WorldWideScience

Sample records for ma50177 lab lecture

  1. In Situ Teaching: Fusing Labs & Lectures in Undergraduate Science Courses to Enhance Immersion in Scientific Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Round, Jennifer; Lom, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate courses in the life sciences at most colleges and universities are traditionally composed of two or three weekly sessions in a classroom supplemented with a weekly three-hour session in a laboratory. We have found that many undergraduates can have difficulty making connections and/or transferring knowledge between lab activities and lecture material. Consequently, we are actively developing ways to decrease the physical and intellectual divides between lecture and lab to help students make more direct links between what they learn in the classroom and what they learn in the lab. In this article we discuss our experiences teaching fused laboratory biology courses that intentionally blurred the distinctions between lab and lecture to provide undergraduates with immersive experiences in science that promote discovery and understanding.

  2. MHD Dynamo phenomenon in our lab (Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailitis, Agris

    2016-04-01

    then underlining mathematical model. Followed by dozens of fields sensor it shows lot of anomalies and variations. More details in the lecture.

  3. Use of Video Technology for Lecture and Lab Material in Introductory Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorey, C. V.

    2008-12-01

    Still images are essential to teaching introductory geology courses, but video has traditionally been relegated a minor role. When creatively integrated with lecture material, video can provide a better perspective on spatial scales and relationships between static geologic locations, or to demonstrate evolving processes with much greater economy. With the use of appropriate editing software, events can be temporally compressed and dilated to give a more visceral experience to processes described in labs and lectures. Video can also be used as a form of virtual field trip for students to see a more wide ranging sample of locations, and such virtual field trips can deliver comparable experiences for students with physical disabilities that may limit their ability to visit the locations their fellow students attend.

  4. Assessing ISLE Labs as an Enhancement to Traditional Large-Lecture Courses at the Ohio State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaree, Dedra; Lin, Yuhfen

    2006-02-01

    At the Ohio State University (OSU), some laboratory sections were replaced with Investigative Science Learning Environment (ISLE) labs during the 3-quarter calculus-based introductory physics sequence this past academic year. The ISLE labs have been developed by the PAER Group at Rutgers University; implementation at OSU is discussed, making a direct comparison of OSU students participating in ISLE labs with students in pre-existing labs under the same large-lecture instruction. Assessment included diagnostic tests and feedback from a Q-type instrument. The ISLE environment focuses on helping students develop scientific abilities, so we also administered a voluntary lab `practical exam' aimed at testing if these abilities were gained by the students in the ISLE labs.

  5. Does It Matter if Students Have the Same Instructor for Lecture and Lab Sections? An Analysis of Introductory Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    With the goal of increasing the immediacy of the relationship between tenure-track professors and students, science departments in liberal arts colleges may try to arrange their curriculum so that students have the same professor in both the lecture and the lab section of introductory courses. While this goal seems laudable, empirical data are…

  6. What Do Students' Behaviors and Performances in Lab Tell Us about Their Behaviors and Performances in Lecture-Portions of Introductory Biology Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Randy

    2007-01-01

    In a study spanning several years and including more than 1600 students, lab attendance was strongly correlated with lab grades (r = 0.64), lecture attendance (r = 0.49), and course grades (r = 0.60) in an introductory biology course. Regardless of the semester, lab attendance was lowest during the first week of the semester, and students who…

  7. Are Students' Performances in Labs Related to Their Performances in Lecture Portions of Introductory Science Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Randy

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the author examined how attendance in the lab is associated with students' lab grades and overall course grades in an introductory biology course. Results from this study indicate that academic motivation, as expressed by high rates of class attendance, is critical to students' success in introductory science courses. The highest…

  8. A Video Lecture and Lab-Based Approach for Learning of Image Processing Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chiung-Fang; Lee, Greg C.

    2009-01-01

    The current practice of traditional in-class lecture for learning computer science (CS) in the high schools of Taiwan is in need of revamping. Teachers instruct on the use of commercial software instead of teaching CS concepts to students. The lack of more suitable teaching materials and limited classroom time are the main reasons for the…

  9. A Video Lecture and Lab-Based Approach for Learning of Image Processing Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chiung-Fang; Lee, Greg C.

    2009-01-01

    The current practice of traditional in-class lecture for learning computer science (CS) in the high schools of Taiwan is in need of revamping. Teachers instruct on the use of commercial software instead of teaching CS concepts to students. The lack of more suitable teaching materials and limited classroom time are the main reasons for the…

  10. Use of On-Line Math Skills Modules in an Introductory General Education Geoscience Course at a Community College: The Importance of Integration Across Lab & Lecture Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    The NSF sponsored on-line math skills module series The Math You Need When You Need It (TMYN) was constructed to provide math skill development and support to introductory geoscience course instructors whose students science learning is often hindered by deficiencies in critical math skills. The on-line modules give instructors a mechanism for student-centered, skill-specific math tutorials, practice exercises and assessments outside regular class time. In principle, a student deficient in a skill such as graphing, calculating a best-fit line or manipulating and quantifying a concept such as density can use the appropriate TMYN module to identify their area of weakness, focus on developing the skill using geologically relevant examples, and get feedback reflecting their mastery of the skill in an asynchronous format just as the skill becomes critical to learning in the course. The asynchronous format allows the instructor to remain focused on the geoscience content during class time without diverting all students' attention to skill remediation needed by only a subset of the population. Such a blended approach prevents the progression of the class from being slowed by the need for remediation for some students while simultaneously not leaving those students behind. The challenge to geoscience educators comes in identifying the best strategy for implementing TMYN modules in their classrooms. This presentation contrasts the effectiveness of 2 strategies for implementing TMYN in an introductory Earth System Science class taken as a general education science lab requirement by lower division students at a community college. This course is typical of many such large general education courses in that lab instruction is provided by separate educators from the primary instructor in charge of the lecture, often creating 2 parallel and only dimly connected courses in the experience of many students. In case 1, TMYN was implemented in 3 of 4 lab sections by an adjunct lab

  11. Puzzle-based versus traditional lecture: comparing the effects of pedagogy on academic performance in an undergraduate human anatomy and physiology II lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetzik, Lucas; Deeter, Anthony; Parker, Jamie; Yukech, Christine

    2015-06-23

    A traditional lecture-based pedagogy conveys information and content while lacking sufficient development of critical thinking skills and problem solving. A puzzle-based pedagogy creates a broader contextual framework, and fosters critical thinking as well as logical reasoning skills that can then be used to improve a student's performance on content specific assessments. This paper describes a pedagogical comparison of traditional lecture-based teaching and puzzle-based teaching in a Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab. Using a single subject/cross-over design half of the students from seven sections of the course were taught using one type of pedagogy for the first half of the semester, and then taught with a different pedagogy for the second half of the semester. The other half of the students were taught the same material but with the order of the pedagogies reversed. Students' performance on quizzes and exams specific to the course, and in-class assignments specific to this study were assessed for: learning outcomes (the ability to form the correct conclusion or recall specific information), and authentic academic performance as described by (Am J Educ 104:280-312, 1996). Our findings suggest a significant improvement in students' performance on standard course specific assessments using a puzzle-based pedagogy versus a traditional lecture-based teaching style. Quiz and test scores for students improved by 2.1 and 0.4% respectively in the puzzle-based pedagogy, versus the traditional lecture-based teaching. Additionally, the assessments of authentic academic performance may only effectively measure a broader conceptual understanding in a limited set of contexts, and not in the context of a Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab. In conclusion, a puzzle-based pedagogy, when compared to traditional lecture-based teaching, can effectively enhance the performance of students on standard course specific assessments, even when the assessments only test a limited

  12. Incorporating a Modified Problem-Based Learning Exercise in a Traditional Lecture and Lab-Based Dairy Products Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liceaga, Andrea M.; Ballard, Tameshia S.; Skura, Brent J.

    2011-01-01

    A modified problem-based learning (PBL) exercise was implemented in a food science Dairy Products course, which had previously been taught in the traditional lecture and laboratory format only. The first 10 wk of the course consisted of weekly lectures and laboratory exercises. During the remaining 3 wk, students were presented with a case study…

  13. News Girls in Physics: Getting girls engaged with physics Schools Lecture: How to explore the universe: the IOP schools lecture series 2009 Elastomobile Competition: Rubber-band vehicles go for gold Congress: Congress celebrates centenary Outreach Programme: Tales of the Stars inspires young children from around the world Physics Olympiad: BPhO selects top students for International Physics Olympiad Mobile Science: Mobile teaching lab visits rural Turkey China: Inspiration and competition in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Girls in Physics: Getting girls engaged with physics Schools Lecture: How to explore the universe: the IOP schools lecture series 2009 Elastomobile Competition: Rubber-band vehicles go for gold Congress: Congress celebrates centenary Outreach Programme: Tales of the Stars inspires young children from around the world Physics Olympiad: BPhO selects top students for International Physics Olympiad Mobile Science: Mobile teaching lab visits rural Turkey China: Inspiration and competition in China

  14. The Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, S. Raj

    2011-01-01

    Academic lectures for the purpose of instruction maintain an important presence in most colleges and universities worldwide. This chapter examines the current state of the lecture and how learning sciences research can inform the most effective use of this method. The author presents evidence that the lecture can be an effective element of…

  15. Vision Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Vision Lab personnel perform research, development, testing and evaluation of eye protection and vision performance. The lab maintains and continues to develop...

  16. Using "Saccharomyces cerevisiae" to Test the Mutagenicity of Household Compounds: An Open Ended Hypothesis-Driven Teaching Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Pamela A.

    2007-01-01

    In our Fundamentals of Genetics lab, students perform a wide variety of labs to reinforce and extend the topics covered in lecture. I developed an active-learning lab to augment the lecture topic of mutagenesis. In this lab exercise, students determine if a compound they bring from home is a mutagen. Students are required to read extensive…

  17. Sacler lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Bernstein, J

    1995-01-01

    The series of three lectures given at Tel-Aviv University in 1992: 1. Tensor categories. 2. Quantum groups. 3. Topological (quantum) field theories. Published as the preprint IAS 897-92 of Tel-Aviv University and The Mortimer and Raymond Sacler Institute of Advanced Studies.

  18. Summary Lecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. O. Stenflo

    2000-09-01

    This summary lecture makes no attempt to summarize what was actually said at the meeting, since this is well covered by the other contributors. Instead I have structured my presentation in three parts: First I try to demonstrate why the Sun is unique by comparing it with laboratory plasmas. This is followed by some personal reminiscences that go back a significant fraction of the century. I conclude in the form of a poem about this memorable conference in honor of the centennial anniversary of the Kodaikanal Observatory.

  19. PD Lab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilow, Marcel; Entrop, Alexis Gerardus; Lichtenberg, Jos; Stoutjesdijk, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    PD Lab explores the applications of building sector related product development. PD lab investigates and tests digital production technologies like CNC milled wood connections. It will also act as a platform in its wider meaning to investigate the effects and influences of file to factory

  20. S'Cool LAB Summer CAMP 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Woithe, Julia

    2017-01-01

    The S’Cool LAB Summer CAMP is an opportunity for high-school students (aged 16-19) from all around the world to spend 2 weeks exploring the fascinating world of particle physics. The 24 selected participants spend their summer at S’Cool LAB, CERN’s hands-on particle physics learning laboratory, for an epic programme of lectures and tutorials, team research projects, visits of CERN’s research installations, and social activities.

  1. PD Lab

    OpenAIRE

    Bilow, Marcel; Entrop, Bram; Lichtenberg, Jos; Stoutjesdijk, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    PD Lab explores the applications of building sector related product development. PD lab investigates and tests digital production technologies like CNC milled wood connections. It will also act as a platform in its wider meaning to investigate the effects and influences of file to factory production, to explore the potential in the field of sustainability, material use, logistics and the interaction of stakeholders within the chain of the building process.

  2. TELECOM LAB

    CERN Multimedia

    IT-CS-TEL Section

    2001-01-01

    The Telecom Lab is moving from Building 104 to Building 31 S-026, with its entrance via the ramp on the side facing Restaurant n°2. The help desk will thus be closed to users on Tuesday 8 May. On May 9, the Lab will only be able to deal with problems of a technical nature at the new address and it will not be able to process any new subscription requests throughout the week from 7 to 11 May. We apologise for any inconvenience this may cause and thank you for your understanding.

  3. The ``RIPL'' Effect on Learning Gains in Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Patricia E.; Cockman, John E.

    2009-11-01

    The main goal of the Redesigned Introductory Physics Lab (RIPL) project at Appalachian State is to improve student performance and attitudes in the algebra-based sequence. Modifications of the student lab experience were examined in terms of their impact on performance in the lecture portion, independent of the lecture instructor's pedagogical approach. Preliminary results for one lecture section, based on Modeling Instruction, indicate a large positive difference in all course measures for students in the redesigned lab compared to those in the more traditional lab offered by the department. On the other hand, FCI and other diagnostic scores show little difference between the two groups. While these measures indicate a discrepancy in the redesigned lab impact, an item-by-item analysis of the diagnostics reveals a rich story, one that can be used to improve both lecture and lab activities. In this paper, we examine some of the factors that strongly affect student performance, as well as the implications for the redesign process.

  4. Industry Lecture 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Sammendrag af "Industry Lecture", Norsk Kjemisk Selskap, Universitetet i Oslo, givet 15/10 2010.......Sammendrag af "Industry Lecture", Norsk Kjemisk Selskap, Universitetet i Oslo, givet 15/10 2010....

  5. Industry Lecture 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Sammendrag af "Industry Lecture", Norsk Kjemisk Selskap, Universitetet i Oslo, givet 15/10 2010.......Sammendrag af "Industry Lecture", Norsk Kjemisk Selskap, Universitetet i Oslo, givet 15/10 2010....

  6. Attention Breaks in Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, A. H.; Percival, F.

    1976-01-01

    Describes research into student attention patterns during lectures that suggests that student attention declines steadily during a lecture, and that the rate of decrease is dependent upon several variables including subject difficulty. (MLH)

  7. TransLectures

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestre Cerdà, Joan Albert; Del Agua Teba, Miguel Angel; Garcés Díaz-Munío, Gonzalo Vicente; GASCÓ MORA, GUILLEM; Giménez Pastor, Adrián; Martínez-Villaronga, Adrià Agustí; Pérez González de Martos, Alejandro Manuel; Sánchez-Cortina, Isaías; Serrano Martínez-Santos, Nicolás; Spencer, Rachel Nadine; Valor Miró, Juan Daniel; Andrés Ferrer, Jesús; Civera Saiz, Jorge; Sanchis Navarro, José Alberto; Juan Císcar, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    transLectures (Transcription and Translation of Video Lectures) is an EU STREP project in which advanced automatic speech recognition and machine translation techniques are being tested on large video lecture repositories. The project began in November 2011 and will run for three years. This paper will outline the project¿s main motivation and objectives, and give a brief description of the two main repositories being considered: VideoLectures.NET and poliMedia. The first re...

  8. Lab architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2008-04-01

    There are few more dramatic illustrations of the vicissitudes of laboratory architecturethan the contrast between Building 20 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its replacement, the Ray and Maria Stata Center. Building 20 was built hurriedly in 1943 as temporary housing for MIT's famous Rad Lab, the site of wartime radar research, and it remained a productive laboratory space for over half a century. A decade ago it was demolished to make way for the Stata Center, an architecturally striking building designed by Frank Gehry to house MIT's computer science and artificial intelligence labs (above). But in 2004 - just two years after the Stata Center officially opened - the building was criticized for being unsuitable for research and became the subject of still ongoing lawsuits alleging design and construction failures.

  9. Laughter in University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesi, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses laughter in spoken academic discourse, with the aim of discovering why lecturers provoke laughter in their lectures. A further purpose of the paper is to identify episodes in British data which may differ from those in other cultural contexts where other lecturing practices prevail, and thus to inform the design of study skills…

  10. Workspace: LAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, Thomas; Lundsgaard, Christina; Nørskov, Eva-Carina

    2007-01-01

    På mange arbejdspladser viger man tilbage fra at inddrage medarbejderne når der igangsættes større forandringer. Workspace:lab er et bud på en inddragende udviklingsproces hvor dialog og eksperimenter står i centrum. Ved at samle såvel medarbejdere som ledelse og rådgivere på et mindre antal...

  11. Student Response Systems and Facilitating the Large Lecture Basic Communication Course: Assessing Engagement and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denker, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    Instructors of large lecture classes face a variety of challenges, including student engagement and participation. With budget cuts and increasing class sizes, more schools may turn to large lecture/lab formats for the basic communication course (Stanley & Porter, 2002); instructors must understand how these classes engage students. One viable…

  12. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 13 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 Student Session (3/3) Course Review Course Review Tuesday 14 August 16:00 Poster Session Further information can be obtained on the web at the following URL: Summer Student Lecture ProgrammeSummer Student Lectures are available at: http://agenda.cern.ch/SSLP2001

  13. E-nhance Lectures

    OpenAIRE

    Naber, Larissa; Köhle, Monika

    2006-01-01

    Ever more lecturers find themselves forced to Web-enhance their courses out of economic pressure or prestige. Universities trapped between rising student numbers and decreasing budgets are turning to e-learning as the one-stop solution, with little concern for student or teacher needs. An e-(nhanced) learning environment can only be successful if it fulfils students' and lecturers' needs alike. The student needs to be supported in various stages of learning, whereas the lecturer cannot afford...

  14. A Geminoid as Lecturer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Julie Rafn; Schärfe, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report our findings from an experiment with the teleoperated android Geminoid-DK. The geminoid took up the role of a university lecturer and delivered a 45 minute lecture in front of 150 freshmen students at Aalborg University. While considering the role of the geminoid in this e......In this paper we report our findings from an experiment with the teleoperated android Geminoid-DK. The geminoid took up the role of a university lecturer and delivered a 45 minute lecture in front of 150 freshmen students at Aalborg University. While considering the role of the geminoid...

  15. Effective lecture presentation skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelula, M H

    1997-02-01

    Lectures are the most popular form of teaching in medical education. As much as preparation and organization are key to the lecture's success, the actual presentation also depends upon the presenter's ability to reach the audience. Teaching is a lively activity. It calls for more than just offering ideas and data to an audience. It calls for direct contact with the audience, effective use of language, capability to use limited time effectively, and the ability to be entertaining. This article offers a structure to effective lecturing by highlighting the importance of voice clarity and speaking speed, approaches to using audiovisual aids, effectively using the audience to the lecture, and ways to be entertaining.

  16. Experiences with lab-centric instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titterton, Nathaniel; Lewis, Colleen M.; Clancy, Michael J.

    2010-06-01

    Lab-centric instruction emphasizes supervised, hands-on activities by substituting lab for lecture time. It combines a multitude of pedagogical techniques into the format of an extended, structured closed lab. We discuss the range of benefits for students, including increased staff interaction, frequent and varied self-assessments, integrated collaborative activities, and a systematic sequence of activities that gradually increases in difficulty. Instructors also benefit from a deeper window into student progress and understanding. We follow with discussion of our experiences in courses at U.C. Berkeley, and using data from some of these investigate the effects of lab-centric instruction on student learning, procrastination, and course pacing. We observe that the lab-centric format helped students on exams but hurt them on extended programming assignments, counter to our hypothesis. Additionally, we see no difference in self-ratings of procrastination and limited differences in ratings of course pace. We do find evidence that the students who choose to attend lab-centric courses are different in several important ways from students who choose to attend the same course in a non-lab-centric format.

  17. Academic Training Lecture - Regular lecture programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Wednesday 28, Thursday 29 and Friday 30 September 2011 Supersymmetric Recipes by Prof. Ben Allanech / University of Cambridge, UK  from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500 ) In these lectures, I shall describe the theory of supersymmetry accessible to people with a knowledge of basic quantum field theory. The lectures will contain recipes of how to calculate which interactions (and which special relations) are in supersymmetry, without providing detailed proofs of where they come from. We shall also cover: motivation for weak-scale supersymmetry and the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  18. Lectures on Law Enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettleship, Lois

    Three lectures on law enforcement are presented that were prepared for study purposes at Johnson County Community College. The first lecture examines the fundamental ideas of the Age of Enlightenment and discusses their influence on the American Revolution, the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. Major provisions of the Bill of…

  19. Lectures on combustion theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burstein, S.Z.; Lax, P.D.; Sod, G.A. (eds.)

    1978-09-01

    Eleven lectures are presented on mathematical aspects of combustion: fluid dynamics, deflagrations and detonations, chemical kinetics, gas flows, combustion instability, flame spread above solids, spark ignition engines, burning rate of coal particles and hydrocarbon oxidation. Separate abstracts were prepared for three of the lectures. (DLC)

  20. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel 73127

    2001-01-01

    28, 29, 30, 31 May and 1 June REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Quantum computing and Quantum cryptography T. Hey / University of Southampton, GB, and D. Ross / CERN-TH This course will give both an overview and a detailed introduction to quantum computing and quantum cryptography. The first lecture will survey the field, starting from its origins in Feyman's lecture in 1981. The next three lectures will explain in detail the relevance of Bell states and the workings of Grover's Quantum Search and Shor's quantum factorization algorithms. In addition, an explanation of quantum teleportation will be given. The last lecture will survey the recent progress towards realizing working quantum computers and quantum cryptographic systems.

  1. S'Cool LAB Summer CAMP 2017 at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    The S’Cool LAB Summer CAMP is an opportunity for high-school students (aged 16-19) from all around the world to spend 2 weeks exploring the fascinating world of particle physics. The 24 selected participants spend their summer at S’Cool LAB, CERN’s hands-on particle physics learning laboratory, for an epic programme of lectures and tutorials, team research projects, visits of CERN’s research installations, and social activities.

  2. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    12, 13, 14, 15 & 16 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Telecommunication for the future Rob Parker / CERN-IT Few fields have experienced such a high level of technical advance over the last few decades as that of telecommunications. This lecture series will track the evolution of telecommunications systems since their inception, and consider how technology is likely to advance over the next years. A personal view will also be given of the effect of these innovations on our work and leisure activities.The lecture series will be aimed at an audience with no specific technical knowledge of telecommunications.

  3. Interactive lectures in engineering education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, L.A.; van den Berg, G.C.; van Keulen, H.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses an alternative approach to lecturing: the interactive lecture. In the literature, interactive teaching is forwarded as a means to increase the effectiveness of lectures. Members of lecturing staff still seem, however, reluctant to incorporate interactive teaching in their clas

  4. Interactive lectures in engineering education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, L.A.; van den Berg, G.C.; van Keulen, H.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses an alternative approach to lecturing: the interactive lecture. In the literature, interactive teaching is forwarded as a means to increase the effectiveness of lectures. Members of lecturing staff still seem, however, reluctant to incorporate interactive teaching in their

  5. Do-It-Yourself Whiteboard-Style Physics Video Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott Samuel; Aiken, John Mark; Greco, Edwin; Schatz, Michael; Lin, Shih-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Video lectures are increasingly being used in physics instruction. For example, video lectures can be used to "flip" the classroom, i.e., to deliver, via the Internet, content that is traditionally transmitted by in-class lectures (e.g., presenting concepts, working examples, etc.), thereby freeing up classroom time for more interactive instruction. To date, most video lectures are live lecture recordings or screencasts. The hand-animated "whiteboard" video is an alternative to these more common styles and affords unique creative opportunities such as stop-motion animation or visual "demonstrations" of phenomena that would be difficult to demo in a classroom. In the spring of 2013, a series of whiteboard-style videos were produced to provide video lecture content for Georgia Tech introductory physics instruction, including flipped courses and a MOOC. This set of videos (which also includes screencasts and live recordings) can be found on the "Your World is Your Lab" YouTube channel. In this article, we describe this method of video production, which is suitable for an instructor working solo or in collaboration with students; we explore students' engagement with these videos in a separate work. A prominent example of whiteboard animation is the "Minute Physics" video series by Henry Reich, whose considerable popularity and accessible, cartoony style were the original inspiration for our own video lectures.

  6. Feynman Lectures on Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Feynman, Richard Phillips; Allen, Robin W

    1999-01-01

    "When, in 1984-86, Richard P. Feynman gave his famous course on computation at the California Institute of Technology, he asked Tony Hey to adapt his lecture notes into a book. Although led by Feynman,"

  7. A Geminoid as Lecturer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Julie Rafn; Schärfe, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report our findings from an experiment with the teleoperated android Geminoid-DK. The geminoid took up the role of a university lecturer and delivered a 45 minute lecture in front of 150 freshmen students at Aalborg University. While considering the role of the geminoid in this e...... in this educational context, we report results relating to large-room teaching, as well as gender differences in the perception of the robot....

  8. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 1 Introduction to particle accelerators E.J.N. Wilson / CERN-AC , Head of the CERN Accelerator School This new series of lectures is intended for anyone with a technical or scientific background who would like to become familiar with the principles of accelerator design. It is a complement to last year's course and includes new lectures on present day accelerators, and their applications as well as colliders and neutrino factories. Beam dynamics, which was treated at length in last year's course, has been compressed into one lecture, intended as revision for those who followed earlier courses and an introduction for newcomers to the field. The course should not be missed by those who will attend the CAS Intermediate Accelerator School in Seville. 1-10 10:00 Present-day Accelerators 11:00 - Beam Dynamics 2-10 10:00 Accelerating Cavities 11:00 - Non-linear Dynamics 3-10 10:00 E...

  9. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Lecture Programme 9 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Inner Tracking Detectors by Pippa Wells (CERN) 10 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Calorimeters (2/5) by Philippe Bloch (CERN) 11 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Muon systems (3/5) by Kerstin Hoepfner (RWTH Aachen) 12 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Particle Identification and Forward Detectors by Peter Krizan (University of Ljubljana and J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia) 13 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Trigger and Data Acquisition (5/5) by Dr. Brian Petersen (CERN) from 11:00 to 12:00 at CERN ( Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant )

  10. Lectures on functor homology

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This book features a series of lectures that explores three different fields in which functor homology (short for homological algebra in functor categories) has recently played a significant role. For each of these applications, the functor viewpoint provides both essential insights and new methods for tackling difficult mathematical problems. In the lectures by Aurélien Djament, polynomial functors appear as coefficients in the homology of infinite families of classical groups, e.g. general linear groups or symplectic groups, and their stabilization. Djament’s theorem states that this stable homology can be computed using only the homology with trivial coefficients and the manageable functor homology. The series includes an intriguing development of Scorichenko’s unpublished results. The lectures by Wilberd van der Kallen lead to the solution of the general cohomological finite generation problem, extending Hilbert’s fourteenth problem and its solution to the context of cohomology. The focus here is o...

  11. Lectures on Chevalley groups

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Robert Steinberg's Lectures on Chevalley Groups were delivered and written during the author's sabbatical visit to Yale University in the 1967-1968 academic year. The work presents the status of the theory of Chevalley groups as it was in the mid-1960s. Much of this material was instrumental in many areas of mathematics, in particular in the theory of algebraic groups and in the subsequent classification of finite groups. This posthumous edition incorporates additions and corrections prepared by the author during his retirement, including a new introductory chapter. A bibliography and editorial notes have also been added. This is a great unsurpassed introduction to the subject of Chevalley groups that influenced generations of mathematicians. I would recommend it to anybody whose interests include group theory. -Efim Zelmanov, University of California, San Diego Robert Steinberg's lectures on Chevalley groups were given at Yale University in 1967. The notes for the lectures contain a wonderful exposition of ...

  12. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service and the Pensioners Association are pleased to invite CERN pensioners to a series of lectures given by professors and specialists from the Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva on the following topic: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The lectures will take place in the Main CERN Auditorium (Building 60) from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. on the following dates: Thursday 15 January 2009: Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease Pr Gabriel GOLD Wednesday 25 February 2009: What is the brain reserve? Speaker’s name to be announced at a later date. The lectures will be given in French, with transparencies in English, and will be followed by a wide-ranging debate with the participants. CERN Medical Service - Pensioners Association - CERN-ESO (GAC-EPA)

  13. Albert Einstein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Mechoulam, Raphael; The Israel Academy for Sciences and Humanities

    2012-01-01

    This volume consists of a selection of the Albert Einstein Memorial Lectures presented annually at the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Delivered by eminent scientists and scholars, including Nobel laureates, they cover a broad spectrum of subjects in physics, chemistry, life science, mathematics, historiography and social issues. This distinguished memorial lecture series was inaugurated by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities following an international symposium held in Jerusalem in March 1979 to commemorate the centenary of Albert Einstein's birth. Considering that Einstein's interests, activities and influence were not restricted to theoretical physics but spanned broad fields affecting society and the welfare of humankind, it was felt that these memorial lectures should be addressed to scientists, scholars and erudite laypersons rather than to physicists alone.

  14. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trish L Varao-Sousa

    Full Text Available The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms.

  15. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varao-Sousa, Trish L; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms.

  16. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    26, 27, 28 February and 1, 2 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Recent Results on CP Violation and B Physics P.F. HARRISON / QMW, London, UK With the advent of the asymmetric B factories in Japan and the US, exciting new results on CP Violation and B Physics are starting to be achieved. In these lectures, we review the existing experimental and phenomenological context of these measurements, we compare and contrast the new experimental facilities and discuss the implications of the recent results on our understanding. Finally we summarise the prospects for future developments.

  17. Lectures in general algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Kurosh, A G; Stark, M; Ulam, S

    1965-01-01

    Lectures in General Algebra is a translation from the Russian and is based on lectures on specialized courses in general algebra at Moscow University. The book starts with the basics of algebra. The text briefly describes the theory of sets, binary relations, equivalence relations, partial ordering, minimum condition, and theorems equivalent to the axiom of choice. The text gives the definition of binary algebraic operation and the concepts of groups, groupoids, and semigroups. The book examines the parallelism between the theory of groups and the theory of rings; such examinations show the

  18. Twenty lectures on thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Buchdahl, H A

    2013-01-01

    Twenty Lectures on Thermodynamics is a course of lectures, parts of which the author has given various times over the last few years. The book gives the readers a bird's eye view of phenomenological and statistical thermodynamics. The book covers many areas in thermodynamics such as states and transition; adiabatic isolation; irreversibility; the first, second, third and Zeroth laws of thermodynamics; entropy and entropy law; the idea of the application of thermodynamics; pseudo-states; the quantum-static al canonical and grand canonical ensembles; and semi-classical gaseous systems. The text

  19. Lectures on quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Dirac, Paul A M

    2001-01-01

    The author of this concise, brilliant series of lectures on mathematical methods in quantum mechanics was one of the shining intellects in the field, winning a Nobel prize in 1933 for his pioneering work in the quantum mechanics of the atom. Beyond that, he developed the transformation theory of quantum mechanics (which made it possible to calculate the statistical distribution of certain variables), was one of the major authors of the quantum theory of radiation, codiscovered the Fermi-Dirac statistics, and predicted the existence of the positron.The four lectures in this book were delivered

  20. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    26, 27, 28 February and 1, 2 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Recent Results on CP Violation and B Physics P.F. HARRISON / QMW, London, UK With the advent of the asymmetric B factories in Japan and the US, exciting new results on CP Violation and B Physics are starting to be achieved. In these lectures, we review the existing experimental and phenomenological context of these measurements, we compare and contrast the new experimental facilities and discuss the implications of the recent results on our understanding. Finally we summarise the prospects for future developments.

  1. Lectures on Constrained Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Date, Ghanashyam

    2010-01-01

    These lecture notes were prepared as a basic introduction to the theory of constrained systems which is how the fundamental forces of nature appear in their Hamiltonian formulation. Only a working knowledge of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulation of mechanics is assumed. These notes are based on the set of eight lectures given at the {\\em Refresher Course for College Teachers} held at IMSc during May-June, 2005. These are submitted to the arxiv for an easy access to a wider body of students.

  2. The Harvey lectures, Series 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botstein, D.; Cech, T.R.; Hille, B.; Lodish, H.F.; Majerus, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Harvey Lecture Series is published annually and provides reviews of research topics in the biomedical sciences. Eight lectures by investigators are included in the volume representing the most recent work in the major laboratories.

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 1 Introduction to particle accelerators E.J.N. Wilson / CERN-AC , Head of the CERN Accelerator School This new series of lectures is intended for anyone with a technical or scientific background who would like to become familiar with the principles of accelerator design. It is a complement to last year's course and includes new lectures on present day accelerators, and their applications as well as colliders and neutrino factories. Beam dynamics, which was treated at length in last year's course, has been compressed into one lecture, intended as revision for those who followed earlier courses and an introduction for newcomers to the field. The course should not be missed by those who will attend the CAS Intermediate Accelerator School in Seville. 1-10 10:00 Present-day Accelerators 11:00 - Beam Dynamics 2-10 10:00 Accelerating Cavities 11:00 - Non-linear Dynamics 3-10 10:00 Electron Dynamics 11:00 - ...

  4. Podcasting a Physics Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, James E. R.

    2008-01-01

    The technology of podcasting, or creating audio or video files that can be subscribed to over the Internet, has grown in popularity over the past few years. Many educators have already begun realizing the potential of delivering such customized content, but most efforts have focused on lecture-style humanities courses or multimedia arts courses.…

  5. When Lecturing: Teach!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Warren R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques that can be used to make the lecture method of teaching more effective include using pictures or objects to facilitate memory, using guided fantasies to stimulate students' imagination of processes, and the suggestopedia method for memorizing facts, principles, and vocabulary. (MSE)

  6. Participatory Lecture Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battino, Rubin

    1979-01-01

    The use of participatory lecture demonstrations in the classroom is described. Examples are given for the following topics: chromatography, chemical kinetics, balancing equations, the gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, Henry's law of gas solubility, electronic energy levels in atoms, and translational, vibrational, and rotational energies of…

  7. Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Wells (CERN) The Higgs Saga at LEP 10:15 - 11:00 G. Cowan (Univ. of London) Introduction to Statistics (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. Cowan (Univ. of London) Introduction to Statistics (3/3) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 3 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Sphicas (CERN) Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems (1/2) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) G. Cowan (University of London) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 4 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Sphicas (CERN) Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) Astroparticle Physics (1/3) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 5 August 09:15 - 10:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) 10:15 - 11:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) A...

