WorldWideScience

Sample records for ma-loaded core experiments

  1. Simulation experiments concerning core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werle, H.

    1979-01-01

    A gas stream causes a remarkable increase in the interfacial heat flux (by a factor of 8 for v = 0.63 cm/s, v = gas volume flux/horizontal area). The most important characteristics of the system investigated (silicon oil/wood metal) are relatively similar to those of a core melt, Therefore a remarkable increase of the interfacial heat transfer by the gas release may be expected also for a core melt, compared with earlier investigations at the system silicon oil/water the influence of a gas stream is nevertheless remarkably lower for silicon oil/wood metal. This shows that the density ratio plays an important role. (orig./RW) [de

  2. An analysis of the uniform core experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterson, R H

    1973-10-15

    This report describes an analysis of the Uniform Core of HITREX using the WIMS E codes, and presents the results of theory/experiment comparisons. The overall picture is one of good agreement for core reaction rate distributions, but theory umderestimating k{sub eff} by about 1.5% {delta}k/k.

  3. Critical experiments of JMTRC MEU cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Y.; Takeda, K.; Shimakawa, S.; Koike, S.; Oyamada, R.

    1984-01-01

    The JMTRC, the critical facility of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), went critical on August 29, 1983, with 14 medium enriched uranium (MEU, 45%) fuel elements. Experiments are now being carried out to measure the change in various reactor characteristics between the previous HEU core and the new MEU fueled core. This paper describes the results obtained thus far on critical mass, excess reactivity, control rod worths and flux distribution, including preliminary neutronics calculations for the experiments using the SRAC code. (author)

  4. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment maintenance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, A.M.; Watts, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    The recently completed Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design project was carried out to investigate potential next generation tokamak concepts. An important aspect of this project was the early development and incorporation of remote maintainability throughout the design process. This early coordination and incorporation of maintenance aspects to the design of the device and facilities would assure that the machine could ultimately be maintained and repaired in an efficient and cost effective manner. To meet this end, a rigorously formatted engineering trade study was performed to determine the preferred configuration for the TFCX reactor based primarily on maintenance requirements. The study indicated that the preferred design was one with an external vacuum vessel and torrodial field coils that could be removed via a simple radial motion. The trade study is presented and the preferred TFCX configuration is described

  5. The Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.; Sheffield, G.V.; Bushnell, C.

    1985-01-01

    The basic objective of the next major step in the US fusion programme has been defined as the achievement of ignition and long pulse equilibrium burn of a fusion plasma in the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) device. Preconceptual design studies have seen completion of four candidate versions to provide the comparative information needed to narrow down the range of TFCX options before proceeding to the conceptual design phase. All four designs share the same objective and conform to common physics, engineering and costing criteria. The four base options considered differed mainly in the toroidal field coil design, two employing superconducting coils and the other two copper coils. In each case (copper and superconducting), one relatively conventional version was carried as well as a version employing more exotic toroidal field coil design assumptions. Sizes range from R=2.6 m for the smaller of the two copper versions to R=4.08 m for the larger superconducting option. In all cases, the plasma current was about 10 MA and the toroidal field about 4 T. (author)

  6. A review of PFR core distortion experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brook, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    Neutron induced voidage (NIV) swelling and irradiation creep, acting together or individually, produce deformation in core components exposed to a fast neutron flux and can lead to mechanical interaction between them. Today the nature of these processes is reasonably well understood, and reactor designers have two options in attempting to accomodate them: either by employing a flexible free standing design in which contact loadings are low but in which distortion may be high, or more commonly, by some type of restrained core in which inter-component loadings are high, but where distortion is relatively small. The aims of this paper are: a. to describe briefly the various operational limits of core and core component distortion and how they arise, for which a brief description of reactor construction is necessary; b. to outline how the problems of inter-component contact loadings are overcome for the interactive core; c. to describe some other potential problems which arise either from absolute swelling, or from differential swelling between components; of particular relevance here is the problem of contact loadings between absorber rods and their guide tubes; d. to comment on the degree of agreement with, and the feedback provided by, PIE findings; e. to show how the results of the work influence reactor operators and the reload program

  7. Molten core debris-sodium interactions: M-Series experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sowa, E.S.; Gabor, J.D.; Pavlik, J.R.; Cassulo, J.C.; Cook, C.J.; Baker, L. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Five new kilogram-scale experiments have been carried out. Four of the experiments simulated the situation where molten core debris flows from a breached reactor vessel into a dry reactor cavity and is followed by a flow of sodium (Ex-vessel case) and one experiment simulated the flow of core debris into an existing pool of sodium (In-vessel case). The core debris was closely simulated by a thermite reaction which produced a molten mixture of UO 2 , ZrO 2 , and stainless steel. There was efficient fragmentation of the debris in all experiments with no explosive interactions observed

  8. Gravity driven emergency core cooling experiments with the PACTEL facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munther, R.; Kalli, H.; Kouhia, J.

    1996-01-01

    PACTEL (Parallel Channel Test Loop) is an experimental out-of-pile facility designed to simulated the major components and system behaviour of a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) during different postulated LOCAs and transients. The reference reactor to the PACTEL facility is Loviisa type WWER-440. The recently made modifications enable experiments to be conducted also on the passive core cooling. In these experiments the passive core cooling system consisted of one core makeup tank (CMT) and pressure balancing lines from the pressurizer and from a cold leg connected to the top of the CMT in order to maintain the tank in pressure equilibrium with the primary system during ECC injection. The line from the pressurizer to the core makeup tank was normally open. The ECC flow was provided from the CMT located at a higher elevation than the main part of the primary system. A total number of nine experiments have been performed by now. 4 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  9. Gravity driven emergency core cooling experiments with the PACTEL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munther, R; Kalli, H [University of Technology, Lappeenranta (Finland); Kouhia, J [Technical Research Centre of Finland, Lappeenranta (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    PACTEL (Parallel Channel Test Loop) is an experimental out-of-pile facility designed to simulated the major components and system behaviour of a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) during different postulated LOCAs and transients. The reference reactor to the PACTEL facility is Loviisa type WWER-440. The recently made modifications enable experiments to be conducted also on the passive core cooling. In these experiments the passive core cooling system consisted of one core makeup tank (CMT) and pressure balancing lines from the pressurizer and from a cold leg connected to the top of the CMT in order to maintain the tank in pressure equilibrium with the primary system during ECC injection. The line from the pressurizer to the core makeup tank was normally open. The ECC flow was provided from the CMT located at a higher elevation than the main part of the primary system. A total number of nine experiments have been performed by now. 4 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs.

  10. Critical experiments on enriched uranium graphite moderated cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko; Akino, Fujiyoshi; Kitadate, Kenji; Kurokawa, Ryosuke

    1978-07-01

    A variety of 20 % enriched uranium loaded and graphite-moderated cores consisting of the different lattice cells in a wide range of the carbon to uranium atomic ratio have been built at Semi-Homogeneous Critical Experimental Assembly (SHE) to perform the critical experiments systematically. In the present report, the experimental results for homogeneously or heterogeneously fuel loaded cores and for simulation core of the experimental reactor for a multi-purpose high temperature reactor are filed so as to be utilized for evaluating the accuracy of core design calculation for the experimental reactor. The filed experimental data are composed of critical masses of uranium, kinetic parameters, reactivity worths of the experimental control rods and power distributions in the cores with those rods. Theoretical analyses are made for the experimental data by adopting a simple ''homogenized cylindrical core model'' using the nuclear data of ENDF/B-III, which treats the neutron behaviour after smearing the lattice cell structure. It is made clear from a comparison between the measurement and the calculation that the group constants and fundamental methods of calculations, based on this theoretical model, are valid for the homogeneously fuel loaded cores, but not for both of the heterogeneously fuel loaded cores and the core for simulation of the experimental reactor. Then, it is pointed out that consideration to semi-homogeneous property of the lattice cells for reactor neutrons is essential for high temperature graphite-moderated reactors using dispersion fuel elements of graphite and uranium. (author)

  11. Dynamics of core voiding during boiloff experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytis, G.T.; Aksan, S.N.; Stierli, F.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1987-01-01

    A series of boiloff experiments were conducted at the EIR NEPTUN test facility with a bundle consisting of 37 PWR fuel rod simulators. The test section was filled with subcooled coolant and the power was turned on. After an initial heatup phase, coolant was expelled from the test section due to rapid vapor generation near the mid-plane where the power generation was highest. Gradual boiloff of the remaining water followed. It was found that the ''collapsed liquid level'' (CLL) and the rod temperature histories could be predicted well, provided the initial expulsion of the coolant was calculated correctly. The axial void fraction and enthalpy profiles calculated with TRAC-BD/MOD1 provided the information needed for understanding the importance of heat transfer to the coolant before the inception of vapor generation, and the sensitivity of the results to the interfacial friction correlation used

  12. Critical heat flux experiments in tight lattice core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kureta, Masatoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    Fuel rods of the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) are so designed to be in tight lattices as to reduce moderation and achieve higher conversion ratio. As for the BWR type reactor coolant flow rate is reduced small compared with the existing BWR, so average void fraction comes to be langer. In order to evaluate thermo hydraulic characteristics of designed cores, critical heat flux experiments in tight lattice core have been conducted using simulated high pressure coolant loops for both the PWR and BWR seven fuel rod bundles. Experimental data on critical heat flux for full bundles have been accumulated and applied to assess the critical power of designed cores using existing codes. Evaluated results are conservative enough to satisfy the limiting condition. Further experiments on axial power distribution effects and 37 fuel rod bundle tests will be performed to validate thermohydraulic characteristics of designed cores. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Critical heat flux experiments in tight lattice core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kureta, Masatoshi

    2002-01-01

    Fuel rods of the Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) are so designed to be in tight lattices as to reduce moderation and achieve higher conversion ratio. As for the BWR type reactor coolant flow rate is reduced small compared with the existing BWR, so average void fraction comes to be langer. In order to evaluate thermo hydraulic characteristics of designed cores, critical heat flux experiments in tight lattice core have been conducted using simulated high pressure coolant loops for both the PWR and BWR seven fuel rod bundles. Experimental data on critical heat flux for full bundles have been accumulated and applied to assess the critical power of designed cores using existing codes. Evaluated results are conservative enough to satisfy the limiting condition. Further experiments on axial power distribution effects and 37 fuel rod bundle tests will be performed to validate thermohydraulic characteristics of designed cores. (T. Tanaka)

  14. Scaling NS-3 DCE Experiments on Multi-Core Servers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-15

    MPTCP) using the same software in DCE. In the experiment, only two wireless links ( LTE and Wi-Fi) are setup to examine MPTCP, resulting in limited...performance drop on the blade server. Our investigation then turned to other straightforward measures including the following: • We reduced the amount...simulation with varying numbers of cores and measured the run time. To pin the simulation to a specific set of cores, we switched from using 0:00   2:00

  15. Fast reactor core concepts to improve transmutation efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Koji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Itooka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Fast Reactor (FR) core concepts to improve transmutation efficiency were conducted. A heterogeneous MA loaded core was designed based on the 1000MWe-ABR breakeven core. The heterogeneous MA loaded core with Zr-H loaded moderated targets had a better transmutation performance than the MA homogeneous loaded core. The annular pellet rod design was proposed as one of the possible design options for the MA target. It was shown that using annular pellet MA rods mitigates the self-shielding effect in the moderated target so as to enhance the transmutation rate

  16. Applications of simulation experiments in LMFBR core materials technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleby, W.K.

    1976-01-01

    The development of charged particle bombardment experiments to simulate neutron irradiation induced swelling in austenitic alloys is briefly described. The applications of these techniques in LMFBR core materials technology are discussed. It is shown that use of the techniques to study the behavior of cold-worked Type-316 was instrumental in demonstrating at an early date the need for advanced materials. The simulation techniques then were used to identify alloying elements which can markedly decrease swelling and thus a focused reactor irradiation program is now in place to allow the future use of a lower swelling alloy for LMFBR core components

  17. Severe core damage experiments and analysis for CANDU applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, P.M.; White, A.J.; Snell, V.G.; Bonechi, M.

    2003-01-01

    AECL uses the MAAP CANDU code to calculate the progression of a severe core damage accident in a CANDU reactor to support Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Severe Accident Management activities. Experimental data are required to ensure that the core damage models used in MAAP CANDU code are adequate. In SMiRT 16, details of single channel experiments were presented to elucidate the mechanisms of core debris formation. This paper presents the progress made in severe core damage experiments since then using single channels in an inert atmosphere and results of the model development work to support the experiments. The core disassembly experiments are conducted with one-fifth scale channels made of Zr-2.5wt%Nb containing twelve simulated fuel bundles in an inert atmosphere. The reference fuel channel geometry consists of a pressure tube/calandria tube composite, with the pressure tube ballooned into circumferential contact with the calandria tube. Experimental results from single channel tests showed the development of time-dependent sag when the reference channel temperature exceeded 850 degC. The test results also showed significant strain localization in the gap at the bundle junctions along the bottom side of the channel, thus suggesting creep to be the main deformation mechanism for debris formation. An ABAQUS finite element model using two-dimensional beam elements with circular cross-section was developed to explain the experimental findings. A comparison of the calculated central sag (at mid-span), the axial displacement at the free end of the channel and the post-test sag profile showed good agreement with the experiments, when strain localization was included in the model, suggesting such a simple modelling approach would be adequate to explain the test findings. The results of the tests are important not only in the context of the validation of the analytical tools and models adopted by AECL for the severe accident analysis of CANDU reactors but

  18. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  19. Fundamental experiment on simulated molten core/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, S.; Katsumura, Y.

    1994-01-01

    If a complete and prolonged failure of coolant flow were to occur in a LWR or FBR, fission product decay heat would cause the fuel to overheat. If no available action to cool the fuel were taken, it would eventually melt. Ibis could lead to slumping of the molten core material and to the failure of the reactor pressure vessel and deposition of these materials into the concrete reactor cavity. Consequently, the molten core could melt and decompose the concrete. Vigorous agitation of the molten core pool by concrete decomposition gases is expected to enhance the convective heat transfer process. Besides the decomposition gases, melting concrete (slag) generated under the molten core pool will be buoyed up, and will also affect the downward heat transfer. Though, in this way, the heat transfer process across the interface is complicated by the slag and the gases evolved from the decomposed concrete, it is very important to make its process clear for the safety evaluation of nuclear reactors. Therefore, in this study, fundamental experiments were performed using simulated materials to observe the behaviors of the hot pool, slag and gases at the interface. Moreover, from the experimental observation, a correlation without empirical constants was proposed to calculate the interface heat transfer. The heat transfer across the interface would depend on thermo-physical interactions between the pool, slag and concrete which are changed by their thermal properties and interface temperature and so on. For example, the molten concrete is miscible in molten oxidic core debris, but is immiscible in metallic core debris. If a contact temperature between the molten core pool and the concrete falls below the solidus of the pool, solidification of the pool will occur. In this study, the case of immiscible slag in the pool is treated and solidification of the pool does not occur. Thus, water, paraffin and air were selected as the simulated molten core pool, concrete, and decomposition

  20. Summary of treat experiments on oxide core-disruptive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickerman, C.E.; Rothman, A.B.; Klickman, A.E.; Spencer, B.W.; DeVolpi, A.

    1979-02-01

    A program of transient in-reactor experiments is being conducted by Argonne National Laboratory in the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility to guide and support analyses of hypothetical core-disruptive accidents (HCDA) in liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR). Test results provide data needed to establish the response of LMFBR cores to hypothetical accidents producing fuel failure, coolant boiling, and the movement of coolant, molten fuel, and molten cladding. These data include margins to fuel failure, the modes of failure and movements, and evidence for identification of the mechanisms which determine the failure and movements. A key element in the program is the fast-neutron hodoscope, which detects fuel movement as a function of time during experiments

  1. Experience with lifetime limits for EBR-II core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.D.B.; Smith, R.N.; Golden, G.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) is operated for the US Department of Energy by Argonne National Laboratory and is located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory where most types of American reactor were originally tested. EBR-II is a complete electricity-producing power plant now in its twenty-fourth year of successful operation. During this long history the reactor has had several concurrent missions, such as demonstration of a closed Liquid-Metal Reactor (LMR) fuel cycle (1964-69); as a steady-state irradiation facility for fuels and materials (1970 onwards); for investigating effects of operational transients on fuel elements (from 1981); for research into the inherent safety aspects of metal-fueled LMR's (from 1983); and, most recently, for demonstration of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept using U-Pu-Zr fuels. This paper describes experience gained at EBR-II in defining lifetime limits for LMR core components, particularly fuel elements

  2. Testing the HTA core model: experiences from two pilot projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternack, Iris; Anttila, Heidi; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyze and describe process and outcomes of two pilot assessments based on the HTA Core Model, discuss the applicability of the model, and explore areas of development. METHODS: Data were gathered from HTA Core Model and pilot Core HTA documents, their va...

  3. Rheumatology training experience across Europe: analysis of core competences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivera, Francisca; Ramiro, Sofia; Cikes, Nada; Cutolo, Maurizio; Dougados, Maxime; Gossec, Laure; Kvien, Tore K; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Mandl, Peter; Moorthy, Arumugam; Panchal, Sonia; da Silva, José A P; Bijlsma, Johannes W

    2016-09-23

    The aim of this project was to analyze and compare the educational experience in rheumatology specialty training programs across European countries, with a focus on self-reported ability. An electronic survey was designed to assess the training experience in terms of self-reported ability, existence of formal education, number of patients managed and assessments performed during rheumatology training in 21 core competences including managing specific diseases, generic competences and procedures. The target population consisted of rheumatology trainees and recently certified rheumatologists across Europe. The relationship between the country of training and the self-reported ability or training methods for each competence was analyzed through linear or logistic regression, as appropriate. In total 1079 questionnaires from 41 countries were gathered. Self-reported ability was high for most competences, range 7.5-9.4 (0-10 scale) for clinical competences, 5.8-9.0 for technical procedures and 7.8-8.9 for generic competences. Competences with lower self-reported ability included managing patients with vasculitis, identifying crystals and performing an ultrasound. Between 53 and 91 % of the trainees received formal education and between 7 and 61 % of the trainees reported limited practical experience (managing ≤10 patients) in each competence. Evaluation of each competence was reported by 29-60 % of the respondents. In adjusted multivariable analysis, the country of training was associated with significant differences in self-reported ability for all individual competences. Even though self-reported ability is generally high, there are significant differences amongst European countries, including differences in the learning structure and assessment of competences. This suggests that educational outcomes may also differ. Efforts to promote European harmonization in rheumatology training should be encouraged and supported.

  4. Experiments pertaining to the formation and equilibration of planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanloz, Raymond; Knittle, Elise; Williams, Quentin

    1987-01-01

    The phase diagram of FeO was experimentally determined to pressures of 155 GPa and temperatures of 4000 K using shock wave and diamond-cell techniques. Researchers discovered a metallic phase of FeO at pressures greater than 70 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1000 K. The metallization of FeO at high pressures implies that oxygen can be present as the light alloying element of the Earth's outer core, in accord with the geochemical predictions of Ringwood. The high pressures necessry for this metallization suggest that the core has acquired its composition well after the initial stages of the Earth's accretion. The core forming alloy can react chemically with oxides such as those forming the mantle. The core and mantle may never have reached complete chemical equilibrium, however. If this is the case, the core-mantle boundary is likely to be a zone of active chemical reactions.

  5. Experiments pertaining to the formation and equilibration of planetary cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanloz, R.; Knittle, E.; Williams, Q.

    1987-01-01

    The phase diagram of FeO was experimentally determined to pressures of 155 GPa and temperatures of 4000 K using shock wave and diamond-cell techniques. Researchers discovered a metallic phase of FeO at pressures greater than 70 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1000 K. The metallization of FeO at high pressures implies that oxygen can be present as the light alloying element of the Earth's outer core, in accord with the geochemical predictions of Ringwood. The high pressures necessry for this metallization suggest that the core has acquired its composition well after the initial stages of the Earth's accretion. The core forming alloy can react chemically with oxides such as those forming the mantle. The core and mantle may never have reached complete chemical equilibrium, however. If this is the case, the core-mantle boundary is likely to be a zone of active chemical reactions

  6. Analysis of ex-core detector response measured during nuclear ship Mutsu land-loaded core critical experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, M.; Abe, J.I.; Kuribayashi, K.

    1987-01-01

    There are some cases where the ex-core neutron detector response is dependent not only on the fission source distribution in a core but also on neutron absorption in the borated water reflector. For example, an unexpectedly large response variation was measured during the nuclear ship Mutsu land-loaded core critical experiment. This large response variation is caused largely by the boron concentration change associated with the change in control rod positioning during the experiment. The conventional Crump-Lee response calculation method has been modified to take into account this boron effect. The correction factor in regard to this effect has been estimated using the one-dimensional transport code ANISN. The detector response variations obtained by means of this new calculation procedure agree well with the measured values recorded during the experiment

  7. Experience with mixed cores in the IRR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilat, J.; Hirshfeld, H.; Wiener, A.

    1985-01-01

    Over twenty mixed core configurations composed of 'old' (18 curved plate) and 'new' 23 flat plate) MTR type fuel elements were irradiated in the IRR-1 swimming pool reactor. The number of 'new' fuel elements in the core varied from one to twenty. To establish the safety of these configurations, thermohydraulic calculations were carried out to derive the maximum allowed hot channel power, determined by the onset of flow instabilities. A core is considered safe if its hot channel power, obtained from a two-dimensional neutronic calculation of power distribution in the core, does not exceed the maximum allowed value. The conservative nature of the assumptions used in the above safety evaluation procedure was verified by measurements of pressure drops vs. coolant flow rates as well as of temperature and neutron flux distributions. (author)

  8. Small core flood experiments for foam EOR: Screening surfactant applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, S.A.; Van der Bent, V.; Farajzadeh, R.; Rossen, W.R.; Vincent-Bonnieu, S.

    2015-01-01

    Aqueous foams are a means of increasing the sweep efficiency of enhanced oil recovery processes. An understanding of how a foam behaves in the presence of oil is therefore of great importance when selecting suitable surfactants for EOR processes. The consensus is currently that the most reliable method for determining the foam behavior in the presence of oil is to inject foam through a rock core. Coreflood tests, however, are typically carried out using large rock cores (e.g. diameter = 4 cm,...

  9. Adaptive Core Simulation Employing Discrete Inverse Theory - Part II: Numerical Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Khalik, Hany S.; Turinsky, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Use of adaptive simulation is intended to improve the fidelity and robustness of important core attribute predictions such as core power distribution, thermal margins, and core reactivity. Adaptive simulation utilizes a selected set of past and current reactor measurements of reactor observables, i.e., in-core instrumentation readings, to adapt the simulation in a meaningful way. The companion paper, ''Adaptive Core Simulation Employing Discrete Inverse Theory - Part I: Theory,'' describes in detail the theoretical background of the proposed adaptive techniques. This paper, Part II, demonstrates several computational experiments conducted to assess the fidelity and robustness of the proposed techniques. The intent is to check the ability of the adapted core simulator model to predict future core observables that are not included in the adaption or core observables that are recorded at core conditions that differ from those at which adaption is completed. Also, this paper demonstrates successful utilization of an efficient sensitivity analysis approach to calculate the sensitivity information required to perform the adaption for millions of input core parameters. Finally, this paper illustrates a useful application for adaptive simulation - reducing the inconsistencies between two different core simulator code systems, where the multitudes of input data to one code are adjusted to enhance the agreement between both codes for important core attributes, i.e., core reactivity and power distribution. Also demonstrated is the robustness of such an application

  10. Split core experiments; Part I. Axial neutron flux distribution measurements in the reactor core with a central horizontal reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strugar, P; Raisic, N; Obradovic, D; Jovanovic, S [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1965-05-01

    A series of critical experiments were performed on the RB reactor in order to determine the thermal neutron flux increase in the central horizontal reflector formed by a split reactor core. The objectives of these experiments were to study the possibilities of improving the thermal neutron flux characteristics of the neutron beam in the horizontal beam tube of the RA research reactor. The construction of RA reactor enables to split the core in two, to form a central horizontal reflector in front of the beam tube. This is achieved by replacing 2% enriched uranium slugs in the fuel channel by dummy aluminium slugs. The purpose of the first series of experiments was to study the gain in thermal neutron component inside the horizontal reflector and the loss of reactivity as a function of the lattice pitch and central reflector thickness.

  11. Experience with Intel's Many Integrated Core Architecture in ATLAS Software

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischmann, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Lavrijsen, W; Neumann, M; Vitillo, R

    2014-01-01

    Intel recently released the first commercial boards of its Many Integrated Core (MIC) Architecture. MIC is Intel's solution for the domain of throughput computing, currently dominated by general purpose programming on graphics processors (GPGPU). MIC allows the use of the more familiar x86 programming model and supports standard technologies such as OpenMP, MPI, and Intel's Threading Building Blocks. This should make it possible to develop for both throughput and latency devices using a single code base.\

  12. Experience with Intel's Many Integrated Core Architecture in ATLAS Software

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischmann, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Lavrijsen, W; Neumann, M; Vitillo, R

    2013-01-01

    Intel recently released the first commercial boards of its Many Integrated Core (MIC) Architecture. MIC is Intel's solution for the domain of throughput computing, currently dominated by general purpose programming on graphics processors (GPGPU). MIC allows the use of the more familiar x86 programming model and supports standard technologies such as OpenMP, MPI, and Intel's Threading Building Blocks. This should make it possible to develop for both throughput and latency devices using a single code base.\

  13. Learning experiences in population education: proposed guidelines and core messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    As a result of the 1984 Regional Workshop for the Development of Packages of Adequate Learning Requirements in Population Education, the participants tackled the problem of non-institutionalization of population education into the formal and non-formal educational curricula in their countries. Based on their deliberations, several sets of guidelines and core messages were formulated to provide countries with a more definite direction that will hopefully ensure the functional and effective integration of population education in their respective national school and out-of-school curriculum system. Useful packages of learning materials in population education should help realize the country's population policy and goals within the broader framework of socioeconomic development, and the content of the package should comprehensively cover the core messages of the country's Population Information, Education and Communication (IEC) Program. The population knowledge base of the package should be accurate and relevant; the package should provide for graphic and visual presentation and for assessment of effects on the target groups. Proposed core messages in population education discuss the advantages of small family size and delayed marriage, and aspects of responsible parenthood. Other messages discuss population resource development and population-related beliefs and values.

  14. Validation experience with the core calculation program karate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegyi, Gy.; Hordosy, G.; Kereszturi, A.; Makai, M.; Maraczy, Cs.

    1995-01-01

    A relatively fast and easy-to-handle modular code system named KARATE-440 has been elaborated for steady-state operational calculations of VVER-440 type reactors. It is built up from cell, assembly and global calculations. In the frame of the program neutron physical and thermohydraulic process of the core at normal startup, steady and slow transient can be simulated. The verification and validation of the global code have been prepared recently. The test cases include mathematical benchmark and measurements on operating VVER-440 units. Summary of the results, such as startup parameters, boron letdown curves, radial and axial power distributions of some cycles of Paks NPP is presented. (author)

  15. Rheumatology training experience across Europe: analysis of core competences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sivera, Francisca; Ramiro, Sofia; Cikes, Nada; Cutolo, Maurizio; Dougados, Maxime; Gossec, Laure; Kvien, Tore K.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Mandl, Peter; Moorthy, Arumugam; Panchal, Sonia; Da Silva, José A. P.; Bijlsma, Johannes W.; Ҫollaku, Ledio; Aroyan, Armine; Radner, Helga; Tushina, Anastasyia; de Langhe, Ellen; Sokolovic, Sekib; Shumnalieva, Russka; Baresic, Marko; Senolt, Ladislav; Holland-Fischer, Mette; Kull, Mart; Puolitaival, Antti; Gobejishvili, Nino; Hueber, Axel; Fanouriakis, Antonis; MacMullan, Paul; Rimar, Doron; Bugatti, Serena; Zepa, Julija; Menassa, Jeanine; Karpec, Diana; Misevska-Percinkova, Snezana; Cassar, Karen; Deseatnicova, Elena; Tas, SanderW; Lie, Elisabeth; Sznajd, Jan; Berghea, Florian; Povzun, Anton; Jeremic, Ivica; Mlynarikova, Vanda; Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Chatzidionysiou, Katerina; Dumusc, Alexandre; Hatemi, Gulen; Ozdemirel, Erhan; Biliavska, Iuliia

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this project was to analyze and compare the educational experience in rheumatology specialty training programs across European countries, with a focus on self-reported ability. Method: An electronic survey was designed to assess the training experience in terms of

  16. Experiment on heat transfer in simulated molten core/concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Yukihiro; Hashizume, Hidetoshi; Toda, Saburo; Kawaguchi, Takahiro.

    1993-01-01

    In order to investigate heat transfer between molten core and concrete in LWR severe accidents, experiments were performed using water as the molten core, paraffin as the concrete, and air as gases from the decomposition of concrete. It was found that the heat transfer on the interface between paraffin and water were promoted strongly by the air gas. (author)

  17. Experience in forming and core mixtures by Alphaset technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Vasková

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemically bound mixtures have had the evolution effect upon the economical and quality aspects of the foundry operations since they presentation at the market. The higher output and significantly increased production efficiency of moulds and cores has lead to the material increase in the quality and profit of the foundries. It can be seen that in last several years the knowledge of bounds based on the organic resins has made enormous advances. The higher strength, improved properties under elevated temperatures, the reduction of the environmental impacts of the organic bounds and at the same their highly improved regenerationability ensure that these systems will be still more significant binding system. The organic binding systems are predominantly being developed recemtly. The technology AlpHaset is ranked among the alkali binding systems. This technology has certain disadvantages – lower strength, speed of hardening- which have been gradually eliminated.

  18. Experience and evaluation of advanced on-line core monitoring system 'BEACON' at IKATA site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujitsuka, Nobumichi; Tanouchi, Hideyuki; Imamura, Yasuhiro; Mizobuchil, Daisuke

    1997-01-01

    Shikoku Electric Power Company installed BEACON core monitoring system into IKATA unit 3 in May 1994. During its first cycle of core operation, various operational data were obtained including data of some anomalous reactor conditions introduced for the test objective of the plant start-up. This paper presents the evaluation of the BEACON system capability based on this experience. The system functions such as core monitoring and anomaly detection, prediction of future reactor conditions and increased efficiency of core management activities are discussed. Our future plan to utilize the system is also presented. (authors)

  19. Simulation of rod drop experiments in the initial cores of Loviisa and Mochovce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaloinen, E.; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Wasastjerna, F.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of rod drop measurements during startup tests of the Loviisa reactors has earlier been studied with two-dimensional core calculations using a spatial prompt jump approximation. In these calculations the prediction for the reactivity meter reading was lower than the measured values by 25%. Another approach to solve the problem is simulation of the rod drop experiment with dynamic core calculations coupled with out of core calculations to estimate the response of ex-core ionization chambers for the reactivity meter. This report described the calculations performed with the three-dimensional dynamic code HEXTRAN for prediction of the reactivity meter readings in rod drop experiments in initial cores of the WWER-440 reactors. (Authors)

  20. Language core values in a multicultural setting: An Australian experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolicz, Jerzy J.

    1991-03-01

    While it has been agreed by the members of the European Community (except the UK) that all secondary students should study two EC languages in addition to their own, in Australia the recent emphasis has been on teaching languages for external trade, particularly in the Asian region. This policy over-looks the 13 per cent of the Australian population who already speak a language other than English at home (and a greater number who are second generation immigrants), and ignores the view that it is necessary to foster domestic multiculturalism in order to have fruitful links with other cultures abroad. During the 1980s there have been moves to reinforce the cultural identity of Australians of non-English speaking background, but these have sometimes been half-hearted and do not fully recognise that cultural core values, including language, have to achieve a certain critical mass in order to be sustainable. Without this recognition, semi-assimilation will continue to waste the potential cultural and economic contributions of many citizens, and to lead to frustration and eventual violence. The recent National Agenda for a Multicultural Australia addresses this concern.

  1. In-core fuel disruption experiments simulating LOF accidents for homogeneous and heterogeneous core LMFBRs: FD2/4 series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.A.; Mast, P.K.; Schumacher, Gustav; Fischer, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    A series of Fuel Disruption (FD) experiments simulating LOF accidents transients for homogeneous- and heterogeneous-core LMFBRs is currently being performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor at SNL. The test fuel is observed with high-speed cinematography to determine the timing and the mode of the fuel disruption. The five experiments performed to date show that the timing and mode of fuel disruption depend on the power level, fuel temperature (after preheat and at disruption), and the fuel temperature gradient. Two basic modes of fuel disruption were observed; solid-state disruption and liquid-state swelling followed by slumping. Solid-state dispersive fuel behavior (several hundred degrees prior to fuel melting) is only observed at high power levels (6P 0 ), low preheat temperatures (2000 K), and high thermal gradients (2800 K/mm). The swelling/slumping behavior was observed in all cases near the time of fuel melting. Computational models have been developed that predict the fuel disruption modes and timing observed in the experiments

  2. In-vessel core debris retention experiments. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    The in-vessel cooling experimental program (Phase 1 and 2) was motivated by the survivability of the TMI lower vessel head during the TMI-2 accident. During that accident, molten debris relocation into the water filled lower head resulted in a localized hot spot in the lower head, but no lower head failure occurred. A postulated set of mechanisms which could be involved in and responsible for the survivability of the TMI lower head were identified and experimentally investigated as part of this program. These mechanisms included: the formation of a gap (contact resistance) between the relocated and frozen debris and the vessel wall was a key aspect of the in-vessel cooling mechanism; wall heatup due to the relocated debris in the presence of wall stress due to a pressure gradient across the vessel wall; gap growth due to a lack of debris adherence to the vessel wall and material creep of the heated vessel wall; and the potential for enhanced wall cooling due to gap growth. Each of these postulated mechanisms was investigated in this experimental program. This report summarizes the several insights and conclusions that were obtained from this experimental program. This report documents the entire set of five experiments completed in Phase 2 of this experimental program. Results from the Phase 1 effort were used to plan and select the Phase 2 test matrix. Conclusions from the Phase 1 and 2 experiments are identified and recommendations for future work are provided

  3. The HOR core conversion program development and licensing experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.W. de; Gibcus, H.P.M.; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with the experiences in the development of a fuel conversion program for a 2 MW university type research reactor, the HOR. It gives an overview of the technical and administrative aspects concerning the fuel conversion program development since the eighties, including the safety review and licensing process. The overall final safety report was submitted in 1995, together with the environmental impact report, and a licence application was submitted accordingly. The licence permitting the conversion was issued in 1996, coming into force at the beginning of this year, although an appeal case is still pending. At the moment the necessary preparations for starting the actual conversion of the HOR are made. The general program characteristics are addressed. (author)

  4. Calculational and experimental experience on core management of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, A.; Arii, Y.; Shono, A.; Suzuki, S.; Kinjo, K.

    1992-01-01

    For the core management of JOYO Mark-II, many core characteristics have been calculated with the core management code system 'MAGI', and measurements have also been carried out at each duty operation cycle. From the evaluation of these results, the characteristics of core parameters such as criticality, reactivity coefficients, and control rod worth can be predicted accurately as followings; excess reactivity: ± 0.1% Δk/k, outlet temperature of subassembly: ±10degC, fuel burn-up: ±5%, control rod worth: ±5%. As a result, we can not only get steady operation of JOYO but also perform various irradiation tests with satisfied conditions. This paper presents experience obtained until now through twenty three duty cycle operations of Mark-II core in JOYO. (author)

  5. Experiences of clinical teaching for dental core trainees working in hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, C J; Brotherton, P

    2014-07-11

    There is recognition that the provision of excellence in education and training results in a skilled and competent workforce. However, the educational experiences of dental core trainees (DCT's) working in the hospital oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) setting have not been previously investigated. In this paper, we examine DCT's learning experiences both 'formal' and 'non-formal' within the hospital setting of ward and clinic-based teaching. Are hospital dental core trainees receiving a meaningful educational experience? To conclude this paper, the authors recommend methods, based upon sound educational principles, to maximise the value of clinical sessions for teaching.

  6. Low-cost workbench client / server cores for remote experiments in electronics

    OpenAIRE

    José M. M. Ferreira; Americo Dias; Paulo Sousa; Zorica Nedic; Jan Machotka; Ozdemir Gol; Andrew Nafalski

    2010-01-01

    This paper offers an open-source solution to implement low-cost workbenches serving a wide range of remote experiments in electronics. The proposed solution comprises 1) a small (9,65 x 6,1 cm) Linux server board; 2) a server core supporting two TCP/IP communication channels, and general purpose I/O pin drivers to interface the remote experiment hardware; and 3) a client core based on a multi-tab user interface supporting text file management to exchange experiment scripts / status informatio...

  7. Polymers and Cross-Linking: A CORE Experiment to Help Students Think on the Submicroscopic Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Mitchell R. M.; Bruce, Alice E.; Avargil, Shirly; Amar, Francois G.; Wemyss, Thomas M.; Flood, Virginia J.

    2016-01-01

    The Polymers and Cross-Linking experiment is presented via a new three phase learning cycle: CORE (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation), which is designed to model productive chemical inquiry and to promote a deeper understanding about the chemistry operating at the submicroscopic level. The experiment is built on two familiar…

  8. Experimental results on improved JARE deep ice core drill-Experiments in Rikubetsu, Hokkaido in 2002 -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Kameda

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Deep ice coring to bedrock (3028m in depth at Dome Fuji Station is planned during three successive summer seasons starting from 2003/2004. An improved JARE deep ice core drill (12.2m in length and 3.8m in maximum core length was developed in December 2001 for the ice coring at Dome Fuji. In January/February of 2002,we performed experiments on drill performance using artificial ice blocks in Rikubetsu, Hokkaido. In this paper, we outline the experiment and report the results. It was found through the experiment that an ice core of 3.8m length was smoothly obtained by the improved drill with three screws in the chip chamber and cutting pitch of 5mm/cycle. About 45000 small holes 1.2mm in diameter were made on the surface of the chip chamber. These small holes enabled liquid to circulate between cutters and outside of the drill through the chip chamber in the drill. The dry density of the chips was 440 to 500kg/m^3 and the chip recovery rate during ice coring was 65 to 91%. A check valve installed at the bottom of the chip chamber to prevent outflow of chips from the drill was not tested enough, but more durability is needed for the valve. The newly developed motor system and core catchers of the drill worked perfectly. The average coring speed was 24.5cm/min with cutting pitch of 5mm/cycle. The average power consumption during ice coring was 171W.

  9. Emergency core cooling strainers-the Candu experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eyvindson, A.; Rhodes, D.; Carson, P.; Makdessi, G.

    2004-01-01

    The Canadian nuclear industry, including Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and the four nuclear utilities (New Brunswick Power, Hydro-Quebec, Ontario Power Generation and Bruce Power) have been heavily involved in strainer clogging issues since the late 1990's. A substantial knowledge base has been obtained with support from various organisations, including the CANDU Owners Group (COG), AECL and the CANDU utilities. Work has included debris assessments at specific stations, debris characterisation, transport, head loss measurements across strainers, head loss models and investigations into paints and coatings. Much of this work was performed at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories and has been used to customize strainer solutions for several CANDU (PWR-type) stations. This paper summarises the CANDU experience, describing problems encountered and lessons learned from strainer implementation at stations. Between 1999 and 2003, AECL supplied strainers to six different CANDU stations, representing 12 units with a total power output of approximately 8.2 GWe. Each station had unique needs with respect to layout, effective area, allowable head loss and installation schedule. Challenges at various sites included installation in a covered trench with single-point access, allowing for field adjustments to accommodate large variations in floor level and pump suction location, on-power installation, very high levels of particulate relative to fibrous debris, and relatively low allowable head loss. The following are key points to consider during any station assessment or strainer implementation: - a realistic testing model and method is essential for accurate predictions of head loss, and the limits of the model must be understood; - assessment of station debris must be sufficiently conservative to overcome uncertainties in debris generation and transport models; - appropriate and reliable data (e.g. flow rate, layout, size of test model, method of debris generation and

  10. Study of advanced LWR cores for effective use of plutonium and MOX physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Matsu-Ura, H.; Ueji, M.; Ota, H.; Kanagawa, T.; Sakurada, K.; Maruyama, H.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced technologies of full MOX cores have been studied to obtain higher Pu consumption based on the advanced light water reactors (APWRs and ABWRs). For this aim, basic core designs of high moderation lattice (H/HM ∼5) have been studied with reduced fuel diameters in fuel assemblies for APWRs and those of high moderation lattice (H/HM ∼6) with addition of extra water rods in fuel assemblies for ABWRs. The analysis of equilibrium cores shows that nuclear and thermal hydraulic parameters satisfy the design criteria and the Pu consumption rate increases about 20 %. An experimental program has been carried out to obtain the core parameters of high moderation MOX cores in the EOLE critical facility at the Cadarache Centre as a joint study of NUPEC, CEA and CEA's industrial partners. The experiments include a uranium homogeneous core, two MOX homogeneous cores of different moderation and a PWR assembly mock up core of MOX fuel with high moderation. The program was started from 1996 and will be completed in 2000. (author)

  11. Estimation of subcriticality with the computed values analysis using MCNP of experiment on coupled cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Arakawa, Takuya; Naito, Yoshitaka

    1998-01-01

    Experiments on coupled cores performed at TCA were analysed using continuous energy Monte Carlo calculation code MCNP 4A. Errors of neutron multiplication factors are evaluated using Indirect Bias Estimation Method proposed by authors. Calculation for simulation of pulsed neutron method was performed for 17 X 17 + 5G + 17 x 17 core system and its of exponential experiment method was also performed for 16 x 9 + 3G + 16 x 9 and 16 x 9 + 5G + 16 x 9 core systems. Errors of neutron multiplication factors are estimated to be (-1.5) - (-0.6)% evaluated by Indirect Bias Estimation Method. Its errors evaluated by conventional pulsed neutron method and exponential experiment method are estimated to be 7%, but it is below 1% for estimation of subcriticality with the computed values by applying Indirect Bias Estimation Method. Feasibility of subcriticality management is higher by application of the method to full scale fuel strage facility. (author)

  12. Performance experiments on the in-vessel core catcher during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Park, Rae Joon; Cho, Young Rho; Kim, Sang Baik

    2004-01-01

    A US-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project has been initiated by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) to determine if IVR is feasible for high power reactors up to 1500 MWe by investigating the performance of enhanced ERVC and in-vessel core catcher. This program is initially focusing on the Korean Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe (APR1400) design. As for the enhancement of the coolability through the ERVC, boiling tests are conducted by using appropriate coating material on the vessel outer surface to promote downward facing boiling and selecting an improved vessel/insulation design to facilitate water flow and steam venting through the insulation in this program. Another approach for successful IVR are investigated by applying the in-vessel core catcher to provide an 'engineered gap' between the relocated core materials and the water-filled reactor vessel and a preliminary design for an in-vessel core catcher was developed during the first year of this program. Feasibility experiments using the LAVA facility, named LAVA-GAP experiments, are in progress to investigate the core catcher performance based on the conceptual design of the in-vessel core catcher proposed in this INERI project. The experiments were performed using 60kg of Al 2 O 3 thermite melt as a core material simulant with a 1/8 linear scale mock-up of the reactor vessel lower plenum. The hemispherical in-vessel core catcher was installed inside the lower head vessel maintaining a uniform gap of 10mm from the inner surface of the lower head vessel. Two types of the core catchers were used in these experiments. The first one was a single layered in-vessel core catcher without internal coating and the second one was a two layered in-vessel core catcher with an internal coating of 0.5mm-thick ZrO 2 via the plasma

  13. Study on core make-up water experiment of AC600 make-up water tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Fuyun; Li Changlin; Zheng Hua; Liu Shaohua; Xu Xiaolan

    1999-01-01

    The core makeup tank (CMT) is a principal component of the passive high pressure safety injection systems for AC600 and has a function to inject cold borated water into reactor vessel during abnormal events. The purpose of this experiment is to verify the gravity drain behavior of the CMT and to provide experimental data to verify the computer codes used in the safety analyses. Five experiments with simulative small and medium break conditions are conducted at AC600 core makeup tank performance test facility of Nuclear Power Institute of China (NPIC). The author provides the results of one test. The simulated accident is a small break loss-of-coolant accident

  14. Criticality experiment for No.2 core of DF-VI fast neutron criticality facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lijun; Liu Zhenhua; Yan Fengwen; Luo Zhiwen; Chu Chun; Liang Shuhong

    2007-01-01

    At the completion of the DF-VI fast neutron criticality facility, its core changed, and it was restarted and a series of experiments and measurements were made. According to the data from 29 criticality experiments, the criticality element number and mass were calculated, the control rod reactivity worth were measured by period method and rod compensate method, reactivity worth of safety rod and safety block were measured using reactivity instrument; the reactivity worth of outer elements and radial distribution of elements were measured too. Based on all the measurements mentioned above, safety operation parameters for core 2 in DF-VI fast neutron criticality facility were conformed. (authors)

  15. Experiments on performance of the multi-layered in-vessel core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, K.H.; Kim, S.B.; Park, R.J.; Cheung, F.B.; Suh, K.Y.; Rempe, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    LAVA-GAP experiments are in progress to investigate the performance of the in-vessel core catcher using alumina melt as a corium simulant. The hemispherical in-vessel core catcher made of carbon steel was installed inside the lower head vessel with a uniform gap of 10 mm. Until now, two types of the in-vessel core catcher were used in this study. The first one is a single layered in-vessel core catcher without an internal coating of the LAVA-GAP-2 test, and the other one is a two layered in-vessel core catcher with a 0.5 mm-thick ZrO 2 internal coating of the LAVA-GAP-3 test. Current LAVA-GAP experimental results indicate that an internally coated in-vessel core catcher has better thermal performance compared with an uncoated in-vessel core catcher. Metallurgical inspections on the test specimens of the LAVA-GAP-3 test have been performed to examine the performance of the coating material and the base carbon steel. Although the base carbon steel had experienced a severe thermal attack to the extent that the microstructures were changed and re-crystallization occurred, the carbon steel showed stable and pure chemical compositions without any oxidation and interaction with the coating layer. In terms of the material aspects, these metallurgical inspection results suggest that the ZrO 2 coating performed well. (authors)

  16. Evaluation of Core Bypass Flow in the Prismatic VHTR with a Multi-block Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Hun; Yoon, Su Jong; Park, Goon Cherl; Kim, Min Hwan

    2010-01-01

    The core of Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) consists of assemblies of hexagonal graphite fuel and reflector elements. The core bypass flow of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is defined as the core flow that does not pass through the coolant channels but passes through the bypass gap between fuel elements. The increase in bypass flow makes the decrease in effective coolant flow. Since the core bypass flow has a negative impact on safety and efficiency of VHTR, core bypass phenomena have to be investigated to improve the core thermal margin of VHTR. For this purpose, the international project, I-NERI project, has been carried out since 2008. I-NERI project is collaborative project that KAERI and SNU of Korea side and INL, ANL and TAMU of U.S side are involved. In order to evaluate the core bypass flow, the multicolumn and multi-layer experimental facility is designed by SNU. In this experiment, the effect of cross-flow and local variation of bypass gap on the bypass flow distribution is investigated. Furthermore, the experimental data will be used for validation of CFD code or thermal hydraulic analysis codes such as GAMMA or GAS-NET

  17. Operating experience, measurements, and analysis of the LEU whole core demonstration at the FNR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weha, D.K.; Drumm, C.R.; King, J.S.; Martin, W.R.; Lee, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 2-MW Ford Nuclear Reactor at the University of Michigan is serving as the demonstration reactor for the MTR-type low enrichment (LEU) fuel for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor program. Operational experience gained through six months of LEU core operation and seven months of mixed HEU-LEU core operation is presented. Subcadmium flux measurements performed with rhodium self-powered neutron detectors and iron wire activations are compared with calculations. Measured reactivity parameters are compared for HEU and LEU cores. Finally, the benchmark calculations for several HEU, LEU, and mixed HEU-LEU FNR cores and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) benchmark problem are presented. (author)

  18. KATS experiments to simulate corium spreading in the EPR core catcher concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppinger, B.; Fieg, G.; Schuetz, W.; Stegmaier, U.

    2001-01-01

    In future Light Water Reactors special devices (core catchers) might be required to prevent containment failure by basement erosion after reactor pressure vessel melt-through during a core meltdown accident. Quick freezing of the molten core masses is desirable to reduce release of radioactivity. Several concepts of core catcher de-vices have been proposed based on the spreading of corium melt onto flat surfaces with subsequent cooling by flooding with water. Therefore a series of experiments to investigate high temperature melt spreading on flat surfaces has been carried out using alumina-iron thermite melts as a simulant. The oxidic thermite melt is conditioned by adding other oxides to simulate a realistic corium melt as close as possible. Spreading of oxidic and metallic melts have been performed in one- and two-dimensional geometry. Substrates were chemically inert ceramic layers, dry concrete and concrete with a shallow water layer on top. (authors)

  19. Analysis of the AP600 core makeup tank experiments using the NOTRUMP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.C.; Haberstroh, R.C.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Jaroszewicz, J.

    1995-01-01

    The AP600 design utilizes passive methods to perform core and containment cooling functions for a postulated loss of coolant. The core makeup tank (CMT) is an important feature of the AP600 passive safety system. The NOTRUMP code has been compared to the 300-series core makeup tank experiments. It has been observed that the code will capture the correct thermal-hydraulic behavior observed in the experiments. The correlations used for wall film condensation and convective heat transfer to the heated CMT liquid appear to be appropriate for these applications. The code will predict the rapid condensation and mixing thermal-hydraulic behavior observed in the 300-series tests. The NOTRUMP predictions can be noding-dependent since the condensation is extremely dependent on the amount of cold CMT liquid that mixes with the incoming steam flow

  20. DABIE: a data banking system of integral experiments for reactor core characteristics computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Naito, Yoshitaka; Ohkubo, Shuji; Aoyanagi, Hideo.

    1987-05-01

    A data banking system of integral experiments for reactor core characteristics computer codes, DABIE, has been developed to lighten the burden on searching so many documents to obtain experiment data required for verification of reactor core characteristics computer code. This data banking system, DABIE, has capabilities of systematic classification, registration and easy retrieval of experiment data. DABIE consists of data bank and supporting programs. Supporting programs are data registration program, data reference program and maintenance program. The system is designed so that user can easily register information of experiment systems including figures as well as geometry data and measured data or obtain those data through TSS terminal interactively. This manual describes the system structure, how-to-use and sample uses of this code system. (author)

  1. Enhancements to the Image Analysis Tool for Core Punch Experiments and Simulations (vs. 2014)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogden, John Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-06

    A previous paper (Hogden & Unal, 2012, Image Analysis Tool for Core Punch Experiments and Simulations) described an image processing computer program developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This program has proven useful so developement has been continued. In this paper we describe enhacements to the program as of 2014.

  2. A dendritic solidification experiment under large gravity - implications for the Earth's inner core solidification regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguen, R.; Alboussière, T.; Brito, D.; La Rizza, P.; Masson, J.

    2009-05-01

    The Earth's inner core solidification regime is usually thought to be dendritic, which should results in the formation of a mushy layer at the inner core boundary, possibly extending deep in the inner core. The release of latent heat and solute associated with crystallization provides an important boyancy source to drive thermo- chemical convection in the core. In the laboratory, two modes of convection associated with the crystallization of mushy layers have been observed. One is a boundary layer mode originating from the destabilisation of the chemical boundary layer present at the mush-liquid interface; the second is the so-called 'mushy layer mode' which involves the whole mushy layer. In the mushy layer mode, convection usually takes the form of narrow plumes rising through crystal free conduits called chimneys. One particularity of inner core crystallization is its extremely small solidification rate compared to typical outer core convective timescales. We have designed and build an experiment devoted to the study of crystallization under a large gravity field, using a centrifuge, of an aqueous solution of ammonium chloride, which is a good analogue to metallic alloys. The large gravity field allows to reach Rayleigh numbers much larger than in typical solidification experiments. Under large gravity fields, we observe the disappearance of chimney convection and show that the large gravity field promotes the boundary layer convection mode at the expent of the mushy layer mode. As the gravitationnal forcing is increased, convective heat and solute transport are significantly enhanced, which results in larger solid fraction directly below the mush-liquid interface. The increase in solid fraction results in a dramatic decrease of the permeability in the mushy layer, which eventually becomes subcritical in respect to the mushy layer mode. Because of the very slow solidification rate of the inner core, convective transport of heat and solute from the ICB is

  3. Influence of core sand properties on flow dynamics of core shooting process based on experiment and multiphase simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-jiang Ni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of core sand properties on flow dynamics was investigated synchronously with various core sands, transparent core-box and high-speed camera. To confirm whether the core shooting process has significant turbulence, the flow pattern of sand particles in the shooting head and core box was reproduced with colored core sands. By incorporating the kinetic theory of granular flow (KTGF, kinetic-frictional constitutive correlation and turbulence model, a two-fluid model (TFM was established to study the flow dynamics of the core shooting process. Two-fluid model (TFM simulations were then performed and a areasonable agreement was achieved between the simulation and experimental results. Based on the experimental and simulation results, the effects of turbulence, sand density, sand diameter and binder ratio were analyzed in terms of filling process, sand volume fraction (αs and sand velocity (Vs.

