Species composition changes, but to a small extent when considered against the background level of compositional differences within the Sunda region. Physiologically the assemblage is very like others that have been studied, although there are some species that do not fit on the expected body size-metabolic rate curve. As elsewhere, soil-feeders and soil-wood interface-feeders tend to produce more methane. As with the termite assemblage characteristics, gross gas and energy fluxes do not differ significantly between logged and unlogged sites. Although gross methane fluxes are high, all the soils at DVCA were methane sinks, suggesting that methane oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria was a more important process than methane production by gut archaea. This implies that methane production by termites in South-East Asia is not contributing significantly to the observed increase in levels of methane production worldwide. Biomass density, species richness, clade complement and energy flow were much lower at DVCA than at a directly comparable site in southern Cameroon. This is probably due to the different biogeographical histories of the areas.

  4. Early Jurassic foraminiferal assemblages in platform carbonates of Mt. Krim, central Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Gale

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available During the Early Jurassic, the subtropical carbonate platforms of the peri-Tethys Ocean experienced signifiant changes in their architectures, as well as in their biota compositions. Shallow-water carbonates from the northern part of the ancient Adriatic Carbonate Platform (External Dinarides were investigated in six sections, which taken together cover the development of the platform from deposition of the uppermost Triassic Main Dolomite to the middle Lower Jurassic, lithiotid limestone. Our aim was to establish a detailed foraminiferal biostratigraphy and to observe the changes in size, abundance and diversity of foraminifera in different types of facies. As a result, the succession was successfully divided into stage or substage levels. Foraminiferal assemblages were shown to experience a gradual change in taxonomic composition (including an increase in the proportion of complex agglutinated forms, a general increase in abundance of specimens, and greater diversity in each facies type, except in bindstone and mudstone. Notable is the difference between Hettangian assemblages, which display fairly uniform compositions in all facies types and the predominance of opportunists, and the post-Hettangian assemblages, which become progressively more species-rich and where the differences in facies are perhaps more pronounced. Changes in the size of the species Meandrovoluta asiagoensis Fugagnoli & Rettori, and of the largest specimen in the assemblages, however, are less clear, but are arguably present. Faunal changes roughly correspond to the gradual change from the flt-top platform of the upper Triassic – Hettangian, where biota would be repeatedly subjected to stressed peritidal conditions, to a platform differentiated into lagoon, sand bars and ephemeral emergent areas, offering numerous habitats and perhaps more stable living conditions for organisms.

  5. Habitat contrasts reveal a shift in the trophic position of ant assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Heloise; Cunningham, Saul A

    2011-01-01

    1. Trophic structure within a guild can be influenced by factors such as resource availability and competition. While ants occupy a wide range of positions in food webs, and ant community composition changes with habitat, it is not well understood if ant genera tend to maintain their position in the trophic structure, or if trophic position varies across habitats. 2. We used ratios of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen to test for differences in the trophic structure and position of assemblages of ants among habitat types. We tested for differences between assemblages in replicate sites of the land use categories: (i) pastures with old large trees; (ii) recently revegetated pastures with small young trees; and (iii) remnant woodlands. Known insect herbivores and predatory spiders provided baselines for herbivorous and predaceous arthropods. Soil samples were used to correct for the base level of isotopic enrichment at each site. 3. We found no significant interactions between land use and ant genus for isotope enrichment, indicating that trophic structure is conserved across land use categories. The fixed relative positions of genera in the trophic structure might be re-enforced by competition or some other factor. However, the entire ant assemblage had significantly lower δ(15) N values in revegetated sites, suggesting that ants feed lower down in the food chain i.e. they are more 'herbivorous' in revegetated sites. This may be a result of the high availability of plant sugars, honeydew and herbivorous arthropod prey. 4. Surprisingly, ants in remnants and pastures with trees displayed similar isotopic compositions. Interactions within ant assemblages are thus likely to be resilient to changes in land use, but ant diets in early successional habitats may reflect the simplicity of communities, which may have comparatively lower rates of saprophagy and predation.

