WorldWideScience

Sample records for m55 rocket system

  1. Mars Rocket Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrin, Robert; Harber, Dan; Nabors, Sammy

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses the methane and carbon monoxide/LOX (McLOx) rocket for ascent from Mars as well as other critical space propulsion tasks. The system offers a specific impulse over 370 s roughly 50 s higher than existing space-storable bio-propellants. Current Mars in-situ propellant production (ISPP) technologies produce impure methane and carbon monoxide in various combinations. While separation and purification of methane fuel is possible, it adds complexity to the propellant production process and discards an otherwise useful fuel product. The McLOx makes such complex and wasteful processes unnecessary by burning the methane/CO mixtures produced by the Mars ISPP systems without the need for further refinement. Despite the decrease in rocket-specific impulse caused by the CO admixture, the improvement offered by concomitant increased propellant density can provide a net improvement in stage performance. One advantage is the increase of the total amount of propellant produced, but with a decrease in mass and complexity of the required ISPP plant. Methane/CO fuel mixtures also may be produced by reprocessing the organic wastes of a Moon base or a space station, making McLOx engines key for a human Lunar initiative or the International Space Station (ISS) program. Because McLOx propellant components store at a common temperature, very lightweight and compact common bulkhead tanks can be employed, improving overall stage performance further.

  2. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKET PROPULSION SYSTEMS, IAA WHITE PAPER PARIS, FRANCE, MARCH 2005 Lt Col Timothy J. Lawrence U.S. Air Force Academy...YYYY) 18-03-2005 2. REPORT TYPE White Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 18 Mar 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKET PROPULSION...reduce radiation exposure, is to have a high energy system like a nuclear thermal rocket that can get the payload to the destination in the fastest

  3. Rocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Karmarkar

    1952-09-01

    Full Text Available The rockets of World War II represented, not the invention of a new weapon, but the modernization of a very old one. As early as 1232 A.D, the Chinese launched rockets against the Mongols. About a hundred years later the knowledge of ledge of rockets was quite widespread and they were used to set fire to buildings and to terrorize the enemy. But as cannon developed, rockets declined in warfare. However rockets were used occasionally as weapons till about 1530 A.D. About this time improvements in artillery-rifled gun barrel and mechanism to absorb recoil-established a standard of efficiency with which rockets could not compare until World War II brought pew conditions

  4. Parallelization of Rocket Engine System Software (Press)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezzar, Ruknet

    1996-01-01

    The main goal is to assess parallelization requirements for the Rocket Engine Numeric Simulator (RENS) project which, aside from gathering information on liquid-propelled rocket engines and setting forth requirements, involve a large FORTRAN based package at NASA Lewis Research Center and TDK software developed by SUBR/UWF. The ultimate aim is to develop, test, integrate, and suitably deploy a family of software packages on various aspects and facets of rocket engines using liquid-propellants. At present, all project efforts by the funding agency, NASA Lewis Research Center, and the HBCU participants are disseminated over the internet using world wide web home pages. Considering obviously expensive methods of actual field trails, the benefits of software simulators are potentially enormous. When realized, these benefits will be analogous to those provided by numerous CAD/CAM packages and flight-training simulators. According to the overall task assignments, Hampton University's role is to collect all available software, place them in a common format, assess and evaluate, define interfaces, and provide integration. Most importantly, the HU's mission is to see to it that the real-time performance is assured. This involves source code translations, porting, and distribution. The porting will be done in two phases: First, place all software on Cray XMP platform using FORTRAN. After testing and evaluation on the Cray X-MP, the code will be translated to C + + and ported to the parallel nCUBE platform. At present, we are evaluating another option of distributed processing over local area networks using Sun NFS, Ethernet, TCP/IP. Considering the heterogeneous nature of the present software (e.g., first started as an expert system using LISP machines) which now involve FORTRAN code, the effort is expected to be quite challenging.

  5. Developments in REDES: The Rocket Engine Design Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.

    1990-01-01

    The Rocket Engine Design Expert System (REDES) was developed at NASA-Lewis to collect, automate, and perpetuate the existing expertise of performing a comprehensive rocket engine analysis and design. Currently, REDES uses the rigorous JANNAF methodology to analyze the performance of the thrust chamber and perform computational studies of liquid rocket engine problems. The following computer codes were included in REDES: a gas properties program named GASP; a nozzle design program named RAO; a regenerative cooling channel performance evaluation code named RTE; and the JANNAF standard liquid rocket engine performance prediction code TDK (including performance evaluation modules ODE, ODK, TDE, TDK, and BLM). Computational analyses are being conducted by REDES to provide solutions to liquid rocket engine thrust chamber problems. REDES was built in the Knowledge Engineering Environment (KEE) expert system shell and runs on a Sun 4/110 computer.

  6. Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leveraging the Phase I achievements of the Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System (DiRETHMS) including its software toolsets and system building...

  7. Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The on-ground and Distributed Rocket Engine Testing Health Monitoring System (DiRETHMS) provides a system architecture and software tools for performing diagnostics...

  8. Computational Analysis for Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle Systems During Rocket-Only Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, C. J., Jr.; Smith, T. D.; Yungster, S.; Keller, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    A series of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes calculations were employed to study the performance of rocket-based combined-cycle systems operating in an all-rocket mode. This parametric series of calculations were executed within a statistical framework, commonly known as design of experiments. The parametric design space included four geometric and two flowfield variables set at three levels each, for a total of 729 possible combinations. A D-optimal design strategy was selected. It required that only 36 separate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solutions be performed to develop a full response surface model, which quantified the linear, bilinear, and curvilinear effects of the six experimental variables. The axisymmetric, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations were executed with the NPARC v3.0 code. The response used in the statistical analysis was created from Isp efficiency data integrated from the 36 CFD simulations. The influence of turbulence modeling was analyzed by using both one- and two-equation models. Careful attention was also given to quantify the influence of mesh dependence, iterative convergence, and artificial viscosity upon the resulting statistical model. Thirteen statistically significant effects were observed to have an influence on rocket-based combined-cycle nozzle performance. It was apparent that the free-expansion process, directly downstream of the rocket nozzle, can influence the Isp efficiency. Numerical schlieren images and particle traces have been used to further understand the physical phenomena behind several of the statistically significant results.

  9. Damage assessment of long-range rocket system by electromagnetic pulse weapon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lingyu; Liu, Guoqing; Li, Jinming

    2017-08-01

    This paper analyzes the damage mechanism and characteristics of electromagnetic pulse weapon, establishes the index system of survivability of long-range rocket launcher system, and uses AHP method to establish the combat effectiveness model of long-range rocket missile system. According to the damage mechanism and characteristics of electromagnetic pulse weapon, the damage effect of the remote rocket system is established by using the exponential method to realize the damage efficiency of the remote rocket system.

  10. Study on risk measurement about ammunition-rocket system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gu Xiaohui; Zhao Youshou

    2005-01-01

    Modern ammunition-rocket system is a complicated multidisciplinary system. During its development,undetermined factors will bring many risks. This paper elaborates the importance of risk analysis approach to ammunition-rocket system development and analyses various methods of risk analysis and estimation. Combined with practical situation of weapon system development, the risk measurement function with characteristics of risk preference is given provided that the risk preference characteristic of behavior maker is risk neutral of fixed constant. The development risk analysis based on risk measurement function enables effective risk decision to be made on the basis of quantified risk.Taking anti-helicopter intelligent mine warhead as an example, the paper verifies the efficiency of the method and shows that it has a scientific and practical value.

  11. Cycle Trades for Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C.; Guidos, M.; Greene, W.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear fission has been used as a reliable source for utility power in the United States for decades. Even in the 1940's, long before the United States had a viable space program, the theoretical benefits of nuclear power as applied to space travel were being explored. These benefits include long-life operation and high performance, particularly in the form of vehicle power density, enabling longer-lasting space missions. The configurations for nuclear rocket systems and chemical rocket systems are similar except that a nuclear rocket utilizes a fission reactor as its heat source. This thermal energy can be utilized directly to heat propellants that are then accelerated through a nozzle to generate thrust or it can be used as part of an electricity generation system. The former approach is Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) and the latter is Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), which is then used to power thruster technologies such as ion thrusters. This paper will explore a number of indirect-NTP engine cycle configurations using assumed performance constraints and requirements, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each cycle configuration, and present preliminary performance and size results. This paper is intended to lay the groundwork for future efforts in the development of a practical NTP system or a combined NTP/NEP hybrid system.

  12. A Historical Systems Study of Liquid Rocket Engine Throttling Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Erin M.; Frederick, Robert A., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This is a comprehensive systems study to examine and evaluate throttling capabilities of liquid rocket engines. The focus of this study is on engine components, and how the interactions of these components are considered for throttling applications. First, an assessment of space mission requirements is performed to determine what applications require engine throttling. A background on liquid rocket engine throttling is provided, along with the basic equations that are used to predict performance. Three engines are discussed that have successfully demonstrated throttling. Next, the engine system is broken down into components to discuss special considerations that need to be made for engine throttling. This study focuses on liquid rocket engines that have demonstrated operational capability on American space launch vehicles, starting with the Apollo vehicle engines and ending with current technology demonstrations. Both deep throttling and shallow throttling engines are discussed. Boost and sustainer engines have demonstrated throttling from 17% to 100% thrust, while upper stage and lunar lander engines have demonstrated throttling in excess of 10% to 100% thrust. The key difficulty in throttling liquid rocket engines is maintaining an adequate pressure drop across the injector, which is necessary to provide propellant atomization and mixing. For the combustion chamber, cooling can be an issue at low thrust levels. For turbomachinery, the primary considerations are to avoid cavitation, stall, surge, and to consider bearing leakage flows, rotordynamics, and structural dynamics. For valves, it is necessary to design valves and actuators that can achieve accurate flow control at all thrust levels. It is also important to assess the amount of nozzle flow separation that can be tolerated at low thrust levels for ground testing.

  13. Nuclear thermal rocket workshop reference system Rover/NERVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.

    1991-01-01

    The Rover/NERVA engine system is to be used as a reference, against which each of the other concepts presented in the workshop will be compared. The following topics are reviewed: the operational characteristics of the nuclear thermal rocket (NTR); the accomplishments of the Rover/NERVA programs; and performance characteristics of the NERVA-type systems for both Mars and lunar mission applications. Also, the issues of ground testing, NTR safety, NASA's nuclear propulsion project plans, and NTR development cost estimates are briefly discussed.

  14. Distributed Health Monitoring System for Reusable Liquid Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. F.; Figueroa, F.; Politopoulos, T.; Oonk, S.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to correctly detect and identify any possible failure in the systems, subsystems, or sensors within a reusable liquid rocket engine is a major goal at NASA John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC). A health management (HM) system is required to provide an on-ground operation crew with an integrated awareness of the condition of every element of interest by determining anomalies, examining their causes, and making predictive statements. However, the complexity associated with relevant systems, and the large amount of data typically necessary for proper interpretation and analysis, presents difficulties in implementing complete failure detection, identification, and prognostics (FDI&P). As such, this paper presents a Distributed Health Monitoring System for Reusable Liquid Rocket Engines as a solution to these problems through the use of highly intelligent algorithms for real-time FDI&P, and efficient and embedded processing at multiple levels. The end result is the ability to successfully incorporate a comprehensive HM platform despite the complexity of the systems under consideration.

  15. Hybrid rocket propulsion systems for outer planet exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jens, Elizabeth T.; Cantwell, Brian J.; Hubbard, G. Scott

    2016-11-01

    Outer planet exploration missions require significant propulsive capability, particularly to achieve orbit insertion. Missions to explore the moons of outer planets place even more demanding requirements on propulsion systems, since they involve multiple large ΔV maneuvers. Hybrid rockets present a favorable alternative to conventional propulsion systems for many of these missions. They typically enjoy higher specific impulse than solids, can be throttled, stopped/restarted, and have more flexibility in their packaging configuration. Hybrids are more compact and easier to throttle than liquids and have similar performance levels. In order to investigate the suitability of these propulsion systems for exploration missions, this paper presents novel hybrid motor designs for two interplanetary missions. Hybrid propulsion systems for missions to Europa and Uranus are presented and compared to conventional in-space propulsion systems. The hybrid motor design for each of these missions is optimized across a range of parameters, including propellant selection, O/F ratio, nozzle area ratio, and chamber pressure. Details of the design process are described in order to provide guidance for researchers wishing to evaluate hybrid rocket motor designs for other missions and applications.

  16. An expert system for spectroscopic analysis of rocket engine plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Greg; Valenti, Elizabeth; Alphonso, Keith; Holladay, Wendy

    The expert system described in this paper analyzes spectral emissions of rocket engine exhaust plumes and shows major promise for use in engine health diagnostics. Plume emission spectroscopy is an important tool for diagnosing engine anomalies, but it is time-consuming and requires highly skilled personnel. The expert system was created to alleviate such problems. The system accepts a spectral plot in the form of wavelength vs intensity pairs and finds the emission peaks in the spectrum, lists the elemental emitters present in the data and deduces the emitter that produced each peak. The system consists of a conventional language component and a commercially available inference engine that runs on an Apple Macintosh computer. The expert system has undergone limited preliminary testing. It detects elements well and significantly decreases analysis time.

  17. The 2003 Goddard Rocket Replica Project: A Reconstruction of the World's First Functional Liquid Rocket System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, R. A.; Elam, S. K.; Hicks, G. D.; Sanders, T. M.; London, J. R.; Mayne, A. W.; Christensen, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    As a part of NASA s 2003 Centennial of Flight celebration, engineers and technicians at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, in cooperation with the Alabama-Mississippi AIAA Section, have reconstructed historically accurate, functional replicas of Dr. Robert H. Goddard s 1926 first liquid- fuel rocket. The purposes of this project were to clearly understand, recreate, and document the mechanisms and workings of the 1926 rocket for exhibit and educational use, creating a vital resource for researchers studying the evolution of liquid rocketry for years to come. The MSFC team s reverse engineering activity has created detailed engineering-quality drawings and specifications describing the original rocket and how it was built, tested, and operated. Static hot-fire tests, as well as flight demonstrations, have further defined and quantified the actual performance and engineering actual performance and engineering challenges of this major segment in early aerospace history.

  18. Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) Implementation in Rocket Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Morris, Jon; Turowski, Mark; Franzl, Richard; Walker, Mark; Kapadia, Ravi; Venkatesh, Meera

    2010-01-01

    A pilot operational ISHM capability has been implemented for the E-2 Rocket Engine Test Stand (RETS) and a Chemical Steam Generator (CSG) test article at NASA Stennis Space Center. The implementation currently includes an ISHM computer and a large display in the control room. The paper will address the overall approach, tools, and requirements. It will also address the infrastructure and architecture. Specific anomaly detection algorithms will be discussed regarding leak detection and diagnostics, valve validation, and sensor validation. It will also describe development and use of a Health Assessment Database System (HADS) as a repository for measurements, health, configuration, and knowledge related to a system with ISHM capability. It will conclude with a discussion of user interfaces, and a description of the operation of the ISHM system prior, during, and after testing.

  19. Multiple dopant injection system for small rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakala, G. G.; Raines, N. G.

    1992-07-01

    The Diagnostics Test Facility (DTF) at NASA's Stennis Space Center (SSC) was designed and built to provide a standard rocket engine exhaust plume for use in the research and development of engine health monitoring instrumentation. A 1000 lb thrust class liquid oxygen (LOX)-gaseous hydrogen (GH2) fueled rocket engine is used as the subscale plume source to simulate the SSME during experimentation and instrument development. The ability of the DTF to provide efficient, and low cost test operations makes it uniquely suited for plume diagnostic experimentation. The most unique feature of the DTF is the Multiple Dopant Injection System (MDIS) that is used to seed the exhaust plume with the desired element or metal alloy. The dopant injection takes place at the fuel injector, yielding a very uniform and homogeneous distribution of the seeding material in the exhaust plume. The MDIS allows during a single test firing of the DTF, the seeding of the exhaust plume with up to three different dopants and also provides distilled water base lines between the dopants. A number of plume diagnostic-related experiments have already utilized the unique capabilities of the DTF.

  20. On the Elastic Vibration Model for High Length-Diameter Ratio Rocket with Attitude Control System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱伯立; 杨树兴

    2003-01-01

    An elastic vibration model for high length-diameter ratio spinning rocket with attitude control system which can be used for trajectory simulation is established. The basic theory of elastic dynamics and vibration dynamics were both used to set up the elastic vibration model of rocket body. In order to study the problem more conveniently, the rocket's body was simplified to be an even beam with two free ends. The model was validated by simulation results and the test data.

  1. Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Flight System Integration at Its Best

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, T. David; Kanner, Howard S.; Freeland, Donna M.; Olson, Derek T.

    2011-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) element integrates all the subsystems needed for ascent flight, entry, and recovery of the combined Booster and Motor system. These include the structures, avionics, thrust vector control, pyrotechnic, range safety, deceleration, thermal protection, and retrieval systems. This represents the only human-rated, recoverable and refurbishable solid rocket ever developed and flown. Challenges included subsystem integration, thermal environments and severe loads (including water impact), sometimes resulting in hardware attrition. Several of the subsystems evolved during the program through design changes. These included the thermal protection system, range safety system, parachute/recovery system, and others. Because the system was recovered, the SRB was ideal for data and imagery acquisition, which proved essential for understanding loads, environments and system response. The three main parachutes that lower the SRBs to the ocean are the largest parachutes ever designed, and the SRBs are the largest structures ever to be lowered by parachutes. SRB recovery from the ocean was a unique process and represented a significant operational challenge; requiring personnel, facilities, transportation, and ground support equipment. The SRB element achieved reliability via extensive system testing and checkout, redundancy management, and a thorough postflight assessment process. However, the in-flight data and postflight assessment process revealed the hardware was affected much more strongly than originally anticipated. Assembly and integration of the booster subsystems required acceptance testing of reused hardware components for each build. Extensive testing was done to assure hardware functionality at each level of stage integration. Because the booster element is recoverable, subsystems were available for inspection and testing postflight, unique to the Shuttle launch vehicle. Problems were noted and corrective actions were implemented as needed

  2. Slit scan radiographic system for intermediate size rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Richard T.; Waters, David D.

    1992-12-01

    The development of slit-scan radiography capability for the NASA Advanced Computed Tomography Inspection System (ACTIS) computed tomography (CT) scanner at MSFC is discussed. This allows for tangential case interface (bondline) inspection at 2 MeV of intermediate-size rocket motors like the Hawk. Motorized mounting fixture hardware was designed, fabricated, installed, and tested on ACTIS. The ACTIS linear array of x-ray detectors was aligned parallel to the tangent line of a horizontal Hawk motor case. A 5 mm thick x-ray fan beam was used. Slit-scan images were produced with continuous rotation of a horizontal Hawk motor. Image features along Hawk motor case interfaces were indicated. A motorized exit cone fixture for ACTIS slit-scan inspection was also provided. The results of this SBIR have shown that slit scanning is an alternative imaging technique for case interface inspection. More data is required to qualify the technique for bondline inspection.

  3. Sounding rocket experiment of bare electrodynamic tether system

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Hironori; Watanabe, Takeo; Kojima, Hirohisa; OYAMA, Koh-ichiro; Kusagaya, Tairo; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Ohtsu, Hirotaka; Cho, Mengu; Sasaki, Susumu; Tanaka, Koji; Williams, John; Rubin, Binyamin; Les Jhonson, Charles; Khazanov, George; Sanmartín Losada, Juan Ramón

    2009-01-01

    An overview of asounding rocket S-520-25th, project on space tether technology experiment is presented.The project is prepared by an international research group consisting of Japanese,European,American,andAustralianresearchers.The sounding rocket will be assembled by the ISAS/JAXA and will be launched in the summer of 2009.

  4. Aerospace propulsion products; high-quality rocket ignition systems for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zon, N.; Nevinskaia, A.

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace Propulsion Products is the leading European company in designing and producing rocket ignition systems and spinoff products. One of their directors, Edwin Vermeulen, gave us an insight on the company and its future. He states that “whatever rocket technology is needed, we have the

  5. Aerospace propulsion products; high-quality rocket ignition systems for the future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zon, N.; Nevinskaia, A.

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace Propulsion Products is the leading European company in designing and producing rocket ignition systems and spinoff products. One of their directors, Edwin Vermeulen, gave us an insight on the company and its future. He states that “whatever rocket technology is needed, we have the technolo

  6. Simulation of an advanced techniques of ion propulsion Rocket system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkiyaraj, R.

    2016-07-01

    The ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of Deuterium,Argon gas and Hexagonal shape Magneto hydrodynamic(MHD) techniques because of the stimulation indirectly generated the power from ionization chamber,design of thrust range is 1.2 N with 40 KW of electric power and high efficiency.The proposed work is the study of MHD power generation through ionization level of Deuterium gas and combination of two gaseous ions(Deuterium gas ions + Argon gas ions) at acceleration stage.IPR consists of three parts 1.Hexagonal shape MHD based power generator through ionization chamber 2.ion accelerator 3.Exhaust of Nozzle.Initially the required energy around 1312 KJ/mol is carrying out the purpose of deuterium gas which is changed to ionization level.The ionized Deuterium gas comes out from RF ionization chamber to nozzle through MHD generator with enhanced velocity then after voltage is generated across the two pairs of electrode in MHD.it will produce thrust value with the help of mixing of Deuterium ion and Argon ion at acceleration position.The simulation of the IPR system has been carried out by MATLAB.By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results,if reaches that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with 40KW power for simulating the IPR system.

  7. Demand-type gas supply system for rocket borne thin-window proportional counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, L. W.; Caravalho, R.; Catura, R. C.; Joki, E. G.

    1977-01-01

    A simple closed loop control system has been developed to maintain the gas pressure in thin-window proportional counters during rocket flights. This system permits convenient external control of detector pressure and system flushing rate. The control system is activated at launch with the sealing of a reference volume at the existing system pressure. Inflight control to plus or minus 2 torr at a working pressure of 760 torr has been achieved on six rocket flights.

  8. Gaseous Helium Reclamation at Rocket Test Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ability to restore large amounts of vented gaseous helium (GHe) at rocket test sites preserves the GHe and reduces operating cost. The used GHe is vented into...

  9. Mars McLOX Rocket Propulsion System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Methane and Carbon Monoxide/LOX rocket (MCLOX) is a technology for accomplishing ascent from Mars. Current Mars in-situ propellant production (ISPP) technologies...

  10. Gaseous Helium Reclamation at Rocket Test Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — GHe reclamation is critical in reducing operating costs at rocket engine test facilities. Increases in cost and shortages of helium will dramatically impact testing...

  11. Energy-Based Acoustic Measurement System for Rocket Noise Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Accurate estimates of the vibroacoustic loading placed on space vehicles and payloads during launch require knowledge of the rocket noise source properties. Given...

  12. First Description of Shigella sonnei Harboring blaCTX-M-55 Outside Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, Jeannete; Ortega-Paredes, David; Barba, Pedro

    2016-12-28

    Shigella sonnei harboring blaCTX-M-55 was isolated outside of Asia for the first time. The blaCTX-M-55 gene was found to be downstream of ISEcp-1 and located in a ~130 kb conjugative plasmid belonging to the I1 incompatibility group. The strain was recovered from a 7-year-old Ecuadorian girl with watery diarrhea who had not travelled abroad. Recent local data describe the emergence of blaCTX-M-55 and other variants typically found in Asia in the Andean Region, suggesting that increased travel of humans and trade relationships with Asian countries are influencing the current Ecuadorian bacterial resistance situation.

  13. Heat exchanger. [rocket combustion chambers and cooling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, D. E. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A heat exchanger, as exemplified by a rocket combustion chamber, is constructed by stacking thin metal rings having microsized openings therein at selective locations to form cooling passages defined by an inner wall, an outer wall and fins. Suitable manifolds are provided at each end of the rocket chamber. In addition to the cooling channel openings, coolant feed openings may be formed in each of rings. The coolant feed openings may be nested or positioned within generally U-shaped cooling channel openings. Compression on the stacked rings may be maintained by welds or the like or by bolts extending through the stacked rings.

  14. Advanced Tactical Booster Technologies: Applications for Long-Range Rocket Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-07

    System HIMARS [3] which can employ the MGM- 140 Army Tactical Missile System (ATacMS) solid propellant missile [4] to achieve the required range...launcher. 15. SUBJECT TERMS solid rocket; optimisation; artillery 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...the volumetrically constrained environment of a land-based launcher. Keywords— solid rocket; optimisation; artillery I. INTRODUCTION The Australian

  15. Association of SUMO4 M55V polymorphism with autoimmune diabetes in Latvian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedimbi, Saikiran K; Shastry, Arun; Park, Yongsoo; Rumba, Ingrida; Sanjeevi, Carani B

    2006-10-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO4), located in IDDM5, has been identified as a potential susceptibility gene for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The novel polymorphism M55V, causing an amino acid change in the evolutionarily conserved met55 residue has been shown to activate the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), hence the suspected role of SUMO4 in the pathogenicity of T1DM. The M55V polymorphism has been shown to be associated with susceptibility to T1DM in Asians, but not in Caucasians. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a slowly progressive form of T1DM and SUMO4 M55V has not been studied in LADA to date. The current study aims to test whether Latvians are similar to Caucasians in susceptibility to autoimmune diabetes (T1DM and LADA), with respect to SUMO4 M55V. We studied, age- and sex-matched, Latvian T1DM patients (n = 100) and healthy controls (n = 90) and LADA patients (n = 45) and healthy controls (n = 95). SUMO4 M55V polymorphism was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The allelic frequencies of the A and G alleles were compared with HLA DR3-DR4-positive and HLA DR3-DR4-negative patients to identify any potential relation between HLA DR3-DR4 and SUMO4 M55V. We found no significant association between SUMO4 M55V and T1DM susceptibility in Latvians, the results being in concurrence with the previous studies in Caucasians of British and Canadian origin. Comparison of the A and G alleles with HLA DR3-DR4 did not result in any significant P values. No significant association was found between SUMO4 M55V and LADA. SUMO4 M55V is not associated with susceptibility to T1DM and LADA in Latvians, and Latvians exhibit similarity to other Caucasians with respect to association of SUMO4 M55V with autoimmune diabetes.

  16. 40th Annual Armament Systems: Guns-Ammunition-Rockets-Missiles Conference and Exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-28

    PM] Abraham Overview, Mr. Robert Daunfeldt, Bofors Defence Summary Overview of an Advanced 2.75 Hypervelocity Weapon, Mr. Larry Bradford, CAT Flight...Engineer Tank Ammunition Directorate - IMI Ammunition Group A105/120/125 mm PELE Firing Results, Dr. Lutz Börngen, Rheinmetall Wafe Munition Line Of Sight...Missiles & Rockets Critical Asset Defense - ABRAHAM Rocket Assisted Projectile Mr. Robert Daunfeldt, Bofors Defence Hypervelocity Propulsion System

  17. The surprising external upturn of the Blue Straggler radial distribution in M55

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzoni, B; Perina, S; Ferraro, F R; Rood, R T; Sollima, A

    2007-01-01

    By combining high-resolution HST and wide-field ground based observations, in ultraviolet and optical bands, we study the Blue Straggler Star (BSS) population of the low density galactic globular cluster M55 (NGC 6809) over its entire radial extent. The BSS projected radial distribution is found to be bimodal, with a central peak, a broad minimum at intermediate radii, and an upturn at large radii. Similar bimodal distributions have been found in other globular clusters (M3, 47 Tucanae, NGC 6752, M5), but the external upturn in M55 is the largest found to date. This might indicate a large fraction of primordial binaries in the outer regions of M55, which seems somehow in contrast with the relatively low (\\sim 10%) binary fraction recently measured in the core of this cluster.

  18. Stage separation study of Nike-Black Brant V Sounding Rocket System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragut, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    A new Sounding Rocket System has been developed. It consists of a Nike Booster and a Black Brant V Sustainer with slanted fins which extend beyond its nozzle exit plane. A cursory look was taken at different factors which must be considered when studying a passive separation system. That is, one separation system without mechanical constraints in the axial direction and which will allow separation due to drag differential accelerations between the Booster and the Sustainer. The equations of motion were derived for rigid body motions and exact solutions were obtained. The analysis developed could be applied to any other staging problem of a Sounding Rocket System.

  19. Stage separation study of Nike-Black Brant V Sounding Rocket System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragut, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    A new Sounding Rocket System has been developed. It consists of a Nike Booster and a Black Brant V Sustainer with slanted fins which extend beyond its nozzle exit plane. A cursory look was taken at different factors which must be considered when studying a passive separation system. That is, one separation system without mechanical constraints in the axial direction and which will allow separation due to drag differential accelerations between the Booster and the Sustainer. The equations of motion were derived for rigid body motions and exact solutions were obtained. The analysis developed could be applied to any other staging problem of a Sounding Rocket System.

  20. Non-rocket Earth-Moon transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolonkin, A.

    Author suggests and researches one of his methods of flights to outer Space, described in book "Non Rocket Flights in Space", which is prepared and offered for publication. In given report the method and facilities named "Bolonkin Transport System" (BTS) for delivering of payload and people to Moon and back is presented. BTS can be used also for free trip to outer Space up at altitude 60,000 km and more. BTS can be applying as a trust system for atmospheric supersonic aircrafts, and as a free energy source. This method uses, in general, the rotary and kinetic energy of the Moon. The manuscript contains the theory and results of computation of special Project. This project uses three cables (main and two for driving of loads) from artificial material: fiber, whiskers, nanotubes, with the specific tensile strength (ratio the tensile stress to density) k=/=4*10^7 or more. The nanotubes with same and better parameters are received in scientific laboratories. Theoretical limit of nanotubes SWNT is about k=100*10^7. The upper end of the cable is connected to the Moon. The lower end of the cable is connected to an aircraft (or buoy), which flies (i.e. glides or slides) in Earth atmosphere along the planet's surface. The aircraft (and Moon) has devices, which allows the length of cables to be changed. The device would consists of a spool, motor, brake, transmission, and controller. The facility could have devices for delivering people and payloads t o the Moon and back using the suggested Transport System. The delivery devices include: containers, cables, motors, brakes, and controllers. If the aircraft is small and the cable is strong the motion of the Moon can be used to move the airplane. For example (see enclosed project), if the airplane weighs 15 tons and has an aerodynamic ratio (the lift force to the drag force) equal 5, a thrust of 3000 kg would be enough for the aircraft to fly for infinity without requiring any fuel. The aircraft could use a small turbine engine

  1. The flight of uncontrolled rockets

    CERN Document Server

    Gantmakher, F R; Dryden, H L

    1964-01-01

    International Series of Monographs on Aeronautics and Astronautics, Division VII, Volume 5: The Flight of Uncontrolled Rockets focuses on external ballistics of uncontrolled rockets. The book first discusses the equations of motion of rockets. The rocket as a system of changing composition; application of solidification principle to rockets; rotational motion of rockets; and equations of motion of the center of mass of rockets are described. The text looks at the calculation of trajectory of rockets and the fundamentals of rocket dispersion. The selection further focuses on the dispersion of f

  2. The Saab spinning rocket attitude control (SPINRAC): An attitude control system for obtaining low impact dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, L.; Helmersson, A.

    The Spining Rocket Attitude Control system, (SPINRAC) system for three-stage sounding rocket impact dispersion reduction is described. The SPINRAC points the spin-stabilized third stage to a predetermined attitude, prior to ignition. The SPINRAC uses a roll-stabilized gyro platform for inertial attitude information, processes the signals in a microcomputer, and uses a cold-gas system for actuation. Using control theory the guidance time can be kept small and thrust force low. Typically a reorientation angle of 20 deg and a coning half-angle of 10 deg is controlled to an accuracy of 0.4 deg 3-sigma value within 20 sec. Using the SPINRAC on a three-stage sounding rocket (Black Brant X, Skylark 12) makes it possible to reach apogee altitudes of 1000 km while maintaining low impact dispersion.

  3. NASA's Hydrogen Outpost: The Rocket Systems Area at Plum Brook Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    "There was pretty much a general knowledge about hydrogen and its capabilities," recalled former researcher Robert Graham. "The question was, could you use it in a rocket engine? Do we have the technology to handle it? How will it cool? Will it produce so much heat release that we can't cool the engine? These were the questions that we had to address." The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Glenn Research Center, referred to historically as the Lewis Research Center, made a concerted effort to answer these and related questions in the 1950s and 1960s. The center played a critical role transforming hydrogen's theoretical potential into a flight-ready propellant. Since then NASA has utilized liquid hydrogen to send humans and robots to the Moon, propel dozens of spacecraft across the universe, orbit scores of satellite systems, and power 135 space shuttle flights. Rocket pioneers had recognized hydrogen's potential early on, but its extremely low boiling temperature and low density made it impracticable as a fuel. The Lewis laboratory first demonstrated that liquid hydrogen could be safely utilized in rocket and aircraft propulsion systems, then perfected techniques to store, pump, and cleanly burn the fuel, as well as use it to cool the engine. The Rocket Systems Area at Lewis's remote testing area, Plum Brook Station, played a little known, but important role in the center's hydrogen research efforts. This publication focuses on the activities at the Rocket Systems Area, but it also discusses hydrogen's role in NASA's space program and Lewis's overall hydrogen work. The Rocket Systems Area included nine physically modest test sites and three test stands dedicated to liquid-hydrogen-related research. In 1962 Cleveland Plain Dealer reporter Karl Abram claimed, "The rocket facility looks more like a petroleum refinery. Its test rigs sprout pipes, valves and tanks. During the night test runs, excess hydrogen is burned from special stacks in the best

  4. Ramjet Application Possibilities for Increasing Fire Range of the Multiple Launch Rocket Systems Ammunition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Zubov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a possibility to increase a flying range of the perspective rockets equipped with the control unit with aerodynamic controllers for the multiple launch rocket systems “Smerch”.To increase a flying range and reduce a starting mass of the rocket, the paper studies a possibility to replace the single-mode rocket engine used in the solid-fuel rocket motor for the direct-flow propulsion jet engine (DFPJE with not head sector air intakes. The DFPJE is implemented according to the classical scheme with a fuel charged in the combustion chamber. A separated solid propellant starting accelerator provides the rocket acceleration to reach a speed necessary for the DFPJE to run.When designing the DFPJE a proper choice of not head air intake parameters is one of the most difficult points. For this purpose a COSMOS Flow Simulation software package and analytical dependences were used to define the following: a boundary layer thickness where an air intake is set, maximum permissible and appropriate angles of attack and deviation angles of controllers at the section where the DFPJE works, and some other parameters as well.Calculation of DFPJE characteristics consisted in determining parameters of an air-gas path of the propulsion system, geometrical sizes of the pipeline flow area, sizes of a fuel charge, and dependence of the propulsion system impulse on the flight height and speed. Calculations were performed both in thermodynamic statement of problem and in using software package of COSMOS Flow Simulation.As a result of calculations and design engineering activities the air intake profile is created and mass-dimensional characteristics of DFPJE are defined. Besides, calculations of the starting solid fuel accelerator were carried out. Further design allowed us to create the rocket shape, estimate its mass-dimensional characteristics, and perform ballistic calculations, which proved that achieving a range of 120 km for the rocket is

  5. NERVA-derived rocket module for solar system exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Herbert R.; Cooper, Martin H.