  8. Optimising Lecture Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst-Christensen, Bo

    the students problems from the educator to the students. By using techniques that put more weight on student participation, cooperation and preparation, I have been able to cut significantly down on the time used for lecturing, allowing more time for student work and reflection. As an example by getting...

  9. When Lecturing: Teach!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Warren R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques that can be used to make the lecture method of teaching more effective include using pictures or objects to facilitate memory, using guided fantasies to stimulate students' imagination of processes, and the suggestopedia method for memorizing facts, principles, and vocabulary. (MSE)

  10. Computer Aided Lecturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meter, Donald E.

    1994-01-01

    Surveyed students taking a natural resource conservation course to determine the effects of computer software that provides tools for creating and managing visual presentations to students. Results indicated that 94% of the respondents believed computer-aided lectures helped them and recommended their continued use; note taking was more effective,…

  11. Usage Reporting on Recorded Lectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Pierre; Bruggen, Jan van; Jochems, Wim

    2012-01-01

    This study analyses the interactions of students with the recorded lectures. We report on an analysis of students' use of recorded lectures at two Universities in the Netherlands. The data logged by the lecture capture system (LCS) is used and combined with collected survey data. We describe the pro

  12. In Defence of the Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    In response to the lecture format coming under "attack" and being replaced by online materials and smaller tutorials, this paper attempts to offer not only a defence but also to assert that the potential value of the lecture is difficult to replicate through other learning formats. Some of the criticisms against lectures will be…

  13. Genome Science and Personalized Cancer Treatment (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe

    2009-08-04

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Results from the Human Genome Project are enabling scientists to understand how individual cancers form and progress. This information, when combined with newly developed drugs, can optimize the treatment of individual cancers. Joe Gray, director of Berkeley Labs Life Sciences Division and Associate Laboratory Director for Life and Environmental Sciences, will focus on this approach, its promise, and its current roadblocks — particularly with regard to breast cancer.

  14. Feynman Lectures on Gravitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borcherds, P

    2003-05-21

    In the early 1960s Feynman lectured to physics undergraduates and, with the assistance of his colleagues Leighton and Sands, produced the three-volume classic Feynman Lectures in Physics. These lectures were delivered in the mornings. In the afternoons Feynman was giving postgraduate lectures on gravitation. This book is based on notes compiled by two students on that course: Morinigo and Wagner. Their notes were checked and approved by Feynman and were available at Caltech. They have now been edited by Brian Hatfield and made more widely available. The book has a substantial preface by John Preskill and Kip Thorne, and an introduction entitled 'Quantum Gravity' by Brian Hatfield. You should read these before going on to the lectures themselves. Preskill and Thorne identify three categories of potential readers of this book. 1. Those with a postgraduate training in theoretical physics. 2. 'Readers with a solid undergraduate training in physics'. 3. 'Admirers of Feynman who do not have a strong physics background'. The title of the book is perhaps misleading: readers in category 2 who think that this book is an extension of the Feynman Lectures in Physics may be disappointed. It is not: it is a book aimed mainly at those in category 1. If you want to get to grips with gravitation (and general relativity) then you need to read an introductory text first e.g. General Relativity by I R Kenyon (Oxford: Oxford University Press) or A Unified Grand Tour of Theoretical Physics by Ian D Lawrie (Bristol: IoP). But there is no Royal Road. As pointed out in the preface and in the introduction, the book represents Feynman's thinking about gravitation some 40 years ago: the lecture course was part of his attempts to understand the subject himself, and for readers in all three categories it is this that makes the book one of interest: the opportunity to observe how a great physicist attempts to tackle some of the hardest challenges of physics

  15. Handouts: making the lecture portable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, K

    1991-01-01

    Previous medical literature on preparing lecture handouts has focused on their use in student education, where as part of a course there is a series of lectures followed by an examination. Conversely, resident and practising physicians usually attend single lectures on individual topics in order to update and improve their clinical skills. Handouts designed for the latter type of lecture can serve as a useful resource in subsequent day-to-day teaching and patient care. This article examines the purpose, distribution, structure, and substance of such handouts. Guidelines to assist the speaker in preparing lecture handouts are discussed.

  16. Exploring Tablet PC Lectures: Lecturer Experiences and Student Perceptions in Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Julia; Kotsanas, George; Dawson, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Lecturers using tablet PCs with specialised pens can utilise real-time changes in lecture delivery via digital inking. We investigated student perceptions and lecturer experiences of tablet PC lectures in large-enrolment biomedicine subjects. Lecturers used PowerPoint or Classroom Presenter software for lecture preparation and in-lecture pen-based…

  17. Design of inquiry-oriented science labs: impacts on students' attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseya, J. M.; Francis, C. D.

    2011-11-01

    Background: Changes in lab style can lead to differences in learning. Two inquiry-oriented lab styles are guided inquiry (GI) and problem-based (PB). Students' attitudes towards lab are important to consider when choosing between GI and PB styles during curriculum design. Purpose: We examined the degree to which lab experiences are explained by a GI or a PB lab style vs. students' attitudes towards specific aspects of the experience, reflected by perceived excitement (exc), difficulty (dif), time efficiency (eff) and association between lab and lecture material (help). Sample: Approximately 1000 students attending first-semester, college biology lab for science majors at the University of Colorado at Boulder, USA, participated in the study. Design and method: In 2007, two labs were run as GI and one as PB. Formats were switched in 2008. Attitudes were assessed with a post-semester survey. Results: Only the four attitude variables (not lab style) had a strong relationship with overall lab rating which was most strongly related to exc, followed by dif and help/eff. Dif and eff had the greatest influence on attitudes for or against GI vs. PB labs, and help and exc had little influence on a GI vs. a PB lab. Also, when dif was low, students' attitudes were not significantly different between PB and GI labs, but when dif was high, students' significantly rated GI labs higher than PB labs. Conclusions: Students' attitudes towards lab are more dependent on specific aspects of the experience than on lab style. Changes in GI vs. PB lab styles primarily influence dif and eff rather than exc and help. Dif may be an important factor to consider when implementing a lab in the PB vs. the GI format. It might be good to go with a GI when dif is high and a PB when dif is low.

  18. Lectures on Classical Integrability

    CERN Document Server

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the lectures consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schroedinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel'fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  19. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    18, 19, 20, 21, 22 November LECTURE FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Telling the Truth with Statistics R. Barlow / Univ. of Manchester, UK This course of lectures will cover probability, distributions, fitting, errors and confidence levels, for practising High Energy Physicists who need to use Statistical techniques to express their results. Concentrating on these appropriate specialist techniques means that they can be covered in appropriate depth, while assuming only the knowledge and experience of a typical Particle Physicist. The different definitions of probability will be explained, and it will be appear why this basic subject is so controversial; there are several viewpoints and it is important to understand them all, rather than abusing the adherents of different beliefs. Distributions will be covered: the situations they arise in, their useful properties, and the amazing result of the Central Limit Theorem. Fitting a parametrisation to a set of data is one of the m...

  20. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    23, 24, 25, 26 and 27 April REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500, on 23 April from 11:15 to 12:15 hrs Searches for Dark Matter F. Feinstein / CPPM, Marseille, F The fact that the mass of the visible stars could not account for the gravitational cohesion of the galaxy clusters was the first manifestation of non-radiating matter in the Universe. Since then, many observations imply that most of the matter is indeed dark. Its nature is still unknown and likely to have several contributions. Recent results indicate that most of it may not be composed of normal matter. These lectures will review the experimental methods, which have been developed to unravel this 70-year long mystery and confront their results with the current theoretical framework of cosmology.

  1. Globe: Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The LHC: an accelerator of science This series of lectures is all about understanding the scientific and technological challenges of the phenomenal LHC project and assessing its innovations through their everyday applications. Come and take a sneak preview of the LHC! Communicate: the Grid, a computer of global dimensions François Grey, head of communication in CERN’s Information Technology Department How will it be possible for the 15 million billion bytes of data generated by the LHC every year to be handled and stored by a computer that doesn’t have to be the size of a skyscraper? The computer scientists have the answer: the Grid, which will harness the power of tens of thousands of computers all over the world by creating a network of computers and making them operate as one. >>> Lectures are free and require no specialist knowledge. In french. 
 >>> By reservation only: tel. +41 (0)22 767 76 76

  2. Lectures on instantons

    CERN Document Server

    Vandoren, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    This is a self-contained set of lecture notes on instantons in (super) Yang-Mills theory in four dimensions and in quantum mechanics. First the basics are derived from scratch: the regular and singular one-instanton solutions for Yang-Mills theories with gauge groups SU(2) and SU(N), their bosonic and fermionic zero modes, the path integral instanton measure, and supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories in Euclidean space. Then we discuss applications: the \\theta-angle of QCD, the solution of the U(1) problem, the way Higgs fields solve the large-instanton problem, and tunneling and phase transitions in quantum mechanics and in nonabelian gauge theories. These lecture notes are an extension of a review on Yang-Mills and D-instantons written in 2000 by both authors and A.Belitsky

  3. Lecture 2: Software Security

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Computer security has been an increasing concern for IT professionals for a number of years, yet despite all the efforts, computer systems and networks remain highly vulnerable to attacks of different kinds. Design flaws and security bugs in the underlying software are among the main reasons for this. This lecture addresses the following question: how to create secure software? The lecture starts with a definition of computer security and an explanation of why it is so difficult to achieve. It then introduces the main security principles (like least-privilege, or defense-in-depth) and discusses security in different phases of the software development cycle. The emphasis is put on the implementation part: most common pitfalls and security bugs are listed, followed by advice on best practice for security development, testing and deployment. Sebastian Lopienski is CERN’s deputy Computer Security Officer. He works on security strategy and policies; offers internal consultancy and audit services; develops and ...

  4. Lectures on Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gomberoff, Andres

    2006-01-01

    The 2002 Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute School on Quantum Gravity was held at the Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS),Valdivia, Chile, January 4-14, 2002. The school featured lectures by ten speakers, and was attended by nearly 70 students from over 14 countries. A primary goal was to foster interaction and communication between participants from different cultures, both in the layman’s sense of the term and in terms of approaches to quantum gravity. We hope that the links formed by students and the school will persist throughout their professional lives, continuing to promote interaction and the essential exchange of ideas that drives research forward. This volume contains improved and updated versions of the lectures given at the School. It has been prepared both as a reminder for the participants, and so that these pedagogical introductions can be made available to others who were unable to attend. We expect them to serve students of all ages well.

  5. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 April REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 New Developments in Supersymmetry S. Raby / CERN-TH Introduction to supersymmetric grand unified theories. An introduction to the MSSM and different mechanisms for supersymmetry breaking. Then the details of SU(5) and SO(10) unification, the new gauge sector beyond the standard model, representations of quarks and leptons. Gauge and Yukawa coupling unification and some predictions.

  6. Lectures on knot homology

    CERN Document Server

    Nawata, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We provide various formulations of knot homology that are predicted by string dualities. In addition, we also explain the rich algebraic structure of knot homology which can be understood in terms of geometric representation theory in these formulations. These notes are based on lectures in the workshop "Physics and Mathematics of Link Homology" at Centre de Recherches Math\\'ematiques, Universit\\'e de Montr\\'eal.

  7. Lectures on classical electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2014-01-01

    These lecture notes cover classical electrodynamics at the level of advanced undergraduates or postgraduates. There is a strong emphasis on the general features of the electromagnetic field and, in particular, on the properties of electromagnetic radiation. It offers a comprehensive and detailed, as well as self-contained, account of material that can be covered in a one-semester course for students with a solid undergraduate knowledge of basic electricity and magnetism.

  8. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    9, 10 and 11 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 10:00 to 12:00 hrs on 9 and 10 May and on 11 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Cosmology and Particle Physics K. Olive / CERN-TH A general overview of the standard big bang model will be presented with special emphasis on astro-particle physics. Specific topics will include: Inflation, Baryoogenesis, Nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter.

  9. B.Gregory Lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    Jacob,M

    1987-01-01

    Troisième série de "Gregory lectures" en mémoire de B.Gregory (1919-1977),DG de 1965 à 1970. La première conférence B.Gregory a été donné par le Prof.V.Weisskopf, son prédécesseur. Chris Greeg (?)de Berkley prend aussi la parole

  10. An LHC Lecture

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2009-01-01

    When we try to advance from a solid knowledge of field theory to LHC physics we usually encounter a frustrating problem: in particular Higgs physics and QCD techniques appear as a impenetrable granite block of phenomenological know-how, common lores, and historically grown intuition what works and what does not. I hope this lecture can drill a few holes into the rock and put you into a position to digest advanced writeups as well as some first research papers on the topic.

  11. The Virtual Lab System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A virtual lab system is the simulation of real devices and experiments using computer and network tech-nology. It can make users do experiments easily, observe experiment phenomena and results through the remote termi-nal. Consequently, users can get final results to verify relative theory. The article analyses the features of virtual labsystems. A real virtual lab system named "Multimedia Virtual Lab for Digital Circuit Logic Design (MVLDCLD) "which has been developed by the authors and their group is also presented.

  12. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service and the Pensioners Association are pleased to invite CERN pensioners to a series of lectures given by professors and specialists from the Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva on the following topic: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The lectures will take place in the Main CERN Auditorium (Building 60) from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. on the following dates: Wednesday 12 November 2008: Assessing the extent of brain ageing Dr Dina ZEKRY Friday 12 December 2008: Can memory decline be prevented? Pr Jean-Pierre MICHEL Thursday 15 January 2009: Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease Pr Gabriel GOLD Wednesday 25 February 2009: What is the brain reserve? Speaker’s name to be announced at a later date The lectures will be given in French, with transparencies in English, and will be followed by a wide-ranging debate with the participants. CERN Medical Service - Pensioners Association - CERN-ESO (GAC-EPA)

  13. Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 More Information DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 7 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Fayard, O. Ullaland, D. Heagerty (CERN) Programme Presentation Workshops presentation Information on Computing Rules 10:15 - 11:00 R. Aymar (CERN) Introduction to CERN (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 J. Engelen (CERN) Introduction to CERN (2/2) 15:00 - 16:30 H. Menzel (CERN) An Introduction to Radiation Protection DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 8 july 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Fundamental questions in modern nuclear physics: The challenge of exotic nuclei (1/2) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Friday 9 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (3/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Fundamental questions in modern nuclear physics: The challenge of exotic nuclei (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 P....

  14. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Tracking at the LHC K. Safarik / CERN-EP The lecture will start with a short history of particle tracking in high-energy physics. Then we will concentrate on tracking in the LHC experiments. We will discuss various tracking devices proposed for these experiments, dividing them into two large groups: solid state detectors and gas detectors. Their characteristics, as well as their behaviour in different external conditions (i.e. magnetic field, radiation) will be compared. Furthermore, we will turn to the question: how to design a tracker using these various technologies, what are the essential parameters to be taken into account and we will apply these considerations to the proposed the LHC detectors. The last part of the lecture will be devoted to tracking software. We will mention simulation and concentrate on track finding and reconstruction, reviewing different algorithms prototyped for the LHC experiments. We will ...

  15. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service and the Pensioners Association are pleased to invite CERN pensioners to a series of lectures given by professors and specialists from the Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva on the following topic: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The lectures will take place in the Main CERN Auditorium (Building 60) from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. on the following dates: Wednesday 12 November 2008: Assessing the extent of brain ageing Dr Dina ZEKRY Friday 12 December 2008: Can memory decline be prevented? Pr Jean-Pierre MICHEL Thursday 15 January 2009: Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease Pr Gabriel GOLD Wednesday 25 February 2009: What is the brain reserve? Speaker’s name to be announced at a later date The lectures will be given in French, with transparencies in English, and will be followed by a wide-ranging debate with the participants. CERN Medical Service - Pensioners Association - CERN-ESO (GAC-EPA)

  16. Most recent Web Lectures

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Goldfarb

    Web Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials recorded over the past two years are available via the University of Michigan portal here. Most recent additions include the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27, the Physics Analysis Tools Workshop held in Bergen, Norway on April 23-27, and the CTEQ Workshop: "Physics at the LHC: Early Challenges" held at Michigan State University on May 14-15. Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally. In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Suggestions for events or tutorials to record in 2007, as well as feedback on existing archives is always welcome. Please contact us at wlap@umich.edu. Thank you and enjoy the lectures! The Michigan Web Lecture Team Tushar Bhatnagar, Steven Goldfarb, Jeremy Herr, Mitch McLachlan, Homer A....

  17. Measuring the Impact of Introductory Physics Labs on Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Wieman, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study showed that two lab courses, whose goals were exclusively to reinforce material developed in the lecture courses, do not have any impact on exam performance at the 1% level. In this study, we replicated this analysis with a modified version of one of these lab courses whose goals also included modeling, designing experiments, and analyzing and visualizing data. This modified course used the same sets of apparatus as the previous version, but changed the pre-lab and in-lab activities to focus on developing and testing models with data. The study evaluated the impact of these additional goals and activities. We found that they did not affect students' performance on the final exam.

  18. USNA DIGITAL FORENSICS LAB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To enable Digital Forensics and Computer Security research and educational opportunities across majors and departments. Lab MissionEstablish and maintain a Digital...

  19. Magnetic Media Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This lab specializes in tape certification and performance characterization of high density digital tape and isprepared to support the certification of standard size...

  20. USNA DIGITAL FORENSICS LAB

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To enable Digital Forensics and Computer Security research and educational opportunities across majors and departments. Lab Mission Establish and maintain a Digital...

  1. Fabrication and Prototyping Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Fabrication and Prototyping Lab for composite structures provides a wide variety of fabrication capabilities critical to enabling hands-on research and...

  2. Crystallization Formulation Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Crystallization Formulation Lab fills a critical need in the process development and optimization of current and new explosives and energetic formulations. The...

  3. Tele-Lab IT-Security: an Architecture for an online virtual IT Security Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Meinel

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Awareness Creation in terms of IT security has become a big thing – not only for enterprises. Campaigns for pupils try to highlight the importance of IT security even in the user’s early years. Common practices in security education – as seen in computer science courses at universities – mainly consist of literature and lecturing. In the best case, the teaching facility offers practical courses in a dedicated isolated computer lab. Additionally, there are some more or less interactive e-learning applications around. Most existing offers can do nothing more than impart theoretical knowledge or basic information. They all lack of possibilities to provide practical experience with security software or even hacker tools in a realistic environment. The only exceptions are the expensive and hard-to-maintain dedicated computer security labs. Those can only be provided by very few organizations. Tele-Lab IT-Security was designed to offer hands-on experience exercises in IT security without the need of additional hardware or maintenance expenses. The existing implementation of Tele-Lab even provides access to the learning environment over the Internet – and thus can be used anytime and anywhere. The present paper describes the extended architecture on which the current version of the Tele-Lab server is built.

  4. Physics Labs with Flavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes my attempts to look deeper into the so-called "shoot for your grade" labs, started in the '90s, when I began applying my teaching experience in Russia to introductory physics labs at the College of Charleston and other higher education institutions in South Carolina. The term "shoot for your grade" became popular among…

  5. Making Real Virtual Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Harry E.; Keller, Edward E.

    2005-01-01

    Francis Bacon began defining scientific methodology in the early 17th century, and secondary school science classes began to implement science labs in the mid-19th century. By the early 20th century, leading educators were suggesting that science labs be used to develop scientific thinking habits in young students, and at the beginning of the 21st…

  6. Three lectures on free probability

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    These are notes from a three-lecture mini-course on free probability given at MSRI in the Fall of 2010 and repeated a year later at Harvard. The lectures were aimed at mathematicians and mathematical physicists working in combinatorics, probability, and random matrix theory. The first lecture was a staged rediscovery of free independence from first principles, the second dealt with the additive calculus of free random variables, and the third focused on random matrix models.

  7. Are Statistics Labs Worth the Effort?--Comparison of Introductory Statistics Courses Using Different Teaching Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose H. Guardiola

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the academic performance of students in three similar elementary statistics courses taught by the same instructor, but with the lab component differing among the three. One course is traditionally taught without a lab component; the second with a lab component using scenarios and an extensive use of technology, but without explicit coordination between lab and lecture; and the third using a lab component with an extensive use of technology that carefully coordinates the lab with the lecture. Extensive use of technology means, in this context, using Minitab software in the lab section, doing homework and quizzes using MyMathlab ©, and emphasizing interpretation of computer output during lectures. Initially, an online instrument based on Gardner’s multiple intelligences theory, is given to students to try to identify students’ learning styles and intelligence types as covariates. An analysis of covariance is performed in order to compare differences in achievement. In this study there is no attempt to measure difference in student performance across the different treatments. The purpose of this study is to find indications of associations among variables that support the claim that statistics labs could be associated with superior academic achievement in one of these three instructional environments. Also, this study tries to identify individual student characteristics that could be associated with superior academic performance. This study did not find evidence of any individual student characteristics that could be associated with superior achievement. The response variable was computed as percentage of correct answers for the three exams during the semester added together. The results of this study indicate a significant difference across these three different instructional methods, showing significantly higher mean scores for the response variable on students taking the lab component that was carefully coordinated with

  8. Weak decays. [Lectures, phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojcicki, S.

    1978-11-01

    Lectures are given on weak decays from a phenomenological point of view, emphasizing new results and ideas and the relation of recent results to the new standard theoretical model. The general framework within which the weak decay is viewed and relevant fundamental questions, weak decays of noncharmed hadrons, decays of muons and the tau, and the decays of charmed particles are covered. Limitation is made to the discussion of those topics that either have received recent experimental attention or are relevant to the new physics. (JFP) 178 references

  9. Lectures in Micro Meteorology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling

    This report contains the notes from my lectures on Micro scale meteorology at the Geophysics Department of the Niels Bohr Institute of Copenhagen University. In the period 1993-2012, I was responsible for this course at the University. At the start of the course, I decided that the text books...... available in meteorology at that time did not include enough of the special flavor of micro meteorology that characterized the work of the meteorology group at Risø (presently of the Institute of wind energy of the Danish Technical University). This work was focused on Boundary layer flows and turbulence...

  10. Lectures on quantum chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Smilga, Andrei

    2001-01-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is the fundamental theory of strong interactions. It is a physical theory describing Nature. Lectures on Quantum Chromodynamics concentrates, however, not on the phenomenological aspect of QCD; books with comprehensive coverage of phenomenological issues have been written. What the reader will find in this book is a profound discussion on the theoretical foundations of QCD with emphasis on the nonperturbative formulation of the theory: What is gauge symmetry on the classical and on the quantum level? What is the path integral in field theory? How to define the path integ

  11. Lectures on electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    These lecture notes on electromagnetism have evolved from graduate and undergraduate EM theory courses given by the author at the University of Rochester, with the basics presented with clarity and his characteristic attention to detail. The thirteen chapters cover, in logical sequence, topics ranging from electrostatics, magnetostatics and Maxwell's equations to plasmas and radiation. Boundary value problems are treated extensively, as are wave guides, electromagnetic interactions and fields. This second edition comprises many of the topics expanded with more details on the derivation of vari

  12. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    26, 27, 28, 29 and 30 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes T. Damour / IHES, Bures-sur-Yvette, F. Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  13. Lectures in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Dan

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this book on particle physics is to present the theory in a simple way. The style and organization of the material is unique in that intuition is employed, not formal theory or the Monte Carlo method. This volume attempts to be more physical and less abstract than other texts without degenerating into a presentation of data without interpretation.This book is based on four courses of lectures conducted at Fermilab. It should prove very useful to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

  14. Joseph Mountin Lecture

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-26

    In this podcast, William H. Foege, MD, MPH delivers the 29th Annual Joseph W. Mountin Lecture. Dr. Foege was a key leader in the smallpox effort and worked as an epidemiologist in the successful eradication campaign in the 1970s. Dr. Foege became chief of the Smallpox Eradication Program at CDC, and was appointed director of CDC in 1977.  Created: 10/26/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/29/2009.

  15. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. The Lecture's Absent Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciullo, Nick J.

    2017-01-01

    According to the "Oxford English Dictionary" ("OED"), the noun "lecture" dates from the 14th century and means the "action of reading, perusal. Also, that which is read or perused." This definition, while accurate and resonates today in many college classrooms, ignores a key feature of any lecture. The…

  16. Lab-Tutorials for teaching quantum physics (Lab-Tutorials fuer den Quantenphysik Unterricht)

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmann, M C

    2006-01-01

    English abstract: In the "Intuitive Quantum Physics" course, we use graphical interpretations of mathematical equations and qualitative reasoning to develop and teach a simplified model of quantum physics. Our course contains three units: Wave physics, Development of a conceptual toolbox, and quantum physics. It also contains three key themes: wave-particle duality, the Schroedinger equation, and tunneling of quantum particles. Students learn most new material in lab-tutorials in which students work in small groups (3 to 3 people) on specially designed worksheets. Lecture reinforces the lab-tutorial content and focuses more on issues about the nature of science. Data show that students are able to learn some of the most difficult concepts in the course, and also that students learn to believe that there is a conceptually accessible structure to the physics in the course. German abstract: Im Kurs "Intuitive Quantum Physics" werden graphische Interpretationen mathematischer Gleichungen und qualitatives Denken d...

  17. Lectures on Yangian symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-08-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfel’d's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang-Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dilatation operator and tree-level scattering amplitudes. These lectures are illustrated by several examples, in particular the two-dimensional chiral Gross-Neveu model, the Heisenberg spin chain and { N }=4 superconformal Yang-Mills theory in four dimensions.

  18. Lectures on Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis

    2007-01-01

    Beautifully illustrated and engagingly written, Lectures on Quantum Mechanics presents theoretical physics with a breathtaking array of examples and anecdotes. Basdevant's style is clear and stimulating, in the manner of a brisk classroom lecture that students can follow with ease and enjoyment. Here is a sample of the book's style, from the opening of Chapter 1: "If one were to ask a passer-by to quote a great formula of physics, chances are that the answer would be 'E = mc2'. Nevertheless, the formula 'E=hV' which was written in the same year 1905 by the same Albert Einstein, and which started quantum theory, concerns their daily life considerably more. In fact, of the three watershed years for physics toward the beginning of the 20th century - 1905: the Special Relativity of Einstein, Lorentz and Poincaré; 1915: the General Relativity of Einstein, with its extraordinary reflections on gravitation, space and time; and 1925: the full development of Quantum Mechanics - it is surely the last which has the mos...

  19. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 5 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (1/3) 10:15-12:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (3&4/4) Tuesday 6 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (2/3) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/3) 11:15-12:00 R. JACOBSEN / T. NAKADA Discussion Session Wednesday 7 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (3/3) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/3) 11:15-12:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (1/4) 14:00-16:00 C. BENVENUTI Basic Science, Society, and Technological Innovation (Council Chamber, bldg. 503) Thursday 8 August 09:15-10:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (2/4) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (3/3) 11:15-12:00 J. CARR / J. LESGOURDES Discussion Session Friday 9 August 09:15-11:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (3&4/4) 11:15-12:00 C. JARLSKOG Historic Lecture 14:00-16:00 Course Review Monday 12 August 09:15-12:00 Students Sessi...

  20. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 P. WELLS Discussion Session 14:00 - 16:00 R. ASSMANN The CLIC Concept for a Future Particle Collider at the Energy Frontier Tuesday 30 July 09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (1/2) 10:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (1&2/4) Wednesday 31 July  09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK / F. ANTINORI Discussion Session Thursday 1 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (1/2) Friday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (2/4) 10:15 ? 11:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (2/2) 11:15 ? 12:00 F. BEDESCHI / T. NAKADA Di...

  1. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15 and 16 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 14, 15 May from 10:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 16 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Council Chamber, bldg 503 Modern Signal Processing: Wavelets vs. Fourier M. Vetterli / EPFL, Lausanne, CH and UC Berkeley Wavelets have established themselves as an important tool in modern signal processing as well as in applied mathematics. This is linked to several facts, among others: i. New theoretical advances have been achieved, like new forms of 4 time-frequency bases for signal analysis. ii. Efficient computational algorithms are available. iii. Many applications either used similar ideas, like for example the concept of multiresolution, or took advantage of the unified framework provided by wavelets. This combination of elegant theory, efficient algorithms, and successful applications makes the field of wavelets and signal processing quite exciting. It is the purpose of these lectures to establish the theory necessary to understand wavelets and related construct...

  2. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15 and 16 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 14, 15 May from 10:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 16 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Council Chamber, bldg 503 Modern Signal Processing: Wavelets vs. Fourier M. Vetterli / EPFL, Lausanne, CH and UC Berkeley Wavelets have established themselves as an important tool in modern signal processing as well as in applied mathematics. This is linked to several facts, among others: New theoretical advances have been achieved, like new forms of 4 time-frequency bases for signal analysis. Efficient computational algorithms are available. Many applications either used similar ideas, like for example the concept of multiresolution, or took advantage of the unified framework provided by wavelets. This combination of elegant theory, efficient algorithms, and successful applications makes the field of wavelets and signal processing quite exciting. It is the purpose of these lectures to establish the theory necessary to understand wavelets and related constructions. A...

  3. Engineering students' experiences from physics group work in learning labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm Mellingsæter, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential for how the students experience the learning labs, and how do these aspects relate to the emergence of occurrences termed joint workspace, i.e. the maintenance of content-related dialogues within the group? Programme description: First year mechanical engineering students attended the learning labs as a compulsory part of the physics course. The student groups were instructed to solve physics problems using the interactive whiteboard and then submit their work as whiteboard files. Sample: One group of five male students was followed during their work in these learning labs through one term. Design and methods: Data were collected as video recordings and fieldwork observation. In this paper, a focus group interview with the students was the main source of analysis. The interpretations of the interview data were compared with the video material and the fieldwork observations. Results: The results show that the students' overall experience with the learning labs was positive. They did, however, point to internal aspects of conflicting common and personal goals, which led to a group-work dynamics that seemed to inhibit elaborate discussions and collaboration. The students also pointed to external aspects, such as a close temporal proximity between lectures and exercises, which also seemed to inhibit occurrences termed joint workspace. Conclusions: In order to increase the likelihood of a joint workspace throughout the term in the learning labs, careful considerations have to be made with regard to timing between lectures and exercises, but also with regard to raising the students' awareness about shared and personal goals.

  4. Surviving Lecture: A Pedagogical Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Lecture is the approach traditionally used to teach music theory courses. Although efficient in the delivery of large amounts of information in a short period of time, lecture lacks the effectiveness of an active learning approach. "Theory Survivor" is a unique cooperative-learning method based on the Student Teams-Achievement Divisions technique…

  5. La lecture à voix haute

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria Reyzabal, Maria

    2015-01-01

    La lecture à voix haute apparaît comme une technique pour la compréhension active des textes, elle ajoute d’autres possibilités de compréhension à la lecture silencieuse et peut préparer à des pratiques créatives et des productions personnelles.

  6. Laser Research Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laser Research lab is thecenter for the development of new laser sources, nonlinear optical materials, frequency conversion processes and laser-based sensors for...

  7. Secure Processing Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Secure Processing Lab is the center of excellence for new and novel processing techniques for the formation, calibration and analysis of radar. In addition, this...

  8. The Udall Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Udall lab is interested in genome evolution and cotton genomics.The cotton genus ( Gossypium) is an extraordinarily diverse group with approximately 50 species...

  9. Deciphering Your Lab Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities ...

  10. Clothing Systems Design Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Clothing Systems Design Lab houses facilities for the design and rapid prototyping of military protective apparel.Other focuses include: creation of patterns and...

  11. LIDAR Research & Development Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The LIDAR Research and Development labs are used to investigate and improve LIDAR components such as laser sources, optical signal detectors and optical filters. The...

  12. Lecture Notes: Approximate Molecular Orbital Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Lecture Notes for the introductory course "Quantum Chemistry & Spectroscopy" (Dept. Science, Roskilde University)......Lecture Notes for the introductory course "Quantum Chemistry & Spectroscopy" (Dept. Science, Roskilde University)...

  13. Lectures on LHC physics

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the LHC experiments have closed the most important gap in our understanding of fundamental interactions, confirming that such interactions between elementary particles can be described by quantum field theory, more specifically by a renormalizable gauge theory. This theory is a priori valid for arbitrarily high energy scales and does not require an ultraviolet completion. Yet, when trying to apply the concrete knowledge of quantum field theory to actual LHC physics - in particular to the Higgs sector and certain regimes of QCD - one inevitably encounters an intricate maze of phenomenological know-how, common lore and other, often historically developed intuitions about what works and what doesn’t. These lectures cover three aspects to help understand LHC results in the Higgs sector and in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model: they discuss the many facets of Higgs physics, which is at the core of this significantly expanded second edition; then QCD, to the deg...

  14. TASI Lectures on Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In a series of five lectures I review inflationary cosmology. I begin with a description of the initial conditions problems of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology and then explain how inflation, an early period of accelerated expansion, solves these problems. Next, I describe how inflation transforms microscopic quantum fluctuations into macroscopic seeds for cosmological structure formation. I present in full detail the famous calculation for the primordial spectra of scalar and tensor fluctuations. I then define the inverse problem of extracting information on the inflationary era from observations of cosmic microwave background fluctuations. The current observational evidence for inflation and opportunities for future tests of inflation are discussed. Finally, I review the challenge of relating inflation to fundamental physics by giving an account of inflation in string theory.

  15. Lectures on Yangian Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfeld's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang-Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dila...