  6. Are assemblages of the fireworm Hermodice carunculata enhanced in sediments beneath offshore fish cages?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rodrigo Riera; Oscar Prez; Myriam Rodrguez; Eva Ramos; scar Monterroso

    2014-01-01

    Abundances of the fireworm Hermodice carunculata were counted through a monitoring assessment study of fish cages in Barranco Hondo (NE Tenerife). Seven campaigns were conducted from November 2007 to June 2010 and temporal variations were found, as well as differences among sampling stations. The poly-chaete H. carunculata obtained its highest abundance in sediments beneath fish cages throughout the study period. Thus, the assemblages of this omnivorous species were favoured by the presence of fish cages.

  7. Effects of CO2 Hydrate on Deep-Sea Foraminiferal Assemblages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricketts, E R; Kennett, J P; Hill, T M; Barry, J P

    2005-06-01

    THE EFFECTS OF CO2 HYDRATE ON DEEP-SEA FORAMINIFERAL ASSEMBLAGES E. R. Ricketts*, J. P. Kennett and T. M. Hill Department of Geological Sciences University of California, Santa Barbara, CA USA Jim Barry Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute Moss Landing, CA USA ABSTRACT This study, conducted with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), is the first to investigate potential effects of CO2 hydrates on benthic microfossils, specifically foraminifera. The experiment was conducted in September 2003 aboard the R/V Western Flier using the ROV Tiburon. Experimental (CO2 exposed) and control cores were collected at 3600m and stained to distinguish live (stained) from dead (unstained) individuals. Foraminifera are ideal because of differing test composition (calcareous and agglutinated) and thickness, and diverse epifaunal and infaunal depth preferences. The effects of the CO2 on assemblages have been tracked both vertically (10cm depth) and horizontally, and between live and dead individuals. Increased mortality and dissolution of calcareous forms resulted from exposure to CO2 hydrate. Preliminary results suggest several major effects on surface sediment assemblages: 1) total number of foraminifera in a sample decreases; 2) foraminiferal diversity decreases in both stained and unstained specimens. The number of planktonic and hyaline calcareous tests declines greatly, with milliolids being more resistant to dissolution when stained; and 3) percentage of stained (live) forms is higher. Down-core trends (up to 10cm) indicate: 1) percent agglutinated forms decline and calcareous forms increasingly dominate; 2) agglutinated diversity decreases with depth; and 3) assemblages become increasingly similar with depth to those in control cores not subjected to CO2 hydrate. These results imply almost complete initial mortality and dissolution upon CO2 hydrate emplacement.

  8. Viral infections stimulate the metabolism and shape prokaryotic assemblages in submarine mud volcanoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Danovaro, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    Mud volcanoes are geological structures in the oceans that have key roles in the functioning of the global ecosystem. Information on the dynamics of benthic viruses and their interactions with prokaryotes in mud volcano ecosystems is still completely lacking. We investigated the impact of viral infection on the mortality and assemblage structure of benthic prokaryotes of five mud volcanoes in the Mediterranean Sea. Mud volcano sediments promote high rates of viral production (1.65-7.89 × 10(9) viruses g(-1) d(-1)), viral-induced prokaryotic mortality (VIPM) (33% cells killed per day) and heterotrophic prokaryotic production (3.0-8.3 μgC g(-1) d(-1)) when compared with sediments outside the mud volcano area. The viral shunt (that is, the microbial biomass converted into dissolved organic matter as a result of viral infection, and thus diverted away from higher trophic levels) provides 49 mgC m(-2) d(-1), thus fuelling the metabolism of uninfected prokaryotes and contributing to the total C budget. Bacteria are the dominant components of prokaryotic assemblages in surface sediments of mud volcanoes, whereas archaea dominate the subsurface sediment layers. Multivariate multiple regression analyses show that prokaryotic assemblage composition is not only dependant on the geochemical features and processes of mud volcano ecosystems but also on synergistic interactions between bottom-up (that is, trophic resources) and top-down (that is, VIPM) controlling factors. Overall, these findings highlight the significant role of the viral shunt in sustaining the metabolism of prokaryotes and shaping their assemblage structure in mud volcano sediments, and they provide new clues for our understanding of the functioning of cold-seep ecosystems.