    1993-06-01

    A 50,000 pound thrust nuclear thermal rocket engine module concept based on Rover/NERVA technology is presented. Key engine features selected for reliability and safety have been integrated into this concept to provide 4.5 hours of full-thrust operation at a specific impulse of over 850 seconds. Those features include a single turbopump with an expander turbine, tank-head start in space, open-cycle decay heat removal with minimal loss of propellant, reactor cold end axial reflector, and tie tubes which are insulated end which are not used to provide turbine power. The tie tube configuration complements the open cycle decay heat removal concept. Retractable safety rods for water immersion subcriticality were considered and a design concept was developed. Other important safety issues were identified, and their method for accommodation in the design were considered for future implementation.

  6. Dynamics of a variable mass system applied to spacecraft rocket attitude theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudge, Jason Dominic

    This research project is a study of the dynamics of a variable mass system. The scope of this research project is to gain understanding as to how a variable mass system will behave. The intent is to bring the level of understanding of variable mass dynamics higher and closer to the level of constant mass dynamics in the area of spacecrafts in particular. A main contribution is the finding of a set of criteria to minimize or eliminate the deviation of the nutation angle (or cone angle or angle of attack) of spacecraft rockets passively, i.e. without active control. The motivation for this research project is the Star 48 anomaly. The Star 48 is a solid rocket motor which has propelled (boosted) communication satellites from lower earth orbit to a higher one during the 1980's. The anomaly is that when the spacecraft rocket is being propelled, the nutation angle may deviate excessively which is considered undesirable. In the first part of this research project, a variable mass system is described and defined and the governing equations are derived. The type of governing equations derived are those that are most useful for analyzing the motion of a spacecraft rocket. The method of derivation makes use of Leibnitz Theorem, Divergence Theorem and Newton's Second Law of Motion. Next, the governing equations are specialized with several assumptions which are generally accepted assumptions applied in the analysis of spacecraft rockets. With these assumptions, the form governing equations is discussed and then the equations are solved analytically for the system's angular velocity. Having solved for the angular velocity of the system, the attitude of the system is obtained using a unique method which circumvents the nonlinearities that exist using Euler Angles and their kinematical equations. The attitude is approximately found analytically and a set of criteria is discussed which will minimize or eliminate the deviation of the nutation angle of a spacecraft rocket. Finally

  7. National Institute for Rocket Propulsion Systems 2012 Annual Report: A Year of Progress and Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L. Dale; Doreswamy, Rajiv; Fry, Emma Kiele

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute for Rocket Propulsion Systems (NIRPS) maintains and advances U.S. leadership in all aspects of rocket propulsion for defense, civil, and commercial uses. The Institute's creation is in response to widely acknowledged concerns about the U.S. rocket propulsion base dating back more than a decade. U.S. leadership in rocket and missile propulsion is threatened by long-term industry downsizing, a shortage of new solid and liquid propulsion programs, limited ability to attract and retain fresh talent, and discretionary federal budget pressures. Numerous trade and independent studies cite erosion of this capability as a threat to national security and the U.S. economy resulting in a loss of global competitiveness for the U.S. propulsion industry. This report covers the period between May 2011 and December 2012, which includes the creation and transition to operations of NIRPS. All subsequent reports will be annual. The year 2012 has been an eventful one for NIRPS. In its first full year, the new team overcame many obstacles and explored opportunities to ensure the institute has a firm foundation for the future. NIRPS is now an active organization making contributions to the development, sustainment, and strategy of the rocket propulsion industry in the United States. This report describes the actions taken by the NIRPS team to determine the strategy, organizational structure, and goals of the Institute. It also highlights key accomplishments, collaborations with other organizations, and the strategic framework for the Institute.

  8. State Machine Modeling of the Space Launch System Solid Rocket Boosters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua A.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System is a Shuttle-derived heavy-lift vehicle currently in development to serve as NASA's premiere launch vehicle for space exploration. The Space Launch System is a multistage rocket with two Solid Rocket Boosters and multiple payloads, including the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. Planned Space Launch System destinations include near-Earth asteroids, the Moon, Mars, and Lagrange points. The Space Launch System is a complex system with many subsystems, requiring considerable systems engineering and integration. To this end, state machine analysis offers a method to support engineering and operational e orts, identify and avert undesirable or potentially hazardous system states, and evaluate system requirements. Finite State Machines model a system as a finite number of states, with transitions between states controlled by state-based and event-based logic. State machines are a useful tool for understanding complex system behaviors and evaluating "what-if" scenarios. This work contributes to a state machine model of the Space Launch System developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The Space Launch System Solid Rocket Booster avionics and ignition subsystems are modeled using MATLAB/Stateflow software. This model is integrated into a larger model of Space Launch System avionics used for verification and validation of Space Launch System operating procedures and design requirements. This includes testing both nominal and o -nominal system states and command sequences.

  9. X-ray and optical observations of M55 and NGC 6366: evidence for primordial binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Bassa, C G; Verbunt, F; Homer, L; Anderson, S F; Lewin, W H G

    2008-01-01

    We present Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S3 X-ray imaging observations and VLT/FORS2 and Hubble Space Telescope optical observations of two low-density Galactic globular clusters; NGC 6366 and M55. We detect 16 X-ray sources with 0.5-6.0 keV luminosities above Lx=4E30 erg/s within the half-mass radius of M55, of which 8 or 9 are expected to be background sources, and 5 within the half-mass radius of NGC 6366, of which 4 are expected to be background sources. Optical counterparts are identified for several X-ray sources in both clusters and from these we conclude that 3 of the X-ray sources in M55 and 2 or 3 of the X-ray sources in NGC 6366 are probably related to the cluster. Combining these results with those for other clusters, we find the best fit for a predicted number of X-ray sources in a globular cluster Nc=1.2 Gamma+1.1 Mh, where Gamma is the collision number and Mh is (half of) the cluster mass, both normalized to the values for the globular cluster M4. Some sources tentatively classified as magneti...

  10. A compact and robust diode laser system for atom interferometry on a sounding rocket

    CERN Document Server

    Schkolnik, V; Wenzlawski, A; Grosse, J; Kohfeldt, A; Döringshoff, K; Wicht, A; Windpassinger, P; Sengstock, K; Braxmaier, C; Krutzik, M; Peters, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a diode laser system optimized for laser cooling and atom interferometry with ultra-cold rubidium atoms aboard sounding rockets as an important milestone towards space-borne quantum sensors. Design, assembly and qualification of the system, combing micro-integrated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser modules and free space optical bench technology is presented in the context of the MAIUS (Matter-wave Interferometry in Microgravity) mission. This laser system, with a volume of 21 liters and total mass of 27 kg, passed all qualification tests for operation on sounding rockets and is currently used in the integrated MAIUS flight system producing Bose-Einstein condensates and performing atom interferometry based on Bragg diffraction. The MAIUS payload is being prepared for launch in fall 2016. We further report on a reference laser system, comprising a rubidium stabilized DFB laser, which was operated successfully on the TEXUS 51 mission in April 2015. The system demonstrated a high level of technol...

  11. A compact and robust diode laser system for atom interferometry on a sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schkolnik, V.; Hellmig, O.; Wenzlawski, A.; Grosse, J.; Kohfeldt, A.; Döringshoff, K.; Wicht, A.; Windpassinger, P.; Sengstock, K.; Braxmaier, C.; Krutzik, M.; Peters, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a diode laser system optimized for laser cooling and atom interferometry with ultra-cold rubidium atoms aboard sounding rockets as an important milestone toward space-borne quantum sensors. Design, assembly and qualification of the system, combing micro-integrated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser modules and free space optical bench technology, is presented in the context of the MAIUS (Matter-wave Interferometry in Microgravity) mission. This laser system, with a volume of 21 l and total mass of 27 kg, passed all qualification tests for operation on sounding rockets and is currently used in the integrated MAIUS flight system producing Bose-Einstein condensates and performing atom interferometry based on Bragg diffraction. The MAIUS payload is being prepared for launch in fall 2016. We further report on a reference laser system, comprising a rubidium stabilized DFB laser, which was operated successfully on the TEXUS 51 mission in April 2015. The system demonstrated a high level of technological maturity by remaining frequency stabilized throughout the mission including the rocket's boost phase.

  12. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  13. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  14. Altitude-Limiting Airbrake System for Small to Medium Scale Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Robert F., III

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the overall internship opportunity this semester was to learn and practice the elements of engineering design through direct exposure to real engineering problems. The primary exposure was to design and manufacture an airbrake device for use with small-medium scale rocket applications. The idea was to take the presented concept of a solution and transform said concept into a reliable fully-functioning and reusable mechanism. The mechanism was to be designed as an insurance feature so that the overall altitude of a rocket with relatively undetermined engine capabilities does not unexpectedly exceed the imposed 10,000 foot ceiling, per range requirements. The airbrake concept was introduced to the Prototype Development Lab as a rotation-driven four tiered offset track pin mechanism, i.e. the airbrake was deployed by rotating a central shaft attached directly to the bottom plate. The individual airbrake fins were subsequently deployed using multiple plates with tracks of offset curvature. The fins were created with guide pins to follow the tracks in each of the offset plates, thus allowing the simultaneous rotational deployment of all fins by only rotating one plate. The concept of this solution was great; though it did not function in application. The rotating plates alone brought up problems like the entire back half of the rocket rotating according to the motion of the aforementioned base plate. Subsequently, the solution currently under development became a static linear actuator-driven spring-loaded fin release system. This solution is almost instantaneously triggered electronically when the avionics detect that the rocket has reached the calculated altitude of deceleration. This altitude will allow enough time remaining to the overall ceiling to adequately decelerate the rocket prior to reaching the ceiling.

  15. Benchmarking File System Benchmarking: It *IS* Rocket Science

    OpenAIRE

    Seltzer, Margo I.; Tarasov, Vasily; Bhanage, Saumitra; Zadok, Erez

    2011-01-01

    The quality of file system benchmarking has not improved in over a decade of intense research spanning hundreds of publications. Researchers repeatedly use a wide range of poorly designed benchmarks, and in most cases, develop their own ad-hoc benchmarks. Our community lacks a definition of what we want to benchmark in a file system. We propose several dimensions of file system benchmarking and review the wide range of tools and techniques in widespread use. We experimentally show that even t...

  16. Design and qualification of an UHV system for operation on sounding rockets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, Jens, E-mail: jens.grosse@dlr.de; Braxmaier, Claus [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), University of Bremen, Bremen, 28359, Germany and German Aerospace Center (DLR) Bremen, Bremen, 28359 (Germany); Seidel, Stephan Tobias; Becker, Dennis; Lachmann, Maike Diana [Institute of Quantum Optics, Leibniz University Hanover, Hanover, 30167 (Germany); Scharringhausen, Marco [German Aerospace Center (DLR) Bremen, Bremen, 28359 (Germany); Rasel, Ernst Maria [Institute of Quantum Optics, Leibniz University Hanover, Hanover, 30167, Bremen (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    The sounding rocket mission MAIUS-1 has the objective to create the first Bose–Einstein condensate in space; therefore, its scientific payload is a complete cold atom experiment built to be launched on a VSB-30 sounding rocket. An essential part of the setup is an ultrahigh vacuum system needed in order to sufficiently suppress interactions of the cooled atoms with the residual background gas. Contrary to vacuum systems on missions aboard satellites or the international space station, the required vacuum environment has to be reached within 47 s after motor burn-out. This paper contains a detailed description of the MAIUS-1 vacuum system, as well as a description of its qualification process for the operation under vibrational loads of up to 8.1 g{sub RMS} (where RMS is root mean square). Even though a pressure rise dependent on the level of vibration was observed, the design presented herein is capable of regaining a pressure of below 5 × 10{sup −10} mbar in less than 40 s when tested at 5.4 g{sub RMS}. To the authors' best knowledge, it is the first UHV system qualified for operation on a sounding rocket.

  17. Design and Feasibility Demonstration of a Deployment System for a Rocket Launched Buoy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-06

    as described in Section 3.3. 3.2 Deployment Piston After early experiments with the standard Sonobuoy deployment piston it was decided to utilize a...syzt-em- desee 4 s not limited to the electronic buoy for which it was developed but is applicable to any quasi cylindrical payload to be deployed following a rocket launch from the MK 36 launching system. -12-

  18. System Modeling and Diagnostics for Liquefying-Fuel Hybrid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poll, Scott; Iverson, David; Ou, Jeremy; Sanderfer, Dwight; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    2003-01-01

    A Hybrid Combustion Facility (HCF) was recently built at NASA Ames Research Center to study the combustion properties of a new fuel formulation that burns approximately three times faster than conventional hybrid fuels. Researchers at Ames working in the area of Integrated Vehicle Health Management recognized a good opportunity to apply IVHM techniques to a candidate technology for next generation launch systems. Five tools were selected to examine various IVHM techniques for the HCF. Three of the tools, TEAMS (Testability Engineering and Maintenance System), L2 (Livingstone2), and RODON, are model-based reasoning (or diagnostic) systems. Two other tools in this study, ICS (Interval Constraint Simulator) and IMS (Inductive Monitoring System) do not attempt to isolate the cause of the failure but may be used for fault detection. Models of varying scope and completeness were created, both qualitative and quantitative. In each of the models, the structure and behavior of the physical system are captured. In the qualitative models, the temporal aspects of the system behavior and the abstraction of sensor data are handled outside of the model and require the development of additional code. In the quantitative model, less extensive processing code is also necessary. Examples of fault diagnoses are given.

  19. Hybrid Rocket Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sankaran Venugopal; K K Rajesh; V Ramanujachari

    2011-01-01

    With their unique operational characteristics, hybrid rockets can potentially provide safer, lower-cost avenues for spacecraft and missiles than the current solid propellant and liquid propellant systems...

  20. Lunar soft landing with minimum-mass propulsion system using H2O2/kerosene bipropellant rocket system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yongjun; Kwon, Sejin

    2014-06-01

    Minimum-mass propulsion specifications using a H2O2/kerosene bipropellant rocket system for a small lunar lander were derived. A multivariable optimization was conducted with propulsion specifications and propellant consumptions obtained by solving optimal control problems for a lunar soft landing. In this paper, the optimal specifications, trajectory, and mass budget are presented.

  1. Smart Sensor Node Development, Testing and Implementation for Rocket Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengers, Timothy R.; Shipley, John; Merrill, Richard; Eggett, Leon; Johnson, Mont; Morris, Jonathan; Figueroa, Fernando; Schmalzel, John; Turowski, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Successful design and implementation of an Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) approach for rocket propulsion systems requires the capability improve the reliability of complex systems by detecting and diagnosing problems. One of the critical elements in the ISHM is an intelligent sensor node for data acquisition that meets specific requirements for rocket motor testing including accuracy, sample rate and size/weight. Traditional data acquisition systems are calibrated in a controlled environment and guaranteed to perform bounded by their tested conditions. In a real world ISHM system, the data acquisition and signal conditioning needs to function in an uncontrolled environment. Development and testing of this sensor node focuses on a design with the ability to self check in order to extend calibration times, report internal faults and drifts and notify the overall system when the data acquisition is not performing as it should. All of this will be designed within a system that is flexible, requiring little re-design to be deployed on a wide variety of systems. Progress in this design and initial testing of prototype units will be reported.

  2. Rocket Flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Evera, Bill; Sterling, Donna R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an activity for designing, building, and launching rockets that provides students with an intrinsically motivating and real-life application of what could have been classroom-only concepts. Includes rocket design guidelines and a sample grading rubric. (KHR)

  3. Optimization and Sizing for Propulsion System of Liquid Rocket Using Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saqlain Akhtar; He Lin-shu

    2007-01-01

    Flight vehicle conceptual design appears to be a promising area for application of the Genetic Algorithm (GA) as an approach to help to automate part of the design process. This computational research effort strives to develop a propulsion system design strategy for liquid rocket to optimize take-off mass, satisfying the mission range under the constraint of axial overload. The method by which this process is accomplished by using GA as optimizer is outlined in this paper. Convergence of GA is improved by introducing initial population based on Design of Experiments Technique.

  4. Rocket propulsion elements - An introduction to the engineering of rockets (6th revised and enlarged edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, George P.

    The subject of rocket propulsion is treated with emphasis on the basic technology, performance, and design rationale. Attention is given to definitions and fundamentals, nozzle theory and thermodynamic relations, heat transfer, flight performance, chemical rocket propellant performance analysis, and liquid propellant rocket engine fundamentals. The discussion also covers solid propellant rocket fundamentals, hybrid propellant rockets, thrust vector control, selection of rocket propulsion systems, electric propulsion, and rocket testing.

  5. The Rationale/Benefits of Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion for NASA's Lunar Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.

    1994-01-01

    The solid core nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) represents the next major evolutionary step in propulsion technology. With its attractive operating characteristics, which include high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight (approximately 4-20), the NTR can form the basis for an efficient lunar space transportation system (LTS) capable of supporting both piloted and cargo missions. Studies conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center indicate that an NTR-based LTS could transport a fully-fueled, cargo-laden, lunar excursion vehicle to the Moon, and return it to low Earth orbit (LEO) after mission completion, for less initial mass in LEO than an aerobraked chemical system of the type studied by NASA during its '90-Day Study.' The all-propulsive NTR-powered LTS would also be 'fully reusable' and would have a 'return payload' mass fraction of approximately 23 percent--twice that of the 'partially reusable' aerobraked chemical system. Two NTR technology options are examined--one derived from the graphite-moderated reactor concept developed by NASA and the AEC under the Rover/NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) programs, and a second concept, the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). The paper also summarizes NASA's lunar outpost scenario, compares relative performance provided by different LTS concepts, and discusses important operational issues (e.g., reusability, engine 'end-of life' disposal, etc.) associated with using this important propulsion technology.

  6. The rationale/benefits of nuclear thermal rocket propulsion for NASA's lunar space transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.

    1994-09-01

    The solid core nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) represents the next major evolutionary step in propulsion technology. With its attractive operating characteristics, which include high specific impulse (approximately 850-1000 s) and engine thrust-to-weight (approximately 4-20), the NTR can form the basis for an efficient lunar space transportation system (LTS) capable of supporting both piloted and cargo missions. Studies conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center indicate that an NTR-based LTS could transport a fully-fueled, cargo-laden, lunar excursion vehicle to the Moon, and return it to low Earth orbit (LEO) after mission completion, for less initial mass in LEO than an aerobraked chemical system of the type studied by NASA during its '90-Day Study.' The all-propulsive NTR-powered LTS would also be 'fully reusable' and would have a 'return payload' mass fraction of approximately 23 percent--twice that of the 'partially reusable' aerobraked chemical system. Two NTR technology options are examined--one derived from the graphite-moderated reactor concept developed by NASA and the AEC under the Rover/NERVA (Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application) programs, and a second concept, the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR). The paper also summarizes NASA's lunar outpost scenario, compares relative performance provided by different LTS concepts, and discusses important operational issues (e.g., reusability, engine 'end-of life' disposal, etc.) associated with using this important propulsion technology.

  7. Zero Boil-Off System Design and Thermal Analysis of the Bimodal Thermal Nuclear Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Robert J.; Plachta, David W.

    2006-01-01

    Mars exploration studies at NASA are evaluating vehicles that incorporate Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) propulsion which use a high temperature nuclear fission reactor and hydrogen to produce thermal propulsion. The hydrogen propellant is to be stored in liquid state for periods up to 18 months. To prevent boil-off of the liquid hydrogen, a system of passive and active components are needed to prevent heat from entering the tanks and to remove any heat that does. This report describes the design of the system components used for the BNTR Crew Transfer Vehicle and the thermal analysis performed. The results show that Zero Boil-Off (ZBO) can be achieved with the electrical power allocated for the ZBO system.

  8. Convective Heat Transfer in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor of the Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This simulation involved a two-dimensional axisymmetric model of a full motor initial grain of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) of the Space Transportation System (STS). It was conducted with CFD (computational fluid dynamics) commercial code FLUENT. This analysis was performed to: a) maintain continuity with most related previous analyses, b) serve as a non-vectored baseline for any three-dimensional vectored nozzles, c) provide a relatively simple application and checkout for various CFD solution schemes, grid sensitivity studies, turbulence modeling and heat transfer, and d) calculate nozzle convective heat transfer coefficients. The accuracy of the present results and the selection of the numerical schemes and turbulence models were based on matching the rocket ballistic predictions of mass flow rate, head end pressure, vacuum thrust and specific impulse, and measured chamber pressure drop. Matching these ballistic predictions was found to be good. This study was limited to convective heat transfer and the results compared favorably with existing theory. On the other hand, qualitative comparison with backed-out data of the ratio of the convective heat transfer coefficient to the specific heat at constant pressure was made in a relative manner. This backed-out data was devised to match nozzle erosion that was a result of heat transfer (convective, radiative and conductive), chemical (transpirating), and mechanical (shear and particle impingement forces) effects combined.

  9. Adaptive Time Stepping for Transient Network Flow Simulation in Rocket Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Alok K.; Ravindran, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    Fluid and thermal transients found in rocket propulsion systems such as propellant feedline system is a complex process involving fast phases followed by slow phases. Therefore their time accurate computation requires use of short time step initially followed by the use of much larger time step. Yet there are instances that involve fast-slow-fast phases. In this paper, we present a feedback control based adaptive time stepping algorithm, and discuss its use in network flow simulation of fluid and thermal transients. The time step is automatically controlled during the simulation by monitoring changes in certain key variables and by feedback. In order to demonstrate the viability of time adaptivity for engineering problems, we applied it to simulate water hammer and cryogenic chill down in pipelines. Our comparison and validation demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of this adaptive strategy.

  10. Study of Electro-Optical Measuring System for Measuring the Swaying of Rocket Launcher and Artillery Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yang; YAN Yu-feng; CAI Li-juan; LIU Zhen-bo

    2008-01-01

    A scheme is proposed, of that the axis of directional barrel is simulated by a laser beam and an electro-optical axial angle encoder is using to measure the swaying of rocket Muncher or artillery. The measuring principle is stated, and an electro-optical measuring system is designed, including automatic force-applying device, angle-measurement device and photodetecting screen. The measurement accuracy of the system is analyzed. The measuring error of system is less then 17.3"(0.08 mil).

  11. Highlights of NASA's Special ETO Program Planning Workshop on rocket-based combined-cycle propulsion system technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, W. J. D.

    1992-01-01

    A NASA workshop on rocket-based combined-cycle propulsion technologies is described emphasizing the development of a starting point for earth-to-orbit (ETO) rocket technologies. The tutorial is designed with attention given to the combined development of aeronautical airbreathing propulsion and space rocket propulsion. The format, agenda, and group deliberations for the tutorial are described, and group deliberations include: (1) mission and space transportation infrastructure; (2) vehicle-integrated propulsion systems; (3) development operations, facilities, and human resource needs; and (4) spaceflight fleet applications and operations. Although incomplete the workshop elevates the subject of combined-cycle hypersonic propulsion and develops a common set of priniciples regarding the development of these technologies.

  12. Status on Technology Development of Optic Fiber-Coupled Laser Ignition System for Rocket Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Early, Jim; Osborne, Robin; Thomas, Matthew; Bossard, John

    2003-01-01

    To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for liquid rocket engine applications. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concept: not only offer system simplicity, but also enhance the combustion performance. Test results have shown that chamber performance is markedly high even at a low chamber length-to-diameter ratio. This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging.

  13. Integrated System Health Management: Pilot Operational Implementation in a Rocket Engine Test Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Schmalzel, John L.; Morris, Jonathan A.; Turowski, Mark P.; Franzl, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a credible implementation of integrated system health management (ISHM) capability, as a pilot operational system. Important core elements that make possible fielding and evolution of ISHM capability have been validated in a rocket engine test stand, encompassing all phases of operation: stand-by, pre-test, test, and post-test. The core elements include an architecture (hardware/software) for ISHM, gateways for streaming real-time data from the data acquisition system into the ISHM system, automated configuration management employing transducer electronic data sheets (TEDS?s) adhering to the IEEE 1451.4 Standard for Smart Sensors and Actuators, broadcasting and capture of sensor measurements and health information adhering to the IEEE 1451.1 Standard for Smart Sensors and Actuators, user interfaces for management of redlines/bluelines, and establishment of a health assessment database system (HADS) and browser for extensive post-test analysis. The ISHM system was installed in the Test Control Room, where test operators were exposed to the capability. All functionalities of the pilot implementation were validated during testing and in post-test data streaming through the ISHM system. The implementation enabled significant improvements in awareness about the status of the test stand, and events and their causes/consequences. The architecture and software elements embody a systems engineering, knowledge-based approach; in conjunction with object-oriented environments. These qualities are permitting systematic augmentation of the capability and scaling to encompass other subsystems.

  14. NONLINEAR DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF AN AXIALLY SLIDE-SPIN ROCKET FLEXIBLE SYSTEM WITH CLEARANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Huailiang; Zhang Fuxiang

    2005-01-01

    A hybrid approach is presented to investigate the dynamic behavior of an axially slide-spin flexible rocket with nonlinear clearance. The equations of motion of the flexible rocket are derived based upon Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and Hamilton principle and the finite element method. The characteristics of clearance between the spinning rocket and launcher are considered to be piecewise linear. Numerical solution is developed by direct integration method and demonstrates the validity of the method. The coupled dynamic behavior of axial motion and transverse vibrations of rocket are analyzed, and the influences of axially moving acceleration, spin speed, linking stiffness of elastic "shoes", and the nonlinearity of clearance on the motion attitude of rocket are studied.

  15. Rocket University at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    "Rocket University" is an exciting new initiative at Kennedy Space Center led by NASA's Engineering and Technology Directorate. This hands-on experience has been established to develop, refine & maintain targeted flight engineering skills to enable the Agency and KSC strategic goals. Through "RocketU", KSC is developing a nimble, rapid flight engineering life cycle systems knowledge base. Ongoing activities in RocketU develop and test new technologies and potential customer systems through small scale vehicles, build and maintain flight experience through balloon and small-scale rocket missions, and enable a revolving fresh perspective of engineers with hands on expertise back into the large scale NASA programs, providing a more experienced multi-disciplined set of systems engineers. This overview will define the Program, highlight aspects of the training curriculum, and identify recent accomplishments and activities.

  16. System Sensitivity Analysis Applied to the Conceptual Design of a Dual-Fuel Rocket SSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, John R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the results of initial efforts to apply the System Sensitivity Analysis (SSA) optimization method to the conceptual design of a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) launch vehicle. SSA is an efficient, calculus-based MDO technique for generating sensitivity derivatives in a highly multidisciplinary design environment. The method has been successfully applied to conceptual aircraft design and has been proven to have advantages over traditional direct optimization methods. The method is applied to the optimization of an advanced, piloted SSTO design similar to vehicles currently being analyzed by NASA as possible replacements for the Space Shuttle. Powered by a derivative of the Russian RD-701 rocket engine, the vehicle employs a combination of hydrocarbon, hydrogen, and oxygen propellants. Three primary disciplines are included in the design - propulsion, performance, and weights & sizing. A complete, converged vehicle analysis depends on the use of three standalone conceptual analysis computer codes. Efforts to minimize vehicle dry (empty) weight are reported in this paper. The problem consists of six system-level design variables and one system-level constraint. Using SSA in a 'manual' fashion to generate gradient information, six system-level iterations were performed from each of two different starting points. The results showed a good pattern of convergence for both starting points. A discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the method, possible areas of improvement, and future work is included.

  17. The liquid rocket booster as an element of the U.S. national space transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialla, Paul H.; Simon, Michael C.

    Liquid rocket boosters (LRBs) were first considered for the U.S. Space Transportation System (STS) during the early conceptual phases of the Space Shuttle program. However, solid rocket boosters (SRBs) were ultimately selected for the STS, primarily due to near-term economics. Liquid rocket boosters are once again being considered as a possible future upgrade to the Shuttle. This paper addresses the findings of these studies to date, with emphasis on the feasibility, benefits, and implementation strategy for a LRB program. The principal issue relating to LRB feasibility is their ability to be integrated into the STS with minimal vehicle and facility impacts. Booster size has been shown to have a significant influence on compatibility with the STS. The physical dimensions of the Orbiter and STS support facilities place an inherent limitation on the size of any booster to be used with this system. In addition, excessively large diameter boosters can cause increased airloads to be induced on the Orbiter wings, requiring modification of STS launch trajectory and possible performance losses. However, trajectory and performance analyses have indicated that LRBs can be designed within these sizing constraints and still have sufficient performance to meet Space Shuttle mission requirements. In fact, several configurations have been developed to meet a design goal of providing a 20,000 lb performance improvement to low Earth-orbit (LEO), as compared with current SRBs. Several major system trade studies have been performed to establish a baseline design which is most compatible with the existing Space Transportation System. These trades include propellant selection (storable, hydrogen-oxygen, hydrocarbon-oxygen, and advanced propellants); pump-fed vs pressure-fed propellant feed system design; engine selection (Space Shuttle Main Engine, Titan LR-87, and advanced new engines); number of engines per booster; and reusability vs expendability. In general, it was determined

  18. Liver abscess caused by CTX-M-55-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Salmonella enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Akira; Ooi, Yukimasa; Edogawa, Shoko; Ogura, Takeshi; Masuda, Daisuke; Mohamed, Malak; Takii, Michiaki; Umegaki, Eiji; Kawahara, Ryuji; Ukimura, Akira; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2014-01-01

    Liver abscesses secondary to Salmonella species are rarely described in the general population. We herein describe a case of a liver abscess caused by CTX-M-55-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Salmonella enteritidis, which has not been reported in the literature. A 54-year-old male was admitted due to a high fever and was clinically diagnosed with a liver abscess. Culture of the fluid from the liver abscess revealed CTX-M-55-type ESBL-producing S. enteritidis. Although the patient underwent percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage and antibiotic therapy, he died one month later. It should be noted that liver abscesses are potentially fatal depending on the causative pathogen.

  19. Common Data Acquisition Systems (DAS) Software Development for Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Phillip W., Sr.; Davis, Dawn M.; Turowski, Mark P.; Holladay, Wendy T.; Hughes, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of the commercial space launch industry and NASA's more recent resumption of operation of Stennis Space Center's large test facilities after thirty years of contractor control resulted in a need for a non-proprietary data acquisition systems (DAS) software to support government and commercial testing. The software is designed for modularity and adaptability to minimize the software development effort for current and future data systems. An additional benefit of the software's architecture is its ability to easily migrate to other testing facilities thus providing future commonality across Stennis. Adapting the software to other Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Centers such as MSFC, White Sands, and Plumbrook Station would provide additional commonality and help reduce testing costs for NASA. Ultimately, the software provides the government with unlimited rights and guarantees privacy of data to commercial entities. The project engaged all RPT Centers and NASA's Independent Verification & Validation facility to enhance product quality. The design consists of a translation layer which provides the transparency of the software application layers to underlying hardware regardless of test facility location and a flexible and easily accessible database. This presentation addresses system technical design, issues encountered, and the status of Stennis development and deployment.

  20. Optical tools and techniques for aligning solar payloads with the SPARCS control system. [Solar Pointing Aerobee Rocket Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N. L.; Chisel, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The success of a rocket-borne experiment depends not only on the pointing of the attitude control system, but on the alignment of the attitude control system to the payload. To ensure proper alignment, special optical tools and alignment techniques are required. Those that were used in the SPARCS program are described and discussed herein. These tools include theodolites, autocollimators, a 38-cm diameter solar simulator, a high-performance 1-m heliostat to provide a stable solar source during the integration of the rocket payload, a portable 75-cm sun tracker for use at the launch site, and an innovation called the Solar Alignment Prism. Using the real sun as the primary reference under field conditions, the Solar Alignment Prism facilitates the coalignment of the attitude sun sensor with the payload. The alignment techniques were developed to ensure the precise alignment of the solar payloads to the SPARCS attitude sensors during payload integration and to verify the required alignment under field conditions just prior to launch.

  1. Maturation of Structural Health Management Systems for Solid Rocket Motors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Solid rocket motor cases are subject to a variety of external environmental and loading conditions from cradle-to-grave. These conditions can significantly impact...

  2. System for Acquisition and Analysis of Energy-Based Acoustic Data for Rocket Noise Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Accurate estimates of the vibroacoustic loading placed on space vehicles and payloads during launch require knowledge of the rocket noise source properties. Given...