  16. Lectures on amenability

    CERN Document Server

    Runde, Volker

    2002-01-01

    The notion of amenability has its origins in the beginnings of modern measure theory: Does a finitely additive set function exist which is invariant under a certain group action? Since the 1940s, amenability has become an important concept in abstract harmonic analysis (or rather, more generally, in the theory of semitopological semigroups). In 1972, B.E. Johnson showed that the amenability of a locally compact group G can be characterized in terms of the Hochschild cohomology of its group algebra L^1(G): this initiated the theory of amenable Banach algebras. Since then, amenability has penetrated other branches of mathematics, such as von Neumann algebras, operator spaces, and even differential geometry. Lectures on Amenability introduces second year graduate students to this fascinating area of modern mathematics and leads them to a level from where they can go on to read original papers on the subject. Numerous exercises are interspersed in the text.

  17. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Introduction to Field Theory R. Kleiss / University of Nijmegen, NL Starting from the notion of path integrals as developed by Feynman, we discuss field theory in zero spacetime dimensions. The concepts of perturbation expansions, connected amplitudes, Feynman diagrams, classical solutions, renormalization and the effective action are developed. The model is extended to four spacetime dimensions, and the full Feynman rules for relativisitc scalar theory derived. The S matrix and the concept of unitarity are discussed, leading to the amputation rules for S matrix elements from considerations of unitarity. The rules are extended to include particles with spin-1/2 and spin-1. The high-energy behaviour of the theory is discussed as a method to derive the gauge symmetry of the various models.

  18. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 June REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 What have we learned from LEP J. Ellis / CERN-TH The basic formalism of the Standard Model will be reviewed, and the limited state of our knowledge before the start-up of LEP will be recalled. Neutrino counting at LEP will be compared with astrophysical and cosmological constraints. The interpretation of precision electroweak data will be discussed, including their predictions for the top quark and the Higgs boson, and the hints they offer for the future direction beyond the Standard Model: probably a weakly-interacting theory that may be extrapolated up to a grand unification scale. Topics in QCD and heavy-flavour physics will be discussed briefly, and topics in W physics at greater length. Direct LEP searches for the Higgs boson and supersymmetric particles will be discussed, and the prospects for their discoveries at future accelerators will be previewed.

  19. Lecture on Thermal Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    This lecture will cover solar thermal radiation, particularly as it relates to the high energy solar processes that are the subject of this summer school. After a general review of thermal radiation from the Sun and a discussion of basic definitions, the various emission and absorption mechanisms will be described including black-body emission, bremsstrahlung, free-bound, and atomic line emissions of all kinds. The bulk of the time will be spent discussing the observational characteristics of thermal flare plasma and what can be learned about the flare energy release process from observations of the thermal radiation at all wavelengths. Information that has been learned about the morphology, temperature distribution, and composition of the flare plasma will be presented. The energetics of the thermal flare plasma will be discussed in relation to the nonthermal energy of the particles accelerated during the flare. This includes the total energy, the radiated and conductive cooling processes, and the total irradiated energy.

  20. Lectures on algebraic statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Drton, Mathias; Sullivant, Seth

    2009-01-01

    How does an algebraic geometer studying secant varieties further the understanding of hypothesis tests in statistics? Why would a statistician working on factor analysis raise open problems about determinantal varieties? Connections of this type are at the heart of the new field of "algebraic statistics". In this field, mathematicians and statisticians come together to solve statistical inference problems using concepts from algebraic geometry as well as related computational and combinatorial techniques. The goal of these lectures is to introduce newcomers from the different camps to algebraic statistics. The introduction will be centered around the following three observations: many important statistical models correspond to algebraic or semi-algebraic sets of parameters; the geometry of these parameter spaces determines the behaviour of widely used statistical inference procedures; computational algebraic geometry can be used to study parameter spaces and other features of statistical models.

  1. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    21, 22, 23 November LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 21 November Auditorium, bldg 500 on 22, 23 November Introduction to symmetry breaking phenomena in physics E. Brezin / ENS, Paris, F. The notion of broken symmetries started slowly to emerge in the 19th century. The early studies of Pasteur on the parity asymmetry of life, the studies of Curie on piezoelectricity and on the symmetries of effects versus the symmetry of causes (which clearly excluded spontaneous symmetry breaking), are important historical landmarks. However the possibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking within the usual principles of statistical mechanics, waited for the work of Peierls and Onsager. The whole theory of phase transitions and critical phenomena, as well as the construction of field theoretic models as long distance limit of yet unknown physics, relies nowadays on the concept of criticality associated to spontaneous symmetry breaking. The phenomena of Goldstone bosons, of Meissn...

  2. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    19, 20, 21, 22 and 23 February REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - 19, 20 and 21 February Main Auditorium bldg. 500, 22 and 23 February Council Chamber, bldg 503 Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering J.G. Weisend / SLAC, Stanford, USA Cryogenic engineering is an important speciality at CERN. With the construction of LHC, this technology will have an even greater impact on machine operations. The goal of the course is to give people not working in cryogenics an appreciation of the basic principals and problems associated with the field. The course will also provide a foundation for future learning in cryogenics. Topics to be covered will include: properties of cryogenic fluids and materials, refrigeration, cryostat design, instrumentation, safety and propertiesof He II. Examples of working cryogenic systems, many of them from high energy physics, will be presented.

  3. Lecture critique de Luttwak

    OpenAIRE

    Guichaoua, Mickaël

    2016-01-01

    La grande stratégie de l’Empire romain d’Edward Luttwak, qui fut conseiller militaire du président Reagan, parut pour la première fois en 1974 mais ne fut éditée en français qu’en 1989. Cet ouvrage connaît toujours un grand succès dans les milieux universitaires et particulièrement chez les étudiants. Cette lecture entre dans le cadre de nos préoccupations sur le dialogue militaire entre Anciens et Modernes, sinon les contemporains. En effet, Luttwak explique, dans son introduction, qu’«  il ...

  4. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Introduction to Field Theory R. Kleiss / University of Nijmegen, NL Starting from the notion of path integrals as developed by Feynman, we discuss field theory in zero spacetime dimensions. The concepts of perturbation expansions, connected amplitudes, Feynman diagrams, classical solutions, renormalization and the effective action are developed. The model is extended to four spacetime dimensions, and the full Feynman rules for relativisitc scalar theory derived. The S matrix and the concept of unitarity are discussed, leading to the amputation rules for S matrix elements from considerations of unitarity. The rules are extended to include particles with spin-1/2 and spin-1. The high-energy behaviour of the theory is discussed as a method to derive the gauge symmetry of the various models.

  5. Göttingen Lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Woyczyński, Wojbor A

    1998-01-01

    These lecture notes are woven around the subject of Burgers' turbulence/KPZ model of interface growth, a study of the nonlinear parabolic equation with random initial data. The analysis is conducted mostly in the space-time domain, with less attention paid to the frequency-domain picture. However, the bibliography contains a more complete information about other directions in the field which over the last decade enjoyed a vigorous expansion. The notes are addressed to a diverse audience, including mathematicians, statisticians, physicists, fluid dynamicists and engineers, and contain both rigorous and heuristic arguments. Because of the multidisciplinary audience, the notes also include a concise exposition of some classical topics in probability theory, such as Brownian motion, Wiener polynomial chaos, etc.

  6. An evaluation of two hands-on lab styles for plant biodiversity in undergraduate biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basey, John M; Maines, Anastasia P; Francis, Clinton D; Melbourne, Brett

    2014-01-01

    We compared learning cycle and expository formats for teaching about plant biodiversity in an inquiry-oriented university biology lab class (n = 465). Both formats had preparatory lab activities, a hands-on lab, and a postlab with reflection and argumentation. Learning was assessed with a lab report, a practical quiz in lab, and a multiple-choice exam in the concurrent lecture. Attitudes toward biology and treatments were also assessed. We used linear mixed-effect models to determine impacts of lab style on lower-order cognition (LO) and higher-order cognition (HO) based on Bloom's taxonomy. Relative to the expository treatment, the learning cycle treatment had a positive effect on HO and a negative effect on LO included in lab reports; a positive effect on transfer of LO from the lab report to the quiz; negative impacts on LO quiz performance and on attitudes toward the lab; and a higher degree of perceived difficulty. The learning cycle treatment had no influence on transfer of HO from lab report to quiz or exam; quiz performance on HO questions; exam performance on LO and HO questions; and attitudes toward biology as a science. The importance of LO as a foundation for HO relative to these lab styles is addressed.

  7. The Oskar Klein Memorial Lectures

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    The Oskar Klein Memorial Lectures, instituted in 1988 and supported by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences through its Nobel Committee for Physics, are given at Stockholm University in Sweden, where Oskar Klein was professor in Theoretical Physics 1930-1962.Volume 1 contains the 1988 lectures on "Symmetry and Physics" and "From the Bethe-Hulthén Hypothesis to the Yang-Baxter Equation," given by C N Yang, Nobel Prize winner (1957) and professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The 1989 lectures on "Beyond the Standard Models," referring to models for cosmology and elementar

  8. To Lecture or Not to Lecture? That is the Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Kenneth John; Kelly, Lesly

    2016-01-01

    A quasi-experimental mixed-methods study compared the effects of an unfolding case study with lecture in a nursing orientation class on new graduate registered nurses' knowledge, perceived learning, and satisfaction with the instructional method. Although results showed that the unfolding case study was engaging, learners who received content in a lecture format achieved significantly higher posttest scores. Nursing professional development specialists will find this article helpful when considering instructional methods for new graduate registered nurses.

  9. The Oskar Fehr Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J S

    2016-06-01

    The first Oskar Fehr lecture is given in honour of Professor Fehr, a well respected ophthalmologist, who was head physician of the Department of Eye Diseases at the Rudolf Virchow Hospital from 1918. He practiced there until 1938, when he was forbidden to enter the clinic because he was Jewish and subject to the anti-Semitic laws that were instituted after the rise of the Nazi party. Dr. Fehr escaped to Great Britain, where he practiced ophthalmology into his eighties. He was the first to distinguish between granular corneal dystrophy, lattice corneal dystrophy and macular corneal dystrophy. The topic of the first Oskar Fehr lecture is Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD), an autosomal dominantly inherited corneal dystrophy associated with abnormal cholesterol deposition in the cornea. The clinical, histopathologic and genetic findings of 115 individuals with SCD followed over 18 years are discussed. The impact of systemic cholesterol metabolism on other diseases is reviewed. Corneal findings in SCD are predictable on the basis of patient age. All patients develop progressive corneal haze because of abnormal deposition of corneal lipid, but only half of patients with SCD have evidence of corneal crystals. The prior name for this disease, Schnyder crystalline corneal dystrophy, led me to create the International Committee for the Classification of Corneal Dystrophies, in order to create a more up-to-date and accurate nomenclature for SCD and other corneal dystrophies. The name was then changed to Schnyder corneal dystrophy. Histopathology of excised SCD corneas demonstrates abnormal deposition of only HDL cholesterol. Mutations in the UBIAD1 gene result in SCD. Three dimensional protein modeling shows that mutations result in impaired vitamin K synthesis, suggesting a common link between vitamin K and cholesterol metabolism. UBIAD1 mutations are associated with other diseases, such as bladder carcinoma and Parkinson's disease like findings in Drosophila. Studies of the

  10. Multicore: Fallout From a Computing Evolution (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yelick, Kathy [Director, NERSC

    2008-07-22

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Parallel computing used to be reserved for big science and engineering projects, but in two years that's all changed. Even laptops and hand-helds use parallel processors. Unfortunately, the software hasn't kept pace. Kathy Yelick, Director of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center at Berkeley Lab, describes the resulting chaos and the computing community's efforts to develop exciting applications that take advantage of tens or hundreds of processors on a single chip.

  11. Making the Case for Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, Franz

    2011-06-01

    This chapter is a personal account of the initial planning and competition for a new laboratory, which eventually became known as the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, with the official nickname "Jefferson Lab." The period covered starts as far back as 1964, with the introduction of quarks, and extends up to the late 1980s after the initial team was assembled, the superconducting design was in place, and construction was well underway. I describe some of the major experiments that were proposed to justify the laboratory, reflect on the present status of those initially proposed experiments, and very briefly outline some of the new ideas that emerged after the laboratory was constructed. The science is presented in a simple manner intended for a lay audience, with some of the ideas illustrated by cartoons that were often used in popular lectures given during this period.

  12. Introductory Lectures on Collider Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Tim M. P.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-12-01

    These are elementary lectures about collider physics. They are aimed at graduate students who have some background in computing Feynman diagrams and the Standard Model, but assume no particular sophistication with the physics of high energy colliders.

  13. Lectures on general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Papapetrou, Achille

    1974-01-01

    This book is an elaboration of lecture notes for the graduate course on General Rela­ tivity given by the author at Boston University in the spring semester of 1972. It is an introduction to the subject only, as the time available for the course was limited. The author of an introduction to General Relativity is faced from the beginning with the difficult task of choosing which material to include. A general criterion as­ sisting in this choice is provided by the didactic character of the book: Those chapters have to be included in priority, which will be most useful to the reader in enabling him to understand the methods used in General Relativity, the results obtained so far and possibly the problems still to be solved. This criterion is not sufficient to ensure a unique choice. General Relativity has developed to such a degree, that it is impossible to include in an introductory textbook of a reasonable length even a very condensed treatment of all important problems which have been discussed unt...

  14. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 16 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN C. Gaspar / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (1/8) Accelerators (1/5) Trigger and Data Acquisition (1/3) Tuesday 17 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN C. Gaspar / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (2/8) Accelerators (2/5) Trigger and Data Acquisition (2/3) Wednesday 18 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN A. Pich and O. Brüning Particle Physics: the Standard Model (3/8) Accelerators (3/5) Discussion Session Thursday 19 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN C. Gaspar / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (4/8) Accelerators (4/5) Trigger and Data Acquisition (3/3) Friday 20 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN A. Pich and O. Brüning Particle Physics: the Standard Model (5/8) Accelerators (5/5) Discussion Session Monday 23 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobse...

  15. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 23 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobsen / LBLN, Berkeley (USA) T. Cass / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (6/8) From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/3) Computing at CERN (1/3) Tuesday 24 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobsen / LBLN, Berkeley (USA) T. Cass / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (7/8) From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/3) Computing at CERN (2/3) Wednesday 25 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobsen / LBLN, Berkeley (USA) A. Pich and R. Jacobsen J. Tuckmantel / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (8/8) From Raw Data to Physics Results (3/3) Discussion Session Superconducting cavities Thursday 26 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN T. Cass / CERN Violation of Particle Anti-particle Symmetry (1/3) LEP Physics (1/4) Computing at CERN (3/3) Friday 27July 9:15 10:15 11:15 T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN T. Nakada; T. Cass T. Nakada in main auditorium T. Cass in TH auditorium Violati...

  16. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 30 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) Violation of Particle Anti-particle Symmetry (3/3) LEP Physics (3/4) Tuesday 31 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN F. Dydak / CERN P. Wells / CERN P. Lebrun / CERN P. Lebrun / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) Neutrino Physics (1/4) LEP Physics (4/4) Superconducting Technology for particle accelerators (1/2) Superconducting Technology for particle accelerators (2/2) Wednesday 1 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN F. Dydak / CERN G. Guidice; P. Wells G. Guidice in main auditorium, P. Wells in TH auditorium) O. Grobner / CERN O. Grobner / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) Neutrino Physics (2/4) Discussion Session Ultra High Vacuum Technology (1/2) Ultra High Vacuum Technology (2/2) Thursday 2 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 F. Antinori / CERN F. Dydak / CERN J. Aysto / CERN Heavy Ions (1/2) Neutrino Physics (3/4) Isolde Physics O...

  17. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Wednesday 4 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 15:45 L. Maiani / CERN L. Maiani / CERN M. Franklin / CERN G. Stevenson M. Diemoz O. Ullaland Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (1/2) Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (2/2) Classic Experiments (1/3) CERN Radiation Protection CERN Information on Activities CERN Intro to workshops Thursday 5 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 16:30 M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN F. Close F. Close   Classic Experiments (2/3) Classic Experiments (3/3) Discussion session Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (1/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (2/4) Welcome Drink Friday 6 July 9:15 10:15 F. Close F. Close Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (3/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (4/4) Monday 9 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) Big Experime...

  18. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Wednesday 4 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 15:45 L. Maiani / CERN L. Maiani / CERN M. Franklin / CERN G. Stevenson M. Diemoz O. Ullaland Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (1/2) Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (2/2) Classic Experiments (1/3) CERN Radiation Protection CERN Information on Activities CERN Intro to workshops Thursday 5 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 16:30 M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN F. Close F. Close   Classic Experiments (2/3) Classic Experiments (3/3) Discussion session Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (1/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (2/4) Welcome Drink Friday 6 July 9:15 10:15 F. Close F. Close Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (3/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (4/4) Further information can be obtained on the web at the following URL: http://cern.web.cern.ch/CERN/Divisions/PE/HRS/Recruitment/sum_prog99.html

  19. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 6 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN E. Copeland / Centre for Theoretical Physics University of Sussex, UK LHC Physics (1/3) Astroparticle Physics (1/3) Introduction to Cosmology (1/2) Tuesday 7 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN E. Copeland / Centre for Theoretical Physics University of Sussex, UK LHC Physics (2/3) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) Introduction to Cosmology (2/2) Wednesday 8 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN J. Carr; F. Gianotti J. Carr in main auditorium F. Gianotti in TH auditorium LHC Physics (2/3) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) Discussion Session Thursday 9 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Veneziano / CERN G. Veneziano; E. Copeland G. Veneziano in main auditorium E. Copeland in TH auditorium Dreams of a Finite Theory (1/2) Student Session (1/3) Discussion Session Friday 10 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Veneziano / CERN L. Okun / CERN Student Se...

  20. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 9 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) Big Experiments Discussion Session Tuesday 10 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (3/6) Particle Detectors (1/5) Wednesday 11 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram / CERN R. Kleiss / C. Joram Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (4/6) Particle Detectors (2/5) Discussion Session Thursday 12 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram / CERN C. Joram / CERN Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (5/6) Particle Detectors (3/5) Particle Detectors (4/5) Friday 13 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram / CERN R. Kleiss / C. Joram Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (6/6) Particle Detectors (5/5) Discussion Session Monday 16 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning C...

  1. Lectures on Bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Even a first approximation of bound states requires contributions of all powers in the coupling. This means that the concept of "lowest order bound state" needs to be defined. In these lectures I discuss the "Born" (no loop, lowest order in $\\hbar$) approximation. Born level states are bound by gauge fields which satisfy the classical field equations. As a check of the method, Positronium states of any momentum are determined as eigenstates of the QED Hamiltonian, quantized at equal time. Analogously, states bound by a strong external field $A^\\mu(\\xv)$ are found as eigenstates of the Dirac Hamiltonian. Their Fock states have dynamically created $e^+e^-$ pairs, whose distribution is determined by the Dirac wave function. The linear potential of $D=1+1$ dimensions confines electrons but repels positrons. As a result, the mass spectrum is continuous and the wave functions have features of both bound states and plane waves. The classical solutions of Gauss' law are explored for hadrons in QCD. A non-vanishing bo...

  2. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15, 16, 17, 18 January LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg 500 Superconducting materials suitable for magnets D.C. Larbalestier / Univ. of Wisconsin, USA The range of materials available for superconducting magnets is steadily expanding, even as the choice of material becomes potentially more complex. When virtually all magnets were cooled by helium at ~2-5 K it was easy to separate the domain of Nb-Ti from those of Nb3Sn applications and very little surprise that more than 90% of all magnets are still made from Nb-Ti. But the development of useful conductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductors, coupled to the recent discovery of the 39 K superconductor MgB2 and the developing availability of cryocoolers suggests that new classes of higher temperature, medium field magnets based on other than Nb-based conductors could become available in the next 5-10 years. My talks will discuss the essential physics and materials science of these 5 classes...

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2002-01-01

    14, 15, 16, 17, 18 January LECTURE SERIES From 11:00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg 500 Superconducting materials suitable for magnets D.C. Larbalestier / Univ. of Wisconsin, USA The range of materials available for superconducting magnets is steadily expanding, even as the choice of material becomes potentially more complex. When virtually all magnets were cooled by helium at ~2-5 K it was easy to separate the domain of Nb-Ti from those of Nb3Sn applications and very little surprise that more than 90% of all magnets are still made from Nb-Ti. But the development of useful conductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductors, coupled to the recent discovery of the 39 K superconductor MgB2 and the developing availability of cryocoolers suggests that new classes of higher temperature, medium field magnets based on other than Nb-based conductors could become available in the next 5-10 years. My talks will discuss the essential physics and materials science of these 5 classes of material - Nb-Ti...

  4. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    27, 28, 29 June and 2, 3 July REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 27, 28, 29 June and Auditorium, bldg 500 on 2, 3 July Particle Identification at the LHC P. Eerola / Lund University, SE The LHC experiments will explore new frontiers of particle physics. To maximize the physics potential of LHC, we need identification of leptons, hadrons, photons and 'invisible' particles. This is realized through reconstruction of electrons and muons, charged particle tracking and identification, b- and tau-tagging, and jet reconstruction. In addition, missing energy has to be measured in order to look for signatures of invisible particles. The experimental conditions posed by the collider, which will be operating at higher energy and luminosity than the present ones, are demanding. A large dynamical range is required in order to measure energies and momenta ranging from below one GeV to several TeVs. The detectors should be able to cope with the 40 MHz collision rate, with a large number ...

  5. John Adams Lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    13 December 2010 14:30 - Council Chamber, Bldg.503-1-001 Accelerator Breakthroughs, Achievements and Lessons from the Tevatron Collider V. Shiltsev / Fermilab’s Accelerator Physics Centre This year we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the first proton-antiproton collisions in the Tevatron. For two and a half decades the Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, IL, USA) was a centerpiece of the US and world’s High Energy Physics as the world’s highest energy particle collider at 1.8 TeV center of mass energy. While funding agencies are deciding on a 3-year extension of the Collider Run II operation through 2014, we – in this 2010 John Adams Lecture - will take a look in exciting story of the Tevatron: the story of long preparations, great expectations, numerous difficulties, years of “blood and sweat”, continuous upgrades, exceeding original goals (by a factor of 400) and high emotions. An accelerator scientist prospective will be given on a wide spectrum o...

  6. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    27, 28, 29 June and 2, 3 July REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 27, 28, 29 June and Auditorium, bldg 500 on 2, 3 July Particle Identification at the LHC P. Eerola / Lund University, SE The LHC experiments will explore new frontiers of particle physics. To maximize the physics potential of LHC, we need identification of leptons, hadrons, photons and 'invisible' particles. This is realized through reconstruction of electrons and muons, charged particle tracking and identification, b- and tau-tagging, and jet reconstruction. In addition, missing energy has to be measured in order to look for signatures of invisible particles. The experimental conditions posed by the collider, which will be operating at higher energy and luminosity than the present ones, are demanding. A large dynamical range is required in order to measure energies and momenta ranging from below one GeV to several TeVs. The detectors should be able to cope with the 40 MHz collision rate, with a large number ...

  7. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (6/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (1/3) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (1/3) Tuesday 23 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (2/3) Wednesday 24July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session 14:00 - 16:00 O. GROBNER UHV Technology Thursday 25 July (Theory Auditorium) 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) (TH) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (1/3) (TH) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (3/3) (TH) Friday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00  R...

  8. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 15 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (1/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (1/5) 11:15 - 12:00 C. GASPAR Trigger and Data Acquisition (1/3) Tuesday 16 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (2/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 C. GASPAR Trigger and Data Acquisition (2/3) Wednesday 17 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (3/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (3/5) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 18 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (4/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 C. GASPAR Trigger and Data Acquisition (3/3) Friday 19 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (5/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (5/5) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (6/8) 10:15 - 11:00 T. WENAUS From Raw Data to Physics ...

  9. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 8 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (1/3) 14:00 - 15:00 M. LINDROOS Isolde 15:30 - 16:30 M. LINDROOS Visit of the Experiment Tuesday 9 july 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (3/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (2/3) Wednesday 10 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (3/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (4/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (5/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (3/3) Friday 12 July 09:15 - 11:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (5&6/6) 11:15 ...

  10. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 3 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. FAYARD, O. ULLALAND Presentation of the Summer Student Programm 10:15 - 12:00 L. MAIANI Introduction to CERN (1&2/2) 14:00 - 15:00 G. Stevenson Radiation Protection (Council Chamber, bldg.503) Thursday 4 July 09:15 - 11:00 F. CLOSE Introduction to Particle Physics for non Physics Students (1&2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (1/5) Friday 5 July 09:15 - 11:00 F. CLOSE Introduction to Particle Physics for non Physics Students (3&4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 8 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (1/3) 14:00 - 15:00 M. LINDROOS Isolde 15:30 - 16:30 M. LINDROOS Visit of the Experiment Tuesday 9 july 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Part...

  11. Optional Student Use of Online Lecture Resources: Resource Preferences, Performance and Lecture Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabe, M.; Christopherson, K.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most common uses of a course management system in the on-campus environment is to offer lecture resources to students. Few researchers have investigated how students use such resources. This study considers student use of lecture resources that offer a representation of the lecture presented (i.e. lecture outline, lecture summary, audio…

  12. CDC Lab Values

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-02-02

    More than fifteen hundred scientists fill the lab benches at CDC, logging more than four million hours each year. CDC’s laboratories play a critical role in the agency’s ability to find, stop, and prevent disease outbreaks. This podcast provides a brief overview of what goes on inside CDC’s labs, and why this work makes a difference in American’s health.  Created: 2/2/2015 by Office of the Associate Director for Communication (OADC).   Date Released: 2/2/2015.

  13. OpenLabNotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Markus; Franz, Michael; Tan, Qihua

    2015-01-01

    the longevity of the providers. Turning towards free alternatives, however, raises questions about data protection, which are not sufficiently addressed by available solutions. To serve as legal documents, ELNs must prevent scientific fraud through technical means such as digital signatures. It would also......LabFramework, a powerful and flexible laboratory information management system. In contrast to comparable solutions, it allows to protect the intellectual property of its users by offering data protection with digital signatures. OpenLabNotes effectively Closes the gap between research documentation and sample management...

  14. SmallSat Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-05

    CubeSat. Mr. Alvarez worked with four students on the PCB layout for the solar panels and the construction of the 6U CubeSat mockup . Support for Mr...Hull and Mr. Alvarez was $49k including fringe benefits. !! Purchases: During this time period a license for MatLab software and the Princeton...Satellite ToolBox was purchased using funds from this award. This software adds tremendous capability to the SmallSat Lab by enabling students to analyze

  15. The NOAO Data Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, M.; Olsen, K.; Stobie, E. B.; Mighell, K. J.; Norris, P.

    2015-09-01

    We describe the NOAO Data Lab to help community users take advantage of current large surveys and prepare them even larger surveys in the era of LSST. The Data Lab will allow users to efficiently utilize catalogs of billions of objects, combine traditional telescope image and spectral data with external archives, share custom results with collaborators, publish data products to other users, and experiment with analysis toolkits. Specific science cases will be used to develop a prototype framework and tools, allowing us to work directly with scientists from survey teams to ensure development remains focused on scientifically productive tasks.

  16. A Big Bang Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheider, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The February 2005 issue of The Science Teacher (TST) reminded everyone that by learning how scientists study stars, students gain an understanding of how science measures things that can not be set up in lab, either because they are too big, too far away, or happened in a very distant past. The authors of "How Far are the Stars?" show how the…

  17. Lab on paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Weian; van den Berg, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices, which are suited to portable point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and on-site detection, hold great promise for improving global health, and other applications.1–8 While their importance and utility are widely acknowledged and extensive research has been conducted in the

  18. The Crime Lab Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Annamae J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Crime Lab Project, which takes an economical, hands-on, interdisciplinary approach to studying the career of forensics in the middle or high school classroom. Includes step-by-step student requirements for the investigative procedure, a sample evidence request form, and an assessment rubric. (KHR)

  19. Lab with Dad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havers, Brenda; Delmotte, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Family science nights are fantastic, but planning one can be overwhelming, especially when one considers the already overloaded schedule of a classroom teacher. To overcome this challenge, the authors--colleagues with a mutual love of science--developed a much simpler annual event called "Lab With Dad." The purpose was for one target age group of…

  20. Physics lab in spin

    CERN Multimedia

    Hawkes, N

    1999-01-01

    RAL is fostering commerical exploitation of its research and facilities in two main ways : spin-out companies exploit work done at the lab, spin-in companies work on site taking advantage of the facilities and the expertise available (1/2 page).

  1. Elemental Chem Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco Mariscal, Antonio Joaquin

    2008-01-01

    This educative material uses the symbols of 45 elements to spell the names of 32 types of laboratory equipment usually found in chemical labs. This teaching material has been divided into three puzzles according to the type of the laboratory equipment: (i) glassware as reaction vessels or containers; (ii) glassware for measuring, addition or…

  2. Lab on paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Weian; van den Berg, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices, which are suited to portable point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and on-site detection, hold great promise for improving global health, and other applications.1–8 While their importance and utility are widely acknowledged and extensive research has been conducted in the labo

  3. Exploring medical student decisions regarding attending live lectures and using recorded lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anmol; Saks, Norma Susswein

    2013-09-01

    Student decisions about lecture attendance are based on anticipated effect on learning. Factors involved in decision-making, the use of recorded lectures and their effect on lecture attendance, all warrant investigation. This study was designed to identify factors in student decisions to attend live lectures, ways in which students use recorded lectures, and if their use affects live lecture attendance. A total of 213 first (M1) and second year (M2) medical students completed a survey about lecture attendance, and rated factors related to decisions to attend live lectures and to utilize recorded lectures. Responses were analyzed overall and by class year and gender. M1 attended a higher percentage of live lectures than M2, while both classes used the same percentage of recorded lectures. Females attended more live lectures, and used a smaller percentage of recorded lectures. The lecturer was a key in attendance decisions. Also considered were the subject and availability of other learning materials. Students use recorded lectures as replacement for live lectures and as supplement to them. Lectures, both live and recorded, are important for student learning. Decisions about lecture placement in the curriculum need to be based on course content and lecturer quality.

  4. The Process of Transforming an Advanced Lab Course: Goals, Curriculum, and Assessments

    CERN Document Server

    Zwickl, Benjamin M; Lewandowski, H J

    2012-01-01

    A thoughtful approach to designing and improving labs, particularly at the advanced level, is critical for the effective preparation of physics majors for professional work in industry or graduate school. With that in mind, physics education researchers in partnership with the physics faculty at the University of Colorado Boulder have overhauled the senior-level Advanced Physics Lab course. The transformation followed a three part process of establishing learning goals, designing curricula that align with the goals, and assessment. Similar efforts have been carried out in physics lecture courses at the University of Colorado Boulder, but this is the first systematic research-based revision of one of our laboratory courses. The outcomes of this effort include a set of learning goals, a suite of new lab-skill activities and transformed optics labs, and a set of assessments specifically tailored for a laboratory environment. While the particular selection of advanced lab experiments varies widely between institu...

  5. Teaching from Data -- Climate Labs at Columbia and Barnard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfirman, S.; Hays, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Since 1995 Columbia and Barnard have offered Earth's Environmental Systems: Climate to undergraduate environmental majors. Both lecture and laboratory resources are available on line. In collaboration with Lamont- Doherty Earth Observatory, the twelve labs engage students in exploring global databases to learn about earth processes. Evaluations of the course as well as exit surveys of senior majors, indicate that the laboratories help students learn how to extract meaning from data and to better understand the research experience. Using classical data such as the Mauna Loa carbon dioxide concentrations, the Vostok record, the atmospheric Earth Radiation Budget Experience, and the Levitus World Ocean Atlas, the laboratories are designed with both structured exercises and open-ended questions. For example, the "Modern Atmospheric CO2 Record" lab has students compare the Mauna Loa data with records from the South Pole and Barrow, and then examine seasonal variations in global primary productivity to understand seasonal and interhemispheric differences. This information is then set in the context of projections from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Development of the Earth Environmental Systems sequence (Climate, Solid Earth, and Life) was supported by NSF and Columbia to establish a firm foundation for environmental majors. The Climate course is taught both fall and spring semesters by a team of professors. Challenges over the years include consistently augmenting the computer-based labs with hands-on elements, and student difficulty in writing lab reports when the lab is open-ended.

  6. Skills Labs: workshop EMERGO toolkit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurvers, Hub; Slootmaker, Aad

    2009-01-01

    Kurvers, H. J., & Slootmaker, A. (2009). Skills Labs: workshop EMERGO toolkit. Presentation given at project members of Skills Labs. March, 31, 2009 and April, 24, 2009, Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open University of the Netherlands.

  7. ERLN Lab Compendium Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Compendium is an online database of environmental testing laboratories nationwide. It enables labs to create profiles of their capabilities, so emergency responders can quickly identify a lab that will meet their support needs.

  8. Practical strategies for effective lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Peter H; McCallister, Jennifer W; Luks, Andrew M; Le, Tao T; Fessler, Henry E

    2015-04-01

    Lecturing is an essential teaching skill for scientists and health care professionals in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. However, few medical or scientific educators have received training in contemporary techniques or technology for large audience presentation. Interactive lecturing outperforms traditional, passive-style lecturing in educational outcomes, and is being increasingly incorporated into large group presentations. Evidence-based techniques range from the very simple, such as inserting pauses for audience discussion, to more technologically advanced approaches such as electronic audience response systems. Alternative software platforms such as Prezi can overcome some of the visual limits that the ubiquitous PowerPoint imposes on complex scientific narratives, and newer technology formats can help foster the interactive learning environment. Regardless of the technology, adherence to good principles of instructional design, multimedia learning, visualization of quantitative data, and informational public speaking can improve any lecture. The storyline must be clear, logical, and simplified compared with how it might be prepared for scientific publication. Succinct outline and summary slides can provide a roadmap for the audience. Changes of pace, and summaries or other cognitive breaks inserted every 15-20 minutes can renew attention. Graphics that emphasize clear, digestible data graphs or images over tables, and simple, focused tables over text slides, are more readily absorbed. Text slides should minimize words, using simple fonts in colors that contrast to a plain background. Adherence to these well-established principles and addition of some new approaches and technologies will yield an engaging lecture worth attending.