  9. Ecological shifts in Mediterranean coralligenous assemblages related to gorgonian forest loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Ponti

    Full Text Available Mediterranean gorgonian forests are threatened by several human activities and are affected by climatic anomalies that have led to mass mortality events in recent decades. The ecological role of these habitats and the possible consequence of their loss are poorly understood. Effects of gorgonians on the recruitment of epibenthic organisms were investigated by manipulating presence of gorgonians on experimental panels at 24 m depth, for Eunicella cavolinii, and at 40 m depth, for Paramuricea clavata, at two sites: Tavolara Island (Tyrrhenian Sea and Portofino Promontory (Ligurian Sea. After 4 months, the most abundant taxa on the panels were encrusting green algae, erect red algae and crustose coralline algae at 24 m depth and encrusting brown algae and erect red algae at 40 m depth. Assemblages on the panels were significantly affected by the presence of the gorgonians, although effects varied across sites and between gorgonian species. Species diversity and evenness were lower on panels with gorgonian branches. Growth of erect algae and recruitment of serpulid polychaetes were also affected by the presence of the gorgonians, primarily at Tavolara. Crustose coralline algae and erect sponges were more abundant on E. cavolinii panels at 24 m depth, while encrusting bryozoans were more abundant on P. clavata panels at 40 m depth. Effects of gorgonians on recruited assemblages could be due to microscale modification of hydrodynamics and sediment deposition rate, or by a shading effect reducing light intensity. Gorgonians may also intercept settling propagules, compete for food with the filter-feeders and/or for space by producing allelochemicals. Presence of gorgonians mainly limits the growth of erect algae and enhances the abundance of encrusting algae and sessile invertebrates. Therefore, the gorgonian disappearances may cause a shift from assemblages characterised by crustose coralline algae to filamentous algae assemblages, decreasing

  10. Soil nematode assemblages as bioindicators of radiation impact in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte-Pradines, C; Bonzom, J-M; Della-Vedova, C; Beaugelin-Seiller, K; Villenave, C; Gaschak, S; Coppin, F; Dubourg, N; Maksimenko, A; Adam-Guillermin, C; Garnier-Laplace, J

    2014-08-15

    In radioecology, the need to understand the long-term ecological effects of radioactive contamination has been emphasised. This requires that the health of field populations is evaluated and linked to an accurate estimate of received radiological dose. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of current radioactive contamination on nematode assemblages at sites affected by the fallout from the Chernobyl accident. First, we estimated the total dose rates (TDRs) absorbed by nematodes, from measured current soil activity concentrations, Dose Conversion Coefficients (DCCs, calculated using EDEN software) and soil-to-biota concentration ratios (from the ERICA tool database). The impact of current TDRs on nematode assemblages was then evaluated. Nematodes were collected in spring 2011 from 18 forest sites in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (CEZ) with external gamma dose rates, measured using radiophotoluminescent dosimeters, varying from 0.2 to 22 μGy h(-1). These values were one order of magnitude below the TDRs. A majority of bacterial-, plant-, and fungal-feeding nematodes and very few of the disturbance sensitive families were identified. No statistically significant association was observed between TDR values and nematode total abundance or the Shannon diversity index (H'). The Nematode Channel Ratio (which defines the relative abundance of bacterial- versus fungal-feeding nematodes) decreased significantly with increasing TDR, suggesting that radioactive contamination may influence nematode assemblages either directly or indirectly by modifying their food resources. A greater Maturity Index (MI), usually characterising better soil quality, was associated with higher pH and TDR values. These results suggest that in the CEZ, nematode assemblages from the forest sites were slightly impacted by chronic exposure at a predicted TDR of 200 μGy h(-1). This may be imputable to a dominant proportion of pollutant resistant nematodes in all sites. This might