  4. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  5. Analysis of the SPERT III E-core experiment using the EUREKA-2 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harami, Taikan; Uemura, Mutsumi; Ohnishi, Nobuaki

    1986-09-01

    EUREKA-2, a coupled nuclear thermal hydrodynamic kinetic code, was adapted for the testing of models and methods. Code evaluations were made with the reactivity addition experiments of the SPERT III E-Core, a slightly enriched oxide core. The code was tested for non damaging power excursions including a wide range of initial operating conditions, such as cold-startup, hot-startup, hot-standby and operating-power initial conditions. Comparisons resulted in a good agreement within the experimental errors between calculated and experimental power, energy, reactivity and clad surface temperature. (author)

  6. First experience from in-core sensor validation based on correlation and neuro-fuzzy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figedy, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this work new types of nuclear reactor in-core sensor validation methods are outlined. The first one is based on combination of correlation coefficients and mutual information indices, which reflect the correlation of signals in linear and nonlinear regions. The method may be supplemented by wavelet transform based signal features extraction and pattern recognition by artificial neural networks and also fuzzy logic based decision making. The second one is based on neuro-fuzzy modeling of residuals between experimental values and their theoretical counterparts obtained from the reactor core simulator calculations. The first experience with this approach is described and further improvements to enhance the outcome reliability are proposed (Author)

  7. CFD Validation with a Multi-Block Experiment to Evaluate the Core Bypass Flow in VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Su Jong; Lee, Jeong Hun; Park, Goon Cherl; Kim, Min Hwan

    2010-01-01

    Core bypass flow of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is defined as the ineffective coolant which passes through the bypass gaps between the block columns and the crossflow gaps between the stacked blocks. This flows lead to the variation of the flow distribution in the core and affect the core thermal margin and the safety of VHTR. Therefore, bypass flow should be investigated and quantified. However, it is not a simple question, because the flow path of VHTR core is very complex. In particular, since dimensions of the bypass gap and the crossflow gap are of the order of few millimeters, it is very difficult to measure and to analyze the flow field at those gaps. Seoul National University (SNU) multi-block experiment was carried out to evaluate the bypass flow distribution and the flow characteristics. The coolant flow rate through outlet of each block column was measured, but the local flow field was measured restrictively in the experiment. Instead, CFD analysis was carried out to investigate the local phenomena of the experiment. A commercial CFD code CFX-12 was validated by comparing the simulation results and the experimental data

  8. Measurement of magnetic susceptibility on tailings cores report on cores obtained from the Ontario Research Foundation lysimeter experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    Bulk susceptibility and induced magnetic remanence results are reported for 40 cores obtained from the uranium tailings lysimeter experiment at the Ontario Research Foundation. Both methods indicate a broad threefold subdivision of the tailings pile. An upper zone is characterized by an enhanced susceptibility level, which is related to enhanced concentration of both magnetite and hematite. Depletion zones, where present, are of limited areal extent and strongly developed. An intermediate zone is characterized by a mixture of large areas of reduced susceptibility that separate smaller regions of slightly enhanced susceptibility. The zones of susceptibility depletion appear to define a dendritic drainage pattern. Locally in this zone magnetite is enhanced and hematite depleted. In the lowermost zone susceptibility levels are reduced over most of the tailings bed. Only in the upper most right hand corner is there any vestige of a positive susceptibility concentration. Both magnetite and hematite are strongly depleted in this lower zone. Visually it is apparent that this lowermost depleted zone correlates to the zones of strongest 'yellowcake' development

  9. Effectiveness of a Core-Competency–based Program on Residents’ Learning and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean; Dobbs, Bonnie; Tian, Peter George; Babenko, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Background The Care of the Elderly (COE) Diploma Program is a six-to-twelve-month enhanced skills program taken after two years of core residency training in Family Medicine. In 2010, we developed and implemented a core-competency–based COE Diploma program (CC), in lieu of one based on learning objectives (LO). This study assessed the effectiveness of the core-competency–based program on residents’ learning and their training experience as compared to residents trained using learning objectives. Methods The data from the 2007–2013 COE residents were used in the study, with nine and eight residents trained in the LO and CC programs, respectively. Residents’ learning was measured using preceptors’ evaluations of residents’ skills/abilities throughout the program (118 evaluations in total). Residents’ rating of training experience was measured using the Graduate’s Questionnaire which residents completed after graduation. Results For residents’ learning, overall, there was no significant difference between the two programs. However, when examined as a function of the four CanMEDS roles, there were significant increases in the CC residents’ scores for two of the CanMEDS roles: Communicator/Collaborator/Manager and Scholar compared to residents in the LO program. With respect to residents’ training experience, seven out of ten program components were rated by the CC residents higher than by the LO residents. Conclusion The implementation of a COE CC program appears to facilitate resident learning and training experience. PMID:27403213

  10. Effectiveness of a Core-Competency-based Program on Residents' Learning and Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean; Dobbs, Bonnie; Tian, Peter George; Babenko, Oksana

    2016-06-01

    The Care of the Elderly (COE) Diploma Program is a six-to-twelve-month enhanced skills program taken after two years of core residency training in Family Medicine. In 2010, we developed and implemented a core-competency-based COE Diploma program (CC), in lieu of one based on learning objectives (LO). This study assessed the effectiveness of the core-competency-based program on residents' learning and their training experience as compared to residents trained using learning objectives. The data from the 2007-2013 COE residents were used in the study, with nine and eight residents trained in the LO and CC programs, respectively. Residents' learning was measured using preceptors' evaluations of residents' skills/abilities throughout the program (118 evaluations in total). Residents' rating of training experience was measured using the Graduate's Questionnaire which residents completed after graduation. For residents' learning, overall, there was no significant difference between the two programs. However, when examined as a function of the four CanMEDS roles, there were significant increases in the CC residents' scores for two of the CanMEDS roles: Communicator/Collaborator/Manager and Scholar compared to residents in the LO program. With respect to residents' training experience, seven out of ten program components were rated by the CC residents higher than by the LO residents. The implementation of a COE CC program appears to facilitate resident learning and training experience.

  11. Alternating current dielectrophoresis of core-shell nanoparticles: Experiments and comparison with theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chungja

    Nanoparticles are fascinating where physical and optical properties are related to size. Highly controllable synthesis methods and nanoparticle assembly are essential for highly innovative technological applications. Well-defined shaped and sized nanoparticles enable comparisons between experiments, theory and subsequent new models to explain experimentally observed phenomena. Among nanoparticles, nonhomogeneous core-shell nanoparticles (CSnp) have new properties that arise when varying the relative dimensions of the core and the shell. This CSnp structure enables various optical resonances, and engineered energy barriers, in addition to the high charge to surface ratio. Assembly of homogeneous nanoparticles into functional structures has become ubiquitous in biosensors (i.e. optical labeling), nanocoatings, and electrical circuits. Limited nonhomogenous nanoparticle assembly has only been explored. Many conventional nanoparticle assembly methods exist, but this work explores dielectrophoresis (DEP) as a new method. DEP is particle polarization via non-uniform electric fields while suspended in conductive fluids. Most prior DEP efforts involve microscale particles. Prior work on core-shell nanoparticle assemblies and separately, nanoparticle characterizations with dielectrophoresis and electrorotation, did not systematically explore particle size, dielectric properties (permittivity and electrical conductivity), shell thickness, particle concentration, medium conductivity, and frequency. This work is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to systematically examine these dielectrophoretic properties for core-shell nanoparticles. Further, we conduct a parametric fitting to traditional core-shell models. These biocompatible core-shell nanoparticles were studied to fill a knowledge gap in the DEP field. Experimental results (chapter 5) first examine medium conductivity, size and shell material dependencies of dielectrophoretic behaviors of spherical CSnp into 2D and

  12. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the last three of the five technical sessions. The first of the three is on plasma materials interaction issues, the second is on research facilities and the third is from smaller working group meetings on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations

  13. Patient experience and satisfaction with inpatient service: development of short form survey instrument measuring the core aspect of inpatient experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza L Y Wong

    Full Text Available Patient experience reflects quality of care from the patients' perspective; therefore, patients' experiences are important data in the evaluation of the quality of health services. The development of an abbreviated, reliable and valid instrument for measuring inpatients' experience would reflect the key aspect of inpatient care from patients' perspective as well as facilitate quality improvement by cultivating patient engagement and allow the trends in patient satisfaction and experience to be measured regularly. The study developed a short-form inpatient instrument and tested its ability to capture a core set of inpatients' experiences. The Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (HKIEQ was established in 2010; it is an adaptation of the General Inpatient Questionnaire of the Care Quality Commission created by the Picker Institute in United Kingdom. This study used a consensus conference and a cross-sectional validation survey to create and validate a short-form of the Hong Kong Inpatient Experience Questionnaire (SF-HKIEQ. The short-form, the SF-HKIEQ, consisted of 18 items derived from the HKIEQ. The 18 items mainly covered relational aspects of care under four dimensions of the patient's journey: hospital staff, patient care and treatment, information on leaving the hospital, and overall impression. The SF-HKIEQ had a high degree of face validity, construct validity and internal reliability. The validated SF-HKIEQ reflects the relevant core aspects of inpatients' experience in a hospital setting. It provides a quick reference tool for quality improvement purposes and a platform that allows both healthcare staff and patients to monitor the quality of hospital care over time.

  14. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) special-purpose remote maintenance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, L.S.; Welland, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    A key element in the preconceptual design of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) was the development of design concepts for special-purpose remote maintenance systems. Included were systems for shield sector replacement, vacuum vessel sector and toroidal field coil replacement, limiter blade replacement, protective tile replacement, and general-purpose maintenance. This paper addresses these systems as they apply to the copper toroidal field (TF) coil version of the TFCX

  15. Analysis of sodium-void experiments in ZPPR-3 modified Phase 3 core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T.

    1978-08-01

    An analysis is presented of a series of sodium-void reactivity measurements performed in assembly 3 of Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR-3), a mockup of the US Demoplant. In this series, large-zone sodium-void effects were studied in detail in the presence of many singularities, namely, control rods (CRs) and control rod positions (CRPs). The Karlsruhe data-and-method have been applied to an analysis of these experiments, and the results are presented. The work is aimed at complementing the sodium-void reactivity analysis based on the SNEAK experiments, where it was difficult to simulate a large plutonium-core of a prototype fast breeder reactor.

  16. Recent results from the MIT in-core experiments on coolant chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, O.K.; Kohse, G.E.; Cabello, E.C.; Bernard, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports results from an ongoing series of in-core experiments that have been conducted at the 5-MW(thermal) MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) for optimizing coolant chemistries in light water reactors. Four experiments are in progress, including a pressurized coolant chemistry loop (PCCL), a boiling coolant chemistry loop (BCCL), a facility for the study of irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking, and one for the evaluation of in situ sensors for the monitoring of crack propagation in metal (SENSOR). The first two have now been fully operational for several years. The latter two are scheduled to begin regular operation later this year

  17. Simulation experiment on the flooding behaviour of core melts: KATS-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieg, G.; Massier, H.; Schuetz, W.; Stegmaier, U.; Stern, G.

    2000-11-01

    For future Light Water Reactors special devices (core catchers) are being developed to prevent containment failure by basement erosion after reactor pressure vessel meltthrough during a core meltdown accident. Quick freezing of the molten core masses is desirable to reduce release of radioactivity. Several concepts of core catcher devices have been proposed based on the spreading of corium melt onto flat surfaces with subsequent water cooling. A KATS-experiment has been performed to investigate the flooding behaviour of high temperature melts using alumina-iron thermite melts as a simulant. The oxidic thermite melt is conditioned by adding other oxides to simulate a realistic corium melt as close as possible in terms of liquidus and solidus temperatures. Before flooding with water, spreading of the separate oxidic and metallic melts has been done in one-dimensional channels with a silicate concrete as the substrate. The flooding rate was, in relation to the melt surface, identical to the flooding rate in EPR. (orig.) [de

  18. Simulant - water experiments to characterize the debris bed formed in severe core melt accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathai, Amala M.; Anandan, J.; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Murthy, S.S.; Malarvizhi, B.; Lydia, G.; Das, Sanjay Kumar; Nashine, B.K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2015-01-01

    Molten Fuel Coolant Interaction (WO) and debris bed configuration on the core catcher plate assumes importance in assessing the Post Accident Heat Removal (PARR) of a heat generating debris bed. The key factors affecting the coolability of the debris bed are the bed porosity, morphology of the fragmented particles, degree of spreading/heaping of the debris on the core catcher and the fraction of lump formed. Experiments are conducted to understand the fragmentation kinetics and subsequent debris bed formation of molten woods metal in water at interface temperatures near the spontaneous nucleation temperature of water. Morphology of the debris particles is investigated to understand the fragmentation mechanisms involved. The spreading behavior of the debris on the catcher plate and the particle size distribution are presented for 5 kg and 10 kg melt inventories. Porosity of the undisturbed bed on the catcher plate is evaluated using a LASER sensor technique. (author)

  19. Experiments of JRR-4 low-enriched-uranium-silicied fuel core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirane, Nobuhiko; Ishikuro, Yasuhiro; Nagadomi, Hideki; Yokoo, Kenji; Horiguchi, Hironori; Nemoto, Takumi; Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Yagi, Masahiro; Arai, Nobuyoshi; Watanabe, Shukichi; Kashima, Yoichi

    2006-03-01

    JRR-4, a light-water-moderated and cooled, swimming pool type research reactor using high-enriched uranium plate-type fuels had been operated from 1965 to 1996. In order to convert to low-enriched-uranium-silicied fuels, modification work had been carried out for 2 years, from 1996 to 1998. After the modification, start-up experiments were carried out to obtain characteristics of the low-enriched-uranium-silicied fuel core. The measured excess reactivity, reactor shutdown margin and the maximum reactivity addition rate satisfied the nuclear limitation of the safety report for licensing. It was confirmed that conversion to low-enriched-uranium-silicied fuels was carried out properly. Besides, the necessary data for reactor operation were obtained, such as nuclear, thermal hydraulic and reactor control characteristics. This report describes the results of start-up experiments and burnup experiments. The first criticality of low-enriched-uranium-silicied core was achieved on 14th July 1998, and the operation for joint-use has been carried out since 6th October 1998. (author)

  20. Irradiation experiments on materials for core internals, pressure vessel and fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Materials degradation due to the aging phenomena is one of the key issues for the life assessment and extension of the light water reactors (LWRs). This presentation introduces JAERI`s activities in the field of LWR material researches which utilize the research and testing reactors for irradiation experiments. The activities are including the material studies for the core internals, pressure vessel and fuel cladding. These materials are exposed to the neutron/gamma radiation and high temperature water environments so that it is worth reviewing their degradation phenomena as the continuum. Three topics are presented; For the core internal materials, the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels is the present major concern. At JAERI the effects of alloying elements on IASCC have been investigated through the post-irradiation stress corrosion cracking tests in high-temperature water. The radiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels is still a significant issue for LWR safety, and at JAERI some factors affecting the embrittlement behavior such as a dose rate have been investigated. Waterside corrosion of Zircaloy fuel cladding is one of the limiting factors in fuel rod performance and an in-situ measurement of the corrosion rate in high-temperature water was performed in JMTR. To improve the reliability of experiments and to extent the applicability of experimental techniques, a mutual utilization of the technical achievements in those irradiation experiments is desired. (author)

  1. A new reactor core monitoring system. First experience gained at the Dukovany NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecka, M.; Svarny, J.; Kment, J.

    2001-01-01

    The article deals with methods of interpretation of in-core measurements that are based on the determination of the three-dimensional (3D) power distribution within the reactor core, discusses on-line mode calculations, and describes the results obtained during the trial operation of the new SCORPIO-VVER reactor core monitoring system. The principles of the method of determination of the fuel assembly subchannel parameters are outlined. Alternative methods of self-powered detector signal conversion to local power are given, and some results of their testing are presented. Emphasis is put on self-powered detectors supplied by the US firm IST, which were first deployed at the Dukovany NPP in 1998. The predictive function of the SCORPIO-VVER system, whose implementation was inspired by favourable experience gained on some PWR reactors (such as the products of the Halden reactor project at Ringhals and Sizewell B) were adapted to the specific needs of WWER-440 reactors. The main results of validation of the functions are described and presented in detail. (author)

  2. Computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of lung lesions: an oncology center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Fonte, Alexandre Calabria da; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: marcosduarte@yahoo.com.b [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis; Andrade, Marcony Queiroz de [Hospital Alianca, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Gross, Jefferson Luiz [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Chest Surgery

    2011-03-15

    Objective: The present study is aimed at describing the experience of an oncology center with computed tomography guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 97 computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions performed in the period between 1996 and 2004 in a Brazilian reference oncology center (Hospital do Cancer - A.C. Camargo). Information regarding material appropriateness and the specific diagnoses were collected and analyzed. Results: Among 97 lung biopsies, 94 (96.9%) supplied appropriate specimens for histological analyses, with 71 (73.2%) cases being diagnosed as malignant lesions and 23 (23.7%) diagnosed as benign lesions. Specimens were inappropriate for analysis in three cases. The frequency of specific diagnosis was 83 (85.6%) cases, with high rates for both malignant lesions with 63 (88.7%) cases and benign lesions with 20 (86.7%). As regards complications, a total of 12 cases were observed as follows: 7 (7.2%) cases of hematoma, 3 (3.1%) cases of pneumothorax and 2 (2.1%) cases of hemoptysis. Conclusion: Computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy of lung lesions demonstrated high rates of material appropriateness and diagnostic specificity, and low rates of complications in the present study. (author)

  3. EXPERIENCE WITH FPGA-BASED PROCESSOR CORE AS FRONT-END COMPUTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOFF, L.T.

    2005-01-01

    The RHIC control system architecture follows the familiar ''standard model''. LINUX workstations are used as operator consoles. Front-end computers are distributed around the accelerator, close to equipment being controlled or monitored. These computers are generally based on VMEbus CPU modules running the VxWorks operating system. I/O is typically performed via the VMEbus, or via PMC daughter cards (via an internal PCI bus), or via on-board I/O interfaces (Ethernet or serial). Advances in FPGA size and sophistication now permit running virtual processor ''cores'' within the FPGA logic, including ''cores'' with advanced features such as memory management. Such systems offer certain advantages over traditional VMEbus Front-end computers. Advantages include tighter coupling with FPGA logic, and therefore higher I/O bandwidth, and flexibility in packaging, possibly resulting in a lower noise environment and/or lower cost. This paper presents the experience acquired while porting the RHIC control system to a PowerPC 405 core within a Xilinx FPGA for use in low-level RF control

  4. Out-of-core detectors experiments in IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Alfredo Y.; Fuga, Rinaldo; Mendonca, Arlindo Gilson; Moreira, Joao M.L.; Angioletto, Elcio; Fanaro, Leda Cristina C.B.; Jerez, Rogerio; Coelho, Paulo R. Pinto; Santos, Adimir dos; Silva, Graciete S. de A. e; Diniz, Ricardo

    2000-01-01

    In order to study the response of out-of-core detectors, 16 stainless steel plates, with 0.5 cm thickness, were placed at the core-reflector interface of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. BF 3 , 10 B and Au foil detectors were localized beyond the stainless steel plates in 7 different positions, one of them outside the moderator tank of the reactor for simulating a true PWR out-of-core detector. Calculations were performed for comparison with the experimental results with the TORT code, a three-dimensional transport theory discrete ordinate code. The experiment model utilized 16 energy groups, X-Y Z geometry, S 16 discrete ordinates and P 3 cross-sections. The obtained results showed a good agreement between measured and calculated reaction rates in Au foils. The larger discrepancy occurred for the case with 16 stainless steel with a 2,2% deviation. For position 7, outside of the moderator tank, the neutron flux was so low that it could not active the Au foils for the reaction rate measurements. (author)

  5. ORR core re-configuration measurements to increase the fast neutron flux in the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, R.W.; Stinnett, R.M.; Sims, T.M.

    1985-06-01

    A study has been made of the relative increases obtainable in the fast neutron flux in the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) experiment positions by reconfiguring the current ORR core. The study was made at the request of the MFE program to examine the percentage increase possible in the current displacement per atom (dpa) rate (assumed proportional to the fast flux). The principle methods investigated to increase the fast flux consisted of reducing the current core size (number of fuel elements) to increase the core average power density and arrangement of the fuel elements in the reduced-size core to tilt the core power distribution towards the MFE positions. The study concluded that fast fluxes in the E-3 core position could be increased by approximately 15 to 20% over current values and in E-5 by approximately 45 to 55%

  6. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the first two of the five technical sessions. The first one being the BCX overview, the second on the BCX candidate materials. The remaining three sessions in volume two are on the plasma materials interaction issues, research facilities and small working group meeting on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations

  7. Blowdown hydraulic influence on core thermal response in LOFT nuclear experiment L2-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeder, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental research into pressurized water reactor (PWR) loss-of-coolant phenomena conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility has given results indicating that for very large pipe breaks the core thermal response is tightly coupled to the fluid hydraulic phenomena during the blowdown phase of the loss-of-coolant transient. This summary presents and discusses data supporting this conclusion. LOFT Loss-of-Coolant Experiment (LOCE) L2-3 simulated a complete double-ended offset shear break of a primary coolant reactor vessel inlet pipe in a commercial PWR. The LOFT system conditions at experiment initiation were: fuel rod maximum linear heat generation rate (MLHGR) of 39.4 +- 3 kW/m, hot leg temperature of 593 +- 3 K, core ΔT of 32.2 +- 4 K, system pressure of 15.06 +- 0.03 MPa, and flow rate/system volume of 25.6 +- 0.8 kg/m 3 . These conditions are typical of those in commercial PWR systems at normal operating conditions

  8. Core heat transfer experiment for JRR-3 to be upgraded at 20 MWt, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Yukio; Miyata, Keiichi; Ikawa, Hiromasa; Ohgawara, Masami; Kaminaga, Masanori

    1985-09-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the condition of onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) and the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) heat flux under forced convection in a vertical rectangular channel, both of which take important roles in the core thermal-hydraulic design of the upgraded JRR-3. This report presents the validity and applicability of the correlations proposed for ONB condition and DNB heat flux, based on the analysis of the experimental results. The upgraded JRR-3 is a low-pressure, low-temperature research reactor and the core heat generation is removed by two cooling modes, one is natural circulation under upflow up to 200 kW and the other is forced circulation under downflow up to 20 MW. Therefore, the difference in heat transfer characteristics between upflow and downflow were investigated in the experiments, which were carried out by using a heated channel properly simulating a subchannel of fuel element because the heat transfer characteristics are considered to be strongly dependent on the configuration of flow channel. (author)

  9. The wide range in-core neutron measurement system used in the Windscale AGR concluding experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodings, A.; Budd, J.; Wilson, I.

    1982-06-01

    The Windscale AGR Concluding Experiments included a comparison of theoretical and experimental power transients and required measurements of neutron flux as a function of position and time within the reactor core. These measurements were specified to cover as wide as possible working range and had to be made against the in-core gamma background of up to 4 x 10 7 R(hr) - 1 . The detectors were required to operate in special, channels cooled by reactor inlet carbon dioxide and the overall system needed a response time such that it could follow transients with doubling times down to 2s with an accuracy of 2 or 3%. These problems were solved by the use of gas ion fission chambers operating in the current fluctuation or Campbelling mode with unusually low filling pressures and fitted with special trilaminax mineral insulated cables. Ten detectors were built and nine were installed in the reactor, three in each of three special stringers at different radial positions. The paper describes the specification against which this system was built, the design process for the detectors, and commissioning experiments together with some of the problems which were encountered. (U.K.)

  10. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-11-01

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the last three of the five technical sessions. The first of the three is on plasma materials interaction issues, the second is on research facilities and the third is from smaller working group meetings on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations.

  11. Simulant melt experiments on performance of the in-vessel core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoung-Ho Kang; Rae-Joon Park; Sang-Baik Kim; Suh, K.Y.; Cheung, F.B.; Rempe, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: LAVA-GAP experiments are in progress to investigate the performance of the in-vessel core catcher using alumina melt as a corium simulant. The hemispherical in-vessel core catcher made of carbon steel was installed inside the lower head vessel with uniform gap of 5 mm or 10 mm to the inner surface of the lower head vessel. As a performance test of the in-vessel core catcher, the effects of base steel and internal coating materials and gap thickness between the core catcher and the lower head vessel were examined in this study. In the LAVA-GAP-2 and LAVA-GAP-3 tests, the base steel was carbon steel and the gap thickness was 10 mm. On the other hand, in the LAVA-GAP-4 and LAVA-GAP-5 tests, the base steel was stainless steel and the gap thickness was 5 mm. Actual composition of the coating material for the LAVA-GAP-4 test was 92% of ZrO 2 - 8% of Y 2 O 3 including 95% of Ni - 5% of Al bond coat same as the LAVA-GAP-3 test. In these tests, the thickness of ZrO 2 internal coating was 0.5 mm. To examine the effects of the coating material, in-vessel core catcher with a 0.6 mm-thick ZrO 2 coating without bond coat was used in the LAVA-GAP-5 test. This report summarizes the experimental results and the post metallurgical inspection results of the LAVA-GAP-4 and LAVA-GAP- 5 tests. In the LAVA-GAP-4 and LAVA-GAP-5 tests, the core catcher was failed and it was stuck to the inner surface of the lower head vessel. LAVA-GAP-4 and LAVA-GAP-5 test results imply that 5 mm thick gap is rather small for sufficient water ingression and steam venting through the gap. In case of small gap size, water is boiled off and steam increases pressure inside the gap and so water can not ingress into the gap at the initial heat up stage. Metallurgical inspections on the test specimens indicate that the internal coating layer might melt totally and dispersed in the base steel and the solidified iron melt and so the detection frequencies of Zr and O are trivial all

  12. Experiment calculated ascertainment of factors affecting the energy release in IGR reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurpesheva, A.M.; Zhotabayev, Zh.R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: At present energy supply resources problem is important. Nuclear reactors can, of course, solve this problem, but at the same time there is another issue, concerning safety exploitation of nuclear reactors. That is why, for the last seven years, such experiments as 'Investigation of the processes, conducting severe accidents with core melting' are being carried out at our IGR (impulse graphite reactor) reactor. Leaving out other difficulties of such experiments, it is necessary to notice, that such experiments require more accurate IGR core energy release calculations. The final aim of the present research is verification and correction of the existing method or creation of new method of IGR core energy release calculation. IGR reactor is unique and there is no the same reactor in the world. Therefore, application of the other research reactor methods here is quite useful. This work is based on evaluation of factors affecting core energy release (physical weight of experimental device, different configuration of reactor core, i.e. location of absorbers, initial temperature of core, etc), as well as interference of absorbers group. As it is known, energy release is a value of integral reactor power. During experiments with rays, Reactor power depends on currents of ion production chambers (IPC), located round the core. It is worth to notice that each ion production chamber (IPC) in the same start-up has its own ratio coefficient between IPC current and reactor present power. This task is complicated due to 'IPC current - reactor power' ratio coefficients, that change continuously, probably, because of new loading of experimental facility and different position of control rods. That is why, in order to try about reactor power, before every start-up, we have to re-determine the 'IPC current - reactor power' ratio coefficients for each ion production chamber (IPC). Therefore, the present work will investigate the behavior of ratio coefficient within the

  13. Simulation of the PHEBUS FPT-1 experiment using MELCOR and exploration of the primary core degradation mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jun; Corradini, Michael L.; Fu, Wen; Haskin, Troy; Zhang, Yapei; Tian, Wenxi; Su, Guanghui; Qiu, Suizheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Core degradation evaluation is an important process in risk analysis. • PHEBUS experiment was simulated using MELCOR. • The results confirm the validity of MELCOR’s simulation of the PHEBUS experiment. • These results are used to analyze the mode and behavior of core degradation. - Abstract: Core degradation evaluation of probability, progression and consequences of a core degradation accident is critical for evaluation of risk as well as its mitigation. However, research and modeling of severe accidents to date are limited, and their accuracy in predicting severe accident consequences is still insufficient. It is therefore important to explore the mechanisms of core degradation and to develop mitigation measures for severe accidents. PHEBUS FPT1 is a typical and classic core degradation experiment. MELCOR is a world famous severe accident analysis code developed by Sandia National Lab that has seen wide application, a broad user base, and a number of supporting experiments. The PHEBUS experiment was simulated using MELCOR in this paper. Experimental data on, thermal power and steam mass flow rates are used to determine average pressure, energy distribution, molten mass, temperature of the fuel, and hydrogen generation. Data from the PHEBUS experiment and Cho’s calculations are used to compare the average pressure, several fuel temperatures and the hydrogen generation rate. The results confirm the validity of MELCOR’s simulation of the PHEBUS experiment. The temperature distribution of the core is provided. These results are used to determine the mode and behavior of core degradation with the intent of building a foundation for further research

  14. CORE EXPERIMENTS, NATURAL HISTORIES AND THE ART OF EXPERIENTIA LITERATA: THE MEANING OF BACONIAN EXPERIMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana JALOBEANU

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Experiment, as a new form of knowledge, was aBaconian creation. It was in Bacon’s project of Great Instauration and inBacon’s reformed natural history that experiment and experimentationceased to be illustrations of theories and become relatively autonomousdevices for the production of knowledge and for setting the mind straightin its attempts to gain knowledge. This paper explores the way in whichBacon’s Latin natural history transformed experiment and experimentationin such devices. More precisely, I investigate the way in which Bacon’sLatin natural histories were put together from a limited number ofsignificant experiments listed in the Novum Organum under the general title“instances of special power” or “instances of the lamp.” Contrary to thereceived view, my claim is that Bacon’s natural histories are based on alimited number of ‘core experiments’ and are generated through a specificmethodological procedure known under the name of experientia literata. Thispaper is an attempt to reconstruct the procedure of putting such naturalhistories together and a more in-depth exploration of their epistemologicaland therapeutic character.

  15. Metallographic post-test investigations for the scaled core-meltdown-experiments FOREVER-1 and -2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.; Boehmert, J.

    2000-08-01

    FOREVER (Failure Of Reactor Vessel Rentention) experiments have been carried out in order to simulate the behaviour the lower head of a reactor pressure vessel under the conditions of a depressurized core melt down scenario. In particular the creep behaviour and the vessel failure mode have been investigated. Metallographic post test investigations have complemented the experimental programme. Samples of different height positions of the vessel of the FOREVER-C1 and -C2 experiments were metallographically examined and characteristic microstructural appearances were identified. Additionally samples with ineffected microstructure were annealed at different temperatures and cooled by different rates and afterwards investigated. In this way the microstructural effects of the temperature regime, the thermomechanical loads and the environmental attack could be characterized. Remarkable effects were characteristic for the FOREVER-C2 experiment where the highest-loaded region below the welding joint reached temperatures of approx. 1100 C and a strong creep damage occurred. In the FOREVER-C1 experiment creep damage could not be observed and the maximum temperature did not exceed 900 C. Environmental attack generated decarburization and oxidation but the effect was restricted to a narrow surface layer. There was almost no chemical interaction between the oxidic melt and the vessel material. (orig.)

  16. European Experiments on 2-D Molten Core Concrete Interaction: Hecla and Vulcano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journeau, Ch.; Bonnet, J. M.; Boccaccio, E.; Piluso, P.; Monerris, J.; Breton, M.; Fritz, G.; Sevon, Tuomo; Pankakoski Pekka, H.; Holmstrom, St.; Virta, Jouko

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results from two ongoing European experimental programs on molten core concrete interactions: HECLA at VTT and VULCANO at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. In the HECLA experiments, metallic melt is poured into a cylindrical concrete crucible. The focus is on the initial, pouring phase of the interaction. Therefore, decay heat simulation is not required. The HECLA-2 experiment involved 50 kg of stainless steel at 1700 C and siliceous concrete. The final ablation depths were 25-30 mm in the basemat and similar to 15 mm in the side wall. The VULCANO VB experiments have been devoted to the study of the interaction of 28 to 45 kg of oxidic corium with silica-rich or limestone-rich concretes. These tests focus on long-term ablation and require the use of induction heating to simulate the decay heat fluxes. Anisotropic ablation between the horizontal and vertical direction has been observed with silica-rich concrete, confirming the CCI tests. A new series of experiments VULCANO VBS has been launched in which there are both oxide and metallic phases in the melt. In these tests, magnetic screening is used so that the induction power is provided almost only to the upper oxidic layer after stratification. (authors)

  17. Current european experiments on 2d molten core concrete interaction: HECLA and VULCANO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Journeau, C.; Bonnet, J. M.; Boccaccio, E.; Piluso, P.; Sevon, T.; Pankakoski, P. H.; Holmstroem, S.; Virta, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results from two ongoing European experimental programs on molten core concrete interactions: HECLA at VTT and VULCANO at CEA. In the HECLA experiments, metallic melt is poured into a cylindrical concrete crucible. The focus is on the initial, pouring phase of the interaction. Therefore, decay heat simulation is not required. The HECLA-2 experiment involved 50 kg of stainless steel at 1700 deg. C and siliceous concrete. The final ablation depths were 25-30 mm in the basemat and about 15 mm in the sidewall. The VULCANO VB experiments have been devoted to the study of the interaction of 28 to 45 kg of oxidic corium with silica-rich or limestone-rich concretes. These tests are focusing on long-term ablation and require the use of induction heating to simulate the decay heat fluxes. Anisotropic ablation between the horizontal and vertical direction has been observed with silica-rich concrete, confirming the CCI tests. A new series of experiments VULCANO VBS has been launched in which there are both oxide and metallic phases in the melt. In these tests, magnetic screening is used so that the induction power is provided almost only to the upper oxidic layer after stratification. (authors)

  18. European Experiments on 2-D Molten Core Concrete Interaction: Hecla and Vulcano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Journeau, Ch.; Bonnet, J. M.; Boccaccio, E.; Piluso, P.; Monerris, J.; Breton, M.; Fritz, G. [CEA Cadarache, Dept Technol Nucl, Serv Technol Reacteurs Ind, Lab Essais Maitrise Accid Graves, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance (France); Sevon, Tuomo; Pankakoski Pekka, H.; Holmstrom, St.; Virta, Jouko [VTT Tech Res Ctr Finland, FI-02044 Espoo (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents results from two ongoing European experimental programs on molten core concrete interactions: HECLA at VTT and VULCANO at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. In the HECLA experiments, metallic melt is poured into a cylindrical concrete crucible. The focus is on the initial, pouring phase of the interaction. Therefore, decay heat simulation is not required. The HECLA-2 experiment involved 50 kg of stainless steel at 1700 C and siliceous concrete. The final ablation depths were 25-30 mm in the basemat and similar to 15 mm in the side wall. The VULCANO VB experiments have been devoted to the study of the interaction of 28 to 45 kg of oxidic corium with silica-rich or limestone-rich concretes. These tests focus on long-term ablation and require the use of induction heating to simulate the decay heat fluxes. Anisotropic ablation between the horizontal and vertical direction has been observed with silica-rich concrete, confirming the CCI tests. A new series of experiments VULCANO VBS has been launched in which there are both oxide and metallic phases in the melt. In these tests, magnetic screening is used so that the induction power is provided almost only to the upper oxidic layer after stratification. (authors)

  19. Study of heat removal by natural convection from the internal core catcher in PFBR using water model experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasmin Sudha, A.; Punitha, G.; Das, S.K.; Lydia, G.; Murthy, S.S.; Malarvizhi, B.; Harvey, J.; Kannan, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the event of a core meltdown accident in a Fast Breeder Reactor, the molten core material settling on the bottom of the main vessel can endanger the structural integrity of the main vessel. In the design of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor in India, the construction of which is about to commence, a core catcher is provided as the internal core retention device to collect and retain the core debris in a coolable configuration. Heat transfer by natural convection above and below the core catcher plate, in the zone beneath the core support structure is evaluated from water mockup experiments in the 1:4 geometrically scaled setup. These studies were undertaken towards comparison of experimentally measured temperatures at different locations with the numerical results. The core catcher assembly consists of a core catcher plate, a heat shield plate and a chimney. Decay heat from the core debris is simulated by electrical heating of the heat shield plate. An opening is provided in the cover plate to reproduce the situation in the actual accident where the core debris would have breached a part of the core support structure. Experiments were carried out with different heat flux levels prevailing upon the heat shield plate. Temperature monitoring was done at more than 100 locations, distributed both on the solid components and in water. The temperature data was analysed to get the temperature profile at different steady state conditions. Flow visualisation was also carried out using water soluble dye to establish the direction of the convective currents. The captured images show that water flows through the slots provided in the top portion of the chimney in the upward direction as evidenced from the diffusion of dye injected inside the chimney. Both the temperature data and flow visualisation confirm mixing of water through the opening in the core support structure which indicates that natural convection is set up in that zone

  20. Analysis of measurements for a uranium-free core experiment at the BFS-2 critical assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Stuart [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-04-01

    This document describes a series of calculations that were carried out to model various measurements from the BFS-58-1-I1 experiment. BFS-58-1-I1 was a mock-up of a uranium-free, Pu burning core at BFS-2, a Russian critical assembly operated by IPPE. The experiment measured values of Keff, Na void reactivity worth, material sample reactivity worths and reaction rate ratios. The experiments were modelled using a number of different methods. Basic nuclear data was taken from JENDL-3.2, in either 70 or 18 groups. Cross-section data for the various material regions of the assembly were calculated by either SLAROM or CASUP; the heterogeneous structure of the core regions was modelled in these calculations, with 3 different options considered for representing the (essentially 2D) geometry of the assembly components in a 1D cell model. Whole reactor calculations of flux and Keff were done using both a diffusion model (CITATION) and a transport model (TWOTRAN2), both using an RZ geometry. Reactivity worths were calculated both directly from differences in Keff values and by using the exact perturbation calculations of PERKY and SN-PERT (for CITATION and TWOTRAN2, respectively). Initial calculations included a number of inaccuracies in the assembly representation, a result of communication difficulties between JNC and IPPE; these errors were removed for the final calculations that are presented. Calculations for the experiments have also been carried out in Russia (IPPE) and France (CEA) as part of an international comparison exercise, some of those results are also presented here. The calculated value of Keff was 1.1%{delta}k/k higher than the measured value, Na void worth C/E values were {approx}1.06; these results were considered to be reasonable. (Discrepancies in certain Na void values were probably due to experimental causes , though the effect should be investigated in any future experiments.) Several sample worth values were small compared with calculational

  1. Concrete - Opalinus clay interaction: in-situ experiment and technique for coring undisturbed interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeder, U.; Dolder, F.; Jenni, A.; Schwyn, B.; Frieg, B.; Eul, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Designs for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste foresee cementitious materials as structural elements, backfill or waste matrix. Interactions near interfaces are driven by chemical gradients in pore water and resultant diffusive transport, and are predicted to lead to mineralogical alterations in the barrier system, which in turn influences properties like swelling pressure, permeability, or specific retention in case of clay materials. Reactive transport modelling predictions and laboratory and in situ studies revealed significant alteration in both cement and clay-stone. An increase in porosity in the cement close to the interface, and clogging in the clay-stone adjacent to the interface is commonly predicted and observed. The Cement-Clay Interaction (CI) Experiment at the Mont Terri Underground Laboratory (St. Ursanne, Switzerland) aims at demonstrating some of the processes at interfaces to be expected at a realistic spatial scale and under saturated conditions. A duration of 20 years is foreseen during which reaction progress should become measurable and thus comparable to laboratory experiments and modelling predictions. Companion studies address cement hydration, and develop new high-resolution techniques for phase identification using μ-X-ray diffraction at the Paul Scherrer Institut. The field experiment at Mont Terri comprises two vertical boreholes (384 mm diameter, up to 9 m length) in Opalinus Clay (OPA) filled with layers of three different concretes and bentonite. The concrete formulations are based on three different binders: Portland cement (OPC), ESDRED cement designed for repository applications (40% of cement substituted by silica fume), and low alkali cement (LAC, containing slag and nano-silica). The characterisation of the three concrete-OPA interfaces after 2 years of alteration are presented in a companion contribution (Jenni et al.). A key issue is the repeat recovery of

  2. Performance improvement of the Annular Core Pulse Reactor for reactor safety experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuscher, J.A.; Pickard, P.S.

    1976-01-01

    The Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) is a TRIGA type reactor which has been in operation at Sandia Laboratories since 1967. The reactor is utilized in a wide variety of experimental programs which include radiation effects, neutron radiography, activation analysis, and fast reactor safety. During the past several years, the ACPR has become an important experimental facility for the United States Fast Reactor Safety Research Program and questions of interest to the safety of the LMFBR are being addressed. In order to enhance the capabilities of the ACPR for reactor safety experiments, a project to improve the performance of the reactor was initiated. It is anticipated that the pulse fluence can be increased by a factor of 2.0 to 2.5 utilizing a two-region core concept with high heat capacity fuel elements around the central irradiation cavity. In addition, the steady-state power of the reactor will be increased by about a factor of two. The new features of the improvements are described

  3. Parametric system studies of candidate TF coil system options for the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiersen, W.T.; Flanagan, C.A.; Miller, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    System studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of hybrid and superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil system options to maximum field at the TF coil and to field enhancement due to resistive insert coils. The studies were performed using Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design assumptions, guidelines, and criteria and involved iterative execution of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) systems code, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium code, and EFFI (a code to evaluate magnetic field strength). The results indicate that for TFCX with no minimum wall loading specified, a design point chosen solely on the basis of cost would likely be in the low-field region of design space where the cost advantage of hybrids is least apparent. However, as the desired neutron wall loading increases, the hybrid option suggests an increasing cost advantage over the all-superconducting option; this cost advantage is countered by increased complexity in design -- particularly in assembly and maintenance

  4. Core Management of NPPs in China and Experience of Tianwan NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guohan, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Current Status of the NPPs in China; the Nuclear Power Development Plan till 2020; the Fuel Management and the Core Management Strategy of NPPs are briefly presented in this paper. The gained experience during construction of Taiwan NPP, new design features and major construction milestones of Taiwan NPP are also discussed. The full list of 21 non-conformance reports (NCR) submitted by Jiangsu Nuclear Power Company to NNSA during construction of Taiwan NPP is given. The main issues raised during FSAR review like: RP operation with incomplete number of primary loops; Sedimentation in the construction and piping of service water system; Location of postulated pipe break; Stratification analysis for surge line of pressurizer; Safety classification of equipment in primary circuit; Fire resistant capability of cable insulation; Fire Hazard Analysis; Optimization of protection against ionizing radiation ect. are also listed

  5. Analysis of sodium-void experiments in ZPPR-3 modified phase 3 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, T.

    1978-08-01

    In this work, large-zone sodium-void effects are studied in detail in the presence of many singularities, namely, control rods (CRs) and control rod positions (CRPs). The results of measurements and calculations are compared by CIE (calculation/experiment) values, which are 1.07 when the voided core region is free of singularities. When the void region includes CPRs, which are concurrently voided, the CIE value deteriorates and varies from 0.35 to 1.58. The agreement can be improved considerably by correcting the reactivity worth of the sodium contained in the CRPs with the aid of experimental data (CIE = 1.00 +- 0.15). The heterogeneity correction for the fuel elements was performed by the plate-cell vollision probability code KAPPER. (GL) [de

  6. Parametric system studies of candidate TF coil system options for the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiersen, W.T.; Flanagan, C.A.; Miller, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    System studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of hybrid and superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil system options to maximum field at the TF coil and to field enhancement due to resistive insert coils. The studies were performed using Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design assumptions, guidelines, and criteria and involved iterative execution of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) systems code, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium code, and EFFI (a code to evaluate magnetic field strength). The results indicate that for TFCX with no minimum wall loading specified, a design point chosen solely on the basis of cost would likely be in the low-field region of design space where the cost advantage of hybrids is least apparent. However, as the desired neutron wall loading increases, the hybrid option suggests an increasing cost advantage over the all-superconducting option; this cost advantage is countered by increased complexity in design - particularly in assembly and maintenance

  7. The wide range in-core neutron measurement system used in the Windscale AGR concluding experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodings, A.; Budd, J.; Wilson, I.

    1982-06-01

    The Windscale AGR concluding experiments included a comparison of theoretical and experimental power transients and required measurements of neutron flux as a function of position and time within the reactor core. These measurements were specified to cover a working range as wide as possible and had to be made against the in-core gamma background of up to 4 x 10 7 R(hr) - 1 . The detectors were required to operate in special channels cooled by reactor inlet CO 2 and the overall system needed a response time such that it could follow transients with doubling times down to 2s with an accuracy of 2 or 3%. These problems were solved by the use of gas ion fission chambers operating in the current fluctuation or ''Campbelling'' mode. Their neutron to gamma sensitivity ratio was optimised by the use of unusually low filling pressures and they were fitted with special ''trilaminax'' mineral insulated cables to minimise the effects of electrical interference at the 100 kHz channel centre frequency. Ten detectors were built and nine were installed in the reactor, three in each of three special stringers at different radial positions. All were processed and tested for operation at 350 deg. C and their fissile coatings (430 μg cm - 1 of natural uranium) were matched to give individual neutron sensitivities with a population spread better than +- 6% about the mean. The mean absolute sensitivities were determined to about +- 5% against manganese foils in the NESTOR reactor at AEE Winfrith. The detectors were complemented by special signal processing channels which provided current fluctuation sensitivity and appropriate output signals to the experiment data acquisition system. These channels also permitted dc measurement of chamber current for more precise flux determination near reactor full power

  8. Experience of Delphi technique in the process of establishing consensus on core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Pankaja Ravi; Kumar, Dewesh; Bhardwaj, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Community Medicine and Family Medicine (CMFM) has been started as a new model for imparting the components of family medicine and delivering health-care services at primary and secondary levels in all six newly established All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), but there is no competency-based curriculum for it. The paper aims to share the experience of Delphi method in the process of developing consensus on core competencies of the new model of CMFM in AIIMS for undergraduate medical students in India. The study adopted different approaches and methods, but Delphi was the most critical method used in this research. In Delphi, the experts were contacted by e-mail and their feedback on the same was analyzed. Two rounds of Delphi were conducted in which 150 participants were contacted in Delphi-I but only 46 responded. In Delphi-II, 26 participants responded whose responses were finally considered for analysis. Three of the core competencies namely clinician, primary-care physician, and professionalism were agreed by all the participants, and the least agreement was observed in the competencies of epidemiologist and medical teacher. The experts having more experience were less consistent as responses were changed from agree to disagree in more than 15% of participants and 6% changed from disagree to agree. Within the given constraints, the final list of competencies and skills for the discipline of CMFM compiled after the Delphi process will provide a useful insight into the development of competency-based curriculum of the subject.

  9. Simulant melt experiments on performance of the in-vessel core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung-Ho; Park, Rae-Joon; Kim, Sang-Baik; Suh, K.Y.; Cheung, F.B.; Rempe, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    In order to enhance the feasibility of in-vessel retention (IVR) of molten core material during a severe accident for high-power reactors, an in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) was designed and evaluated as part of a joint United States-Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI). The proposed IVCC is expected to increase the thermal margin for success of IVR by providing an 'engineered gap' for heat transfer from materials that relocate during a severe accident and potentially serving as a sacrificial material under a severe accident. In this study, LAVA-GAP experiments were performed to investigate the thermal and mechanical performance of the IVCC using the alumina melt as simulant. The LAVA-GAP experiments aim to examine the feasibility and sustainability of the IVCC under the various test conditions using 1/8th scale hemispherical test sections. As a feasibility test of the proposed IVCC in this INERI project, the effects of IVCC base steel materials, internal coating materials, and gap size between the IVCC and the vessel lower head were examined. The test results indicated that the internally coated IVCC has high thermal performance compared with the uncoated IVCC. In terms of integrity of the base steel, carbon steel is superior to stainless steel and the effect of bond coat is found to be trivial for the tests performed in this study. The thermal load is mitigated via boiling heat removal in the gap between the IVCC and the vessel lower head. The current test results imply that gaps less than 10 mm are not enough to guarantee effective cooling induced by water ingression and steam venting there through. Selection of endurable material and pertinent gap size is needed to implement the proposed IVCC concept into advanced reactor designs

  10. EVALUATION OF THE HTA CORE MODEL FOR NATIONAL HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT REPORTS: COMPARATIVE STUDY AND EXPERIENCES FROM EUROPEAN COUNTRIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõrge, Kristina; Berndt, Nadine; Hohmann, Juergen; Romano, Florence; Hiligsmann, Mickael

    2017-01-01

    The health technology assessment (HTA) Core Model® is a tool for defining and standardizing the elements of HTA analyses within several domains for producing structured reports. This study explored the parallels between the Core Model and a national HTA report. Experiences from various European HTA agencies were also investigated to determine the Core Model's adaptability to national reports. A comparison between a national report on Genetic Counseling, produced by the Cellule d'expertise médicale Luxembourg, and the Core Model was performed to identify parallels in terms of relevant and comparable assessment elements (AEs). Semi-structured interviews with five representatives from European HTA agencies were performed to assess their user experiences with the Core Model. The comparative study revealed that 50 percent of the total number (n = 144) of AEs in the Core Model were relevant for the national report. Of these 144 AEs from the Core Model, 34 (24 percent) were covered in the national report. Some AEs were covered only partly. The interviewees emphasized flexibility in using the Core Model and stated that the most important aspects to be evaluated include characteristics of the disease and technology, clinical effectiveness, economic aspects, and safety. In the present study, the national report covered an acceptable number of AEs of the Core Model. These results need to be interpreted with caution because only one comparison was performed. The Core Model can be used in a flexible manner, applying only those elements that are relevant from the perspective of the technology assessment and specific country context.

  11. Chapter 8: Exponential experiments on graphite moderated lattices fuelled by natural uranium tubes containing cylindrical graphite cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.; Hoskins, T.A.

    1963-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out using a fuel element comprising a 2.75 in. o.d./2.40 in. i.d. natural uranium tube containing a graphite core of diameter 2.0 in. Values of material buckling and migration area asymmetry for lattices at 7 in., 8 in. and 8/2 in. pitch have been obtained, and correlated with the theory of Syrett (1961) to derive an effective resonance integral for the cored element. By comparison with the resonance integral for the same fuel tube without a core, a value for the constant 'γ' of the theory of Stace (1959) is obtained. (author)

  12. Experiences modeling ocean circulation problems on a 30 node commodity cluster with 3840 GPU processor cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C.

    2008-12-01

    Low cost graphic cards today use many, relatively simple, compute cores to deliver support for memory bandwidth of more than 100GB/s and theoretical floating point performance of more than 500 GFlop/s. Right now this performance is, however, only accessible to highly parallel algorithm implementations that, (i) can use a hundred or more, 32-bit floating point, concurrently executing cores, (ii) can work with graphics memory that resides on the graphics card side of the graphics bus and (iii) can be partially expressed in a language that can be compiled by a graphics programming tool. In this talk we describe our experiences implementing a complete, but relatively simple, time dependent shallow-water equations simulation targeting a cluster of 30 computers each hosting one graphics card. The implementation takes into account the considerations (i), (ii) and (iii) listed previously. We code our algorithm as a series of numerical kernels. Each kernel is designed to be executed by multiple threads of a single process. Kernels are passed memory blocks to compute over which can be persistent blocks of memory on a graphics card. Each kernel is individually implemented using the NVidia CUDA language but driven from a higher level supervisory code that is almost identical to a standard model driver. The supervisory code controls the overall simulation timestepping, but is written to minimize data transfer between main memory and graphics memory (a massive performance bottle-neck on current systems). Using the recipe outlined we can boost the performance of our cluster by nearly an order of magnitude, relative to the same algorithm executing only on the cluster CPU's. Achieving this performance boost requires that many threads are available to each graphics processor for execution within each numerical kernel and that the simulations working set of data can fit into the graphics card memory. As we describe, this puts interesting upper and lower bounds on the problem sizes

  13. Evaluation of fission spectra and cross sections by zero-leakage core experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iijima, T.; Mukaiyama, T.

    1979-01-01

    A series of unit k-infinity core experiments were performed in FCA of JAERI to obtain the information on the equivalence of 239 Pu to 235 U in fast reactors, and to examine the inelastic slowing down cross section of 238 U. Three assemblies were built. Each assembly consists of a test zone (about 44l) of nearly unit k-infinity, a 20% enriched uranium driver and a natural uranium blanket. Assembly IV-1 (first built in 1969 and rebuilt in 1972) is an all uranium system, and Assemblies IV-1-P, IV-1-P' have a plutonium/natural uranium test zone. Three assemblies are nearly the same from the view-point of the slowing down cross section in the main energy region of the neutron spectrum, since 238 U occupies the most part of the composition. The main difference between Assembly IV-1 and the latter two is the difference in the fissile material. Fission rate ratios and k-infinity values were measured to obtain knowledge of the fission spectra and cross sections important for the criticality. In order to evaluate the inelastic slowing down cross section of 238 U, neutron spectra were measured with various methods. The analysis was done with four cross section sets. The agreement of k-infinity values between the experiment and the calculation is unsatisfactory, especially for Pu/NU systems

  14. Tungsten Transport in the Core of JET H-mode Plasmas, Experiments and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioni, Clemente

    2014-10-01

    The physics of heavy impurity transport in tokamak plasmas plays an essential role towards the achievement of practical fusion energy. Reliable predictions of the behavior of these impurities require the development of realistic theoretical models and a complete understanding of present experiments, against which models can be validated. Recent experimental campaigns at JET with the ITER-like wall, with a W divertor, provide an extremely interesting and relevant opportunity to perform this combined experimental and theoretical research. Theoretical models of both neoclassical and turbulent transport must consistently include the impact of any poloidal asymmetry of the W density to enable quantitative predictions of the 2D W density distribution over the poloidal cross section. The agreement between theoretical predictions and experimentally reconstructed 2D W densities allows the identification of the main mechanisms which govern W transport in the core of JET H-mode plasmas. Neoclassical transport is largely enhanced by centrifugal effects and the neoclassical convection dominates, leading to central accumulation in the presence of central peaking of the density profiles and insufficiently peaked ion temperature profiles. The strength of the neoclassical temperature screening is affected by poloidal asymmetries. Only around mid-radius, turbulent diffusion offsets neoclassical transport. Consistently with observations in other devices, ion cyclotron resonance heating in the plasma center can flatten the electron density profile and peak the ion temperature profile and provide a means to reverse the neoclassical convection. MHD activity may hamper or speed up the accumulation process depending on mode number and plasma conditions. Finally, the relationship of JET results to a parallel modelling activity of the W behavior in the core of ASDEX Upgrade plasmas is presented. This project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation

  15. Localized reactive flow in carbonate rocks: Core-flood experiments and network simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyue; Bernabé, Yves; Mok, Ulrich; Evans, Brian

    2016-11-01

    We conducted four core-flood experiments on samples of a micritic, reef limestone from Abu Dhabi under conditions of constant flow rate. The pore fluid was water in equilibrium with CO2, which, because of its lowered pH, is chemically reactive with the limestone. Flow rates were between 0.03 and 0.1 mL/min. The difference between up and downstream pore pressures dropped to final values ≪1 MPa over periods of 3-18 h. Scanning electron microscope and microtomography imaging of the starting material showed that the limestone is mostly calcite and lacks connected macroporosity and that the prevailing pores are few microns large. During each experiment, a wormhole formed by localized dissolution, an observation consistent with the decreases in pressure head between the up and downstream reservoirs. Moreover, we numerically modeled the changes in permeability during the experiments. We devised a network approach that separated the pore space into competing subnetworks of pipes. Thus, the problem was framed as a competition of flow of the reactive fluid among the adversary subnetworks. The precondition for localization within certain time is that the leading subnetwork rapidly becomes more transmissible than its competitors. This novel model successfully simulated features of the shape of the wormhole as it grew from few to about 100 µm, matched the pressure history patterns, and yielded the correct order of magnitude of the breakthrough time. Finally, we systematically studied the impact of changing the statistical parameters of the subnetworks. Larger mean radius and spatial correlation of the leading subnetwork led to faster localization.

  16. Comparative study on neutron data in integral experiments of MYRRHA mockup critical cores in the VENUS-F reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krása Antonín

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available VENUS-F is a fast, zero-power reactor with 30% wt. metallic uranium fuel and solid lead as coolant simulator. It serves as a mockup of the MYRRHA reactor core. This paper describes integral experiments performed in two critical VENUS-F core configurations (with and without graphite reflector. Discrepancies between experiments and Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP5 of keff, fission rate spatial distribution and reactivity effects (lead void and fuel Doppler depending on a nuclear data library used (JENDL-4.0, ENDF-B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, 3.2, 3.3T2 are presented.

  17. Comparative study on neutron data in integral experiments of MYRRHA mockup critical cores in the VENUS-F reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krása, Antonín; Kochetkov, Anatoly; Baeten, Peter; Vittiglio, Guido; Wagemans, Jan; Bécares, Vicente

    2017-09-01

    VENUS-F is a fast, zero-power reactor with 30% wt. metallic uranium fuel and solid lead as coolant simulator. It serves as a mockup of the MYRRHA reactor core. This paper describes integral experiments performed in two critical VENUS-F core configurations (with and without graphite reflector). Discrepancies between experiments and Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP5) of keff, fission rate spatial distribution and reactivity effects (lead void and fuel Doppler) depending on a nuclear data library used (JENDL-4.0, ENDF-B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, 3.2, 3.3T2) are presented.