  9. Lecture Quiz Extended: An Improvement of the Lecture Quiz Game

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Long Tien

    2008-01-01

    Lecture Quiz is a game used to provide more active and participant students in lectures. The game is based on a server, a teacher client and a student client. In a master thesis done in 2007, Ole Kristian Mørch-Storstein and Terje Øfsdahl have explored concept of game to be used in higher education and develop a prototype game to further evaluate that concept. Their game has three components; the first one is the server part running on a server. This component connect to a database and provid...

  10. Lectures on Conformal Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Qualls, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    These lectures notes are based on courses given at National Taiwan University, National Chiao-Tung University, and National Tsing Hua University in the spring term of 2015. Although the course was offered primarily for graduate students, these lecture notes have been prepared for a more general audience. They are intended as an introduction to conformal field theories in various dimensions, with applications related to topics of particular interest: topics include the conformal bootstrap program, boundary conformal field theory, and applications related to the AdS/CFT correspondence. We assume the reader to be familiar with quantum mechanics at the graduate level and to have some basic knowledge of quantum field theory. Familiarity with string theory is not a prerequisite for this lectures, although it can only help.

  11. "Don't Lecture Me"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Often I will listen to public radio on long drives when I am alone. Recently I happened to catch a program called "Don't Lecture Me" and it really caught my attention for several reasons. First, the speakers were all notable leaders in Physics Education Research such as Joe Redish, David Hestenes, and Eric Mazur. (See this month's WebSights column.) These folks are among many who have devoted their energies to understanding how students learn physics and how teachers can design classroom instruction and interactions to best meet the needs of learners. Second, on this particular trip, I had just observed a teacher whose class was very teacher-centered as the teacher lectured most of the class period. As we discussed this later, she expressed concern that she had to cover the material and didn't feel that she could do it without lecturing.

  12. ``Don't Lecture Me''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Often I will listen to public radio on long drives when I am alone. Recently I happened to catch a program called ``Don't Lecture Me'' and it really caught my attention for several reasons. First, the speakers were all notable leaders in Physics Education Research such as Joe Redish, David Hestenes, and Eric Mazur. (See this month's WebSights column.) These folks are among many who have devoted their energies to understanding how students learn physics and how teachers can design classroom instruction and interactions to best meet the needs of learners. Second, on this particular trip, I had just observed a teacher whose class was very teacher-centered as the teacher lectured most of the class period. As we discussed this later, she expressed concern that she had to cover the material and didn't feel that she could do it without lecturing.

  13. The College of Charleston's 400-Student Observational Lab Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, C. M.

    2006-06-01

    For over thirty years the College of Charleston has been teaching a year-long introductory astronomy course incorporating a mandatory 3 hour lab. Despite our location in a very light polluted, coastal, high humidity, and often cloudy metropolitan area we have emphasized observational activities as much as possible. To accommodate our population of between 300-400 students per semester, we have 28 8-inch Celestron Telescopes and 25 GPS capable 8-inch Meade LX-200 telescopes. Finally, we have a 16 DFM adjacent to our rooftop observing decks. For indoor activities we have access to 42 computers running a variety of astronomy education software. Some of the computer activities are based on the Starry Night software (Backyard and Pro), the CLEA software from Gettysburg College, and Spectrum Explorer from Boston University. Additionally, we have labs involving cratering, eclipses and phases, coordinate systems with celestial globes, the inverse square law, spectroscopy and spectral classification, as well as others. In this presentation we will discuss the difficulties in managing a program of this size. We have approximately 14 lab sections a week. The lab manager's task involves coordinating 8-10 lab instructors and the same number of undergraduate teaching assistants as well as trying to maintain a coherent experience between the labs and lecture sections. Our lab manuals are produced locally with yearly updates. Samples from the manuals will be available. This program has been developed by a large number of College of Charleston astronomy faculty, including Don Drost, Bob Dukes, Chris Fragile, Tim Giblin, Jon Hakkila, Bill Kubinec, Lee Lindner, Jim Neff, Laura Penny, Al Rainis, Terry Richardson, and D. J. Williams, as well as adjunct and visiting faculty Bill Baird, Kevin Bourque, Ethan Denault, Kwayera Davis, Francie Halter, and Alan Johnson. Part of this work has been funded by NSF DUE grants to the College of Charleston.

  14. Eight lectures on theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Planck, Max

    1997-01-01

    In 1909 the great German physicist and Nobel Prize winner Max Planck (1858-1947) delivered a series of eight lectures at Columbia University giving a fascinating overview of the new state of physics, which he had played a crucial role in bringing about. The first, third, fifth, and sixth lectures present his account of the revolutionary developments occasioned when he first applied the quantum hypothesis to blackbody radiation. The reader is given an invaluable opportunity to witness Planck's thought processes both on the level of philosophical principles as well as their application to physi

  15. Displacement ventilation in lecture halls

    OpenAIRE

    Egorov, Artem

    2013-01-01

    This thesis considers several important goals. The main purpose is to see how displacement ventilation sys-tem works in the lecture hall of M-building and compare obtained results with D2 and Indoor Climate Classi-fication. The second one is to analyze the function of the ventilation system. The last one is to realize when displacement ventilation is preferable to mixing ventilation. Analysis of the system was carried out with instruments from MUAS HVAC laboratory. In lecture hall were me...

  16. TASI Lectures on Flavor Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ligeti, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    These notes overlap with lectures given at the TASI summer schools in 2014 and 2011, as well as at the European School of High Energy Physics in 2013. This is primarily an attempt at transcribing my hand-written notes, with emphasis on topics and ideas discussed in the lectures. It is not a comprehensive introduction or review of the field, nor does it include a complete list of references. I hope, however, that someone may find it useful to better understand the reasons for excitement about recent progress and future opportunities in flavor physics.

  17. TASI Lectures on Flavor Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeti, Zoltan

    These notes overlap with lectures given at the TASI summer schools in 2014 and 2011, as well as at the European School of High Energy Physics in 2013. This is primarily an attempt at transcribing my handwritten notes, with emphasis on topics and ideas discussed in the lectures. It is not a comprehensive introduction or review of the field, nor does it include a complete list of references. I hope, however, that some may find it useful to better understand the reasons for excitement about recent progress and future opportunities in flavor physics.

  18. Videotaped Lectures in a Graduate Cytogenetics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R. L.; Jellen, E. N.

    1994-01-01

    Graduate students evaluated the use of videotape recordings of lectures on chromosome configurations in a cytogenetics course. Ninety-two percent of the students indicated that videotaping was worthwhile. Advantages for using the videotaped cytogenetics lectures are presented. (MDH)

  19. Archimedes Remote Lab for Secondary Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Zubia, J.; Angulo Martinez, I.; Martinez Pieper, G.; Lopez de Ipina Gonzalez de Artaza, D.; Hernandez Jayo, U.; Orduna Fernandez, P.; Dziabenko, O.; Rodriguez Gil, L.; Riesen, van S.A.N.; Anjewierden, A.A.; Kamp, E.; Jong, de A.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a remote lab designed for teaching the Archimedes’ principle to secondary school students, as well as an online virtual lab on the general domain of buoyancy. The Archimedes remote lab is integrated into WebLab-Deusto. Both labs are promoted for usage in frame of the Go-Lab Europ

  20. Archimedes Remote Lab for Secondary Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia Zubia, J.; Angulo Martinez, I.; Martinez Pieper, G.; Lopez de Ipina Gonzalez de Artaza, D.; Hernandez Jayo, U.; Orduna Fernandez, P.; Dziabenko, O.; Rodriguez Gil, L.; van Riesen, Siswa; Anjewierden, Anjo Allert; Kamp, Ellen; de Jong, Anthonius J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a remote lab designed for teaching the Archimedes’ principle to secondary school students, as well as an online virtual lab on the general domain of buoyancy. The Archimedes remote lab is integrated into WebLab-Deusto. Both labs are promoted for usage in frame of the Go-Lab

  1. TASI Lectures on Jet Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Shelton, Jessie

    2013-01-01

    Jet physics is a rich and rapidly evolving field, with many applications to physics in and beyond the Standard Model. These notes, based on lectures delivered at the June 2012 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute, provide an introduction to jets at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics covered include sequential jet algorithms, jet shapes, jet grooming, and boosted Higgs and top tagging.

  2. Koshiba, Tanaka give Nobel lectures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Masatoshi Kosiba and Koichi Tanaka presented lectures in English on Sunday, touching on topics ranging from particle physics, to teamwork to commemorate their reception of this year's Nobel Prize for Physics and Chemistry. The two will receive their respective prizes in an awards ceremony scheduled for Tuesday (1 page).

  3. Six Lectures on Commutative Algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Elias, J; Miro-Roig, Rosa Maria; Zarzuela, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    Interest in commutative algebra has surged over the years. In order to survey and highlight the developments in this rapidly expanding field, the Centre de Recerca Matematica in Bellaterra organized a ten-days Summer School on Commutative Algebra in 1996. This title offers a synthesis of the lectures presented at the Summer School

  4. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  5. TASI lectures on complex structures

    CERN Document Server

    Denef, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    These lecture notes give an introduction to a number of ideas and methods that have been useful in the study of complex systems ranging from spin glasses to D-branes on Calabi-Yau manifolds. Topics include the replica formalism, Parisi's solution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, overlap order parameters, supersymmetric quantum mechanics, D-brane landscapes and their black hole duals.

  6. TASI Lectures on Complex Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denef, Frederik

    2012-11-01

    These lecture notes give an introduction to a number of ideas and methods that have been useful in the study of complex systems ranging from spin glasses to D-branes on Calabi-Yau manifolds. Topics include the replica formalism, Parisi's solution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, overlap order parameters, supersymmetric quantum mechanics, D-brane landscapes and their black hole duals.

  7. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  8. Embedding Laboratory Experience in Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, James R.; Barroso, Luciana R.; Simpson, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Demonstrations can be very effective at enhancing student learning and represent a mechanism for embedding laboratory experiences within a classroom setting. A key component to an effective demonstration is active student engagement throughout the entire process, leading to a guided laboratory experience in a lecture setting. Students are involved…

  9. College Students' Perception of Lecturers Using Humor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Ron; Zillmann, Dolf

    1981-01-01

    Audio-taped lectures by male or female professors were produced in four versions: no humor; sexual humor; other-disparaging humor; and self-disparaging humor. Male and female students rated lecturers' intelligence and appeal. Intelligence ratings were unaffected by humor variations, but significant lecturer-student sex interactions were found on…

  10. Interactive Lecture Discourse for University EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Interactive lectures play an important role in improving comprehension and in enhancing communicative competence in the English language for EFL university students taking content lecture courses. This article considers the interactive discourse in lectures of the English Studies Department at the University of Alicante, Spain. It describes an…

  11. Clickers and Formative Feedback at University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelandsdal, Kjetil; Krumsvik, Rune Johan

    2017-01-01

    Lecturing is often criticized for being a monological and student passive way of teaching. However, digital technology such as Student Response Systems (SRS) can be used to reconstruct the traditional lecturing format. During a series of five two-hour lectures in "qualitative methods" for first year psychology students, we used SRS to…

  12. Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

    2009-07-21

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

  13. The Death of the Dinosaurs: 27 Years Later (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, Rich

    2006-06-30

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Rich Muller, a Berkeley Lab physicist, discusses Nobel laureate Luis Alvarez and colleagues' 1979 discovery that an asteroid impact killed the dinosaurs. He also discusses what scientists have learned in the subsequent 27 years. Alvarez's team detected unusual amounts of iridium in sedimentary layers. They attributed the excess iridium to an impact from a large asteroid. His talk was presented June 30, 2006.

  14. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of the analytical procedure of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL can determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of soil analysis on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL will attempt to determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  16. e-Learning - Physics Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohottala, Hashini

    2014-03-01

    The general student population enrolled in any college level class is highly diverse. An increasing number of ``nontraditional'' students return to college and most of these students follow distance learning degree programs while engaging in their other commitments, work and family. However, those students tend to avoid taking science courses with labs, mostly because of the incapability of remotely completing the lab components in such courses. In order to address this issue, we have come across a method where introductory level physics labs can be taught remotely. In this process a lab kit with the critical lab components that can be easily accessible are conveniently packed into a box and distributed among students at the beginning of the semester. Once the students are given the apparatus they perform the experiments at home and gather data All communications with reference to the lab was done through an interactive user-friendly webpage - Wikispaces (WikiS). Students who create pages on WikiS can submit their lab write-ups, embed videos of the experiments they perform, post pictures and direct questions to the lab instructor. The students who are enrolled in the same lab can interact with each other through WikiS to discuss labs and even get assistance.

  17. Inexpensive DAQ based physics labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Clark, Shane

    2015-11-01

    Quality Data Acquisition (DAQ) based physics labs can be designed using microcontrollers and very low cost sensors with minimal lab equipment. A prototype device with several sensors and documentation for a number of DAQ-based labs is showcased. The device connects to a computer through Bluetooth and uses a simple interface to control the DAQ and display real time graphs, storing the data in .txt and .xls formats. A full device including a larger number of sensors combined with software interface and detailed documentation would provide a high quality physics lab education for minimal cost, for instance in high schools lacking lab equipment or students taking online classes. An entire semester’s lab course could be conducted using a single device with a manufacturing cost of under $20.

  18. ERLN Technical Support for Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Response Laboratory Network provides policies and guidance on lab and data requirements, Standardized Analytical Methods, and technical support for water and radiological sampling and analysis

  19. Aircraft Lighting and Transparency Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Lighting and Transparencies with Night Combat Lab performs radiometric and photometric measurements of cockpit lighting and displays. Evaluates the day,...

  20. Using a Practical Instructional Development Process to Show That Integrating Lab and Active Learning Benefits Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goacher, Robyn E.; Kline, Cynthia M.; Targus, Alexis; Vermette, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    We describe how a practical instructional development process helped a first-year assistant professor rapidly develop, implement, and assess the impact on her Analytical Chemistry course caused by three changes: (a) moving the lab into the same semester as the lecture, (b) developing a more collaborative classroom environment, and (c) increasing…

  1. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Craig D

    2015-01-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in bar...

  2. Kindergarten Quantum Mechanics lectures notes

    CERN Document Server

    Coecke, B

    2005-01-01

    These lecture notes survey some joint work with Samson Abramsky as it was presented by me at several conferences in the summer of 2005. It concerns `doing quantum mechanics using only pictures of lines, squares, triangles and diamonds'. This picture calculus can be seen as a very substantial extension of Dirac's notation, and has a purely algebraic counterpart in terms of so-called Strongly Compact Closed Categories (introduced by Abramsky and I in quant-ph/0402130 and [4]) which subsumes my Logic of Entanglement quant-ph/0402014. For a survey on the `what', the `why' and the `hows' I refer to a previous set of lecture notes quant-ph/0506132. In a last section we provide some pointers to the body of technical literature on the subject.

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  4. Lectures on Dark Matter Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lisanti, Mariangela

    2016-01-01

    Rotation curve measurements from the 1970s provided the first strong indication that a significant fraction of matter in the Universe is non-baryonic. In the intervening years, a tremendous amount of progress has been made on both the theoretical and experimental fronts in the search for this missing matter, which we now know constitutes nearly 85% of the Universe's matter density. These series of lectures, first given at the TASI 2015 summer school, provide an introduction to the basics of dark matter physics. They are geared for the advanced undergraduate or graduate student interested in pursuing research in high-energy physics. The primary goal is to build an understanding of how observations constrain the assumptions that can be made about the astro- and particle physics properties of dark matter. The lectures begin by delineating the basic assumptions that can be inferred about dark matter from rotation curves. A detailed discussion of thermal dark matter follows, motivating Weakly Interacting Massive P...

  5. Lectures on matrix field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ydri, Badis

    2017-01-01

    These lecture notes provide a systematic introduction to matrix models of quantum field theories with non-commutative and fuzzy geometries. The book initially focuses on the matrix formulation of non-commutative and fuzzy spaces, followed by a description of the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. As an example, the phase structure of non-commutative phi-four theory is treated in great detail, with a separate chapter on the multitrace approach. The last chapter offers a general introduction to non-commutative gauge theories, while two appendices round out the text. Primarily written as a self-study guide for postgraduate students – with the aim of pedagogically introducing them to key analytical and numerical tools, as well as useful physical models in applications – these lecture notes will also benefit experienced researchers by providing a reference guide to the fundamentals of non-commutative field theory with an emphasis on matrix models and fuzzy geometries.

  6. Lectures on Matrix Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ydri, Badis

    The subject of matrix field theory involves matrix models, noncommutative geometry, fuzzy physics and noncommutative field theory and their interplay. In these lectures, a lot of emphasis is placed on the matrix formulation of noncommutative and fuzzy spaces, and on the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. In particular, the phase structure of noncommutative $\\phi^4$ theory is treated in great detail, and an introduction to noncommutative gauge theory is given.

  7. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 25 & Wednesday 26 May 2010 from 11:00 to 12:30 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500-1-001 Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe by Prof. Hitoshi Murayama (University of California, Berkeley) In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  8. Lecture Notes on Differential Forms

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This is a series of lecture notes, with embedded problems, aimed at students studying differential topology. Many revered texts, such as Spivak's "Calculus on Manifolds" and Guillemin and Pollack's "Differential Topology" introduce forms by first working through properties of alternating tensors. Unfortunately, many students get bogged down with the whole notion of tensors and never get to the punch lines: Stokes' Theorem, de Rham cohomology, Poincare duality, and the realization of various t...

  9. TASI 2006 Lectures on Leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab /UC, Irvine

    2007-03-01

    The origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter of the Universe has been one of the great challenges in particle physics and cosmology. Leptogenesis as a mechanism for generating the cosmological baryon asymmetry of the Universe has gained significant interests ever since the advent of the evidence of non-zero neutrino masses. In these lectures presented at TASI 2006, I review various realizations of leptogenesis and allude to recent developments in this subject.

  10. MGMT 30100: Management Career Lectures

    OpenAIRE

    Landis, Maureen Huffer

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Management Career Lectures (MGMT 30100) is designed to help undergraduate management students with their overall career/professional development whether that focus on internship/job search processes or graduate school attendance. The course also supports the development, refinement and enrichment of the competencies within the “Launching Business Leaders” initiative. Students develop skills useful for the internship/job search process, gain knowledge that benefits short and long-ter...

  11. The Jefferson Lab Program

    CERN Document Server

    James-Boyce, M

    2003-01-01

    The kW-class infrared (IR) free electron laser (FEL) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) had the capability of producing intra-cavity Thomson scattering of the IR off the electron beam thus producing high average flux, sub-picosecond x-rays. We have measured these x-rays and demonstrated the energy tunability range from 3.5 keV to 18 keV. The corresponding flux and brightness have been estimated and will be discussed. In 2002, the FEL was disassembled and has been reconfigured to produce 10 kW average power IR. We present the estimated x-ray capabilities for the new FEL and discuss potential applications.

  12. The lab of fame

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    For a third time, CERN is organising the Swiss heat of Famelab, the world’s leading science communication competition that has already gathered over 5,000 young and talented scientists and engineers from all across the planet.   Besides their degrees, the scientists who participate in Famelab have another thing in common: their passion for communicating science. Coming from a variety of scientific fields, from medicine to particle physics and microbiology, the contestants have three minutes to present a science, technology, mathematics or engineering-based talk using only the props he or she can carry onto the stage; PowerPoint presentations are not permitted. The contestants are then judged by a panel of three judges who evaluate the content, clarity and charisma of their talks. What's unique about FameLab is the fact that content is an important aspect of the performance. At the end of their presentation, contestants are often questioned about the scientific relevance of...

  13. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-04-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in baryons and sketches a picture of baryons as bound-states with Borromean character. Planned experiments are capable of validating the perspectives outlined in these lectures.

  14. Value added or misattributed? A multi-institution study on the educational benefit of labs for reinforcing physics content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, N. G.; Olsen, Jack; Thomas, James L.; Wieman, Carl E.

    2017-06-01

    Instructional labs are widely seen as a unique, albeit expensive, way to teach scientific content. We measured the effectiveness of introductory lab courses at achieving this educational goal across nine different lab courses at three very different institutions. These institutions and courses encompassed a broad range of student populations and instructional styles. The nine courses studied had two key things in common: the labs aimed to reinforce the content presented in lectures, and the labs were optional. By comparing the performance of students who did and did not take the labs (with careful normalization for selection effects), we found universally and precisely no added value to learning course content from taking the labs as measured by course exam performance. This work should motivate institutions and departments to reexamine the goals and conduct of their lab courses, given their resource-intensive nature. We show why these results make sense when looking at the comparative mental processes of students involved in research and instructional labs, and offer alternative goals and instructional approaches that would make lab courses more educationally valuable.

  15. Physics Labs with Flavor II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper was inspired by the numerous requests from "TPT" readers to expand the number of examples of "recurrent study" lab exercises described in my previous paper "Physics Labs with Flavor." I recommend that readers examine it first in order to better understand this one as my attempt here is to be brief. In that paper, one can find details…

  16. Physics Labs with Flavor II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper was inspired by the numerous requests from "TPT" readers to expand the number of examples of "recurrent study" lab exercises described in my previous paper "Physics Labs with Flavor." I recommend that readers examine it first in order to better understand this one as my attempt here is to be brief. In that paper, one can find details…

  17. GitLab repository management

    CERN Document Server

    Hethey, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    A simple, easy to understand tutorial guide on how to build teams and efficiently use version control, using GitLab.If you are a system administrator in a company that writes software or are in charge of an infrastructure, this book will show you the most important features of GitLab, including how to speed up the overall process

  18. How Interactive can a Lecture Become?

    OpenAIRE

    Koohgilani,Mehran

    2014-01-01

    The uses of technology have been well documented and many people have tried to use the available technology. In an age of increasingly idevices dependent generation where on average students check their portable devices at least every 15 minutes for 15 seconds, the way students engage with the lecture and the lecturer has changed. The dynamic environment of the lecture is one which can be very enjoyable, demanding and noisy. It requires the attention of the student, note taking skills, teachi...

  19. Saudi arabian students' chemistry achievement and science attitudes stemming from lecture-demonstration and small group teaching methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harty, Harold; Al-Faleh, Nasser

    The study was designed to determine differences between two chemistry teaching methods on students' chemistry achievement and attitudes toward science. The two methods were the large lecture-demonstration and small-group laboratory approaches to teaching chemistry. The subjects were 74 eleventh-grade Saudi Arabian students randomly assigned to the two treatment groups. The findings revealed that the small-group laboratory students exhibited significantly greater chemistry achievement than students in the lecture-demonstration group on both immediate and delayed posttests. The results also indicated that students taught by the lab approach possessed more desirable attitudes toward science.

  20. What's your lab's strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Important strategic choices cascade throughout a laboratory. Senior management should create a document that answers each of the five key questions explained on page 60. Once this has been detailed in writing, it remains important to disseminate the basics to all employees so they are singing the same tune. A useful way to accomplish this is through a coherent strategy statement that specifies three components: 1) objectives; 2) scope; and 3) advantages. Commercial and hospital outreach labs should be in business to win. It all starts with a definition of what winning looks like. To "participate" in your market contributes to mediocrity-and it's self-defeating. With no clear strategic direction of where-to-play and how-to-win choices that associate with the aspiration, a mission or vision statement can be frustrating rather than inspiring for employees. Articulate it plainly and concisely for everybody. With a care-fully prepared and designed strategy, you will be on your way to winning in the zero-sum game!

  1. Thinking Outside the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colter, Tabitha

    2017-01-01

    As an undergraduate physics major who spent 2015 deep in a quantum optics lab at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, I knew my 2016 experience with the House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee would be a completely new challenge. I have long had a passion for the bridge of communication between the technical and non-technical worlds but it was only through my AIP Mather internship this summer that I was able to see that passion come to life in the realm of science policy. Suddenly, I went from squeezing political philosophy classes into my packed schedule to witnessing the political process first-hand. I was thrilled to find that the skills of critical thinking and communicating complex issues I have developed throughout my training as a physicist were directly applicable to my work in Congress. Overall, my experience this summer has given me insight into the inner workings of the federal policy process, deepened my appreciation for the work of government employees to keep Congressional members informed on the pressing current issues, and exposed me to a whole range of alternative careers within science. AIP and SPS

  2. Lecture Notes on Multigrid Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassilevski, P S

    2010-06-28

    The Lecture Notes are primarily based on a sequence of lectures given by the author while been a Fulbright scholar at 'St. Kliment Ohridski' University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria during the winter semester of 2009-2010 academic year. The notes are somewhat expanded version of the actual one semester class he taught there. The material covered is slightly modified and adapted version of similar topics covered in the author's monograph 'Multilevel Block-Factorization Preconditioners' published in 2008 by Springer. The author tried to keep the notes as self-contained as possible. That is why the lecture notes begin with some basic introductory matrix-vector linear algebra, numerical PDEs (finite element) facts emphasizing the relations between functions in finite dimensional spaces and their coefficient vectors and respective norms. Then, some additional facts on the implementation of finite elements based on relation tables using the popular compressed sparse row (CSR) format are given. Also, typical condition number estimates of stiffness and mass matrices, the global matrix assembly from local element matrices are given as well. Finally, some basic introductory facts about stationary iterative methods, such as Gauss-Seidel and its symmetrized version are presented. The introductory material ends up with the smoothing property of the classical iterative methods and the main definition of two-grid iterative methods. From here on, the second part of the notes begins which deals with the various aspects of the principal TG and the numerous versions of the MG cycles. At the end, in part III, we briefly introduce algebraic versions of MG referred to as AMG, focusing on classes of AMG specialized for finite element matrices.

  3. Live lecture versus video-recorded lecture: are students voting with their feet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardall, Scott; Krupat, Edward; Ulrich, Michael

    2008-12-01

    In light of educators' concerns that lecture attendance in medical school has declined, the authors sought to assess students' perceptions, evaluations, and motivations concerning live lectures compared with accelerated, video-recorded lectures viewed online. The authors performed a cross-sectional survey study of all first- and second-year students at Harvard Medical School. Respondents answered questions regarding their lecture attendance; use of class and personal time; use of accelerated, video-recorded lectures; and reasons for viewing video-recorded and live lectures. Other questions asked students to compare how well live and video-recorded lectures satisfied learning goals. Of the 353 students who received questionnaires, 204 (58%) returned responses. Collectively, students indicated watching 57.2% of lectures live, 29.4% recorded, and 3.8% using both methods. All students have watched recorded lectures, and most (88.5%) have used video-accelerating technologies. When using accelerated, video-recorded lecture as opposed to attending lecture, students felt they were more likely to increase their speed of knowledge acquisition (79.3% of students), look up additional information (67.7%), stay focused (64.8%), and learn more (63.7%). Live attendance remains the predominant method for viewing lectures. However, students find accelerated, video-recorded lectures equally or more valuable. Although educators may be uncomfortable with the fundamental change in the learning process represented by video-recorded lecture use, students' responses indicate that their decisions to attend lectures or view recorded lectures are motivated primarily by a desire to satisfy their professional goals. A challenge remains for educators to incorporate technologies students find useful while creating an interactive learning culture.

  4. Improving Lecture Quality through Training in Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowbray, Robert; Perry, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Lecturing is a common instructional format but poor lecturing skills can detract from students' learning experiences and outcomes. As lecturing is essentially a form of public communication, training in public speaking may improve lecture quality. Twelve university lecturers in Malaysia participated in a six-week public speaking skills training…

  5. Improving Lecture Quality through Training in Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowbray, Robert; Perry, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Lecturing is a common instructional format but poor lecturing skills can detract from students' learning experiences and outcomes. As lecturing is essentially a form of public communication, training in public speaking may improve lecture quality. Twelve university lecturers in Malaysia participated in a six-week public speaking skills training…

  6. Mechanics lectures on theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerfeld, Arnold Johannes Wilhelm

    1952-01-01

    Mechanics: Lectures on Theoretical Physics, Volume I covers a general course on theoretical physics. The book discusses the mechanics of a particle; the mechanics of systems; the principle of virtual work; and d'alembert's principle. The text also describes oscillation problems; the kinematics, statics, and dynamics of a rigid body; the theory of relative motion; and the integral variational principles of mechanics. Lagrange's equations for generalized coordinates and the theory of Hamilton are also considered. Physicists, mathematicians, and students taking Physics courses will find the book

  7. Lectures on the Strominger system

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Fernandez, Mario

    2016-01-01

    These notes give an introduction to the Strominger system of partial differential equations, and are based on lectures given in September 2015 at the GEOQUANT School, held at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences (ICMAT) in Madrid. We describe the links with the theory of balanced metrics in hermitian geometry, the Hermite-Yang-Mills equations, and its origins in physics, that we illustrate with many examples. We also cover some recent developments in the moduli problem and the interrelation of the Strominger system with generalized geometry, via the cohomological notion of string class.

  8. Lectures on quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ashok

    2008-01-01

    This book consists of the lectures for a two-semester course on quantum field theory, and as such is presented in a quite informal and personal manner. The course starts with relativistic one-particle systems, and develops the basics of quantum field theory with an analysis of the representations of the Poincaré group. Canonical quantization is carried out for scalar, fermion, Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories. Covariant quantization of gauge theories is also carried out with a detailed description of the BRST symmetry. The Higgs phenomenon and the standard model of electroweak interactio

  9. Lectures on Logic and Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    foundational, introductory and advanced courses, as well as workshops, covering a wide variety of topics within the three areas of interest: Language and Computation, Language and Logic, and Logic and Computation. During two weeks, around 50 courses and 10 workshops are offered to the attendants, each of 1.......5 hours per day during a five days week, with up to seven parallel sessions. ESSLLI also includes a student session (papers and posters by students only, 1.5 hour per day during the two weeks) and four evening lectures by senior scientists in the covered areas. The 6 course notes were carefully reviewed...

  10. Lecture Notes in Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, D

    2006-01-01

    These lecture notes cover undergraduate textbook topics (e.g. as in Sakurai), and also additional advanced topics at the same level of presentation. In particular: EPR and Bell; Basic postulates; The probability matrix; Measurement theory; Entanglement; Quantum computation; Wigner-Weyl formalism; The adiabatic picture; Berry phase; Linear response theory; Kubo formula; Modern approach to scattering theory with mesoscopic orientation; Theory of the resolvent and the Green function; Gauge and Galilei Symmetries; Motion in magnetic field; Quantum Hall effect; Quantization of the electromagnetic field; Fock space formalism.

  11. The Relative Effects of Traditional Lectures and Guided Notes Lectures on University Student Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W. Larry; Weil, Timothy M.; Porter, James C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Guided notes were employed in two undergraduate Psychology courses involving 71 students. The study design utilized an alternating treatments format to compare Traditional Lectures with Guided Notes lectures. In one of the two courses, tests were administered after each class lecture, whereas the same type of test was administered at the beginning…

  12. The Use of Lecture Recordings in Higher Education: A Review of Institutional, Student, and Lecturer Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Frances V.; Neumann, David L.; Jones, Liz; Creed, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Web-based lecture technologies are being used increasingly in higher education. One widely-used method is the recording of lectures delivered during face-to-face teaching of on-campus courses. The recordings are subsequently made available to students on-line and have been variously referred to as lecture capture, video podcasts, and Lectopia. We…

  13. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. Lecture and Active Learning as a Dialectical Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Irwin

    2017-01-01

    Lecture remains a valuable tool in the student learning toolbox--one that at its best helps students unpack what they read for class, place course material in context, and see how a subject matter expert solves problems. It may be useful to think of lecture and active learning as a dialectical tension satisfied by the interactive lecture. Just as…

  14. Online Lecture Recordings and Lecture Attendance: Investigating Student Preferences in a Large First Year Psychology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alexandra; Raju, Sadhana; Sharma, Manjula D.

    2016-01-01

    While blended learning has been around for some time, the interplay between lecture recordings, lecture attendance and grades needs further examination particularly for large cohorts of over 1,000 students in 500 seat lecture theatres. This paper reports on such an investigation with a cohort of 1,450 first year psychology students' who indicated…

  15. Living Labs – From scientific labs to the smart city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heller, Alfred

    time is part of the Doll Living Lab setup placed in the area. Lyngby Smart City is a living lab approach facilitated by the City of Knowledge. Together with the labs presented above, we find a direct chain from scientific research labs at DTU over the campus lab, out into the real world living labs...... near Lyngby and from there into the big smart city of Copenhagen to be promoted to the world markets. This way the value chain “from research to invoice” is instantiated into not only an innovation and business strategy, but rather a research strategy that aims at elevating DTU’s research to an even......, but also partners from outside. This proposition can be found under the term “Smart Campus” with it’s own homepage. Here you find the example from the library above, the Smart Avenue that enables communication and IT solutions on the campus, enabled through intelligent street lightning that in the same...

  16. Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelson, Roger M.

    The fluid kaleidoscope of the Earth's ocean and atmosphere churns and sparkles with jets, gyres, eddies, waves, streams, and cyclones. These vast circulations, essential elements of the physical environment that support human life, are given a special character by the Earth's rotation and by their confinement to a shallow surficial layer, thin relative to the solid Earth in roughly the same proportion as an apple skin is to an apple. Geophysical fluid dynamics exploits this special character to develop a unified theoretical approach to the physics of the ocean and atmosphere.With Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Rick Salmon has added an insightful and provocative volume to the handful of authoritative texts currently available on the subject. The book is intended for first-year graduate students, but advanced students and researchers also will find it useful. It is divided into seven chapters, the first four of these adapted from course lectures. The book is well written and presents a fresh and stimulating perspective that complements existing texts. It would serve equally well either as the main text for a core graduate curriculum or as a supplementary resource for students and teachers seeking new approaches to both classical and contemporary problems. A lively set of footnotes contains many references to very recent work. The printing is attractive, the binding is of high quality, and typographical errors are few.