  11. Human impacts on functional and taxonomic homogenization of plateau fish assemblages in Yunnan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohuan Su

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Human activities and the consequent extinctions of native species and invasions of non-native species have been changing the composition of species assemblages worldwide. These anthropogenic impacts alter not only the richness of assemblages but also the biological dissimilarity among them. However, much of the research effort to date has focused on changes in taxonomic dissimilarity (i.e. accounting for species composition whether assessments of functional dissimilarity (i.e. accounting for the diversity of biological traits are much more scarce, despite revealing important complimentary information by accounting for changes in the diversity of biological traits. Here, we assess the temporal (1950s against 2000s changes in both taxonomic and functional dissimilarities of freshwater fish assemblages across lakes from the Yunnan Plateau in China. The Jaccard index to quantify the changes in both taxonomic and functional dissimilarity. We then partitioned dissimilarity to extract its turnover component and measured the changes in the contribution of turnover to dissimilarity. We found that functional and taxonomic homogenization occurred simultaneously. However, patterns between these two processes differed for some lakes. Taxonomic and functional homogenizations were stronger when the historical level of taxonomic dissimilarity among assemblages was high. The impact of extinctions of native species and invasions of non-native species on homogenization was otherwise complex to disentangle with no significant effect of any of the studied environmental factors. In agreement with other studies, our study proved that change in taxonomic dissimilarity cannot be used to predict changes in functional dissimilarity and, as an indicator of ecosystem functioning, functional dissimilarity should be used together with taxonomic dissimilarity to attain a more holistic understanding of human impacts on natural ecosystems.

  12. Markedly Divergent Tree Assemblage Responses to Tropical Forest Loss and Fragmentation across a Strong Seasonality Gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo L L Orihuela

    Full Text Available We examine the effects of forest fragmentation on the structure and composition of tree assemblages within three seasonal and aseasonal forest types of southern Brazil, including evergreen, Araucaria, and deciduous forests. We sampled three southernmost Atlantic Forest landscapes, including the largest continuous forest protected areas within each forest type. Tree assemblages in each forest type were sampled within 10 plots of 0.1 ha in both continuous forests and 10 adjacent forest fragments. All trees within each plot were assigned to trait categories describing their regeneration strategy, vertical stratification, seed-dispersal mode, seed size, and wood density. We detected differences among both forest types and landscape contexts in terms of overall tree species richness, and the density and species richness of different functional groups in terms of regeneration strategy, seed dispersal mode and woody density. Overall, evergreen forest fragments exhibited the largest deviations from continuous forest plots in assemblage structure. Evergreen, Araucaria and deciduous forests diverge in the functional composition of tree floras, particularly in relation to regeneration strategy and stress tolerance. By supporting a more diversified light-demanding and stress-tolerant flora with reduced richness and abundance of shade-tolerant, old-growth species, both deciduous and Araucaria forest tree assemblages are more intrinsically resilient to contemporary human-disturbances, including fragmentation-induced edge effects, in terms of species erosion and functional shifts. We suggest that these intrinsic differences in the direction and magnitude of responses to changes in landscape structure between forest types should guide a wide range of conservation strategies in restoring fragmented tropical forest landscapes worldwide.