  18. Analysis of high moderation full MOX BWR core physics experiments BASALA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Kazuya; Ando, Yoshihira; Takada, Naoyuki; Kan, Taro; Sasagawa, Masaru; Kikuchi, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Toru; Kanda, Ryoji; Umano, Takuya

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has performed conceptual design studies of high moderation full MOX LWR cores that aim for increasing fissile Pu consumption rate and reducing residual Pu in discharged MOX fuel. As part of these studies, NUPEC, French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and their industrial partners implemented an experimental program BASALA following MISTRAL. They were devoted to measuring the core physics parameters of such advanced cores. The MISTRAL program consists of one reference UO 2 core, two homogeneous full MOX cores and one full MOX PWR mock-up core that have higher moderation ratio than the conventional lattice. As for MISTRAL, the analysis results have already been reported on April 2003. The BASALA program consists of two high moderation full MOX BWR mock-up cores for operating and cold stand-by conditions. NUPEC has analyzed the experimental results of BASALA with the diffusion and the transport calculations by the SRAC code system and the continuous energy Monte Carlo calculations by the MVP code with the common nuclear data file, JENDL-3.2. The calculation results well reproduce the experimental data approximately within the same range of the experimental uncertainty. The analysis results of MISTRAL and BASALA indicate that these applied analysis methods have the same accuracy for the UO 2 and MOX cores, for the different moderation MOX cores, and for the homogeneous and the mock-up MOX cores. (author)

  19. Experience with Intel's many integrated core architecture in ATLAS software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, S; Neumann, M; Kama, S; Lavrijsen, W; Vitillo, R

    2014-01-01

    Intel recently released the first commercial boards of its Many Integrated Core (MIC) Architecture. MIC is Intel's solution for the domain of throughput computing, currently dominated by general purpose programming on graphics processors (GPGPU). MIC allows the use of the more familiar x86 programming model and supports standard technologies such as OpenMP, MPI, and Intel's Threading Building Blocks (TBB). This should make it possible to develop for both throughput and latency devices using a single code base. In ATLAS Software, track reconstruction has been shown to be a good candidate for throughput computing on GPGPU devices. In addition, the newly proposed offline parallel event-processing framework, GaudiHive, uses TBB for task scheduling. The MIC is thus, in principle, a good fit for this domain. In this paper, we report our experiences of porting to and optimizing ATLAS tracking algorithms for the MIC, comparing the programmability and relative cost/performance of the MIC against those of current GPGPUs and latency-optimized CPUs.

  20. Operating experience of natural circulation core cooling in boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kullberg, C.; Jones, K.; Heath, C.

    1993-01-01

    General Electric (GE) has proposed an advanced boiling water reactor, the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR), which will utilize passive, gravity-driven safety systems for emergency core coolant injection. The SBWR design includes no recirculation loops or recirculation pumps. Therefore the SBWR will operate in a natural circulation (NC) mode at full power conditions. This design poses some concerns relative to stability during startup, shutdown, and at power conditions. As a consequence, the NRC has directed personnel at several national labs to help investigate SBWR stability issues. This paper will focus on some of the preliminary findings made at the INEL. Because of the broad range of stability issues this paper will mainly focus on potential geysering instabilities during startup. The two NC designs examined in detail are the US Humboldt Bay Unit 3 BWR-1 plant and Dodewaard plant in the Netherlands. The objective of this paper will be to review operating experience of these two plants and evaluate their relevance to planned SBWR operational procedures. For completeness, experimental work with early natural circulation GE test facilities will also be briefly discussed

  1. Data Acquisition System Design for Advanced Core-Cooling Mechanism Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ziyang; Tian, Fang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Shen

    2011-01-01

    Data Acquisition System (DAS) design for Advanced Core-Cooling Mechanism Experiment(ACME) is studied in the paper. DAS is an important connection between test facility and result analysis. Firstly, it introduces DAS and its design requirement for ACME. Nearly one thousand data resources need record in ACME. They have different types and acquisition frequencies. In order to record these data, a large scale and high speed layered data acquisition system is developed. Secondly, it discusses the DAS design for ACME, including the analog signal adjusting circuits, clock circuit design, sampling frequencies, data storage and transmission by large database system, anti-interference and etc. Analog signal adjusting circuits are necessary to deal with different kinds of input data to gain standard data resources. Some data change slowly and others change in several seconds according to the test performed on ACME. So it is difficult to use uniform sampling frequencies, and a layered data acquisition system is introduced. A large database is built to store data for ACME test, which keeps data safer and makes subsequent data handling more convenient. A database hot backup is also applied to ensure data safety. The software of DAS is built by Labview, which can provide intuitionist result and friendly interface. Another important function of DAS is the ACME safety protection. Finally, the characteristics and improvement of DAS for ACME is analyzed compared to other test facility. Besides friendly user interface, DAS of ACME can also assure higher data precision and sampling frequency

  2. El Centro Geothermal Utility Core Field Experiment environmental-impact report and environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    The City of El Centro is proposing the development of a geothermal energy utility core field experiment to demonstrate the engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing moderate temperature geothermal heat, on a pilot scale, for space cooling, space heating, and domestic hot water. The proposed facility is located on part of a 2.48 acre (1 hectare) parcel owned in fee by the City in the southeastern sector of El Centro in Imperial County, California. Geothermal fluid at an anticipated temperature of about 250/sup 0/F (121/sup 0/C) will heat a secondary fluid (water) which will be utilized directly or processed through an absorption chiller, to provide space conditioning and water heating for the El Centro Community Center, a public recreational facility located approximately one-half mile north of the proposed well site. The geothermal production well will be drilled to 8500 feet (2590m) and an injection well to 4000 feet (1220m) at the industrially designated City property. Once all relevant permits are obtained it is estimated that site preparation, facility construction, the completion and testing of both wells would be finished in approximately 26 weeks. The environmental impacts are described.

  3. Criticality safety benchmark experiment on 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution using a 28-cm-thickness slab core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Kikuchi, Tsukasa; Watanabe, Shouichi

    2002-01-01

    The second series of critical experiments with 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution using 28-cm-thick slab core have been performed with the Static Experiment Critical Facility of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Systematic critical data were obtained by changing the uranium concentration of the fuel solution from 464 to 300 gU/l under various reflector conditions. In this paper, the thirteen critical configurations for water-reflected cores and unreflected cores are identified and evaluated. The effects of uncertainties in the experimental data on k eff are quantified by sensitivity studies. Benchmark model specifications that are necessary to construct a calculational model are given. The uncertainties of k eff 's included in the benchmark model specifications are approximately 0.1%Δk eff . The thirteen critical configurations are judged to be acceptable benchmark data. Using the benchmark model specifications, sample calculation results are provided with several sets of standard codes and cross section data. (author)

  4. Validation of the ABBN/CONSYST constants system. Part 2: Validation through the critical experiments on cores with uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, T.T.; Manturov, G.N.; Nikolaev, M.N.; Rozhikhin, E.V.; Semenov, M.Yu.; Tsiboulia, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Results of calculations of critical assemblies with the cores of uranium solutions for the considered series of the experiments are presented in this paper. The conclusions about acceptability of the ABBN-93.1 cross sections for the calculations of such systems are made. (author)

  5. Embedding Hands-On Mini Laboratory Experiences in a Core Undergraduate Fluid Mechanics Course: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Duanduan; Ugaz, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Three self-contained mini-labs were integrated into a core undergraduate fluid mechanics course, with the goal of delivering hands-on content in a manner scalable to large class sizes. These mini-labs supported learning objectives involving friction loss in pipes, flow measurement, and centrifugal pump analysis. The hands-on experiments were…

  6. JENDL-3.2 performance in analyses of MISTRAL critical experiments for high-moderation MOX cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Naoyuki; Hibi, Koki; Ishii, Kazuya; Ando, Yoshihira; Yamamoto, Toru; Ueji, Masao; Iwata, Yutaka

    2001-01-01

    NUPEC and CEA have launched an extensive experimental program called MISTRAL to study highly moderated MOX cores for the advanced LWRs. The analyses using SRAC system and MVP code with JENDL-3.2 library are in progress on the experiments of the MISTRAL and the former EPICURE programs. Various comparisons have been made between calculation results and measurement values. (author)

  7. The "Bain Linguistique": A Core French Experiment at Churchill Alternative School, 1993-94. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesche, Marjorie; MacFarlane, Alina; Peters, Martine

    This report describes an experimental intensive core French program for grades 5 and 6 at Churchill Alternative School in Ottawa (Canada). The aim was to improve the oral French skills of core French students by providing a period of intensive exposure to French and by increasing the total number of hours in French during one program year from 120…

  8. Analyses on the BFS critical experiments. An analysis on the BFS-62-1 and 62-2 cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, Kazuteru; Shono, Akira

    2002-04-01

    In order to support the Russian excess weapons plutonium disposition, the international collaboration has been started between Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) and Russian Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE). In the frame of the collaboration, JNC has carried out analyses on the BFS-62 assemblies that are constructed in the fast reactor critical experimental facility BFS-2 of IPPE. This report summarizes an experimental analysis on the BFS-62-1 and BFS-62-2 cores. The BFS-62-1 core models the present BN-600, and contains the enriched UO 2 fuel surrounded by the UO 2 blanket. The BFS-62-2 core has the same layout as the BFS-62-1 but the blanket region was replaced with stainless steel shied. For core parameter analyses, the 3-D Hexagonal-Z or XYZ geometry model was applied by not only diffusion calculation but also transport calculation. Further in terms of the utilization of the BFS experimental analysis data for the standard data base for FBR core design, consistency evaluation with JUPITER experimental analysis data has been performed using the cross-section adjustment method. As the result of analyses, good agreement was obtained between calculations and experiments for the criticality, the reaction rate ratio and reaction rate distribution in BFS-62-1. In the reaction rate distribution of BFS-62-2 calculation without cross-section adjustment produced big radial dependency of calculation over experiment value (C/E value) in the core region and overestimation in the shield region. Cross-section adjustment technique procedure improved those estimation, however alternation of cross-section of Iron, which was dominant in above improvement, compared to the cross-section error, and further investigation was required. Concerning the control rod worth of BFS-62-1, radial dependency of the C/E value was observed whether cross-section adjustment technique was applied or not, therefore comparison with results of other BFS-62 cores analyses is

  9. Coupled fast-thermal core 'HERBE', as the benchmark experiment at the RB reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    2003-10-01

    Validation of the well-known Monte Carlo code MCNP TM against measured criticality data for the coupled fast-thermal HERBE. System at the RB research reactor is shown in this paper. Experimental data are obtained for regular HERBE core and for the cases of controlled flooding of the neutron converter zone by heavy water. Earlier calculations of these criticality parameters, done by combination of transport and diffusion codes using 2D geometry model are also compared to new calculations carried out by the MCNP code in 3D geometry, applying new detailed 3D model of the HEU fuel slug, developed recently. Satisfactory agreements in comparison of the HERBE criticality calculation results with experimental data, in spite complex heterogeneous composition of the HERBE core, are obtained and confirmed that HERBE core could be used as a criticality benchmark for coupled fast-thermal core. (author)

  10. First neutrino events seen by the core of the OPERA experiment (CNGS) on 2 October 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The reconstruction of the core of a neutrino interaction at OPERA. The neutrino arriving from the left of the image has interacted with the lead of a brick, producing various particles identifiable by their tracks visible in the emulsion.

  11. Experience with Aerosol Generation During Rotary Mode Core Sampling in the Hanford Single Shell Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHOFIELD, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides data on aerosol concentrations in tank head spaces, total mass of aerosols in the tank head space and mass of aerosols sent to the exhauster during Rotary Mode Core Sampling from November 1994 through April 1999

  12. Core designs for new VVER reactors and operational experience of immediate prototypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilchenko, I.; Mokhov, V.; Ryzhov, S.

    2011-01-01

    The paper covers the recent improvements analyzed in order to implement the enhanced core performances. AES-2006 reactor core design is considered from the point of view of its application and improvement in the planned VVER-TOI project and of the possibilities of using the basic engineering solutions for the cores with spectral control. The discussion of several types of mixing grids considered in the paper involves a preliminary assessment of their efficiency and the information on their introduction into pilot operation at the VVER-1000 Units. Special attention is given to the results of the operation of immediate prototypes (TVS-2 and TVS-2M) that corroborate the reliability of the design both with regard for the core geometrical stability and fuel cladding tightness

  13. Ultrasound-guided renal biopsy: experience using an automated core biopsy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, R; Common, A A; Marcuzzi, D

    2000-04-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy using an automated core biopsy system, and to determine radiologists' accuracy in predicting sample adequacy. Ninety-five biopsies were performed on 25 native kidneys and 70 renal allografts using a 16-gauge automated, spring-loaded core biopsy device under real-time sonographic guidance. Radiologists performing the biopsy estimated the number of core samples needed to obtain an adequate specimen, based on visual inspection of each core. The final determination of the number of samples was made by a pathology technologist who attended each biopsy, based on preliminary microscopic examination of tissue cores. After each biopsy, an ultrasonographic examination was performed to search for biopsy-related hemorrhage, and a questionnaire was given to the patient to determine biopsy-related complications, which were categorized as either minor or major. The main indication for biopsy was acute renal failure (in 43.2% of biopsies). An average of 3 tissue cores per biopsy were obtained. Of the 94 patients in whom a biopsy was conducted to exclude diffuse renal disease, a mean of 12.5 glomeruli were present in each specimen. Overall, adequate tissue for diagnosis was obtained in 98.9% of cases. The radiologists' estimate of the number of core samples needed concurred with the pathology technologists' determination of sample adequacy in 88.4% of cases. A total of 26 complications occurred (in 27.4% of biopsies), consisting of 23 minor (24.2%) and 3 major (3.2%) complications. Real-time sonographic guidance in conjunction with an automated core biopsy system is a safe and accurate method of performing percutaneous renal biopsy. Routine use of sonographic examinations to search for biopsy-related complications is not indicated. Radiologists are accurate in estimating sample adequacy in most cases; however, the presence of a pathology technologist at the biopsy procedure virtually eliminates the

  14. Analysis of LWR Full MOX Core Physics Experiments with Major Nuclear Data Libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Toru [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) studied high moderation full MOX cores as a part of advanced LWR core concept studies from 1994 to 2003 supported by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. In order to obtain the major physics characteristics of such advanced MOX cores, NUPEC carried out core physics experimental programs called MISTRAL and BASALA from 1996 to 2002 in the EOLE critical facility of the Cadarache Center in collaboration with CEA. NUPEC also obtained a part of experimental data of the EPICURE program that CEA had conducted for 30 % Pu recycling in French PWRs. Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization(JNES) established in 2003 as an incorporated administrative agency took over the NUPEC's projects for nuclear regulation and has been implementing FUBILA program that is for high burn up BWR full MOX cores. This paper presents an outline of the programs and a summary of the analysis results of the criticality of those experimental cores with major nuclear data libraries.

  15. Online selection of short-lived particles on many-core computer architectures in the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-07-07

    Modern experiments in heavy ion collisions operate with huge data rates that can not be fully stored on the currently available storage devices. Therefore the data flow should be reduced by selecting those collisions that potentially carry the information of the physics interest. The future CBM experiment will have no simple criteria for selecting such collisions and requires the full online reconstruction of the collision topology including reconstruction of short-lived particles. In this work the KF Particle Finder package for online reconstruction and selection of short-lived particles is proposed and developed. It reconstructs more than 70 decays, covering signals from all the physics cases of the CBM experiment: strange particles, strange resonances, hypernuclei, low mass vector mesons, charmonium, and open-charm particles. The package is based on the Kalman filter method providing a full set of the particle parameters together with their errors including position, momentum, mass, energy, lifetime, etc. It shows a high quality of the reconstructed particles, high efficiencies, and high signal to background ratios. The KF Particle Finder is extremely fast for achieving the reconstruction speed of 1.5 ms per minimum-bias AuAu collision at 25 AGeV beam energy on single CPU core. It is fully vectorized and parallelized and shows a strong linear scalability on the many-core architectures of up to 80 cores. It also scales within the First Level Event Selection package on the many-core clusters up to 3200 cores. The developed KF Particle Finder package is a universal platform for short- lived particle reconstruction, physics analysis and online selection.

  16. Online selection of short-lived particles on many-core computer architectures in the CBM experiment at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-01-01

    Modern experiments in heavy ion collisions operate with huge data rates that can not be fully stored on the currently available storage devices. Therefore the data flow should be reduced by selecting those collisions that potentially carry the information of the physics interest. The future CBM experiment will have no simple criteria for selecting such collisions and requires the full online reconstruction of the collision topology including reconstruction of short-lived particles. In this work the KF Particle Finder package for online reconstruction and selection of short-lived particles is proposed and developed. It reconstructs more than 70 decays, covering signals from all the physics cases of the CBM experiment: strange particles, strange resonances, hypernuclei, low mass vector mesons, charmonium, and open-charm particles. The package is based on the Kalman filter method providing a full set of the particle parameters together with their errors including position, momentum, mass, energy, lifetime, etc. It shows a high quality of the reconstructed particles, high efficiencies, and high signal to background ratios. The KF Particle Finder is extremely fast for achieving the reconstruction speed of 1.5 ms per minimum-bias AuAu collision at 25 AGeV beam energy on single CPU core. It is fully vectorized and parallelized and shows a strong linear scalability on the many-core architectures of up to 80 cores. It also scales within the First Level Event Selection package on the many-core clusters up to 3200 cores. The developed KF Particle Finder package is a universal platform for short- lived particle reconstruction, physics analysis and online selection.

  17. Assessment of the MARS Code Using the Two-Phase Natural Circulation Experiments at a Core Catcher Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hun Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A core catcher has been developed to maintain the integrity of nuclear reactor containment from molten corium during a severe accident. It uses a two-phase natural circulation for cooling molten corium. Flow in a typical core catcher is unique because (i it has an inclined cooling channel with downwards-facing heating surface, of which flow processes are not fully exploited, (ii it is usually exposed to a low-pressure condition, where phase change causes dramatic changes in the flow, and (iii the effects of a multidimensional flow are very large in the upper part of the core catcher. These features make computational analysis more difficult. In this study, the MARS code is assessed using the two-phase natural circulation experiments that had been conducted at the CE-PECS facility to verify the cooling performance of a core catcher. The code is a system-scale thermal-hydraulic (TH code and has a multidimensional TH component. The facility was modeled by using both one- and three-dimensional components. Six experiments at the facility were selected to investigate the parametric effects of heat flux, pressure, and form loss. The results show that MARS can predict the two-phase flow at the facility reasonably well. However, some limitations are obviously revealed.

  18. Specialists' meeting on predictions and experience of core distortion behaviour, Wilmslow, England, 1-4 October 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    The specialists' meeting on predictions and experience of core distortion behaviour was held at Mottram Hall, Wilmslow, England, under the auspices of the National Nuclear Corporation on 1 to 4 October 1984. The meeting was sponsored by the IAEA on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) and was attended by 28 participants including observers from Belgium, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, the United States, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the IAEA. The meeting was chaired by Mr. K.F. Allbeson of NNC. The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for the exchange of information on core distortion in fast breeder reactors. Emphasis was placed on the predictive computer codes. The technical parts of the meeting were divided into five major sessions as follows: 1) Overview of National Programmes including the identification of key issues to be considered in the following sessions (8 papers); 2) Calculation methods for core distortion and mechanical behaviour (6 papers); 3) Validation and qualification methods (3 papers); 4) Design and evaluation of core styles (5 papers); 5) Operating experience (5 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  19. Experience in dismantling and packaging of pressure vessel and core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillokat, Peter; Bruhn, Jan Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Company AREVA is proud to look back on versatile experience in successfully dismantling nuclear components. After performing several minor dismantling projects and studies for nuclear power plants, AREVA completed the order for dismantling of all remaining Reactor Pressure Vessel internals at German Boiling Water Reactor Wuergassen NPP in October '08. During the onsite activities about 121 tons of steel were successfully cut and packed under water into 200l- drums, as the dismantling was performed partly in situ and partly in an underwater working tank. AREVA deployed a variety of different cutting techniques such as band sawing, milling, nibbling, compass sawing and water jet cutting throughout this project. After successfully finishing this task, AREVA dismantled the cylindrical part of the Wuergassen Pressure Vessel. During this project approximately 320 tons of steel were cut and packaged for final disposal, as dismantling was mainly performed by on air use of water jet cutting with vacuum suction of abrasive and kerfs material. The main clue during this assignment was the logistic challenge to handle and convey cut pieces from the pressure vessel to the packing area. For this, an elevator was installed to transport cut segments into the turbine hall, where a special housing was built for final storage conditioning. At the beginning of 2007, another complex dismantling project of great importance was acquired by AREVA. The contract included dismantling and conditioning for final storage of the complete RPV Internals of the German Pressurized Water Reactor Stade NPP. Very similar cutting techniques turned out to be the proper policy to cope this task. On-site activities took place in up to 5 separate working areas including areas for post segmentation and packaging to perform optimized parallel activities. All together about 85 tons of Core Internals were successfully dismantled at Stade NPP until September '09. To accomplish the best possible on

  20. Analysis of Core Physics Experiments on Irradiated BWR MOX Fuel in REBUS Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toru; Ando, Yoshihira; Hayashi, Yamato

    2008-01-01

    As part of analyses of experimental data of a critical core containing a irradiated BWR MOX test bundle in the REBUS program, depletion calculations was performed for the BWR MOX fuel assemblies from that the MOX test rods were selected by using a general purpose neutronics code system SRAC. The core analyses were carried out using SRAC and a continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP. The calculated k eff s were compared with those of the core containing a fresh MOX fuel bundle in the program. The SRAC-diffusion calculation underestimates k eff s of the both cores by 1.0 to 1.3 %dk and the k eff s of MVP are 1.001. The difference in k eff between the irradiated BWR MOX test bundle core and the fresh MOX one is 0.4 %dk in the SRAC-diffusion calculation and 0.0 %dk in the MVP calculation. The calculated fission rate distributions are in good agreement with the measurement in the SRAC-diffusion and MVP calculations. The calculated neutron flux distributions are also in good agreement with the measurement. The calculated burnup reactivity in the both calculations well reproduce the measurements. (authors)

  1. Experience from development and operation of the core surveillance systems SCORPIO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, O.; Porsmyr, J.; Adlandsvik, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    The main motivation behind the development of SCORPIO is to make a practical tool for reactor operators which can increase the quality and quantity of information presented on core status and dynamic behaviour. This can first of all improve plant safety as undesired core conditions are detected and prevented. Secondly, more flexible and efficient plant operation is made possible. These improvements are obtained by better surveillance of core instrumentation and through detailed calculations of core behaviour using on-line simulators. The SCORPIO system has two parallel modes of operation: the Core Follow Mode and the Predictive Mode. The system has been in operation at the Ringhals PWR unit 2 in Sweden since the end of 1987 where it runs on Norsk Data mini-computers. Recently, there has been a renewed interest for SCORPIO mainly determined by the utilities' desire to obtain more economical and flexible plant operation. The SCORPIO system has been transferred to Unix based workstations and integrated with the Picasso-2 graphics system. In addition to Ringhals the new system is currently being installed at Nuclear Electri's Sizewell B PWR in UK and Duke Power's Catawba Unit 1,2 and McGuire Unit 1,2, USA. (author). 7 refs, 5 figs

  2. Core physics analysis in support of the FNR HEU-LEU demonstration experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losey, David C.; Brown, Forrest B.; Martin, William R.; Lee, John C.

    1983-01-01

    A core neutronics analysis has been undertaken to assess the impact of low-enrichment fuel on the performance and utilization of the FNR As part of this analytic effort a computer code system has been assembled which will be of general use in analyzing research reactors with MTR-type fuel. The code system has been extensively tested and verified in calculations for the present high enrichment core. The analysis presented here compares the high-and-low enrichment fuels in batch and equilibrium core configurations which model the actual FNR operating conditions. The two fuels are compared for cycle length, fuel burnup, and flux and power distributions, as well as for the reactivity effects which are important in assessing the impact of LEU fuel on reactor shutdown margin. (author)

  3. Core physics analysis in support of the FNR HEU-LEU demonstration experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losey, David C; Brown, Forrest B; Martin, William R; Lee, John C [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan (United States)

    1983-08-01

    A core neutronics analysis has been undertaken to assess the impact of low-enrichment fuel on the performance and utilization of the FNR As part of this analytic effort a computer code system has been assembled which will be of general use in analyzing research reactors with MTR-type fuel. The code system has been extensively tested and verified in calculations for the present high enrichment core. The analysis presented here compares the high-and-low enrichment fuels in batch and equilibrium core configurations which model the actual FNR operating conditions. The two fuels are compared for cycle length, fuel burnup, and flux and power distributions, as well as for the reactivity effects which are important in assessing the impact of LEU fuel on reactor shutdown margin. (author)

  4. Validation of the ABBN/CONSYST constants system. Part 1: Validation through the critical experiments on compact metallic cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, T.T.; Manturov, G.N.; Nikolaev, M.N.; Rozhikhin, E.V.; Semenov, M.Yu.; Tsiboulia, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Worldwide compilation of criticality safety benchmark experiments, evaluated due to an activity of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), discovers new possibilities for validation of the ABBN-93.1 cross section library for criticality safety analysis. Results of calculations of small assemblies with metal-fuelled cores are presented in this paper. It is concluded that ABBN-93.1 predicts criticality of such systems with required accuracy

  5. Edge-core interaction revealed with dynamic transport experiment in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, N.; Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.

    2010-11-01

    Large scale coherent structures in electron heat transport of both core and edge plasmas are clearly found in plasma with a nonlocal transport phenomenon (NTP, a core electron temperature rise in response to an edge cooling) on Large Helical Device (LHD). At the onset of the NTP, a first order transition of the electron heat transport, which is characterized by a discontinuity of electron temperature gradient, is found to take place over a wide region (at least 6 cm wide) in the periphery of the plasma. At about the same time, over a wide region (about 10 cm wide) of the plasma core, a second order transition of the electron heat transport, which is characterized by a discontinuity of the time derivative of the electron temperature gradient, appears. The both large scale coherent structures are of a scale larger than a typical micro-turbulent eddy size (a few mm in this case). In order to assess dynamic characteristics of the electron heat transport state in the core region during the NTP, a transit time distribution analysis is applied to the temporal behaviors of the electron temperature gradient. The analysis results more clearly show the existence of the large coherent structures in electron heat transport. Thus the NTP observed in LHD is considered to be invoked by the interaction of those structures. (author)

  6. Experience with Aerosol Generation During Rotary Mode Core Sampling in the Hanford Single Shell Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHOFIELD, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides data on aerosol concentrations in tank head spaces, total mass of aerosols in the tank head space and mass of aerosols sent to the exhauster during Rotary Mode Core Sampling from November 1994 through June 1999. A decontamination factor for the RMCS exhauster filter housing is calculated based on operation data

  7. Time-resolved characterization and energy balance analysis of implosion core in shock-ignition experiments at OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florido, R.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.; Tommasini, R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved temperature and density conditions in the core of shock-ignition implosions have been determined for the first time. The diagnostic method relies on the observation, with a streaked crystal spectrometer, of the signature of an Ar tracer added to the deuterium gas fill. The data analysis confirms the importance of the shell attenuation effect previously noted on time-integrated spectroscopic measurements of thick-wall targets [R. Florido et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 066408 (2011)]. This effect must be taken into account in order to obtain reliable results. The extracted temperature and density time-histories are representative of the state of the core during the implosion deceleration and burning phases. As a consequence of the ignitor shock launched by the sharp intensity spike at the end of the laser pulse, observed average core electron temperature and mass density reach T ∼ 1100 eV and ρ ∼ 2 g/cm 3 ; then temperature drops to T ∼ 920 eV while density rises to ρ ∼ 3.4 g/cm 3 about the time of peak compression. Compared to 1D hydrodynamic simulations, the experiment shows similar maximum temperatures and smaller densities. Simulations do not reproduce all observations. Differences are noted in the heating dynamics driven by the ignitor shock and the optical depth time-history of the compressed shell. Time-histories of core conditions extracted from spectroscopy show that the implosion can be interpreted as a two-stage polytropic process. Furthermore, an energy balance analysis of implosion core suggests an increase in total energy greater than what 1D hydrodynamic simulations predict. This new methodology can be implemented in other ICF experiments to look into implosion dynamics and help to understand the underlying physics

  8. Time-resolved characterization and energy balance analysis of implosion core in shock-ignition experiments at OMEGA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florido, R., E-mail: ricardo.florido@ulpgc.es; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Time-resolved temperature and density conditions in the core of shock-ignition implosions have been determined for the first time. The diagnostic method relies on the observation, with a streaked crystal spectrometer, of the signature of an Ar tracer added to the deuterium gas fill. The data analysis confirms the importance of the shell attenuation effect previously noted on time-integrated spectroscopic measurements of thick-wall targets [R. Florido et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 066408 (2011)]. This effect must be taken into account in order to obtain reliable results. The extracted temperature and density time-histories are representative of the state of the core during the implosion deceleration and burning phases. As a consequence of the ignitor shock launched by the sharp intensity spike at the end of the laser pulse, observed average core electron temperature and mass density reach T ∼ 1100 eV and ρ ∼ 2 g/cm{sup 3}; then temperature drops to T ∼ 920 eV while density rises to ρ ∼ 3.4 g/cm{sup 3} about the time of peak compression. Compared to 1D hydrodynamic simulations, the experiment shows similar maximum temperatures and smaller densities. Simulations do not reproduce all observations. Differences are noted in the heating dynamics driven by the ignitor shock and the optical depth time-history of the compressed shell. Time-histories of core conditions extracted from spectroscopy show that the implosion can be interpreted as a two-stage polytropic process. Furthermore, an energy balance analysis of implosion core suggests an increase in total energy greater than what 1D hydrodynamic simulations predict. This new methodology can be implemented in other ICF experiments to look into implosion dynamics and help to understand the underlying physics.

  9. Core-concrete interactions using molten UO2 with zirconium on a basaltic basemat: The SURC-2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copus, E.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Simpson, R.B.; Lucero, D.A.; Blose, R.E.

    1992-08-01

    An inductively heated experiment, SURC-2, using prototypic U0 2 -ZrO 2 materials was executed as part of the Integral Core-Concrete Interactions Experiments Program. The purpose of this experimental program was to measure and assess the variety of source terms produced during core debris/concrete interactions. These source terms include thermal energy released to both the reactor basemat and the containment environment, as well as flammable gas, condensable vapor and toxic or radioactive aerosols generated during the course of a severe reactor accident. The SURC-2 experiment eroded a total of 35 cm of basaltic concrete during 160 minutes of sustained interaction using 203.9 kg of prototypic U0 2 -ZrO 2 core debris material that included 18 kg of Zr metal and 3.4 kg of fission product simulants. The meltpool temperature ranged from 2400--1900 degrees C during the first 50 minutes of the test followed by steady temperatures of 1750--1800 degrees C during the middle portion of the test and increased temperatures of 1800--1900 degrees C during the final 50 minutes of testing. The total erosion during the first 50 minutes was 15 cm with an additional 7 cm during the middle part of the test and 13 cm of ablation during the final 50 minutes. Comprehensive gas flowrates, gas compositions, and aerosol release rates were also measured during the SURC-2 test. When combined with the SURC-1 results, SURC-2 forms a complete data base for prototypic U0 2 -ZrO 2 core debris interactions with concrete

  10. Core-concrete interactions using molten UO sub 2 with zirconium on a basaltic basemat: The SURC-2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copus, E.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Simpson, R.B.; Lucero, D.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Blose, R.E. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1992-08-01

    An inductively heated experiment, SURC-2, using prototypic U0{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} materials was executed as part of the Integral Core-Concrete Interactions Experiments Program. The purpose of this experimental program was to measure and assess the variety of source terms produced during core debris/concrete interactions. These source terms include thermal energy released to both the reactor basemat and the containment environment, as well as flammable gas, condensable vapor and toxic or radioactive aerosols generated during the course of a severe reactor accident. The SURC-2 experiment eroded a total of 35 cm of basaltic concrete during 160 minutes of sustained interaction using 203.9 kg of prototypic U0{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} core debris material that included 18 kg of Zr metal and 3.4 kg of fission product simulants. The meltpool temperature ranged from 2400--1900{degrees}C during the first 50 minutes of the test followed by steady temperatures of 1750--1800{degrees}C during the middle portion of the test and increased temperatures of 1800--1900{degrees}C during the final 50 minutes of testing. The total erosion during the first 50 minutes was 15 cm with an additional 7 cm during the middle part of the test and 13 cm of ablation during the final 50 minutes. Comprehensive gas flowrates, gas compositions, and aerosol release rates were also measured during the SURC-2 test. When combined with the SURC-1 results, SURC-2 forms a complete data base for prototypic U0{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} core debris interactions with concrete.

  11. Investigating elite behavior through field experiment in Brazil: do candidates answer more to core or swing voters?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Spada

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores recent advances in experimental methodology to analyze elite behavior. Using an email experiment conducted in the context of the Brazilian 2008 municipal elections, we studied whether candidates target "swing" or "core" voters during campaigns. Candidates from all parties – 1,000 candidates in all – were contacted by randomly generated citizens who identified themselves as either core or swing voters. Additionally, we randomized senders' past voting behavior and their gender. To identify the baseline answer rate, we employed a placebo treatment with no reference to the elections. Our results show that Brazilian candidates target any sender as long as she identifies herself as a potential voter. Within this general finding, models with city-specific fixed effects indicate that Brazilian politicians tend to target core voters. The paper contributes to the general experimental literature by providing an easily replicable design that can test the behavior of elite interaction with the public. At the same time, the paper extends the literature on core versus swing voters by providing an empirical test that can shed light on the effects of a specific political environment (type of election, voting rule, and party structure, and how it affects the relationship between candidates and voters during elections.

  12. Analysis of core physics and thermal-hydraulics results of control rod withdrawal experiments in the LOFT facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Chen, T.H.; Harvego, E.A.; Ollikkala, H.

    1983-01-01

    Two anticipated transient experiments simulating an uncontrolled control rod withdrawal event in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) were conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The scaled LOFT 50-MW(t) PWR includes most of the principal features of larger commercial PWRs. The experiments tested the ability of reactor analysis codes to accurately calculate core reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic phenomena in an integral reactor system. The initial conditions and scaled operating parameters for the experiments were representative of those expected in a commercial PWR. In both experiments, all four LOFT control rod assemblies were withdrawn at a reactor power of 37.5 MW and a system pressure of 14.8 MPa

  13. Multi-bundle sodium experiments for thermohydraulics in core subassemblies during natural circulation decay heat removal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamide, H.; Ieda, Y.; Toda, S.; Isozaki, T.; Sugawara, S.

    1993-01-01

    Two types of multi-subassembly sodium experiments, CCTL-CFR tests and PLANDTL-DHX tests, have been carried out in order to investigate thermohydraulics in a fast reactor core during natural circulation. Basic experiments are carried out in CCTL-CFR test rig without inter-wrapper gap and under steady state. Integral experiments are performed in PLANDTL-DHX test rig with the inter-wrapper gap and a dip cooler in an upper plenum under steady state and transient conditions. The first series of the experiments and post analyses showed that inter-subassembly heat transfer had significant effects on the transverse temperature distribution in the subassembly and was strongly coupled with intra-subassembly flow redistribution. And the cold sodium provided by the dip cooler could reduce the hot spot temperature in the pin bundle mainly via the inter-wrapper gap. (author)

  14. Transient core-debris bed heat-removal experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsberg, T.; Klein, J.; Klages, J.; Schwarz, C.E.; Chen, J.C.

    1982-08-01

    An experimental investigation is reported of the thermal interaction between superheated core debris and water during postulated light-water reactor degraded core accidents. Data are presented for the heat transfer characteristics of packed beds of 3 mm spheres which are cooled by overlying pools of water. Results of transient bed temperature and steam flow rate measurements are presented for bed heights in the range 218 mm-433 mm and initial particle bed temperatures between 530K and 972K. Results display a two-part sequential quench process. Initial frontal cooling leaves pockets or channels of unquenched spheres. Data suggest that heat transfer process is limited by a mechanism of countercurrent two-phase flow. An analytical model which combines a bed energy equation with either a quasisteady version of the Lipinski debris bed model or a critical heat flux model reasonably well predicts the characteristic features of the bed quench process. Implications with respect to reactor safety are discussed

  15. On disruption of reactor core of the Chernobylsk-4 reactor (retrospective analysis of experiments and facts)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Fragments of graphite blocks from the damaged Chernobyl NPP, unit 4 are studied, the results are analyzed. The temperature of the graphite blocks at the moment of accident release from the reactor is evaluated. Results of studying the fragments of fuel channel and fuel dispersion are considered. The fuel heat content at the moment of the explosion is evaluated and some conclusions are made about the character of the reactor core destruction [ru

  16. Experience of Applying the CORE-Econ in English Reading Course

    OpenAIRE

    新里, 泰孝

    2018-01-01

    An e-book of CORE-econ project was used in a course of English reading, in autumn term 2016, spring and autumn terms 2017. My aims of English class are 1. quick reading and 2. understanding Economics in English. Especially in my class, students take no translation in principle. In this paper I report how to use the e-book and its effectiveness.

  17. Core heat transfer analysis during a BWR LOCA simulation experiment at ROSA-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonomoto, T.; Koizumi, Y.; Tasaka, K.

    1987-01-01

    The ROSA-III test facility is a 1/424-th volumetrically scaled BWR/6 simulator with an electrically heated core to study the thermal-hydraulic response during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Heat transfer analyses for 5, 15, 50 and 200% break tests were conducted to understand the basic heat transfer behavior in the core under BWR LOCA conditions and to obtain a data base of post-critical heat flux (CHF) heat transfer coefficients and quench temperature. The results show that the convective heat transfer coefficient of dried-out rods at the core midplane during a steam cooling period is less than approximately 120 W/m 2 K. It is larger than existing data measured at lower pressures during a spray cooling period. Bottom-up quench temperatures are given by a simple equations: The sum of the saturation temperature and a constant of 262 K. Then the heat transfer model in the RELAP4/MOD6/U4/J3 code was revised using the present results. The rod surface temperature behavior in the 200% break test was calculated better by using the revised model although the model is very simple. (orig.)

  18. Design, construction and operating experience of demonstration LMFBRs. The application of core and fuel performance experience in British reactors to commercial fast reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, K.Q.

    1978-01-01

    The Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) sub-assembly design is described with particular emphasis on the choice of factors that are important in determining satisfactory performance. Reasons for the adoption of specific clad and fuel design details are given in their historical context, and irradiation experience - mostly from the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR) - in support of the choices is described. The implications of factors that are now better understood than when the PFR fuel was designed, notably neutron-induced void swelling and irradiation creep, are then considered. It is shown that the 'free-standing' core design used in PFR, in which the sub-assembly is unsupported above the level of the lower axial breeder, relies on the availability of low-swelling, preferably irradiation-creep-resistant alloys as sub-assembly structural materials in order to achieve the prescribed burn-up target. The advantages of a 'restrained core', which makes use of irradiation creep to redress the effects of material swelling, are noted briefly, and the application of this concept to the Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) core design is described. Probable future trends in pin and sub-assembly design are reviewed and the scope of associated irradiation testing programmes defined. Arrangements for monitoring and evaluating fuel performance, both in reactor and post-irradiation, are outlined and the provisions for endorsement of CDFR pin, sub-assembly and core design details in PFR are indicated. (author)

  19. Development of the BWR Dry Core Initial and Boundary Conditions for the SNL XR2 Experiments; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Boiling Water Reactor Experimental Analysis and Model Development for Severe Accidents (BEAMD) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are: (1) the development of a sound quantitative understanding of boiling water reactor (BWR) core melt progression; this includes control blade and channel box effects, metallic melt relocation and possible blockage formation under severe accident conditions, and (2) provision of BWR melt progression modeling capabilities in SCDAP/RELAP5 (consistent with the BWR experimental data base). This requires the assessment of current modeling of BWR core melt progression against the expanding BWR data base. Emphasis is placed upon data from the BWR tests in the German CORA test facility and from the ex-reactor experiments[Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation in BWRs, as well as upon in-reactor data from the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) DF-4 BWR test (conducted in 1986 at SNL). The BEAMD Program is a derivative of the BWR Severe Accident Technology Programs at ORNL. The ORNL BWR programs have studied postulated severe accidents in BWRs and have developed a set of models specific to boiling water reactor response under severe accident conditions. These models, in an experiment-specific format, have been successfully applied to both pretest and posttest analyses of the DF-4 experiment, and the BWR severe fuel damage (SFD) experiments performed in the CORA facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany, resulting in excellent agreement between model prediction and experiment. The ORNL BWR models have provided for more precise predictions of the conditions in the BWR experiments than were previously available. This has provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena for which the experiments are performed. The experiment-specific models, as used in the ORNL DF-4 and CORA BWR experimental analyses, also provide a basis

  20. Comparative Experiments to Assess the Effects of Accumulator Nitrogen Injection on Passive Core Cooling During Small Break LOCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuquan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The accumulator is a passive safety injection device for emergency core cooling systems. As an important safety feature for providing a high-speed injection flow to the core by compressed nitrogen gas pressure during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA, the accumulator injects its precharged nitrogen into the system after its coolant has been emptied. Attention has been drawn to the possible negative effects caused by such a nitrogen injection in passive safety nuclear power plants. Although some experimental work on the nitrogen injection has been done, there have been no comparative tests in which the effects on the system responses and the core safety have been clearly assessed. In this study, a new thermal hydraulic integral test facility—the advanced core-cooling mechanism experiment (ACME—was designed and constructed to support the CAP1400 safety review. The ACME test facility was used to study the nitrogen injection effects on the system responses to the small break loss-of-coolant accident LOCA (SBLOCA transient. Two comparison test groups—a 2-inch cold leg break and a double-ended direct-vessel-injection (DEDVI line break—were conducted. Each group consists of a nitrogen injection test and a nitrogen isolation comparison test with the same break conditions. To assess the nitrogen injection effects, the experimental data that are representative of the system responses and the core safety were compared and analyzed. The results of the comparison show that the effects of nitrogen injection on system responses and core safety are significantly different between the 2-inch and DEDVI breaks. The mechanisms of the different effects on the transient were also investigated. The amount of nitrogen injected, along with its heat absorption, was likewise evaluated in order to assess its effect on the system depressurization process. The results of the comparison and analyses in this study are important for recognizing and understanding the

  1. Comparative experiments to assess the effects of accumulator nitrogen injection on passive core cooling during small break LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, YuQuan; Hao, Botao; Zhong, Jia; Wan Nam [State Nuclear Power Technology R and D Center, South Park, Beijing Future Science and Technology City, Beijing (China)

    2017-02-15

    The accumulator is a passive safety injection device for emergency core cooling systems. As an important safety feature for providing a high-speed injection flow to the core by compressed nitrogen gas pressure during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), the accumulator injects its precharged nitrogen into the system after its coolant has been emptied. Attention has been drawn to the possible negative effects caused by such a nitrogen injection in passive safety nuclear power plants. Although some experimental work on the nitrogen injection has been done, there have been no comparative tests in which the effects on the system responses and the core safety have been clearly assessed. In this study, a new thermal hydraulic integral test facility—the advanced core-cooling mechanism experiment (ACME)—was designed and constructed to support the CAP1400 safety review. The ACME test facility was used to study the nitrogen injection effects on the system responses to the small break loss-of-coolant accident LOCA (SBLOCA) transient. Two comparison test groups—a 2-inch cold leg break and a double-ended direct-vessel-injection (DEDVI) line break—were conducted. Each group consists of a nitrogen injection test and a nitrogen isolation comparison test with the same break conditions. To assess the nitrogen injection effects, the experimental data that are representative of the system responses and the core safety were compared and analyzed. The results of the comparison show that the effects of nitrogen injection on system responses and core safety are significantly different between the 2-inch and DEDVI breaks. The mechanisms of the different effects on the transient were also investigated. The amount of nitrogen injected, along with its heat absorption, was likewise evaluated in order to assess its effect on the system depressurization process. The results of the comparison and analyses in this study are important for recognizing and understanding the potential negative

  2. LACOMERA - large scale experiments on core degradation, melt retention and coolability at the Forschungszentrum Karslruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miassoedov, A.; Alsmeyer, H.; Meyer, L.

    2003-01-01

    The LACOMERA project at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe is a 3 year shared-cost action within the Fifth Framework Programme which started in September 2002. The overall objectives of the LACOMERA project are to provide research institutions from the EU member countries and associated states access to large scale experimental facilities at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe which shall be used to increase the knowledge of the quenching of a degraded core and regaining melt coolability in the reactor pressure vessel, of possible melt dispersion to the cavity, of molten core concrete interaction and of ex-vessel melt coolability. One major aspect is to understand how these events affect the safety of European reactors so as to lead to soundly-based accident management procedures. The project will bring together interested partners of different European member states in the area of severe accident analysis and control, with the goal to increase the public confidence in the use of nuclear energy. Moreover, partners from the newly associated states should be included as far as possible, and therefore the needs of Eastern, as well as Western, reactors will be considered in LACOMERA project. The project offers a unique opportunity to get involved in the networks and activities supporting VVER safety, and for Eastern experts to get an access to large scale experimental facilities in a Western research organisation to improve understanding of material properties and core behaviour under severe accident conditions. As a result of the first call for proposals a project on air ingress test in the QUENCH facility has been selected. A second call for proposals is opened with a deadline of 31 December 2003. (author)

  3. Core design experience of WWER-440 reactors when they working on increased power level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeev, V.; Panov, A.; Melenchuk, I.

    2015-01-01

    The Kola NPP continues commercial operation of 2nd generation fuel (FA-2) and trial operation of 3rd generation fuel (FA-3), which has a number of design features providing the best operational characteristics. This report gives the results of VVER-440 core operation with FA-2 and FA-3 with enrichment increased up to 4.87%, and at the power level uprated to 107% of nominal power level. Brief analysis of obtained data is carried out. Peculiarities and techniques of developing loading patterns with new types of nuclear fuel for operation at the uprated power level are reviewed. (authors)

  4. Analysis of an out-of-pile experiment for materials redistribution under core disruptive accident condition of fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tetsuo; Ninokata, Hisashi; Shimizu, Akinao

    1995-01-01

    Calculation of one of the SIMBATH experiments was performed using the SIMMER-II code. The experiments were intended to simulate the fuel pin disintegration, the molten materials relocation and following materials redistribution that could occur during core disruptive accidents assumed in fast breeder reactors. The calculation by SIMMER-II showed that the incorporated step-wise fuel pin disintegration model and the modified particle jamming model were capable of reproducing the course of materials relocation within the identified ranges of the parameters which governed the blockages formation, i.e. the characteristic radius of solid particles jamming and/or sieving out in the flow and the effective particle viscosity. In particular the final materials redistribution calculated by SIMMER-II very well reproduced the experiment. This fact made it possible to interpret theoretically the mechanisms of flow blockages formation and related materials redistribution. (author)

  5. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240}Pu core experiments : a fast reactor core with mixed (Pu,U)-oxide fuel and a centeral high{sup 240}Pu zone.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, R. M.; Morman, J. A.; Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-23

    ZPR-6 Assembly 7 (ZPR-6/7) encompasses a series of experiments performed at the ZPR-6 facility at Argonne National Laboratory in 1970 and 1971 as part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program (Reference 1). Assembly 7 simulated a large sodium-cooled LMFBR with mixed oxide fuel, depleted uranium radial and axial blankets, and a core H/D near unity. ZPR-6/7 was designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, so configurations in the Assembly 7 program were as simple as possible in terms of geometry and composition. ZPR-6/7 had a very uniform core assembled from small plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and Pu-U-Mo alloy loaded into stainless steel drawers. The steel drawers were placed in square stainless steel tubes in the two halves of a split table machine. ZPR-6/7 had a simple, symmetric core unit cell whose neutronic characteristics were dominated by plutonium and {sup 238}U. The core was surrounded by thick radial and axial regions of depleted uranium to simulate radial and axial blankets and to isolate the core from the surrounding room. The ZPR-6/7 program encompassed 139 separate core loadings which include the initial approach to critical and all subsequent core loading changes required to perform specific experiments and measurements. In this context a loading refers to a particular configuration of fueled drawers, radial blanket drawers and experimental equipment (if present) in the matrix of steel tubes. Two principal core configurations were established. The uniform core (Loadings 1-84) had a relatively uniform core composition. The high {sup 240}Pu core (Loadings 85-139) was a variant on the uniform core. The plutonium in the Pu-U-Mo fuel plates in the uniform core contains 11% {sup 240}Pu. In the high {sup 240}Pu core, all Pu-U-Mo plates in the inner core region (central 61 matrix locations per half of the split table machine) were replaced by Pu-U-Mo plates containing 27% {sup 240}Pu in the plutonium

  6. Caramel fuel for research reactors: experience acquired in the fabrication, monitoring and irradiation of Osiris core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contenson, Ghislain de; Foulquier, Henri; Trotabas, Maria; Vignesoult, Nicole; Cerles, J.-M.; Delafosse, Jacques.

    1981-06-01

    A plate type nuclear fuel (Caramel fuel) has been developed in France in the framework of the various activities pursued in the design, fabrication and development of nuclear fuels by the CEA. This fuel can be adapted to various different categories of water cooled reactor (power reactors, marine propulsion reactors, urbain heating reactors, research reactors). The successful work conducted in this field led the realization of a complete core and reloads for the high performance research reactor, Osiris, at Saclay. The existing highly enriched U-Al alloy fuel was replaced by a non-proliferating low enrichment (7%) caramel fuel. This new core has been operating successfully since january 1980. A brief description of Caramel and its main advantages is given. The way in which it is fabricated is described together with the quality controls to which it is subjected. The qualification program and the main results deduced from it are also presented. The program used to monitor its in-pile behavior is described. The essential purpose of this program is to ensure the high performance of the fuel under irradiation. The successful operation of Osiris, which terminated 11 irradiation cycles on the 21st of April 1981 confirmed the correctness of the decisions made and the excellent performance that could be achieved with these fuel elements under the severe conditions encountered in a high performance research reactor [fr

  7. Results from core-edge experiments in high Power, high performance plasmas on DIII-D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.W. Petrie

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Significant challenges to reducing divertor heat flux in highly powered near-double null divertor (DND hybrid plasmas, while still maintaining both high performance metrics and low enough density for application of RF heating, are identified. For these DNDs on DIII-D, the scaling of the peak heat flux at the outer target (q⊥P ∝ [PSOL x IP] 0.92 for PSOL= 8−19MW and IP= 1.0–1.4MA, and is consistent with standard ITPA scaling for single-null H-mode plasmas. Two divertor heat flux reduction methods were tested. First, applying the puff-and-pump radiating divertor to DIII-D plasmas may be problematical at high power and H98 (≥ 1.5 due to improvement in confinement time with deuterium gas puffing which can lead to unacceptably high core density under certain conditions. Second, q⊥P for these high performance DNDs was reduced by ≈35% when an open divertor is closed on the common flux side of the outer divertor target (“semi-slot” but also that heating near the slot opening is a significant source for impurity contamination of the core.

  8. Experience with the upgraded VERONA-u WWER-440 core monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lux, I.; Vegh, J.; Adorjan, F.; Buerger, L.

    1994-01-01

    The paper describes the components, functioning and services of the VERONA-u core monitoring system recently installed at Unit 2 and 3 of the Hungarian Paks NPP. The VERONA-u is a totally upgraded and modernized version of the previous VERONA system, in the upgrading project the data-concentrator, the host computer and the operators' displays were replaced by state-of-the-art hardware and software components. Dual hardware redundancy and automatic function recovery actions were introduced in order to ensure high system availability. The man-machine interface has been redesigned completely, applying X Windows as Graphical User Interface. Improved core analysis and power reconstruction methods were introduced, together with a detailed hot-spot monitoring algorithm. A capable archivation module ensures periodic logging of all measured data, change sensitive storage of important signal changes and provides sophisticated post-mortem analysis tools. The upgraded system has been working satisfactorily on Unit 2 for a complete fuel cycle by now, the on-line system response in complex, transient situations is illustrated in the paper. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs

  9. Development of a standard data base for FBR core nuclear design. 9. Analysis of FCA XVII-1 experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kenji; Ishikawa, Makoto; Oigawa, Hiroyuki; Iijima, Susumu

    1998-10-01

    Pnc had developed the adjusted nuclear cross-section library in which the results of the Jupiter experiments were reflected. Using this adjusted library, the distinct improvement of the accuracy in nuclear design of Fbr cores had been achieved. As a recent research, JNC develops a database of other integral data in addition to the JUPITER experiments, aiming at further improvement for accuracy and reliability. In this report, the authors describe the evaluation of the C/E values and the sensitivity analysis for FCA XVII-1 assembly. FCA XVII-1 is a representative mock-up of a MOX fuel sodium cooling FBR core. The criticality, reaction rate ratio, sodium void reactivity worth and 238 U Doppler reactivity worth of FCA XVII-1 were analyzed. The results of C/E values calculated by the standard analytical method for JUPITER experiments are similar to those calculated by the method of JAERI, except for the sodium void reactivity. So, further investigation for sodium void reactivity is necessary. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis shows the characteristics of FCA XVII-1 in comparison with ZPPR-9. (author)

  10. Staying True to the Core: Designing the Future Academic Library Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2014, the practice of user experience design in academic libraries continues to evolve. It is typically applied in the context of interactions with digital interfaces. Some academic librarians are applying user experience approaches more broadly to design both environments and services with human-centered strategies. As the competition for the…

  11. Core Flooding Experiments and Reactive Transport Modeling of Seasonal Heat Storage in the Hot Deep Gassum Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmslykke, Hanne D.; Kjøller, Claus; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal storage of excess heat in hot deep aquifers is considered to optimize the usage of commonly available energy sources. The chemical effects of heating the Gassum Sandstone Formation to up to 150 degrees C is investigated by combining laboratory core flooding experiments with petrographic...... analysis and geochemical modeling. Synthetic formation water is injected into two sets of Gassum Formation samples at 25, 50 (reservoir temperature), 100, and 150 degrees C with a velocity of 0.05 and 0.1 PV/h, respectively. Results show a significant increase in the aqueous concentration of silicium...

  12. Active core profile and transport modification by application of ion Bernstein wave power in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, B.; Batha, S.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Blush, L.; de la Luna, E.; Doerner, R.; Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Garcia, I.; Ignat, D.; Isler, R.; Jones, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; Levinton, F.; Luckhardt, S.; Mutoh, T.; Okabayashi, M.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S.; Petravich, G.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Sauthoff, N.; Schmitz, L.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; Talvard, M.; Tighe, W.; Tynan, G.; von Goeler, S.; Woskov, P.; Zolfaghari, A.

    1995-03-01

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) [Phys. Fluids B 2, 1271 (1990)] tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH-assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large ∇ne, ∇Te, ∇νφ, and ∇Ti, delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high) mode, but with a confinement zone moved inward. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhances NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central Ti results from χi reduction (compared to the H mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32-0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma.