  17. Lectures on Dark Matter Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisanti, Mariangela

    Rotation curve measurements from the 1970s provided the first strong indication that a significant fraction of matter in the Universe is non-baryonic. In the intervening years, a tremendous amount of progress has been made on both the theoretical and experimental fronts in the search for this missing matter, which we now know constitutes nearly 85% of the Universe's matter density. These series of lectures provide an introduction to the basics of dark matter physics. They are geared for the advanced undergraduate or graduate student interested in pursuing research in high-energy physics. The primary goal is to build an understanding of how observations constrain the assumptions that can be made about the astro- and particle physics properties of dark matter. The lectures begin by delineating the basic assumptions that can be inferred about dark matter from rotation curves. A detailed discussion of thermal dark matter follows, motivating Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, as well as lighter-mass alternatives. As an application of these concepts, the phenomenology of direct and indirect detection experiments is discussed in detail.

  18. Web Lectures - ATLAS Overview Week

    CERN Multimedia

    Tushar Bhatnagar; Jeremy Herr; Mitch McLachlan; Homer A. Neal

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS Web Archives Web Archives of the ATLAS Overview Week in Glasgow are now available from the University of Michigan portal here. Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials recorded over the past two years are available via the University of Michigan Lecture Portal. Other recent additions include the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27, the Physics Analysis Tools Workshop held in Bergen, Norway on April 23-27, and the CTEQ Workshop: "Physics at the LHC: Early Challenges" held at Michigan State University on May 14-15. Viewing requires a standard Web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the Web or downloaded locally. In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Feedback & Suggestions Welcome Suggestions for events or tutorials to record in 2007, as well as feedback on existing archives, is always welcome...

  19. Common Systems Integration Lab (CSIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Common Systems Integration Lab (CSIL)supports the PMA-209 Air Combat Electronics Program Office. CSIL also supports development, test, integration and life cycle...

  20. Where Lab Tests Are Performed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization and does not endorse non-AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities ...

  1. Hospital labs go under microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Geri

    2014-05-01

    Financial pressures are hitting hospital clinical labs on both the inpatient and outpatient sides. To control expenses, hospitals are teaming up to buy supplies, centralizing services and improving blood management.

  2. Pollution hazard closes neutrino lab

    CERN Multimedia

    Jones, Nicola

    2003-01-01

    "A leading astrophysics laboratory in Italy has closed down all but one of its experiments over concerns that toxic polluants could leak form the underground lab into the local water supply" (0.5 page)

  3. Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Chad R.; Sorgenfrei, Matthew C.; Nehrenz, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed (G-NAT) lab at NASA Ames Research Center provides a flexible, easily accessible platform for developing hardware and software for advanced small spacecraft. A collaboration between the Mission Design Division and the Intelligent Systems Division, the objective of the lab is to provide testing data and general test protocols for advanced sensors, actuators, and processors for CubeSat-class spacecraft. By developing test schemes for advanced components outside of the standard mission lifecycle, the lab is able to help reduce the risk carried by advanced nanosatellite or CubeSat missions. Such missions are often allocated very little time for testing, and too often the test facilities must be custom-built for the needs of the mission at hand. The G-NAT lab helps to eliminate these problems by providing an existing suite of testbeds that combines easily accessible, commercial-offthe- shelf (COTS) processors with a collection of existing sensors and actuators.

  4. Jefferson Lab Phenomenology: an Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wally Melnitchouk

    2004-03-01

    Experiments at Jefferson Lab are pushing the frontiers of our knowledge about the structure and dynamics of nucleons and nuclei. I will review a selection of recent results and discuss their impact on our understanding of hadron structure.

  5. Metallurgical Laboratory (MET-LAB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The MET-LAB can perform materials characterization for all types of metallic components and systems to any industry-specific or military standard. Capabilities: The...

  6. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  7. Common Systems Integration Lab (CSIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Common Systems Integration Lab (CSIL)supports the PMA-209 Air Combat Electronics Program Office. CSIL also supports development, test, integration and life cycle...

  8. Assessing the Perceived Effectiveness of the Basic Communication Course: An Examination of the Mass-Lecture Format versus the Self-Contained Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Timothy S.; Tillson, Lou Davidson; Cox, Stephen A.; Malinauskas, Barbara K.

    2000-01-01

    Compares undergraduate college students' attitudes regarding student motivation, student perceptions of teacher verbal and nonverbal immediacy, and student perceptions of teacher credibility in two different instructional formats: mass-lecture/lab versus self-contained. Finds comparable perceptions across both instructional formats and concludes…

  9. Influencing factors on lecture attendance at a tertiary institution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tendency towards decreasing class attendance by students is a concern for ... Various factors contribute to the motivation of students, which in turn directly or ... lecture attendance, lecture/r quality as well as reasons for attending classes.

  10. The history of Rhoton's Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Toshio; Richard Lister, J; Matsushima, Ken; de Oliveira, Evandro; Timurkaynak, Erdener; Peace, David A; Kobayashi, Shigeaki

    2017-09-06

    The work performed in Dr. Rhoton's Lab, represented by over 500 publications on microneurosurgical anatomy, greatly contributed to improving the level of neurosurgical treatment throughout the world. The authors reviewed the development and activities of the Lab over 40 years. Dr. Albert L. Rhoton Jr., the founder of, and leader in, this field, displayed great creativity and ingenuity during his life. He devoted himself to perfecting his study methodology, employing high-definition photos and slides to enhance the quality of his published papers. He dedicated his life to the education of neurosurgeons. His "lab team," which included microneuroanatomy research fellows, medical illustrators, lab directors, and secretaries, worked together under his leadership to develop the methods and techniques of anatomical study to complete over 160 microneurosurgical anatomy projects. The medical illustrators adapted computer technologies and integrated art and science in the field of microneurosurgical anatomy. Dr. Rhoton's fellows established methods of injecting colors and pursued a series of projects to innovate surgical approaches and instruments over a 40-year period. They also continued to help Dr. Rhoton to conduct international educational activities after returning to their home countries. Rhoton's Lab became a world-renowned anatomical lab as well as a microsurgical training center and generated the knowledge necessary to perform accurate, gentle, and safe surgery for the sake of patients.

  11. Short lecture series in sustainable product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2005-01-01

    Three lectures in sustainable product development models, methods and mindsets should give insight into the way of thinking about the environment when developing products. The first two lectures will guide you through: . Environmental problems in industry & life-cycle thinking . Professional...... methods for analysing and changing products’ environmental profiles . Sustainability as a driver for innovation...

  12. The Role of Lecturers and Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Víctor M.; Perera Rodríguez, Víctor Hugo; Melero Aguilar, Noelia; Cotán Fernández, Almudena; Moriña, Anabel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of how lecturers respond to students with disabilities, the initial question being: do lecturers aid or hinder students? Findings pertain to a broader research project employing a non-usual research methodology in higher education research and students with disabilities: the biographical-narrative methodology. The…

  13. The Role of Lecturers and Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Víctor M.; Perera Rodríguez, Víctor Hugo; Melero Aguilar, Noelia; Cotán Fernández, Almudena; Moriña, Anabel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of how lecturers respond to students with disabilities, the initial question being: do lecturers aid or hinder students? Findings pertain to a broader research project employing a non-usual research methodology in higher education research and students with disabilities: the biographical-narrative methodology. The…

  14. In Defense of the Populist Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrad, Mark Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) programs like Microsoft PowerPoint and Apple Keynote have become the norm for large university lecture classes, but their record in terms of student engagement and active learning is mixed at best. Here, the author presents the merits of a "populist" lecture style that takes full advantage of the…

  15. Lectures on Composite Materials for Aircraft Structures,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    lectures are related to structural applications of composites . In Lecture 7, the basic theory that is needed for composite structural analysis is...which composites have been taken up for aeronautical applications. Several specific applications of composites in aircraft structures am described in

  16. Short lecture series in sustainable product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2005-01-01

    Three lectures in sustainable product development models, methods and mindsets should give insight into the way of thinking about the environment when developing products. The first two lectures will guide you through: . Environmental problems in industry & life-cycle thinking . Professional...

  17. Lecture Notes in Statistics. 3rd Semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements of the curriculum for the 3rd smester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business.......The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements of the curriculum for the 3rd smester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business....

  18. Lecture 11: Some More Suggestions and Remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessori, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This lecture discusses how the careful preparation of the observer, control of conditions, and precise use of materials will allow the child to "be free to manifest the phenomena which we wish to observe." This lecture was delivered at the International Training Course, London, 1921. [Reprinted from "AMI Communications" (2008).

  19. Sir Nevill F. Mott Lecture Award

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.

    2010-01-01

    The Mott Lecture is awarded to scientists working in the tradition of Nobel laureate Sir Nevill F. Mott, with exceptional contributions to the fields important to the ICANS conference. The ICANS23 Mott Lecture was awarded to Prof. Dr. Sigurd Wagner of Princeton University. He is recognized for his g

  20. Students' Perception of Live Lectures' Inherent Disadvantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Juraj; Pale, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insight into various properties of live lectures from the perspective of sophomore engineering students. In an anonymous online survey conducted at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, we investigated students' opinions regarding lecture attendance, inherent disadvantages of live…

  1. A Case Against Mandatory Lecture Attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Richard M.; Flournoy, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Students' lecture attendance, course grades, class rank at the end of the first year of medical school, and scores on the NBME Part I examinations were correlated. The data suggest that a significant number of students who did not attend lectures did well academically. (MLW)

  2. Lecture Notes in Statistics. 3rd Semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements of the curriculum for the 3rd smester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business.......The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements of the curriculum for the 3rd smester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business....

  3. Richard Feynman's popular lectures on quantum electrodynamics: The 1979 Robb lectures at Auckland University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, J. M.; Kwan, A. M.

    1996-06-01

    The subject of quantum electrodynamics (QED) was the subject of QED—The Strange Theory of Light and Matter, the popular book by Richard Feynman which was published by Princeton University Press in 1985. On p. 1, Feynman makes passing reference to the fact that the book is based on a series of general lectures on QED which were, however, first delivered in New Zealand. At Auckland University, these lectures were delivered in 1979, as the Sir Douglas Robb lectures, and videotapes of the lectures are held by the Auckland University Physics Department. We have carried out a detailed examination of these videotapes, and we discuss here the major differences between the original Auckland lectures and the published version. We use selected quotations from the lectures to show that the original lectures provide additional insight into Feynman's character, and have great educational value.

  4. Anthropocentric Video Segmentation for Lecture Webcasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Rojas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Many lecture recording and presentation systems transmit slides or chalkboard content along with a small video of the instructor. As a result, two areas of the screen are competing for the viewer's attention, causing the widely known split-attention effect. Face and body gestures, such as pointing, do not appear in the context of the slides or the board. To eliminate this problem, this article proposes to extract the lecturer from the video stream and paste his or her image onto the board or slide image. As a result, the lecturer acting in front of the board or slides becomes the center of attention. The entire lecture presentation becomes more human-centered. This article presents both an analysis of the underlying psychological problems and an explanation of signal processing techniques that are applied in a concrete system. The presented algorithm is able to extract and overlay the lecturer online and in real time at full video resolution.

  5. Lectures on Foliation Dynamics: Barcelona 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Hurder, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This survey is based on a series of five lectures, given May 3--7, 2010, at the Centre de Recerca Matematica, Barcelona. The goal of the lectures was to present aspects of the theory of foliation dynamical systems which have particular importance for the classification of foliations of compact manifolds. The lectures emphasized intuitive concepts and informal discussion, while taking the reader into topics of active research in this subject. These notes update and expand on the lectures, and include more recent progress. This article also includes an extensive set of references, as well as highlighting many open questions and problems. A set of "homework problems" is also included, one for each day of lecture.

  6. Anthropocentric Video Segmentation for Lecture Webcasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas Raul

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many lecture recording and presentation systems transmit slides or chalkboard content along with a small video of the instructor. As a result, two areas of the screen are competing for the viewer's attention, causing the widely known split-attention effect. Face and body gestures, such as pointing, do not appear in the context of the slides or the board. To eliminate this problem, this article proposes to extract the lecturer from the video stream and paste his or her image onto the board or slide image. As a result, the lecturer acting in front of the board or slides becomes the center of attention. The entire lecture presentation becomes more human-centered. This article presents both an analysis of the underlying psychological problems and an explanation of signal processing techniques that are applied in a concrete system. The presented algorithm is able to extract and overlay the lecturer online and in real time at full video resolution.

  7. Lecture notes on diophantine analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zannier, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    These lecture notes originate from a course delivered at the Scuola Normale in Pisa in 2006. Generally speaking, the prerequisites do not go beyond basic mathematical material and are accessible to many undergraduates. The contents mainly concern diophantine problems on affine curves, in practice describing the integer solutions of equations in two variables. This case historically suggested some major ideas for more general problems. Starting with linear and quadratic equations, the important connections with Diophantine Approximation are presented and Thue's celebrated results are proved in full detail. In later chapters more modern issues on heights of algebraic points are dealt with, and applied to a sharp quantitative treatment of the unit equation. The book also contains several Supplements, hinted exercises and an Appendix on recent work on heights.

  8. Lectures on Gravity and Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The AdS/CFT correspondence provides quantum theories of gravity in which spacetime and gravitational physics emerge from ordinary non-gravitational quantum systems with many degrees of freedom. Recent work in this context has uncovered fascinating connections between quantum information theory and quantum gravity, suggesting that spacetime geometry is directly related to the entanglement structure of the underlying quantum mechanical degrees of freedom and that aspects of spacetime dynamics (gravitation) can be understood from basic quantum information theoretic constraints. In these notes, we provide an elementary introduction to these developments, suitable for readers with some background in general relativity and quantum field theory. The notes are based on lectures given at the CERN Spring School 2014, the Jerusalem Winter School 2014, the TASI Summer School 2015, and the Trieste Spring School 2015.

  9. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (1/3), by Maria Teresa Dova (Universidad Nacional de La Plata & CONICET, Argentina).   Wednesday, April 25, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN (500-1-001 - Main Auditorium ) The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above 1000 TeV, is still unknown. The discovery of their sources will reveal the engines of the most energetic astrophysical accelerators in the universe. In these lectures we present the recent observational results from HiRes, Telescope Array and Pierre Auger Observatory as well as (some of) the possible astrophysical origins of UHECR. These experiments deal with particle interactions at energies orders of magnitude higher than achieved in terrestrial accelerators. Organised by Luis Alvarez-Gaume.

  10. Lecture notes: Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ogilvie, Gordon I

    2016-01-01

    These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes, and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is 'frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, includin...

  11. Collide@CERN - public lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to a public lecture by Gilles Jobin, first winner of the Collide@CERN Geneva Dance and Performance Artist-in-residence Prize, and his CERN inspiration partner, Joao Pequenao. They will present their work in dance and science at the Globe of Science and Innovation on Wednesday, 23 May 2012 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6.30 p.m.).   
                                                  Programme 19:00 Opening address by - Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, - Ariane Koek...

  12. Lecture 3: Web Application Security

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Computer security has been an increasing concern for IT professionals for a number of years, yet despite all the efforts, computer systems and networks remain highly vulnerable to attacks of different kinds. Design flaws and security bugs in the underlying software are among the main reasons for this. This lecture focuses on security aspects of Web application development. Various vulnerabilities typical to web applications (such as Cross-site scripting, SQL injection, cross-site request forgery etc.) are introduced and discussed. Sebastian Lopienski is CERN’s deputy Computer Security Officer. He works on security strategy and policies; offers internal consultancy and audit services; develops and maintains security tools for vulnerability assessment and intrusion detection; provides training and awareness raising; and does incident investigation and response. During his work at CERN since 2001, Sebastian has had various assignments, including designing and developing software to manage and support servic...

  13. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  14. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein`s mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  15. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  16. Status of chemistry lab safety in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Krishna Prasad; Neupane, Bhanu Bhakta; Giri, Basant

    2017-01-01

    Chemistry labs can become a dangerous environment for students as the lab exercises involve hazardous chemicals, glassware, and equipment. Approximately one hundred thousand students take chemistry laboratory classes annually in Nepal. We conducted a survey on chemical lab safety issues across Nepal. In this paper, we assess the safety policy and equipment, protocols and procedures followed, and waste disposal in chemistry teaching labs. Significant population of the respondents believed that there is no monitoring of the lab safety in their lab (p<0.001). Even though many labs do not allow food and beverages inside lab and have first aid kits, they lack some basic safety equipment. There is no institutional mechanism to dispose lab waste and chemical waste is disposed haphazardly. Majority of the respondents believed that the safety training should be a part of educational training (p = 0.001) and they would benefit from short course and/or workshop on lab safety (p<0.001).

  17. Citizen Science: The Small World Initiative Improved Lecture Grades and California Critical Thinking Skills Test Scores of Nonscience Major Students at Florida Atlantic University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Joseph P; Israel, Natalie; Rowland, Kimberly; Lovelace, Matthew J; Saunders, Mary Jane

    2016-03-01

    Course-based undergraduate research is known to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics student achievement. We tested "The Small World Initiative, a Citizen-Science Project to Crowdsource Novel Antibiotic Discovery" to see if it also improved student performance and the critical thinking of non-science majors in Introductory Biology at Florida Atlantic University (a large, public, minority-dominant institution) in academic year 2014-15. California Critical Thinking Skills Test pre- and posttests were offered to both Small World Initiative (SWI) and control lab students for formative amounts of extra credit. SWI lab students earned significantly higher lecture grades than control lab students, had significantly fewer lecture grades of D+ or lower, and had significantly higher critical thinking posttest total scores than control students. Lastly, more SWI students were engaged while taking critical thinking tests. These results support the hypothesis that utilizing independent course-based undergraduate science research improves student achievement even in nonscience students.

  18. Citizen Science: The Small World Initiative Improved Lecture Grades and California Critical Thinking Skills Test Scores of Nonscience Major Students at Florida Atlantic University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Paul Caruso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Course-based undergraduate research is known to improve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics student achievement. We tested “The Small World Initiative, a Citizen-Science Project to Crowdsource Novel Antibiotic Discovery” to see if it also improved student performance and the critical thinking of nonscience majors in Introductory Biology at Florida Atlantic University (a large, public, minority-dominant institution in academic year 2014–15. California Critical Thinking Skills Test pre- and posttests were offered to both Small World Initiative (SWI and control lab students for formative amounts of extra credit. SWI lab students earned significantly higher lecture grades than control lab students, had significantly fewer lecture grades of D+ or lower, and had significantly higher critical thinking posttest total scores than control students. Lastly, more SWI students were engaged while taking critical thinking tests. These results support the hypothesis that utilizing independent course-based undergraduate science research improves student achievement even in nonscience students.

  19. Learning by Viewing - Nobel Labs 360

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2013-01-01

    First of all, my thanks to the Nobel Lindau Foundation for their inspiration and leadership in sharing the excitement of scientific discovery with the public and with future scientists! I have had the pleasure of participating twice in the Lindau meetings, and recently worked with the Nobel Labs 360 project to show how we are building the world's greatest telescope yet, the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). For the future, I see the greatest challenges for all the sciences in continued public outreach and inspiration. Outreach, so the public knows why we are doing what we are doing, and what difference it makes for them today and in the long-term future. Who knows what our destiny may be? It could be glorious, or not, depending on how we all behave. Inspiration, so that the most creative and inquisitive minds can pursue the scientific and engineering discoveries that are at the heart of so much of human prosperity, health, and progress. And, of course, national and local security depend on those discoveries too; scientists have been working with "the government" throughout recorded history. For the Lindau Nobel experiment, we have a truly abundant supply of knowledge and excitement, through the interactions of young scientists with the Nobelists, and through the lectures and the video recordings we can now share with the whole world across the Internet. But the challenge is always to draw attention! With 7 billion inhabitants on Earth, trying to earn a living and have some fun, there are plenty of competing opportunities and demands on us all. So what will draw attention to our efforts at Lindau? These days, word of mouth has become word of (computer) mouse, and ideas propagate as viruses ( or memes) across the Internet according to the interests of the participants. So our challenge is to find and match those interests, so that the efforts of our scientists, photographers, moviemakers, and writers are rewarded by our public. The world changes every day, so there

  20. Instructional analysis of lecture video recordings and its application for quality improvement of medical lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sunyong; Im, Sun Ju; Lee, Sun Hee; Kam, Beesung; Yune, So Joung; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Jung A; Lee, Yuna; Lee, Sang Yeoup

    2011-12-01

    The lecture is a technique for delivering knowledge and information cost-effectively to large medical classes in medical education. The aim of this study was to analyze teaching quality, based on triangle analysis of video recordings of medical lectures, to strengthen teaching competency in medical school. The subjects of this study were 13 medical professors who taught 1st- and 2nd-year medical students and agreed to a triangle analysis of video recordings of their lectures. We first performed triangle analysis, which consisted of a professional analysis of video recordings, self-assessment by teaching professors, and feedback from students, and the data were crosschecked by five school consultants for reliability and consistency. Most of the distress that teachers experienced during the lecture occurred in uniform teaching environments, such as larger lecture classes. Larger lectures that primarily used PowerPoint as a medium to deliver information effected poor interaction with students. Other distressing factors in the lecture were personal characteristics and lack of strategic faculty development. Triangle analysis of video recordings of medical lectures gives teachers an opportunity and motive to improve teaching quality. Faculty development and various improvement strategies, based on this analysis, are expected to help teachers succeed as effective, efficient, and attractive lecturers while improving the quality of larger lecture classes.

  1. [THE DISCUSSION CONCERNING THE PLACE OF LECTURES AND COMPULSORY LECTURE ATTENDANCE IN MEDICAL EDUCATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Shmuel

    2016-04-01

    Luder shows that there is a lack of correlation between lecture attendance in medical school and examination performance, and thus draws attention to a discourse concerning the place of lectures and lecture attendance enforcement in 2015 and beyond. The paper addresses 4 questions: First, what is the current place of the traditional lecture in the education of medical students? Second, are there alternatives to this format of teaching? Third, what are the educational consequences of mandating lecture attendance; and fourth, should there be such enforcement? The author discusses these questions and concludes that lectures should be used sparingly, after a careful evaluation that they have an added value over learning away from the classroom. Furthermore, that there are clear guidelines on how to make the traditional lecture enhanced and educationally effective, as well as alternatives such as the "flipped classroom", e-learning and more to lectures. In addition, that lectures frequently drive learning negatively and enforcing attendance in Israel entails serious unintended consequences such as a need to monitor attendance, and a host of disciplinary adverse reactions. Finally, that besides lecture efficiency and economy (when having added value) one reason to consider compulsory attendance, may be when poor attendance negatively influences teachers morale.

  2. Advanced Physics Lab at TCU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarles, C. A.

    2009-04-01

    The one semester, one credit hour Modern Physics Lab is viewed as a transition between the structured Physics 1 and 2 labs and junior/senior research. The labs focus on a variety of experiments built around a multichannel analyzer, various alpha, beta and gamma ray detectors and weak radioactive sources. Experiments include radiation safety and detection with a Geiger counter and NaI detector, gamma ray spectroscopy with a germanium detector, beta spectrum, alpha energy loss, gamma ray absorption, Compton effect, nuclear and positron annihilation lifetime, speed of gamma rays. Other experiments include using the analog oscilloscope, x-ray diffraction of diamond and using an SEM/EDX. Error analysis is emphasized throughout. The semester ends with an individual project, often an extension of one of the earlier experiments, and students present their results as a paper and an APS style presentation to the department.

  3. The Lecture Video Scene Extracting System

    OpenAIRE

    石黒, 信啓; 白井,治彦; 黒岩,丈介; 小高, 知宏; 小倉, 久和; ISHIGURO, Nobuhiko; SHIRAI, Haruhiko; KUROIWA, Josuke; ODAKA, Tomohiko; OGURA, Hisakazu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the system of extracting feature of scenes in a lecture video. To avoid a hand work on a lecture video, we propose a new method automate the judgment of importance of a scene. This system uses the TF-IDF method that is the technique of the natural language processing. Our system has four functions to watch a lecture video efficiently. They are the function of extracting feature of scenes, character string choice, keyword search and important scene choice.These functi...

  4. Study of Introductory Geology lab sections for education majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathryn A.

    This study began with a concern that many elementary teachers hold negative attitudes toward science, lack the confidence to teach science, and/or do not feel qualified to teach science. This quasi-experimental study examined preservice teachers' beliefs regarding teaching science pre and post semester in an Introductory Geology course. Data for the study was collected for three semesters from preservice teachers enrolled in an Introductory Geology lab designed for elementary education majors. After obtaining informed consent, the Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument Form B (STEBI-B), and a course survey, were administered during the first and last lab class sessions. Paired t-tests were performed to examine changes in Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PSTE), Science Teaching Outcome Expectancy (STOE), feelings of success in the course, and comfort level with science topics. Surveys were paired using a code provided by the preservice teachers at the top of the survey. In addition, written responses regarding the experience of the elementary education majors' lab section were also examined. Results of this study indicate a significant difference in Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PSTE), feelings of success for lab, feelings of success in lecture, and comfort level with science topics. No significant differences were found in Science Teaching Outcome Expectancy (STOE) or feelings of success in the course overall. Written comments suggest preservice teachers found their experience in the education majors' lab to be better than other students in the course. The reasons the preservice teachers believed their experience to be better was: they were with like majors, obtained lesson plans and ideas, the material presented was relevant to their future careers as teachers, the Teaching Assistant characteristics, and a smaller class size. This study indicates that it is possible for changes in preservice teachers' science teaching self-efficacy and comfort level

  5. Going Green: Lecture Assignments and Lab Experiences for the College Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Julie A.; Hutchison, James E.; Kirchhoff, Mary M.; Levy, Irvin J.

    2005-01-01

    Green chemistry, the design of chemical products and processes to eliminate hazards to human health and the environment, provides unique opportunities for innovation in the chemistry curriculum for engaging a broad spectrum of students in the study of chemistry. The green chemistry community is expanding efforts to develop educational materials…

  6. Lab-on-fiber technology

    CERN Document Server

    Cusano, Andrea; Crescitelli, Alessio; Ricciardi, Armando

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on a research field that is rapidly emerging as one of the most promising ones for the global optics and photonics community: the "lab-on-fiber" technology. Inspired by the well-established 'lab on-a-chip' concept, this new technology essentially envisages novel and highly functionalized devices completely integrated into a single optical fiber for both communication and sensing applications.Based on the R&D experience of some of the world's leading authorities in the fields of optics, photonics, nanotechnology, and material science, this book provides a broad and accurate de

  7. Ntal/Lab/Lat2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaki, Shoko; Jensen, Bettina M; Gilfillan, Alasdair M

    2007-01-01

    Non-T cell activation linker (NTAL)/linker for activation of B cells (LAB), now officially termed LAT2 (linker for activation of T cells 2) is a 25-30kDa transmembrane adaptor protein (TRAP) associated with glycolipid-enriched membrane fractions (GEMs; lipid rafts) in specific cell types of hemat......Non-T cell activation linker (NTAL)/linker for activation of B cells (LAB), now officially termed LAT2 (linker for activation of T cells 2) is a 25-30kDa transmembrane adaptor protein (TRAP) associated with glycolipid-enriched membrane fractions (GEMs; lipid rafts) in specific cell types...

  8. Towards Automated Lecture Capture, Navigation and Delivery System for Web-Lecture on Demand

    CERN Document Server

    Kannan, Rajkumar

    2010-01-01

    Institutions all over the world are continuously exploring ways to use ICT in improving teaching and learning effectiveness. The use of course web pages, discussion groups, bulletin boards, and e-mails have shown considerable impact on teaching and learning in significant ways, across all disciplines. ELearning has emerged as an alternative to traditional classroom-based education and training and web lectures can be a powerful addition to traditional lectures. They can even serve as a main content source for learning, provided users can quickly navigate and locate relevant pages in a web lecture. A web lecture consists of video and audio of the presenter and slides complemented with screen capturing. In this paper, an automated approach for recording live lectures and for browsing available web lectures for on-demand applications by end users is presented.

  9. Forming a Virtual Material Lab

    OpenAIRE

    ORAL, Okan; ÖZALTIN, Ömer; ÖZSOY, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Theoreticalknowledge taught to students in Faculties of Engineering and TechnicalEducation in chapter lectures needs to be reinforced by applying them in thelaboratory or supporting them by simulations. In the formation of a laboratory;restrictions such as appropriate physical environment, time, expensiveequipment supply and security are encountered. These restrictions bring out theneed to search for appropriate alternatives. It is possible to designexperiments independent to space, time and ...

  10. Why do students miss lectures? A study of lecture attendance amongst students of health science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bati, A Hilal; Mandiracioglu, Aliye; Orgun, Fatma; Govsa, Figen

    2013-06-01

    In the domain of health sciences, attendance by students at lectures is more critical. Lecture attendance is an issue which has been widely neglected. This study aims to determine those factors which affect the lecture attendance. The research data was collected by means of a questionnaire during the second semester of the academic year 2010-2011 from second-year students of the Faculties of Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry and Nursing. Together with demographic data, the questionnaire includes a Likert-type scale aiming to determine the factors influencing attendance at lectures. 663 participated in this study on a voluntary basis from Medical, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Nursing Faculties. Raising attainment levels, being able to take their own lecture notes, learning which aspects of the lecture content were being emphasized, and the opportunity to ask questions were amongst the chief reasons for attending lectures. It appears that the factors preventing students from attending lectures are mainly individual. Amongst the most frequently cited causes of non-attendance, sleeplessness, ill health and the inefficiency of lectures in overcrowded halls are emphasized. In the totals and sub-dimensions of the Lecture Attendance Scale, Medical Faculty students have average scores higher than those of students at other faculties. The vital nature of professional expertise and its applications, health sciences students' attendance at lectures carries greater importance. It is important to strengthen the mentoring system with regard to individual and external factors, which have been implicated as having a substantial influence on lecture attendance by students. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding is that…

  12. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding…

  13. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding…

  14. Factors Shaping Mathematics Lecturers' Service Teaching in Different Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingolbali, E.; Ozmantar, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we focus on university lecturers' approaches to the service teaching and factors that influence their approaches. We present data obtained from the interviews with 19 mathematics and three physics lecturers along with the observations of two mathematics lecturers' calculus courses. The findings show that lecturers' approaches to…

  15. Add a Teacher-Led Stimulation to Your Lecturing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlbaw, Lynn Matthew

    1991-01-01

    Provides a way to enliven the classroom lecture by involving students in the lecture. Students role-play characters in the teacher's lecture becoming active learners through participation. Students learn their roles and make decisions based on the lecture situation presented. Provides an example unit on the growth of big business in U.S. history…

  16. Lectures on Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    OpenAIRE

    Gripaios, Ben

    2015-01-01

    These four lectures, given at the British Universities Summer School in Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics (BUSSTEPP), held in 2014 in Southampton, are a brief introduction to a selection of current topics in physics Beyond the Standard Model.

  17. Lecture about crowdsourcing and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Hanze Honours Lecture, 19-12-12. Het lectoraat Regisseren van Ondernemende Netwerken richt zich op onderzoek naar het effect van regisserend leiderschap in een wereld waarin internet nieuwe verbindingen tussen mensen en organisaties creëert.

  18. Lectures on Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    OpenAIRE

    Gripaios, Ben

    2015-01-01

    These four lectures, given at the British Universities Summer School in Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics (BUSSTEPP), held in 2014 in Southampton, are a brief introduction to a selection of current topics in physics Beyond the Standard Model.

  19. Introductory Lectures on Quantum Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2014-01-01

    In these lectures we present a few topics in Quantum Field Theory in detail. Some of them are conceptual and some more practical. They have been selected because they appear frequently in current applications to Particle Physics and String Theory.

  20. Stream restoration hydraulic design course: lecture notes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newbury, R

    2002-01-01

    Steam restoration encompasses a broad range of activities and disciplines. This lecture series is designed for practitioners who must fit habitat improvement works in the hydraulics of degraded channels...

  1. Dynamica 3-A: Lecture Notes wb1303

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, P.

    1997-01-01

    Lecture Notes for course wb 1303 Dynamica 3-A, Faculty 3me/Mechanical Engineering, TU Delft. Contents: Continuous systems; Dynamics of a reciprocating engine; Non-linear systems; Kinematics and dynamics of multi-body systems; Exercises.

  2. Making lectures memorable: A cognitive perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Azam; Babar, Shazia

    2016-08-01

    Lectures have been a cornerstone of medical education since the introduction of a discipline based curricular model more than two hundred years ago. Recently this instructional strategy has come under criticism because of its reliance on passive learning. There are still many medical schools that cover content predominantly through lectures due to its feasibility. With the introduction of the flipped classrooms, lectures have been given a new lease of life. Improving cognitive imprinting during lectures would enhance retrieval and promote long term storage. Simplifying the content reduces the cognitive load of the information being received and makes it more meaningful hence more memorable. To make learning memorable, rehearsal should be built into the sessions. With the exponential increase in online learning, the need for online learning technologies will require a generation of a large amount of asynchronous video content which should ideally be truly meaningful and memorable, and inspirational to our students.

  3. Recently Published Lectures and Tutorials for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Herr

    2006-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project, a collaboration between the University of Michigan and CERN, has developed a synchronized system for recording and publishing educational multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. The current system, including future developments for the project and the field in general, was recently presented at the CHEP 2006 conference in Mumbai, India. The relevant presentations and papers can be found here: The Web Lecture Archive Project A Web Lecture Capture System with Robotic Speaker Tracking This year, the University of Michigan team has been asked to record and publish all ATLAS Plenary sessions, as well as a large number of Physics and Computing tutorials. A significant amount of this material has already been published and can be accessed via the links below. All lectures can be viewed on any major platform with any common internet browser, either via streaming or local download (for limited bandwidth). Please enjoy the l...