  13. Exotic birds increase generalization and compensate for native bird decline in plant-frugivore assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Daniel; Martínez, Daniel; Stouffer, Daniel B; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2014-11-01

    Exotic species are thought to alter the structure of natural communities and disrupt ecosystem functioning through invasion. Nevertheless, exotic species may also provide ecological insurance when they contribute to maintain ecosystem functions after the decline of native species following anthropogenic disturbance. Here, this hypothesis is tested with the assemblage of frugivorous birds and fleshy-fruited plants of New Zealand, which has suffered strong historical declines in native birds while simultaneously gaining new frugivores introduced by European settlers. We studied the plant-frugivore assemblage from measures of fruit and bird abundances and fruit consumption in nine forest patches, and tested how this changed across a gradient of relative abundance of exotic birds. We then examined how each bird species' role in the assemblage (the proportion of fruits and the number of plant species consumed) varied with their relative abundance, body size and native/exotic status. The more abundant and, to a lesser extent, larger birds species consumed a higher proportion of fruits from more plant species. Exotic birds consumed fruits less selectively and more proportionate to the local availability than did native species. Interaction networks in which exotic birds had a stronger role as frugivores had higher generalization, higher nestedness and higher redundancy of plants. Exotic birds maintained frugivory when native birds became rarer, and diversified the local spectrum of frugivores for co-occurring native plants. These effects seemed related to the fact that species abundances, rather than trait-matching constraints, ultimately determined the patterns of interactions between birds and plants. By altering the structure of plant-frugivore assemblages, exotic birds likely enhance the stability of the community-wide seed dispersal in the face of continued anthropogenic impact.

  14. Ichthyoplankton assemblages in the Gulf of Nicoya and Golfo Dulce embayments, Pacific coast of Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Ureña, H

    1996-12-01

    Ichthyoplankton surveys were conducted in December (rainy season), 1993 and February (dry season), 1994, during the RV Victor Hensen German-Costa Rican Expedition to the Gulf of Nicoya and Gulfo Dulce, Costa Rica. Samples from the inner, central, and outer areas of each gulf were collected in oblique tows with a bongo net of 0.6 m mouth diameter, 2.5 m long and 1000-micron mesh. A total of 416 fish larvae of 22 families were sorted out of 14 samples. Stations of both the maximum (11) and the minimum (1) family richness were located in Golfo Dulce. Mean total larval abundances were 124.9 and 197.2 individuals 10 m-2 for the Gulf of Nicoya and Golfo Dulce, respectively, while mean larval densities ranged from 95.3 larvae 10 m-2 in December to 236.7 larvae 10 m-2 in February. However, no statistical differences between gulfs or seasons were detected, due to the high within-group variability. Cluster Analysis, Multi-Dimensional Scaling (MDS), and non-parametric tests showed two well-defined major groups: (1) the Gulf of Nicoya neritic assemblage, represented by Engraulids, Sciaenids, and Gobiids (inner and central stations), and (2) the oceanic assemblage, dominated by Myctophids, Bregmacerotids, Ophiidids, and Trichiurids (outer stations off the Gulf of Nicoya and Golfo Dulce). A third, although less defined group, was an Ophichthid-dominated assemblage (typical in areas nearby coral or rocky reefs). These assemblages closely resemble the clusters based upon adult fish data of the beamtrawl catches of the same cruise. This publication is the first to report on the ichthyoplankton community of Golfo Dulce.

  15. Quantitative analysis of Elasmobranch assemblages from two successive Ypresian (early Eocene) facies at Marke, western Belgium

    OpenAIRE

    Iserbyt, A.; De Schutter, P.

    2012-01-01

    Temporal patterns in biodiversity are affected largely by changes in environmental conditions. Sea level fluctuations rank amongst the major factors that affect marine biodiversity or community structure on a local or regional scale, as confirmed by numerous case studies relating lithology with fossil assemblages in order to reconstruct palaeoenvironmental conditions. However up to now, few studies quantified selachian and batoid faunas (Elasmobranchii) in such a context. In the present s...