  13. Active core profile and transport modification by application of ion Bernstein wave power in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, B.; Batha, S.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Blush, L.; de la Luna, E.; Doerner, R.; Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Garcia, I.; Ignat, D.; Isler, R.; Jones, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; Levinton, F.; Luckhardt, S.; Mutoh, T.; Okabayashi, M.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S.; Petravich, G.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Sauthoff, N.; Schmitz, L.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; Talvard, M.; Tighe, W.; Tynan, G.; von Goeler, S.; Woskov, P.; Zolfaghari, A.

    1995-01-01

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) [Phys. Fluids B 2, 1271 (1990)] tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH-assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large ∇n e , ∇T e , ∇ν φ , and ∇T i , delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high) mode, but with a confinement zone moved inward. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhances NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central T i results from χ i reduction (compared to the H mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32--0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma

  14. Refractometric sensitivity and thermal stabilization of fluorescent core microcapillary sensors: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, S; Marsiglio, F; Zhi, Y; Meldrum, A

    2015-02-20

    Fluorescent-core microcapillaries (FCMs) present a robust basis for the application of optical whispering gallery modes toward refractometric sensing. An important question concerns whether these devices can be rendered insensitive to local temperature fluctuations, which may otherwise limit their refractometric detection limits, mainly as a result of thermorefractive effects. Here, we first use a standard cylindrical cavity formalism to develop the refractometric and thermally limited detection limits for the FCM structure. We then measure the thermal response of a real device with different analytes in the channel and compare the result to the theory. Good stability against temperature fluctuations was obtained for an ethanol solvent, with a near-zero observed thermal shift for the transverse magnetic modes. Similarly good results could in principle be obtained for any other solvent (e.g., water), if the thickness of the fluorescent layer can be sufficiently well controlled.

  15. Colombian experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation of medtronic CoreValve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dager, Antonio E; Nuis, Rutger-Jan; Caicedo, Bernardo; Fonseca, Jaime A; Arana, Camilo; Cruz, Lidsa; Benitez, Luis M; Nader, Carlos A; Duenas, Eduardo; de Marchena, Eduardo J; O'Neill, William W; de Jaegere, Peter P

    2012-01-01

    At our institutions, increasing numbers of aortic stenosis patients were not candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement. Accordingly, we initiated the Cali Colombian Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) program. From March 2008 through January 2011, 53 consecutive patients (mean age, 79 ± 6 yr; men, 58%) underwent TAVI with the Medtronic CoreValve System, and data were prospectively collected. Our study's endpoints conformed with Valve Academic Research Consortium recommendations. We report our clinical results.Predicted mortality rates were 25% (interquartile range, 17%-34%) according to logistic EuroSCORE and 6% (interquartile range, 3%-8%) according to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons score. The 30-day mortality rate was 9% (3 intraprocedural deaths, 5 total). The combined 30-day safety endpoint was 30% (major vascular sequelae, 23%; life-threatening bleeding, 12%; myocardial infarction, 4%; major stroke, 4%; and acute kidney injury [stage 3], 2%). Eight patients (15%) required post-implantation balloon dilation and 2 (4%) required valve-in-valve implantation, for a technical device success rate of 77%. Mean peak transvalvular gradient decreased from 74 ± 29 to 17 ± 8 mmHg and mean transvalvular gradient from 40 ± 17 to 8 ± 4 mmHg (both P=0.001). Moderate or severe aortic regurgitation decreased from 32% to 18% (P=0.12) and mitral regurgitation from 32% to 13% (P=0.002). The 1-year survival rate was 81%.We found that TAVI with the CoreValve prosthesis was safe and feasible, with sustained long-term results, for treating aortic stenosis in patients at excessive surgical risk; nonetheless, serious adverse events occurred in 30% of the patients.

  16. LMFBR operational and experimental in-core local-fault experience, primarily with oxide fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warinner, D.K.

    Case-by-case reviews of selective world experience with severe local faults, particularly fuel failure and fuel degradation, are reviewed for two sodium-cooled thermal reactors, several LMFBRs, and LMFBR-fuels experiments. The review summarizes fuel-failure frequency and illustrates the results of the most damaging LMFBR local-fault experiences of the last 20 years beginning with BR-5 and including DFR, BOR-60, BR2's MFBS-and Mol-loops experiments, Fermi, KNK, Rapsodie, EBR-II, and TREAT-D2. Local-fault accommodation is demonstrated and a need to more thoroughly investigate delayed-neutron and gaseous-fission-product signals is highlighted in view of uranate formation, observed blockages, and slow fuel-element failure-propagation

  17. Performance of core exit thermocouple for PWR accident management action in vessel top break LOCA simulation experiment at OECD/NEA ROSA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    Presented are experiment results of the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) conducted at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) with a focus on core exit thermocouple (CET) performance to detect core overheat during a vessel top break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation experiment. The CET temperatures are used to start accident management (AM) action to quickly depressurize steam generator (SG) secondary side in case of core temperature excursion. Test 6-1 is first test of the OECD/NEA ROSA Project started in 2005, simulating withdraw of a control rod drive mechanism penetration nozzle at the vessel top head. The break size is equivalent to 1.9% cold leg break. The AM action was initiated when CET temperature rose up to 623K. There was no reflux water fallback onto the CETs during the core heat-up period. The core overheat, however, was detected with a time delay of about 230s. In addition, a large temperature discrepancy was observed between the CETs and the hottest core region. This paper clarifies the reason of time delay and temperature discrepancy between the CETs and heated core during boil-off including three-dimensional steam flows in the core and core exit. The paper discusses applicability of the LSTF CET performance to pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions and a possibility of alternative indicators for earlier AM action than in Test 6-1 is studied by using symptom-based plant parameters such as a reactor vessel water level detection. (author)

  18. Survey of core medical trainees in the United Kingdom 2013 - inconsistencies in training experience and competing with service demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Fiona; Newbery, Nina; Burr, Bill; Goddard, Andrew F

    2014-04-01

    There is currently considerable concern about the attractiveness of hospital medicine as a career and experiences in core medical training (CMT) are a key determinant of whether trainees continue in the medical specialties. Little is understood about the quality and impact of the current CMT programme and this survey was designed to assess this. Three key themes emerged. Firstly, the demands of providing service have led to considerable loss of training opportunities, particularly in outpatients and formal teaching sessions. Trainees spend a lot of this service time doing menial tasks and over 90% report that service takes up 80-100% of their time. Secondly, clinical and educational supervision is variable, with trainees sometimes getting little consultant feedback on their clinical performance. Finally, 44% of trainees report that CMT has not prepared them to be a medical registrar and many trainees are put off acute medical specialties by their experiences in CMT.

  19. Experiment data report for semiscale MOD-1 test S-01-3 (isothermal blowdown with core resistance simulator)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zender, S.N.

    1975-03-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Test S-01-3 of the semiscale Mod-1 isothermal blowdown test series. Test S-01-3 is one of several semiscale Mod-1 experiments which are counterparts of the planned Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) nonnuclear experiments. System hardware is of the LOFT design, selected using volumetric scaling methods, and initial conditions duplicate those identified for the LOFT nonnuclear tests. Test S-01-3 employed an intact loop resistance that was low relative to that of the first test in the series (Test S-01-2) to establish the importance of intact loop resistance on system response during blowdown. An orificed structure was used in the pressure vessel to simulate the LOFT core simulator. The test was initiated at isothermal conditions of 2245 psig and 538 0 F by a simulated offset shear of the cold-leg broken loop piping. During system depressurization, coolant was injected into the lower plenum of the pressure vessel to provide data on the effects of emergency core cooling on system response. Additionally, to aid in determination of the effects of accumulator gas on pressure suppression system response, the nitrogen used to charge the accumulator systems for Test S-01-3 was allowed to vent into the lower plenum following depletion of the coolant. (U.S.)

  20. Experiment data report for semiscale Mod-1 Test S-01-5 (isothermal blowdown with core resistance simulator)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zender, S.N.; Crapo, H.S.; Jensen, M.F.; Sackett, K.E.

    1975-04-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Test S-01-5 of the semiscale Mod-1 isothermal blowdown test series. Test S-01-5 is one of several semiscale Mod-1 experiments which are counterparts of the LOFT nonnuclear experiments. System hardware is representative of LOFT with the design based on volumetric scaling methods and with initial conditions duplicating those identified for LOFT nonnuclear tests. Test S-01-5 was conducted with the secondary side of the steam generator pressurized with nitrogen gas in order to effectively eliminate heat transfer from the steam generator during blowdown and thereby to investigate the effect on overall system behavior of heat transfer from the steam generator. An orificed structure was used in the pressure vessel to simulate the LOFT core simulator. The test was initiated at isothermal conditions of 2270 psig and 540 0 F by a simulated offset shear of the cold leg broken loop piping. During system depressurization, coolant was injected into the cold leg of the operating loop to simulate emergency core cooling (ECC). Following the blowdown portion of the test, coolant spray was introduced into the pressure suppression tank to determine the response of the pressure suppression system. The uninterpreted data from Test S-01-5 and the reference material needed for future data analysis and test results reporting activities are presented. The data, presented in the form of graphs in engineering units, have been analyzed only to the extent necessary to assure that they are reasonable and consistent. (U.S.)

  1. Critical experiment program of heterogeneous core composed for LWR fuel rods and low enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Shouichi; Nakamura, Takemi

    2003-01-01

    In order to stimulate the criticality characteristics of a dissolver in a reprocessing plant, a critical experiment program of heterogeneous cores is under going at a Static Critical Experimental Facility, STACY in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, JAERI. The experimental system is composed of 5w/o enriched PWR-type fuel rod array immersed in 6w/o enriched uranyl nitrate solution. First series of experiments are basic benchmark experiments on fundamental critical data in order to validate criticality calculation codes for 'general-form system' classified in the Japanese Criticality Safety Handbook, JCSHB. Second series of experiments are concerning the neutron absorber effects of fission products related to the burn-up credit Level-2. For demonstrating the reactivity effects of fission products, reactivity effects of natural elements such as Sm, Nd, Eu and 103 Rh, 133 Cs, solved in the nitrate solution are to be measured. The objective of third series of experiments is to validate the effect of gadolinium as a soluble neutron poison. Properties of temperature coefficients and kinetic parameters are also studied, since these parameters are important to evaluate the transient behavior of the criticality accident. (author)

  2. Conceptual design for an air core 2 meg-amp reversed field experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, C.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Los Alamos CTR Division is involved in the conceptual design of a next phase Reversed Field Pinch experiment. The paper will discuss, in general, some of the physics questions that the experiment will address. Also in more detail it will discuss the engineering parameters and the possible hardware design solutions. The experiment is designed to produce a plasma current of about 2 MA which can be sustained for about 200 ms. The electrical energy for the system is provided by a large motor generator set. An inductive energy store is used to drive the magnetizing and poloidal field windings. A capacitor bank provides the energy for the toroidal field windings. The current in both circuits is maintained by using SCR controlled transformer rectifiers

  3. Conceptual design for an AIR CORE 2 MEG-AMP Reversed field experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, C.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Los Alamos CTR Division is involved in the conceptual design of a next phase Reversed Field Pinch experiment. The paper will discuss, in general, some of the physics questions that the experiment will address. Also in more detail it will discuss the engineering parameters and the possible hardware design solutions. The experiment is designed to produce a plasma current of about 2 MA which can be sustained for about 200 ms. The electrical energy for the system is provided by a large motor generator set. An inductive energy store is used to drive the magnetizing and poloidal field windings. A capacitor bank provides the energy for the toroidal field windings. The current in both circuits is maintained by using SCR controlled transformer rectifiers

  4. Modelling small scale infiltration experiments into bore cores of crystalline rock and break-through curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadermann, J.; Jakob, A.

    1987-04-01

    Uranium infiltration experiments for small samples of crystalline rock have been used to model radionuclide transport. The theory, taking into account advection and dispersion in water conducting zones, matrix diffusion out of these, and sorption, contains four independent parameters. It turns out, that the physical variables extracted from those of the best-fit parameters are consistent with values from literature and independent measurements. Moreover, the model results seem to differentiate between various geometries for the water conducting zones. Alpha-autoradiographies corroborate this result. A sensitivity analysis allows for a judgement on parameter dependences. Finally some proposals for further experiments are made. (author)

  5. XPS and EPXMA investigation and chemical speciation of aerosol samples formed in LWR core melting experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moers, H.; Jenett, H.; Kaufmann, R.; Klewe-Nebenius, H.; Pfennig, G.; Ache, H.J.

    1985-09-01

    Aerosol samples consisting of fission products and elements of light water reactor structural materials were collected during simulating in a laboratory scale the heat-up phase of a core melt accident. The aerosol particles were formed in a steam atmosphere at temperatures between 1200 and 1900 0 C of the melting charge. The investigation of the samples by use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) permitted the chemical speciation of the detected aerosol constituents silver, cadmium, indium, tellurium, iodine, and cesium. A comparison of the elemental analysis results obtained from XPS with those achieved from electron probe X-ray micro analysis (EPXMA) revealed that aerosol particle surface and aerosol particle bulk are principally composed of the same elements and that these compositions vary with release temperature. In addition, quantitative differences between the composition of surface and bulk have only been observed for those aerosol samples which were collected at higher melting charge temperatures. In order to obtain direct information on chemical species below the surface selected samples were argon ion bombarded. Changes in composition and chemistry were monitored by XPS, and the results were interpreted in light of the effects, which were observed when appropriate standard samples were sputtered. (orig.) [de

  6. The La Verne Experience: A Common Core for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Devorah

    2014-01-01

    The lasting sense of connection that a graduate feels for his or her alma mater is often rooted in those especially memorable aspects of the college experience--the times spent bonding with friends and faculty, practicing and playing on athletic teams, collaborating with professors on research, and serving as leaders in student government. Such…

  7. Ex-vessel boiling experiments: laboratory- and reactor-scale testing of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention. Pt. II. Reactor-scale boiling experiments of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.H.; Slezak, S.E.; Pasedag, W.F.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., p.77-88 (1997). This paper summarizes the results of a reactor-scale ex-vessel boiling experiment for assessing the flooded cavity design of the heavy water new production reactor. The simulated reactor vessel has a cylindrical diameter of 3.7 m and a torispherical bottom head. Boiling outside the reactor vessel was found to be subcooled nucleate boiling. The subcooling mainly results from the gravity head, which in turn results from flooding the side of the reactor vessel. The boiling process exhibits a cyclic pattern with four distinct phases: direct liquid-solid contact, bubble nucleation and growth, coalescence, and vapor mass dispersion. The results show that, under prototypic heat load and heat flux distributions, the flooded cavity will be effective for in-vessel core retention in the heavy water new production reactor. The results also demonstrate that the heat dissipation requirement for in-vessel core retention, for the central region of the lower head of an AP-600 advanced light water reactor, can be met with the flooded cavity design. (orig.)

  8. CODEX-B4C experiment. Core degradation test with boron carbide control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hozer, Z.; Nagy, I.; Windberg, P.; Balasko, M.; Matus, L.; Prokopiev, O.; Pinter, A.; Horvath, M.; Gyenes, Gy.; Czitrovszky, A.; Nagy, A.; Jani, P.

    2003-11-01

    The CODEX-B4C bundle test has been successfully performed on 25 th May 2001 in the framework of the COLOSS project of the EU 5 th FWP. The high temperature degradation of a VVER-1000 type bundle with B 4 C control rod was investigated with electrically heated fuel rods. The experiment was carried out according to a scenario selected in favour of methane formation. Degradation of control rod and fuel bundle took place at temperatures ∼2000 deg C, cooling down of the bundle was performed in steam atmosphere. The gas composition measurement indicated no methane production during the experiment. High release of aerosols was detected in the high temperature oxidation phase. The on-line measured data are collected into a database and are available for code validation and development. (author)

  9. CODEX-B4C experiment. Core degradation test with boron carbide control rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hozer, Z; Nagy, I; Windberg, P; Balasko, M; Matus, L; Prokopiev, O; Pinter, A; Horvath, M; Gyenes, Gy [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, Budapest (Hungary); Czitrovszky, A; Nagy, A; Jani, P [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Budapest (Hungary)

    2003-11-01

    The CODEX-B4C bundle test has been successfully performed on 25{sup th} May 2001 in the framework of the COLOSS project of the EU 5{sup th} FWP. The high temperature degradation of a VVER-1000 type bundle with B{sub 4}C control rod was investigated with electrically heated fuel rods. The experiment was carried out according to a scenario selected in favour of methane formation. Degradation of control rod and fuel bundle took place at temperatures {approx}2000 deg C, cooling down of the bundle was performed in steam atmosphere. The gas composition measurement indicated no methane production during the experiment. High release of aerosols was detected in the high temperature oxidation phase. The on-line measured data are collected into a database and are available for code validation and development. (author)

  10. Effect of capillary number on the oil recovery using oil-water emulsion injection in core flooding experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillen Nunez, Victor Raul; Carvalho, Marcio da Silveira [Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], E-mail: msn@puc-rio.br; Basante, Vladimir Alvarado [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Chemical/Petroleum Engineering], E-mail: valvard@uwyo.edu

    2010-07-01

    The Water injection flooding is a common method to improve reservoir sweep and pressure maintenance. The heavy-oil-recovery efficiency is in part limited by the high water-to-oil mobility ratio. Several enhanced oil recovery methods are being developed as more efficient alternatives to water flooding. Dispersion injection, in particular oil-water emulsion injection, has been tried with relative success as an enhanced oil recovery method, but the technique is not fully developed or understood. If emulsion injection proves to be an effective EOR method, its use would bring the added benefit of disposing produced water with small oil content that could be modified to serve as the injected oil-water emulsion. The use of such methods requires a detailed analysis of the different flow regimes of emulsions through the porous space of a reservoir rock. If the drop size of the disperse phase is of the same order of magnitude as the pore size, the drops may agglomerate and partially block water flow through pores. This flow regime may be used to control the mobility of the injected liquid, leading to higher recovery factor. We have shown in recent experiments of oil displacement in a sandstone core that, the oil recovery factor could be raised from approximately 40 %, obtained with water injection only, up to approximately 75 % by alternating water and emulsion injection. Although these results clearly show the improvement in the recovery factor, the mechanisms responsible for the phenomenon have not been clearly elucidated. In this work, two sandstone cores were used to demonstrate the effect of flow rate (capillary number) on the mobility control by emulsion injection. Figure 1 shows a schematic representation of the experiment set-up. The experiments show that raising the flow rate by a factor of 10 (0.03 ml/min to 0.3 ml/min), the oil recovered factor decreases considerably. (author)

  11. Experiments on determination and limitation of fission and activation product release during core meltdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, H; Krause, W; Wild, H [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Radiochemie; Perinic, D; Kammerer, B; Knauss, H; Mack, A; Stuka, B [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Reaktorbetrieb und Technik; Osborne, M F

    1976-06-01

    In melting experiments with Corium samples of 500 g under air, temperatures of about 2,300/sup 0/C could be reached whereas 500 g samples of Ni could be heated in argon up to only 1,400/sup 0/C. Obviously, the exothermic oxidation reaction of the zircaloy and steel is the reason for that considerable rise of the Corium temperature in air. Using smaller Ni samples (30 g) the maximum HF-power being coupled to the melt material has been determined by measuring the time of constant temperature at the melting point with the generator at full power. The thermal power effectively transmitted to the specimen was only 1.2 KW. Thus, for melting kg-amounts of Corium, a higher generator power is needed as well as a more effective HF-coupling. The rented generator now in use will be replaced, therefore, by a device with a nominal power of 120 KW, and the power transmission to the induction coil will be improved. The first series of release experiments with 30-60 g of Corium will not be affected by these changes. Melting experiments with various steel components (Fe, Cr, Ni) in an argon atmosphere and with Corium under air did not show any selective influence of the vapors on the intensities of the wavelengths used for the temperature measurement. The behavior of a spherical glass vessel above the crucible was quite satisfactory. After melting tests with temperatures of more than 2,700/sup 0/C it was not broken nor did it show any appearance of softening.

  12. Large-scale boiling experiments of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Slezak, S.E.; Bentz, J.H.; Pasedag, W.F.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents results of ex-vessel boiling experiments performed in the CYBL (CYlindrical BoiLing) facility. CYBL is a reactor-scale facility for confirmatory research of the flooded cavity concept for accident management. CYBL has a tank-within-a-tank design; the inner tank simulates the reactor vessel and the outer tank simulates the reactor cavity. Experiments with uniform and edge-peaked heat flux distributions up to 20 W/cm 2 across the vessel bottom were performed. Boiling outside the reactor vessel was found to be subcooled nucleate boiling. The subcooling is mainly due to the gravity head which results from flooding the sides of the reactor vessel. The boiling process exhibits a cyclic pattern with four distinct phases: direct liquid/solid contact, bubble nucleation and growth, coalescence, and vapor mass dispersion (ejection). The results suggest that under prototypic heat load and heat flux distributions, the flooded cavity in a passive pressurized water reactor like the AP-600 should be capable of cooling the reactor pressure vessel in the central region of the lower head that is addressed by these tests

  13. Burnout experiments in freon 12 using different types of orifices to simulate the core grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladeira, L.; Katsaounis, A.; Orlowski, R.; Fulfs, H.; Hofmann, K.

    1978-01-01

    This paper will report on burnout experiments carried out in freon 12 mainly at steady state and further at mass flow or power transient conditions with annular test sections axially uniformly heating either the inside or both the inside and outside rod. The runs are performed without orifice and using three different types of orifices simulating the reactor spacer grid. An important influence of the flow restriction on burnout position and value is measured. Furthermore, the comparison between the burnout correlations W2, W3, B and W2 and GE and experimental results from the literature using simple test section geometries in water and freon 12 demonstrate, that the accuracy is more or less comparable for both fluids. (orig.) [de

  14. Turbulent-flow split model and supporting experiments for wire-wrapped core assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.; Todreas, N.; Rohsenow, W.

    1978-04-01

    A flow split model for the turbulent flow in a wire-wrapped nuclear fuel rod assembly is developed taking the form drag and sweeping flow between subchannels into consideration. This model is applicable to the flow distribution between two types of subchannels, i.e., interior and edge subchannels. The constants in this model for each type of subchannel were determined using all experimental data in the literature and the results of two tests performed as part of this study to fill a gap in the available literature. These experiments to measure flow split were performed on two wire-wrapped 61 pin bundles of pin pitch to pin diameter ratio, P/D, equal to 1.063 and wire lead to pin diameter ratios, H/D, of 4 and 8. The predictions of this model match all experimental data in the literature within +- 5%

  15. A three-dimensional stratigraphic model for aggrading submarine channels based on laboratory experiments, numerical modeling, and sediment cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, A. B.; Komatsu, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Paola, C.

    2017-12-01

    Turbidity currents deliver clastic sediment from continental margins to the deep ocean, and are the main driver of landscape and stratigraphic evolution in many low-relief, submarine environments. The sedimentary architecture of turbidites—including the spatial organization of coarse and fine sediments—is closely related to the aggradation, scour, and lateral shifting of channels. Seismic stratigraphy indicates that submarine, meandering channels often aggrade rapidly relative to lateral shifting, and develop channel sand bodies with high vertical connectivity. In comparison, the stratigraphic architecture developed by submarine, braided is relatively uncertain. We present a new stratigraphic model for submarine braided channels that integrates predictions from laboratory experiments and flow modeling with constraints from sediment cores. In the laboratory experiments, a saline density current developed subaqueous channels in plastic sediment. The channels aggraded to form a deposit with a vertical scale of approximately five channel depths. We collected topography data during aggradation to (1) establish relative stratigraphic age, and (2) estimate the sorting patterns of a hypothetical grain size distribution. We applied a numerical flow model to each topographic surface and used modeled flow depth as a proxy for relative grain size. We then conditioned the resulting stratigraphic model to observed grain size distributions using sediment core data from the Nankai Trough, offshore Japan. Using this stratigraphic model, we establish new, quantitative predictions for the two- and three-dimensional connectivity of coarse sediment as a function of fine-sediment fraction. Using this case study as an example, we will highlight outstanding challenges in relating the evolution of low-relief landscapes to the stratigraphic record.

  16. Experience in handling core subassemblies in sodium cooled reactor KNK and test rigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Althaus; Jansing; Kesseler; Kirchner; Menck

    1974-01-01

    Compared with a water cooled reactor plant a sodium cooled reactor plant presents a number of problems which result from the specific nature of sodium. These problems that must be faced during all handling operations are mainly: 1. The rapid reaction of sodium in air requires handling to be done only under cover gas. 2. The temperature of all sodium-wetted components is to be kept above the melting point of sodium. 3. Poor draining of removed reactor components due to the high surface tension of sodium and the associated danger of dripping radioactive sodium may produce radiation or contamination problems. 4. Sodium is not transparent. The sum of these and further influences dictate that the general handling usually is carried out without visual means, though a method is under development in the USA to use ultrasonic for under sodium 'viewing'. These limitations to sodium component handling are applicable to all sodium reactor plants, several of which are discussed in this report. After the description of the handling systems of the KNK plant now operating at Karlsruhe, the experience with the SNR test rig and finally the handling systems for SNR 300 and SNR 2 are discussed

  17. Adsorbate-enhanced chemisorption in the CO/Re(001) system: Experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, O.M.; Chacham, I.; Asscher, M.; Ben-Shaul, A.

    1989-01-01

    The chemisorption kinetics of CO molecules on Re(001) crystal surface was studied by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments in the crystal temperature range of 80-360 K. Correlation was found between the population of the tightly bound, partially dissociated, β-CO state and the less tightly bound α-CO state; basically, the α-state starts to populate when the β-sites approach saturation. Furthermore, the increase in β-CO coverage is accompanied by an increase in the overall sticking probability, as well as in the nonmonotonic coverage dependence of the peak desorption temperature of the α-state. The chemisorption kinetics was found to be crystal temperature independent. LEED analysis reveals that the CO overlayer is disordered, as reported previously. A theoretical model is proposed to account for the above observations. In this model, the β-sites are treated as traps for mobile α-CO admolecules. Occupied β-sites then serve as nucleation centers for enhanced, extrinsic precursor-mediated, chemisorption and island growth. The nonmonotonic variation of α-CO adsorption energy, and the appearance of a shoulder in the α-CO TPD peak at high coverages, are explained by a lattice gas model, incorporating repulsive nearest-neighbor and attractive next-nearest-neighbor lateral interactions between the chemisorbed molecules

  18. Mass transfer experiments for the heat load during in-vessel retention of core melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hae Kyun; Chung, Bum Jin [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    We investigated the heat load imposed on the lower head of a reactor vessel by the natural convection of the oxide pool in a severe accident. Mass transfer experiments using a CuSO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} electroplating system were performed based on the analogy between heat and mass transfer. The Ra′{sub H} of 10{sup 14} order was achieved with a facility height of only 0.1 m. Three different volumetric heat sources were compared; two had identical configurations to those previously reported, and the other was designed by the authors. The measured Nu's of the lower head were about 30% lower than those previously reported. The measured angular heat flux ratios were similar to those reported in existing studies except for the peaks appearing near the top. The volumetric heat sources did not affect the Nu of the lower head but affected the Nu of the top plate by obstructing the rising flow from the bottom.

  19. The nuclear core of sun: theoretical perspectives and characterization of the scientific performances of the GOLF / SOHO experiment detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzitko, H.

    1995-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the nuclear core of the sun. The first part is theoretical and concerns neutrino flux predictions. A precise description of the solar plasma is necessary to predict boron, beryllium and CNO cycle neutrinos. We treat here the nuclear reaction rates. They are mainly determined by the cross sections and the enhancement factors due to plasma particles, the co-called screening factors. We have discussed the various possible formalisms that could be used in stellar evolution and performed direct calculations of screened cross sections. We concluded that the screening prescriptions which have been used so far in stellar evolution should be replaced by the Mitler formalism. Next, we examine the cross section uncertainties and we show that it is possible to get a better agreement between theory and experiment. Discrepancies between the gallium experiments and the calculations suggest that we should go beyond the classical solar model. This has motivated our study on possible magnetic fields deeply buried in the solar core. We discuss here the influence of a magnetic pressure perturbation on solar evolution. In the experimental part of this work, we deal with the GOLF experiment, one of the three helio-seismological experiments on board the space probe SOHO. The purpose of this instrument is the study of the global oscillation modes in the frequency range 10 -7 to 6 10 -3 Hz with a sensitivity for frequencies higher than 2 10 -4 Hz of about 1 mm/s over 20 days of continuous integration at counting rates of 12 10 6 cs/s. One part of this work was devoted to the precise characterization of the photomultipliers and their associated electronics in order to select them according to their intrinsic performances. This step was followed by long duration tests of three weeks simulating as well as possible the flight conditions. We show that the detection chain effectively meets the stability requirements of around 10 -7 by velocity measurement. We also

  20. The results of the CCI-3 reactor material experiment investigating 2-D core-concrete interaction and debris coolability with a siliceous concrete crucible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Basu, S.

    2006-01-01

    The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis with the objectives of resolving the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. Despite years of international research, there are remaining uncertainties in the models that evaluate the lateral vs. axial power split during core-concrete interaction because of a lack of truly two-dimensional experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. In the continuing effort to bridge this data gap, the third in a series of large scale Core-Concrete Interaction experiments (CCI-3) has been conducted as part of the MCCI program. This test involved the interaction of a 375 kg core-oxide melt within a two-dimensional siliceous concrete crucible. The initial phase of the test was conducted under dry conditions. After a predetermined ablation depth was reached, the cavity was flooded to obtain data on the coolability of a core melt after core-concrete interaction has progressed for some time. This paper provides a summary description of the test facility and an overview of test results

  1. Evaluation of nuclear characteristics of minor actinide loaded core. Analyses of BFS-69 and BFS-66-2 critical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazama, Taira; Sato, Wakaei

    2010-09-01

    Collaboration with Russian Institute of Physics and Power Engineering named 'Investigation of neutronic-physical characteristics and their change when introducing large quantity of neptunium (Np) at different BFS critical assemblies' has been accomplished. This is the second report of the collaboration to describe experimental information and analysis results on BFS-69 and BFS-66-2 critical experiments. In the experiments, various nuclear characteristics were measured in 2 kinds of cores with/without Np loading of about 8 kg. JAEA's standard analysis results were presented with four kinds of nuclear data (JENDL-3.2, JENDL-3.3, JENDL/AC-2008, and ENDF/BVII). Analytical results show: 1) An overestimation trend has been observed in BFS-69 criticality results, especially with JENDL-3.3 and JENDL/AC-2008. The difference from ENDF/B-II having better results mainly lies in the average cosine of the scattering angle around 1 MeV. 2) A small discrepancy exists in BFS-69 Na void reactivity results with the three JENDL nuclear data. The difference from ENDF/B-II mainly lies in scattering cross sections of sodium around 1 MeV and fission cross section of 239 Pu around 1 keV. 3) The analysis results simulate measured Np effects on nuclear characteristics within experimental errors. (author)

  2. Initial experiences in embedding core competency education in entry-level surgery residents through a nonclinical rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahol, Kanav; Huston, Carrie; Hamann, Jessica; Ferrara, John J

    2011-03-01

    Health care continues to expand in scope and in complexity. In this changing environment, residents are challenged with understanding its intricacies and the impact it will have on their professional activities and careers. Embedding each of the competency elements in residents in a meaningful way remains a challenge for many surgery residency program directors. We established a nonclinical rotation to provide surgery postgraduate year-1 (PGY-1) residents with a structured, multifaceted, largely self-directed curriculum into which each of the 6 core competencies are woven. Posttesting strategies were established for most curricular experiences to ensure to the greatest possible extent that each resident will have achieved an acceptable level of understanding of each of the competency areas before being given credit for the rotation. By uniformly exceeding satisfactory scores on respective objective analyses, residents demonstrated an increased (at least short-term) understanding of each of the assessed competency areas. Our project sought to address a prior lack of opportunity for our residents to develop a sound foundation for our residents in systems-based practice. Our new rotation addresses systems-based practice in several different learning environments, including emergency medical service ride-along, sentinel event participation, and hospice visits. Several research projects have enhanced the overall learning program. Our experience shows that a rotation dedicated to competency training can provide an innovative and engaging means of teaching residents the value of each element.

  3. Experiments on graphite block gaps connected with leak flow in bottom-core structure of experimental very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Takizuka, Takakazu; Kaburaki, Hideo; Sanokawa, Konomo

    1984-01-01

    In order to minimize the leak flow rate of an experimental VHTR (a multi-purpose very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor), the graphite blocks are tightened to reduce the gap distance between blocks by core restrainers surrounded outside of the fixed reflectors of the bottom-core structure and seal elements are placed in the gaps. By using a 1/2.75-scale model of the bottom-core structure, the experiments on the following items have been carried out: a relationship between core restraint force and block gap, a relationship between core restraint force and inclined angle of the model, leak flow characteristics of seal elements etc. The conclusions derived from the experiments are as follows: (1) Core restraint force is significantly effective for decreasing the gap distance between hot plenum blocks, but ineffective for the gap between hot plenum block and fixed reflector. (2) Graphite seal element reduces the leak flow rate from the top surface of hot plenum block into plenum region to one-third. (author)

  4. ROSA/LSTF experiment report for RUN SB-CL-24 repeated core heatup phenomena during 0.5% cold leg break LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Anoda, Yoshinari [Department of Reactor Safety Research, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    A small break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) in a Westinghouse-type four-loop PWR was simulated in an experiment (SB-CL-24) conducted at the Large-Scale Test Facility (LSTF) with an intention to study repeated core heatup during a long-term cooldown process. The experiment was conducted on February 28, 1990 with specified test conditions including failure assumptions both on the high pressure injection (HPI) and the auxiliary feedwater systems, and the intentional secondary system depressurization as an operator action. The secondary depressurization contributed to promote the primary depressurization and the actuation of accumulator injection system (AIS). A temporary core heatup was observed in each of three loopseal clearing (LSC) processes. A significant core heatup occurred in the following boil-off process after loss of the secondary coolant mass and the AIS termination due to increase of the primary pressure. By additional opening of the pressurizer relief valves and safety valves, the primary pressure rapidly decreased to result in the low pressure injection (LPI) which cooled the heated core. This report summarizes results of the experiment (SB-CL-24) in addition to typical responses of some accident indication systems including the core exit thermocouples (CETs) and the water level meters in the primary system. (author)

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic behaviour during core transport barrier experiments with ion Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M: I ELMs fluctuations and crash events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesnic, S.; Kaita, R.; Batha, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    If the ion Bernstein wave (IBW) heating power in an H mode discharge of the PBX-M experiment exceeds a threshold power of about 200 kW, a core transport barrier is created in the central region of the plasma. At lower neutral beam injection (NBI) powers, the core barrier is accompanied by an edge L mode. The high edge localized mode (ELM) repetition frequency (1 kHz) prevents the creation of a strong barrier, so the edge first has to make an H-to-L transition before a strong core transport barrier can be created. At higher NBI powers, the ELM repetition frequency is lowered to less than 200 Hz, which allows the immediate creation of a strong core barrier. Edge localized mode loss, which propagates radially first on a fast (non-diffusive) and then on a slow (diffusive) time-scale all the way to the plasma core, is strongly reduced in the core barrier region. Correlated with the reduced ELM loss, the fluctuations in the core barrier region are also strongly reduced, both during the ELM and during the quite periods between the ELMs. There is strong evidence that the IBW induced poloidal flow shear is responsible for the stabilization of core turbulence and the creation of the core transport barrier. The large perpendicular E x B flow shear component of the measured toroidal velocity in co-injection neutral beam heated discharges seems to be largely cancelled by the ion diamagnetic drift shear produced by large ion pressure gradients in the core barrier region. The value of IBW induced poloidal flow has not been experimentally determined, but its numerical value is found to be a factor of 4 larger than either the toroidal velocity or the ion diamagnetic drift shear components, leaving only IBW induced flow shear as the most probable cause for the turbulence stabilization. The core turbulence suppression and the creation of the core transport barrier is also consistent with expectations from a comparison between the E x B flow shear rate and a rough estimate of the

  6. A national survey exploring UK trainees' perceptions, core training experience, and decisions to pursue advanced training in breast radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, S; Bydder, M; Sinnatamby, R

    2017-11-01

    To investigate UK radiology trainees' perceptions of breast radiology and the factors that influenced their decision whether or not to choose breast radiology as an area of special interest. An online survey was compiled and distributed to all UK specialty trainees in clinical radiology via the Royal College of Radiologists Junior Radiologists' Forum (JRF) regional representatives. There were 275 respondents, representing 22% of all UK radiology trainees. Responses were received from all regions. A significant factor identified in influencing whether or not trainees decide to pursue advanced training in breast radiology is the timing and quality of their initial core training experience. Specific positive aspects of breast radiology that were repeatedly identified included the high level of patient contact and frequent use of interventional procedures. Recurring negative aspects of breast radiology included isolation from general radiology and finding the subject matter boring. Breast radiology faces a significant workforce shortfall that is predicted to worsen in the coming years. There has never been a greater need to recruit specialty trainees into this field, and action is urgently needed to help ensure the sustainability of breast services and drive further improvements to patient care. The findings from this survey should be regarded as a challenge to all breast radiologists to engage with trainees from an early stage in their training and to enthuse them with the many positive aspects of a career in breast radiology. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Core Flooding Experiments and Reactive Transport Modeling of Seasonal Heat Storage in the Hot Deep Gassum Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmslykke, Hanne D.; Kjøller, Claus; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal storage of excess heat in hot deep aquifers is considered to optimize the usage of commonly available energy sources. The chemical effects of heating the Gassum Sandstone Formation to up to 150 degrees C is investigated by combining laboratory core flooding experiments with petrographic ...... minor effects on the properties of the reservoir and that storage of excess heat in the Gassum Formation in the Stenlille area may be possible provided operational precautions are taken....... analysis and geochemical modeling. Synthetic formation water is injected into two sets of Gassum Formation samples at 25, 50 (reservoir temperature), 100, and 150 degrees C with a velocity of 0.05 and 0.1 PV/h, respectively. Results show a significant increase in the aqueous concentration of silicium...... and iron with increasing temperature due to dissolution of silica and siderite. Increasing the reservoir temperature from 50 to 100 degrees C enhanced the naturally occurring weathering of Na-rich feldspar to kaolinite. Dissolution of quartz increased sharply above 100 degrees C and was the dominating...

  8. Experiment data report for semiscale Mod-1 test S-01-1 (isothermal blowdown with core resistance simulator)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zender, S.N.; Crapo, H.S.; Jensen, M.F.; Sackett, K.E.

    1975-04-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Test S-01-1 of the semiscale Mod-1 isothermal blowdown test series. Test S-01-1 is one of several semiscale Mod-1 experiments which are counterparts of the planned Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) nonnuclear experiments. System hardware is representative of the LOFT design, selected using volumetric scaling methods, and initial conditions duplicate those identified for the LOFT nonnuclear tests. Test S-01-1 was conducted from an initial temperature of 540 0 F and an initial pressure of 1596 psig. A simulated intermediate size double-ended hot leg break (0.00145 ft 2 break area on each end) was used to investigate the system response to a slow depressurization transient. An orificed structure was used in the pressure vessel to simulate the LOFT core simulator. During system depressurization, coolant was injected into the vessel downcomer inlet annulus to investigate the effectiveness of injection into the inlet annulus with respect to delivery of coolant to the lower plenum. Following the blowdown portion of Test S-01-1, coolant spray was introduced into the pressure suppression tank to determine the response of the pressure suppression system. The purpose of this report is to make available the uninterpreted data from Test S-01-1 for future data analysis and test results reporting activities. The data, presented in the form of graphs in engineering units, have been analyzed only to the extent necessary to assure that they are reasonable and consistent. (U.S.)

  9. Results of out-of-pile experiments to investigate the possibilities of cooling a core melt with internal heat production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieg, G.

    1976-01-01

    After serious hypothetical reactor accidents, melted core materials with internal heat production can occur in large quantities. A retention of these molten core masses within the containment must be ensured. The knowledge of the heat transport from volume-heated layers is necessary to clarify this matter. (orig./LH) [de

  10. Pearl-necklace structures in core-shell molecular brushes: Experiments, Monte Carlo simulations and self-consistent field modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polotsky, A.; Charlaganov, M.; Xu, Y.P.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Daoud, M.; Muller, A.H.E.; Dotera, T.; Borisov, O.V.

    2008-01-01

    We present theoretical arguments and experimental evidence for a longitudinal instability in core-shell cylindrical polymer brushes with a solvophobic inner (core) block and a solvophilic outer (shell) block in selective solvents. The two-gradient self-consistent field Scheutjens-Fleer (SCF-SF)

  11. Characterizing Mobile/Less-Mobile Porosity and Solute Exchange in Dual-Domain Media Using Tracer Experiments and Electrical Measurements in a Hassler-Type Core Holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, S.; Slater, L. D.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Parker, B. L.; Keating, K.; Robinson, J.

    2017-12-01

    Mass transfer is the process by which solute is retained in less-mobile porosity domains, and later released into the mobile porosity domain. This process is often responsible for the slow arrival and gradual release of contaminants and solute tracers. Recent studies have outlined methods using dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) models for characterizing this phenomenon. These models use the non-linear relationship of bulk (σb) and fluid (σf) conductivity, collected from electrical methods during tracer experiments, to characterize the less-mobile/mobile porosity ratio (β) and the mass-transfer rate coefficient (α). DDMT models use the hysteretic σb-σf relationship observed while solute tracers are injected and then flushed from a sample media. Due to limitations in observing the hysteretic σb-σf relationship, this method has not been used to characterize low permeability samples. We have developed an experimental method for testing porous rock cores that allows us to develop a fundamental understanding of contaminant storage and release in consolidated rock. We test the approach on cores from sedimentary rock sites where mass transfer is expected to occur between hydraulically connected fractures and the adjacent low permeability rock matrix. Our method uses a Hassler-type core holder, designed to apply confining pressure around the outside of a sample core, which hydraulically isolates the sample core, allowing water to be injected into it at increased pressures. The experimental apparatus was also designed to measure σb with spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements, and σf from a sampling port located at the center of the core. Cores were initially saturated with a solution with high electrical conductivity ( 80000 μS/cm). DI water was then injected into the cores at elevated pressures (>60 psi) and the saturating solution was flushed from the cores, in order to generate flow rates fast enough to capture the non-linear σb-σf relationship

  12. The Results of the CCI-3 Reactor Material Experiment Investigating 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction and Debris Coolability with a Siliceous Concrete Crucible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.T.; Lomperski, S.; Basu, S.

    2006-01-01

    The OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two objectives: 1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue, and 2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs of future plants. With respect to the second objective, there are remaining uncertainties in the models that evaluate the lateral vs. axial power split during core-concrete interaction because of a lack of truly two-dimensional experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion profiles predicted by codes such as WECHSL, COSACO, TOLBIAC, MEDICIS, and MELCOR. In the continuing effort to bridge this data gap, the third in a series of large scale Core-Concrete Interaction experiments (CCI-3) has been conducted as part of the MCCI program. This test investigated the long-term interaction of a 375 kg core-oxide melt within a two-dimensional siliceous concrete crucible. The initial phase of the test was conducted under dry conditions. After a predetermined time interval, the cavity was flooded with water to obtain data on the coolability of a core melt after core-concrete interaction has progressed for some time. This paper provides a description of the facility and an overview of results from this test. (authors)

  13. Joining strength performances of metal skin and CFRP core laminate structures realized by compression-curing process, with supporting experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quagliato, Luca; Jang, Changsoon; Kim, Naksoo

    2018-05-01

    In the recent years, the trend of lightening vehicles and structures of every kind has become an ever-growing issue, both for university and industrial researchers. As demonstrated in previous authors' works, laminate structures made of metal skin (MS) and carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) core show high specific bending strength properties while granting considerable weight reduction but, so far, no investigations have been carried out on the hole sensitivity and joinability of these hybrid structures. In the present research work, the hole size sensitivity of MS-CFRP structure has been studied by means of uniaxial tensile test on 160mm (length), 25mm (width), 2.0mm (average thickness) specimens bored with Ø06mm, Ø9mm, and Ø12mm holes. The specimen thickness is composed of two metal skins of 0.4mm thickness each, 8×0.2mm CFRP stacked layers and two thin epoxy-based adhesive layers. The specimens have been manufactured by means of a compression-curing process in which the different materials are stacked and, thanks to die pressure and temperature, the curing process is completed in a relatively short time (15˜20 minutes). The specimens have been tested by means of simple tension test showing that, for the MS-CFRP material, the smaller the hole the smaller the maximum bearable load. Moreover, specimens with the same hole sizes have been bolted together with class 12 resistance bolts and tested by means of tensile test, allowing to determine the maximum transferable load between the two MS-CFRP plates. Aiming to prove the improvement in the specific transferable load, experiments on only-steel specimens with the same weight of the MS-CFRP ones and joined with the same method and bolts have been carried out, allowing to conclude that, for the 9mm hole bolted plates, the proposed material has a specific maximum transferable 27% higher than that of the steel composing their skins.

  14. Stable chromium isotopic composition of meteorites and metal-silicate experiments: Implications for fractionation during core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnand, P.; Williams, H. M.; Parkinson, I. J.; Wood, B. J.; Halliday, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    We present new mass independent and mass dependent Cr isotope compositions for meteorites measured by double spike thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. Small differences in both mass independent 53Cr and 54Cr relative to the Bulk Silicate Earth are reported and are very similar to previously published values. Carbonaceous chondrites are characterised by an excess in 54Cr compared to ordinary and enstatite chondrites which make mass independent Cr isotopes a useful tool for distinguishing between meteoritic groups. Mass dependent stable Cr isotope compositions for the same samples are also reported. Carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites are identical within uncertainty with average δ53 Cr values of - 0.118 ± 0.040 ‰ and - 0.143 ± 0.074 ‰ respectively. The heaviest isotope compositions are recorded by an enstatite chondrite and a CO carbonaceous chondrite, both of which have relatively reduced chemical compositions implying some stable Cr isotope fractionation related to redox processes in the circumstellar disk. The average δ53 Cr values for chondrites are within error of the estimate for the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) also determined by double spiking. The lack of isotopic difference between chondritic material and the BSE provides evidence that Cr isotopes were not fractionated during core formation on Earth. A series of high-pressure experiments was also carried out to investigate stable Cr isotope fractionation between metal and silicate and no demonstrable fractionation was observed, consistent with our meteorites data. Mass dependent Cr isotope data for achondrites suggest that Cr isotopes are fractionated during magmatic differentiation and therefore further work is required to constrain the Cr isotopic compositions of the mantles of Vesta and Mars.

  15. Experiment of IEA-R1 reactor core cooling by air convection after pool water loss accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Walmir Maximo; Baptista Filho, Benedito Dias

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a study of a Emergency Core Cooling to be applied to the IEA-R1 reactor. This system must have the characteristics of passive action, with water spraying over the core, and feeding by gravity from elevated reservoirs. In the evaluation, this system must demonstrate that when the reservoirs are emptied, the core cooling must assure to be fulfilled by air natural convection. This work presents the results of temperature distribution in a test section with plates electrically heated simulation the heat generation conditions on the most heated reactor element

  16. Cognitive Styles, Demographic Attributes, Task Performance and Affective Experiences: An Empirical Investigation into Astrophysics Data System (ADS) Core Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Rong

    As a primary digital library portal for astrophysics researchers, SAO/NASA ADS (Astrophysics Data System) 2.0 interface features several visualization tools such as Author Network and Metrics. This research study involves 20 ADS long term users who participated in a usability and eye tracking research session. Participants first completed a cognitive test, and then performed five tasks in ADS 2.0 where they explored its multiple visualization tools. Results show that over half of the participants were Imagers and half of the participants were Analytic. Cognitive styles were found to have significant impacts on several efficiency-based measures. Analytic-oriented participants were observed to spent shorter time on web pages and apps, made fewer web page changes than less-Analytic-driving participants in performing common tasks, whereas AI (Analytic-Imagery) participants also completed their five tasks faster than non-AI participants. Meanwhile, self-identified Imagery participants were found to be more efficient in their task completion through multiple measures including total time on task, number of mouse clicks, and number of query revisions made. Imagery scores were negatively associated with frequency of confusion and the observed counts of being surprised. Compared to those who did not claimed to be a visual person, self-identified Imagery participants were observed to have significantly less frequency in frustration and hesitation during their task performance. Both demographic variables and past user experiences were found to correlate with task performance; query revision also correlated with multiple time-based measurements. Considered as an indicator of efficiency, query revisions were found to correlate negatively with the rate of complete with ease, and positively with several time-based efficiency measures, rate of complete with some difficulty, and the frequency of frustration. These results provide rich insights into the cognitive styles of ADS' core

  17. Development of a standard data base for FBR core nuclear design (XIII). Analysis of small sample reactivity experiments at ZPPR-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Wakaei; Fukushima, Manabu; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2000-09-01

    A comprehensive study to evaluate and accumulate the abundant results of fast reactor physics is now in progress at O-arai Engineering Center to improve analytical methods and prediction accuracy of nuclear design for large fast breeder cores such as future commercial FBRs. The present report summarizes the analytical results of sample reactivity experiments at ZPPR-9 core, which has not been evaluated by the latest analytical method yet. The intention of the work is to extend and further generalize the standard data base for FBR core nuclear design. The analytical results of the sample reactivity experiments (samples: PU-30, U-6, DU-6, SS-1 and B-1) at ZPPR-9 core in JUPITER series, with the latest nuclear data library JENDL-3.2 and the analytical method which was established by the JUPITER analysis, can be concluded as follows: The region-averaged final C/E values generally agreed with unity within 5% differences at the inner core region. However, the C/E values of every sample showed the radial space-dependency increasing from center to core edge, especially the discrepancy of B-1 was the largest by 10%. Next, the influence of the present analytical results for the ZPPR-9 sample reactivity to the cross-section adjustment was evaluated. The reference case was a unified cross-section set ADJ98 based on the recent JUPITER analysis. As a conclusion, the present analytical results have sufficient physical consistency with other JUPITER data, and possess qualification as a part of the standard data base for FBR nuclear design. (author)

  18. Experiment and analyses on intentional secondary-side depressurization during PWR small break LOCA. Effects of depressurization rate and break area on core liquid level behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaka, Hideaki; Ohtsu, Iwao; Anoda, Yoshinari; Kukita, Yutaka

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the secondary-side depressurization rate and break area on the core liquid level behavior during a PWR small-break LOCA were studied using experimental data from the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) and by using analysis results obtained with a JAERI modified version of RELAP5/MOD3 code. The LSTF is a 1/ 48 volumetrically scaled full-height integral model of a Westinghouse-type PWR. The code reproduced the thermal-hydraulic responses, observed in the experiment, for important parameters such as the primary and secondary side pressures and core liquid level behavior. The sensitivity of the core minimum liquid level to the depressurization rate and break area was studied by using the code assessed above. It was found that the core liquid level took a local minimum value for a given break area as a function of secondary side depressurization rate. Further efforts are, however, needed to quantitatively define the maximum core temperature as a function of break area and depressurization rate. (author)

  19. What factors are critical to attracting NHS foundation doctors into specialty or core training? A discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Gillian Marion; Cleland, Jennifer; Johnston, Peter; Walker, Kim; Krucien, Nicolas; Skåtun, Diane

    2018-03-12

    Multiple personal and work-related factors influence medical trainees' career decision-making. The relative value of these diverse factors is under-researched, yet this intelligence is crucially important for informing medical workforce planning and retention and recruitment policies. Our aim was to investigate the relative value of UK doctors' preferences for different training post characteristics during the time period when they either apply for specialty or core training or take time out. We developed a discrete choice experiment (DCE) specifically for this population. The DCE was distributed to all Foundation Programme Year 2 (F2) doctors across Scotland as part of the National Career Destination Survey in June 2016. The main outcome measure was the monetary value of training post characteristics, based on willingness to forgo additional potential income and willingness to accept extra income for a change in each job characteristic calculated from regression coefficients. 677/798 F2 doctors provided usable DCE responses. Location was the most influential characteristic of a training position, followed closely by supportive culture and then working conditions. F2 doctors would need to be compensated by an additional 45.75% above potential earnings to move from a post in a desirable location to one in an undesirable location. Doctors who applied for a training post placed less value on supportive culture and excellent working conditions than those who did not apply. Male F2s valued location and a supportive culture less than female F2s. This is the first study focusing on the career decision-making of UK doctors at a critical careers decision-making point. Both location and specific job-related attributes are highly valued by F2 doctors when deciding their future. This intelligence can inform workforce policy to focus their efforts in terms of making training posts attractive to this group of doctors to enhance recruitment and retention. © Article author

  20. Investigating heavy water zero power reactors with a new core configuration based on experiment and calculation results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasrazadani, Zahra; Salimi, Raana; Askari, Afrooz; Khorsandi, Jamshid; Mirvakili, Mohammad; Mashayekh, Mohammad [Reactor Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Esfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The heavy water zero power reactor (HWZPR), which is a critical assembly with a maximum power of 100 W, can be used in different lattice pitches. The last change of core configuration was from a lattice pitch of 18-20 cm. Based on regulations, prior to the first operation of the reactor, a new core was simulated with MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle)-4C and WIMS (Winfrith Improved Multigroup Scheme)-CITATON codes. To investigate the criticality of this core, the effective multiplication factor (Keff) versus heavy water level, and the critical water level were calculated. Then, for safety considerations, the reactivity worth of D2O, the reactivity worth of safety and control rods, and temperature reactivity coefficients for the fuel and the moderator, were calculated. The results show that the relevant criteria in the safety analysis report were satisfied in the new core. Therefore, with the permission of the reactor safety committee, the first criticality operation was conducted, and important physical parameters were measured experimentally. The results were compared with the corresponding values in the original core.

  1. A comparison of core degradation phenomena in the CORA, QUENCH, Phébus SFD and Phébus FP experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haste, T., E-mail: tim.haste@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN, BP 3, F-13115 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Steinbrück, M., E-mail: martin.steinbrueck@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Barrachin, M., E-mail: marc.barrachin@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN, BP 3, F-13115 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Luze, O. de, E-mail: olivier.de-luze@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, IRSN, BP 3, F-13115 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Grosse, M., E-mail: mirco.grosse@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Stuckert, J., E-mail: juri.stuckert@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The results of the experiments CORA, QUENCH and Phébus SFD/FP are summarised. • All phenomena expected up to melt movement to the lower head are shown consistently. • Separate-effect tests performed at KIT and IRSN aid improve their modelling. • Data from the integral tests help independent validation of new and improved models. • The improved codes will help reduce uncertainties in safety-critical areas for core degradation. - Abstract: Over the past 20 years, integral fuel bundle experiments performed at IRSN Cadarache, France (Phébus-SFD and Phébus FP – fission heated) and at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany (CORA and QUENCH – electrically heated), accompanied by separate-effect tests, have provided a wealth of detailed information on core degradation phenomena that occur under severe accident conditions, relevant to such safety issues as in-vessel retention of the core, recovery of the core by water reflood, hydrogen generation and fission product release. These data form an important basis for development and validation of severe accident analysis codes such as ASTEC (IRSN/GRS, EC) and MELCOR (USNRC/SNL, USA) that are used to assess the safety of current and future reactor designs, so helping to reduce the uncertainty associated with such code predictions. Following the recent end of the Phébus FP project, it is appropriate now to compare the core degradation phenomena observed in these four major experimental series, indicating the main conclusions that have been drawn. This covers subjects such as early phase degradation up to loss of rod-like geometry (all the series), late phase degradation and the link between fission product release and core degradation (Phébus FP), oxidation phenomena (all the series), reflood behaviour (CORA and QUENCH), as well as particular topics such as the effects of control rod material and fuel burn-up on core degradation. It also outlines the separate-effects experiments performed to

  2. Rx-CADRE (Prescribed Fire Combustion-Atmospheric Dynamics Research Experiments) collaborative research in the core fire sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Jimenez; B. Butler; K. Hiers; R. Ottmar; M. Dickinson; R. Kremens; J. O' Brien; A. Hudak; C. Clements

    2009-01-01

    The Rx-CADRE project was the combination of local and national fire expertise in the field of core fire research. The project brought together approximately 30 fire scientists from six geographic regions and seven diff erent agencies. The project objectives were to demonstrate the capacity for collaborative research by bringing together individuals and teams with a...