  3. Using Monte Carlo techniques and parallel processing for debris hazard analysis of rocket systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFarge, R.A.

    1994-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been involved with rocket systems for many years. Some of these systems have carried high explosive onboard, while others have had FTS for destruction purposes whenever a potential hazard is detected. Recently, Sandia has also been involved with flight tests in which a target vehicle is intentionally destroyed by a projectile. Such endeavors always raise questions about the safety of personnel and the environment in the event of a premature detonation of the explosive or an activation of the FTS, as well as intentional vehicle destruction. Previous attempts to investigate fragmentation hazards for similar configurations have analyzed fragment size and shape in detail but have computed only a limited number of trajectories to determine the probabilities of impact and casualty expectations. A computer program SAFETIE has been written in support of various SNL flight experiments to compute better approximations of the hazards. SAFETIE uses the AMEER trajectory computer code and the Engineering Sciences Center LAN of Sun workstations to determine more realistically the probability of impact for an arbitrary number of exclusion areas. The various debris generation models are described.

  4. Conceptual Engine System Design for NERVA derived 66.7KN and 111.2KN Thrust Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fittje, James E.; Buehrle, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket concept is being evaluated as an advanced propulsion concept for missions to the moon and Mars. A tremendous effort was undertaken during the 1960's and 1970's to develop and test NERVA derived Nuclear Thermal Rockets in the 111.2 KN to 1112 KN pound thrust class. NASA GRC is leveraging this past NTR investment in their vehicle concepts and mission analysis studies, and has been evaluating NERVA derived engines in the 66.7 KN to the 111.2 KN thrust range. The liquid hydrogen propellant feed system, including the turbopumps, is an essential component of the overall operation of this system. The NASA GRC team is evaluating numerous propellant feed system designs with both single and twin turbopumps. The Nuclear Engine System Simulation code is being exercised to analyze thermodynamic cycle points for these selected concepts. This paper will present propellant feed system concepts and the corresponding thermodynamic cycle points for 66.7 KN and 111.2 KN thrust NTR engine systems. A pump out condition for a twin turbopump concept will also be evaluated, and the NESS code will be assessed against the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine preliminary thermodynamic data.

  5. Improving of technical characteristics of launch vehicles with liquid rocket engines using active onboard de-orbiting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushlyakov, V.; Shatrov, Ya.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the analysis of technical requirements (TR) for the development of modern space launch vehicles (LV) with main liquid rocket engines (LRE) is fulfilled in relation to the anthropogenic impact decreasing. Factual technical characteristics on the example of a promising type of rocket ;Soyuz-2.1.v.; are analyzed. Meeting the TR in relation to anthropogenic impact decrease based on the conventional design approach and the content of the onboard system does not prove to be efficient and leads to depreciation of the initial technical characteristics obtained at the first design stage if these requirements are not included. In this concern, it is shown that the implementation of additional active onboard de-orbiting system (AODS) of worked-off stages (WS) into the onboard LV stages systems allows to meet the TR related to the LV environmental characteristics, including fire-explosion safety. In some cases, the orbital payload mass increases.

  6. NASA Data Acquisition System Software Development for Rocket Propulsion Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Phillip W., Sr.; Elliot, Alex C.; Graves, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Current NASA propulsion test facilities include Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama, Plum Brook Station in Ohio, and White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico. Within and across these centers, a diverse set of data acquisition systems exist with different hardware and software platforms. The NASA Data Acquisition System (NDAS) is a software suite designed to operate and control many critical aspects of rocket engine testing. The software suite combines real-time data visualization, data recording to a variety formats, short-term and long-term acquisition system calibration capabilities, test stand configuration control, and a variety of data post-processing capabilities. Additionally, data stream conversion functions exist to translate test facility data streams to and from downstream systems, including engine customer systems. The primary design goals for NDAS are flexibility, extensibility, and modularity. Providing a common user interface for a variety of hardware platforms helps drive consistency and error reduction during testing. In addition, with an understanding that test facilities have different requirements and setups, the software is designed to be modular. One engine program may require real-time displays and data recording; others may require more complex data stream conversion, measurement filtering, or test stand configuration management. The NDAS suite allows test facilities to choose which components to use based on their specific needs. The NDAS code is primarily written in LabVIEW, a graphical, data-flow driven language. Although LabVIEW is a general-purpose programming language; large-scale software development in the language is relatively rare compared to more commonly used languages. The NDAS software suite also makes extensive use of a new, advanced development framework called the Actor Framework. The Actor Framework provides a level of code reuse and extensibility that has previously been difficult

  7. Modeling the Thermal Rocket Fuel Preparation Processes in the Launch Complex Fueling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Zolin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to carry out fuel temperature preparation for space launch vehicles using hydrocarbon propellant components. A required temperature is reached with cooling or heating hydrocarbon fuel in ground facilities fuel storages. Fuel temperature preparing processes are among the most energy-intensive and lengthy processes that require the optimal technologies and regimes of cooling (heating fuel, which can be defined using the simulation of heat exchange processes for preparing the rocket fuel.The issues of research of different technologies and simulation of cooling processes of rocket fuel with liquid nitrogen are given in [1-10]. Diagrams of temperature preparation of hydrocarbon fuel, mathematical models and characteristics of cooling fuel with its direct contact with liquid nitrogen dispersed are considered, using the numerical solution of a system of heat transfer equations, in publications [3,9].Analytical models, allowing to determine the necessary flow rate and the mass of liquid nitrogen and the cooling (heating time fuel in specific conditions and requirements, are preferred for determining design and operational characteristics of the hydrocarbon fuel cooling system.A mathematical model of the temperature preparation processes is developed. Considered characteristics of these processes are based on the analytical solutions of the equations of heat transfer and allow to define operating parameters of temperature preparation of hydrocarbon fuel in the design and operation of the filling system of launch vehicles.The paper considers a technological system to fill the launch vehicles providing the temperature preparation of hydrocarbon gases at the launch site. In this system cooling the fuel in the storage tank before filling the launch vehicle is provided by hydrocarbon fuel bubbling with liquid nitrogen. Hydrocarbon fuel is heated with a pumping station, which provides fuel circulation through the heat exchanger-heater, with

  8. Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Propulsion and Power Systems for Outer Planetary Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, S. K.; Cataldo, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    The high specific impulse (I (sub sp)) and engine thrust generated using liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) propulsion makes them attractive for upper stage applications for difficult robotic science missions to the outer planets. Besides high (I (sub sp)) and thrust, NTR engines can also be designed for "bimodal" operation allowing substantial amounts of electrical power (10's of kWe ) to be generated for onboard spacecraft systems and high data rate communications with Earth during the course of the mission. Two possible options for using the NTR are examined here. A high performance injection stage utilizing a single 15 klbf thrust engine can inject large payloads to the outer planets using a 20 t-class launch vehicle when operated in an "expendable mode". A smaller bimodal NTR stage generating approx. 1 klbf of thrust and 20 to 40 kWe for electric propulsion can deliver approx. 100 kg using lower cost launch vehicles. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Propulsion and Power Systems for Outer Planetary Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, S. K.; Cataldo, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    The high specific impulse (I sp) and engine thrust generated using liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) propulsion makes them attractive for upper stage applications for difficult robotic science missions to the outer planets. Besides high (I sp) and thrust, NTR engines can also be designed for "bimodal" operation allowing substantial amounts of electrical power (10's of kWe ) to be generated for onboard spacecraft systems and high data rate communications with Earth during the course of the mission. Two possible options for using the NTR are examined here. A high performance injection stage utilizing a single 15 klbf thrust engine can inject large payloads to the outer planets using a 20 t-class launch vehicle when operated in an "expendable mode". A smaller bimodal NTR stage generating approx. 1 klbf of thrust and 20 to 40 kWe for electric propulsion can deliver approx. 100 kg using lower cost launch vehicles. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  10. Procedure of Forecasting Operational and Extremal State of Critical Systems of the Rocket Technique Under Repeated Thermo-Force Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko Yu.M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model for investigation of the thermoelastoplastic stress-strain state and the strength of the rocket technique systems under the repeated starting is proposed. The thermal conductivity equation and constitutive equations of thermoplasticity for the repeated elastic-plastic deformation processes of isotropic materials along small-curvature paths, the strength and low-cyclic fatigue criteria, numerical methods for solving the boundary-value heat conduction problems and corresponding computer software are used.

  11. Instrumentation and Communication Systems for Sounding Rockets and Shuttle-Borne Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-27

    samarium into the ionosphere was scheduled for flight during the fall of 1983. Two virtually identical payloads were to be carried on Brazilian Sonda III...stage of the Sonda III rocket burned for only 5 out of the required 20 seconds, thus yielding no scientific data as the vehicle never reached minimum

  12. Application of Adaptive Backstepping Sliding Mode Control in Alternative Current Servo System of Rocket Launcher%Application of Adaptive Backstepping Sliding Mode Control in Alternative Current Servo System of Rocket Launcher

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭亚军; 马大为; 王晓峰; 乐贵高

    2011-01-01

    An adaptive backstepping sliding mode control approach is introduced to control the pitch motion of a rocket launcher. Its control law is proposed to guarantee that the control system is ultimately bounded in a Lyapunov sense and make the servo system track the instruction of reference position globally and asymptotically. In addition, the sliding mode control can restrain the effects of parameter uncertainties and external disturbance. The functions of adaptive mechanism and sliding mode control are analyzed through the simulation in the different conditions. The simulation results illustrate that the method is applicable and robust.

  13. CTX-M-55-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Shigella sonnei isolated from a Korean patient who had travelled to China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonmok; Chung, Hae-Sun; Lee, Hyukmin; Yum, Jong Hwa; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon; Chong, Yunsop

    2013-03-01

    We report a case of CTX-M-55-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Shigella sonnei infection in a 27-year-old Korean woman who had traveled to China. The patient was admitted to the hospital due to abdominal pain, watery diarrhea, and fever (39.3℃). S. sonnei was isolated from her stool specimens, and the pathogen was found to be resistant to cefotaxime due to CTX-M-55-type ESBL. Insertion sequence (IS)Ecp1 was found upstream of the blaCTX-M-55 gene. The blaCTX-M-55 gene was transferred from the S. sonnei isolate to an Escherichia coli J53 recipient by conjugation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting revealed that the blaCTX-M-55 gene was located on a plasmid of approximately 130 kb.

  14. Concept of a self-pressurized feed system for liquid rocket engines and its fundamental experiment results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Jun; Okaya, Shunichi; Igoh, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2017-04-01

    A new propellant feed system referred to as a self-pressurized feed system is proposed for liquid rocket engines. The self-pressurized feed system is a type of gas-pressure feed system; however, the pressurization source is retained in the liquid state to reduce tank volume. The liquid pressurization source is heated and gasified using heat exchange from the hot propellant using a regenerative cooling strategy. The liquid pressurization source is raised to critical pressure by a pressure booster referred to as a charger in order to avoid boiling and improve the heat exchange efficiency. The charger is driven by a part of the generated pressurization gas using a closed-loop self-pressurized feed system. The purpose of this study is to propose a propellant feed system that is lighter and simpler than traditional gas pressure feed systems. The proposed system can be applied to all liquid rocket engines that use the regenerative cooling strategy. The concept and mathematical models of the self-pressurized feed system are presented first. Experiment results for verification are then shown and compared with the mathematical models.

  15. A Review of Propulsion Industrial Base Studies and an Introduction to the National Institute of Rocket Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doreswamy, Rajiv; Fry, Emma K.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been over 40 studies that have examined the state of the industrial base and infrastructure that supports propulsion systems development in the United States. This paper offers a comprehensive, systematic review of these studies and develops conclusions and recommendations in the areas of budget, policy, sustainment, infrastructure, workforce retention and development and mission/vision and policy. The National Institute for Rocket Propulsion System (NIRPS) is a coordinated, national organization that is responding to the key issues highlighted in these studies. The paper outlines the case for NIRPS and the specific actions that the Institute is taking to address these issues.

  16. Rocket Tablet,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-12

    is a vast and desolate world, this is a strip of mir- aculous land! How many struggling dramas full of power and * grandeur were cheered, resisted and...rocket officers and men, a group enormous and powerful , marched into this land soaked with the fresh blood of our ancestors. This place is about to...and tough pestering said he wanted an American aircraft ob- tained on the battlefield to transport goods from Lanzhou, Xian, Beijing, Guangzhou and

  17. Plasmid-mediated transfer of CTX-M-55 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase among different strains of Salmonella and Shigella spp. in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Seok; Kim, Soojin; Park, Jungsun; Shin, Eunkyung; Yun, Young-Sun; Lee, Deog-Yong; Kwak, Hyo-Sun; Seong, Won Keun; Chung, Gyung Tae; Kim, Junyoung

    2017-09-01

    We screened 10 CTX-M-55-producing Shigella and Salmonella isolates from a national surveillance in Korea. The blaCTX-M-55 was located on the IncI1 (n=5), IncA/C (n=4) and IncZ (n=1) plasmids, downstream of ISEcp1, IS26-ISEcp1 and ISEcp1-IS5 sequences, respectively. These results indicate that CTX-M-55 has disseminated to other bacteria by lateral plasmid transfer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Rocket launchers as passive controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.; Gunnels, R. T.; McCutchen, R. K., Jr.

    1981-12-01

    A concept is advanced for using the motion of launchers of a free-flight launcher/rocket system which is caused by random imperfections of the rockets launched from it to reduce the total error caused by the imperfections. This concept is called 'passive launcher control' because no feedback is generated by an active energy source after an error is sensed; only the feedback inherent in the launcher/rocket interaction is used. Relatively simple launcher models with two degrees of freedom, pitch and yaw, were used in conjunction with a more detailed, variable-mass model in a digital simulation code to obtain rocket trajectories with and without thrust misalignment and dynamic imbalance. Angular deviations of rocket velocities and linear deviations of the positions of rocket centers of mass at burnout were computed for cases in which the launcher was allowed to move ('flexible' launcher) and was constrained so that it did not rotate ('rigid' launcher) and ratios of flexible to rigid deviations were determined. Curves of these error ratios versus launcher frequency are presented. These show that a launcher which has a transverse moment of inertia about its pivot point of the same magnitude as that of the centroidal transverse moments of inertia of the rockets launched from it can be tuned to passively reduce the errors caused by rocket imperfections.

  19. Real-Time Rocket/Vehicle System Integrated Health Management Laboratory For Development and Testing of Health Monitoring/Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, R.

    2006-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne has developed a real-time engine/vehicle system integrated health management laboratory, or testbed, for developing and testing health management system concepts. This laboratory simulates components of an integrated system such as the rocket engine, rocket engine controller, vehicle or test controller, as well as a health management computer on separate general purpose computers. These general purpose computers can be replaced with more realistic components such as actual electronic controllers and valve actuators for hardware-in-the-loop simulation. Various engine configurations and propellant combinations are available. Fault or failure insertion capability on-the-fly using direct memory insertion from a user console is used to test system detection and response. The laboratory is currently capable of simulating the flow-path of a single rocket engine but work is underway to include structural and multiengine simulation capability as well as a dedicated data acquisition system. The ultimate goal is to simulate as accurately and realistically as possible the environment in which the health management system will operate including noise, dynamic response of the engine/engine controller, sensor time delays, and asynchronous operation of the various components. The rationale for the laboratory is also discussed including limited alternatives for demonstrating the effectiveness and safety of a flight system.

  20. Analysis and Results from a Flush Airdata Sensing (FADS) System in Close Proximity to Firing Rocket Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aliyah N.; Borrer, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation presents information regarding the nose-cap flush airdata sensing (FADS) system on Orion's Pad Abort 1 (PA-1) vehicle. The purpose of the nose-cap FADS system was to test whether or not useful data could be obtained from a FADS system if it was placed in close proximity to firing rockets nozzles like the attitude control motor (ACM) nozzles on the PA-1 launch abort system (LAS). The nose-cap FADS systems use pressure measurements from a series of pressure ports which are arranged in a cruciform pattern and flush with the surface of the vehicle to estimate values of angle of attack, angle of side-slip, Mach number, impact pressure and free-stream static pressure.

  1. Flight Testing a Real-Time Hazard Detection System for Safe Lunar Landing on the Rocket-Powered Morpheus Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trawny, Nikolas; Huertas, Andres; Luna, Michael E.; Villalpando, Carlos Y.; Martin, Keith E.; Carson, John M.; Johnson, Andrew E.; Restrepo, Carolina; Roback, Vincent E.

    2015-01-01

    The Hazard Detection System (HDS) is a component of the ALHAT (Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology) sensor suite, which together provide a lander Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) system with the relevant measurements necessary to enable safe precision landing under any lighting conditions. The HDS consists of a stand-alone compute element (CE), an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), and a gimbaled flash LIDAR sensor that are used, in real-time, to generate a Digital Elevation Map (DEM) of the landing terrain, detect candidate safe landing sites for the vehicle through Hazard Detection (HD), and generate hazard-relative navigation (HRN) measurements used for safe precision landing. Following an extensive ground and helicopter test campaign, ALHAT was integrated onto the Morpheus rocket-powered terrestrial test vehicle in March 2014. Morpheus and ALHAT then performed five successful free flights at the simulated lunar hazard field constructed at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center, for the first time testing the full system on a lunar-like approach geometry in a relevant dynamic environment. During these flights, the HDS successfully generated DEMs, correctly identified safe landing sites and provided HRN measurements to the vehicle, marking the first autonomous landing of a NASA rocket-powered vehicle in hazardous terrain. This paper provides a brief overview of the HDS architecture and describes its in-flight performance.

  2. Flight Testing a Real-Time Hazard Detection System for Safe Lunar Landing on the Rocket-Powered Morpheus Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trawny, Nikolas; Huertas, Andres; Luna, Michael E.; Villalpando, Carlos Y.; Martin, Keith E.; Carson, John M.; Johnson, Andrew E.; Restrepo, Carolina; Roback, Vincent E.

    2015-01-01

    The Hazard Detection System (HDS) is a component of the ALHAT (Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology) sensor suite, which together provide a lander Guidance, Navigation and Control (GN&C) system with the relevant measurements necessary to enable safe precision landing under any lighting conditions. The HDS consists of a stand-alone compute element (CE), an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), and a gimbaled flash LIDAR sensor that are used, in real-time, to generate a Digital Elevation Map (DEM) of the landing terrain, detect candidate safe landing sites for the vehicle through Hazard Detection (HD), and generate hazard-relative navigation (HRN) measurements used for safe precision landing. Following an extensive ground and helicopter test campaign, ALHAT was integrated onto the Morpheus rocket-powered terrestrial test vehicle in March 2014. Morpheus and ALHAT then performed five successful free flights at the simulated lunar hazard field constructed at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center, for the first time testing the full system on a lunar-like approach geometry in a relevant dynamic environment. During these flights, the HDS successfully generated DEMs, correctly identified safe landing sites and provided HRN measurements to the vehicle, marking the first autonomous landing of a NASA rocket-powered vehicle in hazardous terrain. This paper provides a brief overview of the HDS architecture and describes its in-flight performance.

  3. HST Luminosity Functions of the Globular Clusters M10, M22, and M55. A comparison with other clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Piotto, G

    1999-01-01

    From a combination of deep Hubble Space Telescope V and I images with groundbased images in the same bands, we have obtained color-magnitude diagrams of M10, M22, and M55, extending from just above the hydrogen burning limit to the tip of the red giant branch, down to the white dwarf cooling sequence. We have used the color-magnitude arrays to extract main sequence luminosity functions (LFs) from the turnoff to about 0.13 solar masses. The LFs of M10 is significantly steeper than that for the other two clusters. The difference cannot be due to a difference in metallicity. A comparison with the LFs from Piotto, Cool, and King (1997), shows a large spread in the LF slopes. This spread is also present in the local mass functions (MFs) obtained from the observed LFs using different theoretical mass--luminosity relations. The dispersion in the MF slopes remains also after removing the mass segregation effects by using multimass King-Michie models. The globular cluster MF slopes are also flatter than the MF slope o...

  4. Requirements for the appearance and basic design parameters of a micro-rocket system meant for launching nano-, pico, and femtoscale spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniluk, A. Yu.; Klyushnikov, V. Yu.; Kuznetsov, I. I.; Osadchenko, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    The paper proposes a concept of a microrocket system meant for the injection of nano-, pico-, and femtoscale satellites into near-Earth orbit. Requirements for the appearance and basic design parameters of the micro-rocket system are substantiated. Characteristics of possible prototypes and analogues of this system are analyzed.

  5. Rocket Projectile Detection Information Analysis System%火箭弹检测信息分析系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范志锋; 崔平; 文健; 徐敬青

    2014-01-01

    In allusion to the problem of using detection information of factory and army past years to receive the variation law of the control system electrical capability of a type of rocket projectile, developing a rocket projectile detection information analysis system based on mixed programming of PB/Matlab/SQL Server/Excellis put forward. Overall function, development tools and technology and design of development function module of the system are introduced. Some basically sport technique segments of design and implementation of the system are mainly explained and the main characteristics of the system are analyzed. It is shown by the application that the system has virtues of good interface, universality, operability and easy to maintain. The system has solved the problems of management, analysis and plotting of mass detection information.%针对利用出厂检测信息和部队历年检测信息得到火箭弹控制系统电性能变化规律存在的难题,提出基于PB/Matlab/SQL Server/Excel 混合编程开发火箭弹检测信息分析系统。介绍系统总体功能、开发工具与技术、开发功能模块设计,重点对系统开发与实现的一些主要技术环节进行说明,并分析系统主要特点。应用结果表明:该系统界面友好,通用性、可操作性强,易于维护,能高效解决海量检测信息管理、分析和绘图等问题。

  6. HST luminosity functions of the globular clusters M10, M22, and M55. A comparison with other clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotto, G.; Zoccali, M.

    1999-05-01

    From a combination of deep Hubble Space Telescope V and I images with groundbased images in the same bands, we have obtained color-magnitude diagrams of M10, M22, and M55, extending from just above the hydrogen burning limit to the tip of the red giant branch, down to the white dwarf cooling sequence. We have used the color-magnitude arrays to extract main sequence luminosity functions (LFs) from the turnoff to m ~ 0.13m_sun. The LFs of M10 is significantly steeper than that for the other two clusters. The difference cannot be due to a difference in metallicity. A comparison with the LFs from Piotto et al. (1997), shows a large spread in the LF slopes. This spread is also present in the local mass functions (MFs) obtained from the observed LFs using different theoretical mass-luminosity relations. The dispersion in the MF slopes remains also after removing the mass segregation effects by using multimass King-Michie models. The globular cluster MF slopes are also flatter than the MF slope of the field stars and of the Galactic clusters in the same mass interval. We interpret the MF slope dispersion and the MF flatness as an evidence of dynamical evolution which makes the present day globular cluster stellar MFs different from the initial MFs. The slopes of the present day MFs exclude that the low mass star can be dynamically relevant for the Galactic globular clusters. Based on HST observations retrieved from the ESO ST-ECF Archive, and on observations made at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile, and at the JKT telescope at La Palma, Islas Canarias.

  7. Qualification of Magnesium/Teflon/Viton Pyrotechnic Composition Used in Rocket Motors Ignition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana de Barros

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The application of fluoropolymers in high-energy-release pyrotechnic compositions is common in the space and defense areas. Pyrotechnic compositions of magnesium/Teflon/Viton are widely used in military flares and pyrogen igniters for igniting the solid propellant of a rocket motor. Pyrotechnic components are considered high-risk products as they may cause catastrophic accidents if initiated or ignited inadvertently. To reduce the hazards involved in the handling, storage and transportation of these devices, the magnesium/Teflon/Viton composition was subjected to various sensitivity tests, DSC and had its stability and compatibility tested with other materials. This composition obtained satisfactory results in all the tests, which qualifies it as safe for production, handling, use, storage and transportation.

  8. Performance comparisons of nuclear thermal rocket and chemical propulsion systems for piloted missions to Phobos/Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, S. K.; Mulac, M. W.; Spurlock, O. F.

    1989-01-01

    Performance capability of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) and chemical propulsion systems, operating with and without aerobraking, are compared for a selected set of Mars mission opportunities in the 2000 to 2020 timeframe. Both high- and low-energy mission opportunities are investigated. Results are presented as the required initial mass in low earth orbit (IMLEO) to perform the missions. Missions exclusively using chemical propulsion systems have the greatest initial masses. Significant mass reductions are realized by utilizing either aerobrake or NTR technology or both. As mission energy requirements increase, the benefit of implementing aerobrake or NTR technology increases, resulting in IMLEO mass reductions on the order of 60 to 75 percent when compared with all-propulsive chemical missions. By combining both advanced technologies, still greater mass reductions are possible.

  9. Hybrid Rocket Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankaran Venugopal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available With their unique operational characteristics, hybrid rockets can potentially provide safer, lower-cost avenues for spacecraft and missiles than the current solid propellant and liquid propellant systems. Classical hybrids can be throttled for thrust tailoring, perform in-flight motor shutdown and restart. In classical hybrids, the fuel is stored in the form of a solid grain, requiring only half the feed system hardware of liquid bipropellant engines. The commonly used fuels are benign, nontoxic, and not hazardous to store and transport. Solid fuel grains are not highly susceptible to cracks, imperfections, and environmental temperature and are therefore safer to manufacture, store, transport, and use for launch. The status of development based on the experience of the last few decades indicating the maturity of the hybrid rocket technology is given in brief.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(3, pp.193-200, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.518

  10. High-speed schlieren imaging of rocket exhaust plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coultas-McKenney, Caralyn; Winter, Kyle; Hargather, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Experiments are conducted to examine the exhaust of a variety of rocket engines. The rocket engines are mounted in a schlieren system to allow high-speed imaging of the engine exhaust during startup, steady state, and shutdown. A variety of rocket engines are explored including a research-scale liquid rocket engine, consumer/amateur solid rocket motors, and water bottle rockets. Comparisons of the exhaust characteristics, thrust and cost for this range of rockets is presented. The variety of nozzle designs, target functions, and propellant type provides unique variations in the schlieren imaging.

  11. Liquid rocket engine injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, G. S.; Nurick, W. H.

    1976-01-01

    The injector in a liquid rocket engine atomizes and mixes the fuel with the oxidizer to produce efficient and stable combustion that will provide the required thrust without endangering hardware durability. Injectors usually take the form of a perforated disk at the head of the rocket engine combustion chamber, and have varied from a few inches to more than a yard in diameter. This monograph treats specifically bipropellant injectors, emphasis being placed on the liquid/liquid and liquid/gas injectors that have been developed for and used in flight-proven engines. The information provided has limited application to monopropellant injectors and gas/gas propellant systems. Critical problems that may arise during injector development and the approaches that lead to successful design are discussed.

  12. Modeling of Rocket Fuel Heating and Cooling Processes in the Interior Receptacle Space of Ground-Based Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. I. Denisova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The propellant to fill the fuel tanks of the spacecraft, upper stages, and space rockets on technical and ground-based launch sites before fueling should be prepared to ensure many of its parameters, including temperature, in appropriate condition. Preparation of fuel temperature is arranged through heating and cooling the rocket propellants (RP in the tanks of fueling equipment. Processes of RP temperature preparation are the most energy-intensive and timeconsuming ones, which require that a choice of sustainable technologies and modes of cooling (heating RP provided by the ground-based equipment has been made through modeling of the RP [1] temperature preparation processes at the stage of design and operation of the groundbased fueling equipment.The RP temperature preparation in the tanks of the ground-based systems can be provided through the heat-exchangers built-in the internal space and being external with respect to the tank in which antifreeze, air or liquid nitrogen may be used as the heat transfer media. The papers [1-12], which note a promising use of the liquid nitrogen to cool PR, present schematic diagrams and modeling systems for the RP temperature preparation in the fueling equipment of the ground-based systems.We consider the RP temperature preparation using heat exchangers to be placed directly in RP tanks. Feeding the liquid nitrogen into heat exchanger with the antifreeze provides the cooling mode of PR while a heated air fed there does that of heating. The paper gives the systems of equations and results of modeling the processes of RP temperature preparation, and its estimated efficiency.The systems of equations of cooling and heating RP are derived on the assumption that the heat exchange between the fuel and the antifreeze, as well as between the storage tank and the environment is quasi-stationary.The paper presents calculation results of the fuel temperature in the tank, and coolant temperature in the heat exchanger, as

  13. Rocket propulsion elements

    CERN Document Server

    Sutton, George P

    2011-01-01

    The definitive text on rocket propulsion-now revised to reflect advancements in the field For sixty years, Sutton's Rocket Propulsion Elements has been regarded as the single most authoritative sourcebook on rocket propulsion technology. As with the previous edition, coauthored with Oscar Biblarz, the Eighth Edition of Rocket Propulsion Elements offers a thorough introduction to basic principles of rocket propulsion for guided missiles, space flight, or satellite flight. It describes the physical mechanisms and designs for various types of rockets' and provides an unders

  14. A Comparative Study of Genetic Algorithm Parameters for the Inverse Problem-based Fault Diagnosis of Liquid Rocket Propulsion Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erfu Yang; Hongjun Xiang; Dongbing Gu; Zhenpeng Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Fault diagnosis of liquid rocket propulsion systems (LRPSs) is a very important issue in space launch activities particularly when manned space missions are accompanied, since the safety and reliability can be significantly enhanced by exploiting an efficient fault diagnosis system. Currently, inverse problem-based diagnosis has attracted a great deal of research attention in fault diagnosis domain. This methodology provides a new strategy to model-based fault diagnosis for monitoring the health of propulsion systems. To solve the inverse problems arising from the fault diagnosis of LRPSs, GAs have been adopted in recent years as the first and effective choice of available numerical optimization tools. However, the GA has many control parameters to be chosen in advance and there still lack sound theoretical tools to analyze the effects of these parameters on diagnostic performance analytically. In this paper a comparative study of the influence of GA parameters on diagnostic results is conducted by performing a series of numerical experiments. The objective of this study is to investigate the contribution of individual algorithm parameter to final diagnostic result and provide reasonable estimates for choosing GA parameters in the inverse problem-based fault diagnosis of LRPSs. Some constructive remarks are made in conclusion and will be helpful for the implementation of GA to the fault diagnosis practice of LRPSs in the future.

  15. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Sub-Scale Rocket Engine/Motor Design, Development and Performance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Manish; Seaford, Mark; Kovarik, Brian; Dufrene, Aaron; Solly, Nathan; Kirchner, Robert; Engel, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) base heating test is broken down into two test programs: (1) Pathfinder and (2) Main Test. The Pathfinder Test Program focuses on the design, development, hot-fire test and performance analyses of the 2% sub-scale SLS core-stage and booster element propulsion systems. The core-stage propulsion system is composed of four gaseous oxygen/hydrogen RS-25D model engines and the booster element is composed of two aluminum-based model solid rocket motors (SRMs). The first section of the paper discusses the motivation and test facility specifications for the test program. The second section briefly investigates the internal flow path of the design. The third section briefly shows the performance of the model RS-25D engines and SRMs for the conducted short duration hot-fire tests. Good agreement is observed based on design prediction analysis and test data. This program is a challenging research and development effort that has not been attempted in 40+ years for a NASA vehicle.

  16. Common Data Acquisition Systems (DAS) Software Development for Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Test Facilities - A General Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Phillip W., Sr.; Hughes, Mark S.; Davis, Dawn M.; Turowski, Mark P.; Holladay, Wendy T.; Marshall, PeggL.; Duncan, Michael E.; Morris, Jon A.; Franzl, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of the commercial space launch industry and NASA's more recent resumption of operation of Stennis Space Center's large test facilities after thirty years of contractor control resulted in a need for a non-proprietary data acquisition system (DAS) software to support government and commercial testing. The software is designed for modularity and adaptability to minimize the software development effort for current and future data systems. An additional benefit of the software's architecture is its ability to easily migrate to other testing facilities thus providing future commonality across Stennis. Adapting the software to other Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Centers such as MSFC, White Sands, and Plumbrook Station would provide additional commonality and help reduce testing costs for NASA. Ultimately, the software provides the government with unlimited rights and guarantees privacy of data to commercial entities. The project engaged all RPT Centers and NASA's Independent Verification & Validation facility to enhance product quality. The design consists of a translation layer which provides the transparency of the software application layers to underlying hardware regardless of test facility location and a flexible and easily accessible database. This presentation addresses system technical design, issues encountered, and the status of Stennis' development and deployment.

  17. Solar Thermal Rocket Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sercel, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Paper analyzes potential of solar thermal rockets as means of propulsion for planetary spacecraft. Solar thermal rocket uses concentrated Sunlight to heat working fluid expelled through nozzle to produce thrust.

  18. Influence of Rocket Engine Characteristics on Shaft Sealing Technology Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keba, John E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs of The Influence of Rocket Engine Characteristics on Shaft Sealing Technology Needs. The topics include: 1) Rocket Turbomachinery Shaft Seals (Inter-Propellant-Seal (IPS) Systems, Lift-off Seal Systems, and Technology Development Needs); 2) Rocket Engine Characteristics (Engine cycles, propellants, missions, etc., Influence on shaft sealing requirements); and 3) Conclusions.

  19. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keaton, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report. 57 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keaton, P.W.

    1987-03-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report.