  16. Spatial arrangement overrules environmental factors to structure native and non-native assemblages of synanthropic harvestmen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Muster

    Full Text Available Understanding how space affects the occurrence of native and non-native species is essential for inferring processes that shape communities. However, studies considering spatial and environmental variables for the entire community - as well as for the native and non-native assemblages in a single study - are scarce for animals. Harvestmen communities in central Europe have undergone drastic turnovers during the past decades, with several newly immigrated species, and thus provide a unique system to study such questions. We studied the wall-dwelling harvestmen communities from 52 human settlements in Luxembourg and found the assemblages to be largely dominated by non-native species (64% of specimens. Community structure was analysed using Moran's eigenvector maps as spatial variables, and landcover variables at different radii (500 m, 1000 m, 2000 m in combination with climatic parameters as environmental variables. A surprisingly high portion of pure spatial variation (15.7% of total variance exceeded the environmental (10.6% and shared (4% components of variation, but we found only minor differences between native and non-native assemblages. This could result from the ecological flexibility of both, native and non-native harvestmen that are not restricted to urban habitats but also inhabit surrounding semi-natural landscapes. Nevertheless, urban landcover variables explained more variation in the non-native community, whereas coverage of semi-natural habitats (forests, rivers at broader radii better explained the native assemblage. This indicates that some urban characteristics apparently facilitate the establishment of non-native species. We found no evidence for competitive replacement of native by invasive species, but a community with novel combination of native and non-native species.

  17. The impact of sediment removal on the aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblage in a fishpond littoral zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk ADÁMEK

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bottom sediment removal, a widely used technique in restoration management of standing water bodies, has a strong influence on communities of aquatic organisms. As most information on the impact of sediment removal on the aquatic environment comes from studies on lakes, the aim of this study was to describe macroinvertebrate assemblage succession in a fishpond (Štěpánek fishpond, Bohemian-Moravian highlands, Czech Republic littoral zone following restoration by sediment removal during the winter of 2003/2004. Semi-quantitative hand net sampling was undertaken one year before (2003 and in each of the following five years (2004–2008 after sediment removal. A significant decrease in both abundance (approx. 90% of individuals and diversity (approx. 30% of taxa of macroinvertebrates was detected immediately after pond restoration. The values gradually increased over subsequent years, reaching comparable abundance and diversity three years after sediment removal. A significant shift was recorded in the taxonomic and functional composition of the macroinvertebrate assemblage after sediment removal. Mayfly larvae were the dominant invertebrates before restoration, while chironomid larvae and oligochaetes dominated after sediment removal. Phytophilous taxa, grazers and scrapers, and swimming or diving invertebrates were common in 2003, whilst open-water taxa preferring mud and other mostly inorganic microhabitats, gatherers/collectors, and burrowing/boring invertebrates were relatively common after sediment removal. In 2008, the assemblage reverted towards the situation before sediment removal, probably connected with a lower water level and accelerated macrophyte bed succession. Principal Component Analysis on the species data confirmed the differences in invertebrate taxonomic structure among sampling years. Succession of the fishpond invertebrate assemblage in the years following sediment removal was mainly influenced by fish farming practice and

  18. Recent disturbances augment community shifts in coral assemblages in Moorea, French Polynesia

    KAUST Repository

    Pratchett, Morgan S.

    2010-09-19

    Coral reefs are often subject to disturbances that can cause enduring changes in community structure and abundance of coral reef organisms. In Moorea, French Polynesia, frequent disturbances between 1979 and 2003 caused marked shifts in taxonomic composition of coral assemblages. This study explores recent changes in live cover and taxonomic structure of coral communities on the north coast of Moorea, French Polynesia, to assess whether coral assemblages are recovering (returning to a previous Acropora-dominated state) or continuing to move towards an alternative community structure. Coral cover declined by 29.7% between July 2003 and March 2009, mostly due to loss of Acropora and Montipora spp. Coral mortality varied among habitats, with highest levels of coral loss on the outer reef slope (7-20 m depth). In contrast, there was limited change in coral cover within the lagoon, and coral cover actually increased on the reef crest. Observed changes in coral cover and composition correspond closely with the known feeding preferences and observed spatial patterns of Acanthaster planci L., though observed coral loss also coincided with at least one episode of coral bleaching, as well as persistent populations of the corallivorous starfish Culcita novaeguineae Muller & Troschel. While climate change poses an important and significant threat to the future structure and dynamics coral reef communities, outbreaks of A. planci remain a significant cause of coral loss in Moorea. More importantly, these recent disturbances have followed long-term shifts in the structure of coral assemblages, and the relative abundance of both Pocillopora and Porites continue to increase due to disproportionate losses of Acropora and Montipora. Moreover, Pocillopora and Porites dominate assemblages of juvenile corals, suggesting that there is limited potential for a return to an Acropora-dominated state, last recorded in 1979. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  19. Recent disturbances augment community shifts in coral assemblages in Moorea, French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratchett, M. S.; Trapon, M.; Berumen, M. L.; Chong-Seng, K.