  3. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of FEL pulse

  4. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-30

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of

  5. Application of Dredged Materials and Steelmaking Slag as Basal Media to Restore and Create Seagrass Beds: Mesocosm and Core Incubation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukasaki, A.; Suzumura, M.; Tsurushima, N.; Nakazato, T.; Huang, Y.; Tanimoto, T.; Yamada, N.; Nishijima, W.

    2016-02-01

    Seagrass beds stabilize bottom sediments, improve water quality and light conditions, enhance species diversity, and provide habitat complexity in coastal marine environments. Seagrass beds are now experiencing worldwide decline by rapid environmental changes. Possible options of seagrass bed restoration are civil engineering works including mounding to raise the bottom to elevations with suitable light for seagrass growth. Reuse or recycling of dredged materials (DM) and various industrial by-products including steelmaking slags is a beneficial option to restore and create seagrass beds. To evaluate the applicability of DM and dephosphorization slag (Slag) as basal media of seagrass beds, we carried out mesocosm experiments and core incubation experiments in a land-based flow-through seawater tank over a year. During the mesocosm experiment, no difference was found in growth of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) and macrobenthic community structures between Slag-based sediments and sand-based control experiments, even though Slag-based sediments exhibited substantially higher pH than sand-based sediments. During the core incubation experiment, we investigated detailed variation and distributions of pH and nutrients, and diffusion fluxes of nutrients between the sediment/seawater interface. Though addition of Slag induced high pH up to 10.7 in deep layers (sediments, whereas dissolved phosphate concentration was substantially reduced by the addition of Slag. The low concentrations of phosphate was likely due to precipitation with calcium under high pH condition. Diffusion fluxes of nutrients from the cores were comparable with those reported in natural coastal systems. It was suggested that the mixture of Slag and DM is applicable as basal media for construction of artificial seagrass beds.

  6. Core Flooding Experiments Combined with X-rays and Micro-PET Imaging as a Tool to Calculate Fluid Saturations in a Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gran, M.; Zahasky, C.; Garing, C.; Pollyea, R. M.; Benson, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    One way to reduce CO2 emissions is to capture CO2 generated in power plants and other industrial sources to inject it into a geological formation. Sedimentary basins are the ones traditionally used to store CO2 but the emission sources are not always close to these type of basins. In this case, basalt rocks present a good storage alternative due their extent and also their potential for mineral trapping. Flow through basaltic rocks is governed by the permeable paths provided by rock fractures. Hence, knowing the behavior of the multiphase flow in these fractures becomes crucial. With the aim to describe how aperture and liquid-gas interface changes in the fracture affect relative permeability and what are the implications of permeability stress dependency, a series of core experiments were conducted. To calculate fracture apertures and fluid saturations, core flooding experiments combined with medical X-Ray CT scanner and micro-PET imaging (Micro Positron Emission Tomography) were performed. Capillary pressure and relative permeability drainage curves were simultaneously measured in a fractured basalt core under typical storage reservoir pressures and temperatures. The X-Ray scanner allows fracture apertures to be measured quite accurately even for fractures as small as 30 µ, but obtaining fluid saturations is not straightforward. The micro-PET imaging provides dynamic measurements of tracer distributions which can be used to calculate saturation. Here new experimental data is presented and the challenges associated with measuring fluid saturations using both X-Rays and micro-PET are discussed.

  7. Last experiences on ID BWR shroud inspection and the new developments to examine the below core plate areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, R.; Gonzalez, E.; Willke, A.; Yague, L. [TECNATOM SA, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    In recent years, the owners of BWR type nuclear power plants have had to address new inspection requirements relating to the core shroud inside the reactor vessel, the aim of which is to contain the fuel assemblies and provide support for the structures located in the upper part of the reactor. The shroud consists of a cylinder measuring some 40-50 mm in thickness, manufactured from various sections of AISI-304 stainless steel and INCONEL, joined by vertical and circumferential welds. The appearance of unstable cracks in these welds would directly affect the structural integrity of the component and the safety of the plant. As regards access to the core shroud and to the surface to be examined, two alternatives might be considered: inspection from outside the component, moving along the so-called annulus between the reactor vessel wall and the component (OD inspection), or from the interior (ID inspection). With a view to addressing this problem, Tecnatom has in recent years launched several projects, grouped under the generic name TEIDE, in order to develop scanners and NDT techniques achieving the maximum inspection coverage of this component. The decision was taken to perform ID inspections, mainly because this type of scanners were not available at that time, and which provide the 4 following advantages. 1) Maximum inspected weld length. This avoids interference with the jet pumps and the systems present in the annulus and affecting OD inspections. Besides, the repairs performed on in-service core shrouds in all cases imply the addition of new fixed elements on their outer surface, since the fuel assembly space must be left free. 2) Reduction of inspection times and of unforeseen events: maintenance of planning schedules, reduction of personnel doses, reduced critical path time. 3) High inspection accuracy and repeatability. 4) Simplification of equipment positioning work (similar to the installation of fuel assemblies). As regards inspection techniques, the

  8. Electrically Heated Testing of the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) Experiment Using a Depleted Uranium Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sanzi, James

    2017-01-01

    The Kilopower project aims to develop and demonstrate scalable fission-based power technology for systems capable of delivering 110 kW of electric power with a specific power ranging from 2.5 - 6.5 Wkg. This technology could enable high power science missions or could be used to provide surface power for manned missions to the Moon or Mars. NASA has partnered with the Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos National Labs, and Y-12 National Security Complex to develop and test a prototypic reactor and power system using existing facilities and infrastructure. This technology demonstration, referred to as the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling TechnologY (KRUSTY), will undergo nuclear ground testing in the summer of 2017 at the Nevada Test Site. The 1 kWe variation of the Kilopower system was chosen for the KRUSTY demonstration. The concept for the 1 kWe flight system consist of a 4 kWt highly enriched Uranium-Molybdenum reactor operating at 800 degrees Celsius coupled to sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes deliver heat to the hot ends of eight 125 W Stirling convertors producing a net electrical output of 1 kW. Waste heat is rejected using titanium-water heat pipes coupled to carbon composite radiator panels. The KRUSTY test, based on this design, uses a prototypic highly enriched uranium-molybdenum core coupled to prototypic sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes transfer heat to two Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC-E2s) and six thermal simulators, which simulate the thermal draw of full scale power conversion units. Thermal simulators and Stirling engines are gas cooled. The most recent project milestone was the completion of non-nuclear system level testing using an electrically heated depleted uranium (non-fissioning) reactor core simulator. System level testing at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) has validated performance predictions and has demonstrated system level operation and control in a test configuration that replicates the one

  9. Experience of RIA safety analyses performance for NPP Temelin core arranged with TVSA-T fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryukov, S.A.; Lizorkin, M.P.

    2010-01-01

    The contents of the presentation are as follows: 1. Definition of categories for initiating events; 2. Acceptance criteria for safety assessment; 3. Main aspects of safety assessment methodology; 4. Main stages of calculation analysis; 5. Interface with other parts of the core design; 6. Codes used for calculation; 6.1 Main performances of code package TIGR-1; 6.2 Main performances of code BIPR-7A; 7. TIGR-1 accounting of design margins in calculation of fuel rod powers; 8. Peculiar features of Instrumentation and Control System for Temelin NPP; 9. Calculations; 10. Checklist of margin data important for reload safety assessment. (P.A.)

  10. Annual report of STACY operation in FY.1999. Experiments on two unit neutron-interacting system with slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution (1). (contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Seiji; Sono, Hiroki; Hirose, Hideyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-11-01

    A new series of experiments on two unit neutron-interacting system started in the last half of FY.1999 at STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility) in NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility). The experiments were conducted with two slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution. The dimensions of the core tanks are 35 cm in thickness, 70 cm in width and 150 cm in height. In the experiments, critical level heights were measured varying the distance between the two core tanks under the non-reflected condition in order to evaluate reactivity effects on the neutron interaction between the two core tanks. This report summarizes the data on the operation and the fuel management for the 25 experiments conducted in the last half of FY.1999. (author)

  11. Two-phase flow experiments in emergency core cooling feed through the hot leg for developing numerical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staebler, T.; Meyer, L.; Schulenberg, T.; Laurien, E.

    2006-01-01

    When a leakage, a 'loss-of-coolant accident', occurs in a light water reactor, the emergency cooling system is able to supply large amounts of coolant to ensure residual heat removal. This supply can be routed through a special emergency cooling pipe, the 'scoop', into the horizontal section of the main coolant pipe, the 'hot leg'. At the same time, hot steam from the superheated, partly voided core flows against the coolant. This gives rise to a two-phase flow in the opposite direction. A factor of primary interest in this situation is whether the coolant supplied by the emergency cooling system will reach the reactor core. The research project is being conducted in order to compute the rate of water supply by numerical methods. The WENKA test facility has been designed and built at the Karlsruhe Research Center to verify numerical calculations. It can be used to study the fluid dynamics phenomena expected to arise in emergency coolant feeding into the hot leg; the necessary local data can be determined experimentally. An extensive database for validating the numerical calculations is then available to complete the experimental work. (orig.)

  12. Sensitivity analysis using DECOMP and METOXA subroutines of the MAAP code in modelling core concrete interaction phenomena and post test calculations for ACE-MCCI experiment L-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passalacqua, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    A parametric analysis approach was chosen in order to study core-concrete interaction phenomena. The analysis was performed using a stand-alone version of the MAAP-DECOMP model (DOE version). This analysis covered only those parameters known to have the largest effect on thermohydraulics and fission product aerosol release. Even though the main purpose of the effort was model validation, it eventually resulted in a better understanding of the core-concrete interaction physics and to a more correct interpretation of the ACE-MCCI L5 experimental data. Unusual low heat transfer fluxes from the debris pool to the cavity (corium surrounding volume) were modeled in order to have a good benchmark with the experimental data. Therefore, higher debris pool temperatures were predicted. In case of water flooding, as a consequence of the critical heat flux through the upper crust and the increase of the crust thickness, resulting high debris pool temperatures cause an increase in the concrete ablation rate in the short term. DECOMP model predicts a quick increase of the crust thickness and as a result, causes the quenching of the molten mass. However, especially for fast transient, phenomena of crust bridge formation can occur. Thus, the upward directed heat flux is minimized and the concrete erosion rate remains conspicuous also in the long term. The model validation is based, in these calculations, on post-test predictions using the MCCI L5 test data: these data are derived from results of the 'Molten Core Concrete Interaction' (MCCI) experiments, which in turn are part of the larger Advanced Containment Experiment (ACE) program. Other calculations were also performed for the new proposed MACE (Melt Debris Attack and Coolability) experiments simulating the water flooding of the cavity. Those calculations are preliminarily compared with the recent MACE scoping test results. (author) 4 tabs., 59 figs., 5 refs

  13. Core Values in Nursing Care Based on the Experiences of Nurses Engaged in Neonatal Nursing: A Text-mining Approach for Analyzing Reflection Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiromi; Okuda, Reiko; Hagino, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Background Strong feelings about and enthusiasm for nursing care are reflected in nurses’ thoughts and behaviors in clinical practice and affect their profession. This study was conducted to identify the characteristics of core values in nursing care based on the experiences of nurses engaged in neonatal nursing through a process for recognizing the conceptualization of nursing. Methods We conceptualized nursing care in 43 nurses who were involved in neonatal nursing using a reflection sheet. We classified descriptions on a sheet based on the Three-Staged Recognition scheme and analyzed them using a text-mining approach. Results Nurses involved in neonatal nursing recognized that they must take care of the “child,” “mother,” and “family.” Important elements of nursing in nurses with less than 5 years versus 5 or more years of neonatal nursing experience were classified into seven clusters, respectively. These elements were mainly related to family members in both groups. In nurses with less than 5 years of experience, four clusters of one-way communication by nurses were observed in the analysis of the key elements in nursing. On the other hand, five clusters of mutual relationships between patients, their family members, and nurses were observed in nurses with 5 or more years of experience. Conclusion In conclusion, the core value of nurses engaged in neonatal nursing is family-oriented nursing. Nurses with 5 or more years of neonatal nursing experience understand patients and their family members well through establishing relationships and providing comfort and safety while taking care of them. PMID:29599621

  14. Experience with W3Re/W25Re thermocouples in fuel pins of NS Otto Hahn's two cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, M.

    1976-01-01

    The paper first deals with the installation of 18 and 9 high-temperature sheathed thermocouples in fuel rods of the cores FDR-1 and FDR-2, respectively. The measured fuel rod centerline temperatures could be related to the local linear rod power at any given time by means of the densities of fission products with different half-lives obtained from fuel rod γ-scans. The fuel temperatures show then already an increase with the burn-up of the FDR-1 which becomes steeper when taking into account the decrease of the EMF measured at irradiated thermocouples taken from the fuel rods. Finally, the determination of effective thermocouple time constants and of fuel rod heat transfer time constants is demonstrated by utilizing the reactor noise to measure the transfer function between neutron flux and fuel temperature signal. (orig.) [de

  15. Multi-bundle sodium experiments for thermohydraulics in core subassemblies during natural circulation decay heat removal operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamide, H; Ieda, Y; Toda, S; Isozaki, T; Sugawara, S [Reactor Engineering Section, O-arai Engineering Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Narita, O-arai, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1993-02-01

    Two types of multi-subassembly sodium experiments, CCTL-CFR tests and PLANDTL-DHX tests, have been carried out in order to investigate thermohydraulics in a fast reactor coreduring natural circulation. Basic experiments are carried out in CCTL-CFR test rig without inter-wrapper gap and under steady state. Integral experiments are performed in PLANDTL-DHX test rig with the inter-wrapper gap and a dip cooler in an upper plenum under steady state and transient conditions. The first series of the experiments and post analyses showed that inter-subassembly heat transfer had significant effects on the transverse temperature distribution in the subassembly and was strongly coupled with intra-subassembly flow redistribution. And the cold sodium provided by the dip cooler could reduce the hot spot temperature in the pin bundle mainly via the inter-wrapper gap. (author)

  16. Experiment data report for semiscale Mod-1 Tests S-01-4 and S-01-4A (isothermal blowdown with core resistance simulator)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zender, S.N.; Jensen, M.F.; Sackett, K.E.

    1975-03-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Tests S-01-4 and S-01-4A of the semiscale Mod-1 isothermal blowdown test series. These tests are among several semiscale Mod-1 experiments which are counterparts of the planned Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) nonnuclear experiments. System hardware is representative of LOFT design based on volumetric scaling methods, and initial conditions duplicate those identified for the LOFT nonnuclear tests. Tests S-01-4 and S-01-4A employed an intact loop resistance that was similar to that of Test S-01-3 and low relative to that of Test S-01-2. An orificed structure was used in the pressure vessel to simulate the LOFT core simulator. The tests were initiated at initial isothermal conditions of about 2250 psig and 540 0 F by a simulated offset shear of the cold-leg broken-loop piping. During system depressurization, coolant was injected into the cold leg of the intact loop to provide data on the effects of emergency core cooling on system response. Following the blowdown portion of Test S-01-4, coolant spray was introduced into the pressure suppression tank to determine the response of the pressure suppression system. The uninterpreted data are presented. The data, presented in the form of graphs in engineering units, have been analyzed only to the extent necessary to assure that they are reasonable and consistent. (U.S.)

  17. Why Not Wait? Eight Institutions Share Their Experiences Moving United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 After Core Clinical Clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Michelle; Fleming, Amy; Grochowski, Colleen O'Conner; Harnik, Vicky; Klimstra, Sibel; Morrison, Gail; Pock, Arnyce; Schwartz, Michael L; Santen, Sally

    2017-11-01

    The majority of medical students complete the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 after their foundational sciences; however, there are compelling reasons to examine this practice. This article provides the perspectives of eight MD-granting medical schools that have moved Step 1 after the core clerkships, describing their rationale, logistics of the change, outcomes, and lessons learned. The primary reasons these institutions cite for moving Step 1 after clerkships are to foster more enduring and integrated basic science learning connected to clinical care and to better prepare students for the increasingly clinical focus of Step 1. Each school provides key features of the preclerkship and clinical curricula and details concerning taking Steps 1 and 2, to allow other schools contemplating change to understand the landscape. Most schools report an increase in aggregate Step 1 scores after the change. Despite early positive outcomes, there may be unintended consequences to later scheduling of Step 1, including relatively late student reevaluations of their career choice if Step 1 scores are not competitive in the specialty area of their choice. The score increases should be interpreted with caution: These schools may not be representative with regard to mean Step 1 scores and failure rates. Other aspects of curricular transformation and rising national Step 1 scores confound the data. Although the optimal timing of Step 1 has yet to be determined, this article summarizes the perspectives of eight schools that changed Step 1 timing, filling a gap in the literature on this important topic.

  18. Experiment data report for semiscale Mod-1 test S-01-1B (isothermal blowdown with core resistance simulator)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crapo, H.S.; Jensen, M.F.; Sackett, K.E.; Zender, S.N.

    1975-05-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Test S-01-1B of the semiscale Mod-1 isothermal blowdown test series. System hardware is representative of the LOFT design, selected using volumetric scaling methods, and initial conditions duplicate those identified for the LOFT nonnuclear tests. Test S-01-1B is a repeat of Test S-01-1 with the exception that simulated ECC was injected into the cold leg of the intact loop rather than into the inlet annulus of the downcomer. The principal objective of Test S-01-1B was to determine whether a different ECC injection would significantly alter the system response during the period of ECC injection. Test S-01-1B was conducted from an initial temperature of 541 0 F and an initial pressure of 1630 psig. A simulated intermediate size double-ended hot leg break (0.00145 ft 2 break area on each end) was used to investigate the system response to a slow de-pressurization transient. An orificed structure was used in the pressure vessel to simulate the LOFT core simulator. Following the blowdown portion of Test S-01-1B, coolant spray was introduced into the pressure suppression tank to determine the response of the pressure suppression system. (U.S.)

  19. A laboratory experiment on the behaviour of soil-derived core and intact polar GDGTs in aquatic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterse, F.; Moy, C. M.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed incubation experiments in order to examine the behaviour of soil-derived branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) membrane lipids upon entering an aquatic environment and to evaluate the processes that potentially take place during their fluvial transport from land to

  20. The Models and Hard Cores: Selective Acculturation and Racial Stratification in Chinese Students' School Experience in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Geok Hwa

    2010-01-01

    Are the academic and social experiences of Chinese Malaysian students as much an outcome of the selective acculturation strategy of their parents as the linguistic assimilation policy of the government? Driven by economic necessity on one hand and pressured by cultural preservation on the other, Chinese parents first send their sons and daughters…

  1. Intercomparison of liquid metal fast reactor seismic analysis codes. V.1: Validation of seismic analysis codes using reactor core experiments. Proceedings of a research co-ordination meeting held in Vienna, 16-17 November 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna, 16-17 November 1993, was attended by participants from France, India, Italy, Japan and the Russian Federation. The meeting was held to discuss and compare the results obtained by various organizations for the analysis of Italian tests on PEC mock-up. The background paper by A. Martelli, et al., Italy, entitled Fluid-Structure Interaction Experiments of PEC Core Mock-ups and Numerical Analysis Performed by ENEA presented details on the Italian PEC (Prova Elementi di Combustibile, i.e. Fuel Element Test Facility) test data for the benchmark. Several papers were presented on the analytical investigations of the PEC reactor core experiments. The paper by M. Morishita, Japan, entitled Seismic Response Analysis of PEC Reactor Core Mock-up, gives a brief review of the Japanese data on the Monju mock-up core experiment which had been distributed to the participating countries through the IAEA. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Destruction of the BETA experimental facility for core meltdown experiments in the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center on 21 March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feige, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    The BETA experiment V 6.2 was intended to yield information on the processes involved in a lateral containment meltdown starting in a concrete wall with external water cooling. The unexpected overpressure that caused the explosion occurred 1896 seconds after the melt had been fed into the crucible, inducing the melt-water interaction. The explosion destroyed only the inner space of the facility. (orig.) [de

  3. Representational coexistence in the God concept: Core knowledge intuitions of God as a person are not revised by Christian theology despite lifelong experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlev, Michael; Mermelstein, Spencer; German, Tamsin C

    2018-01-25

    Previous research has shown that in the minds of young adult religious adherents, acquired theology about the extraordinary characteristics of God (e.g., omniscience) coexists with, rather than replaces, an initial concept of God formed by co-option of the person concept. We tested the hypothesis that representational coexistence holds even after extensive experience with Christian theology, as indexed by age. Christian religious adherents ranging in age from 18 to 87 years were asked to evaluate as true or false statements on which core knowledge intuitions about persons and Christian theology about God were consistent (both true or both false) or inconsistent (true on one and false on the other). Results showed, across adulthood, more theological errors in evaluating inconsistent versus consistent statements. Older adults also exhibited slower response times to inconsistent versus consistent statements. These findings show that despite extensive experience, indeed a lifetime of experience for some participants, the Christian theological God concept does not separate from the initial person concept from which it is formed. In fact, behavioral signatures of representational coexistence were not attenuated by experience. We discuss the broader implications of these findings to the acquisition of evolutionarily new concepts.

  4. The Medical Mission and Modern Core Competency Training: A 10-Year Follow-Up of Resident Experiences in Global Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline A; Swanson, Jordan; McCullough, Meghan; Taro, Trisa B; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Bradshaw, Allison; Campbell, Alex; Magee, William P; Magee, William P

    2016-09-01

    The emphasis on cultural competency for physicians and surgeons is increasingly important, as communication with both patients and other providers significantly affects individual and system-wide outcomes. International surgical training has been shown to improve leadership skills, cultural competency, and technical proficiency of participants in short-term follow-up. This study explores the long-term impact of international surgical mission experiences on developing participants' core competencies, professional outcomes, and commitment to global health. All 208 plastic and reconstructive surgeons who completed the Operation Smile Regan/Stryker fellowship programs between 2006 and 2015 were surveyed electronically. One hundred sixty-five surveys were returned, for an overall response rate of 79.3 percent. The majority of participants reported that the fellowship positively impacted all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Most participants who were attending physicians at the time of the survey were practicing general plastic surgery, with 42 percent in an academic/teaching environment, 32 percent in assistant/associate professor positions, and 6 percent in either a program director or department chairman position. The majority currently volunteer on local or international missions, and all respondents would consider volunteering again. Carefully structured and rigorously proctored programs such as the Regan/Stryker Fellowship offer plastic surgery residents the opportunity to gain valuable professional and personal experiences that benefit them long after their service experience. Programs of this nature can not only effectively improve cultural competency of physicians, but also positively influence their attitudes toward leadership and direct that potential to meet the growing need for surgical care in low- and middle-income countries.

  5. Annual report of STACY operation in FY.2000. Experiments on neutron-interacting systems with two slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution. 2. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Seiji; Hirose, Hideyuki; Izawa, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-09-01

    Criticality experiments on neutron-interacting systems have been performed since FY.1999 at STACY (Static Experiment Critical Facility) in NUCEF (Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility). In the experiments two slab-shaped core tanks and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution were used. The dimension of the core tanks is 35 cm in thickness, 70 cm in width and 150 cm in height. In FY.2000, the reactivity effect of neutron-isolating materials, such as polyethylene and concrete, and neutron absorbers made of hafnium and cadmium, which were placed between those two core tanks, was determined by the experiments. This report summarizes the data on the operation and the fuel management for the 57 experiments conducted in FY.2000. (author)

  6. Melt cooling by bottom flooding: The experiment CometPC-H3. Ex-vessel core melt stabilization research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmeyer, H.; Cron, T.; Merkel, G.; Schmidt-Stiefel, S.; Tromm, W.; Wenz, T.

    2003-03-01

    The CometPC-H3 experiment was performed to investigate melt cooling by water addition to the bottom of the melt. The experiment was performed with a melt mass of 800 kg, 50% metal and 50% oxide, and 300 kW typical decay heat were simulated in the melt. As this was the first experiment after repair of the induction coil, attention was given to avoid overload of the induction coil and to keep the inductor voltage below critical values. Therefore, the height of the sacrificial concrete layer was reduced to 5 cm only, and the height of the porous concrete layers was also minimized to have a small distance and good coupling between heated melt and induction coil. After quite homogeneous erosion of the upper sacrificial concrete layer, passive bottom flooding started from the porous concrete after 220 s with 1.3 liter water/s. The melt was safely stopped, arrested and cooled. The porous, water filled concrete was only slightly attacked by the hot melt in the upper 25 mm of one sector of the coolant device. The peak cooling rate in the early contact phase of coolant water and melt was 4 MW/m 2 , and exceeded the decay heat by one order of magnitude. The cooling rate remarkably dropped, when the melt was covered by the penetrating water and a surface crust was formed. Volcanic eruptions from the melt during the solidification process were observed from 360 - 510 s and created a volcanic dome some 25 cm high, but had only minor effect on the generation of a porous structure, as the expelled melt solidified mostly with low porosity. Unfortunately, decay heat simulation in the melt was interrupted at 720 s by an incorrect safety signal, which excluded further investigation of the long term cooling processes. At that time, the melt was massively flooded by a layer of water, about 80 cm thick, and coolant water inflow was still 1 l/s. The melt had reached a stable situation: Downward erosion was stopped by the cooling process from the water filled, porous concrete layer. Top

  7. Experiments on simulation of coolant mixing in fuel assembly head and core exit channel of WWER-440 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzar, L.L; Oleksyuk, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' has performed coolant mixing investigation in a head of a full-size simulator of WWER-440 fuel assembly. The experiments were focused on obtaining the data important for investigating the trends in temperature difference between the value registered by a ICIS thermocouple and the value of average temperature. The completed experiments ensure representative of configuration simulation by reproducing every construction peculiar feature of flow part of fuel assembly in the domain between the lower spacing grid and thermocouple location, and also by slightly modified fuel assembly regular elements (or analogues thereof). For the purpose of effectiveness of coolant mixing assessment within the head cross section of FA simulator, we measured coolant temperature distribution both in the place where coolant flow leaves the rod bundle simulator (in 39 data points along the cross section) and in the cross section location of regular ICIS thermocouple simulator (30 data points). The testing was conducted with pressure of (90 - 95) bar, mass coolant flow rates up to 2000 kg/(m 2 .s), temperature of coolant heating in 'hot' parts of the bundle up to 35.. and differences between coolant temperature extremes measured in rod bundle simulator outlet up to 20... Temperature fields were registered in 63 conditions that differ in coolant flow and inlet coolant temperature, electrical heating rate of FA simulator, and radial coolant distribution. In certain registered conditions we simulated coolant leakage to the space between the fuel assemblies. The received test data may be important both for investigation of dependencies between the coolant temperature in regular thermocouple location or average outlet temperature in assembly head, and for validation of CFD codes or subchannel codes (Authors)

  8. Performance and advantages of a soft-core based parallel architecture for energy peak detection in the calorimeter Level 0 trigger for the NA62 experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammendola, R.; Barbanera, M.; Bizzarri, M.; Bonaiuto, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Simone, N. De; Fantechi, R.; Fucci, A.; Lupi, M.; Ryjov, V.; Checcucci, B.; Papi, A.; Piccini, M.; Federici, L.; Paoluzzi, G.; Salamon, A.; Salina, G.; Sargeni, F.; Venditti, S.

    2017-01-01

    The NA62 experiment at CERN SPS has started its data-taking. Its aim is to measure the branching ratio of the ultra-rare decay K +  → π + ν ν̅ . In this context, rejecting the background is a crucial topic. One of the main background to the measurement is represented by the K +  → π + π 0  decay. In the 1-8.5 mrad decay region this background is rejected by the calorimetric trigger processor (Cal-L0). In this work we present the performance of a soft-core based parallel architecture built on FPGAs for the energy peak reconstruction as an alternative to an implementation completely founded on VHDL language.

  9. Performance and advantages of a soft-core based parallel architecture for energy peak detection in the calorimeter Level 0 trigger for the NA62 experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammendola, R.; Barbanera, M.; Bizzarri, M.; Bonaiuto, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Checcucci, B.; De Simone, N.; Fantechi, R.; Federici, L.; Fucci, A.; Lupi, M.; Paoluzzi, G.; Papi, A.; Piccini, M.; Ryjov, V.; Salamon, A.; Salina, G.; Sargeni, F.; Venditti, S.

    2017-03-01

    The NA62 experiment at CERN SPS has started its data-taking. Its aim is to measure the branching ratio of the ultra-rare decay K+ → π+ν ν̅ . In this context, rejecting the background is a crucial topic. One of the main background to the measurement is represented by the K+ → π+π0 decay. In the 1-8.5 mrad decay region this background is rejected by the calorimetric trigger processor (Cal-L0). In this work we present the performance of a soft-core based parallel architecture built on FPGAs for the energy peak reconstruction as an alternative to an implementation completely founded on VHDL language.

  10. Sampling in the Snow: High School Winter Field Experiences Provide Relevant, Real World Connections Between Scientific Practices and Disciplinary Core Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, E. W.; Burakowski, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    For much of the northern United States, the months surrounding the winter solstice are times of increased darkness, low temperatures, and frozen landscapes. It's a time when many high school science educators, who otherwise would venture outside with their classes, hunker down and are wary of the outdoors. However, a plethora of learning opportunities lies just beyond the classroom. Working collaboratively, a high school science teacher and a snow scientist have developed multiple activities to engage students in the scientific process of collecting, analyzing and interpreting the winter world using snow data to (1) learn about the insulative properties of snow, and (2) to learn about the role of snow cover on winter climate through its reflective properties while participating in a volunteer network that collects snow depth, albedo (reflectivity), and density data. These outdoor field-based snow investigations incorporate Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and disciplinary core ideas, including ESS2.C: The roles of water in Earth's surface processes and ESS2.D: Weather and Climate. Additionally, the lesson plans presented address Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in Mathematics, including the creation and analysis of bar graphs and time series plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.A.1) and xy scatter plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.B.6). High school students participating in the 2013/2014 snow sampling season described their outdoor learning experience as "authentic" and "hands-on" as compared to traditional class indoors. They emphasized that learning outdoors was essential to their understanding of underlying content and concepts because they "learn through actual experience."

  11. Recent progress in the LACOMERA Project (Large-Scale Experiments on Core Degradation, Melt Retention and Coolability) at the Forschungszentrum Karslruhe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miassoedov, A.; Alsmeyer, H.; Eppinger, B.; Meyer, L.; Steinbrueck, M.

    2004-01-01

    The LACOMERA Project at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK) is a 3 year action within the 5 th Framework Programme of the EU. The overall objective of the project is to offer research institutions from the EU member countries and associated states access to four large-scale experimental facilities QUENCH, LIVE, DISCO-H, and COMET which can be used to investigate core melt scenarios from the beginning of core degradation to melt formation and relocation in the vessel, possible melt dispersion to the reactor cavity, and finally corium concrete interaction and corium coolability in the reactor cavity. As a result of two calls for proposals, seven organisations from four countries are expected to profit from the LACOMERA Project participating in preparation, conduct and analysis of the following experiments: QUENCH-L1: Air ingression impact on core degradation. The test has provided unique data for the investigation of air ingress phenomenology in conditions as representative as possible of the reactor case regarding the source term. QUENCH-L2: Boil-off of a flooded bundle. The test will be of a generic interest for all reactor types, providing a link between the severe accident and design basis areas, and would deliver oxidation and thermal hydraulic data at high temperatures. LIVE-L1: Simulation of melt relocation into the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) lower head for VVER conditions. The experiment will provide important information on the melt pool behaviour during the stages of air circulation at the outer RPV surface with a subsequent flooding of the lower head. LIVE-L2: Transient corium spreading and its impact on the heat fluxes to the RPV wall and on the final shape of the melt in the RPV lower head. The test will address the questions of melt stabilisation and the effects of crust formation near the RPV wall for a nonsymmetrical melt pool shape. COMET-L1: Long-term 2D concrete ablation in siliceous concrete cavity at intermediate decay heat power level with

  12. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  13. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  14. Core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, N G; Edel' man, Ya A

    1981-02-15

    A core lifter is suggested which contains a housing, core-clamping elements installed in the housing depressions in the form of semirings with projections on the outer surface restricting the rotation of the semirings in the housing depressions. In order to improve the strength and reliability of the core lifter, the semirings have a variable transverse section formed from the outside by the surface of the rotation body of the inner arc of the semiring aroung the rotation axis and from the inner a cylindrical surface which is concentric to the outer arc of the semiring. The core-clamping elements made in this manner have the possibility of freely rotating in the housing depressions under their own weight and from contact with the core sample. These semirings do not have weakened sections, have sufficient strength, are inserted into the limited ring section of the housing of the core lifter without reduction in its through opening and this improve the reliability of the core lifter in operation.

  15. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a BWR type reactor, a great number of pipes (spectral shift pipes) are disposed in the reactor core. Moderators having a small moderating cross section (heavy water) are circulated in the spectral shift pipes to suppress the excess reactivity while increasing the conversion ratio at an initial stage of the operation cycle. After the intermediate stage of the operation cycle in which the reactor core reactivity is lowered, reactivity is increased by circulating moderators having a great moderating cross section (light water) to extend the taken up burnup degree. Further, neutron absorbers such as boron are mixed to the moderator in the spectral shift pipe to control the concentration thereof. With such a constitution, control rods and driving mechanisms are no more necessary, to simplify the structure of the reactor core. This can increase the fuel conversion ratio and control great excess reactivity. Accordingly, a nuclear reactor core of high conversion and high burnup degree can be attained. (I.N.)

  16. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  17. Natural convection and radiation heat transfer in a vertical porous layer with a hexagonal honeycomb core. 2nd Report. Experiment on heat transfer; Honeycomb core de shikirareta enchoku takoshitsu sonai no shizen tairyu - fukusha fukugo netsu dentatsu. 2. Dennetsu jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Y; Asako, Y [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Technology

    1997-06-25

    The combined natural convection and radiation heat transfer characteristics in a vertical porous layer with a hexagonal honeycomb core were investigate experimentally. The temperature distributions on the honeycomb core wall and the combined heat transfer rates through the porous layer were measured. The measurements of the heat transfer were accomplished using the guarded hot plate (GHP) method. The honeycomb core wall was made of paper and large mesh foamed resins were inserted into the honeycomb enclosures. The measurements were performed while varying the radiation parameters between 0.5 to 0.65, varying the temperature ratios between 0.01 to 0.1 and varying the Darcy-Rayleigh numbers between 5 to 80, and for a fixed aspect ratio of H/L=1. The experimental results for Nusselt numbers agreed well with our available numerical results. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Phase Equilibrium Experiments on Potential Lunar Core Compositions: Extension of Current Knowledge to Multi-Component (Fe-Ni-Si-S-C) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous geophysical and geochemical studies have suggested the existence of a small metallic lunar core, but the composition of that core is not known. Knowledge of the composition can have a large impact on the thermal evolution of the core, its possible early dynamo creation, and its overall size and fraction of solid and liquid. Thermal models predict that the current temperature at the core-mantle boundary of the Moon is near 1650 K. Re-evaluation of Apollo seismic data has highlighted the need for new data in a broader range of bulk core compositions in the PT range of the lunar core. Geochemical measurements have suggested a more volatile-rich Moon than previously thought. And GRAIL mission data may allow much better constraints on the physical nature of the lunar core. All of these factors have led us to determine new phase equilibria experimental studies in the Fe-Ni-S-C-Si system in the relevant PT range of the lunar core that will help constrain the composition of Moon's core.

  19. The nuclear core of sun: theoretical perspectives and characterization of the scientific performances of the GOLF / SOHO experiment detector; La region nucleaire du soleil: perspectives theoriques et caracterisation des performances scientifiques du detecteur de l`experience GOLF / SOHO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzitko, H

    1995-06-23

    The subject of this thesis is the nuclear core of the sun. The first part is theoretical and concerns neutrino flux predictions. A precise description of the solar plasma is necessary to predict boron, beryllium and CNO cycle neutrinos. We treat here the nuclear reaction rates. They are mainly determined by the cross sections and the enhancement factors due to plasma particles, the co-called screening factors. We have discussed the various possible formalisms that could be used in stellar evolution and performed direct calculations of screened cross sections. We concluded that the screening prescriptions which have been used so far in stellar evolution should be replaced by the Mitler formalism. Next, we examine the cross section uncertainties and we show that it is possible to get a better agreement between theory and experiment. Discrepancies between the gallium experiments and the calculations suggest that we should go beyond the classical solar model. This has motivated our study on possible magnetic fields deeply buried in the solar core. We discuss here the influence of a magnetic pressure perturbation on solar evolution. In the experimental part of this work, we deal with the GOLF experiment, one of the three helio-seismological experiments on board the space probe SOHO. The purpose of this instrument is the study of the global oscillation modes in the frequency range 10{sup -7} to 6 10{sup -3} Hz with a sensitivity for frequencies higher than 2 10{sup -4} Hz of about 1 mm/s over 20 days of continuous integration at counting rates of 12 10{sup 6} cs/s. One part of this work was devoted to the precise characterization of the photomultipliers and their associated electronics in order to select them according to their intrinsic performances. This step was followed by long duration tests of three weeks simulating as well as possible the flight conditions. We show that the detection chain effectively meets the stability requirements of around 10{sup -7} by

  20. Exploring the dynamic relationship between the Accelerative Integrated Method (AIM and the core French teachers who use it: Why agency and experience matter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Arnott

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over the last decade, almost 4,000 Canadian schools have moved to using the Accelerative Integrated Method (AIM for core French (CF instruction. Following researchers’ recommendations (Brumfit, 1984; Lapkin, Mady, & Arnott, 2009; Larsen-Freeman, 1996, 2000; Prahbu, 1990, I am shifting the focus in this case study from product to process. In other words, investigating how AIM teachers use and shape the method during implementation instead of comparing AIM and non-AIM student outcomes (Bourdages & Vignola, 2009; Carr, 2001; Mady, Arnott, & Lapkin, 2009; Maxwell, 2001; Michels, 2008;. Four interviews and observation sessions were conducted with eight elementary-level CF teachers. Findings showed that while some AIM routines and strategies were used by all, teachers exercised their agency in supplementing recommended AIM activities and materials, especially those with more AIM and CF teaching experience. Establishing that using AIM engaged teachers’ senses of plausibility (Prahbu, 1990 also exposed important implications for future AIM research and board-level policy. Résumé Depuis les années 2000, plus de 4000 écoles canadiennes ont decidé d’utiliser une forme d’enseignement qui s’appelle AIM (Accelerative Integrated Method pour leurs programmes de français de base (Core French. Selon les recommandations des chercheurs suivants (Brumfit, 1984; Lapkin, Mady, & Arnott, 2009; Larsen-Freeman, 1996, 2000; Prahbu, 1990, au lieu d’étudier les résultats, l’objectif de cette étude de cas était d’examiner la mise en œuvre de AIM. Huit enseignants de français de base ont passé quatre entrevues individuelles. Ils ont eu quatre sessions d’observation de pratique de AIM . Selon les résultats, quoiqu’ils aient employé des stratégies et routines de AIM de la même façon, tous les enseignants ont aussi décidé d’ajouter leurs propres activités et ressources à AIM, surtout ceux experts dans l’enseignement du fran

  1. Plutonium cores of zenith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barclay, F R; Cameron, I R; Drageset, A; Freemantle, R G; Wilson, D J

    1965-03-15

    The report describes a series of experiments carried out with plutonium fuel in the heated zero power reactor ZENITH, with the aim of testing current theoretical methods, with particular reference to excess reactivity, temperature coefficients, differential spectrum and reaction rate distributions. Two cores of widely different fissile/moderator atom ratios were loaded in order to test the theory under significantly varied spectrum conditions.

  2. Models of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  3. Reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Tetsuaki; Nomura, Teiji; Tokunaga, Kensuke; Okuda, Shin-ichi

    1990-01-01

    Fuel assemblies in the portions where the gradient of fast neutron fluxes between two opposing faces of a channel box is great are kept loaded at the outermost peripheral position of the reactor core also in the second operation cycle in the order to prevent interference between a control rod and the channel box due to bending deformation of the channel box. Further, the fuel assemblies in the second row from the outer most periphery in the first operation cycle are also kept loaded at the second row in the second operation cycle. Since the gradient of the fast neutrons in the reactor core is especially great at the outer circumference of the reactor core, the channel box at the outer circumference is bent such that the surface facing to the center of the reactor core is convexed and the channel box in the second row is also bent to the identical direction, the insertion of the control rod is not interfered. Further, if the positions for the fuels at the outermost periphery and the fuels in the second row are not altered in the second operation cycle, the gaps are not reduced to prevent the interference between the control rod and the channel box. (N.H.)

  4. Investigation of EAS cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaulov S.B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascade models in air in the late forties have shown informational content of the study of cores of extensive air showers (EAS. These investigations were the main goal in different experiments which were carried out over many years by a variety of methods. Outcomes of such investigations obtained in the HADRON experiment using an X-ray emulsion chamber (XREC as a core detector are considered. The Ne spectrum of EAS associated with γ-ray families, spectra of γ-rays (hadrons in EAS cores and the Ne dependence of the muon number, ⟨Nμ⟩, in EAS with γ-ray families are obtained for the first time at energies of 1015–1017 eV with this method. A number of new effects were observed, namely, an abnormal scaling violation in hadron spectra which are fundamentally different from model predictions, an excess of muon number in EAS associated with γ-ray families, and the penetrating component in EAS cores. It is supposed that the abnormal behavior of γ-ray spectra and Ne dependence of the muon number are explained by the emergence of a penetrating component in the 1st PCR spectrum ‘knee’ range. Nuclear and astrophysical explanations of the origin of the penetrating component are discussed. The necessity of considering the contribution of a single close cosmic-ray source to explain the PCR spectrum in the knee range is noted.

  5. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    The Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is a language for expressing business process behaviour based on web services. The language is intentionally not minimal but provides a rich set of constructs, allows omission of constructs by relying on defaults, and supports language......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...

  6. Exploring the Dynamic Relationship between the Accelerative Integrated Method (AIM) and the Core French Teachers Who Use It: Why Agency and Experience Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, almost 4,000 Canadian schools have moved to using the Accelerative Integrated Method (AIM) for core French (CF) instruction. Following researchers' recommendations (Brumfit, 1984; Lapkin, Mady, & Arnott, 2009; Larsen-Freeman, 1996, 2000; Prahbu, 1990), I am shifting the focus in this case study from product to process. In…

  7. Track 5: safety in engineering, construction, operations, and maintenance. Reactor physics design, validation, and operating experience. 5. A Negative Reactivity Feedback Device for Actinide Burner Cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, M.J.; Hejzlar, P.

    2001-01-01

    Lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) cooled reactors are of considerable interest because they may be useful for destruction of actinides in a cost-effective manner, particularly cores fueled predominantly with minor actinides, which gain reactivity with burnup. However, they also pose several design challenges: 1. a small (and perhaps even slightly positive) Doppler feedback; 2. small effective delayed neutron yield; 3. a small negative feedback from axial fuel expansion; 4. positive coolant void and temperature coefficients for conventional designs. This has motivated a search for palliative measures, leading to conceptualization of the reactivity feedback device (RFD). The RFD consists of an in-core flask containing helium gas, tungsten wool, and a small reservoir of LBE that communicates with vertical tubes housing neutron absorber floats. The upper part of these guide tubes contains helium gas that is vented into a separate, cooler ex-core helium gas plenum. The principle of operation is as follows: 1. The tungsten wool, hence the helium gas in the in-core plenum, is heated by gammas and loses heat to the walls by convection and conduction (radiation is feeble for monatomic gases and, in any event, intercepted by the tungsten wool). An energy balance determines the gas temperature, hence, pressure, which is 10 atm here. The energy loss rate can be adjusted by using xenon or a gas mixture in place of helium. The tungsten wool mass, which is 1 vol% wool here, can also be increased to increase gamma heating and further retard convection; alternatively, a Dewar flask could be used in place of the additional wool. 2. An increase in core power causes a virtually instantaneous increase in gamma flux, hence, gas heatup: The thermal time constant of the tungsten filaments and their surrounding gas film is ∼40 μs. 3. The increased gas temperature is associated with an increased gas pressure, which forces more liquid metal into the float guide tubes: LBE will rise ∼100 cm

  8. Visible-near infrared point spectrometry of drill core samples from Río Tinto, Spain: results from the 2005 Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE) drilling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Brad; Brown, Adrian J; Stoker, Carol R

    2008-10-01

    Sampling of subsurface rock may be required to detect evidence of past biological activity on Mars. The Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE) utilized the Río Tinto region, Spain, as a Mars analog site to test dry drilling technologies specific to Mars that retrieve subsurface rock for biological analysis. This work examines the usefulness of visible-near infrared (VNIR) (450-1000 nm) point spectrometry to characterize ferric iron minerals in core material retrieved during a simulated Mars drilling mission. VNIR spectrometry can indicate the presence of aqueously precipitated ferric iron minerals and, thus, determine whether biological analysis of retrieved rock is warranted. Core spectra obtained during the mission with T1 (893-897 nm) and T2 (644-652 nm) features indicate goethite-dominated samples, while relatively lower wavelength T1 (832-880 nm) features indicate hematite. Hematite/goethite molar ratios varied from 0 to 1.4, and within the 880-898 nm range, T1 features were used to estimate hematite/goethite molar ratios. Post-mission X-ray analysis detected phyllosilicates, which indicates that examining beyond the VNIR (e.g., shortwave infrared, 1000-2500 nm) will enhance the detection of other minerals formed by aqueous processes. Despite the limited spectral range of VNIR point spectrometry utilized in the MARTE Mars drilling simulation project, ferric iron minerals could be identified in retrieved core material, and their distribution served to direct core subsampling for biological analysis.

  9. Core losses of a permanent magnet synchronous motor with an amorphous stator core under inverter and sinusoidal excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Takaya; Odawara, Shunya; Fujisaki, Keisuke

    2018-05-01

    We report core loss properties of permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM) with amorphous magnetic materials (AMM) core under inverter and sinusoidal excitations. To discuss the core loss properties of AMM core, a comparison with non-oriented (NO) core is also performed. In addition, based on both experiments and numerical simulations, we estimate higher (time and space) harmonic components of the core losses under inverter and sinusoidal excitations. The core losses of PMSM are reduced by about 59% using AMM stator core instead of NO core under sinusoidal excitation. We show that the average decrease obtained by using AMM instead of NO in the stator core is about 94% in time harmonic components.

  10. A comprehensive analysis verified by experiment of a refractometer based on an SMF28–small-core singlemode fiber (SCSMF)–SMF28 fiber structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qiang; Semenova, Yuliya; Wang, Pengfei; Farrell, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical model for an SMF28–small-core SMF (SCSMF)–SMF28 structure based refractometer is developed based on the modal propagation analysis (MPA) method. The simulation result shows that the wavelength shift of this refractometer changes exponentially as the surrounding refractive index (SRI) varies. The core diameter of SCSMF does not have a significant influence on the sensitivity of the refractometer but cladding diameter does have. The simulation results are verified experimentally and it is also experimentally demonstrated that there is a maximum sensitivity of 1808 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) for an SRI range from 1.324 to 1.431 and that, as expected, the wavelength shift response is an exponential function of SRI

  11. Models of the earth's core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    The combination of seismology, high pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to strong constraints on core models. The synthesis presented here is devoted to the defense of the following properties: (1) core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; (2) the outer, liquid core is predominately iron but cannot be purely iron; (3) the inner core-outer core boundary represents a thermodynamic equilibrium between a liquid alloys and a predominanately iron solid; (4) thermodynamic and transport properties of outer core can be estimated from liquid-state theories; and (5) the outer core is probably adiabatic and uniform in composition. None of these propositions are universally accepted by geophysicists. But, the intent of this paper is to present a coherent picture which explains most of the data with the fewest ad hoc assumptions. Areas in which future progress is both essential and likely are geo- and cosmochronology, seismological determinations of core structure, fluid dynamics of the core and mantle, and condensed matter physics

  12. MR-guided preoperative localization and percutaneous core biopsy of suspicious breast lesions - experience on the vertically open 0.5 T system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.P.; Schulz, T.; Rueger, S.; Schmidt, F.; Kahn, T.; Leinung, S.; Briest, S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility of performing breast interventions in a vertically open 0.5 T MR system (SIGNA SP/i, GE Medical Systems). To develop fitted equipment and to establish preoperative wire localization and percutaneous breast core biopsy as clinical routine procedures. Patients and methods. Initially, we applied a localization method with the patient placed in a sitting position in 31 cases using a single loop coil and a self-developed fixation device. Subsequently, 46 wire localizations and 28 percutaneous core biopsies were carried out in prone patient position using an open breast coil with an integrated biopsy device. The used instruments were either MR-compatible (18 G biopsy needle and localization wire, 14 G coaxial needle, prototype of a 16 G double-shoot gun) or MR-safe (double-shoot gun with 16 G needle). Results. After biopsy we found the needle tip (18 G for a wire localization and 14 G for a percutaneous core biopsy, respectively) placed either within or close to the lesions ( [de

  13. Core Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Tim

    2016-01-01

    In this article, two lessons are introduced in which students examine Arctic lake sediments from Lake El'gygytgyn in Russia and discover a climate signal in a lake or pond near their own school. The lessons allow students to experience fieldwork, understand lab procedure, practice basic measurement and observation skills, and learn how to…

  14. Evaluation of In-Core Fuel Management for the Transition Cores of RSG-GAS Reactor to Full-Silicide Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S, Tukiran; MS, Tagor; P, Surian

    2003-01-01

    The core conversion of RSG-GAS reactor from oxide to silicide core with meat density of 2.96 gU/cc has been done. The core-of RSG-GAS reactor has been operated full core of silicide fuels which is started with the mixed core of oxide-silicide start from core 36. Based on previous work, the calculated core parameter for the cores were obtained and it is needed 9 transition cores (core 36 - 44) to achieve a full-silicide core (core 45). The objective of this work is to acquire the effect of the increment of the number of silicide fuel on the core parameters. Conversion core was achieved by transition cores mixed oxide-silicide fuels. Each transition core is calculated and measured core parameter such as, excess reactivity and shutdown margin. Calculation done by Batan-EQUIL-2D code and measurement of the core parameters was carried out using the method of compensation of couple control rods. The results of calculation and experiment shows that the excess reactivity trends lower with the increment of the number of silicide fuel in the core. However, the shutdown margin is not change with the increment of the number of silicide fuel. Therefore, the transition cores can be operated safely to a full-silicide core

  15. ''Last experiences on ID BWR shroud inspection and the new developments to examine the below core plate areas''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, R.; Willke, A.; Gonzalez, E.; Yague, L

    2001-07-01

    In recent years, the owners of BWR type nuclear power plants have had to address new inspection requirements relating to the core shroud inside the reactor vessel, the aim of which is to contain the fuel assemblies and provide support for the structures located in the upper part of the reactor. The shroud consists of a cylinder measuring some 40-50 mm in thickness, manufactured from various sections of AISI-304 stainless steel and INCONEL, joined by vertical and circumferential welds. The appearance of unstable cracks in these welds would directly affect the structural integrity of the component and the safety of the plant. As regards access to the core shroud and to the surface to be examined, two alternatives might be considered: inspection from outside the component, moving along the so-called annulus between the reactor vessel wall and the component (OD inspection), or from the interior (ID inspection). With a view to addressing this problem, Tecnatom has in recent years launched several projects, grouped under the generic name TEIDE, in order to develop scanners and NDT techniques achieving the maximum inspection coverage of this component. As regards inspection techniques, the decision was taken to carry out acquisition simultaneously using both ultrasonics (UT) and eddy currents (ET). (author)

  16. Diagnostic feasibility and safety of CT-guided core biopsy for lung nodules less than or equal to 8 mm. A single-institution experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ying-Yueh [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); Chen, Chun-Ku [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); Yeh, Yi-Chen [National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China); Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Taipei (China); Wu, Mei-Han [Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taipei (China); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (China)

    2018-02-15

    This retrospective study evaluated the diagnostic yield and safety of CT-guided core biopsy of pulmonary nodules ≤8 mm. We determined the diagnostic yield and safety profile of CT-guided lung biopsies for 125 pulmonary nodules ≤8 mm. Pathological diagnoses were made by a combination of histopathological examination and imprint cytology. Results were compared with biopsy results for 134 pulmonary nodules >8 and ≤10 mm. Final diagnoses were established in 94 nodules ≤8 mm. The sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided core biopsy for nodules ≤8 mm were 87.1 % (61/70 nodules), 100 % (24/24) and 90.4 % (85/94), respectively. Diagnostic failure rates were comparable for nodules ≤8 mm and nodules >8 mm and ≤10 mm (9/94, 9.6 % and 7/111, 6.3 %, respectively, P=0.385). The rate of tube thoracostomy for nodules ≤8 mm was comparable to that for nodules >8 and ≤10 mm (1.6 % vs. 0.7 %, P=0.611). Nodules ≤6 mm had a higher non-diagnostic result rate of 15.4 % (6/39) than did nodules >8 and ≤10 mm (3.7 %, 5/134, P=0.017). CT-guided pulmonary biopsy is feasible for lung nodules ≤8 mm, especially those >6 mm, and has an acceptable diagnostic yield and safety profile. (orig.)

  17. Side core lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A

    1982-01-01

    A side core lifter is proposed which contains a housing with guide slits and a removable core lifter with side projections on the support section connected to the core receiver. In order to preserve the structure of the rock in the core sample by means of guaranteeing rectilinear movement of the core lifter in the rock, the support and core receiver sections are hinged. The device is equipped with a spring for angular shift in the core-reception part.