  1. Complete sequences of KPC-2-encoding plasmid p628-KPC and CTX-M-55-encoding p628-CTXM coexisted in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Fang, Haihong; Feng, Jiao; Yin, Zhe; Xie, Xiaofang; Zhu, Xueming; Wang, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Yang, Ruisheng; Du, Hong; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 628 was isolated from a human case of intracranial infection in a Chinese teaching hospital. Strain 628 produces KPC-2 and CTX-M-55 encoded by two different conjugative plasmids, i.e., the IncFIIK plasmid p628-KPC and the IncI1 plasmid p628-CTXM respectively. bla KPC-2 is captured by a Tn1722-based unit transposon with a linear structure. ΔTn3-ISKpn27-bla KPC-2-ΔISKpn6-ΔTn1722 and this transposon together with a mercury resistance (mer) gene locus constitutes a 34 kb acquired drug-resistance region. bla KPC-2 has two transcription starts (nucleotides G and C located at 39 and 250 bp upstream of its coding region respectively) which correspond to two promoters, i.e., the intrinsic P1 and the upstream ISKpn27/Tn3-provided P2 with the core -35/-10 elements TAATCC/TTACAT and TTGACA/AATAAT respectively. bla CTX-M-55 is mobilized in an ISEcp1-bla CTX-M-55-Δorf477 transposition unit and appears to be the sole drug-resistant determinant in p628-CTXM. bla CTX-M-55 possesses a single transcription start (nucleotides G located at 116 bp upstream of its coding region) corresponding to the ISEcp1-provided P1 promoter with the core -35/-10 element TTGAAA/TACAAT. All the above detected promoters display a characteristic of constitutive expression. Coexistence of bla KPC and bla CTX-M in K. pneumoniae has been reported many times but this is the first report to gain deep insights into genetic platforms, promoters, and expression of the two coexisting bla genes with determination of entire nucleotide sequences of the two corresponding plasmids.

  2. Complete sequences of KPC-2-encoding plasmid p628-KPC and CTX-M-55-encoding p628-CTXM coexisted in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eWang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 628 was isolated from a human case of intracranial infection in a Chinese teaching hospital. Strain 628 produces KPC-2 and CTX-M-55 encoded by two different conjugative plasmids, i.e., the IncFIIK plasmid p628-KPC and the IncI1 plasmid p628-CTXM, respectively. blaKPC-2 is captured by a Tn1721-based unit transposon with a linear structure ΔTn3-ISKpn27-blaKPC-2-ΔISKpn6-ΔTn1721, and this transposon together with a mercury resistance (mer gene locus constitutes a 34 kb acquired drug-resistance region. blaKPC-2 has two transcription starts (nucleotides G and C located at 39 and 250 bp upstream of its coding region, respectively, which correspond to two promoters, i.e., the intrinsic P1 and the upstream ISKpn27/Tn3-provided P2 with the core -35/-10 elements TAATCC/TTACAT and TTGACA/AATAAT, respectively. blaCTX-M-55 is mobilized in an ISEcp1-blaCTX-M-55-Δorf477 transposition unit and appears to be the sole drug-resistant determinant in p628-CTXM. blaCTX-M-55 possesses a single transcription start (nucleotides G located at 116 bp upstream of its coding region, corresponding to the ISEcp1-provided P1 promoter with the core -35/-10 element TTGAAA/TACAAT. All the above detected promoters display a characteristic of constitutive expression. Coexistence of blaKPC and blaCTX-M in K. pneumoniae has been reported many times, but this is the first report to gain deep insights into genetic platforms, promoters, and expression of the two coexisted bla genes with determination of entire nucleotide sequences of the two corresponding plasmids.

  3. NASA Rocket Propulsion Test Replacement Effort for Oxygen System Cleaner - Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) 225

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt Burns, H.; Mitchell, Mark A.; Lowrey, Nikki M.; Farner, Bruce R.; Ross, H. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous and liquid oxygen are extremely reactive materials used in bipropellant propulsion systems. Both flight and ground oxygen systems require a high level of cleanliness to support engine performance, testing, and prevent mishaps. Solvents used to clean and verify the cleanliness of oxygen systems and supporting test hardware must be compatible with the system's materials of construction and effective at removing or reducing expected contaminants to an acceptable level. This paper will define the philosophy and test approach used for evaluating replacement solvents for the current Marshall Space Flight Center/Stennis Space Center baseline HCFC-225 material that will no longer be available for purchase after 2014. MSFC/SSC applications in cleaning / sampling oxygen propulsion components, support equipment, and test system were reviewed then candidate replacement cleaners and test methods selected. All of these factors as well as testing results will be discussed.

  4. Reducing Thrusts In Solid-Fuel Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1989-01-01

    Thrust-terminating system conceived to reduce thrust of solid-propellant rocket motor in controlled manner such that thrust loads not increased or decreased beyond predictable levels. Concept involves explosively cutting opposing venting pairs in case of rocket motor above nozzles to initiate venting of chamber and reduction of thrust. Vents sized and numbered to control amount and rate of reduction in thrust.

  5. Rockets two classic papers

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Rockets, in the primitive form of fireworks, have existed since the Chinese invented them around the thirteenth century. But it was the work of American Robert Hutchings Goddard (1882-1945) and his development of liquid-fueled rockets that first produced a controlled rocket flight. Fascinated by rocketry since boyhood, Goddard designed, built, and launched the world's first liquid-fueled rocket in 1926. Ridiculed by the press for suggesting that rockets could be flown to the moon, he continued his experiments, supported partly by the Smithsonian Institution and defended by Charles Lindbergh. T

  6. Numerical Modeling of Fluid Transient in Cryogenic Fluid Network of Rocket Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Alok; Flachbart, Robin

    2003-01-01

    Fluid transients, also known as water hammer, can have a significant impact on the design and operation of both spacecraft and launch vehicles propulsion systems. These transients often occur at system activation and shut down. For ground safety reasons, many spacecrafts are launched with the propellant lines dry. These lines are often evacuated by the time the spacecraft reaches orbit. When the propellant isolation valve opens during propulsion system activation, propellant rushes into lines creating a pressure surge. During propellant system shutdown, a pressure surge is created due to sudden closure of a valve. During both activation and shutdown, pressure surges must be predicted accurately to ensure structural integrity of the propulsion system fluid network. The method of characteristics is the most widely used method of calculating fluid transients in pipeline [ 1,2]. The method of characteristics, however, has limited applications in calculating flow distribution in complex flow circuits with phase change, heat transfer and rotational effects. A robust cryogenic propulsion system analyzer must have the capability to handle phase change, heat transfer, chemical reaction, rotational effects and fluid transients in conjunction with subsystem flow model for pumps, valves and various pipe fittings. In recent years, such a task has been undertaken at Marshall Space Flight Center with the development of the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP), which is based on finite volume method in fluid network [3]. GFSSP has been extensively verified and validated by comparing its predictions with test data and other numerical methods for various applications such as internal flow of turbo-pump [4], propellant tank pressurization [5,6], chilldown of cryogenic transfer line [7] and squeeze film damper rotordynamics [8]. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the applicability of the finite volume method to predict fluid transient in cryogenic flow

  7. Identification of a physically idealized human rated rocket based interplanetary transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewig, Ralph

    Every system engineering trade study has to address the challenge of eliminating unintentional bias towards one of the available system options. This challenge becomes especially difficult when trading conceptual options, where the amount and fidelity of data available to characterize the options is highly variable. This dissertation introduces the methodology of Physical Idealization as a tool to remove unintentional bias from conceptual trade studies. The premise is that (1) given the options available based on our understanding of physics, and (2) within the set of constraints necessary to define the problem, it is possible to identify the optimal physically idealized solution. This solution can then be used as a benchmark for technology development and real world system implementation. The methodology of Physical Idealization is developed to support a study of Interplanetary Transportation Systems (ITS). The ITS is modeled as consisting of payload, power, and propulsion subsystems, and optimized using a simplified two-dimensional equation of motion set. Both a genetic algorithm and gradient based optimization methods are used in a nested loop process. The presented results illustrate both the strengths and weaknesses associated with using physical idealization in a trade study, showing the methodology to be a useful addition to the system engineer's selection of tools.

  8. Development of the Functional Flow Block Diagram for the J-2X Rocket Engine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas; Stoller, Sandra L.; Greene, WIlliam D.; Christenson, Rick L.; Bowen, Barry C.

    2007-01-01

    The J-2X program calls for the upgrade of the Apollo-era Rocketdyne J-2 engine to higher power levels, using new materials and manufacturing techniques, and with more restrictive safety and reliability requirements than prior human-rated engines in NASA history. Such requirements demand a comprehensive systems engineering effort to ensure success. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne system engineers performed a functional analysis of the engine to establish the functional architecture. J-2X functions were captured in six major operational blocks. Each block was divided into sub-blocks or states. In each sub-block, functions necessary to perform each state were determined. A functional engine schematic consistent with the fidelity of the system model was defined for this analysis. The blocks, sub-blocks, and functions were sequentially numbered to differentiate the states in which the function were performed and to indicate the sequence of events. The Engine System was functionally partitioned, to provide separate and unique functional operators. Establishing unique functional operators as work output of the System Architecture process is novel in Liquid Propulsion Engine design. Each functional operator was described such that its unique functionality was identified. The decomposed functions were then allocated to the functional operators both of which were the inputs to the subsystem or component performance specifications. PWR also used a novel approach to identify and map the engine functional requirements to customer-specified functions. The final result was a comprehensive Functional Flow Block Diagram (FFBD) for the J-2X Engine System, decomposed to the component level and mapped to all functional requirements. This FFBD greatly facilitates component specification development, providing a well-defined trade space for functional trades at the subsystem and component level. It also provides a framework for function-based failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), and a

  9. Development of the Functional Flow Block Diagram for the J-2X Rocket Engine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Thomas; Stoller, Sandra L.; Greene, WIlliam D.; Christenson, Rick L.; Bowen, Barry C.

    2007-01-01

    The J-2X program calls for the upgrade of the Apollo-era Rocketdyne J-2 engine to higher power levels, using new materials and manufacturing techniques, and with more restrictive safety and reliability requirements than prior human-rated engines in NASA history. Such requirements demand a comprehensive systems engineering effort to ensure success. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne system engineers performed a functional analysis of the engine to establish the functional architecture. J-2X functions were captured in six major operational blocks. Each block was divided into sub-blocks or states. In each sub-block, functions necessary to perform each state were determined. A functional engine schematic consistent with the fidelity of the system model was defined for this analysis. The blocks, sub-blocks, and functions were sequentially numbered to differentiate the states in which the function were performed and to indicate the sequence of events. The Engine System was functionally partitioned, to provide separate and unique functional operators. Establishing unique functional operators as work output of the System Architecture process is novel in Liquid Propulsion Engine design. Each functional operator was described such that its unique functionality was identified. The decomposed functions were then allocated to the functional operators both of which were the inputs to the subsystem or component performance specifications. PWR also used a novel approach to identify and map the engine functional requirements to customer-specified functions. The final result was a comprehensive Functional Flow Block Diagram (FFBD) for the J-2X Engine System, decomposed to the component level and mapped to all functional requirements. This FFBD greatly facilitates component specification development, providing a well-defined trade space for functional trades at the subsystem and component level. It also provides a framework for function-based failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), and a

  10. Integrated approach for hybrid rocket technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barato, Francesco; Bellomo, Nicolas; Pavarin, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    Hybrid rocket motors tend generally to be simple from a mechanical point of view but difficult to optimize because of their complex and still not well understood cross-coupled physics. This paper addresses the previous issue presenting the integrated approach established at University of Padua to develop hybrid rocket based systems. The methodology tightly combines together system analysis and design, numerical modeling from elementary to sophisticated CFD, and experimental testing done with incremental philosophy. As an example of the approach, the paper presents the experience done in the successful development of a hybrid rocket booster designed for rocket assisted take off operations. It is thought that following the proposed approach and selecting carefully the most promising applications it is possible to finally exploit the major advantages of hybrid rocket motors as safety, simplicity, low cost and reliability.

  11. 2005 40th Annual Armament Systems: Guns - Ammunition - Rockets - Missiles Conference and Exhibition. Volume 2: Wednesday

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-28

    system SRL 6 24 CTA INTERNATIONAL UK and French Government Collaboration Warrior = VCI EBM = FRES UK TDP Manned Turret Integration...WARRIOR FRES VBCI EBM EMD & PROD’N 25 CTA INTERNATIONAL CTAI Turret Demonstrator Programmes MTIP 4 Tonne Conventional Manned Turret Toutatis 1,5...learned that do not apply 8 Grouping • Sort out those that do not apply • Combine lessons learned into themes – Facilitates comparing Lessons Learns

  12. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A detailed description of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) is presented. The contents include: 1) Design Requirements; 2) NTREES Layout; 3) Data Acquisition and Control System Schematics; 4) NTREES System Schematic; and 5) NTREES Setup.

  13. RADEM: An Air Launched, Rocket Demonstrator for Future Advanced Launch Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, R. C.; Skorodelov, V. A.; Serdijk, I. I.; Neiland, V. Ya.

    1995-10-01

    Critical features associated with future reusable launch vehicles include reduction of turn around effort, use of integral liquid hydrogen tanks, advanced structures and thermal protection, and re-usable LOx-hydrogen propulsion with low maintenance overheads. Many doubts associated with such designs could be removed by a sub-orbital demonstrator. An air launched vehicle would fulfil many of the objectives for such demonstration. British Aerospace, NPO Molnija, TsAGI and DB Antonov have made an initial study for ESA for such a demonstrator (RADEM), using earlier studies of operational launch systems with the An-225 /Hotol and MAKS proposals. The paper describes the results of this study, including the selection of two potential vehicle designs, and an approach to sub-system design and vehicle development to minimize the costs. It appears that such a vheicle, capable of flying to Mach 12 or beyond using currently available technology, could have a cost an order of magnitude less than that required for development of an operational vehicle.

  14. Computational modeling of nuclear thermal rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peery, Steven D.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: rocket engine transient simulation (ROCETS) system; ROCETS performance simulations composed of integrated component models; ROCETS system architecture significant features; ROCETS engineering nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) modules; ROCETS system easily adapts Fortran engineering modules; ROCETS NTR reactor module; ROCETS NTR turbomachinery module; detailed reactor analysis; predicted reactor power profiles; turbine bypass impact on system; and ROCETS NTR engine simulation summary.

  15. Space Systems Failures Disasters and Rescues of Satellites, Rockets and Space Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Harland, David M

    2005-01-01

    In the 1960s and 1970s deep space missions were dispatched in pairs in case one was lost in launch or failed during its journey. Following the triumphs of the Viking landings on Mars in 1976 and both Voyagers spacecraft successfully surveying the outer giant planets of the Solar System, it was decided by NASA to cut costs and send out just a single probe. Although Magellan successfully mapped Venus by radar, it suffered from problems during the flight. Then came the loss of Mars Observer, whose engine exploded as it was preparing to enter Mars’ orbit because it was using technology designed for Earth’s satellites and the engine was not suited to spending several months in space. Later came the high-profile losses of Mars Climate Observer and Mars Polar Lander - a consequence of the faster, better, cheaper philosophy introduced by Dan Goldin in 1993. Even the highly successful Galileo mission suffered a major setback when its high-gain antenna (also based on satellite mission suffered a major setback when ...

  16. A study of early korean rockets (1377-1600)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Yeon Seok

    The first Korean rocket was fired between 1377 and 1389 and began the Korean development of rockets as a tactical weapon. Although, Korea had successfully demonstrated the use of rockets as firearms in the fifteenth century, there had been no effort to present the historical development of the early Korean rockets in a paper which will be useful to both historians and scientists. The book entitled Kuk Cho Ore Sorye (1474) in the Korean language provided extensive rocket system description, however it required considerable research to interpret them. This paper is the first study of early Korean rockets and launchers. The major effort in this study is directed toward the development of design concepts and details of early Korean rockets. Also, to substantiate support of the historical data presented, some versions of the early Korean rockets were made according to their specifications and fired successfully by the author in 1981.

  17. Introduction to rocket science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Travis S

    2009-01-01

    What Are Rockets? The History of RocketsRockets of the Modern EraRocket Anatomy and NomenclatureWhy Are Rockets Needed? Missions and PayloadsTrajectoriesOrbitsOrbit Changes and ManeuversBallistic Missile TrajectoriesHow Do Rockets Work? ThrustSpecific ImpulseWeight Flow RateTsiolkovsky's Rocket EquationStagingRocket Dynamics, Guidance, and ControlHow Do Rocket Engines Work? The Basic Rocket EngineThermodynamic Expansion and the Rocket NozzleExit VelocityRocket Engine Area Ratio and LengthsRocket Engine Design ExampleAre All Rockets the Same? Solid Rocket EnginesLiquid Propellant Rocket Engines

  18. Estimation of Initial Disturbances for Rockets Based on Interactions of Rockets and Directional Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In the range of the rockets/launcher system itself, the dynamic equations for rocket and directional tube during semi-constraint period have been constructed by using Newton-Euler method. Considering the interaction of rockets and directional tubes when clearances exist, the method of estimating initial disturbances for the rocket by using vibration data of the directional tube has been given. The estimated results have been compared with the simulation results computed by the dynamic simulating software ADAMS. Results computed by the two methods are basically consistent and the computing errors do not increase with the variation of the clearance. The validity of the proposed method has been proved.

  19. Replacement of chemical rocket launchers by beamed energy propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunari, Masafumi; Arnault, Anthony; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2014-11-01

    Microwave Rocket is a beamed energy propulsion system that is expected to reach space at drastically lower cost. This cost reduction is estimated by replacing the first-stage engine and solid rocket boosters of the Japanese H-IIB rocket with Microwave Rocket, using a recently developed thrust model in which thrust is generated through repetitively pulsed microwave detonation with a reed-valve air-breathing system. Results show that Microwave Rocket trajectory, in terms of velocity versus altitude, can be designed similarly to the current H-IIB first stage trajectory. Moreover, the payload ratio can be increased by 450%, resulting in launch-cost reduction of 74%.

  20. 火箭弹几何尺寸测量系统及测量原理研究%Research on Measurement Systems and Principles of Rocket Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雪峰; 冯进良; 王蕾

    2014-01-01

    针对体积庞大的火箭弹轴向尺寸和径向尺寸难以测量的问题,提出了一种基于位移传感器的火箭弹几何尺寸测量系统。首先将弹体稳定支撑,然后通过测量装置对火箭弹轴向尺寸、径向尺寸及翼展进行测量,最后对测量结果进行精度分析。结果表明,文中提出的火箭弹几何尺寸检测系统,可用于直径达500mm、长度达5000mm的火箭弹的非接触测量。并实现对火箭弹的径向尺寸和轴向任意两点之间距离以及翼展的测量,具备测量精度高、自动化程度好、测量时间短、实用性强等优点。%For bulky rockets, it is difficult to measure the axial dimension and radial dimension, in order to solve this problem the rockets geometry measurement system was proposed which based on the displacement sensor. Firstly the projectile was supported stably. Then the radial size and axial size of rockets were measured through measuring device. Finally the measurement results were analyzed accurately. The results show that the rocket geometric dimension mea-surement system can be used for noncontact measurement of rockets which diameter is up to 500mm and length is up to 5000mm. The measurement of the distance between the radial dimension and the axial measurement and the wing-span measurement are realized.At the same time it has the advantages of high accuracy, good degree of automation, time saving and practical.

  1. Centaur Rocket Installation in PSL #1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    Centaur Rocket Installation in PSL - Propulsion Systems Laboratory #1. The RL-10 Rocket was developed by Pratt and Whitney in the late 1950's and tested at the Lewis Research Center (now known as the John H. Glenn Research Lewis Field). This power plant was the propulsion system for NASA's upper stage Centaur rocket and was significant for being the first to use liquid hydrogen and oxygen as fuel. The Centaur suffered a number of early failures, but later proved to be a very successful upper stage for numerous commercial, NASA and military payloads.

  2. Collaborative Sounding Rocket launch in Alaska and Development of Hybrid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Tomohisa; Tsutsumi, Akimasa; Ito, Toshiyuki; Kan, Yuji; Tohyama, Fumio; Nakashino, Kyouichi; Hawkins, Joseph

    Tokai University student rocket project (TSRP) was established in 1995 for a purpose of the space science and engineering hands-on education, consisting of two space programs; the one is sounding rocket experiment collaboration with University of Alaska Fairbanks and the other is development and launch of small hybrid rockets. In January of 2000 and March 2002, two collaborative sounding rockets were successfully launched at Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. In 2001, the first Tokai hybrid rocket was successfully launched at Alaska. After that, 11 hybrid rockets were launched to the level of 180-1,000 m high at Hokkaido and Akita in Japan. Currently, Tokai students design and build all parts of the rockets. In addition, they are running the organization and development of the project under the tight budget control. This program has proven to be very effective in providing students with practical, real-engineering design experience and this program also allows students to participate in all phases of a sounding rocket mission. Also students learn scientific, engineering subjects, public affairs and system management through experiences of cooperative teamwork. In this report, we summarize the TSRP's hybrid rocket program and discuss the effectiveness of the program in terms of educational aspects.

  3. The Ion Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-05-29

    discharge velocity w and the speci- fic impulse lap respectively cannot be increased. At this limit condition the thermal rocket oecouos "choked up...structural quality is 900 t, 3) In the case of an atomic-driven thermal rocket ’,;lth specific Ipipulse ISjy«8C0 sec and thrust to weight ratio « 1, the

  4. Model Rockets and Microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    Points out the instructional applications and program possibilities of a unit on model rocketry. Describes the ways that microcomputers can assist in model rocket design and in problem calculations. Provides a descriptive listing of model rocket software for the Apple II microcomputer. (ML)

  5. Comparative Study of 28 and 18 Years Field Aged Siemens-Arco M55 Modules in Temperate and Hot-Dry Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chicca, Matthew; Wohlgemuth, John; TamizhMani, GovindaSamy

    2016-11-21

    The primary objective of this research work is two-fold: (i) determine the degradation rates of Siemens-Arco M55 modules exposed over 18 and 28 years in a hot-dry climate of Arizona and a temperate climate of California, and; (ii) identify the potential modes responsible for these degradation losses. The degradation rates were determined based on the I-V data obtained on exposed modules and on the corresponding control modules which were not exposed in the fields. The degradation modes responsible for these degradations were determined using several nondestructive tests and destructive tests performed on these control and exposed modules. The nondestructive tests included: current-voltage, visual inspection, cell-module quantum efficiency, and module level reflectance spectroscopy. The destructive tests included: transmittance spectroscopy of glass superstrates, and FTIR, DSC and TGA of encapsulant materials.

  6. Pressure-Equalizing Cradle for Booster Rocket Mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutan, Elbert L. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A launch system and method improve the launch efficiency of a booster rocket and payload. A launch aircraft atop which the booster rocket is mounted in a cradle, is flown or towed to an elevation at which the booster rocket is released. The cradle provides for reduced structural requirements for the booster rocket by including a compressible layer, that may be provided by a plurality of gas or liquid-filled flexible chambers. The compressible layer contacts the booster rocket along most of the length of the booster rocket to distribute applied pressure, nearly eliminating bending loads. Distributing the pressure eliminates point loading conditions and bending moments that would otherwise be generated in the booster rocket structure during carrying. The chambers may be balloons distributed in rows and columns within the cradle or cylindrical chambers extending along a length of the cradle. The cradle may include a manifold communicating gas between chambers.

  7. 15 CFR 744.3 - Restrictions on Certain Rocket Systems (including ballistic missile systems and space launch...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Vehicles (including cruise missile systems, target drones and reconnaissance drones) End-Uses. 744.3... missile systems, target drones and reconnaissance drones) End-Uses. (a) General prohibition. In addition... transfer (in-country) you know that the item: (1) Will be used in the design, development, production...

  8. Improved hybrid rocket fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, David L.

    1995-01-01

    McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, as part of its Independent R&D, has initiated development of a clean burning, high performance hybrid fuel for consideration as an alternative to the solid rocket thrust augmentation currently utilized by American space launch systems including Atlas, Delta, Pegasus, Space Shuttle, and Titan. It could also be used in single stage to orbit or as the only propulsion system in a new launch vehicle. Compared to solid propellants based on aluminum and ammonium perchlorate, this fuel is more environmentally benign in that it totally eliminates hydrogen chloride and aluminum oxide by products, producing only water, hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon oxides, and trace amounts of nitrogen oxides. Compared to other hybrid fuel formulations under development, this fuel is cheaper, denser, and faster burning. The specific impulse of this fuel is comparable to other hybrid fuels and is between that of solids and liquids. The fuel also requires less oxygen than similar hybrid fuels to produce maximum specific impulse, thus reducing oxygen delivery system requirements.

  9. Advanced Solid Rocket Launcher and Its Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Yasuhiro; Imoto, Takayuki; Habu, Hiroto; Ohtsuka, Hirohito; Hori, Keiichi; Koreki, Takemasa; Fukuchi, Apollo; Uekusa, Yasuyuki; Akiba, Ryojiro

    The research on next generation solid propellant rockets is actively underway in various spectra. JAXA is developing the Advanced Solid Rocket (ASR) as a successor to the M-V launch vehicle, which was utilized over past ten years for space science programs including planetary missions. ASR is a result of the development of the next generation technology including a highly intelligent autonomous check-out system, which is connected to not only the solid rocket but also future transportation systems. It is expected to improve the efficiency of the launch system and double the cost performance. Far beyond this effort, the passion of the volunteers among the industry-government-academia cooperation has been united to establish the society of the freewheeling thinking “Next generation Solid Rocket Society (NSRS)”. It aims at a larger revolution than what the ASR provides so that the order of the cost performance is further improved. A study of the Low melting temperature Thermoplastic Propellant (LTP) is now at the experimental stage, which is expected to reform the manufacturing process of the solid rocket propellant and lead to a significant increase in cost performance. This paper indicates the direction of the big flow towards the next generation solid-propellant rockets: the concept of the intelligent ASR under development; and the innovation behind LTP.

  10. Simple-1: Development stage of the data transmission system for a solid propellant mid-power rocket model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarce, Andrés; Sebastián Rodríguez, Juan; Galvez, Julián; Gómez, Alejandro; García, Manuel J.

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents the development stage of a communication module for a solid propellant mid-power rocket model. The communication module was named. Simple-1 and this work considers its design, construction and testing. A rocket model Estes Ventris Series Pro II® was modified to introduce, on the top of the payload, several sensors in a CanSat form factor. The Printed Circuit Board (PCB) was designed and fabricated from Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) components and assembled in a cylindrical rack structure similar to this small format satellite concept. The sensors data was processed using one Arduino Mini and transmitted using a radio module to a Software Defined Radio (SDR) HackRF based platform on the ground station. The Simple-1 was tested using a drone in successive releases, reaching altitudes from 200 to 300 meters. Different kind of data, in terms of altitude, position, atmospheric pressure and vehicle temperature were successfully measured, making possible the progress to a next stage of launching and analysis.

  11. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-08-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  12. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  13. Not just rocket science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacAdam, S.; Anderson, R. [Celan Energy Systems, Rancho Cordova, CA (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The paper explains a different take on oxyfuel combustion. Clean Energy Systems (CES) has integrated aerospace technology into conventional power systems, creating a zero-emission power generation technology that has some advantages over other similar approaches. When using coal as a feedstock, the CES process burns syngas rather than raw coal. The process uses recycled water and steam to moderate the temperature, instead of recycled CO{sub 2}. With no air ingress, the CES process produces very pure CO{sub 2}. This makes it possible to capture over 99% of the CO{sub 2} resulting from combustion. CES uses the combustion products to drive the turbines, rather than indirectly raising steam for steam turbines, as in the oxyfuel process used by companies such as Vattenfall. The core of the process is a high-pressure oxy-combustor adapted from rocket engine technology. This combustor burns gaseous or liquid fuels with gaseous oxygen in the presence of water. Fuels include natural gas, coal or coke-derived synthesis gas, landfill and biodigester gases, glycerine solutions and oil/water emulsion. 2 figs.

  14. The XQC microcalorimeter sounding rocket: a stable LTD platform 30 seconds after rocket motor burnout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, F.S. E-mail: frederick.s.porter@gsfc.nasa.gov; Almy, R.; Apodaca, E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Galeazzi, M.; Kelley, R.; McCammon, D.; Stahle, C.K.; Szymkowiak, A.E.; Sanders, W.T

    2000-04-07

    The XQC microcalorimeter sounding rocket experiment is designed to provide a stable thermal environment for an LTD detector system within 30 s of the burnout of its second stage rocket motor. The detector system used for this instrument is a 36-pixel microcalorimeter array operated at 60 mK with a single-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The ADR is mounted on a space-pumped liquid helium tank with vapor cooled shields which is vibration isolated from the rocket structure. We present here some of the design and performance details of this mature LTD instrument, which has just completed its third suborbital flight.

  15. Design and Experimental Investigation of Ejector Rocket Chamber for RBCC Propulsion System%RBCC引射火箭燃烧室设计及试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱韶华; 田亮; 刘亚冰; 侯金丽; 李轩; 徐旭

    2014-01-01

    A GO2/kerosene ejector rocket chamber was designed and tested to meet the requirements of the RBCC propulsion system. It was required to operate at chamber pressure 2MPa and 1.6 mixture ratio, while the mass flow rate of the rocket was changed from 95g/s to 285g/s. The mass flow rate controlling,ignition,injection and thermal protection of the faceplate and chamber body have achieved reasonably good performance during the reacting flow tests and non-reacting flow tests. Then the performance of the rocket was investigated in the RBCC combined tests. As the results shown,the rocket has achieved efficiency 88%~98%C*,and it is influenced by the mass flow rate,mixture ratio,momentum flux ratio and pressure decrease of the rocket. The higher momen-tum flux ratio and pressure decrease in a suitable range, the better performance of the atomizing, mixing and burning will attain. Although the pressure decrease of the kerosene is only 11%of the design value,the GO2/ker-osene Gas Center Swirl Coaxial (GCSC) injector can achieve efficienicy at least 88%C*by effective aerodynamic effects. The purge flow should be controlled in tests and taken into account when the performance of the rocket is analyzed,as there will be efficiency decrease by 3%C*when the purge flow reaches 5%of the rocket mass flow rate. When the performance of the rocket is compared in the separate tests and combined tests, the rocket is found to attain almost efficiency 7%higher C*in combined test,because of its longer characteristic length.%为了满足RBCC推进系统需求,进行了气氧/煤油引射火箭燃烧室的设计和试验研究。燃烧室室压为2MPa,氧燃比为1.6,火箭流量在95~285g/s范围内变化。通过火箭单独的冷、热态试验,对其流量控制、点火、喷注及面板和身部热防护进行了考核验证,均得到了较满意的结果。在此基础上研究了RBCC联试中火箭燃烧室的工作性能,试验结果表明:燃烧室的特

  16. Common findings of bla CTX-M-55-encoding 104-139 kbp plasmids harbored by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in pork meat, wholesale market workers, and patients with urinary tract infection in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, T A V; Nguyen, T N H; Ueda, S; Le, Q P; Tran, T T N; Nguyen, T N D; Dao, T V K; Tran, M T; Le, T T T; Le, T L; Nakayama, T; Hirai, I; Do, T H; Vien, Q M; Yamamoto, Y

    2017-02-01

    Extended-spectrum, β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-E) harboring the bla CTX-M-55-encoding plasmid (ESBL-E55) has been reported to be associated with urinary tract infection (UTI). The aims of this study were to clarify the prevalence of ESBL-E55 in pork meats and workers from the same wholesale market, as well as patients with UTI from a nearby hospital in Vietnam; we also investigated the plasmids encoding bla CTX-M-55. Sequencing analysis showed that 66.6% of the ESBL-E isolated from pork meats contained bla CTX-M-55, whereas the gene was present in 25.0% of workers and 12.5% of patients with UTI. Plasmid analysis showed that several sizes of plasmid encoded bla CTX-M-55 in ESBL-E55 isolated from pork meats, whereas ESBL-E55 isolated from workers and patients with UTI contained only 104-139 kbp of bla CTX-M-55-encoding plasmids. This indicates that the 104-139 kbp sizes of bla CTX-M-55-encoding plasmids were commonly disseminated in pork meats, wholesale market workers, and patients with UTI.

  17. Rocket noise - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerny, S. A.

    1990-10-01

    This paper reviews what is known about far-field rocket noise from the controlled studies of the late 1950s and 1960s and from launch data. The peak dimensionless frequency, the dependence of overall sound power on exhaust parameters, and the directivity of the overall sound power of rockets are compared to those of subsonic jets and turbo-jets. The location of the dominant sound source in the rocket exhaust plume and the mean flow velocity in this region are discussed and shown to provide a qualitative explanation for the low peak Strouhal number, fD(e)/V(e), and large angle of maximum directivity. Lastly, two empirical prediction methods are compared with data from launches of a Titan family vehicle (two, solid rocket motors of 5.7 x 10 to the 6th N thrust each) and the Saturn V (five, liquid oxygen/rocket propellant engines of 6.7 x 10 to the 6th N thrust, each). The agreement is favorable. In contrast, these methods appear to overpredict the far-field sound pressure levels generated by the Space Shuttle.