  4. Recently Published Lectures and Tutorials for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S.

    2006-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project, WLAP, a collaboration between the University of Michigan and CERN, has developed a synchronized system for recording and publishing educational multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. The current system, including future developments for the project and the field in general, was recently presented at the CHEP 2006 conference in Mumbai, India. The relevant presentations and papers can be found here: The Web Lecture Archive Project. A Web Lecture Capture System with Robotic Speaker Tracking This year, the University of Michigan team has been asked to record and publish all ATLAS Plenary sessions, as well as a large number of Physics and Computing tutorials. A significant amount of this material has already been published and can be accessed via the links below. All lectures can be viewed on any major platform with any common internet browser, either via streaming or local download (for limited bandwidth). Please e...

  5. Educational technology and the traditional lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Jacobs

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available I was recently invited to give a lecture at the opening of a new high-technology lecture theatre at Leeds Metropolitan University. It is one of the best examples of its kind I have seen. Its impressive features include hi-fi surround sound, an enormous back-projected screen giving superb picture quality from either a VCR or directly from a computer for live demonstrations, online facilities, the latest remote-control slide-projection equipment, complete lecturer's control panel, and several nice touches such as automatic dimming of the auditorium lights when Play is pressed on any of the hidden video playback machines. The overhead projectors and their screens are of the best quality and correctly positioned for the clearest possible display. There are also video-link facilities for spill-over into a secondary lecture theatre which itself is well fitted out in presentational equipment.

  6. Paul Dirac lectures at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    When a group of physicists entered the Main Auditorium, during the evening of 29 June, they felt they had opened a time portal.   Paul Dirac in front of a blackboard showing his formula. ©Sandra Hoogeboom An attentive audience, dressed in early 1900 costumes, were watching a lecture by the elusive Paul Dirac, presenting for the first time his famous formula on the blackboard. Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac (1902-1984) was a British mathematical physicist at Cambridge, and one of the "fathers" of quantum mechanics. When he first wrote it, in 1928, Dirac was not sure what his formula really meant. As demonstrated by Andersson four year later, what Dirac had written on the blackboard was the first definition of a positron, hence he is credited with having anticipated the existence of antimatter. The actor John Kohl performs as Paul Dirac. ©Sandra Hoogeboom What the group of puzzled physicists were really observing when they entered the CERN Auditorium was the shoo...

  7. Lectures on advances in combinatorics

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlswede, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    The main focus of these lectures is basis extremal problems and inequalities – two sides of the same coin. Additionally they prepare well for approaches and methods useful and applicable in a broader mathematical context. Highlights of the book include a solution to the famous 4m-conjecture of Erdös/Ko/Rado 1938, one of the oldest problems in combinatorial extremal theory, an answer to a question of Erdös (1962) in combinatorial number theory "What is the maximal cardinality of a set of numbers smaller than n with no k+1 of its members pair wise relatively prime?", and the discovery that the AD-inequality implies more general and sharper number theoretical inequalities than for instance Behrend's inequality. Several concepts and problems in the book arise in response to or by rephrasing questions from information theory, computer science, statistical physics. The interdisciplinary character creates an atmosphere rich of incentives for new discoveries and lends Ars Combinatoria a special status in mathemat...

  8. A peculiar lecture by Ettore Majorana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, S.

    2006-09-01

    We give, for the first time, the English translation of a manuscript by Ettore Majorana, which probably corresponds to the text for a seminar lecture delivered at the University of Naples in 1938, where he lectured on theoretical physics. Some passages reveal a physical interpretation of quantum mechanics which anticipates for several years the Feynman approach in terms of path integrals, independent of the underlying mathematical formulation.

  9. Lecture Notes in Statistics. 3rd Semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models.......The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models....

  10. Lectures on flips and minimal models

    OpenAIRE

    Corti, Alessio; Hacking, Paul; Kollár, János; Lazarsfeld, Robert; Mustaţă, Mircea

    2007-01-01

    This document contains notes from the lectures of Corti, Koll\\'ar, Lazarsfeld, and Musta\\c{t}\\u{a} at the workshop ``Minimal and canonical models in algebraic geometry" at MSRI, Berkeley, April 2007. The lectures give an overview of the recent advances on canonical and minimal models of algebraic varieties obtained by Hacon--McKernan and Birkar--Cascini--Hacon--McKernan.

  11. Lecture Notes in Statistics. 3rd Semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models.......The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models....

  12. Carrier Analysis Lab (CAL) – Aircraft/Weapons/Ship Compatibility Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Carrier Analysis Lab (CAL) - Aircraft/Weapons/Ship Compatibility Lab located at the Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division, Lakehurst, NJ provides...

  13. A Simple, Successful Capacitor Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, William

    2011-01-01

    Capacitors are a fundamental component of modern electronics. They appear in myriad devices and in an enormous range of sizes. Although our students are taught the function and analysis of capacitors, few have the opportunity to use them in our labs.

  14. The Telecom Lab is moving

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    As of 2nd March 2009, the Telecom Lab will move to Building 58 R-017. The Telecom Lab is the central point for all support questions regarding CERN mobile phone services (provision of SIM cards, requests for modifications of subscriptions, diagnostics for mobile phone problems, etc.). The opening hours as well as the contact details for the Telecom Lab remain unchanged: New location: Building 58 R-017 Opening hours: Every week day, from 11 a.m. to 12 a.m. Phone number: 72480 Email address: labo.telecom@cern.ch This change has no impact on support requests for mobile services. Users can still submit their requests concerning mobile phone subscriptions using the usual EDH form (https://edh.cern.ch/Document/GSM). The automatic message sent to inform users of their SIM card availability will be updated to indicate the new Telecom Lab location. You can find all information related to CERN mobile phone services at the following link: http://cern.ch/gsm CS Section - IT/CS group

  15. Flipped classroom or an active lecture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D; Roberts, David J H

    2017-08-31

    Recent changes in anatomy education have seen the introduction of flipped classrooms as a replacement to the traditional didactic lecture. This approach utilizes the increasing availability of digital technology to create learning resources that can be accessed prior to attending class, with face-to-face sessions then becoming more student-centered via discussion, collaborative learning, and problem-solving activities. Although this approach may appear intuitive, this viewpoint commentary presents a counter opinion and highlights a simple alternative that utilizes evidence-based active learning approaches as part of the traditional lecture. The active lecture takes the traditional lecture, and (1) ensures the lecture content is relevant and has clear objectives, (2) contains lecture material that is designed according to the latest evidence-base, (3) complements it with additional supplementary material, (4) creates space to check prior understanding and knowledge levels, and (5) utilizes suitable technology to facilitate continual engagement and interaction. Clin. Anat., 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Indian dental students' preferences regarding lecture courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolia, Abhishek; Mohan, Mandakini; Kundabala, M; Shenoy, Ramya

    2012-03-01

    Teaching and learning activities in the dental clinic or hospital are a challenging area for students as well as teachers. With various teaching methodologies being used in dental schools around the world, gaining greater understanding of students' attitudes toward these methodologies would be useful for dental educators. The objective of this study was to explore the preferences of dental students in India about various aspects of lecture courses. A structured survey consisting of ten closed-ended questions was developed, and 2,680 undergraduate students from forty-three dental schools in India were approached via e-mail with a follow-up postal mailing. Of these, 1,980 students responded, for a response rate of 73.8 percent. Most of the students reported preferring lectures with the aid of PowerPoint and chalkboard. They preferred morning lectures from 8 am to 10 am for a maximum of thirty to forty minutes for each lecture, and they preferred to receive information about the lecture topic in advance. The students said that delivery of clinical demonstrations was beneficial after the lectures, and they preferred learning-based rather than exam-oriented education. The respondents also said that attendance should be made compulsory and that numerical marking of examinations should not be replaced by a grading system.

  17. Envisioning the Transformative Role of IT in Lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo Zarraonandia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most widely used methods for teaching is the lecture. During the last few decades lecturers and students have taken advantage of the progressive introduction of new technology for supporting these lectures. As this trend is very likely to continue, in this paper we will try to anticipate some possible technology enriched future lecture scenarios. We also present ALFs, a system which aims to improve the communication between participants in a lecture making use of augmented reality techniques.

  18. Revitalizing the Live Lecture Class With Instructor-Created Videos

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Alpert

    2016-01-01

    Today, the lecture class as a format for higher education is under attack more than ever. This article addresses the research question of how lectures can be modernized and revitalized through new uses of digital technology—in particular, video. Critics of lecturing have for a long time observed that lecture classes can be weak on student engagement and motivation to attend class. This article introduces one way to help modernize and revitalize the live lecture class session, a new conceptual...

  19. Laser physics from principles to practical work in the lab

    CERN Document Server

    Eichhorn, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This textbook originates from a lecture course in laser physics at the Karlsruhe School of Optics and Photonics at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). A main goal in the conception of this textbook was to describe the fundamentals of lasers in a uniform and especially lab-oriented notation and formulation as well as many currently well-known laser types, becoming more and more important in the future. It closes a gap between the measureable spectroscopic quantities and the whole theoretical description and modeling. This textbook contains not only the fundamentals and the context of laser physics in a mathematical and methodical approach important for university-level studies. It allows simultaneously, owing to its conception and its modern notation, to directly implement and use the learned matter in the practical lab work. It is presented in a format suitable for everybody who wants not only to understand the fundamentals of lasers but also use modern lasers or even develop and make laser setups. T...

  20. Argonne lectures on particles accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devred, A

    1999-09-01

    The quest for elementary particles has promoted the development of particle accelerators producing beams of increasingly higher energies. In a synchrotron, the particle energy is directly proportional to the product of the machine's radius times the bending magnets' field strength. Present proton experiments at the TeV scale require facilities with circumferences ranging from a few to tens of kilometers and relying on a large number (several hundred to several thousand) high field dipole magnets and high field gradient quadrupole magnets. These electro-magnets use high-current-density, low-critical-temperature superconducting cables and are cooled down at liquid helium temperature. They are among the most costly and the most challenging components of the machine. After explaining what are the various types of accelerator magnets and why they are needed (lecture 1), we briefly recall the origins of superconductivity and we review the parameters of existing superconducting particle accelerators (lecture 2). Then, we review the superconducting materials that are available at industrial scale (chiefly, NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn) and we explain in details the manufacturing of NbTi wires and cables (lecture 3). We also present the difficulties of processing and insulating Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors, which so far have limited the use of this material in spite of its superior performances. We continue by discussing the two dimensional current distributions which are the most appropriate for generating pure dipole and quadrupole fields and we explain how these ideal distributions can be approximated by so called cos{theta} and cos 2{theta} coil designs (lecture 4). We also present a few alternative designs which are being investigated and we describe the difficulties of realizing coil ends. Next, we present the mechanical design concepts that are used in existing accelerator magnets (lecture 5) and we describe how the magnets are assembled (lecture 6). Some of the toughest

  1. Flexible HVAC System for Lab or Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedan, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses an effort to design a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system flexible enough to accommodate an easy conversion of classrooms to laboratories and dry labs to wet labs. The design's energy efficiency and operations and maintenance are examined. (GR)

  2. Flexible HVAC System for Lab or Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedan, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses an effort to design a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system flexible enough to accommodate an easy conversion of classrooms to laboratories and dry labs to wet labs. The design's energy efficiency and operations and maintenance are examined. (GR)

  3. GeoLab Sample Handling System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop  a robotic sample handling/ manipulator system for the GeoLab glovebox. This work leverages from earlier GeoLab work and a 2012 collaboration with a...

  4. Updated version of an interim connection space LabPQR for spectral color reproduction: LabLab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qian; Wan, Xiaoxia; Li, Junfeng; Liang, Jingxing

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new interim connection space (ICS) called LabLab, which is an updated version of LabPQR, to overcome the drawback that the last three dimensions of LabPQR have no definite colorimetric meanings. We extended and improved the method by which the first three dimensions of LabPQR are deduced to obtain an ICS consisting of two sets of CIELAB values under different illuminants, and the reconstructed spectra from LabLab were obtained by minimizing colorimetric errors by means of the computational formula of the CIE-XYZ tristimulus values combined with least-squares best fit. The improvement obtained from the proposed method was tested to compress and reconstruct the reflectance spectra of the 1950 Natural Color System color chips and more than 50,000 ISO SOCS color patches as well as six multispectral images acquired by multispectral image acquisition systems using 1600 glossy Munsell color chips as training samples. The performance was evaluated by the mean values of color differences between the original and reconstructed spectra under the CIE 1931 standard colorimetric observer and the CIE standard illuminants D50, D55, D65, D75, F2, F7, F11, and A as well as five multichip white LED light sources. The mean and maximum values of the root mean square errors between the original and reconstructed spectra were also calculated. The experimental results show that the proposed three LabLab interim connection spaces significantly outperform principal component analysis, LabPQR, XYZLMS, Fairman-Brill, and LabRGB in colorimetric reconstruction accuracy at the cost of slight reduction of spectral reconstruction accuracy and illuminant independence of color differences of the suggested LabLab interim connection spaces outperform other interim connection spaces. In addition, the presented LabLab interim connection spaces could be quite compatible with the extensively used colorimetric management system since each dimension has definite colorimetric

  5. Characteristics of good mathematics lecturers based on students and lecturers perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapsari, Trusti; Putri, Dian Permana; Raharjo, Jajo Firman

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to determine the characteristics of good mathematics lecturers based on students' and lecturers' perspectivesand compare the characteristics of good lecturers/ teachers which are in accordance with the findings of some previous studies and the theories. This study is survey study. The Data were collected through questionnaires and interview. The population consists of some mathematics students from the first level through the third level and some mathematics education lecturers of a private university in West Java. Qualitative analysis was undertaken to examine the results of questionnaires and interviews. The finding shows that the characteristic of good mathematics lecturers is inspiring. They can inspire other mathematics lecturers and educators in general. Based on the students and lecturers' perspective, some characteristics of good mathematics lecturers are mastering the materials well, being on time, being objective, understanding the students, presenting the materials with clearly, and being disciplined. Some other characteristic mentioned are: teaching eagerly, being unhurried, being friendly, giving exemplary and preparing the lesson well. These characteristics are not much different from the characteristics described by some previous researchers and some theories of experts, i.e. mastering the subject matters well, pedagogic, and work wholeheartedly.

  6. Reaction Lecture : Text Messaging to Increase Student Engagement in Large-Scale Lectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winnips, Koos; Heutink, Joost; Beldhuis, Hans; Greener, S; Rospigliosi, A

    2011-01-01

    By helping to be active during large scale lectures, students remember better what is presented, and can better connect new knowledge to entry knowledge. In large scale lectures with more than 150 students, it is nearly impossible to manage personal, face-to-face discussions and interaction. Based u

  7. Reaction Lecture : Text Messaging to Increase Student Engagement in Large-Scale Lectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winnips, Koos; Heutink, Joost; Beldhuis, Hans; Greener, S; Rospigliosi, A

    2011-01-01

    By helping to be active during large scale lectures, students remember better what is presented, and can better connect new knowledge to entry knowledge. In large scale lectures with more than 150 students, it is nearly impossible to manage personal, face-to-face discussions and interaction. Based

  8. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. The Lost Art of Lecturing: Cultivating Student Listening and Notetaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Kevin R.; Hunt, Stephen K.

    2017-01-01

    As this forum's call for papers notes, lecture represents one of the more "controversial forms of instructional communication," yet remains a predominant instructional method in academia. Ironically, instructors face increasing pressure to abandon lecture at a time when these classes are popular and students readily enroll in lecture…

  9. Modeling of the time sharing for lecturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Shakhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of modernization of the Russian system of higher education, it is necessary to analyze the working time of the university lecturers, taking into account both basic job functions as the university lecturer, and others.The mathematical problem is presented for the optimal working time planning for the university lecturers. The review of the documents, native and foreign works on the study is made. Simulation conditions, based on analysis of the subject area, are defined. Models of optimal working time sharing of the university lecturers («the second half of the day» are developed and implemented in the system MathCAD. Optimal solutions have been obtained.Three problems have been solved:1 to find the optimal time sharing for «the second half of the day» in a certain position of the university lecturer;2 to find the optimal time sharing for «the second half of the day» for all positions of the university lecturers in view of the established model of the academic load differentiation;3 to find the volume value of the non-standardized part of time work in the department for the academic year, taking into account: the established model of an academic load differentiation, distribution of the Faculty number for the positions and the optimal time sharing «the second half of the day» for the university lecturers of the department.Examples are given of the analysis results. The practical application of the research: the developed models can be used when planning the working time of an individual professor in the preparation of the work plan of the university department for the academic year, as well as to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the administrative decisions in the development of local university regulations.

  10. The Development of MSFC Usability Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yiwei; Richardson, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This conference poster reviews the development of the usability lab at Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of the lab was to integrate a fully functioning usability laboratory to provide a resource for future human factor assessments. and to implement preliminary usability testing on a MSFC website to validate the functionality of the lab.

  11. NI新款LabVIEW工具包

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    美国国家仪器有限公司(National Instruments,NI)近日推出新的LabVIEW图形化开发环境的软件工程工具——LabVIEW单元测试工具包和LabVIEW桌面执行追踪工具包。

  12. Exclusive processes at Jefferson Lab

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haiyan Gao

    2003-11-01

    Mapping the transition from strongly interacting, non-perturbative quantum chromodynamics, where nucleon–meson degrees of freedom are effective to perturbative QCD of quark and gluon degrees of freedom, is one of the most fundamental, challenging tasks in nuclear and particle physics. Exclusive processes such as proton–proton elastic scattering, meson photoproduction, and deuteron photodisintegration have been pursued extensively at many laboratories over the years in the search for such a transition, particularly at Jefferson Lab in recent years, taking the advantage of the high luminosity capability of the CEBAF facility. In this talk, I review recent results from Jefferson Lab on deuteron photodisintegration and photopion production processes and the future 12 GeV program.

  13. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785). The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p lecturer-students interactions were increased in the EVS lecture for one lecturer and reduced for the other. Both lecturers felt that the EVS lectures were difficult to prepare, that they were able to keep to time in the traditional lectures, that the educational value of both lecture styles was similar, and that they were neutral-to-slightly favourably disposed

  14. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Paul M; Palmer, Edward; Devitt, Peter

    2007-07-27

    Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8-12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785). The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p higher-order lecturer-students interactions were increased in the EVS lecture for one lecturer and reduced for the other. Both lecturers felt that the EVS lectures were difficult to prepare, that they were able to keep to time in the traditional lectures, that the educational value of both lecture styles was similar, and that they were neutral-to-slightly favourably disposed to continue with

  15. The Web-Lecture - a viable alternative to the traditional lecture format?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meibom, S.

    2004-12-01

    Educational research shows that students learn best in an environment with emphasis on teamwork, problem-solving, and hands-on experience. Still professors spend the majority of their time with students in the traditional lecture-hall setting where the combination of large classes and limited time prevents sufficient student-teacher interaction to foster an active learning environment. Can modern computer technology be used to provide "lecture-type" information to students via the World Wide Web? If so, will that help professors make better and/or different use of their scheduled time with the students? Answering these questions was the main motivation for the Extra-Solar Planet Project. The Extra-Solar Planet Project was designed to test the effectiveness of a lecture available to the student on the World Wide Web (Web-Lecture) and to engage the students in an active learning environment were their use the information presented in the Web-Lecture. The topic of the Web-Lecture was detection of extra-solar planets and the project was implemented into an introductory astronomy course at University of Wisconsin Madison in the spring of 2004. The Web-Lecture was designed to give an interactive presentation of synchronized video, audio and lecture notes. It was created using the eTEACH software developed at the University of Wisconsin Madison School of Engineering. In my talk, I will describe the project, show excerpts of the Web-Lecture, and present assessments of student learning and results of student evaluations of the web-lecture format.

  16. Vocal intensity in lecturers: Results of measurements conducted during lecture sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Mikulski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational voice users (inter alia: lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Speakers adjust this intensity knowingly (e.g. to underline the importance of fragments of the speech or unknowingly. The unknown adjustment of voice intensity occurs e.g. in the presence of high acoustic background noise (so-called Lombard effect, but it also results from many other factors: hearing loss, construction of the vocal tract, habits and others. The aim of the article is to confirm the thesis that in similar conditions of acoustic properties of the room different lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a group of 10 lecturers in the same conference room. A-weighted sound pressure level determined at 1 m from the lecturer's mouth was adopted as a parameter defining the intensity of the lecturer's voice. The levels of all lecturers' voice intensity were compared and evaluated according to the criteria defined in EN ISO 9921. Results: Nine in ten lecturers were speaking with normal voice intensity (60-65 dB and only one full-time university lecturer was speaking with raised voice (66-71 dB. Conclusions: It was found that in the room of the same acoustic conditions the lecturers spoke with different intensities of voice. Some lecturers occasionally, and one all the time spoke with the voice intensity specified by PN-EN ISO 9921 as a raised voice. The results of the preliminary study warrant further studies in a larger group of teachers. Med Pr 2013;64(6:797–804

  17. Explicit constructivism: a missing link in ineffective lectures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, E S

    2010-06-01

    This study tested the possibility that interactive lectures explicitly based on activating learners' prior knowledge and driven by a series of logical questions might enhance the effectiveness of lectures. A class of 54 students doing the respiratory system course in the second year of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program in my university was randomized to two groups to receive one of two types of lectures, "typical" lectures (n = 28, 18 women and 10 men) or "constructivist" lectures (n = 26, 19 women and 7 men), on the same topic: the regulation of respiration. Student pretest scores in the two groups were comparable (P > 0.1). Students that received the constructivist lectures did much better in the posttest conducted immediately after the lectures (6.8 +/- 3.4 for constructivist lectures vs. 4.2 +/- 2.3 for typical lectures, means +/- SD, P = 0.004). Although both types of lectures were well received, students that received the constructivist lectures appeared to have been more satisfied with their learning experience. However, on a posttest conducted 4 mo later, scores obtained by students in the two groups were not any different (6.9 +/- 3 for constructivist lectures vs. 6.9 +/- 3.7 for typical lectures, P = 0.94). This study adds to the increasing body of evidence that there is a case for the use of interactive lectures that make the construction of knowledge and understanding explicit, easy, and enjoyable to learners.

  18. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Lesley J; Joyce, Domino A

    2015-01-01

    Audience response systems ('clickers') are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost) can be overcome using students' personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using questionnaires, we compare student perceptions of clicker and smartphone based polling systems. We find that students prefer interactive lectures generally, but those that used their own device preferred those lectures over lectures using clickers. However, device users were more likely to report using their devices for other purposes (checking email, social media etc.) when they were available to answer polling questions. These students did not feel that this distracted them from the lecture, instead, concerns over the use of smartphones centred around increased battery usage and inclusivity for students without access to suitable technology. Our results suggest that students generally preferred to use their own devices over clickers, and that this may be a sensible way to overcome some of the limitations associated with clickers, although issues surrounding levels of distraction and the implications for retention and recall of information need further investigation.

  19. Do prerecorded lecture VODcasts affect lecture attendance of first-yearpre-clinical Graduate Entry to Medicine students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Mark G; O'Malley, Dervla

    2017-03-01

    There is increasing concern amongst educators that the provision of recorded lectures may reduce student attendance of live lectures. We therefore sought to determine if the provision of prerecorded lecture video podcasts (VODcasts) to first-year Graduate Entry to Medicine (GEM) students, affected attendance at 21 Physiology lectures within three separate pre-clinical modules. Data on lecture attendance, utilization of VODcasts, and whether VODcasts should replace live lectures were drawn from three surveys conducted in academic years 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 on all first-year GEM students in two first-year pre-clinical modules where prerecorded Physiology VODcasts were available for viewing or downloading prior to scheduled live lectures. A total of 191/214 (89%) students responded to the three surveys, with 84.3% of students attending all 21 lectures in the study. Only 4% of students missed more than one lecture in each of the three lecture series, with 79% indicating that VODcasts should not replace lectures. Therefore, we conclude that the attendance of pre-clinical GEM students at live lectures is not significantly impacted upon by the provision of lecture VODcasts, with most students viewing them as useful revision tools rather than as a replacement for live lectures.

  20. Going Beyond the Lecture Class - Is it Worth it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funaro, G. M.; Paytan, A.; Arrigo, K. R.; Chandran, R.; Schindell, J.

    2001-12-01

    Lectures, labs, and seminars dominate the course offerings at most American universities. Students have been learning successfully from these teaching methods for hundreds of years. Alternatively, in order to provide a more personally meaningful learning experience, educational researchers espouse a constructivist approach to learning. To demonstrate this approach, we will describe a case study of two courses, marine chemistry and biological oceanography, that were taught as a single interdisciplinary experience by Stanford University faculty. The courses incorporated an innovative curriculum using active learning methodologies including problem-based learning and teamwork, a set of interactive and facilitative teaching practices, customized technology that worked in the background to make the course effective and efficient, and a goal to reveal the interdisciplinary nature of the content in the two courses. Videotapes of group problem solving revealed that students displayed higher order thinking skills. Students indicated in focus groups that teamwork provided a motivating, rich, learning environment. The communication technology supported both the faculty in the delivery and assessment of the course and the students in communicating with their teams. The technology was the glue that made the course work effectively and efficiently. The overall learning experience can be best expressed by the students themselves who said they felt like they were participating in "real science" for the first time.

  1. The Defining Characteristics of Urban Living Labs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Steen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The organization of supported and sustainable urban interventions is challenging, with multiple actors involved, fragmented decision-making powers, and multiple values at stake. Globally, urban living labs have become a fashionable phenomenon to tackle this challenge, fostering the development and implementation of innovation, experimentation, and knowledge in urban, real-life settings while emphasizing the important role of participation and co-creation. However, although urban living labs could in this way help cities to speed up the sustainable transition, urban living lab experts agree that, in order to truly succeed in these ambitious tasks, the way urban living labs are being shaped and steered needs further research. Yet, they also confirm the existing variation and opaqueness in the definition of the concept. This article contributes to conceptual clarity by developing an operationalized definition of urban living labs, which has been used to assess 90 sustainable urban innovation projects in the city of Amsterdam. The assessment shows that the majority of the projects that are labelled as living labs do not include one or more of the defining elements of a living lab. In particular, the defining co-creation and development activities were found to be absent in many of the projects. This article makes it possible to categorize alleged living lab projects and distill the “true” living labs from the many improperly labelled or unlabelled living labs, allowing more specific analyses and, ultimately, better targeted methodological recommendations for urban living labs.

  2. LabVIEW 8 student edition

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Robert H

    2007-01-01

    For courses in Measurement and Instrumentation, Electrical Engineering lab, and Physics and Chemistry lab. This revised printing has been updated to include new LabVIEW 8.2 Student Edition. National Instruments' LabVIEW is the defacto industry standard for test, measurement, and automation software solutions. With the Student Edition of LabVIEW, students can design graphical programming solutions to their classroom problems and laboratory experiments with software that delivers the graphical programming capabilites of the LabVIEW professional version. . The Student Edition is also compatible with all National Instruments data acquisition and instrument control hardware. Note: The LabVIEW Student Edition is available to students, faculty, and staff for personal educational use only. It is not intended for research, institutional, or commercial use. For more information about these licensing options, please visit the National Instruments website at (http:www.ni.com/academic/)

  3. Lecture Notes on Network Information Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gamal, Abbas El

    2010-01-01

    Network information theory deals with the fundamental limits on information flow in networks and optimal coding techniques and protocols that achieve these limits. It extends Shannon's point-to-point information theory and the Ford--Fulkerson max-flow min-cut theorem to networks with multiple sources and destinations, broadcasting, interference, relaying, distributed compression and computing. Although a complete theory is yet to be developed, several beautiful results and techniques have been developed over the past forty years with potential applications in wireless communication, the Internet, and other networked systems. This set of lecture notes, which is a much expanded version of lecture notes used in graduate courses over the past eight years at Stanford, UCSD, CUHK, UC Berkeley, and EPFL, aims to provide a broad coverage of key results, techniques, and open problems in network information theory. The lectures are organized in a "top-down" manner into four parts: background, single-hop networks, multi...

  4. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES QUESTIONNAIRE: SUGGEST AND WIN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Time to plan for the 2001-02 lecture series. From today until April 9 you have the chance to give your contribution to improved planning for next year's Academic Training Lectures Series. At the web site: http://wwwinfo/support/survey/academic-training/ you will find questionnaires concerning the following different categories: high energy physics, applied physics, science and society and post-graduate students lectures. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at CERN bookshop.

  5. Professional development of international classroom lecturers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    With a rapidly growing number of students learning and lecturers teaching through a language other than their own first language, there is equally a growing need to consider how lecturers are trained to teach in the international classroom where students have a range of different linguistic...... to planning and managing multilingual and multicultural learning environments (best practice) and (ii) to suggest possible formats of suitable training sessions for university lecturers. Based on a comprehensive literature review, the study comprises cases of professional development programmes offered...... and weaknesses) and discuss their applicability in a wider context. Key words: Professional development; International classroom; English Medium Instruction, Opportunities and challenges Simon, Eszter & Gabriela Pleschová (eds).2013. Teacher Development in Higher Education. Existing Programs, Program Impact...

  6. Lectures on formal and rigid geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    A first version of this work appeared in 2005 as a Preprint of the Collaborative Research Center "Geometrical Structures in Mathematics" at the University of Münster. Its aim was to offer a concise and self-contained 'lecture-style' introduction to the theory of classical rigid geometry established by John Tate, together with the formal algebraic geometry approach launched by Michel Raynaud. These Lectures are now viewed commonly as an ideal means of learning advanced rigid geometry, regardless of the reader's level of background. Despite its parsimonious style, the presentation illustrates a number of key facts even more extensively than any other previous work. This Lecture Notes Volume is a revised and slightly expanded version of the original preprint and has been published at the suggestion of several experts in the field.

  7. Lectures in the history of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, Henk J M

    1993-01-01

    "[These lectures] are about themes of the history of mathematics which, for various reasons, are dear to me. The early differential and integral calculus, the work of Christiaan Huygens, and the concept of construction in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century mathematics are the three themes around which much of my research has concentrated and which continue to fascinate me by the insights they offer in the development of that special human activity called mathematics." -from the Introduction This volume contains eleven lectures ranging over a variety of topics in the history of mathematics. The lectures, presented between 1970 and 1987, were delivered in a variety of venues and appeared only in less accessible publications. Those who teach mathematics, as well as mathematics historians, will appreciate this insightful, wide-ranging book.

  8. On performing concepts during science lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzer-Ardenghi, Lilian; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2007-01-01

    When lecturing, teachers make use of both verbal and nonverbal communication. What is called teaching, therefore, involves not only the words and sentences a teacher utters and writes on the board during a lesson, but also all the hands/arms gestures, body movements, and facial expressions a teacher performs in the classroom. All of these communicative modalities constitute resources that are made available to students for making sense of and learning from lectures. Yet in the literature on teaching science, these other means of communication are little investigated and understood - and, correspondingly, they are undertheorized. The purpose of this position paper is to argue for a different view of concepts in lectures: they are performed simultaneously drawing on and producing multiple resources that are different expressions of the same holistic meaning unit. To support our point, we provide examples from a database of 26 lectures in a 12th-grade biology class, where the human body was the main topic of study. We analyze how different types of resources - including verbal and nonverbal discourse and various material artifacts - interact during lectures. We provide evidence for the unified production of these various sense-making resources during teaching to constitute a meaning unit, and we emphasize particularly the use of gestures and body orientations inside this meaning unit. We suggest that proper analyses of meaning units need to take into account not only language and diagrams but also a lecturer's pointing and depicting gestures, body positions, and the relationships between these different modalities. Scientific knowledge (conceptions) exists in the concurrent display of all sense-making resources, which we, following Vygotsky, understand as forming a unit (identity) of nonidentical entities.

  9. Lecture notes for Advanced Time Series Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Holst, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A first version of this notes was used at the lectures in Grenoble, and they are now extended and improved (together with Jan Holst), and used in Ph.D. courses on Advanced Time Series Analysis at IMM and at the Department of Mathematical Statistics, University of Lund, 1994, 1997, ......A first version of this notes was used at the lectures in Grenoble, and they are now extended and improved (together with Jan Holst), and used in Ph.D. courses on Advanced Time Series Analysis at IMM and at the Department of Mathematical Statistics, University of Lund, 1994, 1997, ...

  10. Rawls on Dewey before the Dewey Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    This article sheds light on John Rawls's views on John Dewey's philosophical temperament by investigating unpublished papers and lectures that Rawls wrote and delivered across the late 1940s, the 1950s, the 1960s, and the early 1970s. Moreover, the article shows that Rawls's rejection of Kant's dualisms predates by at least three decades the "Dewey Lectures" (1980) and that Dewey's notion of deliberation as "dramatic rehearsal in imagination" might have had an impact on Rawls's development of the notion of "reflective equilibrium" as a state of affairs that we strive to reach in ethical reflection.

  11. Five Lectures on Radial Basis Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Powell, Mike J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Professor Mike J. D. Powell spent three weeks at IMM in November - December 2004. During the visit he gave five lectures on radial basis functions. These notes are a TeXified version of his hand-outs, made by Hans Bruun Nielsen, IMM.......Professor Mike J. D. Powell spent three weeks at IMM in November - December 2004. During the visit he gave five lectures on radial basis functions. These notes are a TeXified version of his hand-outs, made by Hans Bruun Nielsen, IMM....

  12. Examining and contrasting the cognitive activities engaged in undergraduate research experiences and lab courses

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, N G

    2016-01-01

    While the positive outcomes of undergraduate research experiences (UREs) have been extensively categorized, the mechanisms for those outcomes are less understood. Through lightly structured focus group interviews, we have extracted the cognitive tasks that students identify as engaging in during their UREs. We also use their many comparative statements about their coursework, especially lab courses, to evaluate their experimental physics-related cognitive tasks in those environments. We find there are a number of cognitive tasks consistently encountered in physics UREs that are present in most experimental research. These are seldom encountered in lab or lecture courses, with some notable exceptions. Having time to reflect and fi?x or revise, and having a sense of autonomy, were both repeatedly cited as key enablers of the bene?fits of UREs. We also identify tasks encountered in actual experimental research that are not encountered in UREs. We use these findings to identify opportunities for better integratio...