  18. A experiência brasileira com o core set da classificação internacional de funcionalidade, incapacidade e saúde para lombalgia La experiencia brasileña con el core set de la clasificación internacional de funcionalidad, incapacidad y salud para dorsalgia The Brazilian experience with the international classification of functioning, disability and health core set for low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Riberto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Validar empiricamente o core set da CIF para lombalgia e descrever a funcionalidade de uma amostra de pacientes com lombalgia mecânica crônica inespecífica. MÉTODOS: Vinte e nove pacientes de um centro de reabilitação foram avaliados por meio do core set da CIF para lombalgia e pelo questionário de Roland Morris (QRM e SF-36. RESULTADOS: Todas as categorias de estruturas do corpo do core set se mostraram comprometidas em ao menos 80% dos pacientes, sendo consideradas validadas. Entre as 19 categorias de Funções do corpo, apenas quatro estavam comprometidas em menos que 80% dos pacientes, sendo consideradas não-validadas, o mesmo foi observado para cinco das 29 de Atividades e participações e cinco das 25 categorias de Fatores ambientais. CONCLUSÕES: As categorias selecionadas para o core set da CIF para lombalgia foram consideradas empiricamente validadas e em conjunto permitiram descrever a multiplicidade de repercussões dessa condição de saúde sobre a funcionalidade das pessoas. O core set da CIF serve para guiar a intervenção terapêutica interdisciplinar.OBJETIVO: Validar empíricamente el core set de la CIF para dorsalgia y describir la funcionalidad de una muestra de pacientes con dorsalgia mecánica crónica inespecífica. MÉTODOS: Veintinueve pacientes de un centro de rehabilitación fueron evaluados por medio del core set de la CIF para dorsalgia, y mediante el cuestionario Roland Moris (QRM y SF-36. RESULTADOS: Todas las categorías de Estructuras del cuerpo del core set se mostraron comprometidas en por lo menos 80% de los pacientes, siendo consideradas validadas. Entre las 19 categorías de Funciones del cuerpo, sólo cuatro estaban comprometidas en menos de 80% de los pacientes, siendo consideradas como no validadas; lo mismo fue observado para 5 de las 29 categorías de Actividades y participaciones, y 5 de las 25 categorías de Factores ambientales. CONCLUSIONES: Las categorías seleccionadas para el

  19. Experiences Using Hybrid MPI/OpenMP in the Real World: Parallelization of a 3D CFD Solver for Multi-Core Node Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Jost

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Today most systems in high-performance computing (HPC feature a hierarchical hardware design: shared-memory nodes with several multi-core CPUs are connected via a network infrastructure. When parallelizing an application for these architectures it seems natural to employ a hierarchical programming model such as combining MPI and OpenMP. Nevertheless, there is the general lore that pure MPI outperforms the hybrid MPI/OpenMP approach. In this paper, we describe the hybrid MPI/OpenMP parallelization of IR3D (Incompressible Realistic 3-D code, a full-scale real-world application, which simulates the environmental effects on the evolution of vortices trailing behind control surfaces of underwater vehicles. We discuss performance, scalability and limitations of the pure MPI version of the code on a variety of hardware platforms and show how the hybrid approach can help to overcome certain limitations.

  20. RB reactor benchmark cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1998-01-01

    A selected set of the RB reactor benchmark cores is presented in this paper. The first results of validation of the well-known Monte Carlo MCNP TM code and adjoining neutron cross section libraries are given. They confirm the idea for the proposal of the new U-D 2 O criticality benchmark system and support the intention to include this system in the next edition of the recent OECD/NEA Project: International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Experiment, in near future. (author)

  1. Analysis Of Core Management For The Transition Cores Of RSG-GAS Reactor To Full-Silicide Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malem Sembiring, Tagor; Suparlina, Lily; Tukiran

    2001-01-01

    The core conversion of RSG-GAS reactor from oxide to silicide core with meat density of 2.96 g U/cc is still doing. At the end of 2000, the reactor has been operated for 3 transition cores which is the mixed core of oxide-silicide. Based on previous work, the calculated core parameter for the cores were obtained and it is needed 10 transition cores to achieve a full-silicide core. The objective of this work is to acquire the effect of the increment of the number of silicide fuel on the core parameters such as excess reactivity and shutdown margin. The measurement of the core parameters was carried out using the method of compensation of couple control rods. The experiment shows that the excess reactivity trends lower with the increment of the number of silicide fuel in the core. However, the shutdown margin is not change with the increment of the number of silicide fuel. Therefore, the transition cores can be operated safety to a full-silicide core

  2. Critical evaluation of the experiments and mathematical models for the determination of fission product release from the spherical fuel elements in cases of core heating accidents in modular HTR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    In this work, the thermal behaviour of modular reactors in cases of core heating accidents and the physical phenomena relevant for a release of radioactive materials from HTR fuel elements are explained as far as is necessary for understanding the work. The present mathematical models by which the release of radioactive materials from HTR fuel elements due to diffusion or breaking particles in cases of core heating accidents are also described, examined and evaluated with regard to their applicability to module reactors. The experiments used to verify the mathematical models are also evaluated. The mathematical models are in nearly all cases computer programs, which describe the complicated process of releasing radioactive materials quantitative mathematically. One should point out that these models are constantly being developed further, in line with the increasing amount of knowledge. To conclude the work, proposals are made for improving the certainty of information from experiments and mathematical models to determine the release behaviour of modular reactors. (orig./GL) [de

  3. Measuring methods in out-of-pile simulation experiments investigating the cooling capability of melted core material with internal heat production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieg, G.

    1977-01-01

    The present paper deals with the application of various measuring methods in model experiments for studying the steady heat transport from volume-heated liquid films by natural convection. The aim of these model experiments is to test computing models for temperature and flow behavior of internally heated liquid films at different boundary conditions. Therefore, besides pure heat transfer measurements, temperature as well as velocity fields must be experimentally determined. Determination of the temperature fields is carried our with suitable thermoelements of small size, the velocity fields are determined by the laser-Doppler method as well as the stroboscopic method for photographically visualizing the flow. (orig.) [de

  4. Industrial Guidelines for Undertaking a Hard-Core Employment Program: An Analytic Case Study of the Experience of an Urban Industrial Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feifer, Irwin; And Others

    Based on an analytically evaluative case study of a New York City furniture department store's experiences with a Manpower Administration contract, this report deals with the development and progress of the program as analyzed by one investigator through interviews with almost all of the participants in the program. As a result of the study,…

  5. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  6. Contribution to the experimental validation of the coupling between a particle accelerator and a subcritical core: Muse-3 and Muse-7 experiments; Contribution a la validation experimentale du couplage entre un accelerateur et un massif sous-critique: experience muse 3. et muse 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bompas, C A

    2000-12-01

    As part of the research on the Hybrid Systems and more specially on the physical phenomena involved in a sub-critical core coupled with an external source, it is necessary to qualify several neutronic parameters. These parameters characterize, on the one hand, the external source supplying the core with neutrons (importance, amplification) and, on the other hand, the sub-critical core (spatial distribution of flux, power emitted from the core, reactivity, influence of a spectrum degraded by the presence of buffers like lead). The MUSE Program consists of parametric studies of configuration with different compositions at different sub-critical levels supplied by different types of external source. The first part of this work concerns the first analyses of the static results obtained during the third phase of this experimental program (MUSE-III experiment) and also the preparation of the fourth phase (MUSE-IV experiment). This study has notably concluded on the superiority of a transition zone in lead compared to a sodium zone in terms of neutronic potential (because of the (n, 2n) reaction) and of the source importance. The second part of this work concerns the interpretation of the dynamic results obtained during the MUSE-III experiment and the realization of calculations on the MUSE-IV configurations. This study has shown the important impact of the hydrogenous materials on the external source for the MUSE-III dynamic results. It has also determined the applicability of the pulsed neutron source reactivity measurement technique and optimized the position of monitors for the future MUSE-IV experiment. (authors)

  7. N2O, NO, N2 and CO2 emissions from tropical savanna and grassland of northern Australia: an incubation experiment with intact soil cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Werner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Strong seasonal variability of hygric and thermal soil conditions are a defining environmental feature in northern Australia. However, how such changes affect the soil–atmosphere exchange of nitrous oxide (N2O, nitric oxide (NO and dinitrogen (N2 is still not well explored. By incubating intact soil cores from four sites (three savanna, one pasture under controlled soil temperatures (ST and soil moisture (SM we investigated the release of the trace gas fluxes of N2O, NO and carbon dioxide (CO2. Furthermore, the release of N2 due to denitrification was measured using the helium gas flow soil core technique. Under dry pre-incubation conditions NO and N2O emissions were very low (−2 h−1; 2O-N m−2 h−1 or in the case of N2O, even a net soil uptake was observed. Substantial NO (max: 306.5 μg N m−2 h−1 and relatively small N2O pulse emissions (max: 5.8 ± 5.0 μg N m−2 h−1 were recorded following soil wetting, but these pulses were short lived, lasting only up to 3 days. The total atmospheric loss of nitrogen was generally dominated by N2 emissions (82.4–99.3% of total N lost, although NO emissions contributed almost 43.2% to the total atmospheric nitrogen loss at 50% SM and 30 °C ST incubation settings (the contribution of N2 at these soil conditions was only 53.2%. N2O emissions were systematically higher for 3 of 12 sample locations, which indicates substantial spatial variability at site level, but on average soils acted as weak N2O sources or even sinks. By using a conservative upscale approach we estimate total annual emissions from savanna soils to average 0.12 kg N ha−1 yr−1 (N2O, 0.68 kg N ha−1 yr−1 (NO and 6.65 kg N ha−1 yr−1 (N2. The analysis of long-term SM and ST records makes it clear that extreme soil saturation that can lead to high N2O and N2 emissions only occurs a few days per year and thus has little impact on the annual total. The potential contribution of nitrogen released due to pulse events

  8. N2O, NO, N2 and CO2 emissions from tropical savanna and grassland of northern Australia: an incubation experiment with intact soil cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C.; Reiser, K.; Dannenmann, M.; Hutley, L. B.; Jacobeit, J.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2014-11-01

    Strong seasonal variability of hygric and thermal soil conditions are a defining environmental feature in northern Australia. However, how such changes affect the soil-atmosphere exchange of nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric oxide (NO) and dinitrogen (N2) is still not well explored. By incubating intact soil cores from four sites (three savanna, one pasture) under controlled soil temperatures (ST) and soil moisture (SM) we investigated the release of the trace gas fluxes of N2O, NO and carbon dioxide (CO2). Furthermore, the release of N2 due to denitrification was measured using the helium gas flow soil core technique. Under dry pre-incubation conditions NO and N2O emissions were very low (soil uptake was observed. Substantial NO (max: 306.5 μg N m-2 h-1) and relatively small N2O pulse emissions (max: 5.8 ± 5.0 μg N m-2 h-1) were recorded following soil wetting, but these pulses were short lived, lasting only up to 3 days. The total atmospheric loss of nitrogen was generally dominated by N2 emissions (82.4-99.3% of total N lost), although NO emissions contributed almost 43.2% to the total atmospheric nitrogen loss at 50% SM and 30 °C ST incubation settings (the contribution of N2 at these soil conditions was only 53.2%). N2O emissions were systematically higher for 3 of 12 sample locations, which indicates substantial spatial variability at site level, but on average soils acted as weak N2O sources or even sinks. By using a conservative upscale approach we estimate total annual emissions from savanna soils to average 0.12 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (N2O), 0.68 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (NO) and 6.65 kg N ha-1 yr-1 (N2). The analysis of long-term SM and ST records makes it clear that extreme soil saturation that can lead to high N2O and N2 emissions only occurs a few days per year and thus has little impact on the annual total. The potential contribution of nitrogen released due to pulse events compared to the total annual emissions was found to be of importance for NO emissions

  9. Correlation of needle core biopsy with excision histology in screen-detected B3 lesions: the Merrion Breast Screening Unit experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, B D

    2012-02-01

    AIMS: Needle core biopsy (NCB) is a widely-used technique for non-operative evaluation of screen-detected breast lesions. Although most NCBs are B2 (benign) or B5 (malignant), some fall into the B3 category of "uncertain malignant potential". This study aims to categorise the lesions prompting a B3 NCB in the Merrion Breast Screening Unit, and establish the incidence of malignancy on subsequent excision biopsy. METHODS: Patients attending the Merrion Breast Screening Unit in Dublin between 2000 and 2008 who had a B3 NCB were identified. The NCB pathology reports were reviewed and the diagnosis correlated with excision histology; the latter was classified as benign, atypical or malignant. Lesion-specific positive predictive values (PPVs) for malignancy were derived. RESULTS: 141 patients with a B3 NCB were identified. The most frequent lesions on NCB were radial scar (RS; n = 57), atypical intraductal epithelial proliferation (AIDEP; n = 25) and papillary lesion (n = 24). The final diagnosis was malignant in 22 patients (16%), atypical in 40 (28%) and benign in 79 (56%). Two of the patients with a malignant diagnosis had invasive carcinoma. The lesion-specific PPVs were: lobular neoplasia 50%, AIDEP 32%, columnar cell lesion with atypia 12.5%, RS 12.3%, papillary lesion 8.3%, suspected phyllodes tumour 7.7%, and spindle cell lesion 0%. Atypia on RS NCB predicted an atypical or malignant excision diagnosis, but atypia on papillary lesion NCB did not. CONCLUSIONS: One-sixth of B3 NCBs in this series proved to be malignant on excision. The PPV for malignancy varied according to lesion type.

  10. Prediction of PEC core mechanical behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchini, F.; Di Francesca, R.; Mcloughlin, J.; Neri, P.

    1984-01-01

    A brief description of the original PEC core restraint system is presented. Recent advanced seismic analysis studies have necessitated the introduction of anti-seismic design modifications which have increased the difficulties of fuel handling. Computer codes and numerical methods, used by ENEA to resolve core restraint and fuel handling problems are given together with an outline of mechanical tests and handling experiments in support of the anti-seismic core design. (author)

  11. Burnout experiments in freon 12 using different types of orifices to simulate the core grids - comparision between measured and predicted burnout values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsaounis, A.; Orlowski, R.; Fulfs, H.; Hofmann, K.; Ladeira, L.C.D.

    1978-06-01

    This paper will report on burnout experiments carried out in freon 12 mainly at steady state and further at mass flow or power transient conditions with annular test sections axially uniformly heating either the inside or both the inside and outside rod. The runs are performed without orifice and using three different types of orifices simulating the reactor spacer grid. An important influence of the flow restriction on burnout position and value is measured. Furthermore, the comparison between the burnout correlations W2, W3, BandW2 and GE and experimental results from the literature using simple test section geometries in water and freon 12 demonstrate, that the accuracy is more or less comparable for both fluids

  12. Unraveling the Geologic History of Antarctica Through the Study of Sediment and Rock Cores: The ANDRILL Education and Public Outreach Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, F. R.; Huffman, L.; Berg, M.; Levy, R.; Harwood, D.; Lacy, L.

    2007-12-01

    ANDRILL (ANtarctic geological DRILLing) is a multinational collaboration involving more than 250 scientists from Germany, Italy, New Zealand and the United States. The ANDRILL Program has mobilized scientists, technicians, drillers, engineers, students and educators from four member nations to bring world-class science into focus and provide in-depth immersive experiences to educators through the ARISE (ANDRILL Research Immersion for Science Educators) Program and Project Iceberg. During two seasons of scientific drilling, encompassing the McMurdo Ice Shelf (MIS) Project and the Southern McMurdo Sound (SMS) Project, 15 educators have been immersed in ANDRILL science and have participated in both learning and teaching experiences. Blogs, video journals, images and other resources were generated and distributed online to teachers, students and the general public through the ANDRILL website as part of Project Iceberg, which was used as a unifying theme for the outreach effort. The video journals chronicled the journey from Lincoln, Nebraska to Antarctica and introduced viewers to many aspects of the ANDRILL program in an engaging manner. An accompanying guide provided background information, discussion starters, and engaging activities for students and adults alike. Subtitles in German and Italian were used on each of the video journals in addition to the English narrative, and the resulting product was entitled, ANDRILL: A REAL WORLD GEOSCIENCE ADVENTURE. The primary objective was to introduce teachers, students, and the general public to Antarctica and the ANDRILL Program, and to provide preliminary insights into the following questions: How do scientists from around the world come together in the coldest, windiest, driest place on Earth to uncover the secrets that have been shrouded beneath the ice for millions of years? What secrets do the rocks record? How can I join the journey to learn more about Antarctica and ANDRILL?

  13. Percolation experiments to determine fluid-matrix interaction (with particular regard to pretreatment of the drill core); Kerndurchstroemungsversuche zur Ermittlung von Fluid-Matrix-Wechselwirkungen (unter besonderer Beruecksichtigung der Kernvorbehandlung)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M; Seibt, A [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Bohrtechnik und Fluidbergbau; Hoth, P [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    The injection of fluids into sandstone reservoirs leads to interactions between these waters, the reservoir rocks, and the formation fluids. Estimations about possible permeability reducing processes caused by these interactions are therefore of great importance for the exploitation of sandstone aquifers as geothermal reservoirs. Percolation experiments under in situ conditions with core samples from North German geothermal boreholes were done in order to investigate these fluid-rock interactions. (orig./AKF) [Deutsch] Die Injektion von Fluiden in Aquiferspeicher fuehrt zu Wechselwirkungen zwischen dem Speichergestein, den Formationsfluiden und den injizierten Loesungen. Fuer die Bewirtschaftung der Speicher sind insbesondere Kenntnisse ueber moegliche Permeabilitaetsreduzierungen durch diese Wechselwirkungen von Bedeutung. Mit Hilfe von Kern-Durchstroemungsexperimenten, durchgefuehrt unter lagerstaettenaehnlichen Bedingungen mit Original- bzw. modifizierten Fluiden, wurde daher das Durchstroemungsverhalten von unterschiedlich ausgebildeten Reservoirsandsteinen aus norddeutschen Geothermiebohrungen untersucht. (orig./AKF)

  14. Core Hunter 3: flexible core subset selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beukelaer, Herman; Davenport, Guy F; Fack, Veerle

    2018-05-31

    Core collections provide genebank curators and plant breeders a way to reduce size of their collections and populations, while minimizing impact on genetic diversity and allele frequency. Many methods have been proposed to generate core collections, often using distance metrics to quantify the similarity of two accessions, based on genetic marker data or phenotypic traits. Core Hunter is a multi-purpose core subset selection tool that uses local search algorithms to generate subsets relying on one or more metrics, including several distance metrics and allelic richness. In version 3 of Core Hunter (CH3) we have incorporated two new, improved methods for summarizing distances to quantify diversity or representativeness of the core collection. A comparison of CH3 and Core Hunter 2 (CH2) showed that these new metrics can be effectively optimized with less complex algorithms, as compared to those used in CH2. CH3 is more effective at maximizing the improved diversity metric than CH2, still ensures a high average and minimum distance, and is faster for large datasets. Using CH3, a simple stochastic hill-climber is able to find highly diverse core collections, and the more advanced parallel tempering algorithm further increases the quality of the core and further reduces variability across independent samples. We also evaluate the ability of CH3 to simultaneously maximize diversity, and either representativeness or allelic richness, and compare the results with those of the GDOpt and SimEli methods. CH3 can sample equally representative cores as GDOpt, which was specifically designed for this purpose, and is able to construct cores that are simultaneously more diverse, and either are more representative or have higher allelic richness, than those obtained by SimEli. In version 3, Core Hunter has been updated to include two new core subset selection metrics that construct cores for representativeness or diversity, with improved performance. It combines and outperforms the

  15. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  16. Argon/UF6 plasma exhaust gas reconstitution experiments using preheated fluorine and on-line diagnostics. [fissioning uranium plasma core reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of employing a flowing, high-temperature, pure fluorine/UF6 regeneration system to efficiently convert a large fraction of the effluent plasma exhaust back to pure UF6 was demonstrated. The custom built T.O.F. mass spectrometer sampling system permitted on-line measurements of the UF6 concentration at different locations in the exhaust system. Negligible amounts ( 100 ppm) of UF6 were detected in the axial bypass exhaust duct and the exhaust ducts downstream of the cryogenic trap system used to collect the UF6, thus verifying the overall system efficiency over a range of operating conditions. Use of a porous Monel duct as part of the exhaust duct system, including provision for injection of pure fluorine, provided a viable technique to eliminate uranium compound residue on the inside surface of the exhaust ducts. Typical uranium compound mass deposition per unit area of duct was 2 micron g/sq cm. This porous duct technique is directly applicable to future uranium compound transfer exhaust systems. Throughout these experiments, additional basic data on the corrosion aspects of hot, pressurized UF6/fluorine were also accumulated.

  17. The Core Journal Concept in Black Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissinger, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Black Studies scholars have shown interest in the core journal concept. Indeed, the idea of core journals for the study of the Black experience has changed several times since 1940. While Black Studies scholars are citing Black Studies journals with frequency, they also cite traditional disciplinary journals a great deal of the time. However,…

  18. Degradation and leaching behaviour of 14C-glufosinate in a silty sand soil. Experiments in outdoor lysimeters with undisturbed soil cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubiak, R.

    1996-12-01

    Degradation and leaching behaviour of 14 C-labelled glufosinate in a silty sand soil was investigated in two outdoor lysimeters after repeated application of 12.5 litres/hectare (1/ha) Basta (divided in 7.5 and 5 l/ha respectively). The 14 C-loss during application was 4.8-8.2%. The 14 C-content in the plants (vines and weeds) was 0.3% of that applied at the most. After 130 days, 25.9 and 25.5% of the applied material was found in the soil up to a depth of 40 cm. One year after the first application, this amount was still 18.5 and 18.6%. As a consequence of the renewed spraying, the detected amounts of 14 C were 44.3 and 43.1% some 107 days after the first application in the second experimental year. The additional investigation in lysimeter 2 after 373 days showed a decrease to 33.9%. Most of the detected radioactivity remained in the 0-10 cm soil layer. At the end of the experiment, the amount of 14 C in the 30-40 cm layer was 0.5%. The total residues in the 0-10 cm soil layer were less than 1 mg/kg at all dates of sampling, and only a small amount still represented the free acid of the active ingredient. The average values were 0.05 mg/kg after 130 days, 0.01 mg/kg after 363 days and 0.09 mg/kg at the following date of sampling. In the spring of the following year, no residues of the free acid were detectable. The radioactivity in the percolate amounted to a maximum of 0.11% of that applied and in no case represented the free acid of the ammonium salt. (author)

  19. Degradation and leaching behaviour of {sup 14}C-glufosinate in a silty sand soil. Experiments in outdoor lysimeters with undisturbed soil cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiak, R

    1996-12-01

    Degradation and leaching behaviour of {sup 14}C-labelled glufosinate in a silty sand soil was investigated in two outdoor lysimeters after repeated application of 12.5 litres/hectare (1/ha) Basta (divided in 7.5 and 5 l/ha respectively). The {sup 14}C-loss during application was 4.8-8.2%. The {sup 14}C-content in the plants (vines and weeds) was 0.3% of that applied at the most. After 130 days, 25.9 and 25.5% of the applied material was found in the soil up to a depth of 40 cm. One year after the first application, this amount was still 18.5 and 18.6%. As a consequence of the renewed spraying, the detected amounts of {sup 14}C were 44.3 and 43.1% some 107 days after the first application in the second experimental year. The additional investigation in lysimeter 2 after 373 days showed a decrease to 33.9%. Most of the detected radioactivity remained in the 0-10 cm soil layer. At the end of the experiment, the amount of {sup 14}C in the 30-40 cm layer was 0.5%. The total residues in the 0-10 cm soil layer were less than 1 mg/kg at all dates of sampling, and only a small amount still represented the free acid of the active ingredient. The average values were 0.05 mg/kg after 130 days, 0.01 mg/kg after 363 days and 0.09 mg/kg at the following date of sampling. In the spring of the following year, no residues of the free acid were detectable. The radioactivity in the percolate amounted to a maximum of 0.11% of that applied and in no case represented the free acid of the ammonium salt. (author)

  20. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  1. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  2. Seismic core shroud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puri, A.; Mullooly, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    A core shroud is provided, comprising: a coolant boundary, following the shape of the core boundary, for channeling the coolant through the fuel assemblies; a cylindrical band positioned inside the core barrel and surrounding the coolant boundary; and support members extending from the coolant boundary to the band, for transferring load from the coolant boundary to the band. The shroud may be assembled in parts using automated welding techniques, and it may be adjusted to fit the reactor core easily

  3. Core Values | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Core Values Core Values NREL's core values are rooted in a safe and supportive work environment guide our everyday actions and efforts: Safe and supportive work environment Respect for the rights physical and social environment Integrity Maintain the highest standard of ethics, honesty, and integrity

  4. Sidewall coring shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelman, Ya A; Konstantinov, L P; Martyshin, A N

    1966-12-12

    A sidewall coring shell consists of a housing and a detachable core catcher. The core lifter is provided with projections, the ends of which are situated in another plane, along the longitudinal axis of the lifter. The chamber has corresponding projections.

  5. Heysham II/Torness AGR core integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birch, A.L.; Hampson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The design and construction process for the Heysham II/Torness AGR core structures is presented. The design intent utilizing all past experience in designing and building AGR core structures is described. The major aspects of the design criteria and the design conditions are outlined to demonstrate how the integrity of the Heysham II/Torness core is assured. Since no recognized codes of practice for graphite core design exist, the National Nuclear Corporation (NNC) have conceived design criteria utilizing reserve factors based on their design experience. Target reserve factors are defined for particular loading conditions including the ultimate 'safe-shutdown earthquake'. The substantial programme of computer analysis and RandD work to substantiate the design, including seismic qualification, is described. In keeping with their responsibility for the detailed core structure design and the fuel path geometry (guide tube system), NNC attach great importance to design/manufacture/construction liaison, which is demonstrated in the quality assurance section. (author)

  6. Rotary core drills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-11-30

    The design of a rotary core drill is described. Primary consideration is given to the following component parts of the drill: the inner and outer tube, the core bit, an adapter, and the core lifter. The adapter has the form of a downward-converging sleeve and is mounted to the lower end of the inner tube. The lifter, extending from the adapter, is split along each side so that it can be held open to permit movement of a core. It is possible to grip a core by allowing the lifter to assume a closed position.

  7. FRG compact core - one year experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knop, W.; Schreiner, P.

    2001-01-01

    The GKSS research centre Geesthacht GmbH operates the MTR-type swimming pool reactor FRG-1 (5 MW) for more than 40 years. The FRG-1 has been upgraded and refurbished many times to follow the changing demands of safe operation and today's needs of high neutron flux for scientific research. High neutron fluxes with highest availability is the permanent demand of the science on the operation of a neutron source. (orig.)

  8. Core degradation and fission product release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.W.; Hagen, S.J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments on core degradation and melt progression in severe LWR accidents have provided reasonable understanding of the principal processes involved in the early phase of melt progression that extends through core degradation and metallic material melting and relocation. A general but not a quantitative understanding of late phase melt progression that involves ceramic material melting and relocation has also been obtained, primarily from the TMI-2 core examination. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge on core degradation and melt progression obtained from these integral experiments and of the principal remaining significant uncertainties. A summary is also given of the principal results on in-vessel fission product release obtained from these experiments. (author). 8 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  9. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate

  10. Core losses of a permanent magnet synchronous motor with an amorphous stator core under inverter and sinusoidal excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Yao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We report core loss properties of permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM with amorphous magnetic materials (AMM core under inverter and sinusoidal excitations. To discuss the core loss properties of AMM core, a comparison with non-oriented (NO core is also performed. In addition, based on both experiments and numerical simulations, we estimate higher (time and space harmonic components of the core losses under inverter and sinusoidal excitations. The core losses of PMSM are reduced by about 59% using AMM stator core instead of NO core under sinusoidal excitation. We show that the average decrease obtained by using AMM instead of NO in the stator core is about 94% in time harmonic components.

  11. Droplet generation during core reflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocamustafaogullari, G.; De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.

    1983-01-01

    The process of entrainment and disintegration of liquid droplets by a flow of steam has considerable practical importance in calculating the effectivenes of the emergency core cooling system. Liquid entrainment is also important in determination of the critical heat flux point in general. Thus the analysis of the reflooding phase of a LOCA requires detailed knowledge of droplet size. Droplet size is mainly determined by the droplet generation mechanisms involved. To study these mechanisms, data generated in the PWR FLECHT SEASET series of experiments was analyzed. In addition, an experiment was performed in which the hydrodynamics of low quality post-CHF flow (inverted annular flow) were simulated in an adiabatic test section

  12. Deuterium incorporation experiments from (3R)- and (3S)-[3-2H]leucine into characteristic isoprenoidal lipid-core of halophilic archaea suggests the involvement of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Noriaki; Tanoue, Ryo

    2017-11-01

    The stereochemical reaction course for the two C-3 hydrogens of leucine to produce a characteristic isoprenoidal lipid in halophilic archaea was observed using incubation experiments with whole cell Halobacterium salinarum. Deuterium-labeled (3R)- and (3S)-[3- 2 H]leucine were freshly prepared as substrates from 2,3-epoxy-4-methyl-1-pentanol. Incorporation of deuterium from (3S)-[3- 2 H]leucine and loss of deuterium from (3R)-[3- 2 H]leucine in the lipid-core of H. salinarum was observed. Taken together with the results of our previous report, involving the incubation of chiral-labeled [5- 2 H]leucine, these results strongly suggested an involvement of isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase in leucine conversion to isoprenoid lipid in halophilic archaea. The stereochemical course of the reaction (anti-elimination) might have been the same as that previously reported for mammalian enzyme reactions. Thus, these results suggested that branched amino acids were metabolized to mevalonate in archaea in a manner similar to other organisms.

  13. A study of 2-Dimensional effects in the core of a PWR during the refloading phase of a LOCA. Analysis of data of PERICLES experiments with the COBRA-NC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, H.J.

    1989-09-01

    The project is embedded in the Shared Cost Action Programme (SCA) of the European Communities (CEC) on Reactor Safety, Research Area No. 4, concerning the analysis of experimental data on loss-of-coolant accidents and emergency core cooling. The PERICLES experiments, performed at CEA in Grenoble, had the objective to study multidimensional effects under well defined conditions concentrating on the inter-assembly character of reflood phenomena. The general aim of the present project is to analyse PERICLES experimental data in order to improve models in relevant system codes. Particular objectives of the project are - the critical evaluation of the experimental data of PERICLES Run 8; - the drawing of conclusions from the data with respect to physical and geometrical models for the multi-bundle reflood analysis; - the performance of one-and multi-dimensional computations with COBRA-NC; - the comparison of computational and experimental data; and - the development of conclusions and specifications of additional research needed. The analysis of the experimetal data of Run 8 was performed by a computer programme developed for postprocessing data of any PERICLES experiment. The postprocessor includes an automatic location of the quenchfront and displays it graphically with respect to time, vertical and horizontal directions. Furthermore, rod and fluid temperatures versus height, quenchtimes versus height, densities versus height, and temperatures, pressures, densities etc. versus time can be plotted. As far as computer simulations are concerned, it was one of the objectives of the present study to analyse in greater detail the multidimensional phenomena during the reflooding phase of a LOCA and to compare the numerical results with the experimental data. Such simulation may serve to adjust and improve existing computer codes as well as to validate the codes. Moreover, computer simulations are able to give information which are not available from experimental data; in the

  14. The core paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  15. Nuclear reactor core flow baffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A flow baffling arrangement is disclosed for the core of a nuclear reactor. A plurality of core formers are aligned with the grids of the core fuel assemblies such that the high pressure drop areas in the core are at the same elevations as the high pressure drop areas about the core periphery. The arrangement minimizes core bypass flow, maintains cooling of the structure surrounding the core, and allows the utilization of alternative beneficial components such as neutron reflectors positioned near the core

  16. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments.DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  17. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  18. Transport-diffusion comparisons for small core LMFBR disruptive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, E.T.

    1977-11-01

    A number of numerical experiments were performed to assess the validity of diffusion theory for calculating the reactivity state of various small core LMFBR disrupted geometries. The disrupted configurations correspond, in general, to various configurations predicted by SAS3A for transient undercooling (TUC) and transient overpower (TOP) accidents for homogeneous cores and to the ZPPR-7 configurations for heterogeneous core. In all TUC cases diffusion theory was shown to be inadequate for the calculation of reactivity changes during core disassembly

  19. PWR core design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zeleznik, N.

    1992-01-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [sl

  20. Replaceable LMFBR core components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, E.A.; Cunningham, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding material and component performance in the high temperature, fast neutron environment of the LMFBR. Current data have provided strong assurance that the initial core component lifetime objectives of FFTF and CRBR can be met. At the same time, this knowledge translates directly into the need for improved core designs that utilize improved materials and advanced fuels required to meet objectives of low doubling times and extended core component lifetimes. An industrial base for the manufacture of quality core components has been developed in the US, and all procurements for the first two core equivalents for FFTF will be completed this year. However, the problem of fabricating recycled plutonium while dramatically reducing fabrication costs, minimizing personnel exposure, and protecting public health and safety must be addressed

  1. Lunar Core and Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  2. Internal core tightener

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynsvold, G.V.; Snyder, H.J. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    An internal core tightener is disclosed which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a ''fixed'' outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change. 5 claims, 12 drawing figures

  3. Heterogeneous cores for fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, R.; Spenke, H.

    1980-01-01

    Firstly, the motivation for heterogeneous cores is discussed. This is followed by an outline of two reactor designs, both of which are variants of the combined ring and island core. These designs are presented by means of figures and detailed tables. Subsequently, a description of two international projects at fast critical zero energy facilities is given. Both of them support the nuclear design of heterogeneous cores. In addition to a survey of these projects, a typical experiment is discussed: the measurement of rate distributions. (orig.) [de

  4. Bayesian estimation of core-melt probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    A very simple application of the canonical Bayesian algorithm is made to the problem of estimation of the probability of core melt in a commercial power reactor. An approximation to the results of the Rasmussen study on reactor safety is used as the prior distribution, and the observation that there has been no core melt yet is used as the single experiment. The result is a substantial decrease in the mean probability of core melt--factors of 2 to 4 for reasonable choices of parameters. The purpose is to illustrate the procedure, not to argue for the decrease

  5. Earth's inner core: Innermost inner core or hemispherical variations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Deuss, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412396610; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of Earth's deep inner core has important implications for core evolution, since it is thought to be related to the early stages of core formation. Previous studies have suggested that there exists an innermost inner core with distinct anisotropy relative to the rest of the inner core.

  6. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investi- gated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux density, ...

  7. Korrelasjon mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core

    OpenAIRE

    Berg-Olsen, Andrea Marie; Fugelsøy, Eivor; Maurstad, Ann-Louise

    2010-01-01

    Formålet med studien var å se hvilke korrelasjon det er mellom core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Testingen bestod av tre hoveddeler hvor vi testet core styrke, core stabilitet og utholdende styrke i core. Innenfor core styrke og utholdende styrke i core ble tre ulike tester utført. Ved måling av core stabilitet ble det gjennomført kun en test. I core styrke ble isometrisk abdominal fleksjon, isometrisk rygg ekstensjon og isometrisk lateral fleksjon testet. Sit-ups p...

  8. Modelamiento del proceso de carbonatación del hormigón (UR-CORE, con datos de conversión fraccional obtenidos a través de experimentos de difracción de neutrones monitoreados in-situ Modelling of the carbonation of concrete (UR-CORE from fractionafconversion data obtained through in situ monitored neutrón diffraction experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Castellote

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Una de las principales causas de despasivación de las armaduras embebidas en hormigón es la denominada carbonatación, que consiste en la neutralización de la matriz de cemento como consecuencia de su interacción con el C0(2 atmosférico. En este trabajo, se presenta un resumen del desarrollo de un modelo de carbonatación de las matrices de base cemento (UR-CORE. En primer lugar se ha llevado a cabo la carbonatación acelerada (al 100% de C0(2 sobre probetas de pasta de cemento con distintas matrices cementantes tomando espectros de Difracción de Neutrones a lo largo del tiempo de experimento. La evolución de la intensidad de los picos correspondientes a cada una de las fases involucradas ha proporcionado datos de conversión fraccional en tiempo real, lo que ha posibilitado una aproximación cinética al fenómeno de la carbonatación y el desarrollo del modelo UR-CORE, basado en los principios de los sistemas de "núcleo sin reaccionar", típicos de los procesos en ingeniería química.One of the most important depassivation mechanisms of steel reinforcement in concrete is that caused by the neutralisation of the cement matrix. In this work, a summary of the development of a model for the carbonation of cementitious matrixes (UR-CORE is presented. On one hand, in-situ monitoring of the changes that take place in the phase composition of cement pastes during accelerated carbonation (100% C02 for different binders, is reported, by taking Neutrón Diffraction patterns in parallel with the carbonation experiments. The variation of the intensity of chosen reflections for each phase along the experiment supplied data, in real time, for fractional conversión of different phases. On the second hand, fitting of these results allowed to make a quantitative approach to the kinetics of the carbonation of the different phases, and develop the UR-CORE model that is based on the principies of the "unreacted-core" systems, typical of chemical

  9. Gas Hydrate Investigations Using Pressure Core Analysis: Current Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultheiss, P.; Holland, M.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M.

    2006-12-01

    Recently there have been a number of major gas hydrate expeditions, both academic and commercially oriented, that have benefited from advances in the practice of pressure coring and pressure core analysis, especially using the HYACINTH pressure coring systems. We report on the now mature process of pressure core acquisition, pressure core handling and pressure core analysis and the results from the analysis of pressure cores, which have revealed important in situ properties along with some remarkable views of gas hydrate morphologies. Pressure coring success rates have improved as the tools have been modified and adapted for use on different drilling platforms. To ensure that pressure cores remain within the hydrate stability zone, tool deployment, recovery and on-deck handling procedures now mitigate against unwanted temperature rises. Core analysis has been integrated into the core transfer protocol and automated nondestructive measurements, including P-wave velocity, gamma density, and X-ray imaging, are routinely made on cores. Pressure cores can be subjected to controlled depressurization experiments while nondestructive measurements are being made, or cores can be stored at in situ conditions for further analysis and subsampling.

  10. Windscale pile core surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, R.F.; Mathews, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    The two Windscale Piles were closed down, defueled as far as possible and mothballed for thirty years following a fire in the core of Pile 1 in 1957 resulting from the spontaneous release of stored Wigner energy in the graphite moderator. Decommissioning of the reactors commenced in 1987 and has reached the stage where the condition of both cores needs to be determined. To this end, non-intrusive and intrusive surveys and sampling of the cores have been planned and partly implemented. The objectives for each Pile differ slightly. The location and quantity of fuel remaining in the damaged core of Pile 1 needed to be established, whereas the removal of all fuel from Pile 2 needed to be confirmed. In Pile 1, the possible existence of a void in the core is to be explored and in Pile 2, the level of Wigner energy remaining required to be quantified. Levels of radioactivity in both cores needed to be measured. The planning of the surveys is described including strategy, design, safety case preparation and the remote handling and viewing equipment required to carry out the inspection, sampling and monitoring work. The results from the completed non-intrusive survey of Pile 2 are summarised. They confirm that the core is empty and the graphite is in good condition. The survey of Pile 1 has just started. (UK)

  11. Core shroud corner joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  12. IGCSE core mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wall, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Give your core level students the support and framework they require to get their best grades with this book dedicated to the core level content of the revised syllabus and written specifically to ensure a more appropriate pace. This title has been written for Core content of the revised Cambridge IGCSE Mathematics (0580) syllabus for first teaching from 2013. ? Gives students the practice they require to deepen their understanding through plenty of practice questions. ? Consolidates learning with unique digital resources on the CD, included free with every book. We are working with Cambridge

  13. LMFR core thermohydraulics: Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-06-01

    One of the fundamental steps for a successful reactor core thermohydraulic design is the capability to predict, reliably and accurately, the temperature distribution in the core assemblies. A detailed knowledge of the assembly and fuel pin thermohydraulic behaviour in the steady state and transient conditions is an indispensable prerequisite to safe and stable operation of the reactor. Considerable experimental and theoretical studies on various aspects of LMFR core thermohydraulics are necessary to acquire such knowledge. During the last decade, there have been substantial advances in fast reactor core thermohydraulic design and operation in several countries with fast reactor programmes (notably in France, the Russian Federation, Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany and the United States of America). Chief among these has been the demonstration of reliable operation of reactor cores at a high burnup. During the last years, some additional countries such as China, India and the Republic of Korea have launched new fast reactor programmes. International exchange of information and experience on LMFR development including core thermohydraulic design is becoming of increasing importance to these countries. It is with this focus that the IAEA convened the Technical Committee on 'Methods and Codes for Calculations of Thermohydraulic Parameters for Fuel, Absorber Pins and Assemblies of LMFR's with Traditional and Burner Cores'. This meeting, attended by participants from seven countries, brought together a group of international experts to review and discuss the thermohydraulic advances and design approaches providing a reliable, safe and robust reactor core, as well as to exchange the experience accumulated in different countries of using the codes for thermohydraulic calculations and to discuss the issues requiring further research and development. A total of thirty technical papers presented covered theoretical and computational issues as well as experiments under

  14. WWER-440 type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizov, J.; Svec, P.; Rajci, T.

    1987-01-01

    Assemblies with patly spent fuel of enrichment within 5 and 36 MWd/kg U or lower than the maximum enrichment of freshly charged fuel are placed in at least one of the peripheral positions of each hexagonal sector of the WWER-440 reactor type core. This increases fuel availability and reduces the integral neutron dose to the reactor vessel. The duration is extended of the reactor campaign and/or the mean fuel enrichment necessary for the required duration of the period between refuellings is reduced. Thus, fuel costs are reduced by 1 up to 3%. The results obtained in the experiment are tabulated. (J.B.). 1 fig., 3 tabs

  15. TMI-2 Core Shipping Preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, L.J.; Barkanic, R.J.; Conaway, W.T. II; Schmoker, D. S.; Post, Roy G.

    1988-01-01

    Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes of the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hard-ware-systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience. (author)

  16. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.; Dugan, E.T.

    1983-01-01

    A heterogeneous gas core nuclear reactor is disclosed comprising a core barrel provided interiorly with an array of moderator-containing tubes and being otherwise filled with a fissile and/or fertile gaseous fuel medium. The fuel medium may be flowed through the chamber and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a fluid which is flowed through the tubes and through an external circuit in which heat is extracted. The moderator may be a solid which may be cooled by a fluid flowing within the tubes and through an external heat extraction circuit. The core barrel is surrounded by moderator/coolant material. Fissionable blanket material may be disposed inwardly or outwardly of the core barrel

  17. iPSC Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) Core was created in 2011 to accelerate stem cell research in the NHLBI by providing investigators consultation, technical...

  18. Core Flight Software

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Core Flight Software (CFS) project purpose is to analyze applicability, and evolve and extend the reusability of the CFS system originally developed by...

  19. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  20. Restraint system for core elements of a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Class, G.

    1975-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, a core element bundle formed of a plurality of side-by-side arranged core elements is surrounded by restraining elements that exert a radially inwardly directly restraining force generating friction forces between the core elements in a restraining plane that is transverse to the core element axes. The adjoining core elements are in rolling contact with one another in the restraining plane by virtue of rolling-type bearing elements supported in the core elements. (Official Gazette)

  1. Heterogeneous gas core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.I.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary investigations of a heterogeneous gas core reactor (HGCR) concept suggest that this potential power reactor offers distinct advantages over other existing or conceptual reactor power plants. One of the most favorable features of the HGCR is the flexibility of the power producing system which allows it to be efficiently designed to conform to a desired optimum condition without major conceptual changes. The arrangement of bundles of moderator/coolant channels in a fissionable gas or mixture of gases makes a truly heterogeneous nuclear reactor core. It is this full heterogeneity for a gas-fueled reactor core which accounts for the novelty of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and leads to noted significant advantages over previous gas core systems with respect to neutron and fuel economy, power density, and heat transfer characteristics. The purpose of this work is to provide an insight into the design, operating characteristics, and safety of a heterogeneous gas core reactor system. The studies consist mainly of neutronic, energetic and kinetic analyses of the power producing and conversion systems as a preliminary assessment of the heterogeneous gas core reactor concept and basic design. The results of the conducted research indicate a high potential for the heterogeneous gas core reactor system as an electrical power generating unit (either large or small), with an overall efficiency as high as 40 to 45%. The HGCR system is found to be stable and safe, under the conditions imposed upon the analyses conducted in this work, due to the inherent safety of ann expanding gaseous fuel and the intrinsic feedback effects of the gas and water coolant

  2. FBR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamiya, Tadashi; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Fujimura, Koji; Murakami, Tomoko.

    1995-01-01

    Neutron reflectors are disposed at the periphery of a reactor core fuel region and a blanket region, and a neutron shielding region is disposed at the periphery of them. The neutron reflector has a hollow duct structure having a sealed upper portion, a lower portion opened to cooling water, in which a gas and coolants separately sealed in the inside thereof. A driving pressure of a primary recycling pump is lowered upon reduction of coolant flow rate, then the liquid level of coolants in the neutron reflector is lowered due to imbalance between the driving pressure and a gas pressure, so that coolants having an effect as a reflector are eliminated from the outer circumference of the reactor core. Therefore, the amount of neutrons leaking from the reactor core is increased, and negative reactivity is charged to the reactor core. The negative reactivity of the neutron reflector is made greater than a power compensation reactivity. Since this enables reactor scram by using an inherent performance of the reactor core, the reactor core safety of an LMFBR-type reactor can be improved. (I.N.)

  3. The earths innermost core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, J.N.

    1989-01-01

    A new earth model is advanced with a solid innermost core at the centre of the Earth where elements heavier than iron, over and above what can be retained in solution in the iron core, are collected. The innermost core is separated from the solid iron-nickel core by a shell of liquid copper. The innermost core has a natural vibration measured on the earth's surface as the long period 26 seconds microseisms. The earth was formed initially as a liquid sphere with a relatively thin solid crust above the Byerly discontinuity. The trace elements that entered the innermost core amounted to only 0.925 ppm of the molten mass. Gravitational differentiation must have led to the separation of an explosive thickness of pure 235 U causing a fission explosion that could expel beyond the Roche limit a crustal scab which would form the centre piece of the moon. A reservoir of helium floats on the liquid copper. A small proportion of helium-3, a relic of the ancient fission explosion present there will spell the exciting magnetic field. The field is stable for thousands of years because of the presence of large quantity of helium-4 which accounts for most of the gaseous collisions that will not disturb the atomic spin of helium-3 atoms. This field is prone to sudden reversals after long periods of stability. (author). 14 refs

  4. Nonlinear core deflection in injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poungthong, P.; Giacomin, A. J.; Saengow, C.; Kolitawong, C.; Liao, H.-C.; Tseng, S.-C.

    2018-05-01

    Injection molding of thin slender parts is often complicated by core deflection. This deflection is caused by molten plastics race tracking through the slit between the core and the rigid cavity wall. The pressure of this liquid exerts a lateral force of the slender core causing the core to bend, and this bending is governed by a nonlinear fifth order ordinary differential equation for the deflection that is not directly in the position along the core. Here we subject this differential equation to 6 sets of boundary conditions, corresponding to 6 commercial core constraints. For each such set of boundary conditions, we develop an explicit approximate analytical solution, including both a linear term and a nonlinear term. By comparison with finite difference solutions, we find our new analytical solutions to be accurate. We then use these solutions to derive explicit analytical approximations for maximum deflections and for the core position of these maximum deflections. Our experiments on the base-gated free-tip boundary condition agree closely with our new explicit approximate analytical solution.

  5. Reactor core control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hiroki

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a reactor core control device, in which switching from a manual operation to an automatic operation, and the control for the parameter of an automatic operation device are facilitated. Namely, the hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter by an manual operation input means is stored. The hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter is collected. The state of the reactor core simulated by an operation control to which the collected operation parameters are manually inputted is determined as an input of the reactor core state to the automatic input means. The record of operation upon manual operation is stored as a hysteresis of control for the operation parameter, but the hysteresis information is not only the result of manual operation of the operation parameter. This is results of operation conducted by a skilled operator who judge the state of the reactor core to be optimum. Accordingly, it involves information relevant to the reactor core state. Then, it is considered that the optimum automatic operation is not deviated greatly from the manual operation. (I.S.)

  6. The PWR cores management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, J.C.; Rippert, D.; Johner, J.

    2000-01-01

    During the meeting of the 25 january 2000, organized by the SFEN, scientists and plant operators in the domain of the PWR debated on the PWR cores management. The five first papers propose general and economic information on the PWR and also the fast neutron reactors chains in the electric power market: statistics on the electric power industry, nuclear plant unit management, the ITER project and the future of the thermonuclear fusion, the treasurer's and chairman's reports. A second part offers more technical papers concerning the PWR cores management: performance and optimization, in service load planning, the cores management in the other countries, impacts on the research and development programs. (A.L.B.)

  7. Molten core retention assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampe, R.F.

    1976-01-01

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods

  8. Core status computing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To calculate power distribution, flow rate and the like in the reactor core with high accuracy in a BWR type reactor. Constitution: Total flow rate signals, traverse incore probe (TIP) signals as the neutron detector signals, thermal power signals and pressure signals are inputted into a process computer, where the power distribution and the flow rate distribution in the reactor core are calculated. A function generator connected to the process computer calculates the absolute flow rate passing through optional fuel assemblies using, as variables, flow rate signals from the introduction part for fuel assembly flow rate signals, data signals from the introduction part for the geometrical configuration data at the flow rate measuring site of fuel assemblies, total flow rate signals for the reactor core and the signals from the process computer. Numerical values thus obtained are given to the process computer as correction signals to perform correction for the experimental data. (Moriyama, K.)

  9. TMI-2 core examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbins, R.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Owen, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    The examination of the damaged core at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor is structured to address the following safety issues: fission product release, transport, and deposition; core coolability; containment integrity; and recriticality during severe accidents; as well as zircaloy cladding ballooning and oxidation during so-called design basis accidents. The numbers of TMI-2 components or samples to be examined, the priority of each examination, the safety issue addressed by each examination, the principal examination techniques to be employed, and the data to be obtained and the principal uses of the data are discussed in this paper

  10. Superconducting tin core fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, Daniel; Liang, Yongxuan; Hill, Cary; Kaur, Gurbinder; Pickrell, Gary

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated superconductivity in a fiber with a tin core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a modified melt-draw technique and maintained core diameters ranging from 50-300 microns and overall diameters of 125-800 microns. Superconductivity of this fiber design was validated via the traditional four-probe test method in a bath of liquid helium at temperatures on the order of 3.8 K. The synthesis route and fiber design are perquisites to ongoing research dedicated all-fiber optoelectronics and the relationships between superconductivity and the material structures, as well as corresponding fabrication techniques. (orig.)

  11. LMFBR core design analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, M.; Yang, J.C.; Yoh, K.C.; Suk, S.D.; Soh, D.S.; Kim, Y.M.

    1980-01-01

    The design parameters of a commercial-scale fast breeder reactor which is currently under construction by regeneration of these data is preliminary analyzed. The analysis of nuclear and thermal characteristics as well as safety features of this reactor is emphasized. And the evaluation of the initial core mentioned in the system description is carried out in the areas of its kinetics and control system, and, at the same time, the flow distribution of sodium and temperature distribution of the initial FBR core system are calculated. (KAERI INIS Section)

  12. Nuclear core catchers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1976-01-01

    A receptacle is described for taking the molten fragments of a nuclear reactor during a reactor core fusion accident. The receptacle is placed under the reactor. It includes at least one receptacle for the reactor core fragments, with a dome shaped part to distribute the molten fragments and at least one outside layer of alumina bricks around the dome. The characteristic of this receptacle is that the outer layer of bricks contains neutron poison rods which pass through the bricks and protrude in relation to them [fr

  13. Organizing Core Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    has remained much the same within the last 10 years. However, how the core task has been organized has changed considerable under the influence of various “organizing devices”. The paper focusses on how organizing devices such as risk assessment, output-focus, effect orientation, and treatment...... projects influence the organization of core tasks within the tax administration. The paper shows that the organizational transformations based on the use of these devices have had consequences both for the overall collection of revenue and for the employees’ feeling of “making a difference”. All in all...

  14. GREEN CORE HOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NECULAI Oana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Green Core House is a construction concept with low environmental impact, having as main central element a greenhouse. The greenhouse has the innovative role to use the biomass energy provided by plants to save energy. Although it is the central piece, the greenhouse is not the most innovative part of the Green Core House, but the whole building ensemble because it integrates many other sustainable systems as "waste purification systems", "transparent photovoltaic panels" or "double skin façades".

  15. PWR core design calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkov, A; Ravnik, M; Zeleznik, N [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1992-07-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [Slovenian] Opisali smo programski paket CORD-2, ki se uporablja pri projektnih izracunih sredice pri upravljanju tlacnovodnega reaktorja. Prikazana je uporaba paketa in racunskih postopkov za tipicne probleme, ki nastopajo pri projektiranju sredice. Primerjava glavnih rezultatov z eksperimentalnimi vrednostmi je predstavljena kot del preveritvenega procesa. (author)

  16. Exploring Function Transformations Using the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Becky; Giacin, Rich

    2013-01-01

    When examining transformations of the plane in geometry, teachers typically have students experiment with transformations of polygons. Students are usually quick to notice patterns with ordered pairs. The Common Core State Standard, Geometry, Congruence 2 (G-CO.2), requires students to describe transformations as functions that take points in the…

  17. Reconstitution of fuel assemblies and core components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummel, Wolfgang; Langenberger, Jan [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Due to AREVA's experience and big portfolio of techniques, reconstitution of fuel assemblies and core components at light water reactors is possible within a reasonable timeframe and with interesting cost benefit. Customer feedback indicates the sustainability of such reconstitutions. As a result, a long-term maintenance of value can be assured and early waste disposal can be avoided. (orig.)

  18. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly ...

  19. Development of Core Design Technology for LMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeong Il; Hong, S. G.; Jang, J. W. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    developed and programmed. The 1st order and exact perturbation theory calculation module to use in the TRI-Z geometry model was developed. The SFR inter-assembly core thermal flow analysis code MATCOM has been developed using the sub-channel code MATRA-LMR and the porous media code COMMIX-1AR/P. The analysis model for thermal creep, irradiation creep and the creep rupture strength characteristics for the Mod. HT9 were developed based on the available experiment data. To analyze the pin power distributions considering the influence of non-fuel pin inside fuel assembly, the form function concept was introduced and the program for the pin power calculation was develop.

  20. Multi-core processing and scheduling performance in CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández, J M; Evans, D; Foulkes, S

    2012-01-01

    Commodity hardware is going many-core. We might soon not be able to satisfy the job memory needs per core in the current single-core processing model in High Energy Physics. In addition, an ever increasing number of independent and incoherent jobs running on the same physical hardware not sharing resources might significantly affect processing performance. It will be essential to effectively utilize the multi-core architecture. CMS has incorporated support for multi-core processing in the event processing framework and the workload management system. Multi-core processing jobs share common data in memory, such us the code libraries, detector geometry and conditions data, resulting in a much lower memory usage than standard single-core independent jobs. Exploiting this new processing model requires a new model in computing resource allocation, departing from the standard single-core allocation for a job. The experiment job management system needs to have control over a larger quantum of resource since multi-core aware jobs require the scheduling of multiples cores simultaneously. CMS is exploring the approach of using whole nodes as unit in the workload management system where all cores of a node are allocated to a multi-core job. Whole-node scheduling allows for optimization of the data/workflow management (e.g. I/O caching, local merging) but efficient utilization of all scheduled cores is challenging. Dedicated whole-node queues have been setup at all Tier-1 centers for exploring multi-core processing workflows in CMS. We present the evaluation of the performance scheduling and executing multi-core workflows in whole-node queues compared to the standard single-core processing workflows.

  1. Progress of full MOX core design in ABWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izutsu, S.; Sasagawa, M.; Aoyama, M.; Maruyama, H.; Suzuki, T.