  18. Complete sequences of KPC-2-encoding plasmid p628-KPC and CTX-M-55-encoding p628-CTXM coexisted in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Fang, Haihong; Feng, Jiao; Yin, Zhe; Xie, Xiaofang; Zhu, Xueming; Wang, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Yang, Ruisheng; Du, Hong; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 628 was isolated from a human case of intracranial infection in a Chinese teaching hospital. Strain 628 produces KPC-2 and CTX-M-55 encoded by two different conjugative plasmids, i.e., the IncFIIK plasmid p628-KPC and the IncI1 plasmid p628-CTXM respectively. blaKPC−2 is captured by a Tn1722-based unit transposon with a linear structure. ΔTn3-ISKpn27-blaKPC−2-ΔISKpn6-ΔTn1722 and this transposon together with a mercury resistance (mer) gene locus constitutes a 34 kb acquired drug-resistance region. blaKPC−2 has two transcription starts (nucleotides G and C located at 39 and 250 bp upstream of its coding region respectively) which correspond to two promoters, i.e., the intrinsic P1 and the upstream ISKpn27/Tn3-provided P2 with the core −35/−10 elements TAATCC/TTACAT and TTGACA/AATAAT respectively. blaCTX−M−55 is mobilized in an ISEcp1-blaCTX−M−55-Δorf477 transposition unit and appears to be the sole drug-resistant determinant in p628-CTXM. blaCTX−M−55 possesses a single transcription start (nucleotides G located at 116 bp upstream of its coding region) corresponding to the ISEcp1-provided P1 promoter with the core −35/−10 element TTGAAA/TACAAT. All the above detected promoters display a characteristic of constitutive expression. Coexistence of blaKPC and blaCTX−M in K. pneumoniae has been reported many times but this is the first report to gain deep insights into genetic platforms, promoters, and expression of the two coexisting bla genes with determination of entire nucleotide sequences of the two corresponding plasmids. PMID:26347725

  19. Rivaroxaban in the Prevention of Stroke and Systemic Embolism in Patients with Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation: Clinical Implications of the ROCKET AF Trial and Its Subanalyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Ryan J; Amerena, John V

    2015-12-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly common cause of stroke and systemic embolism. While warfarin has been the mainstay of stroke prevention in patients with AF, newer novel oral anticoagulant medications are now available. Rivaroxaban, a direct factor Xa inhibitor with a rapid onset and offset after oral administration, offers potential advantages over warfarin, predominantly due to its predictable pharmacokinetics across wide patient populations. It requires no coagulation monitoring, and only two different doses are needed (20 mg daily for patients with normal renal function and 15 mg daily in those with reduced renal function). A large randomized trial (ROCKET AF) has shown non-inferiority to warfarin for preventing stroke or systemic embolism in the per-protocol population and superiority to warfarin in the on-treatment safety population. Several subanalyses confirm that the treatment effect of rivaroxaban is consistent across different patient subgroups, including those with reduced renal function. The tolerability of rivaroxaban appears similar to that of warfarin, with comparable overall bleeding rates in clinical trials. In ROCKET AF, significantly lower rates of fatal and intracranial bleeding were seen with rivaroxaban, while lower rates of gastrointestinal bleeding were seen with warfarin. Important contraindications to rivaroxaban include valvular AF, the presence of a prosthetic valve (mechanical or bioprosthetic) or valve repair, the need for concurrent dual antiplatelet therapy, and creatinine clearance <30 ml/min. Once-daily dosing and the lack of coagulation monitoring may increase utilization and adherence compared with warfarin, potentially decreasing the large burden of care associated with stroke secondary to AF. Overall, rivaroxaban offers a useful alternative to warfarin for stroke prevention in patients with AF.

  20. Rocket Flight Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Waters

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This project uses Newton’s Second Law of Motion, Euler’s method, basic physics, and basic calculus to model the flight path of a rocket. From this, one can find the height and velocity at any point from launch to the maximum altitude, or apogee. This can then be compared to the actual values to see if the method of estimation is a plausible. The rocket used for this project is modeled after Bullistic-1 which was launched by the Society of Aeronautics and Rocketry at the University of South Florida.

  1. Prevalence of ST1193 clone and IncI1/ST16 plasmid in E-coli isolates carrying blaCTX-M-55 gene from urinary tract infections patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Liang; Liu, Yang; Xia, Shu; Kudinha, Timothy; Xiao, Shu-Nian; Zhong, Nan-Shan; Ren, Guo-Sheng; Zhuo, Chao

    2017-03-24

    To study molecular epidemiology of CTX-M-55-carrying Escherichia coli isolates from urinary tract infections (UTIs) in China. 111 blaCTX-M-55-positive E.coli isolates from UTIs patients in China were studied. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to analyze the homologies among the strains. Conjugation experiments, S1nuclease PFGE and PCR analysis were performed to characterize plasmids harboring blaCTX-M-55 and their genetic environment. 111 isolates were clustered into 86 individual pulsotypes and three clusters by PFGE. Fifty-five (49.5%) of the isolates belonged to 8 STs. Most of the ST1193 isolates belonged to one PFGE cluster. Transconjugants (n = 45) derived from randomly selected blaCTX-M-55 donors (n = 58), were found to contain a single 90-kb conjugative plasmid, which mainly belonged to the IncI1 groups (34, 76%). Among the IncI1 plasmids, the blaCTX-M-55/IncI1/ST16 predominated (23/34, 68%). The blaTEM-1 and aac (3')-II genes were frequently detected on the IncI1 plasmids, and the insertion of ISEcp1 or IS26 was observed at the 48 bp or 45 bp upstream of the start codon of blaCTX-M-55 gene. The dissemination of blaCTX-M-55 gene among E. coli UTI isolates, appeared to be due to both the major clonal lineage of ST1193 and the horizontal transfer of epidemic plasmid IncI1/ST16.

  2. Prevalence of ST1193 clone and IncI1/ST16 plasmid in E-coli isolates carrying blaCTX-M-55 gene from urinary tract infections patients in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Liang; Liu, Yang; Xia, Shu; Kudinha, Timothy; Xiao, Shu-nian; Zhong, Nan-shan; Ren, Guo-sheng; Zhuo, Chao

    2017-01-01

    To study molecular epidemiology of CTX-M-55-carrying Escherichia coli isolates from urinary tract infections (UTIs) in China. 111 blaCTX-M-55-positive E.coli isolates from UTIs patients in China were studied. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to analyze the homologies among the strains. Conjugation experiments, S1nuclease PFGE and PCR analysis were performed to characterize plasmids harboring blaCTX-M-55 and their genetic environment. 111 isolates were clustered into 86 individual pulsotypes and three clusters by PFGE. Fifty-five (49.5%) of the isolates belonged to 8 STs. Most of the ST1193 isolates belonged to one PFGE cluster. Transconjugants (n = 45) derived from randomly selected blaCTX-M-55 donors (n = 58), were found to contain a single 90-kb conjugative plasmid, which mainly belonged to the IncI1 groups (34, 76%). Among the IncI1 plasmids, the blaCTX-M-55/IncI1/ST16 predominated (23/34, 68%). The blaTEM-1 and aac (3′)-II genes were frequently detected on the IncI1 plasmids, and the insertion of ISEcp1 or IS26 was observed at the 48 bp or 45 bp upstream of the start codon of blaCTX-M-55 gene. The dissemination of blaCTX-M-55 gene among E. coli UTI isolates, appeared to be due to both the major clonal lineage of ST1193 and the horizontal transfer of epidemic plasmid IncI1/ST16. PMID:28338012

  3. Rockets in World War I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    World War I enlisted rockets once again for military purposes. French pilots rigged rockets to the wing struts of their airplanes and aimed them at enemy observation balloons filled with highly inflammable hydrogen.

  4. An Evaluation Of Rocket Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Beri

    1959-07-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of conventional parameters of internal ballistics of Solid Propellant Rockets using external burning cruciform charge, on the geometry of charge aad rocket motor is discussed and results applied in a special case.

  5. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

    2009-01-01

    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the…

  6. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

    2009-01-01

    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the…

  7. Introduction to Rocket Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    Von Braun; 1966. 4. Introduction to Ordnance Technology; IHSP 76-129; 1976. 5. Physics; D. Halliday and R. Resnick ; 1963. 6. Physics Tells Why: 0...to Luke Sky- walker in Star Wars when he said "Don’t get cocky." We never plan for EVERYTHING, though we like to think we do. As we’ve said, rocket

  8. Low toxicity rocket propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrazine (N2H4) and its hypergolic mate nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) are used on virtually all spacecraft and on a large number of launch vehicles. In recent years however, there has been an effort in identifying and developing alternatives to replace hydrazine as a rocket propellant.

  9. This "Is" Rocket Science!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Wayne; Martin, Cynthia; Veltkamp, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Using model rockets to teach physics can be an effective way to engage students in learning. In this paper, we present a curriculum developed in response to an expressed need for helping high school students review physics equations in preparation for a state-mandated exam. This required a mode of teaching that was more advanced and analytical…

  10. The Relativistic Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antippa, Adel F.

    2009-01-01

    We solve the problem of the relativistic rocket by making use of the relation between Lorentzian and Galilean velocities, as well as the laws of superposition of successive collinear Lorentz boosts in the limit of infinitesimal boosts. The solution is conceptually simple, and technically straightforward, and provides an example of a powerful…

  11. Rocketing to the Skies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    ONE sunny morning,we startedfor Yanqi Lake,Huairou District,Beijing,to try“rocket bungy”,so farthe only facility for this sport inChina.On the way there,wequestioned our courage and heartendurance. Entering the gate we saw,towering over a banner saying,

  12. Low toxicity rocket propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrazine (N2H4) and its hypergolic mate nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) are used on virtually all spacecraft and on a large number of launch vehicles. In recent years however, there has been an effort in identifying and developing alternatives to replace hydrazine as a rocket propellant.

  13. Simulation-Based Early Prediction of Rocket, Artillery, and Mortar Trajectories and Real-Time Optimization for Counter-RAM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Ramezani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The threat imposed by terrorist attacks is a major hazard for military installations, for example, in Iraq and Afghanistan. The large amounts of rockets, artillery projectiles, and mortar grenades (RAM that are available pose serious threats to military forces. An important task for international research and development is to protect military installations and implement an accurate early warning system against RAM threats on conventional computer systems in out-of-area field camps. This work presents a method for determining the trajectory, caliber, and type of a projectile based on the estimation of the ballistic coefficient. A simulation-based optimization process is presented that enables iterative adjustment of predicted trajectories in real time. Analytical and numerical methods are used to reduce computing time for out-of-area missions and low-end computer systems. A GUI is programmed to present the results. It allows for comparison between predicted and actual trajectories. Finally, different aspects and restrictions for measuring the quality of the results are discussed.

  14. Metallic Hydrogen: A Game Changing Rocket Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to produce metallic hydrogen in the laboratory using an innovative approach, and to study its metastability properties. Current theoretical and experimental considerations expect that extremely high pressures of order 4-6 megabar are required to transform molecular hydrogen to the metallic phase. When metallic hydrogen is produced in the laboratory it will be extremely important to determine if it is metastable at modest temperatures, i.e. remains metallic when the pressure is released. Then it could be used as the most powerful chemical rocket fuel that exists and revolutionize rocketry, allowing single-stage rockets to enter orbit and chemically fueled rockets to explore our solar system.

  15. Additive Manufacturing for Affordable Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Brian; Robertson, Elizabeth; Osborne, Robin; Calvert, Marty

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (also known as 3D printing) technology has the potential to drastically reduce costs and lead times associated with the development of complex liquid rocket engine systems. NASA is using 3D printing to manufacture rocket engine components including augmented spark igniters, injectors, turbopumps, and valves. NASA is advancing the process to certify these components for flight. Success Story: MSFC has been developing rocket 3D-printing technology using the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process. Over the last several years, NASA has built and tested several injectors and combustion chambers. Recently, MSFC has 3D printed an augmented spark igniter for potential use the RS-25 engines that will be used on the Space Launch System. The new design is expected to reduce the cost of the igniter by a factor of four. MSFC has also 3D printed and tested a liquid hydrogen turbopump for potential use on an Upper Stage Engine. Additive manufacturing of the turbopump resulted in a 45% part count reduction. To understanding how the 3D printed parts perform and to certify them for flight, MSFC built a breadboard liquid rocket engine using additive manufactured components including injectors, turbomachinery, and valves. The liquid rocket engine was tested seven times in 2016 using liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In addition to exposing the hardware to harsh environments, engineers learned to design for the new manufacturing technique, taking advantage of its capabilities and gaining awareness of its limitations. Benefit: The 3D-printing technology promises reduced cost and schedule for rocket engines. Cost is a function of complexity, and the most complicated features provide the largest opportunities for cost reductions. This is especially true where brazes or welds can be eliminated. The drastic reduction in part count achievable with 3D printing creates a waterfall effect that reduces the number of processes and drawings, decreases the amount of touch

  16. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    booster rocket engines • 6000-10000 psia capabilities – Can use gaseous nitrogen, helium, or hydrogen to pressurize propellant tanks 9Distribution A...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited. PA Clearance 16493 Simplified Test Stand Layout Oxidizer  TankFuel  Tank High  Pressure   Gas (GN2...requires large, complex facilities to deliver propellant at the proper pressure , temperature, and flow rates • The enormous energies involved

  17. Solid propellant rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowler, W. L.; Shafer, J. I.; Behm, J. W.; Strand, L. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of a solid propellant rocket engine with a controlled rate of thrust buildup to a desired thrust level are discussed. The engine uses a regressive burning controlled flow solid propellant igniter and a progressive burning main solid propellant charge. The igniter is capable of operating in a vacuum and sustains the burning of the propellant below its normal combustion limit until the burning propellant surface and combustion chamber pressure have increased sufficiently to provide a stable chamber pressure.

  18. Straw Rockets Are out of This World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Joan

    2013-01-01

    To capture students' excitement and engage their interest in rocketships and visiting planets in the solar system, the author designed lessons that give students the opportunity to experience the joys and challenges of developing straw rockets, and then observing which design can travel the longest distance. The lessons are appropriate for…

  19. Solid Rocket Booster-Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    This illustration is a cutaway of the solid rocket booster (SRB) sections with callouts. The Shuttle's two SRB's are the largest solids ever built and the first designed for refurbishment and reuse. Standing nearly 150-feet high, the twin boosters provide the majority of thrust for the first two minutes of flight, about 5.8 million pounds, augmenting the Shuttle's main propulsion system during liftoff. The major design drivers for the solid rocket motors (SRM's) were high thrust and reuse. The desired thrust was achieved by using state-of-the-art solid propellant and by using a long cylindrical motor with a specific core design that allows the propellant to burn in a carefully controlled marner. At burnout, the boosters separate from the external tank and drop by parachute to the ocean for recovery and subsequent refurbishment. The boosters are designed to survive water impact at almost 60 miles per hour, maintain flotation with minimal damage, and preclude corrosion of the hardware exposed to the harsh seawater environment. Under the project management of the Marshall Space Flight Center, the SRB's are assembled and refurbished by the United Space Boosters. The SRM's are provided by the Morton Thiokol Corporation.

  20. Genetic Algorithm with Maximum-Minimum Crossover (GA-MMC Applied in Optimization of Radiation Pattern Control of Phased-Array Radars for Rocket Tracking Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo W. T. Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In launching operations, Rocket Tracking Systems (RTS process the trajectory data obtained by radar sensors. In order to improve functionality and maintenance, radars can be upgraded by replacing antennas with parabolic reflectors (PRs with phased arrays (PAs. These arrays enable the electronic control of the radiation pattern by adjusting the signal supplied to each radiating element. However, in projects of phased array radars (PARs, the modeling of the problem is subject to various combinations of excitation signals producing a complex optimization problem. In this case, it is possible to calculate the problem solutions with optimization methods such as genetic algorithms (GAs. For this, the Genetic Algorithm with Maximum-Minimum Crossover (GA-MMC method was developed to control the radiation pattern of PAs. The GA-MMC uses a reconfigurable algorithm with multiple objectives, differentiated coding and a new crossover genetic operator. This operator has a different approach from the conventional one, because it performs the crossover of the fittest individuals with the least fit individuals in order to enhance the genetic diversity. Thus, GA-MMC was successful in more than 90% of the tests for each application, increased the fitness of the final population by more than 20% and reduced the premature convergence.

  1. Rocket Assembly and Checkout Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Integrates, tests, and calibrates scientific instruments flown on sounding rocket payloads. The scientific instruments are assembled on an optical bench;...

  2. Rocket + Science = Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris,Bruce; Sullivan, Greg; Burkey, Martin

    2010-01-01

    It's a cliche that rocket engineers and space scientists don t see eye-to-eye. That goes double for rocket engineers working on human spaceflight and scientists working on space telescopes and planetary probes. They work fundamentally different problems but often feel that they are competing for the same pot of money. Put the two groups together for a weekend, and the results could be unscientific or perhaps combustible. Fortunately, that wasn't the case when NASA put heavy lift launch vehicle designers together with astronomers and planetary scientists for two weekend workshops in 2008. The goal was to bring the top people from both groups together to see how the mass and volume capabilities of NASA's Ares V heavy lift launch vehicle could benefit the science community. Ares V is part of NASA's Constellation Program for resuming human exploration beyond low Earth orbit, starting with missions to the Moon. In the current mission scenario, Ares V launches a lunar lander into Earth orbit. A smaller Ares I rocket launches the Orion crew vehicle with up to four astronauts. Orion docks with the lander, attached to the Ares V Earth departure stage. The stage fires its engine to send the mated spacecraft to the Moon. Standing 360 feet high and weighing 7.4 million pounds, NASA's new heavy lifter will be bigger than the 1960s-era Saturn V. It can launch almost 60 percent more payload to translunar insertion together with the Ares I and 35 percent more mass to low Earth orbit than the Saturn V. This super-sized capability is, in short, designed to send more people to more places to do more things than the six Apollo missions.

  3. Development of small solid rocket boosters for the ILR-33 sounding rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Pawel; Okninski, Adam; Pakosz, Michal; Cieslinski, Dawid; Bartkowiak, Bartosz; Wolanski, Piotr

    2017-09-01

    This paper gives an overview of the development of a 6000 Newton-class solid rocket motor for suborbital applications. The design configuration and results of interior ballistics calculations are given. The initial use of the motor as the main propulsion system of the H1 experimental in-flight test platform, within the Polish Small Sounding Rocket Program, is presented. Comparisons of theoretical and experimental performance are shown. Both on-ground and in-flight tests are discussed. A novel composite-case manufacturing technology, which enabled to reach high propellant mass fractions, was validated and significant cost-reductions were achieved. This paper focuses on the process of adapting the design for use as the booster stage of the ILR-33 sounding rocket, under development at the Institute of Aviation in Warsaw, Poland. Parallel use of two of the flight-proven rocket motors along with the main stage is planned. The process of adapting the rocket motor for booster application consists of stage integration, aerothermodynamics and reliability analyses. The separation mechanism and environmental impact are also discussed within this paper. Detailed performance analysis with focus on propellant grain geometry is provided. The evolution of the design since the first flights of the H1 rocket is covered and modifications of the manufacturing process are described. Issues of simultaneous ignition of two motors and their non-identical performance are discussed. Further applications and potential for future development are outlined. The presented results are based on the initial work done by the Rocketry Group of the Warsaw University of Technology Students' Space Association. The continuation of the Polish Small Sounding Rocket Program on a larger scale at the Institute of Aviation proves the value of the outcomes of the initial educational project.

  4. ACTIVE MODEL ROCKET STABILIZATION VIA COLD GAS THRUSTERS

    OpenAIRE

    Malyuta, Danylo; Collaud, Xavier; Martins Gaspar, Mikael; Rouaze, Gautier Marie Pierre; Pictet, Raimondo; Ivanov, Anton; Mullin, Nickolay

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a reaction control system (RCS) for a model rocket named FALCO-4. The rocket uses cold gas jets to keep itself perfectly vertical at low speeds. We first describe the mechanical layout of FALCO-4 and the characteristics of the cold gas propulsion system. We then propose a dynamical model of the rocket and a control scheme based on decoupled PID regulators for roll, pitch and yaw. The control scheme is then evaluated based on MATLAB simulatio...

  5. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Sub-Scale Rocket Engine/Motor Design, Development & Performance Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Manish; Seaford, Mark; Kovarik, Brian; Dufrene, Aaron; Solly, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    ATA-002 Technical Team has successfully designed, developed, tested and assessed the SLS Pathfinder propulsion systems for the Main Base Heating Test Program. Major Outcomes of the Pathfinder Test Program: Reach 90% of full-scale chamber pressure Achieved all engine/motor design parameter requirements Reach steady plume flow behavior in less than 35 msec Steady chamber pressure for 60 to 100 msec during engine/motor operation Similar model engine/motor performance to full-scale SLS system Mitigated nozzle throat and combustor thermal erosion Test data shows good agreement with numerical prediction codes Next phase of the ATA-002 Test Program Design & development of the SLS OML for the Main Base Heating Test Tweak BSRM design to optimize performance Tweak CS-REM design to increase robustness MSFC Aerosciences and CUBRC have the capability to develop sub-scale propulsion systems to meet desired performance requirements for short-duration testing.

  6. 2.75 Inch Rocket/AH-1G Helicopter Weapons System Baseline Instrumentation Test Report. Volume 1,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-04-01

    network with sharper transduers while eliminating the e a d cost eut-of characteristics than thoe ordinarily supplied of complex arrier systems...chancX in the output proportional to the displacement. Both IF LOAD series of transduers are available in seven stroke W.e s rn .Cores ane available with

  7. Tactical Grade MEMS IMUs for Spin-Stabilized Rockets Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a tactical grade MEMS IMU for spin-stabilized rockets for metric tracking and autonomous systems. The enabling instrument is a gyroscope designed for very...

  8. Scaled Rocket Testing in Hypersonic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrene, Aaron; MacLean, Matthew; Carr, Zakary; Parker, Ron; Holden, Michael; Mehta, Manish

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) uses four clustered liquid rocket engines along with two solid rocket boosters. The interaction between all six rocket exhaust plumes will produce a complex and severe thermal environment in the base of the vehicle. This work focuses on a recent 2% scale, hot-fire SLS base heating test. These base heating tests are short-duration tests executed with chamber pressures near the full-scale values with gaseous hydrogen/oxygen engines and RSRMV analogous solid propellant motors. The LENS II shock tunnel/Ludwieg tube tunnel was used at or near flight duplicated conditions up to Mach 5. Model development was strongly based on the Space Shuttle base heating tests with several improvements including doubling of the maximum chamber pressures and duplication of freestream conditions. Detailed base heating results are outside of the scope of the current work, rather test methodology and techniques are presented along with broader applicability toward scaled rocket testing in supersonic and hypersonic flow.

  9. Free-Flight Terrestrial Rocket Lander Demonstration for NASA's Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, David K.; Epp, Chirold; Robertson, Ed

    2012-01-01

    The Autonomous Landing Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) Project is chartered to develop and mature to a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of six an autonomous system combining guidance, navigation and control with terrain sensing and recognition functions for crewed, cargo, and robotic planetary landing vehicles. The ALHAT System must be capable of identifying and avoiding surface hazards to enable a safe and accurate landing to within tens of meters of designated and certified landing sites anywhere on a planetary surface under any lighting conditions. Since its inception in 2006, the ALHAT Project has executed four field test campaigns to characterize and mature sensors and algorithms that support real-time hazard detection and global/local precision navigation for planetary landings. The driving objective for Government Fiscal Year 2012 (GFY2012) is to successfully demonstrate autonomous, real-time, closed loop operation of the ALHAT system in a realistic free flight scenario on Earth using the Morpheus lander developed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). This goal represents an aggressive target consistent with a lean engineering culture of rapid prototyping and development. This culture is characterized by prioritizing early implementation to gain practical lessons learned and then building on this knowledge with subsequent prototyping design cycles of increasing complexity culminating in the implementation of the baseline design. This paper provides an overview of the ALHAT/Morpheus flight demonstration activities in GFY2012, including accomplishments, current status, results, and lessons learned. The ALHAT/Morpheus effort is also described in the context of a technology path in support of future crewed and robotic planetary exploration missions based upon the core sensing functions of the ALHAT system: Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN), Hazard Detection and Avoidance (HDA), and Hazard Relative Navigation (HRN).

  10. Peregrine 100-km Sounding Rocket Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilliac, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    The Peregrine Sounding Rocket Program is a joint basic research program of NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Wallops, Stanford University, and the Space Propulsion Group, Inc. (SPG). The goal is to determine the applicability of this technology to a small launch system. The approach is to design, build, and fly a stable, efficient liquefying fuel hybrid rocket vehicle to an altitude of 100 km. The program was kicked off in October of 2006 and has seen considerable progress in the subsequent 18 months. This research group began studying liquifying hybrid rocket fuel technology more than a decade ago. The overall goal of the research was to gain a better understanding of the fundamental physics of the liquid layer entrainment process responsible for the large increase in regression rate observed in these fuels, and to demonstrate the effect of increased regression rate on hybrid rocket motor performance. At the time of this reporting, more than 400 motor tests were conducted with a variety of oxidizers (N2O, GOx, LOx) at ever increasing scales with thrust levels from 5 to over 15,000 pounds (22 N to over 66 kN) in order to move this technology from the laboratory to practical applications. The Peregrine program is the natural next step in this development. A number of small sounding rockets with diameters of 3, 4, and 6 in. (7.6, 10.2, and 15.2 cm) have been flown, but Peregrine at a diameter of 15 in. (38.1 cm) and 14,000-lb (62.3-kN) thrust is by far the largest system ever attempted and will be one of the largest hybrids ever flown. Successful Peregrine flights will set the stage for a wide range of applications of this technology.

  11. What fuel for a rocket?

    CERN Document Server

    Miranda, E N

    2012-01-01

    Elementary concepts from general physics and thermodynamics have been used to analyze rocket propulsion. Making some reasonable assumptions, an expression for the exit velocity of the gases is found. From that expression one can conclude what are the desired properties for a rocket fuel.

  12. Rocketdyne/Westinghouse nuclear thermal rocket engine modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: systems approach needed for nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) design optimization; generic NTR engine power balance codes; rocketdyne nuclear thermal system code; software capabilities; steady state model; NTR engine optimizer code-logic; reactor power calculation logic; sample multi-component configuration; NTR design code output; generic NTR code at Rocketdyne; Rocketdyne NTR model; and nuclear thermal rocket modeling directions.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmentation of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    Detonation Rocket-Induced MHD Ejector (PDRIME) concept, energy could be extracted from the high speed portion of the system, e.g., through an MHD...but with some challenges associated with achieving these gains, suggesting further analysis and optimization are required. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16...mentation, such as in the Pulse Detonation Rocket-Induced MHD Ejector (PDRIME) concept, energy could be extracted from the high speed por- tion of the system

  14. Simulation and experimental research on line throwing rocket with flight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-bin GU; Ming LU; Jian-qing LIU; Qin-xing DONG; Zhen-xiong WANG; Jiang-hai CHEN

    2014-01-01

    The finite segment method is used to model the line throwing rocket system. A dynamic model of line throwing rocket with flight motion based on Kane’s method is presented by the kinematics description of the system and the consideration of the forces acting on the system. The experiment designed according to the parameters of the dynamic model is made. The simulation and experiment results, such as range, velocity and flight time, are compared and analyzed. The simulation results are basically agreed with the test data, which shows that the flight motion of the line throwing rocket can be predicted by the dynamic model. A theoretical model and guide for the further research on the disturbance of rope and the guidance, flight control of line throwing rocket are provided by the dynamic modeling.

  15. Optimization of Construction of the rocket-assisted projectile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkhipov Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New scheme of the rocket motor of rocket-assisted projectile providing the increase in distance of flight due to controlled and optimal delay time of ignition of the solid-propellant charge of the SRM and increase in reliability of initiation of the SRM by means of the autonomous system of ignition excluding the influence of high pressure gases of the propellant charge in the gun barrel has been considered. Results of the analysis of effectiveness of using of the ignition delay device on motion characteristics of the rocket-assisted projectile has been presented.

  16. US Rocket Propulsion Industrial Base Health Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doreswamy, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    The number of active liquid rocket engine and solid rocket motor development programs has severely declined since the "space race" of the 1950s and 1960s center dot This downward trend has been exacerbated by the retirement of the Space Shuttle, transition from the Constellation Program to the Space launch System (SLS) and similar activity in DoD programs center dot In addition with consolidation in the industry, the rocket propulsion industrial base is under stress. To Improve the "health" of the RPIB, we need to understand - The current condition of the RPIB - How this compares to past history - The trend of RPIB health center dot This drives the need for a concise set of "metrics" - Analogous to the basic data a physician uses to determine the state of health of his patients - Easy to measure and collect - The trend is often more useful than the actual data point - Can be used to focus on problem areas and develop preventative measures The nation's capability to conceive, design, develop, manufacture, test, and support missions using liquid rocket engines and solid rocket motors that are critical to its national security, economic health and growth, and future scientific needs. center dot The RPIB encompasses US government, academic, and commercial (including industry primes and their supplier base) research, development, test, evaluation, and manufacturing capabilities and facilities. center dot The RPIB includes the skilled workforce, related intellectual property, engineering and support services, and supply chain operations and management. This definition touches the five main segments of the U.S. RPIB as categorized by the USG: defense, intelligence community, civil government, academia, and commercial sector. The nation's capability to conceive, design, develop, manufacture, test, and support missions using liquid rocket engines and solid rocket motors that are critical to its national security, economic health and growth, and future scientific needs

  17. Three validation methods of SCIAMACHY and MIPAS-E data with DOAS measurements obtained by the GASCOD/A4π spectrometer on board the Geophysica-M55 aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanelli, G.; Redaelli, G.; Petritoli, A.; Bortoli, D.; Kostadinov, I.; Ravegnani, F.

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present three methods for the validation of the SCIAMACHY and MIPAS-E data using the UV/Vis. DOAS spectrometer, called GASCOD/A4π, installed on board the Geophysica M-55 aircraft, which can fly up to 20 km of altitude. The first method is the classic one of the cross-crossing that requires the temporal and spatial simultaneity of the measurements on board both the ENVISAT-1 satellite and the M55 aircraft. The second one is based on a Lagrangian approach, which allows for the identification of the best flight trajectory of the M55, on the basis of the dynamic and chemical "history" of the air masses at the aircraft altitude. In this case the comparison can be extended for longer time periods. The latter method is proposed to validate the tropospheric amounts of O3 and NO2. In fact, from SCIAMACHY data it can be possible to infer the tropospheric amounts of minor gases subtracting the stratospheric column, detected with limb measurements, from the total column obtained with subsequent nadir measurements. In the GASCOD/A4π data the tropospheric gases amounts are directly observed by means of the nadir measurements, if the flight altitude is close up the tropopause level. Especially the latter two methods can be consider innovative techniques in the field of satellite data validation.

  18. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  19. Submillimetre-sized dust aggregate collision and growth properties. Experimental study of a multi-particle system on a suborbital rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, J.; Heißelmann, D.; Kothe, S.; Weidling, R.; Blum, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. In the very first steps of the formation of a new planetary system, dust agglomerates grow inside the protoplanetary disk that rotates around the newly formed star. In this disk, collisions between the dust particles, induced by interactions with the surrounding gas, lead to sticking. Aggregates start growing until their sizes and relative velocities are high enough for collisions to result in bouncing or fragmentation. With the aim of investigating the transitions between sticking and bouncing regimes for colliding dust aggregates and the formation of clusters from multiple aggregates, the Suborbital Particle and Aggregation Experiment (SPACE) was flown on the REXUS 12 suborbital rocket. Aims: The collisional and sticking properties of sub-mm-sized aggregates composed of protoplanetary dust analogue material are measured, including the statistical threshold velocity between sticking and bouncing, their surface energy and tensile strength within aggregate clusters. Methods: We performed an experiment on the REXUS 12 suborbital rocket. The protoplanetary dust analogue materials were micrometre-sized monodisperse and polydisperse SiO2 particles prepared into aggregates with sizes around 120 μm and 330 μm, respectively and volume filling factors around 0.37. During the experimental run of 150 s under reduced gravity conditions, the sticking of aggregates and the formation and fragmentation of clusters of up to a few millimetres in size was observed. Results: The sticking probability of the sub-mm-sized dust aggregates could be derived for velocities decreasing from ~22 to 3 cm s-1. The transition from bouncing to sticking collisions happened at 12.7+2.1-1.4 cm s-1 for the smaller aggregates composed of monodisperse particles and at 11.5+1.9-1.3 and 11.7+1.9-1.3 cm s-1 for the larger aggregates composed of mono- and polydisperse dust particles, respectively. Using the pull-off force of sub-mm-sized dust aggregates from the clusters, the surface energy of the

  20. Water rocket - Electrolysis propulsion and fuel cell power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, P H; Dittman, M D; Kare, J T; Militsky, F; Myers, B; Weisberg, A H

    1999-07-24

    Water Rocket is the collective name for an integrated set of technologies that offer new options for spacecraft propulsion, power, energy storage, and structure. Low pressure water stored on the spacecraft is electrolyzed to generate, separate, and pressurize gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. These gases, stored in lightweight pressure tanks, can be burned to generate thrust or recombined to produce electric power. As a rocket propulsion system, Water Rocket provides the highest feasible chemical specific impulse (-400 seconds). Even higher specific impulse propulsion can be achieved by combining Water Rocket with other advanced propulsion technologies, such as arcjet or electric thrusters. With innovative pressure tank technology, Water Rocket's specific energy [Wh/kg] can exceed that of the best foreseeable batteries by an order of magnitude, and the tanks can often serve as vehicle structural elements. For pulsed power applications, Water Rocket propellants can be used to drive very high power density generators, such as MHD devices or detonation-driven pulse generators. A space vehicle using Water Rocket propulsion can be totally inert and non-hazardous during assembly and launch. These features are particularly important for the timely development and flight qualification of new classes of spacecraft, such as microsats, nanosats, and refuelable spacecraft.

  1. Turbopump Design and Analysis Approach for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-cheng S.; Veres, Joseph P.; Fittje, James E.

    2006-01-01

    A rocket propulsion system, whether it is a chemical rocket or a nuclear thermal rocket, is fairly complex in detail but rather simple in principle. Among all the interacting parts, three components stand out: they are pumps and turbines (turbopumps), and the thrust chamber. To obtain an understanding of the overall rocket propulsion system characteristics, one starts from analyzing the interactions among these three components. It is therefore of utmost importance to be able to satisfactorily characterize the turbopump, level by level, at all phases of a vehicle design cycle. Here at NASA Glenn Research Center, as the starting phase of a rocket engine design, specifically a Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine design, we adopted the approach of using a high level system cycle analysis code (NESS) to obtain an initial analysis of the operational characteristics of a turbopump required in the propulsion system. A set of turbopump design codes (PumpDes and TurbDes) were then executed to obtain sizing and performance characteristics of the turbopump that were consistent with the mission requirements. A set of turbopump analyses codes (PUMPA and TURBA) were applied to obtain the full performance map for each of the turbopump components; a two dimensional layout of the turbopump based on these mean line analyses was also generated. Adequacy of the turbopump conceptual design will later be determined by further analyses and evaluation. In this paper, descriptions and discussions of the aforementioned approach are provided and future outlooks are discussed.