  13. Digital media labs in libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Amanda L

    2014-01-01

    Families share stories with each other and veterans reconnect with their comrades, while teens edit music videos and then upload them to the web: all this and more can happen in the digital media lab (DML), a gathering of equipment with which people create digital content or convert content that is in analog formats. Enabling community members to create digital content was identified by The Edge Initiative, a national coalition of leading library and local government organizations, as a library technology benchmark. Surveying academic and public libraries in a variety of settings and sharing a

  14. Double success for neutrino lab

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    "The Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy is celebrating two key developments in the field of neutrino physics. Number one is the first ever detection, by the OPERA experiement, of possible tau neutrino that has switched its identity from a muon neutrino as it travelled form its origins at CERN in Switzerland to the Italian lab. Number two is the successful start-up of the ICARUS detector, which, like OPERA, is designed to study neutrinos that "oscillate" between types" (0.5 pages)

  15. Laser safety in the lab

    CERN Document Server

    Barat, Ken L

    2012-01-01

    There is no more challenging setting for laser use than a research environment. In almost every other setting the laser controls count on engineering controls, and human exposure is kept to a minimum. In research, however, the user often manipulates the optical layout and thereby places him or herself in peril, but this does not mean that accidents and injury are unavoidable. On the contrary, laser accidents can be avoided by following a number of simple approaches. [i]Laser Safety in the Lab[/i] provides the laser user and laser safety officer with practical guidelines from housekeeping to ey

  16. Maintaining Students’ Involvement in a Math Lecture Using Countdown Timers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ann Krizzel A. Aban; Lauro L. Fontanil

    2015-01-01

    ...), to deliver their lectures. The non-stop use of these softwares, however, seems to have negative effects on the students when it comes to maintaining their involvement in a lecture discussion for they tend to be more passive spectators...

  17. Instructional Uses of Instant Messaging (IM) During Classroom Lectures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mable B Kinzie; Stephen D Whitaker; Mark J Hofer

    2005-01-01

    ...) discussions during undergraduate university lectures. Over the course of three weeks, students practiced with and then employed hand-held computers for brief, synchronous class discussions in response to assigned questions related to the lectures...

  18. Goals and design of public physics lectures: perspectives of high-school students, physics teachers and lecturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapon, S.; Ganiel, U.; Eylon, B.

    2009-09-01

    Many large scientific projects and scientific centres incorporate some kind of outreach programme. Almost all of these outreach programmes include public scientific lectures delivered by practising scientists. In this article, we examine such lectures from the perspectives of: (i) lecturers (7) who are practising scientists acknowledged to be good public lecturers and (ii) audiences composed of high-school students (169) and high-school physics teachers (80) who attended these lectures. We identify and discuss the main goals as expressed by the lecturers and the audiences, and the correspondence between these goals. We also discuss how the lecturers' goals impact on the design of their lectures and examine how the lecture affects audiences with different attitudes towards (and interests in) physics. Our findings suggest that the goals of the participating lecturers and the expectations of their audiences were highly congruent. Both believe that a good public scientific lecture must successfully communicate state-of-the-art scientific knowledge to the public, while inspiring interest in and appreciation of science. Our findings also suggest that exemplary public scientific lectures incorporate content, structure and explanatory means that explicitly adhere to the lecturers' goals. We identify and list several design principles.

  19. Music during Lectures: Will Students Learn Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosseville, Fabrice; Laborde, Sylvain; Scelles, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the influence of music during learning on the academic performance of undergraduate students, and more particularly the influence of affects induced by music. Altogether 249 students were involved in the study, divided into a control group and an experimental group. Both groups attended the same videotaped lecture, with the…

  20. Lecture Notes on Software Process Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    13 Introduction bo Software Verification and Validation EM-8 Lecture Notes on Software Process Improvement CM-14 Intelectual Property Protection for...Talented people are important in any software organization. Nevertheless, people need to be supported by a good working environment. Software

  1. Lecture notes for Advanced Time Series Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Holst, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A first version of this notes was used at the lectures in Grenoble, and they are now extended and improved (together with Jan Holst), and used in Ph.D. courses on Advanced Time Series Analysis at IMM and at the Department of Mathematical Statistics, University of Lund, 1994, 1997, ...

  2. College Students' Preference for Compressed Speech Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primrose, Robert A.

    To test student reactions to compressed-speech lectures, tapes for a general education course in oral communication were compressed to 49 to 77 percent of original time. Students were permitted to check them out via a dial access retrieval system. Checkouts and use of tapes were compared with student grades at semester's end. No significant…

  3. Academic Training: Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. Pich (IFIC) The Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) 11:15 - 12:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic Colliders (1/4) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 27 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. Pich (IFIC) The Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) A. Pich (IFIC) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 28 July 09:15 - 10:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic Colliders (2/4) 10:15 - 11:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic Colliders (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) 14:00 - 15:00 R. Assmann (CERN) The CLIC project DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic ...

  4. Lectures on quantization of gauge systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reshetikhin, N.; Booß-Bavnbek, B.; Esposito, G.; Lesch, M.

    2010-01-01

    A gauge system is a classical field theory where among the fields there are connections in a principal G-bundle over the space - time manifold and the classical action is either invariant or transforms appropriately with respect to the action of the gauge group. The lectures are focused on the path

  5. Lectures on Flavor Physics and CP Violation

    OpenAIRE

    Grinstein, B.

    2017-01-01

    Two short introductory lectures on Flavor Physics delivered at CLASHEP 2015. Among included topics: The KM matrix and the KM model of CP-violation, Determination of KM Elements, FCNC and GIM, New Physics and Flavor, Neutral Meson Mixing and CP Asymmetries. Many problems for the student, and solutions to selected problems, included.

  6. Lecturers' Views on Ghana's Undergraduate Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assuah, Charles; Ayebo, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    This paper synthesizes the views of 6 university lecturers on Ghana's undergraduate mathematics education. These views were expressed during a mathematics workshop sensitization program on the "contribution of undergraduate mathematics education to the Ghanaian economy." The data consisting of open-ended questions followed by…

  7. KAWA lecture notes on complex hyperbolic geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Rousseau, Erwan

    2016-01-01

    These lecture notes are based on a mini-course given at the fifth KAWA Winter School on March 24-29, 2014 at CIRM, Marseille. They provide an introduction to hyperbolicity of complex algebraic varieties namely the geometry of entire curves, and a description of some recent developments.

  8. Movement and Character. Lecture, London, 1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesorri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Montessori's words from the 1946 London Lectures describe principles of intelligence and character, the work of the hand, and movement with a purpose as being integral to self-construction. The perfection of movement is spiritual, says Dr. Montessori. Repetition of practical life exercises are exercises in movement with the dignity of human…

  9. Academic Training: Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 19 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (1/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (3/5) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 20 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (2/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) A. PICH (IFIC) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 21 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (3/8) 10:15 - 11:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (4/8) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (5/5) 14:00 - 15:00 R. BRUN (CERN) ROOT: Introduction and Demonstration DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (5/8) 10:15 - 11:00 C. De La Taille (Laboratoire de l'Accélérateur Linéaire) Introduction to Electronics (1/3) 11:15 - 12:00 A. PICH (IFIC) C. De La Taille (Laboratoi...

  10. Music during Lectures: Will Students Learn Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosseville, Fabrice; Laborde, Sylvain; Scelles, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the influence of music during learning on the academic performance of undergraduate students, and more particularly the influence of affects induced by music. Altogether 249 students were involved in the study, divided into a control group and an experimental group. Both groups attended the same videotaped lecture, with the…

  11. CAS paleoichthyologist gives Artedi Lecture in Sweden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Prof. ZHANG Miman (CHANG Mee-mann), a CAS Member from the CAS Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, was invited to give a talk at the Artedi Lectures at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on 5 December, 2008.

  12. Engineering Lecturers' Views on CLIL and EMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims to shed some light on how engineering lecturers teaching in English at a Spanish university view their work (teaching goals) within the current European internationalisation trend of offering courses and master programmes in English. A questionnaire where content and language integrated learning (CLIL) and English-medium…

  13. Creativity and the Curriculum. Inaugural Professorial Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is regarded by many as a vital aspect of the human world, and creative endeavours are seen as a central element of society. Hence student creativity is regarded as a desirable outcome of education. This inaugural professorial lecture examines the place of creativity in education and in national curricula. Beginning with examples of…

  14. Knowledge, Power, and Freud's Clark Conference Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Martha; Makay, John J.

    1988-01-01

    Examines Freud's Clark Conference Lectures in which he offers a case in point of the intersection among knowledge, power, and discourse. Argues that Freud's rhetorical action constituted the "new" knowledge of psychoanalysis, while simultaneously forging relationships between the scientific and medical communities that endowed the…

  15. Creativity and the Curriculum. Inaugural Professorial Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is regarded by many as a vital aspect of the human world, and creative endeavours are seen as a central element of society. Hence student creativity is regarded as a desirable outcome of education. This inaugural professorial lecture examines the place of creativity in education and in national curricula. Beginning with examples of…

  16. Movement and Learning in Lecture Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Michala Paige

    2011-01-01

    This mixed methods research utilized Action Based Learning Theory on a population of undergraduate college-aged students to determine if movement breaks in a predominately lecture-style college class affected a student's ability to demonstrate learning. Four professors from various disciplines, each teaching two sections of the same…

  17. Video Lecture Capture Technology Helps Students Study without Affecting Attendance in Large Microbiology Lecture Courses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jennifer Lynn McLean; Erica L. Suchman

    2016-01-01

    .... Several studies have reported that students use lecture capture to enhance their learning and study for assessments, as well as to catch up on material they miss when they cannot attend class due...

  18. Engagement of Students with Lectures in Biochemistry and Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elizabeth Ann; Hodgson, Yvonne; Macaulay, Janet Olwyn

    2012-01-01

    Academic staff at universities have become concerned about the decrease in student attendance at lectures and the implication of this on student achievement and learning. Few studies have measured actual lecture attendance in a coherent or comprehensive way. The aim of this study was to measure actual lecture attendance of students over two year…

  19. Lecturers' Experience of Using Social Media in Higher Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seechaliao, Thapanee

    2015-01-01

    This research paper presents lecturers' experience of using social media in higher education courses. The research methodology used a survey approach. The research instrument was a questionnaire about lecturers' experience of using social media in higher education courses. Thirty-one lecturers completed the questionnaire. The data were scored by…

  20. Does Instructor's Image Size in Video Lectures Affect Learning Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Z.; Hong, J.; Yang, J.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most commonly used forms of video lectures is a combination of an instructor's image and accompanying lecture slides as a picture-in-picture. As the image size of the instructor varies significantly across video lectures, and so do the learning outcomes associated with this technology, the influence of the instructor's image size should…

  1. The Effect of Instant Messaging on Lecture Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVaugh, Nathan Kant

    2012-01-01

    The impact of instant message interruptions via computer on immediate lecture retention for college students was examined. While watching a 24-minute video of a classroom lecture, students received various numbers of related-to-lecture ("Is consistent use of the eye contact method necessary for success?") versus not-related-to lecture…

  2. University Lecturer Publication Output: Qualifications, Time and Confidence Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmings, Brian; Kay, Russell

    2010-01-01

    An investigation of factors which differentiate between university lecturers in relation to publication output is reported. The study drew on data from lecturers working full-time at two large Australian universities. Measures of research publication output were used to select two groups of lecturers (N[subscript 1] = 119; N[subscript 2] = 119);…

  3. Student Use of Mobile Devices in University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Neil; Rees, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly used by students in university lectures. This has resulted in controversy and the banning of mobile devices in some lectures. Although there has been some research into how students use laptop computers in lectures, there has been little investigation into the wider use of mobile devices. This study was designed to…

  4. Do-It-Yourself Whiteboard-Style Physics Video Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott Samuel; Aiken, John Mark; Greco, Edwin; Schatz, Michael; Lin, Shih-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Video lectures are increasingly being used in physics instruction. For example, video lectures can be used to "flip" the classroom, i.e., to deliver, via the Internet, content that is traditionally transmitted by in-class lectures (e.g., presenting concepts, working examples, etc.), thereby freeing up classroom time for more interactive…

  5. Methodological triangulation of the students' use of recorded lectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Pierre; Bruggen, Jan van; Jochems, Wim

    2013-01-01

    A lot of research into the use of recorded lectures has been done by using surveys or interviews. We will show that triangulation of multiple data sources is needed. We will discuss how students use recorded lectures according to their self-report and what actual usage of the recorded lectures can b

  6. Do-It-Yourself Whiteboard-Style Physics Video Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott Samuel; Aiken, John Mark; Greco, Edwin; Schatz, Michael; Lin, Shih-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Video lectures are increasingly being used in physics instruction. For example, video lectures can be used to "flip" the classroom, i.e., to deliver, via the Internet, content that is traditionally transmitted by in-class lectures (e.g., presenting concepts, working examples, etc.), thereby freeing up classroom time for more interactive…

  7. Mathematics Lectures as Narratives: Insights from Network Graph Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Aaron; Wiesner, Emilie; Fukawa-Connelly, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Although lecture is the traditional method of university mathematics instruction, there has been little empirical research that describes the general structure of lectures. In this paper, we adapt ideas from narrative analysis and apply them to an upper-level mathematics lecture. We develop a framework that enables us to conceptualize the lecture…

  8. Student Preferences for Online Lecture Formats: Does Prior Experience Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Michelle; Hile, Rachel E.; Vartanian, Lesa R.; Webb, Janae

    2013-01-01

    We examined undergraduate students' quality ratings of and preferences for different types of online lecture formats. Students preferred richer online lecture formats that included both audio and visual components; however, there were no significant differences between students' ratings of PowerPoint lectures with "audio" of the…

  9. The Effects of Lecture Diversity on Germane Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costley, Jamie; Lange, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    An important aspect of MOOCs is the way students interact with video lectures. Instruction provided through video lectures should focus on ways to increase germane cognitive load, which directly contributes to learning. One approach that may lead to an increase of germane load may be to use video lectures with diverse forms of media, including…

  10. Taxonomy of Lecture Note-Taking Skills and Subskills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Musalli, Alaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Note taking (NT) in lectures is as active a skill as listening, which stimulates it, and as challenging as writing, which is the end product. Literature on lecture NT misses an integration of the processes involved in listening with those in NT. In this article, a taxonomy is proposed of lecture NT skills and subskills based on a similar list…

  11. 45 CFR 73.735-706 - Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Teaching, lecturing, or writing may not be for the purpose of the special preparation of a person or class... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. 73.735-706... OF CONDUCT Outside Activities § 73.735-706 Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. (a) Employees...

  12. Engagement of Students with Lectures in Biochemistry and Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elizabeth Ann; Hodgson, Yvonne; Macaulay, Janet Olwyn

    2012-01-01

    Academic staff at universities have become concerned about the decrease in student attendance at lectures and the implication of this on student achievement and learning. Few studies have measured actual lecture attendance in a coherent or comprehensive way. The aim of this study was to measure actual lecture attendance of students over two year…

  13. Lecture on Female Masturbation Harassed Him, Male Student Says.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin

    1995-01-01

    A male student in a California State University-Sacramento psychology lecture on female masturbation has filed a sexual harassment complaint, claiming the lecture violated institutional policy by creating an intimidating, hostile, and offensive learning environment. He felt the lecture was inappropriately graphic and political in intent. (MSE)

  14. Annual Advances in Cancer Prevention Lecture | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016 Keynote Lecture Polyvalent Vaccines Targeting Oncogenic Driver Pathways A special keynote lecture became part of the NCI Summer Curriculum in Cancer Prevention in 2000. This lecture will be held on Thursday, July 21, 2016 at 1:30pm at Masur Auditorium, Building 10, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD. This year’s keynote speaker is Dr. Mary L. (Nora) Disis, MD. |

  15. Taxonomy of Lecture Note-Taking Skills and Subskills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Musalli, Alaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Note taking (NT) in lectures is as active a skill as listening, which stimulates it, and as challenging as writing, which is the end product. Literature on lecture NT misses an integration of the processes involved in listening with those in NT. In this article, a taxonomy is proposed of lecture NT skills and subskills based on a similar list…

  16. How Much Do They Understand? Lectures, Students and Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Denise; Kirkpatrick, Andy

    2000-01-01

    Studied the nature and extent of problems in comprehension of lectures experienced by 198 college students from non-English speaking backgrounds at a British university. Slightly fewer than 1 in 10 was able to understand the content and intent of lectures very well, and almost 25% had not understood the lectures at all. (SLD)

  17. Lecturer practitioners in six professions: combining cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Pat; Mathers, Nigel J

    2004-07-01

    Whilst research has been undertaken in relation to the lecturer practitioner role in nursing, there have been no cross-professional studies. There is an explicit political agenda in the United Kingdom on interprofessional education and enhancing the status of those who provide practice-based teaching. This paper reports a study to investigate the commonalities and differences between lecturer practitioners across professions and to generate hypotheses about the role, which follows different models of practice in the different professions. An exploratory research design was adopted, using semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of lecturer practitioners from six professions (architecture, clinical psychology, law, medicine, nursing and social work). A grounded theory approach was used. All lecturer practitioners perceived a clear dichotomy between their professional practice role and their university role. All used similar strategies to adapt to and deal with combining two very differently perceived cultures. There were striking similarities in response to the consequences of serving "two masters" in the areas of time management and role identity/definition. The role not only bridges theory and practice, but has to operate within very different organizational cultures. Further research is needed to test the generalizability of the findings. Relevance to clinical practice. This investigation aims to inform higher education and health service policy on lecturer practitioners, and also provide support for those undertaking this challenging role. The study poses challenging questions for policymakers in the current climate of interprofessional learning, which need to be addressed if future initiatives in this area are to be successful.

  18. Curricular Adaptations in Introductory Physics Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Ewell, Mary; Moore, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    When curricular materials are disseminated to new sites, there can be a tension between fidelity to the original intent of the developers and adaptation to local needs. In this case study we look at a lab activity that was initially developed for an introductory physics for the life sciences (IPLS) course at the University of Maryland, then implemented at George Mason University with significant adaptations. The goals of the two implementations were overlapping, but also differed in ways that are reflected in the two versions of the lab. We compare student lab report data from the two sites to examine the impacts of the adaptation on how students engaged with the lab.

  19. Learning from an Ambient Assisted Living Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Kanstrup, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents methodological lessons learned from an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) lab exploring the use of intelligent beds in a nursing home. The living lab study was conducted over a period of three month. 20 intelligent beds were installed. Data was collected via self-registration, diar......This paper presents methodological lessons learned from an Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) lab exploring the use of intelligent beds in a nursing home. The living lab study was conducted over a period of three month. 20 intelligent beds were installed. Data was collected via self...

  20. MatLab Script and Functional Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab Script and Functional Programming: MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. The MatLab seminar covers the functional and script programming aspect of MatLab language. Specific expectations are: a) Recognize MatLab commands, script and function. b) Create, and run a MatLab function. c) Read, recognize, and describe MatLab syntax. d) Recognize decisions, loops and matrix operators. e) Evaluate scope among multiple files, and multiple functions within a file. f) Declare, define and use scalar variables, vectors and matrices.

  1. Improved LabVIEW Code Generation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Evita Vavilina; Gatis Gaigals

    2016-01-01

    .... LabVIEW provides highly convenient environment for simulation development and also tools for generation of simulation environment that can include simulation itself and collection of simulation data...

  2. Goals and Design of Public Physics Lectures: Perspectives of High-School Students, Physics Teachers and Lecturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapon, S.; Ganiel, U.; Eylon, B.

    2009-01-01

    Many large scientific projects and scientific centres incorporate some kind of outreach programme. Almost all of these outreach programmes include public scientific lectures delivered by practising scientists. In this article, we examine such lectures from the perspectives of: (i) lecturers (7) who are practising scientists acknowledged to be good…

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Feynman Lectures on Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feynman, Richard P.; Morinigo, Fernando B.; Wagner, William G.

    2003-05-01

    In the early 1960s Feynman lectured to physics undergraduates and, with the assistance of his colleagues Leighton and Sands, produced the three-volume classic Feynman Lectures in Physics. These lectures were delivered in the mornings. In the afternoons Feynman was giving postgraduate lectures on gravitation. This book is based on notes compiled by two students on that course: Morinigo and Wagner. Their notes were checked and approved by Feynman and were available at Caltech. They have now been edited by Brian Hatfield and made more widely available. The book has a substantial preface by John Preskill and Kip Thorne, and an introduction entitled 'Quantum Gravity' by Brian Hatfield. You should read these before going on to the lectures themselves. Preskill and Thorne identify three categories of potential readers of this book. 1. Those with a postgraduate training in theoretical physics. 2. 'Readers with a solid undergraduate training in physics'. 3. 'Admirers of Feynman who do not have a strong physics background'. The title of the book is perhaps misleading: readers in category 2 who think that this book is an extension of the Feynman Lectures in Physics may be disappointed. It is not: it is a book aimed mainly at those in category 1. If you want to get to grips with gravitation (and general relativity) then you need to read an introductory text first e.g. General Relativity by I R Kenyon (Oxford: Oxford University Press) or A Unified Grand Tour of Theoretical Physics by Ian D Lawrie (Bristol: IoP). But there is no Royal Road. As pointed out in the preface and in the introduction, the book represents Feynman's thinking about gravitation some 40 years ago: the lecture course was part of his attempts to understand the subject himself, and for readers in all three categories it is this that makes the book one of interest: the opportunity to observe how a great physicist attempts to tackle some of the hardest challenges of physics. However, the book was written 40

  4. Lectures on Higher Structures in M-Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Saemann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    These are notes for four lectures on higher structures in M-theory as presented at workshops at the Erwin Schroedinger Institute and Tohoku University. The first lecture gives an overview of systems of multiple M5-branes and introduces the relevant mathematical structures underlying a local description of higher gauge theory. In the second lecture, we develop the corresponding global picture. A construction of non-abelian superconformal gauge theories in six dimensions using twistor spaces is discussed in the third lecture. The last lecture deals with the problem of higher quantization and its relation to loop space. An appendix summarizes the relation between 3-Lie algebras and Lie 2-algebras.

  5. Jefferson Lab: Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2016-08-01

    The continuous electron beam accelerator facility and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for nuclear physics research whose upgrade is presently underway, with completion expected in 2017. The upgraded facility will accelerate electron beams to 11 GeV for experiments in the existing Halls A, B and C. In addition, a 12 GeV beam can be provided to a new experimental hall, Hall D, to generate a 9 GeV tagged photon beam. This upgrade will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in hadronic, nuclear, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  6. Famed lab seeks big grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Lillington, K

    2001-01-01

    DUBLIN, Ireland -- CERN, the famed Swiss high-energy particle physics lab, has a problem. It's about to start generating more data than any computer or network anywhere in the world is able to analyze. That prospect has led CERN to drive a major European project to create a vast "grid" research network of computers across Europe. When completed, the 10 million euro, Linux-based endeavor called DataGRID, will become a principal European computing resource for researchers of many disciplines. "I believe grid computing will revolutionize the way we compute, in much the same way as the World Wide Web and Internet changed the way we communicate," said John Ellis, a theoretical physicist and adviser to the director general of CERN.

  7. Innovations in STEM education: the Go-Lab federation of online labs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Ton; Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Gillet, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The Go-Lab federation of online labs opens up virtual laboratories (simulation), remote laboratories (real equipment accessible at distance) and data sets from physical laboratory experiments (together called “online labs”) for large-scale use in education. In this way, Go-Lab enables inquiry-based

  8. Programming Arduino with LabVIEW

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Marco

    2015-01-01

    If you already have some experience with LabVIEW and want to apply your skills to control physical objects and make measurements using the Arduino sensor, this book is for you. Prior knowledge of Arduino and LabVIEW is essential to fully understand the projects detailed in this book.

  9. Innovation - A view from the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA Ag Lab in Peoria helps bridge the gap between agricultural producers and commercial manufacturers. In 2015, the Ag Lab, officially known as the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research (NCAUR), is celebrating 75 years of research in Peoria. T...

  10. The DVCS program at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niccolai, Silvia [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay, France

    2014-06-01

    Recent promising results, obtained at Jefferson Lab, on cross sections and asymmetries for DVCS and their link to the Generalized Parton Distributions are the focus of this paper. The extensive experimental program to measure DVCS with the 12-GeV-upgraded CEBAF in three experimental Halls (A, B, C) of Jefferson Lab, will also be presented.

  11. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritchie B.G.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST. An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  12. Hydrogel Beads: The New Slime Lab?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockway, Debra; Libera, Matthew; Welner, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    Creating slime fascinates students. Unfortunately, though intrigue is at its peak, the educational aspect of this activity is often minimal. This article describes a chemistry lab that closely relates to the slime lab and allows high school students to explore the concepts of chemical bonding, properties, and replacement reactions. It involves the…

  13. Lectures on Dark Energy and Cosmic Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Joshua A.

    2008-09-01

    The discovery ten years ago that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating put in place the present cosmological model, in which the Universe is composed of 4% baryons, 20% dark matter, and 76% dark energy. Yet the underlying cause of cosmic acceleration remains a mystery: it could arise from the repulsive gravity of dark energy-for example, the quantum energy of the vacuum-or it may signal that General Relativity breaks down on cosmological scales and must be replaced. In these lectures, I present the observational evidence for cosmic acceleration and what it has revealed about dark energy, discuss a few of the theoretical ideas that have been proposed to explain acceleration, and describe the key observational probes that we hope will shed light on this enigma in the coming years. Based on five lectures given at the XII Ciclo de Cursos Especiais at the Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1-5 October 2007.

  14. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme: Cloud Computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Cloud Computing (1/2), by Belmiro Rodrigues Moreira (LIP Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Part).   Wednesday, May 30, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( 500-1-001 - Main Auditorium ) Cloud computing, the recent years buzzword for distributed computing, continues to attract and keep the interest of both the computing and business world. These lectures aim at explaining "What is Cloud Computing?" identifying and analyzing it's characteristics, models, and applications. The lectures will explore different "Cloud definitions" given by different authors and use them to introduce the particular concepts. The main cloud models (SaaS, PaaS, IaaS), cloud types (public, private, hybrid), cloud standards and security concerns will be presented. The borders between Cloud Computing and Grid Computing, Server Virtualization, Utility Computing will be discussed and analyzed.

  15. Lectures on Flavor Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, B

    2016-01-01

    These lectures on flavor physics are an introduction to the subject. First lec- ture: We discuss the meaning of flavor and the importance of flavor physics in restricting extensions of the Standard Model (SM) of Electroweak interactions. We explain the origin of the KM matrix and how its elements are determined. We discuss FCNC and the GIM mechanism, followed by how a principle of Minimal Flavor Violation leads to SM extensions that are safe as far as FCNC are concerned even if the new physics comes in at low, TeVish scales. This is illustrated by the example of B radiative decays ( b → sγ ). Second lecture: We then turn our attention to CP-violation. We start by presenting neutral meson mixing. Then we consider various CP-asymmetries, culminating in the theoretically clean interference between mixing and decay into CP eigenstates.

  16. Academic Training: Academic Training Lectures-Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  17. Lecture Notes on Topics in Accelerator Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alex W.

    2002-11-15

    These are lecture notes that cover a selection of topics, some of them under current research, in accelerator physics. I try to derive the results from first principles, although the students are assumed to have an introductory knowledge of the basics. The topics covered are: (1) Panofsky-Wenzel and Planar Wake Theorems; (2) Echo Effect; (3) Crystalline Beam; (4) Fast Ion Instability; (5) Lawson-Woodward Theorem and Laser Acceleration in Free Space; (6) Spin Dynamics and Siberian Snakes; (7) Symplectic Approximation of Maps; (8) Truncated Power Series Algebra; and (9) Lie Algebra Technique for nonlinear Dynamics. The purpose of these lectures is not to elaborate, but to prepare the students so that they can do their own research. Each topic can be read independently of the others.

  18. Lecture Notes on Topics in Accelerator Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Chao, A W

    2002-01-01

    These are lecture notes that cover a selection of topics, some of them under current research, in accelerator physics. I try to derive the results from first principles, although the students are assumed to have an introductory knowledge of the basics. The topics covered are: (1) Panofsky-Wenzel and Planar Wake Theorems; (2) Echo Effect; (3) Crystalline Beam; (4) Fast Ion Instability; (5) Lawson-Woodward Theorem and Laser Acceleration in Free Space; (6) Spin Dynamics and Siberian Snakes; (7) Symplectic Approximation of Maps; (8) Truncated Power Series Algebra; and (9) Lie Algebra Technique for nonlinear Dynamics. The purpose of these lectures is not to elaborate, but to prepare the students so that they can do their own research. Each topic can be read independently of the others.

  19. Lectures series in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1987-01-01

    The lecture notes cover the basic principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). They are oriented more toward practical applications than theory, and are intended to serve as a unified source for basic material in the CFD field as well as an introduction to more specialized topics in artificial viscosity and boundary conditions. Each chapter in the test is associated with a videotaped lecture. The basic properties of conservation laws, wave equations, and shock waves are described. The duality of the conservation law and wave representations is investigated, and shock waves are examined in some detail. Finite difference techniques are introduced for the solution of wave equations and conservation laws. Stability analysis for finite difference approximations are presented. A consistent description of artificial viscosity methods are provided. Finally, the problem of nonreflecting boundary conditions are treated.

  20. Academic Training Lecture: Jets at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Programme 30, 31 March and 1 April  2011 from 11:00 to 12:00 -  Bldg. 40-S2-A01 - Salle Andersson Jets at Hadron Colliders by Gavin Salam These three lectures will discuss how jets are defined at hadron colliders, the physics that is responsible for the internal structure of jets and the ways in which an understanding of jets may help in searches for new particles at the LHC.

  1. Three lectures on topological phases of matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, E.

    2016-07-01

    These notes are based on lectures at the PSSCMP/PiTP summer school that was held at Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study in July, 2015. They are devoted largely to topological phases of matter that can be understood in terms of free fermions and band theory. They also contain an introduction to the fractional quantum Hall effect from the point of view of effective field theory.

  2. Virginia Tech Distinguished Lecture Series: Eric Lyon

    OpenAIRE

    Lyon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Associate Professor - Music Technology, Composition Eric Lyon is a composer and computer music researcher. Major areas of focus include computer chamber music, spatial orchestration, and articulated noise composition. Recent compositions include "Spirits", a 43-channel electroacoustic piano composition for the ZKM Kubus,"Noise Variations" for ensemble mise-en, and “The Book of Strange Positions” for the violin duo String Noise. Subject: Distinguished Lecture Series

  3. TASI 2008 Lectures on Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2009-01-01

    Based on lectures given at the 2008 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute (TASI), I review here some aspects of the phenomenology of particle dark matter, including the process of thermal freeze-out in the early universe, and the direct and indirect detection of WIMPs. I also describe some of the most popular particle candidates for dark matter and summarize the current status of the quest to discover dark matter's particle identity.

  4. Academic Training: Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 12 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. Ross (The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics & CERN) Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 O. Bruening (CERN) Accelerators (1/5) 11:15 - 12:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (4/4) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 13 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. Ross (The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics & CERN) Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) 10:15 - 11:00 O. Bruening (CERN) Accelerators (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. Bruening (CERN) G. Ross (The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics & CERN) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 14 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. Ross (The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics & CERN) Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (3/6) 10:15 - 11:00 O. Bruening (CERN) Accelerators (3/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. Bruening (CERN) Accelerators (4/5) 14:00 - ...

  5. Lecture programme The reality of science today

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    John Ellis (CERN): Gauguin’s questions in the context of particle physics.John Ellis (CERN) will speak about: Gauguin’s questions in the context of particle physics In a famous painting, Paul Gauguin asked the universal and eternal questions: Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going? In this lecture, John Ellis will comment on the prospects of particle physics in an attempt to provide elements of answers to these questions. This is the second in the series of lectures organised by the History and Philosophy of Sciences Unit of Geneva University, in collaboration with ASPERA, the European network for astroparticle physics research, which began with a contribution from Dominique Pestre (EHESS and Centre Koyré, Paris). What are the new challenges and realities facing research? What is its place in today’s society? In this series of lectures covering a range of topics, researchers and members of the general public are invited to think about the state of sc...

  6. Nursing students' attitudes to biomedical science lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Modhefer, A K; Roe, S

    To explore what first-year nursing students believe to be the preferred characteristics of common foundation programme biomedical science lecturers, and to investigate whether students prefer active or passive learning. Survey and interview methodologies were used to explore the attitudes of a cohort of first-year nursing students at Queen's University Belfast. Questionnaires were distributed among 300 students. Individuals were asked to select five of a list of 14 criteria that they believed characterised the qualities of an effective lecturer. Informal interviews were carried out with five participants who were randomly selected from the sample to investigate which teaching methods were most beneficial in assisting their learning. Nursing students favoured didactic teaching and found interactivity in lectures intimidating. Students preferred to learn biomedical science passively and depended heavily on their instructors. In response to the survey, the authors propose a set of recommendations to enhance the learning process in large classes. This guidance includes giving clear objectives and requirements to students, encouraging active participation, and sustaining student interest through the use of improved teaching aids and innovative techniques.

  7. Lecture programme The reality of science today

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    What are the new challenges and realities facing scientific research? What is its place in society today? To answer these questions, the History and Philosophy of Sciences Unit of Geneva University, in collaboration with ASPERA, the European network for astroparticle physics research, has organised a programme of lectures entitled La réalité de la science d’aujourd’hui, enjeux et défis de la diversité. This series of lectures will provide researchers and members of the public with a snapshot of the state of science today from the perspective of laboratories and institutes, and on subjects such as funding policy and technological and legal impact. The first lecture will be given by science historian Dominique Pestre (EHESS & Centre Koyré, Paris), renowned for his contributions to the analysis of science past and present, and notably one of the authors of the work "History of CERN". He will discuss the modern methods of producing scientific knowledge which have been develop...