    2000-01-01

    Full MOX ABWR core design has been made, based on the MOX design concept of 8x8 bundle configuration with a large central water rod, 40 GWd/t maximum bundle exposure, and the compatibility with 9x9 high-burnup UO 2 bundles. Core performance on shutdown margin and thermal margin of the MOX-loaded core is similar to that of UO 2 cores for the range from full UO 2 core to full MOX core. Safety analyses based on its safety parameters and MOX property have shown its conformity to the design criteria in Japan. In order to confirm the applicability of the nuclear design method to full MOX cores, Tank-type Critical Assembly (TCA) experiment data have been analyzed on criticality, power distribution and β eff /l measurements. (author)

  2. Core monitoring with analytical model adaption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linford, R.B.; Martin, C.L.; Parkos, G.R.; Rahnema, F.; Williams, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    The monitoring of BWR cores has evolved rapidly due to more capable computer systems, improved analytical models and new types of core instrumentation. Coupling of first principles diffusion theory models such as applied to design to the core instrumentation has been achieved by GE with an adaptive methodology in the 3D Minicore system. The adaptive methods allow definition of 'leakage parameters' which are incorporated directly into the diffusion models to enhance monitoring accuracy and predictions. These improved models for core monitoring allow for substitution of traversing in-core probe (TIP) and local power range monitor (LPRM) with calculations to continue monitoring with no loss of accuracy or reduction of thermal limits. Experience in small BWR cores has shown that with one out of three TIP machines failed there was no operating limitation or impact from the substitute calculations. Other capabilities exist in 3D Monicore to align TIPs more accurately and accommodate other types of system measurements or anomalies. 3D Monicore also includes an accurate predictive capability which uses the adaptive results from previous monitoring calculations and is used to plan and optimize reactor maneuvers/operations to improve operating efficiency and reduce support requirements

  3. Nuclear core baffling apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, F.W. Jr.; Silverblatt, B.L.; Knight, C.B.; Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for baffling the flow of reactor coolant fluid into and about the core of a nuclear reactor is described. The apparatus includes a plurality of longitudinally aligned baffle plates with mating surfaces that allow longitudinal growth with temperature increases while alleviating both leakage through the aligned plates and stresses on the components supporting the plates

  4. The Uncommon Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This author contends that the United States neglects creativity in its education system. To see this, he states, one may look at the Common Core State Standards. If one searches the English Language Arts and Literacy standards for the words "creative," "innovative," and "original"--and any associated terms, one will…

  5. Utah's New Mathematics Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Utah has adopted more rigorous mathematics standards known as the Utah Mathematics Core Standards. They are the foundation of the mathematics curriculum for the State of Utah. The standards include the skills and understanding students need to succeed in college and careers. They include rigorous content and application of knowledge and reflect…

  6. Some Core Contested Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  7. Reactor core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashinakagawa, Emiko; Sato, Kanemitsu.

    1992-01-01

    Taking notice on the fact that Fe based alloys and Ni based alloys are corrosion resistant in a special atmosphere of a nuclear reactor, Fe or Ni based alloys are applied to reactor core structural components such as fuel cladding tubes, fuel channels, spacers, etc. On the other hand, the neutron absorption cross section of zirconium is 0.18 barn while that of iron is 2.52 barn and that of nickel is 4.6 barn, which amounts to 14 to 25 times compared with that of zirconium. Accordingly, if the reactor core structural components are constituted by the Fe or Ni based alloys, neutron economy is lowered. Since it is desirable that neutrons contribute to uranium fission with least absorption to the reactor core structural components, the reactor core structural components are constituted with the Fe or Ni based alloys of good corrosion resistance only at a portion in contact with reactor water, that is, at a surface portion, while the main body is constituted with zircalloy in the present invention. Accordingly, corrosion resistnace can be kept while keeping small neutron absorption cross section. (T.M.)

  8. Core damage risk indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szikszai, T.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to show a method for the fast recalculation of the PSA. To avoid the information loose, it is necessary to simplify the PSA models, or at least reorganize them. The method, introduced in this document, require that preparation, so we try to show, how to do that. This document is an introduction. This is the starting point of the work related to the development of the risk indicators. In the future, with the application of this method, we are going to show an everyday use of the PSA results to produce the indicators of the core damage risk. There are two different indicators of the plant safety performance, related to the core damage risk. The first is the core damage frequency indicator (CDFI), and the second is the core damage probability indicator (CDPI). Of course, we cannot describe all of the possible ways to use these indicators, rather we will try to introduce the requirements to establish such an indicator system and the calculation process

  9. Core calculations of JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In material testing reactors like the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) of 50 MW in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of irradiated samples show complex distributions. It is necessary to assess the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of an irradiation field by carrying out the nuclear calculation of the core for every operation cycle. In order to advance core calculation, in the JMTR, the application of MCNP to the assessment of core reactivity and neutron flux and spectra has been investigated. In this study, in order to reduce the time for calculation and variance, the comparison of the results of the calculations by the use of K code and fixed source and the use of Weight Window were investigated. As to the calculation method, the modeling of the total JMTR core, the conditions for calculation and the adopted variance reduction technique are explained. The results of calculation are shown. Significant difference was not observed in the results of neutron flux calculations according to the difference of the modeling of fuel region in the calculations by K code and fixed source. The method of assessing the results of neutron flux calculation is described. (K.I.)

  10. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Ken.

    1989-01-01

    In PWR type reactors, a cooling water spray portion of emergency core cooling pipelines incorporated into pipelines on high temperature side is protruded to the inside of an upper plenum. Upon rupture of primary pipelines, pressure in a pressure vessel is abruptly reduced to generate a great amount of steams in the reactor core, which are discharged at a high flow rate into the primary pipelines on high temperature side. However, since the inside of the upper plenum has a larger area and the steam flow is slow, as compared with that of the pipelines on the high temperature side, ECCS water can surely be supplied into the reactor core to promote the re-flooding of the reactor core and effectively cool the reactor. Since the nuclear reactor can effectively be cooled to enable the promotion of pressure reduction and effective supply of coolants during the period of pressure reduction upon LOCA, the capacity of the pressure accumulation vessel can be decreased. Further, the re-flooding time for the reactor is shortened to provide an effect contributing to the improvement of the safety and the reduction of the cost. (N.H.)

  11. Inflation targeting and core inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Smith

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the interaction of core inflation and inflation targeting as a monetary policy regime. Interest in core inflation has grown because of inflation targeting. Core inflation is defined in numerous ways giving rise to many potential measures; this paper defines core inflation as the best forecaster of inflation. A cross-country study finds before the start of inflation targeting, but not after, core inflation differs between non-inflation targeters and inflation targeters. Thr...

  12. CORE annual report 2006; CORE Jahresbericht 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gut, A

    2007-04-15

    This annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the activities of the Swiss Federal Commission on Energy Research CORE in 2006. The six main areas of work during the period 2004 - 2007 are examined, including a review of the SFOE's energy research programme, a road-map for the way towards the realisation of a 2000-watt society, the formulation of an energy research concept for 2008 - 2011, international co-operation, the dissemination of information and the assessment of existing and new instruments. International activities and Switzerland's involvement in energy research within the framework of the International Energy Agency IEA are discussed. New and existing projects are listed and the work done at the Competence Centre for Energy and Mobility noted. The Swiss Technology Award 2007 is presented. Information supplied to interested bodies to help improve knowledge on research work being done and to help make discussions on future energy supply more objective is discussed.

  13. European ERANOS formulaire for fast reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimpault, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    ERANOS code scheme was developed within the European collaboration on fast reactors. It contains all the functions required to calculate a complete set of core, shielding and fuel cycle parameters for LMFR cores. Nuclear data are taken from recent evaluations (JEF2.2) and adjusted on integral experiments (ERALIB1). Calculational scheme uses the ECCO cell code to generate cross section data. Whole core calculations are carried out using the spatial modules BISTRO (Sn) and TGVNARIANT (nodal method). Validation is based on integral and power reactor experiments. Integral experiments are also used for adjustment of nuclear data

  14. Research on plasma core reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, G.A.; Barton, D.M.; Helmick, H.H.; Bernard, W.; White, R.H.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments and theoretical studies are being conducted for NASA on critical assemblies with 1-m-diam by 1-m-long low-density cores surrounded by a thick beryllium reflector. These assemblies make extensive use of existing nuclear propulsion reactor components, facilities, and instrumentation. Due to excessive porosity in the reflector, the initial critical mass was 19 kg U(93.2). Addition of a 17-cm-thick by 89-cm-diam beryllium flux trap in the cavity reduced the critical mass to 7 kg when all the uranium was in the zone just outside the flux trap. A mockup aluminum UF 6 container was placed inside the flux trap and fueled with uranium-graphite elements. Fission distributions and reactivity worths of fuel and structural materials were measured. Finally, an 85,000-cm 3 aluminum canister in the central region was fueled with UF 6 gas and fission density distributions determined. These results will be used to guide the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test energy removal by optical radiation

  15. Ice cores and palaeoclimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krogh Andersen, K.; Ditlevsen, P.; Steffensen, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Ice cores from Greenland give testimony of a highly variable climate during the last glacial period. Dramatic climate warmings of 15 to 25 deg. C for the annual average temperature in less than a human lifetime have been documented. Several questions arise: Why is the Holocene so stable? Is climatic instability only a property of glacial periods? What is the mechanism behind the sudden climate changes? Are the increased temperatures in the past century man-made? And what happens in the future? The ice core community tries to attack some of these problems. The NGRIP ice core currently being drilled is analysed in very high detail, allowing for a very precise dating of climate events. It will be possible to study some of the fast changes on a year by year basis and from this we expect to find clues to the sequence of events during rapid changes. New techniques are hoped to allow for detection of annual layers as far back as 100,000 years and thus a much improved time scale over past climate changes. It is also hoped to find ice from the Eemian period. If the Eemian layers confirm the GRIP sequence, the Eemian was actually climatically unstable just as the glacial period. This would mean that the stability of the Holocene is unique. It would also mean, that if human made global warming indeed occurs, we could jeopardize the Holocene stability and create an unstable 'Eemian situation' which ultimately could start an ice age. Currenlty mankind is changing the composition of the atmosphere. Ice cores document significant increases in greenhouse gases, and due to increased emissions of sulfuric and nitric acid from fossil fuel burning, combustion engines and agriculture, modern Greenland snow is 3 - 5 times more acidic than pre-industrial snow (Mayewski et al., 1986). However, the magnitude and abruptness of the temperature changes of the past century do not exceed the magnitude of natural variability. It is from the ice core perspective thus not possible to attribute the

  16. Dynamic Musical Communication of Core Affect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eFlaig

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Is there something special about the way music communicates feelings? Theorists since Meyer (1956 have attempted to explain how music could stimulate varied and subtle affective experiences by violating learned expectancies, or by mimicking other forms of social interaction. Our proposal is that music speaks to the brain in its own language; it need not imitate any other form of communication. We review recent theoretical and empirical literature, which suggests that all conscious processes consist of dynamic neural events, produced by spatially dispersed processes in the physical brain. Intentional thought and affective experience arise as dynamical aspects of neural events taking place in multiple brain areas simultaneously. At any given moment, this content comprises a unified scene that is integrated into a dynamic core through synchrony of neuronal oscillations. We propose that 1 neurodynamic synchrony with musical stimuli gives rise to musical qualia including tonal and temporal expectancies, and that 2 music-synchronous responses couple into core neurodynamics, enabling music to directly modulate core affect. Expressive music performance, for example, may recruit rhythm-synchronous neural responses to support affective communication. We suggest that the dynamic relationship between musical expression and the experience of affect presents a unique opportunity for the study of emotional experience. This may help elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying arousal and valence, and offer a new approach to exploring the complex dynamics of the how and why of emotional experience.

  17. Emergency core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzaki, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Akihiro.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve core cooling effect by making the operation region for a plurality of water injection pumps more broader. Constitution: An emergency reactor core cooling device actuated upon failure of recycling pipe ways is adapted to be fed with cooling water through a thermal sleeve by way of a plurality of water injection pump from pool water in a condensate storage tank and a pressure suppression chamber as water feed source. Exhaust pipes and suction pipes of each of the pumps are connected by way of switching valves and the valves are switched so that the pumps are set to a series operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is high and the pumps are set to a parallel operation if the pressure in the pressure vessel is low. (Furukawa, Y.)

  18. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... applications, and places emphasis on the development of polarization maintaining (PM) HC-PCF. The polarization cross-coupling characteristics of PM HC-PCF are very different from those of conventional PM fibers. The former fibers have the advantage of suffering far less from stress-field fluctuations...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  19. Plasma core reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, T.S.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations are being conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Power, in the form of thermal radiation emitted from the high-temperature nuclear fuel, is transmitted through fused-silica transparent walls to working fluids which flow in axial channels embedded in segments of the cavity walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration; each cavity is approximately 1 m in diameter by 4.35 m in length. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall

  20. Reactor core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To safely and effectively cool down the reactor core after it has been shut down but is still hot due to after-heat. Constitution: Since the coolant extraction nozzle is situated at a location higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the coolant sprayed from the nozzle, is free from sucking immediately from the extraction nozzle and is therefore used effectively to cool the reactor core. As all the portions from the top to the bottom of the reactor are cooled simultaneously, the efficiency of the reactor cooling process is increased. Since the coolant extraction nozzle can be installed at a point considerably higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the distance from the coolant surface to the point of the coolant extraction nozzle can be made large, preventing cavitation near the coolant extraction nozzle. Therefore, without increasing the capacity of the heat exchanger, the reactor can be cooled down after a shutdown safely and efficiently. (Kawakami, Y.)

  1. Some core contested concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  2. Schumpeter's core works revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    2012-01-01

    This paper organises Schumpeter’s core books in three groups: the programmatic duology,the evolutionaryeconomic duology,and the socioeconomic synthesis. By analysing these groups and their interconnections from the viewpoint of modern evolutionaryeconomics,the paper summarises resolved problems a...... and points at remaining challenges. Its analyses are based on distinctions between microevolution and macroevolution, between economic evolution and socioeconomic coevolution, and between Schumpeter’s three major evolutionary models (called Mark I, Mark II and Mark III)....

  3. s-core network decomposition: A generalization of k-core analysis to weighted networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidsaa, Marius; Almaas, Eivind

    2013-12-01

    A broad range of systems spanning biology, technology, and social phenomena may be represented and analyzed as complex networks. Recent studies of such networks using k-core decomposition have uncovered groups of nodes that play important roles. Here, we present s-core analysis, a generalization of k-core (or k-shell) analysis to complex networks where the links have different strengths or weights. We demonstrate the s-core decomposition approach on two random networks (ER and configuration model with scale-free degree distribution) where the link weights are (i) random, (ii) correlated, and (iii) anticorrelated with the node degrees. Finally, we apply the s-core decomposition approach to the protein-interaction network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the context of two gene-expression experiments: oxidative stress in response to cumene hydroperoxide (CHP), and fermentation stress response (FSR). We find that the innermost s-cores are (i) different from innermost k-cores, (ii) different for the two stress conditions CHP and FSR, and (iii) enriched with proteins whose biological functions give insight into how yeast manages these specific stresses.

  4. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  5. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masaki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To actuate an automatic pressure down system (ADS) and a low pressure emergency core cooling system (ECCS) upon water level reduction of a nuclear reactor other than loss of coolant accidents (LOCA). Constitution: ADS in a BWR type reactor is disposed for reducing the pressure in a reactor container thereby enabling coolant injection from a low pressure ECCS upon LOCA. That is, ADS has been actuated by AND signal for a reactor water level low signal and a dry well pressure high signal. In the present invention, ADS can be actuated further also by AND signal of the reactor water level low signal, the high pressure ECCS and not-operation signal of reactor isolation cooling system. In such an emergency core cooling system thus constituted, ADS operates in the same manner as usual upon LOCA and, further, ADS is operated also upon loss of feedwater accident in the reactor pressure vessel in the case where there is a necessity for actuating the low pressure ECCS, although other high pressure ECCS and reactor isolation cooling system are not operated. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the reliability upon reactor core accident and mitigate the operator burden. (Horiuchi, T.)

  6. Functional requirements for core surveillance systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, T.

    2000-01-01

    Operating experience at Ringhals-2 has demonstrated the feasibility of a mixed core surveillance system comprised of fixed in-core detectors combined with the original movable detector system. A small number of fixed in-core detectors provide continuous measurement of the thermal margins while the movable detectors are used mainly at start-up to verify the expected power distribution. Reactor noise diagnostics and neural networks can further improve the monitoring system. The reliability of the movable detector system can be improved by mechanical simplification. Wear and maintenance costs are lowered if the required flux-mapping frequency is reduced. Improved computer codes make the measurement uncertainties less dependent on the number of instrumented positions. A mixed system requires new types of technical specifications. (author)

  7. In-core fuel management: New challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolmayer, A.; Vallee, A.; Mondot, J.

    1992-01-01

    Experience accumulated by pressurized water reactor (PWR) utilities allows them to improve their strategies in the use of eventual margins to core design limits. They are used for nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) power upgrading, to improve operating margins, or to adapt fuel management to specific objectives. As a result, in-core fuel management strategies have become very diverse: UO 2 or mixed-oxide loading, out-in or in-out fuel loading patterns, extended or annual cycle lengths with margins on design limits such as moderator temperature coefficients, boron concentrations, or peaking factors. Perspectives also appear concerning use of existing plutonium stocks or actinide incineration. Burnable poisons are most often needed to satisfactorily achieve these goals. Among them, gadolinia are now largely used, owing to their excellent performance. More than 24 Framatome first cores and reloads, representing more than 3000 gadolinia-bearing rods, have been irradiated since 1983

  8. Core catcher concepts future PWR-Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsmeyer, H.; Werle, H.

    1994-01-01

    Light water reactors of the next generation should have still greater passive safety, even in the most serious accidents. This includes the long term safe inclusion of the core inventory in the case of core meltdown accidents. The three concepts for cooling the liquefied core outside the reactor pressure vessel examined by KfK should remove the post-shutdown heat by direct contact of the melt with water. The geometric distribution of the melt increases its surface area, so that favourable conditions for heat removal from the poorly thermally-conducting melt are created and complete quick solidification occurs. The experiments examine both the relocation and distribution mechanisms of the melt and the reactions occurring when water enters. As strong interaction is possible on direct contact of the melt with water, an important aim is experimental determination and limitation of any resulting mechanical stresses. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Reactivity accident analysis in MTR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldman, R.M.; Vertullo, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is the analysis of reactivity transients in MTR cores with LEU and HEU fuels. The analysis includes the following aspects: the phenomenology of the principal events of the accident that takes place, when a reactivity of more than 1$ is inserted in a critical core in less than 1 second. The description of the accident that happened in the RA-2 critical facility in September 1983. The evaluation of the accident from different points of view: a) Theoretical and qualitative analysis; b) Paret Code calculations; c) Comparison with Spert I and Cabri experiments and with post-accident inspections. Differences between LEU and HEU RA-2 cores. (Author)

  10. The 2nd reactor core of the NS Otto Hahn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manthey, H.J.; Kracht, H.

    1979-01-01

    Details of the design of the 2nd reactor core are given, followed by a brief report summarising the operating experience gained with this 2nd core, as well as by an evaluation of measured data and statements concerning the usefulness of the knowledge gained for the development of future reactor cores. Quite a number of these data have been used to improve the concept and thus the specifications for the fuel elements of the 3rd core of the reactor of the NS Otto Hahn. (orig./HP) [de

  11. SISH/CISH or qPCR as alternative techniques to FISH for determination of HER2 amplification status on breast tumors core needle biopsies: a multicenter experience based on 840 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spyratos, Frédérique; Esterni, Benjamin; Mozziconacci, Marie-Joëlle; Antoine, Martine; Arnould, Laurent; Lizard, Sarab; Bertheau, Philippe; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Fournier, Cécile Blanc; Krieger, Sophie; Bibeau, Frédéric; Lamy, Pierre-Jean; Chenard, Marie Pierre; Legrain, Michèle; Guinebretière, Jean-Marc; Loussouarn, Delphine; Macgrogan, Gaëtan; Hostein, Isabelle; Mathieu, Marie Christine; Lacroix, Ludovic; Valent, Alexander; Robin, Yves Marie; Revillion, Françoise; Triki, Magali Lacroix; Seaume, Aline; Salomon, Anne Vincent; de Cremoux, Patricia; Portefaix, Geneviève; Xerri, Luc; Vacher, Sophie; Bièche, Ivan; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique

    2013-07-22

    Until now, FISH has been the gold standard technique to identify HER2 amplification status in ambiguous cases of breast cancer. Alternative techniques have been developed to increase the capacities of investigating HER2 amplification status. The aims of this multicenter study in a large series of breast cancer patients were to prospectively compare the level of performance of CISH, SISH, and qPCR alternative techniques on paraffin-embedded core biopsies with "gold standard FISH" for evaluation of HER2 amplification status. This study was performed on 840 cases scored by immunohistochemistry (IHC): 0=317 (38%), 1+=183 (22%), 2+=109 (13%), 3+=231 (27%). Each of the 15 French centers participating in the study analyzed 56 breast carcinoma cases diagnosed on fixed paraffin-embedded core biopsies. HER2 amplification status was determined by commercially available FISH used as the reference technique with determination of the HER2/CEN17 ratio or HER2 copy number status. The alternative techniques performed on the same cases were commercially available SISH or CISH and a common qPCR method especially designed for the study including a set of 10 primer pairs: 2 for HER2 (exons 8 and 26), 5 to evaluate chromosome 17 polysomy TAOK1, UTP6, MRM1, MKS1, SSTR2 and 3 for diploidy control TSN, LAP3 and ADAMTS16. The concordance between IHC and FISH was 96% to 95% based on the HER2/CEN17 ratio (n=766) or HER2 copy number (n=840), respectively. The concordance of the alternative techniques with FISH was excellent: 97% and 98% for SISH (498 and 587 cases), 98% and 75% for CISH (108 and 204 cases) and 95% and 93% (699 and 773 cases) for qPCR based on the HER2/CEN17 ratio or HER2 copy number, respectively. Similarly, sensitivity ranged from 99% to 95% for SISH, 100% to 99% for CISH and 89% to 80% for qPCR. The concordance with FISH (ratio) in the 2+ cases was 89% for SISH, 100% for CISH and 93% for qPCR. These alternative techniques showed an excellent concordance with FISH in core

  12. A disappearing heritage: the clinical core of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parnas, Josef

    2011-01-01

    ("schizoidia" and "latent schizophrenia"). The fundamental features are manifest across all domains of consciousness: subjective experience, expression, cognition, affectivity, behavior, and willing. Yet, the specificity of the core was only graspable at a more comprehensive Gestalt-level, variously designated...

  13. Integrated core-edge-divertor modeling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    An integrated calculation model for simulating the interaction of physics phenomena taking place in the plasma core, in the plasma edge and in the SOL and divertor of tokamaks has been developed and applied to study such interactions. The model synthesises a combination of numerical calculations (1) the power and particle balances for the core plasma, using empirical confinement scaling laws and taking into account radiation losses (2), the particle, momentum and power balances in the SOL and divertor, taking into account the effects of radiation and recycling neutrals, (3) the transport of feeling and recycling neutrals, explicitly representing divertor and pumping geometry, and (4) edge pedestal gradient scale lengths and widths, evaluation of theoretical predictions (5) confinement degradation due to thermal instabilities in the edge pedestals, (6) detachment and divertor MARFE onset, (7) core MARFE onsets leading to a H-L transition, and (8) radiative collapse leading to a disruption and evaluation of empirical fits (9) power thresholds for the L-H and H-L transitions and (10) the width of the edge pedestals. The various components of the calculation model are coupled and must be iterated to a self-consistent convergence. The model was developed over several years for the purpose of interpreting various edge phenomena observed in DIII-D experiments and thereby, to some extent, has been benchmarked against experiment. Because the model treats the interactions of various phenomena in the core, edge and divertor, yet is computationally efficient, it lends itself to the investigation of the effects of different choices of various edge plasma operating conditions on overall divertor and core plasma performance. Studies of the effect of feeling location and rate, divertor geometry, plasma shape, pumping and over 'edge parameters' on core plasma properties (line average density, confinement, density limit, etc.) have been performed for DIII-D model problems. A

  14. Molten salt reactors: reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In this critical analysis of the MSBR I project are examined the problems concerning the reactor core. Advantages of breeding depend essentially upon solutions to technological problems like continuous reprocessing or graphite behavior under neutron irradiation. Graphite deformation, moderator unloading, control rods and core instrumentation require more studies. Neutronics of the core, influence of core geometry and salt composition, fuel evolution, and thermohydraulics are reviewed [fr

  15. WNP-2 core model upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golightly, C.E.; Ravindranath, T.K.; Belblidia, L.A.; O'Farrell, D.; Andersen, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the core model upgrade of the WNP-2 training simulator and the reasons for the upgrade. The core model as well as the interface with the rest of the simulator are briefly described . The paper also describes the procedure that will be used by WNP-2 to update the simulator core data after future core reloads. Results from the fully integrated simulator are presented. (author)

  16. On-line core monitoring with CORE MASTER / PRESTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindahl, S.O.; Borresen, S.; Ovrum, S.

    1986-01-01

    Advanced calculational tools are instrumental in improving reactor plant capacity factors and fuel utilization. The computer code package CORE MASTER is an integrated system designed to achieve this objective. The system covers all main activities in the area of in-core fuel management for boiling water reactors; design, operation support, and on-line core monitoring. CORE MASTER operates on a common data base, which defines the reactor and documents the operating history of the core and of all fuel bundles ever used

  17. Imaging of High-Z doped, Imploded Capsule Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisbrey, Shon T.; Edwards, M. John; Suter, Larry J.

    2006-10-01

    The ability to correctly ascertain the shape of imploded fusion capsules is critical to be able to achieve the spherical symmetry needed to maximize the energy yield of proposed fusion experiments for the National Ignition Facility. Implosion of the capsule creates a hot, dense core. The introduction of a high-Z dopant into the gas-filled core of the capsule increases the amount of bremsstrahlung radiation produced in the core and should make the imaging of the imploded core easier. Images of the imploded core can then be analyzed to ascertain the symmetry of the implosion. We calculate that the addition of Ne gas into a deuterium gas core will increase the amount of radiation emission while preserving the surrogacy of the radiation and hydrodynamics in the indirect drive NIF hohlraum in the proposed cryogenic hohlraums. The increased emission will more easily enable measurement of asymmetries and tuning of the implosion.

  18. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  19. Dual-core Itanium Processor

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Intel’s first dual-core Itanium processor, code-named "Montecito" is a major release of Intel's Itanium 2 Processor Family, which implements the Intel Itanium architecture on a dual-core processor with two cores per die (integrated circuit). Itanium 2 is much more powerful than its predecessor. It has lower power consumption and thermal dissipation.

  20. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    60, No. 3. — journal of. March 2003 physics pp. 415–422. Maximum stellar iron core mass. F W GIACOBBE. Chicago Research Center/American Air Liquide ... iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large .... thermal equilibrium velocities will tend to be non-relativistic.

  1. Core TuLiP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czenko, M.R.; Etalle, Sandro

    2007-01-01

    We propose CoreTuLiP - the core of a trust management language based on Logic Programming. CoreTuLiP is based on a subset of moded logic programming, but enjoys the features of TM languages such as RT; in particular clauses are issued by different authorities and stored in a distributed manner. We

  2. Automated Core Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2005-01-01

    Multistate searching methods are a subfield of distributed artificial intelligence that aims to provide both principles for construction of complex systems involving multiple states and mechanisms for coordination of independent agents' actions. This paper proposes a multistate searching algorithm with reinforcement learning for the automatic core design of a boiling water reactor. The characteristics of this algorithm are that the coupling structure and the coupling operation suitable for the assigned problem are assumed and an optimal solution is obtained by mutual interference in multistate transitions using multiagents. Calculations in an actual plant confirmed that the proposed algorithm increased the convergence ability of the optimization process

  3. Ice Sheets & Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Troels Bøgeholm

    Since the discovery of the Ice Ages it has been evident that Earth’s climate is liable to undergo dramatic changes. The previous climatic period known as the Last Glacial saw large oscillations in the extent of ice sheets covering the Northern hemisphere. Understanding these oscillations known....... The first part concerns time series analysis of ice core data obtained from the Greenland Ice Sheet. We analyze parts of the time series where DO-events occur using the so-called transfer operator and compare the results with time series from a simple model capable of switching by either undergoing...

  4. Nuclear reactor core assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.

    1978-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to provide a fast reactor core assembly design for use with a fluid coolant such as liquid sodium or carbon monoxide incorporating a method of increasing the percentage of coolant flow though the blanket elements relative to the total coolant flow through the blanket and fuel elements during shutdown conditions without using moving parts. It is claimed that deterioration due to reactor radiation or temperature conditions is avoided and ready modification or replacement is possible. (U.K.)

  5. Reload core safety verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetlik, M.; Minarcin, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a brief look at the process of reload core safety evaluation and verification in Slovak Republic. It gives an overview of experimental verification of selected nuclear parameters in the course of physics testing during reactor start-up. The comparison of IAEA recommendations and testing procedures at Slovak and European nuclear power plants of similar design is included. An introduction of two level criteria for evaluation of tests represents an effort to formulate the relation between safety evaluation and measured values (Authors)

  6. Effects of Core Cavity on a Flow Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae-Soon; Kim, Kihwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The axial pressure drop is removed in the free core condition, But the actual core has lots of fuel bundles and mixing vanes to the flow direction. The axial pressure drop induces flow uniformity. In a uniform flow having no shear stress, the cross flow or cross flow mixing decreases. The mixing factor is important in the reactor safety during a Steam Line Break (SLB) or Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) transients. And the effect of core cavity is needed to evaluate the realistic core mixing factor quantification. The multi-dimensional flow mixing phenomena in a core cavity has been studied using a CFD code. The 1/5-scale model was applied for the reactor flow analysis. A single phase water flow conditions were considered for the 4-cold leg and DVI flows. To quantify the mixing intensity, a boron scalar was introduced to the ECC injection water at cold legs and DVI nozzles. The present CFD pre-study was performed to quantify the effects of core structure on the mixing phenomena. The quantified boron mixing scalar in the core simulator model represented the effect of core cavity on the core mixing phenomena. This simulation results also give the information for sensor resolution to measure the boron concentration in the experiments and response time to detect mixing phenomena at the core and reactor vessel.

  7. Modelling guidelines for core exit temperature simulations with system codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freixa, J., E-mail: jordi.freixa-terradas@upc.edu [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) (Spain); Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Martínez-Quiroga, V., E-mail: victor.martinez@nortuen.com [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) (Spain); Zerkak, O., E-mail: omar.zerkak@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Reventós, F., E-mail: francesc.reventos@upc.edu [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Core exit temperature is used in PWRs as an indication of core heat up. • Modelling guidelines of CET response with system codes. • Modelling of heat transfer processes in the core and UP regions. - Abstract: Core exit temperature (CET) measurements play an important role in the sequence of actions under accidental conditions in pressurized water reactors (PWR). Given the difficulties in placing measurements in the core region, CET readings are used as criterion for the initiation of accident management (AM) procedures because they can indicate a core heat up scenario. However, the CET responses have some limitation in detecting inadequate core cooling and core uncovery simply because the measurement is not placed inside the core. Therefore, it is of main importance in the field of nuclear safety for PWR power plants to assess the capabilities of system codes for simulating the relation between the CET and the peak cladding temperature (PCT). The work presented in this paper intends to address this open question by making use of experimental work at integral test facilities (ITF) where experiments related to the evolution of the CET and the PCT during transient conditions have been carried out. In particular, simulations of two experiments performed at the ROSA/LSTF and PKL facilities are presented. The two experiments are part of a counterpart exercise between the OECD/NEA ROSA-2 and OECD/NEA PKL-2 projects. The simulations are used to derive guidelines in how to correctly reproduce the CET response during a core heat up scenario. Three aspects have been identified to be of main importance: (1) the need for a 3-dimensional representation of the core and Upper Plenum (UP) regions in order to model the heterogeneity of the power zones and axial areas, (2) the detailed representation of the active and passive heat structures, and (3) the use of simulated thermocouples instead of steam temperatures to represent the CET readings.

  8. How cores grow by pebble accretion. I. Direct core growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, M. G.; Vazan, A.; Ormel, C. W.

    2018-03-01

    Context. Planet formation by pebble accretion is an alternative to planetesimal-driven core accretion. In this scenario, planets grow by the accretion of cm- to m-sized pebbles instead of km-sized planetesimals. One of the main differences with planetesimal-driven core accretion is the increased thermal ablation experienced by pebbles. This can provide early enrichment to the planet's envelope, which influences its subsequent evolution and changes the process of core growth. Aims: We aim to predict core masses and envelope compositions of planets that form by pebble accretion and compare mass deposition of pebbles to planetesimals. Specifically, we calculate the core mass where pebbles completely evaporate and are absorbed before reaching the core, which signifies the end of direct core growth. Methods: We model the early growth of a protoplanet by calculating the structure of its envelope, taking into account the fate of impacting pebbles or planetesimals. The region where high-Z material can exist in vapor form is determined by the temperature-dependent vapor pressure. We include enrichment effects by locally modifying the mean molecular weight of the envelope. Results: In the pebble case, three phases of core growth can be identified. In the first phase (Mcore mixes outwards, slowing core growth. In the third phase (Mcore > 0.5M⊕), the high-Z inner region expands outwards, absorbing an increasing fraction of the ablated material as vapor. Rainout ends before the core mass reaches 0.6 M⊕, terminating direct core growth. In the case of icy H2O pebbles, this happens before 0.1 M⊕. Conclusions: Our results indicate that pebble accretion can directly form rocky cores up to only 0.6 M⊕, and is unable to form similarly sized icy cores. Subsequent core growth can proceed indirectly when the planet cools, provided it is able to retain its high-Z material.

  9. Development and Integration of Professional Core Values Among Practicing Clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Patricia Quinn; Guenther, Lee Ann; Wainwright, Susan F

    2016-09-01

    The physical therapy profession has adopted professional core values, which define expected values for its members, and developed a self-assessment tool with sample behaviors for each of the 7 core values. However, evidence related to the integration of these core values into practice is limited. The aims of this study were: (1) to gain insight into physical therapists' development of professional core values and (2) to gain insight into participants' integration of professional core values into clinical practice. A qualitative design permitted in-depth exploration of the development and integration of the American Physical Therapy Association's professional core values into physical therapist practice. Twenty practicing physical therapists were purposefully selected to explore the role of varied professional, postprofessional, and continuing education experiences related to exposure to professional values. The Core Values Self-Assessment and résumé sort served as prompts for reflection via semistructured interviews. Three themes were identified: (1) personal values were the foundation for developing professional values, which were further shaped by academic and clinical experiences, (2) core values were integrated into practice independent of practice setting and varied career paths, and (3) participants described the following professional core values as well integrated into their practice: integrity, compassion/caring, and accountability. Social responsibility was an area consistently identified as not being integrated into their practice. The Core Values Self-Assessment tool is a consensus-based document developed through a Delphi process. Future studies to establish reliability and construct validity of the tool may be warranted. Gaining an in-depth understanding of how practicing clinicians incorporate professional core values into clinical practice may shed light on the relationship between core values mastery and its impact on patient care. Findings may

  10. The Game Experience Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJsselsteijn, W.A.; de Kort, Y.A.W.; Poels, K.

    2013-01-01

    This document contains the English version of the Game Experience Questionnaire. The development and testing of the Game Experience Questionnaire is described in project Deliverable 3.3. The Game Experience Questionnaire has a modular structure and consists of : 1. The core questionnaire 2. The

  11. BWR core melt progression phenomena: Experimental analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    In the BWR Core Melt in Progression Phenomena Program, experimental results concerning severe fuel damage and core melt progression in BWR core geometry are used to evaluate existing models of the governing phenomena. These include control blade eutectic liquefaction and the subsequent relocation and attack on the channel box structure; oxidation heating and hydrogen generation; Zircaloy melting and relocation; and the continuing oxidation of zirconium with metallic blockage formation. Integral data have been obtained from the BWR DF-4 experiment in the ACRR and from BWR tests in the German CORA exreactor fuel-damage test facility. Additional integral data will be obtained from new CORA BWR test, the full-length FLHT-6 BWR test in the NRU test reactor, and the new program of exreactor experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on metallic melt relocation and blockage formation. an essential part of this activity is interpretation and use of the results of the BWR tests. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed experiment-specific models for analysis of the BWR experiments; to date, these models have permitted far more precise analyses of the conditions in these experiments than has previously been available. These analyses have provided a basis for more accurate interpretation of the phenomena that the experiments are intended to investigate. The results of posttest analyses of BWR experiments are discussed and significant findings from these analyses are explained. The ORNL control blade/canister models with materials interaction, relocation and blockage models are currently being implemented in SCDAP/RELAP5 as an optional structural component

  12. TMI-2 core examination plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, D.E.; MacDonald, P.E.; Hobbins, R.R.; Ploggr, S.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Three Mile Island (TMI-2) core examination is divided into four stages: (1) before removing the head; (2) before removing the plenum; (3) during defueling; and (4) offsite examinations. Core examinations recommended during the first three stages are primarily devoted to documenting the post-accident condition of the core. The detailed analysis of core damage structures will be performed during offsite examinations at government and commercial hot cell facilities. The primary objectives of these examinations are to enhance the understanding of the degraded core accident sequence, to develop the technical bases for reactor regulations, and to improve LWR design and operation

  13. Monitoring an electric cable core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Marris, A.

    1984-01-01

    A method of, and apparatus for, continuously monitoring an advancing core having a continuous covering comprises directing X-ray radiation laterally towards the advancing covered core; continuously forming an X-ray image pattern of the advancing covered core and translating the image pattern into a visible image pattern; continuously transforming the visible pattern into a digital bit pattern; and processing the digital bit pattern using a microprocessor with interfacing electronics to provide an image profile of the advancing covered core and/or to provide analogue and/or digital signals indicative of the overall diameter and eccentricity of the covered core and of the thickness of the covering. (author)

  14. Winning Cores in Parity Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Steen

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the novel notion of winning cores in parity games and develop a deterministic polynomial-time under-approximation algorithm for solving parity games based on winning core approximation. Underlying this algorithm are a number properties about winning cores which are interesting...... in their own right. In particular, we show that the winning core and the winning region for a player in a parity game are equivalently empty. Moreover, the winning core contains all fatal attractors but is not necessarily a dominion itself. Experimental results are very positive both with respect to quality...

  15. Initial charge reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyono, Takeshi

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To effectivity burn fuels and improve the economical performance in an inital charge reactor core of BWR type reactors or the likes. Constitution: In a reactor core constituted with a plurality of fuel assemblies which are to be partially replaced upon fuel replacement, the density of the fissionable materials and the moderator - fuel ratio of a fuel assembly is set corresponding to the period till that fuel assembly is replaced, in which the density of the nuclear fissionable materials is lowered and the moderator - fuel ratio is increased for the fuel assembly with a shorter period from the fueling to the fuel exchange and, while on the other hand, the density of the fissionable materials is increased and the moderator - fuel ratio is decreased for the fuel assembly with a longer period from the fueling to the replacement. Accordingly, since the moderator - fuel ratio is increased for the fuel assembly to be replaced in a shorter period, the neutrons moderating effect is increased to increase the reactivity. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Statistical core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelkers, E.; Heller, A.S.; Farnsworth, D.A.; Kearfott, K.J.

    1978-01-01

    The report describes the statistical analysis of DNBR thermal-hydraulic margin of a 3800 MWt, 205-FA core under design overpower conditions. The analysis used LYNX-generated data at predetermined values of the input variables whose uncertainties were to be statistically combined. LYNX data were used to construct an efficient response surface model in the region of interest; the statistical analysis was accomplished through the evaluation of core reliability; utilizing propagation of the uncertainty distributions of the inputs. The response surface model was implemented in both the analytical error propagation and Monte Carlo Techniques. The basic structural units relating to the acceptance criteria are fuel pins. Therefore, the statistical population of pins with minimum DNBR values smaller than specified values is determined. The specified values are designated relative to the most probable and maximum design DNBR values on the power limiting pin used in present design analysis, so that gains over the present design criteria could be assessed for specified probabilistic acceptance criteria. The results are equivalent to gains ranging from 1.2 to 4.8 percent of rated power dependent on the acceptance criterion. The corresponding acceptance criteria range from 95 percent confidence that no pin will be in DNB to 99.9 percent of the pins, which are expected to avoid DNB

  17. Nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo; Ishibashi, Yoko; Mochida, Takaaki; Haikawa, Katsumasa; Yamanaka, Akihiro.

    1995-01-01

    A reactor core is radially divided into an inner region, an outer region and an outermost region. As a fuel, three kinds of fuels, namely, a high enrichment degree fuel at 3.4%, a middle enrichment degree fuel at 2.3% and a low enrichment degree at 1.1% of a fuel average enrichment degree of fission product are used. Each of the fuels is bisected to upper and lower portions at an axial center thereof. The difference of average enrichment degrees between upper and lower portions is 0.1% for the high enrichment degree fuel, 0.3% for the middle enrichment degree fuel and 0.2% for the low enrichment degree fuel. In addition, the composition of fuels in each of radial regions comprises 100% of the low enrichment degree fuels in the outermost region, 91% of the higher enrichment degree fuels and 9% of the middle enrichment degree fuels in the outer region, and 34% of the high enrichment degree fuels and 30% of the middle enrichment degree fuels in the inner region. With such a constitution, fuel economy can be improved while maintaining the thermal margin in an initially loaded reactor core of a BWR type reactor. (I.N.)

  18. Tidal excitation of elliptical instability in the Martian core: Possible mechanism for generating the core dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkani-Hamed, J.; Seyed-Mahmoud, B.; Aldridge, K. D.; Baker, R. E.

    2008-06-01

    We propose a causal relationship between the creation of the giant impact basins on Mars by a large asteroid, ruptured when it entered the Roche limit, and the excitation of the Martian core dynamo. Our laboratory experiments indicate that the elliptical instability of the Martian core can be excited if the asteroid continually exerts tidal forces on Mars for ~20,000 years. Our numerical experiments suggest that the growth-time of the instability was 5,000-15,000 years when the asteroid was at a distance of 50,000-75,000 km. We demonstrate the stability of the orbital motion of an asteroid captured by Mars at a distance of 100,000 km in the presence of the Sun and Jupiter. We also present our results for the tidal interaction of the asteroid with Mars. An asteroid captured by Mars in prograde fashion can survive and excite the elliptical instability of the core for only a few million years, whereas a captured retrograde asteroid can excite the elliptical instability for hundreds of millions of years before colliding with Mars. The rate at which tidal energy dissipates in Mars during this period is over two orders of magnitude greater than the rate at which magnetic energy dissipates. If only 1% of the tidal energy dissipation is partitioned to the core, sufficient energy would be available to maintain the core dynamo. Accordingly, a retrograde asteroid is quite capable of exciting an elliptical instability in the Martian core, thus providing a candidate process to drive a core dynamo.

  19. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  20. Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: Cosmological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Valentino, E.; Brinckmann, T.; Gerbino, M.; Poulin, V.; Bouchet, F. R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Melchiorri, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; Delabrouille, J.; Dvorkin, C.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Hooper, D. C.; Lattanzi, M.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Salvati, L.; Cabass, G.; Caputo, A.; Giusarma, E.; Hivon, E.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paradiso, S.; Rubiño-Martin, J. A.; Achúcarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartolo, N.; Bartlett, J. G.; Basak, S.; Baumann, D.; de Bernardis, P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. S.; Castellano, G.; Challinor, A.; Charles, I.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; De Petris, M.; De Zotti, G.; Diego, J. M.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Ferraro, S.; Finelli, F.; de Gasperis, G.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; González-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hazra, D. K.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Martin, S.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McCarthy, D.; Melin, J.-B.; Mohr, J. J.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Quartin, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Ringeval, C.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Trombetti, T.; Tucker, C.; Väliviita, J.; van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vermeulen, G.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.

    2018-04-01

    We forecast the main cosmological parameter constraints achievable with the CORE space mission which is dedicated to mapping the polarisation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). CORE was recently submitted in response to ESA's fifth call for medium-sized mission proposals (M5). Here we report the results from our pre-submission study of the impact of various instrumental options, in particular the telescope size and sensitivity level, and review the great, transformative potential of the mission as proposed. Specifically, we assess the impact on a broad range of fundamental parameters of our Universe as a function of the expected CMB characteristics, with other papers in the series focusing on controlling astrophysical and instrumental residual systematics. In this paper, we assume that only a few central CORE frequency channels are usable for our purpose, all others being devoted to the cleaning of astrophysical contaminants. On the theoretical side, we assume ΛCDM as our general framework and quantify the improvement provided by CORE over the current constraints from the Planck 2015 release. We also study the joint sensitivity of CORE and of future Baryon Acoustic Oscillation and Large Scale Structure experiments like DESI and Euclid. Specific constraints on the physics of inflation are presented in another paper of the series. In addition to the six parameters of the base ΛCDM, which describe the matter content of a spatially flat universe with adiabatic and scalar primordial fluctuations from inflation, we derive the precision achievable on parameters like those describing curvature, neutrino physics, extra light relics, primordial helium abundance, dark matter annihilation, recombination physics, variation of fundamental constants, dark energy, modified gravity, reionization and cosmic birefringence. In addition to assessing the improvement on the precision of individual parameters, we also forecast the post-CORE overall reduction of the allowed

  1. Waves in the core and mechanical core-mantle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This Chapter focuses on time-dependent uid motions in the core interior, which can beconstrained by observations of the Earth's magnetic eld, on timescales which are shortcompared to the magnetic diusion time. This dynamics is strongly inuenced by the Earth's rapid rotation, which rigidies...... the motions in the direction parallel to the Earth'srotation axis. This property accounts for the signicance of the core-mantle topography.In addition, the stiening of the uid in the direction parallel to the rotation axis gives riseto a magnetic diusion layer attached to the core-mantle boundary, which would...... otherwisebe dispersed by Alfven waves. This Chapter complements the descriptions of large-scaleow in the core (8.04), of turbulence in the core (8.06) and of core-mantle interactions(8.12), which can all be found in this volume. We rely on basic magnetohydrodynamictheory, including the derivation...

  2. Core cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeppner, G.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor cooling system transports the heat liberated in the reactor core to the component - heat exchanger, steam generator or turbine - where the energy is removed. This basic task can be performed with a variety of coolants circulating in appropriately designed cooling systems. The choice of any one system is governed by principles of economics and natural policies, the design is determined by the laws of nuclear physics, thermal-hydraulics and by the requirement of reliability and public safety. PWR- and BWR- reactors today generate the bulk of nuclear energy. Their primary cooling systems are discussed under the following aspects: 1. General design, nuclear physics constraints, energy transfer, hydraulics, thermodynamics. 2. Design and performance under conditions of steady state and mild transients; control systems. 3. Design and performance under conditions of severe transients and loss of coolant accidents; safety systems. (orig./RW)

  3. The true 'core' splitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallerbach, J.

    1978-01-01

    Massive unemployment and the fear of a barred future put at present the unions and civil initiative to the apparent alternatives; securing work places or securing life and future. How the 'atomic fight' is fought and its result can have considerable consequences for our society. This volume presents a dialogue: Firstly the situation and environment must be understood giving rise to the controversial arguments. Reports, analyses and interviews are presented on this as basic structure for the future discussion. The quality and direction of the technical progress are dealt with in the core of the discussion. Is atomic technology acceptable. Who should decide and whom does it serve. What is progress going to look like anyway. (orig.) [de

  4. Emergency core cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubokoya, Takashi; Okataku, Yasukuni.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the fuel soundness upon loss of primary coolant accidents in a pressure tube type nuclear reactor by injecting cooling heavy water at an early stage, to suppress the temperature of fuel cans at a lower level. Constitution: When a thermometer detects the temperature rise and a pressure gauge detects that the pressure for the primary coolants is reduced slightly from that in the normal operation upon loss of coolant accidents in the vicinity of the primary coolant circuit, heavy water is caused to flow in the heavy water feed pipeway by a controller. This enables to inject the heavy water into the reactor core in a short time upon loss of the primary coolant accidents to suppress the temperature rise in the fuel can thereby maintain the fuel soundness. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. The core and cosmopolitans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlander, Linus; Frederiksen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Users often interact and help each other solve problems in communities, but few scholars have explored how these relationships provide opportunities to innovate. We analyze the extent to which people positioned within the core of a community as well as people that are cosmopolitans positioned...... across multiple external communities affect innovation. Using a multimethod approach, including a survey, a complete database of interactions in an online community, content coding of interactions and contributions, and 36 interviews, we specify the types of positions that have the strongest effect...... on innovation. Our study shows that dispositional explanations for user innovation should be complemented by a relational view that emphasizes how these communities differ from other organizations, the types of behaviors this enables, and the effects on innovation....

  6. Adult educators' core competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    ” requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students’ prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator’s reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence......Abstract Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators’ required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural...... environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or “core...

  7. CORE annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gut, A.

    2007-04-01

    This annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the activities of the Swiss Federal Commission on Energy Research CORE in 2006. The six main areas of work during the period 2004 - 2007 are examined, including a review of the SFOE's energy research programme, a road-map for the way towards the realisation of a 2000-watt society, the formulation of an energy research concept for 2008 - 2011, international co-operation, the dissemination of information and the assessment of existing and new instruments. International activities and Switzerland's involvement in energy research within the framework of the International Energy Agency IEA are discussed. New and existing projects are listed and the work done at the Competence Centre for Energy and Mobility noted. The Swiss Technology Award 2007 is presented. Information supplied to interested bodies to help improve knowledge on research work being done and to help make discussions on future energy supply more objective is discussed

  8. Nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescott, R F

    1974-07-11

    The core of the fast neutron reactor consisting, among other components, of fuel elements enriched in plutonium is divided into modules. Each module contains a bundle of four or six elongated components (fuel elements and control rods). In the arrangement with four components, one is kept rigid while the other three are elastically yielding inclined towards the center and lean against the rigid component. In the modules with six pieces, each component is elastically yielding inclined towards a central cavity. In this way, they form a circular arc. A control rod may be placed in the cavity. In order to counteract a relative lateral movement, the outer surfaces of the components which have hexagonal cross-sections have interlocking bearing cushions. The bearing cushions consist of keyway-type ribs or grooves with the wedges or ribs gripping in the grooves of the neighbouring components. In addition, the ribs have oblique entering surfaces.

  9. IRIS core criticality calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jecmenica, R.; Trontl, K.; Pevec, D.; Grgic, D.

    2003-01-01

    Three-dimensional Monte Carlo computer code KENO-VI of CSAS26 sequence of SCALE-4.4 code system was applied for pin-by-pin calculations of the effective multiplication factor for the first cycle IRIS reactor core. The effective multiplication factors obtained by the above mentioned Monte Carlo calculations using 27-group ENDF/B-IV library and 238-group ENDF/B-V library have been compared with the effective multiplication factors achieved by HELIOS/NESTLE, CASMO/SIMULATE, and modified CORD-2 nodal calculations. The results of Monte Carlo calculations are found to be in good agreement with the results obtained by the nodal codes. The discrepancies in effective multiplication factor are typically within 1%. (author)

  10. Understanding core conductor fabrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, D E

    2011-01-01

    ESD Association standard test method ANSI/ESD STM2.1 - Garments (STM2.1), provides electrical resistance test procedures that are applicable for materials and garments that have surface conductive or surface dissipative properties. As has been reported in other papers over the past several years 1 fabrics are now used in many industries for electrostatic control purposes that do not have surface conductive properties and therefore cannot be evaluated using the procedures in STM2.1 2 . A study was conducted to compare surface conductive fabrics with samples of core conductor fibre based fabrics in order to determine differences and similarities with regards to various electrostatic properties. This work will be used to establish a new work item proposal within WG-2, Garments, in the ESD Association Standards Committee in the USA.

  11. Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: Cluster science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, J.-B.; Bonaldi, A.; Remazeilles, M.; Hagstotz, S.; Diego, J. M.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Luzzi, G.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Grandis, S.; Mohr, J. J.; Bartlett, J. G.; Delabrouille, J.; Ferraro, S.; Tramonte, D.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Macìas-Pérez, J. F.; Achúcarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Basu, K.; Battye, R. A.; Baumann, D.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Buzzelli, A.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Calvo, M.; Carvalho, C. S.; Castellano, M. G.; Challinor, A.; Chluba, J.; Clesse, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; De Petris, M.; De Zotti, G.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S. M.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Greenslade, J.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Le Brun, A. M. C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Maffei, B.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Notari, A.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Quartin, M.; Roman, M.; Salvati, L.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Trappe, N.; Triqueneaux, S.; Trombetti, T.; Tucker, C.; Väliviita, J.; van de Weygaert, R.; Van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Weller, J.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.

    2018-04-01

    We examine the cosmological constraints that can be achieved with a galaxy cluster survey with the future CORE space mission. Using realistic simulations of the millimeter sky, produced with the latest version of the Planck Sky Model, we characterize the CORE cluster catalogues as a function of the main mission performance parameters. We pay particular attention to telescope size, key to improved angular resolution, and discuss the comparison and the complementarity of CORE with ambitious future ground-based CMB experiments that could be deployed in the next decade. A possible CORE mission concept with a 150 cm diameter primary mirror can detect of the order of 50,000 clusters through the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect (SZE). The total yield increases (decreases) by 25% when increasing (decreasing) the mirror diameter by 30 cm. The 150 cm telescope configuration will detect the most massive clusters (>1014 Msolar) at redshift z>1.5 over the whole sky, although the exact number above this redshift is tied to the uncertain evolution of the cluster SZE flux-mass relation; assuming self-similar evolution, CORE will detect 0~ 50 clusters at redshift z>1.5. This changes to 800 (200) when increasing (decreasing) the mirror size by 30 cm. CORE will be able to measure individual cluster halo masses through lensing of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies with a 1-σ sensitivity of 4×1014 Msolar, for a 120 cm aperture telescope, and 1014 Msolar for a 180 cm one. From the ground, we estimate that, for example, a survey with about 150,000 detectors at the focus of 350 cm telescopes observing 65% of the sky would be shallower than CORE and detect about 11,000 clusters, while a survey with the same number of detectors observing 25% of sky with a 10 m telescope is expected to be deeper and to detect about 70,000 clusters. When combined with the latter, CORE would reach a limiting mass of M500 ~ 2‑3 × 1013 Msolar and detect 220,000 clusters (5 sigma detection limit

  12. Um mundo de cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elis Artz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A pintura de Elis Artz é feita com muita alma e transborda alegria. A vitalidade de seu trabalho transparece nas cores fortes e nos traços simples e harmoniosos. Confira o trabalho da artista nesta edição da Revista Jangada. ELIS by ELIS Descobri meu talento artístisco e criativo há uns 25 anos. Nasci no Brasil e me mudei para os EUA 10 anos atrás por puro amor. Embora seja psicóloga de formação, o meu apreço pela pintura só cresceu e, com o passar dos anos, a paixão pelas tintas me direcionou a fazer cursos com artistas brasileiros renomados. Já morando nos EUA e com essa grande paixão adormecida, durante anos, decidi me entregar para as cores que sempre me trouxeram alegria e cor para os meus dias. Embora muitas de minhas pinturas tenham ido para minha família e amigos no Brasil, vendi inúmeras outras pelo país através de exposições em galerias de arte. Em 2014, fui uma das artistas em destaque no MTD ART nos Estados Unidos. Minha obra estava dentro de cada ônibus das cidades de Champaign e Urbana e exposta em destaque na Estação de Trem. Em maio de 2015, tive o prazer de ter outro trabalho meu nos outdoors da cidade, destacando a minha tela 'Frida' o ano inteiro e de expor em conjunto com alguns artistas locais no final de outubro. Desde então, tenho pintado cada vez mais e me interessado em divulgar o meu trabalho. E, como diria um amigo meu "Elis, você me mostrou que a vida não é só preto no branco". Ele estava certo.