  2. Turbopump Design and Analysis Approach for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Cheng S.; Veres, Joseph P.; Fittje, James E.

    2006-01-01

    A rocket propulsion system, whether it is a chemical rocket or a nuclear thermal rocket, is fairly complex in detail but rather simple in principle. Among all the interacting parts, three components stand out: they are pumps & turbines (turbopumps), and the thrust chamber. To obtain an understanding of the overall rocket propulsion system characteristics, one starts from analyzing the interactions among these three components. It is therefore of utmost importance to be able to satisfactorily characterize the turbopump, level by level, at all phases of a vehicle design cycle. Here at the NASA Glenn Research Center, as the starting phase of a rocket engine design, specifically a Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine design, we adopted the approach of using a high level system cycle analysis code (NESS) to obtain an initial analysis of the operational characteristics of a turbopump required in the propulsion system. A set of turbopump design codes (PumpDes and TurbDes) were then executed to obtain sizing and performance parameters of the turbopump that were consistent with the mission requirements. A set of turbopump analyses codes (PUMPA and TURBA) were applied to obtain the full performance map for each of the turbopump components; a two dimensional layout of the turbopump based on these mean line analyses was also generated. Adequacy of the turbopump conceptual design will later be determined by further analyses and evaluation. In this paper, descriptions and discussions of the aforementioned approach are provided and future outlooks are discussed.

  3. 高精度小型固体火箭发动机184性能检测系统研究%Research on the Performance Detecting System of High-precision Small-scale Solid Rocket Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯喜平; 董韬; 李进贤; 曹琪

    2011-01-01

    针对固体火箭发动机研制和生产中的性能检测需求,基于柔性试验架建立试验平台,采用虚拟仪器技术搭建测控平台,使用LabvieW7.1开发一套包含参数标定、数据测量、数据处理等模块的固体火箭发动机性能检测试验测控软件,构建了固体火箭发动机性能检测系统。通过对标准发动机进行测试,结果表明:该系统实现了发动机参数的现场方便标定、发动机数据的高速采集和实验数据的快速处理,测量精度达到0.3%的工程要求,并同步监测了整个发动机的工作过程,满足了发动机性能检测的高精度要求。%According to the performance detecting requirements in development and manufacture of solid rocket motor, a test platform has been set up based on flexible test stand, in which the measurement and control platform has been built using virtual instrument technology ; a set of solid rocket motor ground test performance detecting software including parameter calibration model, data measure model and data processing model have been developed based on the LabViewT. 1 ; and the solid rocket motor performance detecting system was built. The application results through testing normative solid rocket motor show that: this system could actualize parameter calibration expediently, experimental data collection and processing rapidly, even reach the measurement precision by 0.3% required in projects and could monitor the testing process of solid rocket motor simultaneously, which satisfied high-precision requirements of motor performance detection.

  4. Rocket plume tomography of combustion species

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Interest in accurate detection and targeting of aggressor missiles has received considerable interest with the national priority of developing a missile defense system. Understanding the thermal signatures of the exhaust plumes of such missiles is key to accomplishing that mission. Before signature models can be precisely developed for specific rockets, the radiation of the molecular or combustion species within those plumes must be accurately predicted. A combination translation / rotation s...

  5. Laser Ignition Technology for Bi-Propellant Rocket Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Matt; Bossard, John; Early, Jim; Trinh, Huu; Dennis, Jay; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of laser ignition technology for bipropellant rocket engines applications. The objectives of this project include: (1) the selection test chambers and flows; (2) definition of the laser ignition setup; (3) pulse format optimization; (4) fiber optic coupled laser ignition system analysis; and (5) chamber integration issues definition. The testing concludes that rocket combustion chamber laser ignition is imminent. Support technologies (multiplexing, window durability/cleaning, and fiber optic durability) are feasible.

  6. Solar Rocket System Concept Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    seconds. A stage mass fraction of 0.80 was used to pre- pare this curve. More precise mass fractions were computed and are discussed in Section 8.0...as heliostat mirrors, are thereby avoided. Additional versions of the selected collector/vehicle concept are shown in Section 7.0, Spacecraft Design...plane de-orbit operations would be approximately 7000 fps. Precision orbit maintenance or special orbit positioning missions can be performed by the

  7. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Forecasting method is a normative forecasting technique that allows the designer to quantify the effects of adding new technologies on a given design. This method can be used to assess and identify the necessary technological improvements needed to close the gap that exists between the current design and one that satisfies all constraints imposed on the design. The TIF methodology allows for more design knowledge to be brought to the earlier phases of the design process, making use of tools such as Quality Function Deployments, Morphological Matrices, Response Surface Methodology, and Monte Carlo Simulations.2 This increased knowledge allows for more informed decisions to be made earlier in the design process, resulting in shortened design cycle time. This paper will investigate applying the TIF method, which has been widely used in aircraft applications, to the conceptual design of a hydrocarbon rocket engine. In order to reinstate a manned presence in space, the U.S. must develop an affordable and sustainable launch capability. Hydrocarbon-fueled rockets have drawn interest from numerous major government and commercial entities because they offer a low-cost heavy-lift option that would allow for frequent launches1. However, the development of effective new hydrocarbon rockets would likely require new technologies in order to overcome certain design constraints. The use of advanced design methods, such as the TIF method, enables the designer to identify key areas in need of improvement, allowing one to dial in a proposed technology and assess its impact on the system. Through analyses such as this one, a conceptual design for a hydrocarbon-fueled vehicle that meets all imposed requirements can be achieved.

  8. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J.

    2008-01-01

    To support a potential future development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components could be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts.

  9. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    To support the eventual development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts.

  10. British used Congreve Rockets to Attack Napoleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Sir William Congreve developed a rocket with a range of about 9,000 feet. The incendiary rocket used black powder, an iron case, and a 16-foot guide stick. In 1806, British used Congreve rockets to attack Napoleon's headquarters in France. In 1807, Congreve directed a rocket attack against Copenhagen.

  11. Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket (APTR) is a novel concept for propulsion of space exploration or orbit transfer vehicles. APTR propulsion is provided by...

  12. Portable measurement and control system of rocket motor ground experiment%便携式火箭发动机地面试验测量与控制系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新田; 俞南嘉; 李君海; 蔡国飙

    2012-01-01

    根据火箭发动机地面试验对测量与控制的要求,设计了一套用于火箭发动机地面试验数据采集与控制的便携式测控系统.测控系统硬件基于NI(National Instruments)公司的USB(universal serial BUS)数据采集与控制设备开发,集测量与控制功能于一体,便携性好,通用性强;软件基于模块化设计思想,采用LabVIEW编程环境开发,人机交互界面友好,通用性强,可扩展性好.该测控系统平台已成功应用于多次发动机地面试验,能满足多种类型的火箭发动机试验对测控的需求.%A set of portable measurement and control system of rocket motor ground ex- periment was proposed. It was designed according to the requirements of rocket engine ground test. Based on NI (National Instruments) USB (universal serial BUS) data acquisi- tion device development, the system, portable and universal, was integrated with both measurement and control functions. Using the LabVIEW as the development environment, the software of the system, adopted with modularization ideology, gave a friendly human machine interface and was easy to expand. The system has been successfully used in several experiments and it can satisfy the requests of different types of rocket motor experiments.

  13. The development of space solid rocket motors in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianding, Huang; Dingyou, Ye

    1997-01-01

    China has undertaken to research and develop composite solid propellant rocket motors since 1958. At the request of the development of space technology, composite solid propellant rocket motor has developed from small to large, step by step. For the past thirty eight years, much progress has made, many technical obstacles, such as motor design, case materials and their processing technology, propellant formulations and manufacture, nozzles and thrust vector control, safe ignition, environment tests, nondestructive inspection and quality assurance, static firing test and measurement etc. have been solved. A serial of solid rocket motors have been offered for China's satellites launch. The systems of research, design, test and manufacture of solid rocket motors have been formed.

  14. NASA Space Rocket Logistics Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, James R.; Jones, James V.; Watson, Michael D.; Bramon, Christopher J.; Inman, Sharon K.; Tuttle, Loraine

    2014-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is the new NASA heavy lift launch vehicle and is scheduled for its first mission in 2017. The goal of the first mission, which will be uncrewed, is to demonstrate the integrated system performance of the SLS rocket and spacecraft before a crewed flight in 2021. SLS has many of the same logistics challenges as any other large scale program. Common logistics concerns for SLS include integration of discreet programs geographically separated, multiple prime contractors with distinct and different goals, schedule pressures and funding constraints. However, SLS also faces unique challenges. The new program is a confluence of new hardware and heritage, with heritage hardware constituting seventy-five percent of the program. This unique approach to design makes logistics concerns such as commonality especially problematic. Additionally, a very low manifest rate of one flight every four years makes logistics comparatively expensive. That, along with the SLS architecture being developed using a block upgrade evolutionary approach, exacerbates long-range planning for supportability considerations. These common and unique logistics challenges must be clearly identified and tackled to allow SLS to have a successful program. This paper will address the common and unique challenges facing the SLS programs, along with the analysis and decisions the NASA Logistics engineers are making to mitigate the threats posed by each.

  15. Analysis of Rocket Weapon System Decision Based on Virtual Simulation%基于虚拟仿真的火箭武器系统决策分析法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付昆; 于存贵

    2011-01-01

    In view of the defects in classical expert system exist that the lack of dynamic prediction function and principium illumination problem, an improved frame work of multiple rocket weapon expert system based on virtual simulation model is proposed. By building the virtual simulation model, and multiple rocket launch weapon system performance without servo system control, process control and intermittent control three control mode of the simulation analysis, and taking an example calculation. The results show that the model is feasible and effective, can provide an efficient and intuitionistic new way for solve the weapon system analysis.%针对传统武器专家系统缺少动态预测功能和机理性解释的问题,提出基于虚拟样机仿真的多管火箭武器专家系统集成框架,建立仿真模型,对多管火箭武器发射系统性能进行没有伺服系统控制、全过程控制和间断性控制3种控制方式的仿真分析,并通过实例进行演算.结果表明:该模型是可行、有效的,可为解决武器系统分析提供一种有效、直观的新途径.

  16. Produtividade de alface e rúcula, em sistema consorciado, sob adubação orgânica e mineral Productivity of lettuce and rocket in intercropping system under organic and mineral fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Q de Oliveira

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Foram realizados dois experimentos em Lavras-MG, nos meses de abril a setembro de 2006. Para cada experimento, utilizou-se o delineamento de blocos completos casualizados, com cinco tratamentos e quatro repetições. Os tratamentos consistiram de quatro arranjos espaciais entre as culturas da alface (A e rúcula (R, plantadas em fileiras alternadas 1A:1R; fileiras duplas alternadas 2A:2R; fileiras triplas alternadas 3A:3R e quatro fileiras alternadas 4A:4R e, alface e rúcula em cultivo solteiro. Avaliou-se o diâmetro (alface, altura, número de folhas por planta, rendimento de folhas e massa seca da parte aérea da alface e rúcula. Os maiores rendimentos de folhas da alface foram registrados no cultivo orgânico. O rendimento de massa verde da rúcula, no sistema solteiro sobressaiu-se dos demais, embora estatisticamente semelhante aos arranjos espaciais 3A:3R e 4A:4R no número de folhas. No cultivo orgânico, diferenças significativas entre o primeiro e o segundo ciclo da rúcula expressaram-se na altura de plantas e na massa seca da parte aérea, com a maior altura média no primeiro cultivo e a maior quantidade de massa seca da parte aérea na rebrota. Os consórcios da alface e rúcula nos arranjos espaciais 1A:1R e 3A:3R tiveram a maior eficiência do uso da área (EUA, de 55 e 63%, respectivamente, no sistema de cultivo orgânico. A eficiência biológica aumentou para 62 e 70% nestes mesmos arranjos, com o cultivo da rebrota da rúcula no sistema orgânico. Todas as associações da alface e rúcula, assim como os seus cultivos solteiros tiveram melhor desempenho produtivo sob a adubação orgânica. A rebrota da rúcula aumentou a eficiência agronômica do sistema consorciado.Two experiments were carried out at Federal University of Lavras Minas Gerais State, Brazil, from April to September, 2006, aiming to evaluate the lettuce and rocket intercropping system, under organic and mineral fertilization in different spatial

  17. Digital Machining System for Nozzle Cooling Channel of Large Liquid Rocket Engine%大型液体火箭发动机喷管数字化铣槽加工系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永青; 刘海波; 李护林; 贾振元

    2012-01-01

    Rocket nozzle is a key structural part of high-thrust liquid rocket engine. There are a hundreds of cooling channels around the nozzle, to ensure the reliable cooling and preheat the fuel. However, it is very difficult to machine the cooling channel due to large size, complex profile, low rigidity, etc. In this article, an integrated digital method for cooling channel machining composed of profile measuring, data processing and channel milling is proposed. Because of large difference between the actual contour and the design model, the channel bottom should be redesigned by using the measured geometric information. Therefore, the varying-thickness and varying-depth cooling channel of nozzle with high order contour or parametric shapes can be machined. Further, a special digital machining system is developed based on an open numerical control platform for the dual-channel vertical milling machine. Finally, an experiment utilizing a typical rocket nozzle is implemented to verify the feasibility of the system. It has been proved that the digital machining system can meet the machining requirements for liquid rocket engine nozzle.%针对大型液体火箭发动机喷管几何尺寸大、廓形复杂、结构刚度低致使其冷却通道加工质量难以保证的难题,提出一种集“测量-数据处理-铣槽”于一体的喷管冷却通道数字化加工新方法,并在开放式数控平台上开发出喷管专用数字化铣槽加工系统.该方法利用喷管几何外廓的实际测量信息再设计出槽底曲面,进而实现高次曲线或参数曲线廓形、变壁厚变槽深喷管冷却通道的数字化加工.通过某型号火箭发动喷管的实际加工,表明所研制的双通道立式铣槽加工专用装备与系统可满足我国新一代大推力液体火箭发动机喷管冷却通道高质量、高效、高可靠的制造要求.

  18. Design of Solid-fuel Rocket Attitude Control System Based on Monte Carlo Method%基于蒙特卡罗方法的固体火箭姿态控制系统设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王辰琳; 赵长见; 宋志国

    2016-01-01

    在固体火箭姿态控制系统设计过程中,为保证设计结果的可靠性,需要针对发动机性能、全箭质量及气动参数等进行拉偏仿真分析,各项偏差的大小及使用方法直接影响对固体火箭控制能力的需求。传统固体火箭姿态控制系统设计时,一般针对各项偏差进行极限拉偏组合仿真,导致设计结果较为保守。针对总体各项偏差量,建立概率模型,采用蒙特卡罗方法进行控制力分析。数学仿真结果表明,相比传统设计方法,在保证系统具有一定的可靠度情况下,大幅降低了对姿态控制系统的需求,优化了系统方案。%In the design process of solid-fuel rocket attitude control system, it is necessary to simulate based on population deviations of engine performance, whole solid-fuel rocket mass and aerodynamic parameter in order to assure the reliability of design results, because the using method of deviation factors are accounted for the demand of solid-fuel rocket control. The extreme value of population deviations are taken in the traditional design method, but it leads to more conservative design results. The probability models of population deviations are established, and then Monte Carlo methods are introduced to analysis the controlling force. The simulated results show that, compared to the traditional design method, the probability design method reduces the demand of solid-fuel rocket attitude control system and optimizes the system design scheme obviously.

  19. Computational simulation of liquid rocket injector anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekwas, A. J.; Singhal, A. K.; Tam, L. T.; Davidian, K.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model has been developed to analyze the three-dimensional two-phase reactive flows in liquid fueled rocket combustors. The model is designed to study the influence of liquid propellant injection nonuniformities on the flow pattern, combustion and heat transfer within the combustor. The Eulerian-Lagrangian approach for simulating polidisperse spray flow, evaporation and combustion has been used. Full coupling between the phases is accounted for. A nonorthogonal, body fitted coordinate system along with a conservative control volume formulation is employed. The physical models built into the model include a kappa-epsilon turbulence model, a two-step chemical reaction, and the six-flux radiation model. Semiempirical models are used to describe all interphase coupling terms as well as chemical reaction rates. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate an analytical capability to predict the effects of reactant injection nonuniformities (injection anomalies) on combustion and heat transfer within the rocket combustion chamber. The results show promising application of the model to comprehensive modeling of liquid propellant rocket engines.

  20. Environmentally compatible solid rocket propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacox, James L.; Bradford, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Hercules' clean propellant development research is exploring three major types of clean propellant: (1) chloride-free formulations (no chlorine containing ingredients), being developed on the Clean Propellant Development and Demonstration (CPDD) contract sponsored by Phillips Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA; (2) low HCl scavenged formulations (HCl-scavenger added to propellant oxidized with ammonium perchlorate (AP)); and (3) low HCl formulations oxidized with a combination of AN and AP (with or without an HCl scavenger) to provide a significant reduction (relative to current solid rocket boosters) in exhaust HCl. These propellants provide performance approaching that of current systems, with less than 2 percent HCl in the exhaust, a significant reduction (greater than or equal to 70 percent) in exhaust HCl levels. Excellent processing, safety, and mechanical properties were achieved using only readily available, low cost ingredients. Two formulations, a sodium nitrate (NaNO3) scavenged HTPB and a chloride-free hydroxy terminated polyether (HTPE) propellant, were characterized for ballistic, mechanical, and rheological properties. In addition, the hazards properties were demonstrated to provide two families of class 1.3, 'zero-card' propellants. Further characterization is planned which includes demonstration of ballistic tailorability in subscale (one to 70 pound) motors over the range of burn rates required for retrofit into current Hercules space booster designs (Titan 4 SRMU and Delta 2 GEM).

  1. NASA's Advanced solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) will not only bring increased safety, reliability and performance for the Space Shuttle Booster, it will enhance overall Shuttle safety by effectively eliminating 174 failure points in the Space Shuttle Main Engine throttling system and by reducing the exposure time to aborts due to main engine loss or shutdown. In some missions, the vulnerability time to Return-to-Launch Site aborts is halved. The ASRM uses case joints which will close or remain static under the effects of motor ignition and pressurization. The case itself is constructed of the weldable steel alloy HP 9-4-0.30, having very high strength and with superior fracture toughness and stress corrosion resistance. The internal insulation is strip-wound and is free of asbestos. The nozzle employs light weight ablative parts and is some 5,000 pounds lighter than the Shuttle motor used to date. The payload performance of the ASRM-powered Shuttle is 12,000 pounds higher than that provided by the present motor. This is of particular benefit for payloads delivered to higher inclinations and/or altitudes. The ASRM facility uses state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, including continuous propellant mixing and direct casting.

  2. NASA's Advanced solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) will not only bring increased safety, reliability and performance for the Space Shuttle Booster, it will enhance overall Shuttle safety by effectively eliminating 174 failure points in the Space Shuttle Main Engine throttling system and by reducing the exposure time to aborts due to main engine loss or shutdown. In some missions, the vulnerability time to Return-to-Launch Site aborts is halved. The ASRM uses case joints which will close or remain static under the effects of motor ignition and pressurization. The case itself is constructed of the weldable steel alloy HP 9-4-0.30, having very high strength and with superior fracture toughness and stress corrosion resistance. The internal insulation is strip-wound and is free of asbestos. The nozzle employs light weight ablative parts and is some 5,000 pounds lighter than the Shuttle motor used to date. The payload performance of the ASRM-powered Shuttle is 12,000 pounds higher than that provided by the present motor. This is of particular benefit for payloads delivered to higher inclinations and/or altitudes. The ASRM facility uses state-of-the-art manufacturing techniques, including continuous propellant mixing and direct casting.

  3. Design Study: Rocket Based MHD Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report addresses the technical feasibility and design of a rocket based MHD generator using a sub-scale LOx/RP rocket motor. The design study was constrained by assuming the generator must function within the performance and structural limits of an existing magnet and by assuming realistic limits on (1) the axial electric field, (2) the Hall parameter, (3) current density, and (4) heat flux (given the criteria of heat sink operation). The major results of the work are summarized as follows: (1) A Faraday type of generator with rectangular cross section is designed to operate with a combustor pressure of 300 psi. Based on a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla, the electrical power output from this generator is estimated to be 54.2 KW with potassium seed (weight fraction 3.74%) and 92 KW with cesium seed (weight fraction 9.66%). The former corresponds to a enthalpy extraction ratio of 2.36% while that for the latter is 4.16%; (2) A conceptual design of the Faraday MHD channel is proposed, based on a maximum operating time of 10 to 15 seconds. This concept utilizes a phenolic back wall for inserting the electrodes and inter-electrode insulators. Copper electrode and aluminum oxide insulator are suggested for this channel; and (3) A testing configuration for the sub-scale rocket based MHD system is proposed. An estimate of performance of an ideal rocket based MHD accelerator is performed. With a current density constraint of 5 Amps/cm(exp 2) and a conductivity of 30 Siemens/m, the push power density can be 250, 431, and 750 MW/m(sup 3) when the induced voltage uB have values of 5, 10, and 15 KV/m, respectively.

  4. Solar thermal rocket engine (STRE) thrust characteristics at the change of engine operation mode and of the flight vehicle attitude in the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrin, O. I.

    1993-10-01

    Relationships are presented which describe changes in the thrust and specific impulse of a solar thermal rocket engine due to a change in the flow rate of the working fluid (hydrogen). Expressions are also presented which describe the variation of the STRE thrust and specific impulse with the distance between the flight vehicle and the sun. Results of calculations are presented for an STRE with afterburning of the working fluid (hydrogen + oxygen) using hydrogen heating by solar energy to a temperature of 2360 K.

  5. Technical and educational improvements of the Student Rocket Program at NAROM and Andøya Rocket Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylund, Amund; Rønningen, Jan-Erik

    2007-06-01

    Norwegian Centre for Space-Related Education (NAROM) is co-located with Andøya Rocket Range (ARR) and was established in 2000 as a field station for space-related education. The Student Rocket Program (SRP) was introduced to give the students hands-on experience and a comprehensive introduction to an ordinary scientific rocket launch. NAROM and ARR have since 1998 developed and launched more than 30 student rockets. Since summer 2005 the SRP has been significantly improved with a more powerful rocket motor and a new telemetry system. With these technical improvements, NAROM can introduce new challenges for the students concerning rocket technique, instrumentation, telemetry and data processing. It has also opened possibilities for new pedagogical improvements in terms of a larger curriculum, more use of the ARR infrastructure and making the SRP more adapted to the different participants' qualifications and background. But even though the SRP has been significantly improved during the last years, the program still is in continuously development, making the SRP at NAROM and ARR a unique educational activity for students at different levels of education.

  6. Rocket Science 101 Interactive Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Dennis; Funkhouse, Deborah; DiMarzio, Donald

    2007-01-01

    To better educate the public on the basic design of NASA s current mission rockets, Rocket Science 101 software has been developed as an interactive program designed to retain a user s attention and to teach about basic rocket parts. This program also has helped to expand NASA's presence on the Web regarding educating the public about the Agency s goals and accomplishments. The software was designed using Macromedia s Flash 8. It allows the user to select which type of rocket they want to learn about, interact with the basic parts, assemble the parts to create the whole rocket, and then review the basic flight profile of the rocket they have built.

  7. Rocket-Powered Parachutes Rescue Entire Planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Langley Research Center helped BRS Aerospace, of Saint Paul, Minnesota, to develop technology that has saved 246 lives to date. The company s whole aircraft parachute systems deploy in less than 1 second thanks to solid rocket motors and are capable of arresting the descent of a small aircraft, lowering it safely to the ground. BRS has sold more than 30,000 systems worldwide, and the technology is now standard equipment on many of the world s top-selling aircraft. Parachutes for larger airplanes are in the works.

  8. Nuclear thermal rocket engine operation and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Stanley V.; Savoie, Margarita T.; Hundal, Rolv

    1993-06-01

    The operation of a typical Rover/Nerva-derived nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engine is characterized and the control requirements of the NTR are defined. A rationale for the selection of a candidate diverse redundant NTR engine control system is presented and the projected component operating requirements are related to the state of the art of candidate components and subsystems. The projected operational capabilities of the candidate system are delineated for the startup, full-thrust, shutdown, and decay heat removal phases of the engine operation.

  9. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale.

  10. Some typical solid propellant rocket motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbergen, B.T.C.

    2013-01-01

    Typical Solid Propellant Rocket Motors (shortly referred to as Solid Rocket Motors; SRM's) are described with the purpose to form a database, which allows for comparative analysis and applications in practical SRM engineering.

  11. Integrated Composite Rocket Nozzle Extension Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate an Integrated Composite Rocket Nozzle Extension (ICRNE) for use in rocket thrust chambers. The ICRNE will utilize an...

  12. Some typical solid propellant rocket motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbergen, B.T.C.

    2013-01-01

    Typical Solid Propellant Rocket Motors (shortly referred to as Solid Rocket Motors; SRM's) are described with the purpose to form a database, which allows for comparative analysis and applications in practical SRM engineering.

  13. Closure Letter Report for Corrective Action Unit 496: Buried Rocket Site - Antelope Lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-05-01

    A Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for investigation and closure of CAU 496, Corrective Action Site (CAS) TA-55-008-TAAL (Buried Rocket), at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), was approved by the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on July 21,2004. Approval to transfer CAS TA-55-008-TAAL from CAU 496 to CAU 4000 (No Further Action Sites) was approved by NDEP on December 21, 2005, based on the assumption that the rocket did not present any environmental concern. The approval letter included the following condition: ''NDEP understands, from the NNSA/NSO letter dated November 30,2005, that a search will be conducted for the rocket during the planned characterization of other sites at the Tonopah Test Range and, if found, the rocket will be removed as a housekeeping measure''. NDEP and U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office personnel located the rocket on Mid Lake during a site visit to TTR, and a request to transfer CAS TA-55-008-TAAL from CAU 4000 back to CAU 496 was approved by NDEP on September 11,2006. CAS TA-55-008-TAAL was added to the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' of 1996, based on an interview with a retired TTR worker in 1993. The original interview documented that a rocket was launched from Area 9 to Antelope Lake and was never recovered due to the high frequency of rocket tests being conducted during this timeframe. The interviewee recalled the rocket being an M-55 or N-55 (the M-50 ''Honest John'' rocket was used extensively at TTR from the 1960s to early 1980s). A review of previously conducted interviews with former TTR personnel indicated that the interviewees confused information from several sites. The location of the CAU 496 rocket on Mid Lake is directly south of the TTR rocket launch facility in Area 9 and is consistent with information gathered on the lost rocket during recent

  14. 'RCHX-1-STORM' first Slovenian meteorological rocket program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstein, Aleksander; Matko, Drago; Trauner, Amalija; Britovšek, Zvone

    2004-08-01

    Astronautic and Rocket Society Celje (ARSC) formed a special working team for research and development of a small meteorological hail suppression rocket in the 70th. The hail suppression system was established in former Yugoslavia in the late 60th as an attempt to protect important agricultural regions from one of the summer's most vicious storm. In this time Slovenia was a part of Yugoslavia as one of the federal republic with relative high developed agricultural region production. The Rocket program 'RCHX-STORM' was a second attempt, for Slovenia indigenously developed in the production of meteorological hail suppression rocket. ARSC has designed a family of small sounding rocket that were based on highly promising hybrid propellant propulsion. Hybrid propulsion was selected for this family because it was offering low cost, save production and operation and simple logistics. Conventional sounding rockets use solid propellant motor for their propulsion. The introduction of hybrid motors has enabled a considerable decrease in overall cost. The transportation handling and storage procedures were greatly simplified due to the fact that a hybrid motor was not considered as explosive matter. A hybrid motor may also be designed to stand a severe environment without resorting to conditioning arrangements. The program started in the late 70th when the team ARSC was integrated in the Research and Development Institute in Celje (RDIC). The development program aimed to produce three types of meteorological rockets with diameters 76, 120 and 160 mm. Development of the RCHX-76 engine and rocket vehicle including flight certification has been undertaken by a joint team comprising of the ARCS, RDIC and the company Cestno podjetje Celje (CPC), Road building company Celje. Many new techniques and methods were used in this program such as computer simulation of external and internal ballistics, composite materials for rocket construction, intensive static testing of models and

  15. Complete Sequence of a F33:A-:B- Conjugative Plasmid Carrying the oqxAB, fosA3 and blaCTX-M-55 Elements from a Foodborne Escherichia coli Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ho-yin Wong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the complete sequence of pE80, a conjugative IncFII plasmid recovered from an E. coli strain isolated from chicken meat. This plasmid harbors multiple resistance determinants including oqxAB, fosA3, blaCTX-M-55 and blaTEM-1, and is a close variant of the recently reported p42-2 element, which was recovered from E. coli of veterinary source. Recovery of pE80 constitutes evidence that evolution or genetic re-arrangement of IncFII type plasmids residing in animal-borne organisms is an active event, which involves acquisition and integration of foreign resistance elements into the plasmid backbone. Dissemination of these plasmids may further compromise the effectiveness of current antimicrobial strategies.

  16. Summarization on variable liquid thrust rocket engines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The technology actuality and development trend of variable thrust rocket engines at home and abroad are summarized. Key technologies of developing variable thrust rocket engines are analyzed. Development advices on developing variable thrust rocket engines that are adapted to the situation of our country are brought forward.

  17. Nuclear-Thermal Rocket Orbits Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-01-01

    Originally investigated in the 1960's by Marshall Space Flight Center plarners as part of the Nuclear Energy for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) program, nuclear-thermal rocket propulsion has been more recently considered in spacecraft designs for interplanetary human exploration. This artist's concept illustrates a nuclear-thermal rocket with an aerobrake disk as it orbits Mars.

  18. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  19. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  20. Software for Collaborative Engineering of Launch Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Thomas Troy

    2003-01-01

    The Rocket Evaluation and Cost Integration for Propulsion and Engineering software enables collaborative computing with automated exchange of information in the design and analysis of launch rockets and other complex systems. RECIPE can interact with and incorporate a variety of programs, including legacy codes, that model aspects of a system from the perspectives of different technological disciplines (e.g., aerodynamics, structures, propulsion, trajectory, aeroheating, controls, and operations) and that are used by different engineers on different computers running different operating systems. RECIPE consists mainly of (1) ISCRM a file-transfer subprogram that makes it possible for legacy codes executed in their original operating systems on their original computers to exchange data and (2) CONES an easy-to-use filewrapper subprogram that enables the integration of legacy codes. RECIPE provides a tightly integrated conceptual framework that emphasizes connectivity among the programs used by the collaborators, linking these programs in a manner that provides some configuration control while facilitating collaborative engineering tradeoff studies, including design to cost studies. In comparison with prior collaborative-engineering schemes, one based on the use of RECIPE enables fewer engineers to do more in less time.

  1. Analytical study of nozzle performance for nuclear thermal rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A parametric study has been conducted by the NASA-Lewis Rocket Engine Design Expert System for the convergent-divergent nozzle of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket system, which uses a nuclear reactor to heat hydrogen to high temperature and then expands it through the nozzle. It is established by the study that finite-rate chemical reactions lower performance levels from theoretical levels. Major parametric roles are played by chamber temperature and chamber pressure. A maximum performance of 930 sec is projected at 2700 K, and of 1030 at 3100 K.

  2. 远程火箭炮通信控制机故障模式及影响分析%Failure Mode and Effect Analysis of Communication Controller of the Long-range Rocket Launcher System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    靳树昌; 胡俊

    2014-01-01

    A communication controller is the kernel equipment of the communication system in a long-range rocket launcher system.As a kind of electronic communication equipment,its failure mechanism is very complex,this brings about enormous difficulties to the fault diagnosis and maintenance support tasks of the equipment support personnel.The failure mode and the effect of the communication controller were analyzed by means of the hardware failure mode and effect analysis method,with the help of analyzing the structure,function,failure mode,failure effect of the communication controller,the failure mode and the effect analysis report of the communication controller in the long-range rocket launcher system was ac-quired.The report can provide the basis for the fault diagnosis and maintenance support of the long-range rocket launcher system.%某型通信控制机是某型远程火箭炮通信系统的核心设备。作为一种电子通信设备,其故障机理十分复杂,给装备保障人员的故障诊断及维修保障工作带来了巨大的困难。采用硬件故障模式及影响分析法对通信控制机故障模式及影响进行分析,通过通信控制机的结构分析、功能分析、故障模式分析、故障影响分析等,最后得出某型远程火箭炮通信控制机故障模式及影响分析报告。该故障模式及影响分析报告可为某型远程火箭炮通信控制机的故障诊断和维修保障提供依据。

  3. Vibration Isolation Design for the Micro-X Rocket Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danowski, M. E.; Heine, S. N. T.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Goldfinger, D.; Wikus, P.; McCammon, D.; Oakley, P.

    2016-08-01

    Micro-X is a NASA-funded sounding rocket-borne X-ray imaging spectrometer designed to enable high precision measurements of extended astrophysical systems. To perform high energy resolution measurements and capture unprecedented spectra of supernova remnants and galaxy clusters, Micro-X must maintain tight temperature control. One of the biggest challenges in payload design is to prevent heating of the detectors due to the vibrational loads on the rocket skin during launch. Several stages of vibration damping systems are implemented to prevent energy transmission from the rocket skin to the detector stage, each stage more rigid than the last. We describe recent redesign efforts to improve this vibration isolation by tuning the resonant frequencies of the various stages to minimize heating prior to the projected launch in 2016.