    2011-03-01

    Coral reefs are often subject to disturbances that can cause enduring changes in community structure and abundance of coral reef organisms. In Moorea, French Polynesia, frequent disturbances between 1979 and 2003 caused marked shifts in taxonomic composition of coral assemblages. This study explores recent changes in live cover and taxonomic structure of coral communities on the north coast of Moorea, French Polynesia, to assess whether coral assemblages are recovering (returning to a previous Acropora-dominated state) or continuing to move towards an alternative community structure. Coral cover declined by 29.7% between July 2003 and March 2009, mostly due to loss of Acropora and Montipora spp. Coral mortality varied among habitats, with highest levels of coral loss on the outer reef slope (7-20 m depth). In contrast, there was limited change in coral cover within the lagoon, and coral cover actually increased on the reef crest. Observed changes in coral cover and composition correspond closely with the known feeding preferences and observed spatial patterns of Acanthaster planci L., though observed coral loss also coincided with at least one episode of coral bleaching, as well as persistent populations of the corallivorous starfish Culcita novaeguineae Muller & Troschel. While climate change poses an important and significant threat to the future structure and dynamics coral reef communities, outbreaks of A. planci remain a significant cause of coral loss in Moorea. More importantly, these recent disturbances have followed long-term shifts in the structure of coral assemblages, and the relative abundance of both Pocillopora and Porites continue to increase due to disproportionate losses of Acropora and Montipora. Moreover, Pocillopora and Porites dominate assemblages of juvenile corals, suggesting that there is limited potential for a return to an Acropora-dominated state, last recorded in 1979.

  20. Bryozoan assemblages and relation with environmental factors: An example from the latium coast (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimenz Gusso, C. [Rome, Univ. La Sapienza (Italy). Dipt. di Biologia Animale e dell`Uomo; Nicoletti, L.

    1995-12-31

    The distribution of Bryozoa Gymnolaemata in 3 transect with different characteristics of inclination and exposure in analysed. The structural and morpho-functional characteristics of the assemblages are discussed in relation to the environmental factor. The data and the observations, considered on the whole, accord with the hypothesis that morpho-functional characteristics in the Bryozoa considered are in good relation with the environmental factors.

  1. Bait effects in sampling coral reef fish assemblages with stereo-BRUVs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey R Dorman

    Full Text Available Baited underwater video techniques are increasingly being utilised for assessing and monitoring demersal fishes because they are: 1 non extractive, 2 can be used to sample across multiple habitats and depths, 3 are cost effective, 4 sample a broader range of species than many other techniques, 5 and with greater statistical power. However, an examination of the literature demonstrates that a range of different bait types are being used. The use of different types of bait can create an additional source of variability in sampling programs. Coral reef fish assemblages at the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia, were sampled using baited remote underwater stereo-video systems. One-hour stereo-video recordings were collected for four different bait treatments (pilchards, cat food, falafel mix and no bait (control from sites inside and outside a targeted fishery closure (TFC. In total, 5209 individuals from 132 fish species belonging to 41 families were recorded. There were significant differences in the fish assemblage structure and composition between baited and non-baited treatments (P<0.001, while no difference was observed with species richness. Samples baited with cat food and pilchards contained similar ingredients and were found to record similar components of the fish assemblage. There were no significant differences in the fish assemblages in areas open or closed to fishing, regardless of the bait used. Investigation of five targeted species indicated that the response to different types of bait was species-specific. For example, the relative abundance of Pagrus auratus was found to increase in areas protected from fishing, but only in samples baited with pilchards and cat food. The results indicate that the use of bait in conjunction with stereo-BRUVs is advantageous. On balance, the use of pilchards as a standardised bait for stereo-BRUVs deployments is justified for use along the mid-west coast of Western Australia.