  13. Growth outside the core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully.

  14. Core catcher for nuclear reactor core meltdown containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, M.J.; Bowman, F.L.

    1978-01-01

    A bed of graphite particles is placed beneath a nuclear reactor core outside the pressure vessel but within the containment building to catch the core debris in the event of failure of the emergency core cooling system. Spray cooling of the debris and graphite particles together with draining and flooding of coolant fluid of the graphite bed is provided to prevent debris slump-through to the bottom of the bed

  15. Intercomparison of liquid metal fast reactor seismic analysis codes. V. 2: Verification and improvement of reactor core seismic analysis codes using core mock-up experiments. Proceedings of a research co-ordination meeting held in Vienna, 26-28 September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    This report (Volume II) contains the papers summarizing the verification of and improvement to the codes on the basis of the French and Japanese data. Volume I: ''Validation of the Seismic Analysis Codes Using the Reactor Code Experiments'' (IAEA-TECDOC-798) included the Italian PEC reactor data. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Intercomparison of liquid metal fast reactor seismic analysis codes. V. 2: Verification and improvement of reactor core seismic analysis codes using core mock-up experiments. Proceedings of a research co-ordination meeting held in Vienna, 26-28 September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    This report (Volume II) contains the papers summarizing the verification of and improvement to the codes on the basis of the French and Japanese data. Volume I: ``Validation of the Seismic Analysis Codes Using the Reactor Code Experiments`` (IAEA-TECDOC-798) included the Italian PEC reactor data. Refs, figs and tabs.

  17. Experimental research of reactor core flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaha, V.; Kotrnoch, J.; Krett, V.

    1978-01-01

    The results are presented of experiments performed with the aim of finding the influence of the method of fixing the thermocouples for measuring the distribution of temperature to the wall of fuel pin simulator. This influence was found for the purpose of emergency core flooding. First experimental results on the effect of nitrogen dissolved in the water on the velocity of the cooling wave are given. These experiments were carried out under the following conditions: initial temperature in pin centre 300 to 600 degC, velocity of water at the inlet into the measuring section 3.5 to 20 cm/s, and atmospheric pressure in the model. (author)

  18. Optimized core loading sequence for Ukraine WWER-1000 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dye, M.; Shah, H.

    2015-01-01

    Fuel Assemblies (WFAs) experienced mechanical damage of the grids during loading at both South Ukraine 2 (SU2) and South Ukraine 3 (SU3). The grids were damaged due to high lateral loads exceeding their strength limit. The high lateral loads were caused by a combination of distortion and stiffness of the mixed core fuel assemblies and significant fuel assembly-to-fuel assembly interaction combined with the core loading sequence being used. To prevent damage of the WFA grids during core loading, Westinghouse has developed a loading sequence technique and loading aides (smooth sided dummies and top nozzle loading guides) designed to minimize fuel assembly-to-fuel assembly interaction while maximizing the potential for successful loading (i.e., no fuel assembly damage and minimized loading time). The loading sequence technique accounts for cycle-specific core loading patterns and is based on previous Westinghouse WWER core loading experience and fundamental principles. The loading aids are developed to “open-up” the target core location or to provide guidance into a target core location. The Westinghouse optimized core loading sequence and smooth sided dummies were utilized during the successful loading of SU3 Cycle 25 mixed core in March 2015, with no instances of fuel assembly damage and yet still provided considerable time savings relative to the 2012 and 2013 SU3 reload campaigns. (authors)

  19. Siderophile Volatile Element Partitioning during Core Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loroch, D. C.; Hackler, S.; Rohrbach, A.; Klemme, S.

    2017-12-01

    Since the nineteen sixties it is known, that the Earth's mantle is depleted relative to CI chondrite in numerous elements as a result of accretion and core-mantle differentiation. Additionally, if we take the chondritic composition as the initial solar nebular element abundances, the Earth lacks 85 % of K and up to 98 % of other volatiles. However one potentially very important group of elements has received considerably less attention in this context and these elements are the siderophile but volatile elements (SVEs). SVEs perhaps provide important information regarding the timing of volatile delivery to Earth. Especially for the SVEs the partitioning between metal melt and silicate melt (Dmetal/silicate) at core formation conditions is poorly constrained, never the less they are very important for most of the core formation models. This study is producing new metal-silicate partitioning data for a wide range of SVEs (S, Se, Te, Tl, Ag, As, Au, Cd, Bi, Pb, Sn, Cu, Ge, Zn, In and Ga) with a focus on the P, T and fO2dependencies. The initial hypothesis that we are aiming to test uses the accretion of major portions of volatile elements while the core formation was still active. The key points of this study are: - What are the effects of P, T and fO2 on SVE metal-silicate partioning? - What is the effect of compositional complexity on SVE metal-silicate partioning? - How can SVE's D-values fit into current models of core formation? The partitioning experiments will be performed using a Walker type multi anvil apparatus in a pressure range between 10 and 20 GPa and temperatures of 1700 up to 2100 °C. To determine the Dmetal/silicate values we are using a field emission high-resolution JEOL JXA-8530F EPMA for major elements and a Photon Machines Analyte G2 Excimer laser (193 nm) ablation system coupled to a Thermo Fisher Element 2 single-collector ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) for the trace elements. We recently finished the first sets of experiments and can provide the

  20. AGR core safety assessment methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLachlan, N.; Reed, J.; Metcalfe, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    To demonstrate the safety of its gas-cooled graphite-moderated AGR reactors, nuclear safety assessments of the cores are based upon a methodology which demonstrates no component failures, geometrical stability of the structure and material properties bounded by a database. All AGRs continue to meet these three criteria. However, predictions of future core behaviour indicate that the safety case methodology will eventually need to be modified to deal with new phenomena. A new approach to the safety assessment of the cores is currently under development, which can take account of these factors while at the same time providing the same level of protection for the cores. This approach will be based on the functionality of the core: unhindered movement of control rods, continued adequate cooling of the fuel and the core, continued ability to charge and discharge fuel. (author). 5 figs

  1. Fast breeder physics and nuclear core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marth, W.; Schroeder, R.

    1983-07-01

    This report gathers the papers that have been presented on January 18/19, 1983 at a seminar ''Fast breeder physics and nuclear core design'' held at KfK. These papers cover the results obtained within about the last five years in the r+d program and give some indication, what still has to be done. To begin with, the ''tools'' of the core designer, i.e. nuclear data and neutronics codes are covered in a comprehensive way, the seminar emphasized the applications, however. First of all the accuracies obtained for the most important parameters are presented for the design of homogeneous and heterogeneous cores of about 1000 MWe, they are based on the results of critical experiments. This is followed by a survey on activities related to the KNK II reactor, i.e. calculations concerning a modification of the core as well as critical experiments done with respect to re-loads. Finally, work concerning reactivity worths of accident configurations is presented: the generation of reactivity worths for the input of safety-related calculations of a SNR 2 design, and critical experiments to investigate the requirements for the codes to be used for these calculations. These papers are accompanied by two contributions from the industrial partners. The first one deals with the requirements to nuclear design methods as seen by the reactor designer and then shows what has been achieved. The latter one presents state, trends, and methods of the SNR 2 design. The concluding remarks compare the state of the art reached within DeBeNe with international achievements. (orig.) [de

  2. Overview of core disruptive accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchaterre, J.F.

    1977-01-01

    An overview of the analysis of core-disruptive accidents is given. These analyses are for the purpose of understanding and predicting fast reactor behavior in severe low probability accident conditions, to establish the consequences of such conditions and to provide a basis for evaluating consequence limiting design features. The methods are used to analyze core-disruptive accidents from initiating event to complete core disruption, the effects of the accident on reactor structures and the resulting radiological consequences are described

  3. Coupling between core and cladding modes in a helical core fiber with large core offset

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napiorkowski, Maciej; Urbanczyk, Waclaw

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the effect of resonant coupling between core and cladding modes in a helical core fiber with large core offset using the fully vectorial method based on the transformation optics formalism. Our study revealed that the resonant couplings to lower order cladding modes predicted by perturbative methods and observed experimentally in fibers with small core offsets are in fact prohibited for larger core offsets. This effect is related to the lack of phase matching caused by elongation of the optical path of the fundamental modes in the helical core. Moreover, strong couplings to the cladding modes of the azimuthal modal number much higher than predicted by perturbative methods may be observed for large core offsets, as the core offset introduces higher order angular harmonics in the field distribution of the fundamental modes. Finally, in contrast to previous studies, we demonstrate the existence of spectrally broad polarization sensitive couplings to the cladding modes suggesting that helical core fibers with large core offsets may be used as broadband circular polarizers. (paper)

  4. Aseismic study of high temperature gas-cooled reactor core with block-type fuel, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takeshi; Honma, Toshiaki.

    1985-01-01

    A two-dimensional horizontal seismic experiment with single axis and simultaneous two-axes excitations was performed to obtain the core seismic design data on the block-type high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Effects of excitation directions and core side support stiffness on characteristics of core displacements and reaction forces of support were revealed. The values of the side reaction forces are the largest in the excitation of flat-to-flat of hexagonal block. Preload from the core periphery to the core center are effective to decrease core displacements and side reaction forces. (author)

  5. Wire core reactor for NTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harty, R.B.

    1991-01-01

    The development of the wire core system for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) that took place from 1963 to 1965 is discussed. A wire core consists of a fuel wire with spacer wires. It's an annular flow core having a central control rod. There are actually four of these, with beryllium solid reflectors on both ends and all the way around. Much of the information on the concept is given in viewgraph form. Viewgraphs are presented on design details of the wire core, the engine design, engine weight vs. thrust, a technique used to fabricate the wire fuel element, and axial temperature distribution

  6. Nuclear reactor with several cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swars, H.

    1977-01-01

    Several sodium-cooled cores in separate vessels with removable closures are placed in a common reactor tank. Each individual vessel is protected against the consequences of an accident in the relevant core. Maintenance devices and inlet and outlet pipes for the coolant are also arranged within the reactor tank. The individual vessels are all enclosed by coolant in a way that in case of emergency cooling or refuelling each core can be continued to be cooled by means of the coolant loops of the other cores. (HP) [de

  7. Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The UCLA-DOE Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Facility provides the UCLA biochemistry community with easy access to sophisticated instrumentation for a wide variety...

  8. Core barrel inner tube lifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffers, J P

    1968-07-16

    A core drill with means for selectively lifting a core barrel inner tube consists of a lifting means connected to the core barrel inner tube assembly. It has a closable passage to permit drilling fluid normally to pass through it. The lifting means has a normally downward facing surface and a means to direct drilling fluid pressure against that surface so that on closure of the passage to fluid flow, the pressure of the drilling fluid is caused to act selectively on it. This causes the lifting means to rise and lift the core barrel. (7 claims)

  9. TMI-2 core debris analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, B.A.; Carlson, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    One of the ongoing examination tasks for the damaged TMI-2 reactor is analysis of samples of debris obtained from the debris bed presently at the top of the core. This paper summarizes the results reported in the TMI-2 Core Debris Grab Sample Examination and Analysis Report, which will be available early in 1986. The sampling and analysis procedures are presented, and information is provided on the key results as they relate to the present core condition, peak temperatures during the transient, temperature history, chemical interactions, and core relocation. The results are then summarized

  10. Meltdown reactor core cooling facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Tsuyoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The meltdown reactor core cooling facility comprises a meltdown reactor core cooling tank, a cooling water storage tank situates at a position higher than the meltdown reactor core cooling tank, an upper pipeline connecting the upper portions of the both of the tanks and a lower pipeline connecting the lower portions of them. Upon occurrence of reactor core meltdown, a high temperature meltdown reactor core is dropped on the cooling tank to partially melt the tank and form a hole, from which cooling water is flown out. Since the water source of the cooling water is the cooling water storage tank, a great amount of cooling water is further dropped and supplied and the reactor core is submerged and cooled by natural convection for a long period of time. Further, when the lump of the meltdown reactor core is small and the perforated hole of the meltdown reactor cooling tank is small, cooling water is boiled by the high temperature lump intruding into the meltdown reactor core cooling tank and blown out from the upper pipeline to the cooling water storage tank to supply cooling water from the lower pipeline to the meltdown reactor core cooling tank. Since it is constituted only with simple static facilities, the facility can be simplified to attain improvement of reliability. (N.H.)

  11. Fort St. Vrain core performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEachern, D.W.; Brown, J.R.; Heller, R.A.; Franek, W.J.

    1977-07-01

    The Fort St. Vrain High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor core performance has been evaluated during the startup testing phase of the reactor operation. The reactor is graphite moderated, helium cooled, and uses coated particle fuel and on-line flow control to each of the 37 refueling regions. Principal objectives of startup testing were to determine: core and control system reactivity, radial power distribution, flow control capability, and initial fission product release. Information from the core demonstrates that Technical Specifications are being met, performance of the core and fuel is as expected, flow and reactivity control are predictable and simple for the operator to carry out

  12. Data Acquisition Backbone Core DABC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamczewski, J; Essel, H G; Kurz, N; Linev, S

    2008-01-01

    For the new experiments at FAIR new concepts of data acquisition systems have to be developed like the distribution of self-triggered, time stamped data streams over high performance networks for event building. The Data Acquisition Backbone Core (DABC) is a software package currently under development for FAIR detector tests, readout components test, and data flow investigations. All kinds of data channels (front-end systems) are connected by program plug-ins into functional components of DABC like data input, combiner, scheduler, event builder, analysis and storage components. After detailed simulations real tests of event building over a switched network (InfiniBand clusters with up to 110 nodes) have been performed. With the DABC software more than 900 MByte/s input and output per node can be achieved meeting the most demanding requirements. The software is ready for the implementation of various test beds needed for the final design of data acquisition systems at FAIR. The development of key components is supported by the FutureDAQ project of the European Union (FP6 I3HP JRA1)

  13. Characterizing the Core via K-Core Covers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez, S.M.; Borm, P.E.M.; Estevez, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  14. Adult educators' core competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  15. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kenji; Oikawa, Hirohide.

    1990-01-01

    The device according to this invention can ensure cooling water required for emerency core cooling upon emergence such as abnormally, for example, loss of coolant accident, without using dynamic equipments such as a centrifugal pump or large-scaled tank. The device comprises a pressure accumulation tank containing a high pressure nitrogen gas and cooling water inside, a condensate storage tank, a pressure suppression pool and a jet stream pump. In this device there are disposed a pipeline for guiding cooling water in the pressure accumulation tank as a jetting water to a jetting stream pump, a pipeline for guiding cooling water stored in the condensate storage tank and the pressure suppression pool as pumped water to the jetting pump and, further, a pipeline for guiding the discharged water from the jet stream pump which is a mixed stream of pumped water and jetting water into the reactor pressure vessel. In this constitution, a sufficient amount of water ranging from relatively high pressure to low pressure can be supplied into the reactor pressure vessel, without increasing the size of the pressure accumulation tank. (I.S.)

  16. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Akira; Kobayashi, Masahide.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable a stable operation of an emergency core cooling system by preventing the system from the automatic stopping at an abnormally high level of the reactor water during its operation. Constitution: A pump flow rate signal and a reactor water level signal are used and, when the reactor water level is increased to a predetermined level, the pump flow rate is controlled by the reactor water level signal instead of the flow rate signal. Specifically, when the reactor water level is gradually increased by the water injection from the pump and exceeds a setting signal for the water level, the water level deviation signal acts as a demand signal for the decrease in the flow rate of the pump and the output signal from the water level controller is also decreased depending on the control constant. At a certain point, the output signal from the water level controller becomes smaller than the output signal from the flow rate controller. Thus, the output signal from the water level controller is outputted as the output signal for the lower level preference device. In this way, the reactor water level and the pump flow rate can be controlled within a range not exceeding the predetermined pump flow rate. (Horiuchi, T.)

  17. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Nobuaki.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor comprises a static emergency reactor core cooling system having an automatic depressurization system and a gravitationally dropping type water injection system and a container cooling system by an isolation condenser. A depressurization pipeline of the automatic depressurization system connected to a reactor pressure vessel branches in the midway. The branched depressurizing pipelines are extended into an upper dry well and a lower dry well, in which depressurization valves are disposed at the top end portions of the pipelines respectively. If loss-of-coolant accidents should occur, the depressurization valve of the automatic depressurization system is actuated by lowering of water level in the pressure vessel. This causes nitrogen gases in the upper and the lower dry wells to transfer together with discharged steams effectively to a suppression pool passing through a bent tube. Accordingly, the gravitationally dropping type water injection system can be actuated faster. Further, subsequent cooling for the reactor vessel can be ensured sufficiently by the isolation condenser. (I.N.)

  18. Necrosome core machinery: MLKL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yang, Yu; He, Wenyan; Sun, Liming

    2016-06-01

    In the study of regulated cell death, the rapidly expanding field of regulated necrosis, in particular necroptosis, has been drawing much attention. The signaling of necroptosis represents a sophisticated form of a death pathway. Anti-caspase mechanisms (e.g., using inhibitors of caspases, or genetic ablation of caspase-8) switch cell fate from apoptosis to necroptosis. The initial extracellular death signals regulate RIP1 and RIP3 kinase activation. The RIP3-associated death complex assembly is necessary and sufficient to initiate necroptosis. MLKL was initially identified as an essential mediator of RIP1/RIP3 kinase-initiated necroptosis. Recent studies on the signal transduction using chemical tools and biomarkers support the idea that MLKL is able to make more functional sense for the core machinery of the necroptosis death complex, called the necrosome, to connect to the necroptosis execution. The experimental data available now have pointed that the activated MLKL forms membrane-disrupting pores causing membrane leakage, which extends the prototypical concept of morphological and biochemical events following necroptosis happening in vivo. The key role of MLKL in necroptosis signaling thus sheds light on the logic underlying this unique "membrane-explosive" cell death pathway. In this review, we provide the general concepts and strategies that underlie signal transduction of this form of cell death, and then focus specifically on the role of MLKL in necroptosis.

  19. Longitudinal Relationships between Core Self-Evaluations and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Huei; Griffin, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Core self-evaluations (CSE) have been proposed as a static personality trait that influences individuals' work experiences. However, CSE can also be influenced by work experiences. Based on the corresponsive principle of personality development, this study incorporated both dispositional and contextual perspectives to examine longitudinal…

  20. Some activities at CEA related to behaviour of core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrequin, P.

    1998-01-01

    Eighteen transparencies where presented, elaborating some activities at CEA related to behaviour of core internals. After some introduction, ten of the transparencies are essentially a copy of the table of contents of the AMES report no. 11 (report no: EUR 17694 EN). The remaining 6 foils concerned themselves with irradiation experiments in test reactors, namely the IDAHO, CASIMIR and ALEXANDRA experiments

  1. Calcium ions affect the hepatitis B virus core assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yongwook; Gyoo Park, Sung; Yoo, Jun-hi; Jung, Guhung

    2005-01-01

    Previous report showed that cytosolic Ca 2+ induced by hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) promotes HBV replication. In this study, in vitro experiments showed that (i) HBV core assembly in vitro was promoted by Ca 2+ through the sucrose density gradient and the analytical ultracentrifuge analysis. Also (ii) transmission electron microscope analysis demonstrated these assembled HBV core particles were the capsids. Ex vivo experiments showed that the treatment of BAPTA-AM and cyclosporine A (CsA) reduced HBV capsids in the transfected HepG2 cells. In addition to that, the treatment of Thapsigargin (TG) increased HBV capsids in the transfected HepG2 cells. Furthermore, we investigated the increased HBV core assembly by HBx. The results show that the increased cytosolic calcium ions by HBx promote the HBV core assembly

  2. Core-to-core uniformity improvement in multi-core fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Emma; Min, Seong-Sik; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Cvetojevic, Nick; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Lawrence, Jon; Gris-Sanchez, Itandehui; Birks, Tim; Haynes, Roger; Haynes, Dionne

    2014-07-01

    Multi-core fiber Bragg gratings (MCFBGs) will be a valuable tool not only in communications but also various astronomical, sensing and industry applications. In this paper we address some of the technical challenges of fabricating effective multi-core gratings by simulating improvements to the writing method. These methods allow a system designed for inscribing single-core fibers to cope with MCFBG fabrication with only minor, passive changes to the writing process. Using a capillary tube that was polished on one side, the field entering the fiber was flattened which improved the coverage and uniformity of all cores.

  3. Core losses of an inverter-fed permanent magnet synchronous motor with an amorphous stator core under no-load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Denis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM with a stator core made of amorphous magnetic material (AMM is presented. The IPMSM is driven by a voltage source three-phase inverter with classical pulse width modulation (PWM control. The core losses under no-load condition are measured by experiment and compared to an equivalent IPMSM with a stator core made of NO steel. Under these conditions, the core losses are influenced by the stator, rotor and magnet shapes but also by the PWM carrier signal that implies a high frequency harmonic in the magnetic flux density. It is demonstrated that the AMM can reduce the core losses by about 56 %.

  4. In vessel core melt progression phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtaud, M.

    1993-01-01

    For all light water reactor (LWR) accidents, including the so called severe accidents where core melt down can occur, it is necessary to determine the amount and characteristics of fission products released to the environment. For existing reactors this knowledge is used to evaluate the consequences and eventual emergency plans. But for future reactors safety authorities demand decrease risks and reactors designed in such a way that fission products are retained inside the containment, the last protective barrier. This requires improved understanding and knowledge of all accident sequences. In particular it is necessary to be able to describe the very complex phenomena occurring during in vessel core melt progression because they will determine the thermal and mechanical loads on the primary circuit and the timing of its rupture as well as the fission product source term. On the other hand, in case of vessel failure, knowledge of the physical and chemical state of the core melt will provide the initial conditions for analysis of ex-vessel core melt progression and phenomena threatening the containment. Finally a good understanding of in vessel phenomena will help to improve accident management procedures like Emergency Core Cooling System water injection, blowdown and flooding of the vessel well, with their possible adverse effects. Research and Development work on this subject was initiated a long time ago and is still in progress but now it must be intensified in order to meet the safety requirements of the next generation of reactors. Experiments, limited in scale, analysis of the TMI 2 accident which is a unique source of global information and engineering judgment are used to establish and assess physical models that can be implemented in computer codes for reactor accident analysis

  5. Vver-1000 Mox core computational benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The NEA Nuclear Science Committee has established an Expert Group that deals with the status and trends of reactor physics, fuel performance and fuel cycle issues related to disposing of weapons-grade plutonium in mixed-oxide fuel. The objectives of the group are to provide NEA member countries with up-to-date information on, and to develop consensus regarding, core and fuel cycle issues associated with burning weapons-grade plutonium in thermal water reactors (PWR, BWR, VVER-1000, CANDU) and fast reactors (BN-600). These issues concern core physics, fuel performance and reliability, and the capability and flexibility of thermal water reactors and fast reactors to dispose of weapons-grade plutonium in standard fuel cycles. The activities of the NEA Expert Group on Reactor-based Plutonium Disposition are carried out in close co-operation (jointly, in most cases) with the NEA Working Party on Scientific Issues in Reactor Systems (WPRS). A prominent part of these activities include benchmark studies. At the time of preparation of this report, the following benchmarks were completed or in progress: VENUS-2 MOX Core Benchmarks: carried out jointly with the WPRS (formerly the WPPR) (completed); VVER-1000 LEU and MOX Benchmark (completed); KRITZ-2 Benchmarks: carried out jointly with the WPRS (formerly the WPPR) (completed); Hollow and Solid MOX Fuel Behaviour Benchmark (completed); PRIMO MOX Fuel Performance Benchmark (ongoing); VENUS-2 MOX-fuelled Reactor Dosimetry Calculation (ongoing); VVER-1000 In-core Self-powered Neutron Detector Calculational Benchmark (started); MOX Fuel Rod Behaviour in Fast Power Pulse Conditions (started); Benchmark on the VENUS Plutonium Recycling Experiments Configuration 7 (started). This report describes the detailed results of the benchmark investigating the physics of a whole VVER-1000 reactor core using two-thirds low-enriched uranium (LEU) and one-third MOX fuel. It contributes to the computer code certification process and to the

  6. Nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement is described wherein a plurality of actuators, disposed in a pattern laterally surrounding a group of elongated fuel assemblies, press against respective contiguous fuel assemblies on the periphery of the group to reduce the clearance between adjacent fuel assemblies thereby forming a more compacted, vibration resistant core structure. 7 claims, 4 drawing figures

  7. Complicated Politics to the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinn, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    People dislike the Common Core for several different reasons, and so it is important to disaggregate the sources of opposition and to assess and then to dispel some of the myths that have built up around it. It also is important to understand the unusual political alliances that have emerged in opposition to Common Core implementation and how they…

  8. Toward full MOX core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouviere, G.; Guillet, J.L.; Bruna, G.B.; Pelet, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a selection of the main preliminary results of a study program sponsored by COGEMA and currently carried out by FRAMATOME. The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of full MOX core loading in a French 1300 MWe PWR, a recent and widespread standard nuclear power plant. The investigation includes core nuclear design, thermal hydraulic and systems aspects. (authors)

  9. Collapsing stellar cores and supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, R J [Nordisk Inst. for Teoretisk Atomfysik, Copenhagen (Denmark); Noorgaard, H [Nordisk Inst. for Teoretisk Atomfysik, Copenhagen (Denmark); Chicago Univ., IL (USA). Enrico Fermi Inst.); Bond, J R [Niels Bohr Institutet, Copenhagen (Denmark); California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (USA). W.K. Kellogg Radiation Lab.)

    1979-05-01

    The evolution of a stellar core is studied during its final quasi-hydrostatic contraction. The core structure and the (poorly known) properties of neutron rich matter are parametrized to include most plausible cases. It is found that the density-temperature trajectory of the material in the central part of the core (the core-center) is insensitive to nearly all reasonable parameter variations. The central density at the onset of the dynamic phase of the collapse (when the core-center begins to fall away from the rest of the star) and the fraction of the emitted neutrinos which are trapped in the collapsing core-center depend quite sensitively on the properties of neutron rich matter. We estimate that the amount of energy Ecm which is imparted to the core-mantle by the neutrinos which escape from the imploded core-center can span a large range of values. For plausible choices of nuclear and model parameters Ecm can be large enough to yield a supernova event.

  10. The INTEGRAL Core Observing Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, C.; Gehrels, N.; Lund, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The Core Programme of the INTEGRAL mission is defined as the portion of the scientific programme covering the guaranteed time observations for the INTEGRAL Science Working Team. This paper describes the current status of the Core Programme preparations and summarizes the key elements...... of the observing programme....

  11. Core design aspects of SNR 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehmann, U.K.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes in its first part the main characteristics of the core of the SNR 2 fast breeder reactor which is being planned within the European collaboration on fast breeder reactors. In the second part some core design aspects are discussed. The fuel element management with an inwards shuffling after each cycle is illustrated which offers advantages with respect to linear rating, steel damage and average discharge burnup. For this management, the full three-dimensional power and burnup history has been calculated and some typical results are presented. The shutdown requirements and the capabilities of the two shutdown systems of SNR 2 are discussed. The necessity for a reliable surveillance of the power distribution is demonstrated by the pronounced power tilts in case of the unintentional withdrawal of an absorber rod. Finally, a short review of the main nuclear design methods and their validation with help of the evaluation of experiments in zero power facilities and power reactors is given

  12. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Slavov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs, some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function.

  13. TCA UO2/MOX core analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, Yoshihisa; Noda, Hideyuki

    2000-01-01

    In order to examine the adequacy of nuclear data, the TCA UO 2 and MOX core experiments were analyzed with MVP using the libraries based on ENDF/B-VI Mod.3 and JENDL-3.2. The ENDF/B-VI data underpredict k eff values. The replacement of 238 U data with the JENDL-3.2 data and the adjustment of 235 ν-value raise the k eff values by 0.3% for UO 2 cores, but still underpredict k eff values. On the other hand, the nuclear data of JENDL-3.2 for H, O, Al, 238 U and 235 U of ENDF/B-VI whose 235 ν-value in thermal energy region is adjusted to the average value of JENDL-3.2 give a good prediction of k eff . (author)

  14. Evaluation of tight-pitch PWR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, F.; Driscoll, M.J.; Lanning, D.D.

    1979-08-01

    The impact of tight pinch cores on the consumption of natural uranium ore has been evaluated for two systems of coupled PWR's namely one particular type of thorium system - 235 U/UO 2 : Pu/ThO 2 : 233 U/ThO 2 - and the conventional recycle-mode uranium system - 235 U/UO 2 : Pu/UO 2 . The basic parameter varied was the fuel-to-moderator volume ratio (F/M) of the (uniform) lattice for the last core in each sequence. Although methods and data verification in the range of present interest, 0.5 (current lattices) 1.0, the EPRI-LEOPARD and LASER programs used for the thorium and uranium calculations, respectively, were successfully benchmarked against several of the more pertinent experiments

  15. Experiência inicial em málaga (Espanha) com prótese aórtica CoreValve para tratamento de estenose aórtica sintomática grave

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-García,José M.; Muñoz García,Antonio J.; Alonso-Briales,Juan H.; Jiménez-Navarro,Manuel F.; Domínguez-Franco,Antonio J.; Rodríguez-Bailón,Isabel; Hernández,Paula; Olalla-Mercadé,Eduardo; Teresa-Galván,Eduardo de

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO: A prevalência de estenose aórtica grave vem crescendo em decorrência do aumento da expectativa de vida. Alguns pacientes não se beneficiam do tratamento cirúrgico por causa das comorbidades associadas. Apresentamos os resultados de nossa experiência no tratamento percutâneo da estenose aórtica. MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo, realizado entre abril de 2008 e fevereiro de 2009, em que 31 pacientes consecutivos com estenose aórtica grave sintomática e que apresentavam alto risco cirúrgic...

  16. Translation and convection of Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnereau, M.; Calvet, M.; Margerin, L.; Mizzon, H.; Souriau, A.

    2012-12-01

    The image of the inner core growing slowly at the center of the Earth by gradual cooling and solidification of the surrounding liquid outer core is being replaced by the more vigorous image of a ``deep foundry'', where melting and crystallization rates exceed by many times the net growth rate. Recently, a particular mode of convection, called translation, has been put forward as an important mode of inner core dynamics because this mechanism is able to explain the observed East-West asymmetry of P-wave velocity and attenuation (Monnereau et al. 2010). Translation is a pure solid displacement of the inner core material (solid iron) within its envelop, implying crystallization of entering iron on one side of the inner core and melting on the opposite side. Translation is consistent with multiple scattering models of wave propagation. If they do not experience deformation, iron crystals grow as they transit from one hemisphere to the other. Larger crystals constituting a faster and more attenuating medium, a translation velocity of some cm/yr (about ten times the growth rate) is enough to account for the superficial asymmetry observed for P-wave velocity and attenuation, with grains of a few hundred meters on the crystallizing side (West) growing up to a few kilometers before melting on the East side, and a drift direction located in the equatorial plane. Among all hypotheses that have been proposed to account for the seismic asymmetry, translation is the only one based on a demonstrated link between the seismic data and the proposed dynamics, notably through a model of seismic wave propagation. This mechanism was also proposed to be responsible for the formation of a dense layer at the bottom of the outer core, since the high rate of melting and crystallization would release a liquid depleted in light elements at the surface of the inner core (Alboussiere et al 2010). This would explain the anomalously low gradient of P wave velocity in the lowermost 200 km of the

  17. Core barrel plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolino, R.W.; Hopkins, R.J.; Congleton, R.L.; Popalis, C.H.

    1986-01-01

    A plug is described for preventing flow through a port in a core barrel of a pressurized water nuclear reactor which consists of: a substantially cylindrical body formed with a cylindrical portion and a flange and defining a tapered leading open end with the other end being closed by an end plug attached to the flange, the body defining a bore therein extending from the open end to the end plug with the bore having a smaller diameter near the open end than near the end plug, the cylindrical portion having a lip near the open end and being formed with longitudinal slots extending from the open end toward the flange and extending entirely through the thickness of the cylindrical portion, the cylindrical portion having a circumferential first groove on the outer surface thereof located near the forwardmost portion of the cylindrical portion but not in the section of the cylindrical portion that has the slots therein, and a plurality of circumferential second grooves on the outer surface thereof located in the section of the cylindrical portion that has the slots therein, the first and second grooves establishing a seal between the cylindrical portion and the inside surface of the port when the cylindrical portion is expanded, and the flange and the end plug having a passageway defined therein for introducing a fluid into the body; a metal ring disposed in each of the second grooves; a mandrel slidably disposed and captured in the body and capable of being moved toward the open end of the body when the fluid is introduced through the passageway, thereby causing the cylindrical portion to be expanded into contact with the inside surface of the port; and a locking mechanism disposed in the end plug for preventing inadvertent movement of the mandrel

  18. SCORPIO - VVER core surveillance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalesky, K.; Svarny, J.; Novak, L.; Rosol, J.; Horanes, A.

    1997-01-01

    The Halden Project has developed the core surveillance system SCORPIO which has two parallel modes of operation: the Core Follow Mode and the Predictive Mode. The main motivation behind the development of SCORPIO is to make a practical tool for reactor operators which can increase the quality and quantity of information presented on core status and dynamic behavior. This can first of all improve plant safety as undesired core conditions are detected and prevented. Secondly, more flexible and efficient plant operation is made possible. So far the system has only been implemented on western PWRs but the basic concept is applicable to a wide range of reactor including WWERs. The main differences between WWERs and typical western PWRs with respect to core surveillance requirements are outlined. The development of a WWER version of SCORPIO was initiated in cooperation with the Nuclear Research Institute at Rez and industry partners in the Czech Republic. The first system will be installed at the Dukovany NPP. (author)

  19. Study of the multiplication factor in the core of Saclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacrot, B.; Netter, F.; Raievski, V.

    1953-01-01

    Several methods were studied for the measure of the multiplication factor strength in a core, by experiences in subcritical regime. These methods are applied to the determination of the effect on the reactivity of such different parameters of the battery that: heavy water level, position of the regulating plates. These results are used to establish an experimental relation between the time of the rise of the divergent core and the factor of effective multiplication. It is also given the application of these methods to the assessment of the power of the core. (author) [fr

  20. Fast Flux Test Facility core restraint system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, S.L.; Trenchard, R.G.

    1990-02-01

    Characterizing Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) core restraint system performance has been ongoing since the first operating cycle. Characterization consists of prerun analysis for each core load, in-reactor and postirradiation measurements of subassembly withdrawal loads and deformations, and using measurement data to fine tune predictive models. Monitoring FFTF operations and performing trend analysis has made it possible to gain insight into core restraint system performance and head off refueling difficulties while maximizing component lifetimes. Additionally, valuable information for improved designs and operating methods has been obtained. Focus is on past operating experience, emphasizing performance improvements and avoidance of potential problems. 4 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Two-phase flow pattern and heat transfer during core uncovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osakabe, Masahiro; Koizumi, Yasuo; Tasaka, Kanji

    1987-01-01

    The low and high power core uncovery patterns were observed in the high-pressure quasi-steady core uncovery experiments in a 25-rod bundle. The boundary between the two patterns was obtained in the experiments. The difference of two patterns was considered to be due to the slug-annular transition below the dryout points. The Osakabe's slug-annular transition model was the good boundary between the two patterns. The small break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) experiments were conducted by using the integral experimental facility with the 1,168-rod core. The transient core uncovery pattern was expected as the low power core uncovery pattern based on the quasisteady experiments mentioned above. The transient core uncovery patterns were classified into the boiloff and hydraulic core uncovery. In the boiloff core uncovery, the dryout points were controlled with the mixture level like the quasi-steady state. In the hydraulic core uncovery, the dryout points were not controlled with the mixture level alone, and the multi-dimensional dryout process in the core and the relatively high heat transfer above the dryout points were observed. It was considered that a part of water was remained above the dryout points due to the rapid depression of core liquid level. (author)

  2. Making Mercury's Core with Light Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has low FeO abundances (less than 2 wt%) and high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%), suggesting the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials is somewhere between 3 to 7 log10 units below the IW buffer. The highly reducing nature of Mercury has resulted in a relatively thin mantle and a large core that has the potential to exhibit an exotic composition in comparison to the other terrestrial planets. This exotic composition may extend to include light elements (e.g., Si, C, S). Furthermore, has argued for a possible primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, which may require a core that is C-saturated. In order to investigate mercurian core compositions, we conducted piston cylinder experiments at 1 GPa, from 1300 C to 1700 C, using a range of starting compositions consisting of various Si-Fe metal mixtures (Si5Fe95, Si10Fe90, Si22Fe78, and Si35Fe65). All metals were loaded into graphite capsules used to ensure C-saturation during the duration of each experimental run. Our experiments show that Fe-Si metallic alloys exclude carbon relative to more Fe-rich metal. This exclusion of carbon commences within the range of 5 to 10 wt% Si. These results indicate that if Mercury has a Si-rich core (having more than approximately 5 wt% silicon), it would have saturated in carbon at low C abundances allowing for the possible formation of a graphite floatation crust as suggested by. These results have important implications for the thermal and magmatic evolution of Mercury.

  3. Edge and core dynamics in harness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.

    2007-01-01

    Resistive kink oscillations in tokamak plasmas are usually treated as core localized events, yet there there are several mechanisms by which they may interact with the edge dynamics. This suggests that we may regulate edge oscillatory behaviour, or ELMs, by harnessing the natural or contrived sawtooth period and amplitude. In this work I investigate core-edge oscillatory entrainment through direct propagation of heat pulses, inductive coupling, and global higher order resonance effects. In the core of auxiliary heated tokamak plasmas the ineluctable rhythm of slow buildup and rapid conversion of potential energy governs electron and heat radial transport. The growth phase of the sawtooth is accompanied by significant reconnection, then during the collapse the temperature and density in the core fall dramatically. There is evidence from experiments in reversed field pinch devices that ensuing energy fluxes can affect flow shear and confinement at the edge. The basis for this study is the dynamical (BDS) model for edge plasma behavior that was derived from electrostatic resistive MHD equations. The BDS model reflects the major qualitative features of edge dynamics that have been observed, such as L-H transitions and associated ELMs, hysteresis, and spontaneous reversal of poloidal shear flow. Under poorly dissipative conditions the transient behavior of the model can exhibit period-doubling, blue-sky, homoclinic, and other exotic bifurcations. Thus we might ask questions such as: Is it possible to mode-lock the edge dynamics to the core sawteeth? Can we induce, or prevent, a change in direction of shear flow? What about MHD effects? Is core-edge communication one way or is there some feedback? In the simplest prototype for coupled core-edge dynamics I model the sawtooth crash as a periodic power input to the edge potential energy reservoir. This is effected by coupling the BDS model to the dynamical system u = u(1 - u 2 - x 2 ) - ω s x, x = x(1-u 2 -x 2 ) + ω s u

  4. Core body temperature in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikens, Marc J; Gorbach, Alexander M; Eden, Henry S; Savastano, David M; Chen, Kong Y; Skarulis, Monica C; Yanovski, Jack A

    2011-05-01

    A lower core body temperature set point has been suggested to be a factor that could potentially predispose humans to develop obesity. We tested the hypothesis that obese individuals have lower core temperatures than those in normal-weight individuals. In study 1, nonobese [body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) temperature-sensing capsules, and we measured core temperatures continuously for 24 h. In study 2, normal-weight (BMI of 18-25) and obese subjects swallowed temperature-sensing capsules to measure core temperatures continuously for ≥48 h and kept activity logs. We constructed daily, 24-h core temperature profiles for analysis. Mean (±SE) daily core body temperature did not differ significantly between the 35 nonobese and 46 obese subjects (36.92 ± 0.03°C compared with 36.89 ± 0.03°C; P = 0.44). Core temperature 24-h profiles did not differ significantly between 11 normal-weight and 19 obese subjects (P = 0.274). Women had a mean core body temperature ≈0.23°C greater than that of men (36.99 ± 0.03°C compared with 36.76 ± 0.03°C; P body temperature. It may be necessary to study individuals with function-altering mutations in core temperature-regulating genes to determine whether differences in the core body temperature set point affect the regulation of human body weight. These trials were registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00428987 and NCT00266500.

  5. Gas Hydrate-Sediment Morphologies Revealed by Pressure Core Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Roberts, J.; Druce, M.

    2006-12-01

    Analysis of HYACINTH pressure cores collected on IODP Expedition 311 and NGHP Expedition 1 showed gas hydrate layers, lenses, and veins contained in fine-grained sediments as well as gas hydrate contained in coarse-grained layers. Pressure cores were recovered from sediments on the Cascadia Margin off the North American West Coast and in the Krishna-Godavari Basin in the Western Bay of Bengal in water depths of 800- 1400 meters. Recovered cores were transferred to laboratory chambers without loss of pressure and nondestructive measurements were made at in situ pressures and controlled temperatures. Gamma density, P-wave velocity, and X-ray images showed evidence of grain-displacing and pore-filling gas hydrate in the cores. Data highlights include X-ray images of fine-grained sediment cores showing wispy subvertical veins of gas hydrate and P-wave velocity excursions corresponding to grain-displacing layers and pore-filling layers of gas hydrate. Most cores were subjected to controlled depressurization experiments, where expelled gas was collected, analyzed for composition, and used to calculate gas hydrate saturation within the core. Selected cores were stored under pressure for postcruise analysis and subsampling.

  6. Multi-core processing and scheduling performance in CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Commodity hardware is going many-core. We might soon not be able to satisfy the job memory needs per core in the current single-core processing model in High Energy Physics. In addition, an ever increasing number of independent and incoherent jobs running on the same physical hardware not sharing resources might significantly affect processing performance. It will be essential to effectively utilize the multi-core architecture. CMS has incorporated support for multi-core processing in the event processing framework and the workload management system. Multi-core processing jobs share common data in memory, such us the code libraries, detector geometry and conditions data, resulting in a much lower memory usage than standard single-core independent jobs. Exploiting this new processing model requires a new model in computing resource allocation, departing from the standard single-core allocation for a job. The experiment job management system needs to have control over a larger quantum of resource since multi-...

  7. Core attitudes of professionals in palliative care: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steffen T; Ramsenthaler, Christina; Bausewein, Claudia; Krischke, Norbert; Geiss, Gerlinde

    2009-08-01

    Self-awareness of one's own reactions towards patients and their relatives is of paramount importance for all professionals in palliative care. 'Core attitude' describes the way in which a person perceives himself and the world, and forms the basis for his actions and thoughts. The aim of this study is to explore what core attitude means for palliative care professionals and whether there is a specific core attitude in palliative care. Qualitative study with 10 face-to-face in-depth interviews with experts in palliative care (nurses, physicians, social workers, psychologists, chaplain) in Germany. Core attitude in palliative care can be best described with the following three domains: 1) personal characteristics; 2) experience of care; and 3) competence in care. Authenticity is the most important characteristic of professionals, along with honesty and mindfulness. Core attitude primarily becomes apparent in the relationship with the patient. Perception and listening are key competences. The experts emphasized the universality of the core attitude in the care of ill people. They stressed the importance and relevance of teaching core attitudes in palliative care education. In the field of palliative care, core attitude consists predominately of authenticity, manifests itself in relationships, and requires a high degree of perceptiveness.

  8. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations

  9. Nitrogen partitioning during core-mantle differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speelmanns, I. M.; Schmidt, M. W.; Liebske, C.

    2016-12-01

    This study investiagtes nitrogen partitioing between metal and silicate melts as relevant for core segregation during the accretion of planetesimals into the Earth. On present day Earth, N belongs to the most important elements, as it is one of the key constituents of our atmosphere and forms the basis of life. However, the geochemistry of N, i.e. its distribution and isotopic fractionation between Earth's deep reservoirs is not well constrained. In order to determine the partitioning behaviour of N, a centrifuging piston cylinder was used to euqilibrate and then gravitationally separate metal-silicate melt pairs at 1250 °C, 1 GPa over the range of oxygen fugacities thought to have prevailied druing core segreagtion (IW-4 to IW). Complete segregation of the two melts was reached within 3 hours at 1000 g, the interface showing a nice meniscus The applied double capsule technique, using an outer metallic and inner non-metallic (mostly graphite) capsule, minimizes volatile loss over the course of the experiment compared to single non-metallic capsules. The two quenched melts were cut apart, cleaned at the outside and N concentrations of the melts were analysed on bulk samples by an elemental analyser. Nevertheless, the low amount of sample material and the N yield in the high pressure experiments required the developement of new analytical routines. Despite these experimental and analytical difficulties, we were able to determine a DNmetal/silicateof 13±0.25 at IW-1, N partitioning into the core froming metal. The few availible literature data [1],[2] suggest that N changes its compatibility favoring the silicate melt or magma ocean at around IW-2.5. In order to asses how much N may effectively be contained in the core and the silicate Earth, experiments characterizing N behaviour over the entire range of core formation condtitions are well under way. [1] Kadik et al., (2011) Geochemistry International 49.5: 429-438. [2] Roskosz et al., (2013) GCA 121: 15-28.

  10. Epistemology and ontology in core ontologies: FOLaw and LRI-Core, two core ontologies for law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukers, J.A.P.J.; Hoekstra, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    For more than a decade constructing ontologies for legal domains, we, at the Leibniz Center for Law, felt really the need to develop a core ontology for law that would enable us to re-use the common denominator of the various legal domains. In this paper we present two core ontologies for law. The

  11. Ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor-MHD system for space nuclear electric power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, Isaac; Anghaie, Samim; Diaz, Nils J.; Dugan, Edward T.

    1991-01-01

    The conceptual design of a nuclear space power system based on the ultrahigh temperature vapor core reactor with MHD energy conversion is presented. This UF4 fueled gas core cavity reactor operates at 4000 K maximum core temperature and 40 atm. Materials experiments, conducted with UF4 up to 2200 K, demonstrate acceptable compatibility with tungsten-molybdenum-, and carbon-based materials. The supporting nuclear, heat transfer, fluid flow and MHD analysis, and fissioning plasma physics experiments are also discussed.

  12. Research on Power Output Characteristics of Magnetic Core in Energy Harvesting Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Ping GUO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic core is the dominant factor in the performance of current transformer energy harvesting devices. The power output model of the magnetic core is established and verified through experiments. According to the actual application requirements, the concept of power density is proposed. The relationships of power density to air gap, material and dimension of the magnetic core are analyzed and verified through experiments.

  13. An experimental study of the heterogeneous LMFBR core using FCA assemblies with axial internal blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, M.; Iijima, S.; Shirakata, K.; Hirota, J.

    1980-01-01

    To investigate physics properties of the heterogeneous LMFBR core and to examine the reliability of the current data and method for heterogeneous core configuration, an experimental study has been made on FCA VII-3 assemblies which have an internal blanket (IB) at midplane of the cylindrical core. Systematic experiments were carried out on the heterogeneous cores whose IBs were different in composition and thickness. A homogeneous core was also built to compare the results with those obtained on the heterogeneous cores. The sodium-void worth is not sensitive to the composition of IB. The positive void worth in the core of the 40 cm IB is lowered by about 40% compared with that in the homogeneous core. The analysis was made using the JAERI-Fast Set Version II and the diffusion code CITATION. Directional diffusion coefficients were used to take account of the axial streaming. To evaluate transport effects, the S 4 calculation was made. Comparison between the calculated and experimental results reveals the following: ksub(eff) and Pu worth in the core are not well predicted for the heterogeneous core, although they are represented satisfactorily for the homogeneous core. Reaction rates sensitive to the low-energy neutron are underestimated in the IB when they are normalized in the core. Sodium-void worths are fairly well predicted. However, the positive void worth in the heterogeneous core is underestimated, while that in the homogeneous core is overestimated. (author)

  14. HOW STARLESS ARE STARLESS CORES?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnee, Scott; Friesen, Rachel; Di Francesco, James; Johnstone, Doug; Enoch, Melissa; Sadavoy, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy continuum and spectral line observations of the dense core Per-Bolo 45. Although this core has previously been classified as starless, we find evidence for an outflow and conclude that Per-Bolo 45 is actually an embedded, low-luminosity protostar. We discuss the impact of newly discovered, low-luminosity, embedded objects in the Perseus molecular cloud on starless core and protostar lifetimes. We estimate that the starless core lifetime has been overestimated by 4%-18% and the Class 0/I protostellar lifetime has been underestimated by 5%-20%. Given the relatively large systematic uncertainties involved in these calculations, variations on the order of 10% do not significantly change either core lifetimes or the expected protostellar luminosity function. Finally, we suggest that high-resolution (sub)millimeter surveys of known cores lacking near-infrared and mid-infrared emission are necessary to make an accurate census of starless cores.

  15. Challenges for proteomics core facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, Kathryn S; Deery, Michael J; Gatto, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    Many analytical techniques have been executed by core facilities established within academic, pharmaceutical and other industrial institutions. The centralization of such facilities ensures a level of expertise and hardware which often cannot be supported by individual laboratories. The establishment of a core facility thus makes the technology available for multiple researchers in the same institution. Often, the services within the core facility are also opened out to researchers from other institutions, frequently with a fee being levied for the service provided. In the 1990s, with the onset of the age of genomics, there was an abundance of DNA analysis facilities, many of which have since disappeared from institutions and are now available through commercial sources. Ten years on, as proteomics was beginning to be utilized by many researchers, this technology found itself an ideal candidate for being placed within a core facility. We discuss what in our view are the daily challenges of proteomics core facilities. We also examine the potential unmet needs of the proteomics core facility that may also be applicable to proteomics laboratories which do not function as core facilities. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Core principles of evolutionary medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunspan, Daniel Z; Nesse, Randolph M; Barnes, M Elizabeth; Brownell, Sara E

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives Evolutionary medicine is a rapidly growing field that uses the principles of evolutionary biology to better understand, prevent and treat disease, and that uses studies of disease to advance basic knowledge in evolutionary biology. Over-arching principles of evolutionary medicine have been described in publications, but our study is the first to systematically elicit core principles from a diverse panel of experts in evolutionary medicine. These principles should be useful to advance recent recommendations made by The Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute to make evolutionary thinking a core competency for pre-medical education. Methodology The Delphi method was used to elicit and validate a list of core principles for evolutionary medicine. The study included four surveys administered in sequence to 56 expert panelists. The initial open-ended survey created a list of possible core principles; the three subsequent surveys winnowed the list and assessed the accuracy and importance of each principle. Results Fourteen core principles elicited at least 80% of the panelists to agree or strongly agree that they were important core principles for evolutionary medicine. These principles over-lapped with concepts discussed in other articles discussing key concepts in evolutionary medicine. Conclusions and implications This set of core principles will be helpful for researchers and instructors in evolutionary medicine. We recommend that evolutionary medicine instructors use the list of core principles to construct learning goals. Evolutionary medicine is a young field, so this list of core principles will likely change as the field develops further. PMID:29493660

  17. Assessing Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marches in 1987. Assessment in the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). It is widely recognized that sophisticated computing technologies are becoming a key element in today's classroom instructional techniques. Regardless, the Professor must be held responsible for creating an instructional environment in which the technology actually supplements learning outcomes of the students. Almost all academic disciplines have found a niche for computer-based instruction in their respective professional domain. In many cases, it is viewed as an essential and integral part of the educational process. Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology

  18. Education: A Core Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, William F., Jr.

    2001-09-01

    Teaching our Children. ACS should develop an intensive course in modern teaching methods, challenges and responsibilities, and press for streamlined teacher certification procedures for advanced degree or life experience chemists. Teaching our Future Colleagues. As President I will encourage companies to make scientists with special skills available to universities, and will encourage universities to utilize these scientists to round out areas of study not covered by their existing faculty. Teaching our Members. ACS should develop functional and management-related courses for scientists to facilitate career advancement from the bench to research management or from science to business. Teaching the Public. The President is the most visible representative of the Society, and should devote significant time to communication with lay audiences. Value Matters. My first priority as President will be to increase value creation, communication and quantification so members can easily identify programs that fill their needs and exceed their expectations.

  19. Patients' Experience of Myositis and Further Validation of a Myositis-specific Patient Reported Outcome Measure - Establishing Core Domains and Expanding Patient Input on Clinical Assessment in Myositis. Report from OMERACT 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regardt, Malin; Basharat, Pari; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Sarver, Catherine; Björn, Anita; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Wook Song, Yeong; Bingham, Clifton O; Alexanderson, Helene

    2015-12-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) myositis working group was established to examine patient-reported outcomes (PRO) as well as to validate patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) in myositis. Qualitative studies using focus group interviews and cognitive debriefing of the myositis-specific Myositis Activities Profile (MAP) were used to explore the experience of adults living with polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM). Preliminary results underscore the importance of patient input in the development of PROM to ensure content validity. Results from multicenter focus groups indicate the range of symptoms experienced including pain, fatigue, and impaired cognitive function, which are not currently assessed in myositis. Preliminary cognitive debriefing of the MAP indicated that while content was deemed relevant and important, several activities were not included; and that questionnaire construction and wording may benefit from revision. A research agenda was developed to continue work toward optimizing PRO assessment in myositis with 2 work streams. The first would continue to conduct and analyze focus groups until saturation in the thematic analysis was achieved to develop a framework that encompassed the patient-relevant aspects of myositis. The second would continue cognitive debriefing of the MAP to identify potential areas for revision. There was agreement that further work would be needed for inclusion body myositis and juvenile dermatomyositis, and that the inclusion of additional contributors such as caregivers and individuals from the pharmaceutical/regulatory spheres would be desirable. The currently used PROM do not assess symptoms or the effects of disease that are most important to patients; this emphasizes the necessity of patient involvement. Our work provides concrete examples for PRO identification.

  20. SMART core preliminary nuclear design-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Chan; Ji, Seong Kyun; Chang, Moon Hee

    1997-06-01

    Three loading patterns for 330 MWth SMART core are constructed for 25, 33 and 29 CRDMs, and one loading pattern for larger 69-FA core with 45 CRDMs is also constructed for comparison purpose. In this study, the core consists of 57 reduced height Korean Optimized Fuel Assemblies (KOFAs) developed by KAERI. The enrichment of fuel is 4.95 w/o. As a main burnable poison, 35% B-10 enriched B{sub 4}C-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shim is used. To control stuck rod worth, some gadolinia bearing fuel rods are used. The U-235 enrichment of the gadolinia bearing fuel rods is 1.8 w/o as used in KOFA. All patterns return cycle length of about 3 years. Three loading patterns except 25-CRDM pattern satisfy cold shutdown condition of keff {<=} 0.99 without soluble boron. These three patterns also satisfy the refueling condition of keff {<=} 0.95. In addition to the construction of loading pattern, an editing module of MASTER PPI files for rod power history generation is developed and rod power histories are generated for 29-CRDM loading pattern. Preliminary Fq design limit is suggested as 3.71 based on KOFA design experience. (author). 9 tabs., 45 figs., 16 refs.