  4. An Eight-Parameter Function for Simulating Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooling, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    The toy model rocket is used extensively as an example of a realistic physical system. Teachers from grade school to the university level use them. Many teachers and students write computer programs to investigate rocket physics since the problem involves nonlinear functions related to air resistance and mass loss. This paper describes a nonlinear…

  5. 固体火箭发动机自动回转系统的设计与实现%Design and Implementation of Auto-rotation System for Solid Rocket Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵锴; 何敏; 于殿泓; 郑毅

    2011-01-01

    In the process of high energy X-ray radiography detection, the disadvantages of low control accuracy and difficult radiation-proof for operators exist in manually controlling the rotation of solid rocket engine. Thus, the auto-rotation system based on OMRON CQM1H PLC has been designed. Two operating modes: auto and manual are equipped in this system to implement remote and high accurate automatic rotating function for solid rocket engine. The practice shows that the system features high stability and reliability, ease maintenance, and satisfies the requirements of explosion-proof, safety and high reliability.%在对固体火箭发动机进行高能X射线照相检测的过程中,针对采用人工方式存在回转固体火箭发动机存在控制精度不高、人员辐射防护困难等问题,设计了一种基于OMRON CQM1H PLC的自动回转系统.系统具备手动和自动两种运行模式,实现了固体火箭发动机的远程、高精度和自动化回转控制功能.实际应用表明,系统稳定性好、可靠性高且易于维护,符合检测现场防爆安全和高可靠性的要求.

  6. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Radiation-Cooled Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Brian D.; Biaglow, James A.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation-cooled rockets are used for a range of low-thrust propulsion functions, including apogee insertion, attitude control, and repositioning of satellites, reaction control of launch vehicles, and primary propulsion for planetary space- craft. The key to high performance and long lifetimes for radiation-cooled rockets is the chamber temperature capability. The material system that is currently used for radiation-cooled rockets, a niobium alloy (C103) with a fused silica coating, has a maximum operating temperature of 1370 C. Temperature limitations of C103 rockets force the use of fuel film cooling, which degrades rocket performance and, in some cases, imposes a plume contamination issue from unburned fuel. A material system composed of a rhenium (Re) substrate and an iridium (Ir) coating has demonstrated operation at high temperatures (2200 C) and for long lifetimes (hours). The added thermal margin afforded by iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) allows reduction or elimination of fuel film cooling. This, in turn, leads to higher performance and cleaner spacecraft environments. There are ongoing government- and industry-sponsored efforts to develop flight Ir/ Re engines, with the primary focus on 440-N, apogee insertion engines. Complementing these Ir/Re engine development efforts is a program to address specific concerns and fundamental characterization of the Ir/Re material system, including (1) development of Ir/Re rocket fabrication methods, (2) establishment of critical Re mechanical properly data, (3) development of reliable joining methods, and (4) characterization of Ir/Re life-limiting mechanisms.

  7. The Chameleon Solid Rocket Propulsion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Glen A.

    2010-01-01

    The Khoury and Weltman (2004a and 2004b) Chameleon Model presents an addition to the gravitation force and was shown by the author (Robertson, 2009a and 2009b) to present a new means by which one can view other forces in the Universe. The Chameleon Model is basically a density-dependent model and while the idea is not new, this model is novel in that densities in the Universe to include the vacuum of space are viewed as scalar fields. Such an analogy gives the Chameleon scalar field, dark energy/dark matter like characteristics; fitting well within cosmological expansion theories. In respect to this forum, in this paper, it is shown how the Chameleon Model can be used to derive the thrust of a solid rocket motor. This presents a first step toward the development of new propulsion models using density variations verse mass ejection as the mechanism for thrust. Further, through the Chameleon Model connection, these new propulsion models can be tied to dark energy/dark matter toward new space propulsion systems utilizing the vacuum scalar field in a way understandable by engineers, the key toward the development of such systems. This paper provides corrections to the Chameleon rocket model in Robertson (2009b).

  8. Advanced materials for radiation-cooled rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Brian; Biaglow, James; Schneider, Steven

    1993-01-01

    The most common material system currently used for low thrust, radiation-cooled rockets is a niobium alloy (C-103) with a fused silica coating (R-512A or R-512E) for oxidation protection. However, significant amounts of fuel film cooling are usually required to keep the material below its maximum operating temperature of 1370 C, degrading engine performance. Also the R-512 coating is subject to cracking and eventual spalling after repeated thermal cycling. A new class of high-temperature, oxidation-resistant materials are being developed for radiation-cooled rockets, with the thermal margin to reduce or eliminate fuel film cooling, while still exceeding the life of silicide-coated niobium. Rhenium coated with iridium is the most developed of these high-temperature materials. Efforts are on-going to develop 22 N, 62 N, and 440 N engines composed of these materials for apogee insertion, attitude control, and other functions. There is also a complimentary NASA and industry effort to determine the life limiting mechanisms and characterize the thermomechanical properties of these materials. Other material systems are also being studied which may offer more thermal margin and/or oxidation resistance, such as hafnium carbide/tantalum carbide matrix composites and ceramic oxide-coated iridium/rhenium chambers.

  9. Rocket experiment on microwave power transmission with Furoshiki deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Nobuyuki; Iwashita, Masashi; Tanaka, Kohei; Nakasuka, Shinichi; Summerer, Leopold

    2009-07-01

    Huge antennas has many useful applications in space as well as on the ground, for example, Solar Power Satellite to provide electricity to the ground, telecommunication for cellular phones, radars for remote sensing, navigation and observation, and so on. The S-310-36 sounding rocket was successfully launched on 22 January 2006 to verify our newly proposed scheme to construct huge antennas under microgravity condition in space. The rocket experiment has three main objectives, the first objective of which is to verify the Furoshiki deployment system [S. Nakasuka, R. Funase, K. Nakada, N. Kaya, J. Mankins, Large membrane "FUROSHIKI Satellite" applied to phased array antenna and its sounding rocket experiment, in: Proceedings of the 54th International Astronautical Congress, 2003. [1

  10. Probe experiment with RIKI device on a meteorological rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapknov, S.K.; Ivanova, T.N.; Gusheva, M.N.; Knchev, A.G.; Tsvetkov, Z.I.

    1979-01-01

    The RIKI device carried on board the Centaure-II ionospheric sounding rocket launched on October 31, 1978 from the equatorial rocket base at Tumba, India in order to measure local plasma ion concentrations and temperatures is described. The device consists of a four-spherical-electrode and a three-spherical-electrode spherical ion trap and a block of measuring electronics mounted in the air-tight rocket container. The volt-ampere characteristics of protons traversing a system of concentric grids are determined in fine or coarse resolution as sweeping voltages are supplied to the grids from a sawtooth wave generator. Positive ions which penetrate the grids are collected by the ion trap collectors, and the current generated is used to determine operational modes. Measurements of ion concentration obtained with the RIKI device have been found to be in good agreement with electron concentration measurements obtained concurrently.

  11. Chemical rocket propulsion a comprehensive survey of energetic materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shimada, Toru; Sinditskii, Valery; Calabro, Max

    2017-01-01

    Developed and expanded from the work presented at the New Energetic Materials and Propulsion Techniques for Space Exploration workshop in June 2014, this book contains new scientific results, up-to-date reviews, and inspiring perspectives in a number of areas related to the energetic aspects of chemical rocket propulsion. This collection covers the entire life of energetic materials from their conceptual formulation to practical manufacturing; it includes coverage of theoretical and experimental ballistics, performance properties, as well as laboratory-scale and full system-scale, handling, hazards, environment, ageing, and disposal. Chemical Rocket Propulsion is a unique work, where a selection of accomplished experts from the pioneering era of space propulsion and current technologists from the most advanced international laboratories discuss the future of chemical rocket propulsion for access to, and exploration of, space. It will be of interest to both postgraduate and final-year undergraduate students in...

  12. Nuclear thermal rocket nozzle testing and evaluation program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1993-01-01

    Performance characteristics of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket can be enhanced through the use of unconventional nozzles as part of the propulsion system. The Nuclear Thermal Rocket nozzle testing and evaluation program being conducted at the NASA Lewis is outlined and the advantages of a plug nozzle are described. A facility description, experimental designs and schematics are given. Results of pretest performance analyses show that high nozzle performance can be attained despite substantial nozzle length reduction through the use of plug nozzles as compared to a convergent-divergent nozzle. Pretest measurement uncertainty analyses indicate that specific impulse values are expected to be within + or - 1.17 pct.

  13. Yuzhnoye's new liquid rocket engines as enablers for space exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtyarev, Alexander; Kushnaryov, Alexander; Shulga, Vladimir; Ventskovsky, Oleg

    2016-10-01

    Advanced liquid rocket engines (LREs) are being created by Yuzhnoye Design Office of Ukraine based on the fifty-year experience of rocket engines' and propulsion systems' development. These LREs use both hypergolic (NTO+UDMH) and cryogenic (liquid oxygen+kerosene) propellants. First stage engines have a range of thrust from 40 to 250 t, while the upper stage (used in space) engines - from several kilograms to 50 t and a re-ignition feature. The engines are intended for both Ukraine"s independent access to space and international market.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of solid rocket components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallner, A.S. [Missouri Western State College, St. Joseph, MO (United States); Nissan, R.A.; Merwin, L.H. [Naval Air Warfare Center, China Lake, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    The evaluation of solid rocket components has become an area of great interest. Studying these materials with MRI offers a great advantage to observe knit lines, regions of inhomogeneity, voids, defects, plasticizer rich/poor areas and solids distribution because of the nondestructive nature of the technique. Aspects of sample preparation, spectroscopic relaxation studies, and MRI as a method of studying these systems will be discussed. Initial images show the ability to image propellant, liner, and explosive materials with an in-plane resolution of 70 {mu}m/pixel. These initial images show that MRI can be developed as a viable nondestructive evaluation method of solid rocket components.

  15. Rocket Plume Burn Hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-03

    Directorate Command Projects 20 Systems Directorate 30 Sensors & Avionics Technology Directorate 40 Communication 6r Navigation Technology Directorate 50...the criterion for permissible flame contact as measured at the operational site of exposure. EXPERIENTAL PROCEDURES AND MATERIALS A synthesis of the...postulated from extrapolations of actual measurements (1) and computer analyses of combustion ingredients (W. Stone, NL, China Lake, personal communication

  16. 液氢加注系统漏热故障对火箭发射的影响%Impact of Liquid Hydrogen Injection System Heat Leakage Fault on the Rocket Launch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马昕晖; 栾骁; 陈景鹏; 孙克

    2013-01-01

    Using AMEsim modeling object-oriented software, with resistance to fluid and friction loss equation (Darcy-Weisbach) formula, extrusion and heat leakage model, based on liquid hydrogen injection system of the launch range, the paper establishes liquid flow and gas-liquid two-phase flow model, and analyzes the different heat leakage rate, pipe and device thermal failure, which affect the rocket changes in the tank. The results show that high-purity hydrogen flow compared with the actual value, in the two-phase flow model gasification hydrogen pressure, resistance, flow and other parameters have changed the role of the rocket tank's injection height and air pillow pressure; the two-phase flow model can simulate the heat leakage fault and can also indicate injection system failure process and results.%以AMEsim面向对象软件作为建模工具,以液阻与摩擦损失方程Darcy Weisbach公式、挤压与漏热模型为基础,基于发射场液氢加注系统,建立液相流动和气液两相流动模型,分析了不同漏热率,管路、器件漏热故障时对火箭贮箱的影响变化情况.研究结果表明:与液氢流动实际数值相比,两相流模型中气化液氢的压力、阻力、流量等参数的作用,改变了火箭贮箱的加注工位高度和贮箱气枕压力;两相流模型可进行加注系统漏热故障仿真,并能预示加注故障过程与结果.

  17. Water Rockets. Get Funny With Newton's Laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Roca Vicent

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the movement of the rocket has been used for decades to encourage students in the study of physics. This system has an undeniable interest to introduce concepts such as properties of gases, laws of Newton,  exchange  between  different  types  of  energy  and  its  conservation  or fluid  mechanics.  Our  works has  been  to  build  and  launch  these  rockets  in  different  educational  levels  and  in  each  of  these  ones  have introduced  the  part  of  Physics  more  suited  to  the  knowledge  of  our  students.  The  aim  of  the  learning experience  is  to  launch  the  rocket  as  far  as  possible  and  learn  to  predict  the  travelled  distance,  using Newton's  laws  and fluid  mechanics.  After  experimentation  we  demonstrated  to  be  able  to  control  the parameters that improve the performance of our rocket, such as the  fill factor, the volume and mass of the empty  bottle,  liquid  density,  launch  angle,  pressure  prior  air  release.  In addition, it is a fun experience can be attached to all levels of education in primary and high school.

  18. Unique nuclear thermal rocket engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culver, D.W. (Aerojet Propulsion Division, P.O. Box 13222, Sacramento, California 95813-6000 (United States)); Rochow, R. (Babcock Wilcox Space Nuclear Systems, P.O. Box 11165, Lynchburg, Virginia 24506-1165 (United States))

    1993-01-15

    Earlier this year Aerojet Propulsion Division (APD) introduced a new, advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine (NTRE) concept intended for manned missions to the moon and to Mars. This NTRE promises to be both shorter and lighter in weight than conventionally designed engines, because its forward flowing reactor is located within an expansion-deflection (E-D) rocket nozzle. The concept has matured during the year, and this paper discusses a nearer term version that resolves four open issues identified in the initial concept: (1)Reactor design and cooling scheme simplification while retaining a high pressure power balance option; (2)Eliminate need for a new, uncooled nozzle throat material suitable for long life application; (3)Practical provision for reactor power control; and (4)Use near term, long life turbopumps.

  19. Nanoparticles for solid rocket propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galfetti, L [Politecnico di Milano, SPLab, Milan (Italy); De Luca, L T [Politecnico di Milano, SPLab, Milan (Italy); Severini, F [Politecnico di Milano, SPLab, Milan (Italy); Meda, L [Polimeri Europa, Istituto G Donegani, Novara (Italy); Marra, G [Polimeri Europa, Istituto G Donegani, Novara (Italy); Marchetti, M [Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aerospaziale ed Astronautica, Rome (Italy); Regi, M [Universita di Roma ' La Sapienza' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aerospaziale ed Astronautica, Rome (Italy); Bellucci, S [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy)

    2006-08-23

    The characterization of several differently sized aluminium powders, by BET (specific surface), EM (electron microscopy), XRD (x-ray diffraction), and XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), was performed in order to evaluate their application in solid rocket propellant compositions. These aluminium powders were used in manufacturing several laboratory composite solid rocket propellants, based on ammonium perchlorate (AP) as oxidizer and hydroxil-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) as binder. The reference formulation was an AP/HTPB/Al composition with 68/17/15% mass fractions respectively. The ballistic characterization of the propellants, in terms of steady burning rates, shows better performance for propellant compositions employing nano-aluminium when compared to micro-aluminium. Results obtained in the pressure range 1-70 bar show that by increasing the nano-Al mass fraction or decreasing the nano-Al size, larger steady burning rates are measured with essentially the same pressure sensitivity.

  20. Unique nuclear thermal rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Donald W.; Rochow, Richard

    1993-06-01

    In January, 1992, a new, advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine (NTRE) concept intended for manned missions to the moon and to Mars was introduced (Culver, 1992). This NTRE promises to be both shorter and lighter in weight than conventionally designed engines, because its forward flowing reactor is located within an expansion-deflection rocket nozzle. The concept has matured during the year, and this paper discusses a nearer term version that resolves four open issues identified in the initial concept: (1) the reactor design and cooling scheme simplification while retaining a high pressure power balance option; (2) elimination need for a new, uncooled nozzle throat material suitable for long life application; (3) a practical provision for reactor power control; and (4) use of near-term, long-life turbopumps.

  1. Nanoparticles for solid rocket propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galfetti, L.; DeLuca, L. T.; Severini, F.; Meda, L.; Marra, G.; Marchetti, M.; Regi, M.; Bellucci, S.

    2006-08-01

    The characterization of several differently sized aluminium powders, by BET (specific surface), EM (electron microscopy), XRD (x-ray diffraction), and XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), was performed in order to evaluate their application in solid rocket propellant compositions. These aluminium powders were used in manufacturing several laboratory composite solid rocket propellants, based on ammonium perchlorate (AP) as oxidizer and hydroxil-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) as binder. The reference formulation was an AP/HTPB/Al composition with 68/17/15% mass fractions respectively. The ballistic characterization of the propellants, in terms of steady burning rates, shows better performance for propellant compositions employing nano-aluminium when compared to micro-aluminium. Results obtained in the pressure range 1-70 bar show that by increasing the nano-Al mass fraction or decreasing the nano-Al size, larger steady burning rates are measured with essentially the same pressure sensitivity.

  2. Extended temperature range rocket injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A rocket injector is provided with multiple sets of manifolds for supplying propellants to injector elements. Sensors transmit the temperatures of the propellants to a suitable controller which is operably connnected to valves between these manifolds and propellant storage tanks. When cryogenic propellant temperatures are sensed, only a portion of the valves are opened to furnish propellants to some of the manifolds. When lower temperatures are sensed, additional valves are opened to furnish propellants to more of the manifolds.

  3. Mini-Rocket User Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Missile Research , Development, and Engineering Center and Ray Sells DESE Research , Inc. 315 Wynn Drive Huntsville, AL 35805 August 2007...with the minirock command, you are prompted for a filename: Mini-Rocket v1.01 by Ray Sells, DESE Research , Inc. Input file: - Output is printed...nancv.bucher@us.army.mil Commander, U.S. Army ARDEC Picatinny Arsenal, NJ 07806-5000 ATTN: AMSRD-AR-AIS -SA DESE Research , Inc. 3 15 Wynn Drive

  4. Optimization Problem of Multistage Rocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Tawakley

    1972-04-01

    Full Text Available The necessary conditions for the existence of minimum of a function of initial and final values of mass, position and velocity components and time of a multistage rocket have been reviewed when the thrust levels in each stage are considered to bounded and variation in gravity with height has been taken into account. The nature of the extremal subarcs comprising the complete extremal are has been studied. A few simple examples have been given as illustrations.

  5. Liquid atomization by coaxial rocket injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, S. V.; Brena De La Rosa, A.; Isakovic, A.; Bachalo, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    The atomization characteristics of a scaled-down version of a coaxial rocket injector was investigated using a phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). The injector was operated in the conventional mode with liquid being injected through its inner orifice and gas being injected through its outer annulus. The shearing action occurring at the liquid-gas interface causes the liquid jet to atomize. In this study, two different liquid-air systems, namely a water-air system and a liquid nitrogen-gaseous nitrogen system, were chosen for detailed investigation. This paper discusses the performance characteristics of the coaxial injector under different flow and geometric conditions. Specifically, the effects of injection gas pressure and the injector cavity size on variables such as the mean particle diameter, Sauter mean diameter, number density, volume flux, and velocity have been presented.

  6. Additive Manufacturing a Liquid Hydrogen Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carl P.; Robertson, Elizabeth H.; Koelbl, Mary Beth; Singer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Space Propulsion is a 5 day event being held from 2nd May to the 6th May 2016 at the Rome Marriott Park Hotel in Rome, Italy. This event showcases products like Propulsion sub-systems and components, Production and manufacturing issues, Liquid, Solid, Hybrid and Air-breathing Propulsion Systems for Launcher and Upper Stages, Overview of current programmes, AIV issues and tools, Flight testing and experience, Technology building blocks for Future Space Transportation Propulsion Systems : Launchers, Exploration platforms & Space Tourism, Green Propulsion for Space Transportation, New propellants, Rocket propulsion & global environment, Cost related aspects of Space Transportation propulsion, Modelling, Pressure-Thrust oscillations issues, Impact of new requirements and regulations on design etc. in the Automotive, Manufacturing, Fabrication, Repair & Maintenance industries.

  7. The Effect of Resistance on Rocket Injector Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability, where unsteady heat release couples with acoustic modes, has long been an area of concern in liquid rocket engines. Accurate modeling of the acoustic normal modes of the combustion chamber is important to understanding and preventing combustion instability. The injector resistance can have a significant influence on the chamber normal mode shape, and hence on the system stability.

  8. Computational simulation of liquid fuel rocket injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, D. Brian

    1994-01-01

    A major component of any liquid propellant rocket is the propellant injection system. Issues of interest include the degree of liquid vaporization and its impact on the combustion process, the pressure and temperature fields in the combustion chamber, and the cooling of the injector face and chamber walls. The Finite Difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS) code is a primary computational tool used in the MSFC Computational Fluid Dynamics Branch. The branch has dedicated a significant amount of resources to development of this code for prediction of both liquid and solid fuel rocket performance. The FDNS code is currently being upgraded to include the capability to model liquid/gas multi-phase flows for fuel injection simulation. An important aspect of this effort is benchmarking the code capabilities to predict existing experimental injection data. The objective of this MSFC/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship term was to evaluate the capabilities of the modified FDNS code to predict flow fields with liquid injection. Comparisons were made between code predictions and existing experimental data. A significant portion of the effort included a search for appropriate validation data. Also, code simulation deficiencies were identified.

  9. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Simulation in NPSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belair, Michael L.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lavelle, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Four nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) models have been created in the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) framework. The models are divided into two categories. One set is based upon the ZrC-graphite composite fuel element and tie tube-style reactor developed during the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) project in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The other reactor set is based upon a W-UO2 ceramic-metallic (CERMET) fuel element. Within each category, a small and a large thrust engine are modeled. The small engine models utilize RL-10 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 33.4 kN (7,500 lbf ). The large engine models utilize scaled RL-60 turbomachinery performance maps and have a thrust of approximately 111.2 kN (25,000 lbf ). Power deposition profiles for each reactor were obtained from a detailed Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) model of the reactor cores. Performance factors such as thermodynamic state points, thrust, specific impulse, reactor power level, and maximum fuel temperature are analyzed for each engine design.

  10. Space shuttle with common fuel tank for liquid rocket booster and main engines (supertanker space shuttle)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    An operation and schedule enhancement is shown that replaces the four-body cluster (Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO), external tank, and two solid rocket boosters) with a simpler two-body cluster (SSO and liquid rocket booster/external tank). At staging velocity, the booster unit (liquid-fueled booster engines and vehicle support structure) is jettisoned while the remaining SSO and supertank continues on to orbit. The simpler two-bodied cluster reduces the processing and stack time until SSO mate from 57 days (for the solid rocket booster) to 20 days (for the liquid rocket booster). The areas in which liquid booster systems are superior to solid rocket boosters are discussed. Alternative and future generation vehicles are reviewed to reveal greater performance and operations enhancements with more modifications to the current methods of propulsion design philosophy, e.g., combined cycle engines, and concentric propellant tanks.

  11. Reusable rocket engine optical condition monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyett, L.; Maram, J.; Barkhoudarian, S.; Reinert, J.

    1987-01-01

    Plume emission spectrometry and optical leak detection are described as two new applications of optical techniques to reusable rocket engine condition monitoring. Plume spectrometry has been used with laboratory flames and reusable rocket engines to characterize both the nominal combustion spectra and anomalous spectra of contaminants burning in these plumes. Holographic interferometry has been used to identify leaks and quantify leak rates from reusable rocket engine joints and welds.

  12. Studies of an extensively axisymmetric rocket based combined cycle (RBCC) engine powered single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Richard W.; Escher, William J. D.; Robinson, John W.

    1989-01-01

    The present comparative performance study has established that rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) propulsion systems, when incorporated by essentially axisymmetric SSTO launch vehicle configurations whose conical forebody maximizes both capture-area ratio and total capture area, are capable of furnishing payload-delivery capabilities superior to those of most multistage, all-rocket launchers. Airbreathing thrust augmentation in the rocket-ejector mode of an RBCC powerplant is noted to make a major contribution to final payload capability, by comparison to nonair-augmented rocket engine propulsion systems.

  13. Telemaxus: A telescience oriented sounding rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, R.; Fortezza, R.; Desiderio, G.; Capuano, G.; Titomanlio, D.

    Following the success of the Texus 23 Campaign (November 1989), during which the Teletexus experiment was conducted a more ambitious Telescience experiment was accomodated on the 1991 MAXUS 1 Payload. The fluidynamic experiment on the oscillatory Marangoni flow was performed on board the rocket (launched at Kiruna, Sweden) using a modified TEM-06/4 module. The experiment was fully controlled by the PI (Professor Monti) directly from the Telescience Control Room located at MARS Center (Naples, Italy). The experiment was also aimed to demonstrate the capabilities of Telescience Service that ESA offers to the European Microgravity User Community. Respect to other experiments already tested and assessed during previous Texus missions (14b, 23), the Telescience operation mode included new state-of-art technologies and subsystems to demonstrate capabilities, flexibility and usefulness of this operation concept mainly in the perspective of Columbus utilization. Unfortunately due to a failure of the rocket system, the microgravity condition was not reached during the flight and the fluidynamic results were missed. However, in spite of the tumbling attitude of the rocket, the telescience link was successfully tested and the video/data/audio communication was correctly established between MARS and Esrange. This paper illustrates the technological aspects and gives an overview of the systems/equipments integrated and realized for the experiment control. In the first part the H/W configurations for the experiment monitoring and control, identified by the research team are illustrated. The relevant items of the H/W configuration include: the Telescience Work Stations architecture, the link channels used for the selection, transmission and reception of video/data/commands and the subsystems manufactured to improve the system versatility. The second part deals with the communication link used for transmission between Sweden and Italy of experimental data, facility status, voice

  14. The four INTA-300 rocket prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, J. S.

    1985-03-01

    A development history and performance capability assessment is presented for the INTA-300 'Flamenco' sounding rocket prototype specimens. The Flamenco is a two-stage solid fuel rocket, based on British sounding rocket technology, that can lift 50 km payloads to altitudes of about 300 km. The flight of the first two prototypes, in 1974 and 1975, pointed to vibration problems which reduced the achievable apogee, and the third prototype's flight was marred by a premature detonation that destroyed the rocket. The fourth Flamenco flight, however, yielded much reliable data.

  15. Radiation/convection coupling in rocket motors and plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, R. C.; Saladino, A. J.

    1993-07-01

    The three commonly used propellant systems - H2/O2, RP-1/O2, and solid propellants - primarily radiate as molecular emitters, non-scattering small particles, and scattering larger particles, respectively. Present technology has accepted the uncoupling of the radiation analysis from that of the flowfield. This approximation becomes increasingly inaccurate as one considers plumes, interior rocket chambers, and nuclear rocket propulsion devices. This study will develop a hierarchy of methods which will address radiation/convection coupling in all of the aforementioned propulsion systems. The nature of the radiation/convection coupled problem is that the divergence of the radiative heat flux must be included in the energy equation and that the local, volume-averaged intensity of the radiation must be determined by a solution of the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The intensity is approximated by solving the RTE along several lines of sight (LOS) for each point in the flowfield. Such a procedure is extremely costly; therefore, further approximations are needed. Modified differential approximations are being developed for this purpose. It is not obvious which order of approximations are required for a given rocket motor analysis. Therefore, LOS calculations have been made for typical rocket motor operating conditions in order to select the type approximations required. The results of these radiation calculations, and the interpretation of these intensity predictions are presented herein.

  16. Demilitarization of Lance rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Peter

    1995-02-01

    In 1992 Royal Ordnance was awarded contract by NAMSA for the demilitarization of NATO's European stock of Lance missile rocket motors. Lance is a liquid fueled surface to surface guided missile designed to give general battlefield support with either a nuclear or conventional capability at ranges of up to 130 km. The NAMSA contract required Royal Ordnance to undertake the following: (1) transportation of missiles from NATO depots in Europe to Royal Ordnance's factory at Bishopton in Scotland; (2) establishment of a dedicated demilitarization facility at Bishopton; and (3) demilitarization of live M5 and M6 training missiles by the end of 1994.

  17. Ultrasonic inspection of rocket fuel model using laminated transducer and multi-channel step pulser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, T.; Hamajima, T.; Tashiro, H.; Sato, A.

    2013-01-01

    For the ultrasonic inspection for the packing of solid fuel in a rocket booster, an industrial inspection is difficult. Because the signal to noise ratio in ultrasonic inspection of rocket fuel become worse due to the large attenuation even using lower frequency ultrasound. For the improvement of this problem, we tried to applied the two techniques in ultrasonic inspection, one was the step function pulser system with the super wideband frequency properties and the other was the laminated element transducer. By combining these two techniques, we developed the new ultrasonic measurement system and demonstrated the advantages in ultrasonic inspection of rocket fuel model specimen.

  18. Low Erosion Ceramic Composite Liners for Improved Performance of Ablative Rocket Thrust Chambers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced liquid rocket propulsion systems must achieve longer burn times without performance degradation to allow the lowest cost per kilogram access to space....

  19. Neptune modular rockets for breakthrough low-cost space access Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Interorbital Systems is developing a new generation of modular, low-cost, rapid-response space launch vehicles. Interorbital modular rockets core element is the...

  20. Low Erosion Ceramic Composite Liners for Improved Performance of Ablative Rocket Thrust Chambers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced liquid rocket propulsion systems must achieve longer burn times without performance degradation to allow the lowest cost per kilogram access to space....

  1. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicided niobium alloy (C103) combustion chambers have been used extensively in both NASA and DoD liquid rocket propulsion systems. Niobium alloys offer a good...

  2. Aerodynamics and flow characterisation of multistage rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, G.; Prakash, M. V. S.

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this paper is to conduct a systematic flow analysis on single, double and multistage rockets using ANSYS software. Today non-air breathing propulsion is increasing dramatically for the enhancement of space exploration. The rocket propulsion is playing vital role in carrying the payload to the destination. Day to day rocket aerodynamic performance and flow characterization analysis has becoming challenging task to the researchers. Taking this task as motivation a systematic literature is conducted to achieve better aerodynamic and flow characterization on various rocket models. The analyses on rocket models are very little especially in numerical side and experimental area. Each rocket stage analysis conducted for different Mach numbers and having different flow varying angle of attacks for finding the critical efficiency performance parameters like pressure, density and velocity. After successful completion of the analysis the research reveals that flow around the rocket body for Mach number 4 and 5 best suitable for designed payload. Another major objective of this paper is to bring best aerodynamics flow characterizations in both aero and mechanical features. This paper also brings feature prospectus of rocket stage technology in the field of aerodynamic design.

  3. Data Mining for ISHM of Liquid Rocket Propulsion Status Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ashok; Schwabacher, Mark; Oza, Nijunj; Martin, Rodney; Watson, Richard; Matthews, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    This document consists of presentation slides that review the current status of data mining to support the work with the Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) for the systems associated with Liquid Rocket Propulsion. The aim of this project is to have test stand data from Rocketdyne to design algorithms that will aid in the early detection of impending failures during operation. These methods will be extended and improved for future platforms (i.e., CEV/CLV).

  4. Nuclear Thermal Rocket by 2000: a DOE Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Steven D.; Stanley, Marland

    1992-01-01

    It is asserted that a Nuclear Propulsion Space Transportation System is required for the Manned Mars Mission. Additionally, it is felt that a Nuclear Propulsion Space Transportation System can support a wide variety of future space missions, including lunar base implementation and support. The Rover/NERVA program demonstrated that a safe, reliable Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) can be developed and operated for sufficient run times, at desirable temperatures, and with multiple restarts. The discussion is presented in viewgraph form.

  5. Comparison of HRDI wind measurements with radar and rocket observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, M.D.; Skinner, W.R.; Marshall, A.R.; Hays, P.B.; Lieberman, R.S.; Gell, D.A.; Ortland, D.A.; Morton, Y.T.; Wu, D.L.; Franke, S.J.; Schmidlin, F.J.; Vincent, R.A.

    1993-06-18

    This paper reports wind measurements in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere made by the high resolution doppler imager (HRDI) on board the upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS). These measurements are correlated with ground based radar and rocket measurements. The HRDI makes measurements by observing doppler shifts in molecular oxygen lines. The intercomparison helps to validate the remote sensing results, helps to verify the on board calibration system, and also gives a common measurement which other measurements systems can be compared against.

  6. 轨姿控液体火箭发动机水击仿真模拟%Simulation of water hammer in liquid rocket engine of orbit and attitude control system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张峥岳; 康乃全

    2012-01-01

    Taking the liquid rocket engine of orbit and attitude control system as the study object, an emulator was established with AMESim according to the modular modeling idea. The simulation computation of water hammer pressure in the pipeline while the engine system was working was per- formed. The results show that the running of orbit control engine is a major factor creating high water hammer. The compared result of theoretical calculation and test data indicate that the simulation mod- els can give reasonable descriptions for generative process of water hammer. The measure to reduce the amount of water hammer is introduced.%以轨姿控液体火箭发动机为研究对象,根据模块化思想,利用AMESim建立了仿真平台,仿真计算了发动机系统工作中管路的水击压力。结果表明:轨控发动机的工作是引起大水击的主要因素。通过与理论计算和试验数据的对比表明,仿真模型较好地描述了管路水击的生成过程。介绍了减小系统水击量的措施。

  7. Development of high performance hybrid rocket fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaseck, Christopher R.