  8. Lecture Script: Introduction to Computational Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Schmied, Roman

    2014-01-01

    This document is the lecture script of a one-semester course taught at the University of Basel in the Fall semesters of 2012 and 2013. It is aimed at advanced students of physics who are familiar with the concepts and notations of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics lectures can often be separated into two classes. In the first class you get to know Schroedinger's equation and find the form and dynamics of simple physical systems (square well, harmonic oscillator, hydrogen atom); most calculations are analytic and inspired by calculations originally done in the 1920s and 1930s. In the second class you learn about large systems such as molecular structures, crystalline solids, or lattice models; these calculations are usually so complicated that it is difficult for the student to understand them in all detail. This lecture tries to bridge the gap between simple analytic calculations and complicated large-scale computations. We will revisit most of the problems encountered in introductory quantum mechanics, fo...

  9. Recently Published Lectures and Tutorials for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Herr, J.

    2006-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project, WLAP, a collaboration between the University of Michigan and CERN, has developed a synchronized system for recording and publishing educational multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. This year, the University of Michigan team has been asked to record and publish all ATLAS Plenary sessions, as well as a large number of Physics and Computing tutorials. A significant amount of this material has already been published and can be accessed via the links below. The WLAP model is spreading. This summer, the CERN's High School Teachers program has used WLAP's system to record several physics lectures directed toward a broad audience. And a new project called MScribe, which is essentially the WLAP system coupled with an infrared tracking camera, is being used by the University of Michigan to record several University courses this academic year. All lectures can be viewed on any major platform with any common internet browser...

  10. "A COMPARISON OF ""TRADITIONAL LECTURE"" AND ""LECTURE ALONG WITH FILMSTRIP PROJECTION"""

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Tahvildari

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, for the first time in Iran, the application and effectiveness of two educational methods of" traditional lecture" and " lecture along with filmstrip projection", on the level of personal health knowledge of students studying at third grade of girls guidance school in the 7th educational district of Tehran was compared. The "Experimental design" was chosen for conducting this research in order to have a more suitable ground for understanding causal relationships. In order to consider both, the effects of the primary measurement and also the effects of the simultaneous factors, the experimental design was applied. A control group was also included in the experiment. The results of this study showed that the "lecture along with filmstrip projection" was significantly better and more effective that "traditional lecture" method of education in increasing student's health knowledge in relation to personal health contents. It was also concluded that the "traditional lecture" method of education has had significantly more effects on increasing student's health knowledge as compared to control group (without receiving health education in relation to personal health.

  11. Video Lecture Capture Technology Helps Students Study without Affecting Attendance in Large Microbiology Lecture Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lynn McLean

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recording lectures using video lecture capture software and making them available for students to watch anytime, from anywhere, has become a common practice in many universities across many disciplines. The software has become increasingly easy to use and is commonly provided and maintained by higher education institutions. Several studies have reported that students use lecture capture to enhance their learning and study for assessments, as well as to catch up on material they miss when they cannot attend class due to extenuating circumstances. Furthermore, students with disabilities and students from non-English Speaking Backgrounds (NESB may benefit from being able to watch the video lecture captures at their own pace. Yet, the effect of this technology on class attendance remains a controversial topic and largely unexplored in undergraduate microbiology education. Here, we show that when video lecture captures were available in our large enrollment general microbiology courses, attendance did not decrease. In fact, the majority of students reported that having the videos available did not encourage them to skip class, but rather they used them as a study tool. When we surveyed NESB students and nontraditional students about their attitudes toward this technology, they found it helpful for their learning and for keeping up with the material.

  12. Communication Method between LabVIEW and Excel%LabVIEW与Excel的通信方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈金平; 王生泽; 吴文英

    2006-01-01

    在虚拟仪器开发过程中,需要将一些多路采集数据存储在Excel表格中.LabVIEW是一种方便灵活的虚拟仪器开发环境,而LabVIEW中的DDE是Windows操作系统中的一种基于消息的协议.利用LabVIEW的DDE功能可以很好地实现LabVIEW与Excel的数据通信.通过具体例子叙述了LabVIEW的DDE功能,这种功能使得LabVIEW与Excel的数据交换方便快捷,实现方法简单明了,实践表明DDE是增强LabVIEW整体功能的一条有效途径.

  13. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer Edward

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785. The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p Conclusion In this setting, EVS technology used in large group lectures did not offer significant advantages over the more traditional lecture format.

  14. The Trieste Lecture of John Stewart Bell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Angelo; Carlo Ghirardi, Gian

    2007-03-01

    Delivered at Trieste on the occasion of the 25th Anniversary of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, 2 November 1989 The video of this lecture is available here. Please see the PDF for the transcript of the lecture. General remarks by Angelo Bassi and GianCarlo Ghirardi During the autumn of 1989 the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, celebrated the 25th anniversary of its creation. Among the many prestigious speakers, who delivered extremely interesting lectures on that occasion, was the late John Stewart Bell. All lectures have been recorded on tape. We succeeded in getting a copy of John's lecture. In the lecture, many of the arguments that John had lucidly stressed in his writings appear once more, but there are also extremely interesting new remarks which, to our knowledge, have not been presented elsewhere. In particular he decided, as pointed out by the very choice of the title of his lecture, to call attention to the fact that the theory presents two types of difficulties, which Dirac classified as first and second class. The former are those connected with the so-called macro-objectification problem, the latter with the divergences characterizing relativistic quantum field theories. Bell describes the precise position of Dirac on these problems and he stresses appropriately how, contrary to Dirac's hopes, the steps which have led to a partial overcoming of the second class difficulties have not helped in any way whatsoever to overcome those of the first class. He then proceeds to analyse the origin and development of the Dynamical Reduction Program and draws attention to the problems that still affect it, in particular that of a consistent relativistic generalization. When the two meetings Are there quantum jumps? and On the present status of Quantum Mechanics were organized in Trieste and Losinj (Croatia), on 5 10 September 2005, it occurred to us that this lecture, which has never been published, might represent an

  15. Le temps passe,la lecture reste%Le temps passe, la lecture reste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓霖

    2011-01-01

    Il y a plus de deux mille ans,Confucius insistait déjà sur l'importance de la lecture.En effet,depuis deux mille ans,la lecture est une tradition,qui influence beaucoup les Chinois.De m(e)me,en Occident,l'Eglise chrétienne a demandé très t(o)t à ses fidèles de lire la Bible,car sa lecture était le moyen d'entrer en communication avec Dieu.Selon la tradition juda(i)que,la mère mettait un peu de miel sur la Bible,et laissait ses enfants l'embrasser,ceci dans le but de leur faire comprendre que le Livre est d'une douceur merveilleuse.

  16. Lab-on-a-Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Labs on chips are manufactured in many shapes and sizes and can be used for numerous applications, from medical tests to water quality monitoring to detecting the signatures of life on other planets. The eight holes on this chip are actually ports that can be filled with fluids or chemicals. Tiny valves control the chemical processes by mixing fluids that move in the tiny channels that look like lines, connecting the ports. Scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama designed this chip to grow biological crystals on the International Space Station. Through this research, they discovered that this technology is ideally suited for solving the challenges of the Vision for Space Exploration. For example, thousands of chips the size of dimes could be loaded on a Martian rover looking for biosignatures of past or present life. Other types of chips could be placed in handheld devices used to monitor microbes in water or to quickly conduct medical tests on astronauts. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  17. Designing Viable Business Models for Living Labs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard R. Katzy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Over 300 regions have integrated the concept of living labs into their economic development strategy since 2006, when the former Finnish Prime Minister Esko Aho launched the living lab innovation policy initiative during his term of European presidency. Despite motivating initial results, however, success cases of turning research into usable new products and services remain few and uncertainty remains on what living labs actually do and contribute. This practitioner-oriented article presents a business excellence model that shows processes of idea creation and team mobilization, new product development, user involvement, and entrepreneurship through which living labs deliver high-potential investment opportunities. Customers of living labs are identified as investors such as venture capitalists or industrial firms because living labs can generate revenue from them to create their own sustainable business model. The article concludes that living labs provide extensive support “lab” infrastructure and that it remains a formidable challenge to finance it, which calls for a more intensive debate.

  18. e-REAL: Enhanced Reality Lab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Salvetti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available e-REAL - enhanced reality lab - is a fully-immersive and multitasking environment, designed to experience challenging situations in a group setting, engaging all participants simultaneously on different levels: with peers, thematic experts and learning facilitators, both on site and remotely. e-REAL is a lab based on visual thinking and knowledge visualization, facilitated by enhanced (or augmented reality tools. It is a highly interactive and face-to-face lab that promotes proactive data and information research (everything is available, but learners have to actively look for it - allowing knowledge sharing with remote teams and integrating training on soft skills with those that are technical and specialized.

  19. Teachers' Perspectives on Online Virtual Labs vs. Hands-On Labs in High School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Teresa M.

    This study of online science teachers' opinions addressed the use of virtual labs in online courses. A growing number of schools use virtual labs that must meet mandated laboratory standards to ensure they provide learning experiences comparable to hands-on labs, which are an integral part of science curricula. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs. The theoretical foundation was constructivism, as labs provide student-centered activities for problem solving, inquiry, and exploration of phenomena. The research questions focused on experienced teachers' perceptions of the quality of virtual vs. hands-on labs. Data were collected through survey questions derived from the lab objectives of The Next Generation Science Standards . Eighteen teachers rated the degree of importance of each objective and also rated how they felt virtual labs met these objectives; these ratings were reported using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were few and served to illustrate the numerical results. Many teachers stated that virtual labs are valuable supplements but could not completely replace hands-on experiences. Studies on the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs are limited despite widespread use. Comprehensive studies will ensure that online students have equal access to quality labs. School districts need to define lab requirements, and colleges need to specify the lab experience they require. This study has potential to inspire positive social change by assisting science educators, including those in the local school district, in evaluating and selecting courseware designed to promote higher order thinking skills, real-world problem solving, and development of strong inquiry skills, thereby improving science instruction for all high school students.

  20. The Interactive Lecture: Teaching and Learning Technologies for Large Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Conventional lectures in large classrooms are connected to fundamental didactic problems due to a lack of interactivity and feedback opportunities. In an interactive lecture each student is equipped with a light-weight, mobile device that can be used to interact with the lecturer during the lesson, thus creating an additional channel of communication. These devices support new teaching and learning paradigms such as participatory simulations. In this paper, we present our experiences with the...

  1. Blended versus lecture learning: outcomes for staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Heidi; Comer, Linda; Putnam, Lorene; Freeman, Helen

    2012-07-01

    Critical care pharmacology education is crucial to safe patient care for nurses orienting to specialized areas. Although traditionally taught as a classroom lecture, it is important to consider effectiveness of alternative methods for education. This study provided experimentally derived evidence regarding effectiveness of blended versus traditional lecture for critical care pharmacology education. Regardless of learner demographics, the findings determined no significant differences in cognitive learning outcomes or learner satisfaction between blended versus lecture formats.

  2. Labs not in a lab: A case study of instructor and student perceptions of an online biology lab class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Jessica Boyce

    Distance learning is not a new phenomenon but with the advancement in technology, the different ways of delivering an education have increased. Today, many universities and colleges offer their students the option of taking courses online instead of sitting in a classroom on campus. In general students like online classes because they allow for flexibility, the comfort of sitting at home, and the potential to save money. Even though there are advantages to taking online classes, many students and instructors still debate the effectiveness and quality of education in a distant learning environment. Many universities and colleges are receiving pressure from students to offer more and more classes online. Research argues for both the advantages and disadvantages of online classes and stresses the importance of colleges and universities weighing both sides before deciding to adopt an online class. Certain classes may not be suitable for online instruction and not all instructors are suitable to teach online classes. The literature also reveals that there is a need for more research on online biology lab classes. With the lack of information on online biology labs needed by science educators who face the increasing demand for online biology labs, this case study hopes to provide insight into the use of online biology lab classes and the how students and an instructor at a community college in Virginia perceive their online biology lab experience as well as the effectiveness of the online labs.

  3. Examining and contrasting the cognitive activities engaged in undergraduate research experiences and lab courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, N. G.; Wieman, Carl E.

    2016-12-01

    While the positive outcomes of undergraduate research experiences (UREs) have been extensively categorized, the mechanisms for those outcomes are less understood. Through lightly structured focus group interviews, we have extracted the cognitive tasks that students identify as engaging in during their UREs. We also use their many comparative statements about their coursework, especially lab courses, to evaluate their experimental physics-related cognitive tasks in those environments. We find there are a number of cognitive tasks consistently encountered in physics UREs that are present in most experimental research. These are seldom encountered in lab or lecture courses, with some notable exceptions. Having time to reflect and fix or revise, and having a sense of autonomy, were both repeatedly cited as key enablers of the benefits of UREs. We also identify tasks encountered in actual experimental research that are not encountered in UREs. We use these findings to identify opportunities for better integration of the cognitive tasks in UREs and lab courses, as well as discussing the barriers that exist. This work responds to extensive calls for science education to better develop students' scientific skills and practices, as well as calls to expose more students to scientific research.

  4. Astrochemistry Lecture and Laboratory Courses at the University of Illinois: Applied Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, David E.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    The Department of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign offers two courses in astrochemistry, one lecture (Chem 450) and one laboratory (Chem 451). Both courses present the opportunity for advanced undergraduate and graduate students to learn about various spectroscopic concepts as they are applied toward an exotic subject, astrochemistry. In the lecture course, each student devotes a substantial fraction of the course work to one of the known astromolecules, building a wiki page for it during the semester, presenting a brief oral description about it in class, and then finally writing a paper about it. The course covers electronic, vibrational, and rotational spectroscopy, along with Einstein coefficients, line widths, and the interpretation of actual astronomical spectra. It also covers relevant reactions and reaction networks. Students learn to use pgopher for modeling rotational spectra. The lab course focuses on the methylidyne radical (CH). It begins with its chemistry and spectroscopy and then moves on to laboratory study of its electronic spectrum as observed in a butane flame and then collected with the university's 12" f/15 Brashear refracting telescope in the campus observatory built in 1896. Students learn to use IGOR to reduce CCD data.

  5. Development of collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media for instrumental analytical chemistry lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurweni, Wibawa, Basuki; Erwin, Tuti Nurian

    2017-08-01

    The framework for teaching and learning in the 21st century was prepared with 4Cs criteria. Learning providing opportunity for the development of students' optimal creative skills is by implementing collaborative learning. Learners are challenged to be able to compete, work independently to bring either individual or group excellence and master the learning material. Virtual laboratory is used for the media of Instrumental Analytical Chemistry (Vis, UV-Vis-AAS etc) lectures through simulations computer application and used as a substitution for the laboratory if the equipment and instruments are not available. This research aims to design and develop collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media for Instrumental Analytical Chemistry lectures, to know the effectiveness of this design model adapting the Dick & Carey's model and Hannafin & Peck's model. The development steps of this model are: needs analyze, design collaborative-creative learning, virtual laboratory media using macromedia flash, formative evaluation and test of learning model effectiveness. While, the development stages of collaborative-creative learning model are: apperception, exploration, collaboration, creation, evaluation, feedback. Development of collaborative-creative learning model using virtual laboratory media can be used to improve the quality learning in the classroom, overcome the limitation of lab instruments for the real instrumental analysis. Formative test results show that the Collaborative-Creative Learning Model developed meets the requirements. The effectiveness test of students' pretest and posttest proves significant at 95% confidence level, t-test higher than t-table. It can be concluded that this learning model is effective to use for Instrumental Analytical Chemistry lectures.

  6. Using lecture capture: a qualitative study of nursing faculty's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Patricia E; Bertram, Julie E; McLaughlin, Dorcas E

    2014-04-01

    As lecture capture technology becomes widely available in schools of nursing, faculty will need to master new technological skills and make decisions about recording their classroom lectures or other activities. This study sought to understand faculty's experience of using a new lecture capture system. This qualitative study used Kruger's systematic approach to explore undergraduate nursing faculty's first-time experience using a lecture capture system purchased by the university. Four focus groups were conducted with a total of fourteen undergraduate faculty using lecture capture for the first-time. The interviews were recorded and transcribed and then analyzed by the researchers. Four themes were identified from the faculty interviews. Two of the themes expressed faculty's concerns about the teaching role, and two themes expressed the faculty's concerns about student learning. Participants experienced stress when learning to use the new lecture capture technology and struggled to resolve it with their own beliefs and teaching values. The impact of lecture capture on student learning, impact on class attendance, and the promotion of a culture of lecturing were revealed as important issues to consider when lecture capture becomes available. © 2013.

  7. Lecture Evaluations by Medical Students: Concepts That Correlate With Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Aaron; Webb, Emily M; Ahearn, Bren; Naeger, David M

    2016-01-01

    The didactic lecture remains one of the most popular teaching formats in medical education; yet, factors that most influence lecturing success in radiology education are unknown. The purpose of this study is to identify patterns of narrative student feedback that are associated with relatively higher and lower evaluation scores. All student evaluations from our core radiology elective during 1 year were compiled. All evaluation comments were tagged, to identify discrete descriptive concepts. Correlation coefficients were calculated, for each tag with mean evaluation scores. Tags that were the most strongly associated with the highest- versus lowest-rated (> or lectures were identified. A total of 3,262 comments, on 273 lectures, rated by 77 senior medical students, were analyzed. The mean lecture score was 8.96 ± 0.62. Three tags were significantly positively correlated with lecture score: "interactive"; "fun/engaging"; and "practical/important content" (r = 0.39, r = 0.34, and r = 0.32, respectively; all P lectures yielded similar results. Several factors were identified that were strongly associated with lecture score. Among the actionable characteristics, interactive lectures with appropriately targeted content (ie, practical/useful) were the most highly rated. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Surgical frontal lecture. Still important for teaching students?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierlemann, A; Baur, J; Germer, C T

    2013-10-01

    In times of manifold digital learning resources open to public access lectures in surgery still play a major role in medical training. It is a platform for discussion with the medical teacher and provides the opportunity to create a vivid learning experience by showing live operations via video streaming and inviting patients to the lectures. When then change in paradigm is achieved from pure knowledge transfer to cross-linkage of knowledge, the surgical lecture will be a major future keystone in medical education, where the lecturer can reach the students with his own passion for the field of expertise and get them interested in surgery.

  9. The work of lecturing in high school chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, SungWon; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2013-09-01

    Lecturing is an important aspect of the culture of science education. Perhaps because of the negative associations constructivist educators make with lecturing, little research has been done concerning the generally invisible aspects of the (embodied, lived) work that is required. Traditional research on science lectures focuses on ideas and (mental) concepts that somehow are "gotten across"; and it is interested in identifying verbal content and visual representations science teachers provide. The purpose of this study is to explicitly describe and theorize the living work of lecturing that produces in a societal arena everything from which students can learn. We use two case studies from the chemistry lectures in a tenth-grade Singapore classroom to exemplify the central role of the performative aspects of lecturing. We articulate and exemplify assertions that (a) corporeal performances differentiate and coordinate the contents of lecturing with its pitch, rhythm, and speech volume, and thereby orient students to specific discourse features of chemistry; and (b) corporeal performances differentiate and coordinate layers of talk with prosody, gestures, and body orientation, and thereby make analogies available to students. We conclude that what is visible in lectures (e.g., scientific discourse, analogies) is always the outcome of the (generally unattended to) corporeal labor including gestures, body orientation, and prosodic features (e.g., shifts in pitch) and that this outcome | labor pair constitutes an appropriate unit of understanding lecturing as societal phenomenon.

  10. Explaining the Unexplainable: Translated Scientific Explanations (TSE) in Public Physics Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapon, Shulamit; Ganiel, Uri; Eylon, Bat Sheva

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the features and design of explanations in public physics lectures. It presents the findings from a comparative study of three exemplary public physics lectures, given by practicing physicists who are acknowledged as excellent public lecturers. The study uses three different perspectives: the lecture, the lecturer, and the…

  11. Media Richness and Social Norms in the Choice to Attend Lectures or to Watch Them Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassili, John N.

    2008-01-01

    Lectures in a large psychology course were taped and posted online where they could be viewed by streaming video. All students in the course had the option to attend lectures or watch them online, a choice that could be exercised on a lecture-by-lecture basis. The proportion of lectures watched online revealed that students chose between…

  12. Automatic Camera Control System for a Distant Lecture with Videoing a Normal Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Akira; Nishigori, Shuichiro

    The growth of a communication network technology enables students to take part in a distant lecture. Although many lectures are conducted in universities by using Web contents, normal lectures using a blackboard are still held. The latter style lecture is good for a teacher's dynamic explanation. A way to modify it for a distant lecture is to…

  13. Lectures on Hamiltonian Dynamics : Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Benettin, Giancarlo; Kuksin, Sergei

    2005-01-01

    This volume collects three series of lectures on applications of the theory of Hamiltonian systems, contributed by some of the specialists in the field. The aim is to describe the state of the art for some interesting problems, such as the Hamiltonian theory for infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems, including KAM theory, the recent extensions of the theory of adiabatic invariants and the phenomena related to stability over exponentially long times of Nekhoroshev's theory. The books may serve as an excellent basis for young researchers, who will find here a complete and accurate exposition of recent original results and many hints for further investigation.

  14. Nobel Lecture: Graphene: Materials in the Flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselov, K. S.

    2011-07-01

    Much like the world described in Abbott’s Flatland, graphene is a two-dimensional object. And, as “Flatland” is “a romance of many dimensions,” graphene is much more than just a flat crystal. It possesses a number of unusual properties which are often unique or superior to those in other materials. In this brief lecture I would like to explain the reason for my (and many other people’s) fascination with this material, and invite the reader to share some of the excitement I’ve experienced while researching it.

  15. Erice Lectures on Black Holes and Attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Sergio; Marrani, A

    2008-01-01

    These lectures give an elementary introduction to the subject of four dimensional black holes (BHs) in supergravity and the Attractor Mechanism in the extremal case. Some thermodynamical properties are discussed and some relevant formulae for the critical points of the BH effective potential are given. The case of Maxwell-Einstein-axion-dilaton (super)gravity is discussed in detail. Analogies among BH entropy and multipartite entanglement of qubits in quantum information theory, as well moduli spaces of extremal BH attractors, are also discussed.

  16. Protein physics a course of lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelstein, Alexei V

    2002-01-01

    Protein Physics is a lively presentation of the most general problems of protein structure, folding and function from the physics and chemistry perspective, based on lectures given by the authors. It deals with fibrous, membrane and, most of all, with the best studied water-soluble globular proteins, in both their native and denatured states. The major aspects of protein physics are covered systematically, physico-chemical properties of polypeptide chains; their secondary structures; tertiary structures of proteins and their classification; conformational transitions in protein molecules and t

  17. Banting lecture 2011: hyperinsulinemia: cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkey, Barbara E

    2012-01-01

    The Banting Medal for Scientific Achievement Award is the American Diabetes Association's highest scientific award and honors an individual who has made significant, long-term contributions to the understanding of diabetes, its treatment, and/or prevention. The award is named after Nobel Prize winner Sir Frederick Banting, who codiscovered insulin treatment for diabetes. Dr. Barbara E. Corkey received the American Diabetes Association's Banting Medal for Scientific Achievement at the Association's 71st Scientific Sessions, 24-28 June 2011, San Diego, California. She presented the Banting Lecture, "Hyperinsulinemia: Cause or Consequence?" on Sunday, 26 June 2011.

  18. Elements of Linear Algebra. Lecture Notes

    CERN Document Server

    Cotaescu, Ion I

    2016-01-01

    These pedagogical lecture notes address to the students in theoretical physics for helping them to understand the mechanisms of the linear operators defined on finite-dimensional vector spaces equipped with definite or indefinite inner products. The importance of the Dirac conjugation is pointed out presenting its general theory and a version of the Riesz theorem for the indefinite inner product spaces, based on the Dirac-Riesz map that combines the action of the Riesz map with that of the metric operator. The matrix representations of the linear operators on vector spaces with definite or indefinite inner products is also presented.

  19. Graphene: materials in the Flatland (Nobel lecture).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselov, Kostya S

    2011-07-25

    Much like the world described in Abbott's "Flatland", graphene is a two-dimensional object. And, as "Flatland" is "A Romance of Many Dimensions", graphene is much more than just a flat crystal. It possesses a number of unusual properties which are often unique or superior to those in other materials. In this brief lecture I would like to explain the reason for my (and many other people's) fascination with this material, and invite the reader to share some of the excitement I've experienced while researching it.

  20. Lectures on N_X(p)

    CERN Document Server

    Serre, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Lectures on NX(p) deals with the question on how NX(p), the number of solutions of mod p congruences, varies with p when the family (X) of polynomial equations is fixed. While such a general question cannot have a complete answer, it offers a good occasion for reviewing various techniques in l-adic cohomology and group representations, presented in a context that is appealing to specialists in number theory and algebraic geometry. Along with covering open problems, the text examines the size and congruence properties of NX(p) and describes the ways in which it is computed, by closed formulae a

  1. Paris-Princeton Lectures on Mathematical Finance

    CERN Document Server

    Carmona, René A; Kohatsu-Higa, Arturo; Lasry, Jean-Michel; Lions, Pierre-Louis; Pham, Huyên; Taflin, Erik

    2007-01-01

    The Paris-Princeton Lectures in Financial Mathematics, of which this is the third volume, will, on an annual basis, publish cutting-edge research in self-contained, expository articles from outstanding - established or upcoming! - specialists. The aim is to produce a series of articles that can serve as an introductory reference for research in the field. It arises as a result of frequent exchanges between the finance and financial mathematics groups in Paris and Princeton. The present volume sets standards with articles by René Carmona, Ivar Ekeland/Erik Taflin, Arturo Kohatsu-Higa, Pierre-Louis Lions/Jean-Michel Lasry, and Hyuên Pham.

  2. Lectures on the Quantum Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, David

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to describe the basic theoretical structures underlying the rich and beautiful physics of the quantum Hall effect. The focus is on the interplay between microscopic wavefunctions, long-distance effective Chern-Simons theories, and the modes which live on the boundary. The notes are aimed at graduate students in any discipline where $\\hbar=1$. A working knowledge of quantum field theory is assumed. Contents: 1. The Basics (Landau levels and Berry phase). 2. The Integer Quantum Hall Effect. 3. The Fractional Quantum Hall Effect. 4. Non-Abelian Quantum Hall States. 5. Chern-Simons Theories. 6. Edge Modes.

  3. Panels and Lectures Address China Controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Video Resources

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Editors note: Over the past several months, colleagues have brought to our attention three public panel discussions and lectures that address contemporary controversies in Chinese studies. These discussions have been video-recorded and are available to view on the internet. These presentations may be useful either for scholarly pursuits or may be excerpted for classroom viewing. We wish to thank those who contacted us about these resources, and we encourage readers who know of other such video resources to let us know about them so that we can inform our ASIANetwork colleagues of their existence and availability.

  4. Weak interactions at high energies. [Lectures, review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, J.

    1978-08-01

    Review lectures are presented on the phenomenological implications of the modern spontaneously broken gauge theories of the weak and electromagnetic interactions, and some observations are made about which high energy experiments probe what aspects of gauge theories. Basic quantum chromodynamics phenomenology is covered including momentum dependent effective quark distributions, the transverse momentum cutoff, search for gluons as sources of hadron jets, the status and prospects for the spectroscopy of fundamental fermions and how fermions may be used to probe aspects of the weak and electromagnetic gauge theory, studies of intermediate vector bosons, and miscellaneous possibilities suggested by gauge theories from the Higgs bosons to speculations about proton decay. 187 references. (JFP)

  5. Lecture Phonologique De L’image Publicitaire

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZATEŞ, Öğr.Gör. Mediha

    2013-01-01

    Introduction En partant des points de vue de B Grunig nous allons essayer d’analyser l’image publicitaire sur le plan phonologique afin de faciliter la tâche du lecteur du texte publicitaire pour en assurer une interprétation correcte Qu’est ce que la lecture? «Rien n’est aussi clair qu’un texte clos » dit Umberto Eco 1991: 10 qui est le créateur de Lecteur modèle Lettore Modello dont le rôle est très grand envers le texte En comparant le texte à une machine paresseuse il dit que...

  6. Laboratory Professionals: Who's Who in the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as in clinical chemistry, immunology, molecular pathology, microbiology, or blood bank /transfusion service. MLSs/MTs have ... Many labs are looking for laboratory professionals with advanced degrees and experience. « Prev | Next » Proudly sponsored by ... ...

  7. Photonics and Fiber Optics Processor Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Photonics and Fiber Optics Processor Lab develops, tests and evaluates high speed fiber optic network components as well as network protocols. In addition, this...

  8. Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility (formerly LOASIS) develops advanced accelerators and radiation sources. High gradient (1-100 GV/m) laser-plasma...

  9. Podcast: Scientific Integrity and Lab Fraud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nov 25, 2015. Dr. Bruce Woods, a chemist in the Electronic Crimes Division within the OIG’s Office of Investigations discusses his recent webinar for the Association of Public Health Laboratories on lab fraud.

  10. Thanatology for Everyone: Developmental Labs and Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Walter E.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    In an effort to "treat" the growing death concerns of many medical staffs, an experiential death and dying lab was created. Its evolution to meet changing needs is discussed, as well as future potential for work in this area. (Author)

  11. European labs fight back against cuts

    CERN Multimedia

    König, R

    1997-01-01

    Germany's 1997 budget contains cuts amounting to 3.7% in funding of domestic research programs and in contributions to international labs. Contributions will be cut to the European Space Agency, the European Synchrotron facility and CERN.

  12. Electro-Optic System Development Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electro-Optic System Development Lab serves as a development facility for electro-optical systems ranging from visible through long wave infrared. Capabilities...

  13. Årsrapport 2007: Knowledge Lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik

    Denne rapport beskriver Knowledge Labs udvikling og aktiviteter i 2007. Knowledge Lab har været og ikke mindst er et forsknings- og udviklingslaboratorium ved Syd- dansk Universitet. Det blev etableret i 2002 som en del af den jysk-fynske it-satsning. Laboratoriet beskæftiger en lang række forskere...... og projektmedarbejdere, som tilsammen repræsenterer kompetencer inden for fokusområderne: digital kompetenceudvikling, vidensledelse og vidensudvikling. Knowledge Lab arbejder med fokusområderne i et gensidigt betinget samspil mellem forskning, udvikling og anvendelse. Det forskningsmæssige grundlag...... for Knowledge Lab er: Grundlæggende og anvendt vidensteori med særligt henblik på brugen af digitale teknologier til understøttelse af videnstilegnelse, vidensdeling og vidensskabelse. Arbejds- og forskningsmåden er partnerskaber med private og offentlige virksomheder....

  14. Virtual labs in Leonardo da Vinci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw Nagy

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the problem of virtual lab capabilities in the e-learning. Using combination of web conferencing and "virtual labs" capabilities, a new quality distance learning teaching is now in preparation and will be included in the course teaching to produce interactive, online simulations for the natural gas engineering studies. The activities are designed to enhance the existing curriculum and to include online assessments. A special care is devoted to the security problem between a server and a client computer. Several examples of the virtual labs related to the PVT thermodynamics, fluid flow, the natural gas well-testing, and thev gas network flow are prepared and tested. A major challenge for the 'CELGAS' system is in managing the delicate balance between the student collaboration and the isolation. Students may be encouraged to collaborate and work with each other, simulating their exploration of the lab material.

  15. Airborne Low-Frequency Sonar (ALFS) Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The ALFS lab is dedicated to support acoustic data analysis and processing software support to the AN/AQS-22 dipping sonar system. It includes stand-alone Software...

  16. Developing an Advanced Lab course from scratch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Rudi

    2012-10-01

    A few years ago the Alpha group in APS organized faculty with interests in advanced lab courses in physics. At the University of Wyoming, we re-launched an advanced lab course after doing more than 15 years without one. Our majors had to take an electronic course in the Electrical Engineering department to get familiar with any kind of electronic equipment. Now we are in the fourth teaching session of the advanced Modern Physics lab and we will expand the course into a two-term course beginning spring 2013. Forty-five majors have gone through our labs, We developed an oral exam tradition, which is now beginning to lend our department upper level outcome assessment credibility for campus wide assessment.

  17. Do Language Proficiency and Lecture Comprehension Matter? OpenCourseWare Lectures for Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Chih; Yang, Hui-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Open source lectures not only provide knowledge-seekers with convenient ways to obtain knowledge and information, they also serve as potential language learning resources that provide extensive language input and repeated exposure to vocabulary within specific topics or disciplines. This current study aims to examine the relationship between…

  18. LECTURES ON ACUPUNCTURE:Part Ⅰ Clinical Acupuncture Lecture Twenty-one MELANCHOLY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚秀葵; 付娟; 董红英

    2001-01-01

    Melancholy is a general term for diseases resulting from emotional depressign and stagnation of qi. Disorder of qi-circulation can disturb functional activity of the blood system and result in many pathological changes. In this section, only hysteria is discussed. If you want to treat headache, insomnia, palpitation, seminal emission and globus hystericus, the relative sections in other lectures can be referred to.

  19. Podcasting in the STEM disciplines: the implications of supplementary lecture recording and 'lecture flipping'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjianastasis, Marios; Nightingale, Karl P

    2016-02-01

    Lecture capture or 'podcasting' technology offers a new and engaging format of learning materials that can be used to increase the flexibility and interactivity of learning and teaching environments. Here we discuss different ways that these recordings can be incorporated into STEM discipline teaching, and the impact this can have on students' learning.

  20. Do Language Proficiency and Lecture Comprehension Matter? OpenCourseWare Lectures for Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Chih; Yang, Hui-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Open source lectures not only provide knowledge-seekers with convenient ways to obtain knowledge and information, they also serve as potential language learning resources that provide extensive language input and repeated exposure to vocabulary within specific topics or disciplines. This current study aims to examine the relationship between…