  2. Reef fishes of Saba Bank, Netherlands Antilles: assemblage structure across a gradient of habitat types.

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    Wes Toller

    Full Text Available Saba Bank is a 2,200 km(2 submerged carbonate platform in the northeastern Caribbean Sea off Saba Island, Netherlands Antilles. The presence of reef-like geomorphic features and significant shelf edge coral development on Saba Bank have led to the conclusion that it is an actively growing, though wholly submerged, coral reef atoll. However, little information exists on the composition of benthic communities or associated reef fish assemblages of Saba Bank. We selected a 40 km(2 area of the bank for an exploratory study. Habitat and reef fish assemblages were investigated in five shallow-water benthic habitat types that form a gradient from Saba Bank shelf edge to lagoon. Significant coral cover was restricted to fore reef habitat (average cover 11.5% and outer reef flat habitat (2.4% and declined to near zero in habitats of the central lagoon zone. Macroalgae dominated benthic cover in all habitats (average cover: 32.5--48.1% but dominant algal genera differed among habitats. A total of 97 fish species were recorded. The composition of Saba Bank fish assemblages differed among habitat types. Highest fish density and diversity occurred in the outer reef flat, fore reef and inner reef flat habitats. Biomass estimates for commercially valued species in the reef zone (fore reef and reef flat habitats ranged between 52 and 83 g/m(2. The composition of Saba Bank fish assemblages reflects the absence of important nursery habitats, as well as the effects of past fishing. The relatively high abundance of large predatory fish (i.e. groupers and sharks, which is generally considered an indicator of good ecosystem health for tropical reef systems, shows that an intact trophic network is still present on Saba Bank.

  3. Diversity and composition of estuarine and lagoonal fish assemblages of Socotra Island, Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, E; Zajonz, U; Krupp, F; Naseeb, F; Aideed, M S

    2016-05-01

    Estuarine and lagoonal surveys of Socotra Island and selected sites on the Hadhramout coast of Yemen were conducted with the objective of documenting and analysing fish diversity and assemblage structure. A total of 74 species in 35 families were recorded, among which 65 species in 32 families were from Socotra and 20 species in 17 families were from mainland Yemen. Twenty-one species represent new faunal records for Socotra. Including historic records re-examined in this study, the total fish species richness of estuaries and lagoons of Socotra Island reaches 76, which is relatively high compared to species inventories of well-researched coastal estuaries in southern Africa. Five species dominate the occurrence and abundance frequencies: Terapon jarbua, Hyporhamphus sindensis, Aphanius dispar, Ambassis gymnocephala and Chelon macrolepis. Rarefaction and extrapolation analyses suggest that the actual number of fish species inhabiting some of those estuaries might be higher than the one observed. Thus, additional sampling at specific sites should be conducted to record other less conspicuous species. Ordination and multivariate analyses identified four main distinct assemblage clusters. Two groups are geographically well structured and represent northern Socotra and mainland Yemen, respectively. The other two assemblage groups tend to be determined to a greater extent by the synchrony between physical (e.g. estuary opening periods) and biological (e.g. spawning and recruitment periods) variables than by geographical location. Finally, the single intertidal lagoon of Socotra represents by itself a specific fish assemblage. The high proportion of economically important fish species (38) recorded underscores the paramount importance of these coastal water bodies as nursery sites, and for sustaining vital provisioning ecosystem services.

  4. Ecological shifts in Mediterranean coralligenous assemblages related to gorgonian forest loss.