    In this document I discuss paraffin fuel combustion and investigate the effects of additives on paraffin entrainment and regression. In general, hybrid rockets offer an economical and safe alternative to standard liquid and solid rockets. However, slow polymeric fuel regression and low combustion efficiency have limited the commercial use of hybrid rockets. Paraffin is a fast burning fuel that has received significant attention in the 2000's and 2010's as a replacement for standard fuels. Paraffin regresses three to four times faster than polymeric fuels due to the entrainment of a surface melt layer. However, further regression rate enhancement over the base paraffin fuel is necessary for widespread hybrid rocket adoption. I use a small scale opposed flow burner to investigate the effect of additives on the combustion of paraffin. Standard additives such as aluminum combust above the flame zone where sufficient oxidizer levels are present. As a result no heat is generated below the flame itself. In small scale opposed burner experiments the effect of limited heat feedback is apparent. Aluminum in particular does not improve the regression of paraffin in the opposed burner. The lack of heat feedback from additive combustion limits the applicability of the opposed burner. In turn, the results obtained in the opposed burner with metal additive loaded hybrid fuels do not match results from hybrid rocket experiments. In addition, nano-scale aluminum increases melt layer viscosity and greatly slows the regression of paraffin in the opposed flow burner. However, the reactive additives improve the regression rate of paraffin in the opposed burner where standard metals do not. At 5 wt.% mechanically activated titanium and carbon (Ti-C) improves the regression rate of paraffin by 47% in the opposed burner. The mechanically activated Ti C likely reacts in or near the melt layer and provides heat feedback below the flame region that results in faster opposed burner regression

  8. Hybrid Rocket Experiment Station for Capstone Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Edgar; Hull, Bethanne J.

    2012-01-01

    Portable hybrid rocket motors and test stands can be seen in many papers but none have been reported on the design or instrumentation at such a small magnitude. The design of this hybrid rocket and test stand is to be small and portable (suitcase size). This basic apparatus will be used for demonstrations in rocket propulsion. The design had to include all of the needed hardware to operate the hybrid rocket unit (with the exception of the external Oxygen tank). The design of this project includes making the correlation between the rocket's thrust and its size, the appropriate transducers (physical size, resolution, range, and cost), compatability with a laptop analog card, the ease of setup, and its portability.

  9. Thrust Vector Control for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensworth, Clinton B. F.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions may use Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) stages for human and cargo missions to Mars and other destinations. The vehicles are likely to require engine thrust vector control (TVC) to maintain desired flight trajectories. This paper explores requirements and concepts for TVC systems for representative NTR missions. Requirements for TVC systems were derived using 6 degree-of-freedom models of NTR vehicles. Various flight scenarios were evaluated to determine vehicle attitude control needs and to determine the applicability of TVC. Outputs from the models yielded key characteristics including engine gimbal angles, gimbal rates and gimbal actuator power. Additional factors such as engine thrust variability and engine thrust alignment errors were examined for impacts to gimbal requirements. Various technologies are surveyed for TVC systems for the NTR applications. A key factor in technology selection is the unique radiation environment present in NTR stages. Other considerations including mission duration and thermal environments influence the selection of optimal TVC technologies. Candidate technologies are compared to see which technologies, or combinations of technologies best fit the requirements for selected NTR missions. Representative TVC systems are proposed and key properties such as mass and power requirements are defined. The outputs from this effort can be used to refine NTR system sizing models, providing higher fidelity definition for TVC systems for future studies.

  10. Attitude Dynamics of a Spinning Rocket with Internal Fluid Whirling Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Ionut MARMUREANU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the impact that helical motion of fluid products of combustion within the combustion chamber of a rocket can have on the attitude dynamics of rocket systems. By developing the study presented by Sookgaew (2004, we determined the configuration of the Coriolis moment components, which catch the impact of the combustion product’s whirling motion, for the radial and centripetal propellant burn pattern specific to S-5M and S-5K solid rocket motors. We continue the investigation of the effects of internal whirling motion of fluid products of combustion on the attitude behavior of variable mass systems of the rocket type by examining the spin motion and transverse attitude motion of such systems. The results obtained show that internal fluid whirling motion can cause appreciable deviations in spin rate predictions, and also affects the frequencies of the transverse angular velocity components.

  11. Deposit formation in hydrocarbon rocket fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roback, R.; Szetela, E. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study deposit formation in hydrocarbon fuels under flow conditions that exist in high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. A high pressure fuel coking test apparatus was designed and developed and was used to evaluate thermal decomposition (coking) limits and carbon deposition rates in heated copper tubes for two hydrocarbon rocket fuels, RP-1 and commercial-grade propane. Tests were also conducted using JP-7 and chemically-pure propane as being representative of more refined cuts of the baseline fuels. A parametric evaluation of fuel thermal stability was performed at pressures of 136 atm to 340 atm, bulk fuel velocities in the range 6 to 30 m/sec, and tube wall temperatures in the range 422 to 811 K. Results indicated that substantial deposit formation occurs with RP-1 fuel at wall temperatures between 600 and 800 K, with peak deposit formation occurring near 700 K. No improvements were obtained when deoxygenated JP-7 fuel was substituted for RP-1. The carbon deposition rates for the propane fuels were generally higher than those obtained for either of the kerosene fuels at any given wall temperature. There appeared to be little difference between commercial-grade and chemically-pure propane with regard to type and quantity of deposit. Results of tests conducted with RP-1 indicated that the rate of deposit formation increased slightly with pressure over the range 136 atm to 340 atm. Finally, lating the inside wall of the tubes with nickel was found to significantly reduce carbon deposition rates for RP-1 fuel.

  12. Rocket Experiment For Neutral Upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenward, D. R.; Lessard, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from the CHAMP satellite from 2004 show relatively small scale heating in the thermosphere. Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. The RENU 2 rocket mission includes a suite of 14 instruments which will acquire data to help understand processes involved in neutral upwelling in the cusp. Neutral, ion, and electron measurements will be made to provide an assessment of the upwelling process. SUPERDarn measurements of large- scale Joule heating in the cusp during overflight will also be acquired. Small-scale data which could possibly be associated with Alfvén waves, will be acquired using onboard electric field measurements. In-situ measurement of precipitating electrons and all other measurements will be used in thermodynamic and electrodynamic models for comparison to the observed upwelling.

  13. Heterogeneous fuel for hybrid rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, David B. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Heterogeneous fuel compositions suitable for use in hybrid rocket engines and solid-fuel ramjet engines, The compositions include mixtures of a continuous phase, which forms a solid matrix, and a dispersed phase permanently distributed therein. The dispersed phase or the matrix vaporizes (or melts) and disperses into the gas flow much more rapidly than the other, creating depressions, voids and bumps within and on the surface of the remaining bulk material that continuously roughen its surface, This effect substantially enhances heat transfer from the combusting gas flow to the fuel surface, producing a correspondingly high burning rate, The dispersed phase may include solid particles, entrained liquid droplets, or gas-phase voids having dimensions roughly similar to the displacement scale height of the gas-flow boundary layer generated during combustion.

  14. The Design of Adaptive Seeking Fuzzy Sliding Mode for Position Controller of Rocket Launcher Servo System%火箭炮位置控制器的自寻迹模糊滑模设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李平; 王瑞华; 李伟华; 吴坤

    2013-01-01

    Considering the atrocious load property when the rocket is launched, an adaptive position controller is designed, which comprises of the baseline mode design and the curbing controller design, the first one is for the nominal plant, and the second one is designed to overcome the uncertainties, including parameter variations and external disturbance in the whole control process. Simulated results due to step command shows that the dynamic behaviors of the proposed control system is robust with regard to uncertainties.%针对多管火箭炮随动系统位置控制器转动惯量和外部干扰变化大的特性,设计了一种自寻迹模糊滑模控制器。由自寻迹滑模控制器和模糊滑模控制器组成,自寻迹滑模策略作用于系统名义模型保证全局鲁棒性,模糊滑模策略用于消减外部干扰及系统参数变化等不确定性的影响。仿真结果表明该控制策略有效改善了系统的静、动态特性。

  15. Design study of RL10 derivatives. Volume 2: Engine design characteristics, appendices. [development of rocket engine for application to space tug propulsion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Calculations, curves, and substantiating data which support the engine design characteristics of the RL-10 engines are presented. A description of the RL-10 ignition system is provided. The performance calculations of the RL-10 derivative engines and the performance results obtained are reported. The computer simulations used to establish the control system requirements and to define the engine transient characteristics are included.

  16. Coordinated control for regulation/protection mode-switching of ducted rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yiwen; Bao, Wen; Zhao, Jun; Chang, Juntao

    2014-05-01

    This study is concerned with the coordinated control problem for regulation/protection mode-switching of a ducted rocket, in order to obtain the maximum system performance while ensuring safety. The proposed strategy has an inner/outer loop control structure which decomposes the contradiction between performance and safety into two modes of regulation and protection. Specifically, first, the mathematical model including the actuator (gas regulating system) and the plant (ducted rocket engine) is introduced. Second, taking the inlet buzz for instance, the ducted rocket coordinated control problem for thrust regulation and inlet buzz limit protection is formulated and discussed. Third, to solve the problem, based on the main inner loop, a limit protection controller (outer loop) design method is developed utilizing a linear quadratic optimal control technique, and a coordinated control logic is then presented. At last, the whole coordinated control strategy is applied to the ducted rocket control model, and simulation results demonstrate its effectiveness.

  17. Dual-theodolite real-time computation method used during the optical alignment of the Excitation by Electron Deposition (EXCEDE) III rocket payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerstrom, David S.; Galanis, Charles J.; Stuart, Robert F.

    1994-09-01

    Phillips Laboratory and Systems Integration Engineering developed a two-theodolite, reflecting-surface technique for measuring the lines of sight (LOS) of sensors in rocket payload modules. A flat mirror, keyed to one theodolite provides a stable and adjustable reference by which the angular separation of sensor LOS's can be measured and referenced to the rocket's coordinate system. The rocket's Attitude Control System and external launch pad geodetic survey points are referenced to the vehicle's geometry using this procedure.

  18. Nuclear thermal rockets using indigenous extraterrestrial propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrin, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary examination of a concept for a Mars and outer solar system exploratory vehicle is presented. Propulsion is provided by utilizing a nuclear thermal reactor to heat a propellant volatile indigenous to the destination world to form a high thrust rocket exhaust. Candidate propellants, whose performance, materials compatibility, and ease of acquisition are examined and include carbon dioxide, water, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and argon. Ballistics and winged supersonic configurations are discussed. It is shown that the use of this method of propulsion potentially offers high payoff to a manned Mars mission. This is accomplished by sharply reducing the initial mission mass required in low earth orbit, and by providing Mars explorers with greatly enhanced mobility in traveling about the planet through the use of a vehicle that can refuel itself each time it lands. Thus, the nuclear landing craft is utilized in combination with a hydrogen-fueled nuclear-thermal interplanetary launch. By utilizing such a system in the outer solar system, a low level aerial reconnaissance of Titan combined with a multiple sample return from nearly every satellite of Saturn can be accomplished in a single launch of a Titan 4 or the Space Transportation System (STS). Similarly a multiple sample return from Callisto, Ganymede, and Europa can also be accomplished in one launch of a Titan 4 or the STS.

  19. Research on Test and Diagnosis System on AVR of the Rocket Cannon Supplemental Power Station%某型火箭炮配套电站AVR测试诊断系统研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高伟波; 刘洪文; 谷志锋

    2011-01-01

    According to the key and urgency of test and diagnosis system on AVR of the rocket cannon supplemental power station, this paper was used to design the test and diagnosis system. Firstly, this paper analyzed the importance in power station and the necessariness in fault diagnosis, and educed the importance of design about AVR diagnosis system. Secondly, this paper analyzed working principle and the structural composition of AVR, and reviewed the evolution history of test technology and fault diagnosis technology, especially go with the vigorous development of virtual instrument technology and the reasonable application of fault tree. Finally, this paper educed the design block diagram including the hardware, software as well as fault analysis method.%针对某型火箭炮配套电站AVR测试诊断的关键性和迫切性,该文用于研究设计AVR诊断测试系统.首先通过分析AVR在电站中重要性和故障诊断的必要性,得出AVR诊断系统设计的重要性,其次分析了该AVR的结构组成及其工作原理,并回顾了测试技术和故障诊断技术的沿革史,特别是虚拟仪器技术的蓬勃发展和故障树的合理应用性,最后得出系统设计框图、该系统设计的硬件、软件以及故障分析方法.

  20. Approaches to Low Fuel Regression Rate in Hybrid Rocket Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Dario Pastrone

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid rocket engines are promising propulsion systems which present appealing features such as safety, low cost, and environmental friendliness. On the other hand, certain issues hamper the development hoped for. The present paper discusses approaches addressing improvements to one of the most important among these issues: low fuel regression rate. To highlight the consequence of such an issue and to better understand the concepts proposed, fundamentals are summarized. Two approaches are pre...

  1. NERVA-Derived Concept for a Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusselman, Steven P.; Borowski, Stanley K.; Frye, Patrick E.; Gunn, Stanley V.; Morrison, Calvin Q.

    2005-02-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket is an enabling technology for human exploration missions. The "bimodal" NTR (BNTR) provides a novel approach to meeting both propulsion and power requirements of future manned and robotic missions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate tie-tube cooling configurations, NTR performance, Brayton cycle performance, and LOX-Augmented NTR (LANTR) feasibility to arrive at a point of departure BNTR configuration for subsequent system definition.

  2. Mechanical and Thermal Design and Qualification of an Atom Interferometer Sounding Rocket Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, J.; Seidel, S. T.; Krutzik, M.; Wendrich, T.; Stamminger, A.; Scharringhausen, M.; Quantus Consortium

    2015-09-01

    The MAIUS-1 experiment is a pathfinder quantum optics experiment about to fly on a VSB-30 sounding rocket in November 2015. The scientific objective of the mission is to demonstrate the feasibility of creating a Bose-Einstein Condensate and performing atom interferometry aboard a sounding rocket with Rubidium 87atoms. This paper will summarize the thermal and mechanical design of the payload and its (sub)systems. Moreover the qualification procedures and the results of the qualification test will be presented.

  3. Early Spin-Stabilised Rockets - the Rockets of Bergrat Heinrich Gottlob Kuhn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, H.-D.

    19th century's war rockets were at first stabilised by sticks, but these sticks produced a very uncertain flight path and it often happened that rockets changed their direction and even flew back to their firing position. So very many early inventors in Europe, America, and British-India tried to stabilise the rocket's flight in a better way. They tried fins and even rotation but they did not succeed. It is said in history that William Hale was the first who succeeded in constructing a spin stabilised (i.e. rotating) rocket which worked. But before him, in the thirties of that century, a German amateur rocket inventor succeeded as well and secretly proved his stickless rotating rockets in trials for Prussian officers and some years later officially for Saxon artillery officers. His invention was then bought by the kingdom of Saxony, but these were never use in the field because of lack of money.

  4. Nuclear Thermal Rocket - An Established Space Propulsion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Milton

    2004-02-01

    From the late 1950s to the early 1970s a major program successfully developed the capability to conduct space exploration using the advanced technology of nuclear rocket propulsion. The program had two primary elements: pioneering and advanced technology work-Rover-at Los Alamos National Laboratory and its contractors provided the basic reactor design, fuel materials development, and reactor testing capability; and engine development-NERVA-by the industrial team of Aerojet and Westinghouse building on and extending the Los Alamos efforts to flight system development. This presentation describes the NERVA program, the engine system testing that demonstrated the space-practical operation capabilities of nuclear thermal rockets, and the mission studies that point the way to most effectively use the NTR capabilities. Together, the two programs established a technology base that includes proven NTR capabilities of (1) over twice the specific impulse of chemical propulsion systems, (2) thrust capabilities ranging from 44kN to 1112kN, and (3) practical thrust-to-weight ratios for future NASA space exploration missions, both manned payloads to Mars and unmanned payloads to the outer planets. The overall nuclear rocket program had a unique management structure that integrated the efforts of the two government agencies involved-NASA and the then-existing Atomic Energy Commission. The objective of this paper is to summarize and convey the technical and management lessons learned in this program as the nation considers the design of its future space exploration activities.

  5. 21 CFR 866.4830 - Rocket immunoelectro-phoresis equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rocket immunoelectro-phoresis equipment. 866.4830... § 866.4830 Rocket immunoelectro-phoresis equipment. (a) Identification. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis... called rocket immunoelectrophoresis. In this procedure, an electric current causes the protein...

  6. Water Impact Prediction Tool for Recoverable Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooker, William; Glaese, John; Clayton, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Reusing components from a rocket launch can be cost saving. NASA's space shuttle system has reusable components that return to the Earth and impact the ocean. A primary example is the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) that descends on parachutes to the Earth after separation and impacts the ocean. Water impact generates significant structural loads that can damage the booster, so it is important to study this event in detail in the design of the recovery system. Some recent examples of damage due to water impact include the Ares I-X First Stage deformation as seen in Figure 1 and the loss of the SpaceX Falcon 9 First Stage.To ensure that a component can be recovered or that the design of the recovery system is adequate, an adequate set of structural loads is necessary for use in failure assessments. However, this task is difficult since there are many conditions that affect how a component impacts the water and the resulting structural loading that a component sees. These conditions include the angle of impact with respect to the water, the horizontal and vertical velocities, the rotation rate, the wave height and speed, and many others. There have been attempts to simulate water impact. One approach is to analyze water impact using explicit finite element techniques such as those employed by the LS-Dyna tool [1]. Though very detailed, this approach is time consuming and would not be suitable for running Monte Carlo or optimization analyses. The purpose of this paper is to describe a multi-body simulation tool that runs quickly and that captures the environments a component might see. The simulation incorporates the air and water interaction with the component, the component dynamics (i.e. modes and mode shapes), any applicable parachutes and lines, the interaction of winds and gusts, and the wave height and speed. It is capable of quickly conducting Monte Carlo studies to better capture the environments and genetic algorithm optimizations to reproduce a

  7. Development of Kabila rocket: A radioisotope heated thermionic plasma rocket engine

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A new type of plasma rocket engine, the Kabila rocket, using a radioisotope heated thermionic heating chamber instead of a conventional combustion chamber or catalyst bed is introduced and it achieves specific impulses similar to the ones of conventional solid and bipropellant rockets. Curium-244 is chosen as a radioisotope heat source and a thermal reductive layer is also used to obtain precise thermionic emissions. The self-sufficiency principle is applied by simultaneously heating up the e...

  8. Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Rocket Plumes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A non-intrusive method for measuring velocities in a rocket exhaust is proposed in a joint effort by MetroLaser and Vanderbilt University. Hydroxyl Tagging...

  9. Fundamentals of aircraft and rocket propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    El-Sayed, Ahmed F

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive basics-to-advanced course in an aero-thermal science vital to the design of engines for either type of craft. The text classifies engines powering aircraft and single/multi-stage rockets, and derives performance parameters for both from basic aerodynamics and thermodynamics laws. Each type of engine is analyzed for optimum performance goals, and mission-appropriate engines selection is explained. Fundamentals of Aircraft and Rocket Propulsion provides information about and analyses of: thermodynamic cycles of shaft engines (piston, turboprop, turboshaft and propfan); jet engines (pulsejet, pulse detonation engine, ramjet, scramjet, turbojet and turbofan); chemical and non-chemical rocket engines; conceptual design of modular rocket engines (combustor, nozzle and turbopumps); and conceptual design of different modules of aero-engines in their design and off-design state. Aimed at graduate and final-year undergraduate students, this textbook provides a thorough grounding in th...

  10. Magnesium Based Rockets for Martian Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the proposed Phase II program, we will continue the development of Mg bipropellant rockets for Martian PAV applications. In Phase I, we proved the feasibility of...

  11. Magnesium Based Rockets for Martian Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop Mg rockets for Martian ascent vehicle applications. The propellant can be acquired in-situ from MgO in the Martian regolith (5.1% Mg by mass)...

  12. Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC) proposes to develop a unique Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) to achieve a highly-reliable, low-cost and...

  13. Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a unique Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) to achieve a safe, highly-reliable, low-cost and uniquely versatile propulsion...

  14. Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Rocket Plumes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the need for non-intrusive sensors for rocket plume properties, we propose a laser-based velocity diagnostic that does not require seeding, works in high...

  15. Electrodynamic actuators for rocket engine valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiet, O.; Doshi, D.

    1972-01-01

    Actuators, employed in acoustic loudspeakers, operate liquid rocket engine valves by replacing light paper cones with flexible metal diaphragms. Comparative analysis indicates better response time than solenoid actuators, and improved service life and reliability.

  16. Manufacturing Advanced Channel Wall Rocket Liners Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR will adapt and demonstrate a low cost flexible method of manufacturing channel wall liquid rocket nozzles and combustors, while providing developers a...

  17. Use of a Nonequilibrium MHD Generator for Conversion of SNTP Nuclear Thermal Rocket Exhaust to DC Electric Power for a Multimegawatt Nuclear Electric Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Charles J.

    1994-07-01

    This paper explores a method by which the energy of a high speed flowing gas can efficiently be converted into DC electric power by a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator. A nonequilibrium state may be created in the working fluid during the ionization process using an arc discharge. This nonequilibrium state may possibly be sustained in the fluid using the waste heat byproduct of the natural operation of the generator, if certain characteristics of the fluid/MHD system are maintained. The improved efficiency of the resulting nonequilibrium MHD generator not only allows the system to deliver increased power to the load, but reduces the amount of energy to be expelled from the closed fluid cycle by a radiator.

  18. Stability of Rocket Flight during Burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Srivastava

    1967-10-01

    Full Text Available Stability of the rocket motion during burning is discussed taking into consideration gravity, aerodynamic forces and torques. Conditions for stabilizing the rocket motion are investigated. Analysis for initial and final phases of burning is given separately. Stability regions of the projected motions on two dimensional co-ordinate planes are obtained and thereby stability region of the actual motion is derived. Stability diagrams illustrate statically and dynamically stable and unstable regions.

  19. Rocket Rendezvous at Preassigned Destinations with Optimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Srivastava

    1982-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of rendezvous of an interceptor rocket vehicle through optimal exit path with a destination rocket vehicle at a preassigned location on the destination orbit has been investigated for non-coaxial coplanar elliptic launch and destination orbits in an inverse square gravitational field. The case, when launch and destination orbits are coplanar circular, is also discussed. In the end numerical results for rendezvous have been obtained taking Earth and Mars orbits as launch and destination orbits respectively.

  20. RECENT ACTIVITIES AT THE CENTER FOR SPACE NUCLEAR RESEARCH FOR DEVELOPING NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. O' Brien

    2001-09-01

    Nuclear power has been considered for space applications since the 1960s. Between 1955 and 1972 the US built and tested over twenty nuclear reactors/ rocket-engines in the Rover/NERVA programs. However, changes in environmental laws may make the redevelopment of the nuclear rocket more difficult. Recent advances in fuel fabrication and testing options indicate that a nuclear rocket with a fuel form significantly different from NERVA may be needed to ensure public support. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is pursuing development of tungsten based fuels for use in a NTR, for a surface power reactor, and to encapsulate radioisotope power sources. The CSNR Summer Fellows program has investigated the feasibility of several missions enabled by the NTR. The potential mission benefits of a nuclear rocket, historical achievements of the previous programs, and recent investigations into alternatives in design and materials for future systems will be discussed.

  1. Magnetic bearings: A key technology for advanced rocket engines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, J. PH.

    1992-01-01

    For several years, active magnetic bearings (AMB) have demonstrated their capabilities in many fields, from industrial compressors to control wheel suspension for spacecraft. Despite this broad area, no significant advance has been observed in rocket propulsion turbomachinery, where size, efficiency, and cost are crucial design criteria. To this respect, Societe Europeenne de Propulsion (SEP) had funded for several years significant efforts to delineate the advantages and drawbacks of AMB applied to rocket propulsion systems. Objectives of this work, relative technological basis, and improvements are described and illustrated by advanced turbopump layouts. Profiting from the advantages of compact design in cryogenic environments, the designs show considerable improvements in engine life, performances, and reliability. However, these conclusions should still be tempered by high recurrent costs, mainly due to the space-rated electronics. Development work focused on this point and evolution of electronics show the possibility to decrease production costs by an order of magnitude.

  2. Experimental/Analytical Characterization of the RBCC Rocket-Ejector Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, J. H.; Lehman, M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental/analytical research work described here addresses the rocket-ejector mode (Mach 0-2 operational range) of the RBCC engine. The experimental phase of the program includes studying the mixing and combustion characteristics of the rocket-ejector system utilizing state-of-the-art diagnostic techniques. A two-dimensional variable geometry rocket-ejector system with enhanced optical access was utilized as the experimental platform. The goals of the experimental phase of the research being conducted at Penn State are to: (a) systematically increase the range of rocket-ejector understanding over a wide range of flow/geometry parameters and (b) provide a comprehensive data base for evaluating and anchoring CFD codes. Concurrent with the experimental activities, a CFD code benchmarking effort at Marshall Space Flight Center is also being used to further investigate the RBCC rocket-ejector mode. Experiments involving the single rocket based optically-accessible rocket-ejector system have been conducted for Diffusion and Afterburning (DAB) as well as Simultaneous Mixing and Combustion configurations. For the DAB configuration, air is introduced (direct-connect) or ejected (sea-level static) into a constant area mixer section with a centrally located gaseous oxygen (GO2)/gaseous hydrogen (GH2) rocket combustor. The downstream flowpath for this configuration includes a diffuser, an afterburner and a final converging nozzle. For the SMC configuration, the rocket is centrally located in a slightly divergent duct. For all tested configurations, global measurements of the axial pressure and heat transfer profiles as well as the overall engine thrust were made. Detailed measurements include major species concentration (H2 O2 N2 and H2O) profiles at various mixer locations made using Raman spectroscopy. Complementary CFD calculations of the flowfield at the experimental conditions also provide additional information on the physics of the problem. These calculations

  3. The CODEX sounding rocket payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiger, B.; Shipley, A.; Cash, W.; Rogers, T.; Schultz, T.; McEntaffer, R.; Kaiser, M.

    2011-05-01

    We present the CODEX sounding rocket payload, a soft x-ray (0.1-1.0 keV) spectrometer designed to observe diffuse high-surface brightness astronomical sources. The payload is composed of two modules, each with a 3.25° x 3.25° field of view defined by a stack of wire grids that block light not coming to a 3.0 m focus and admit only nearly-collimated light onto an array of 67 diffraction gratings in an off-plane mount. After a 2.0 m throw, the spectrum is detected by offset large-format gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) detectors. CODEX will target the Vela supernova remnant later this year to measure the temperature and abundances and to determine the contributions of various soft x-ray emission mechanisms to the remnant's energy budget; resulting spectra will have resolution (E/▵E) ranging from 50 to 100 across the band. CODEX is the third-generation of similar payloads from the University of Colorado, with an increased bandpass, higher throughput, and a more robust mechanical structure than its predecessors.

  4. Nitrous Oxide/Paraffin Hybrid Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrin, Robert; Snyder, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Nitrous oxide/paraffin (N2OP) hybrid rocket engines have been invented as alternatives to other rocket engines especially those that burn granular, rubbery solid fuels consisting largely of hydroxyl- terminated polybutadiene (HTPB). Originally intended for use in launching spacecraft, these engines would also be suitable for terrestrial use in rocket-assisted takeoff of small airplanes. The main novel features of these engines are (1) the use of reinforced paraffin as the fuel and (2) the use of nitrous oxide as the oxidizer. Hybrid (solid-fuel/fluid-oxidizer) rocket engines offer advantages of safety and simplicity over fluid-bipropellant (fluid-fuel/fluid-oxidizer) rocket en - gines, but the thrusts of HTPB-based hybrid rocket engines are limited by the low regression rates of the fuel grains. Paraffin used as a solid fuel has a regression rate about 4 times that of HTPB, but pure paraffin fuel grains soften when heated; hence, paraffin fuel grains can, potentially, slump during firing. In a hybrid engine of the present type, the paraffin is molded into a 3-volume-percent graphite sponge or similar carbon matrix, which supports the paraffin against slumping during firing. In addition, because the carbon matrix material burns along with the paraffin, engine performance is not appreciably degraded by use of the matrix.

  5. A3 Subscale Rocket Hot Fire Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, G. P.; Yen, J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper gives a description of the methodology and results of J2-X Subscale Simulator (JSS) hot fire testing supporting the A3 Subscale Diffuser Test (SDT) project at the E3 test facility at Stennis Space Center, MS (SSC). The A3 subscale diffuser is a geometrically accurate scale model of the A3 altitude simulating rocket test facility. This paper focuses on the methods used to operate the facility and obtain the data to support the aerodynamic verification of the A3 rocket diffuser design and experimental data quantifying the heat flux throughout the facility. The JSS was operated at both 80% and 100% power levels and at gimbal angle from 0 to 7 degrees to verify the simulated altitude produced by the rocket-rocket diffuser combination. This was done with various secondary GN purge loads to quantify the pumping performance of the rocket diffuser. Also, special tests were conducted to obtain detailed heat flux measurements in the rocket diffuser at various gimbal angles and in the facility elbow where the flow turns from vertical to horizontal upstream of the 2nd stage steam ejector.

  6. Nuclear rockets: High-performance propulsion for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, C. W.

    1994-05-01

    A new impetus to manned Mars exploration was introduced by President Bush in his Space Exploration Initiative. This has led, in turn, to a renewed interest in high-thrust nuclear thermal rocket propulsion (NTP). The purpose of this report is to give a brief tutorial introduction to NTP and provide a basic understanding of some of the technical issues in the realization of an operational NTP engine. Fundamental physical principles are outlined from which a variety of qualitative advantages of NTP over chemical propulsion systems derive, and quantitative performance comparisons are presented for illustrative Mars missions. Key technologies are described for a representative solid-core heat-exchanger class of engine, based on the extensive development work in the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs (1955 to 1973). The most driving technology, fuel development, is discussed in some detail for these systems. Essential highlights are presented for the 19 full-scale reactor and engine tests performed in these programs. On the basis of these tests, the practicality of graphite-based nuclear rocket engines was established. Finally, several higher-performance advanced concepts are discussed. These have received considerable attention, but have not, as yet, developed enough credibility to receive large-scale development.

  7. The Rocket Balloon (Rocketball): Applications to Science, Technology, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esper, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Originally envisioned to study upper atmospheric phenomena, the Rocket Balloon system (or Rocketball for short) has utility in a range of applications, including sprite detection and in-situ measurements, near-space measurements and calibration correlation with orbital assets, hurricane observation and characterization, technology testing and validation, ground observation, and education. A salient feature includes the need to reach space and near-space within a critical time-frame and in adverse local meteorological conditions. It can also provide for the execution of technology validation and operational demonstrations at a fraction of the cost of a space flight. In particular, planetary entry probe proof-of-concepts can be examined. A typical Rocketball operational scenario consists of a sounding rocket launch and subsequent deployment of a balloon above a desired location. An obvious advantage of this combination is the additional mission 'hang-time' rendered by the balloon once the sounding rocket flight is completed. The system leverages current and emergent technologies at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and other organizations.

  8. Design of a hybrid rocket / inflatable wing UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudduth, Cory

    This paper discusses the design challenges and development of a UAV that transitions from a rocket, which allows the aircraft to reach a target altitude rapidly, and then deploys an inflatable wing from an enclosed shell in midflight to allow for loitering and surveillance. The wing deployment and transition is tested in static and dynamic environments, while the performance and stability of both the aircraft mode and rocket mode are examined analytically. An in-depth discussion of key components, including the design, analysis and testing, is also included. Designing an UAV that transitions from a high velocity rocket, to a slow velocity UAV provides many difficult and unique design challenges. For example, the incorporation of deployable wing technology into a full UAV system results in many design constraints. In this particular design inflatable wings are used to generate lift during aircraft mode, and the stabilizing fins for the main wing also acted as the fins for the vehicle during its rocket phase. This required the balancing of the two different vehicle configurations to ensure that the aircraft would be able to fly stably in both modes, and transition between them without catastrophic failure. Significant research, and testing went into the finding the best method of storing the inflatable wing, as well as finding the required inflation rate to minimize unsteady aerodynamic affects. Design work was also invested in the development of an inflation system, as it had to be highly reliable, and yet very light weight for use in this small UAV. This paper discusses how these design challenges were overcome, the development and testing of individual sub-components and how they are incorporated into the overall vehicle. The analysis that went into this UAV, as well as methods used to optimize the design in order to minimize weight and maximize the aircraft performance and loitering time is also discussed.

  9. Rockets and People. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chertok, Boris E; Siddiqi, Asif A. (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    Much has been written in the West on the history of the Soviet space program but few Westerners have read direct first-hand accounts of the men and women who were behind the many Russian accomplishments in exploring space.The memoirs of Academician Boris Chertok, translated from the original Russian, fills that gap.Chertok began his career as an electrician in 1930 at an aviation factory near Moscow.Twenty-seven years later, he became deputy to the founding figure of the Soviet space program, the mysterious Chief Designer Sergey Korolev. Chertok s sixty-year-long career and the many successes and failures of the Soviet space program constitute the core of his memoirs, Rockets and People. These writings are spread over four volumes. This is volume I. Academician Chertok not only describes and remembers, but also elicits and extracts profound insights from an epic story about a society s quest to explore the cosmos. In Volume 1, Chertok describes his early years as an engineer and ends with the mission to Germany after the end of World War II when the Soviets captured Nazi missile technology and expertise. Volume 2 takes up the story with the development of the world s first intercontinental ballistic missile ICBM) and ends with the launch of Sputnik and the early Moon probes. In Volume 3, Chertok recollects the great successes of the Soviet space program in the 1960s including the launch of the world s first space voyager Yuriy Gagarin as well as many events connected with the Cold War. Finally, in Volume 4, Chertok meditates at length on the massive Soviet lunar project designed to beat the Americans to the Moon in the 1960s, ending with his remembrances of the Energiya-Buran project.

  10. Nonlinear Control of a Reusable Rocket Engine for Life Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Holmes, Michael S.; Ray, Asok

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual development of a life-extending control system where the objective is to achieve high performance and structural durability of the plant. A life-extending controller is designed for a reusable rocket engine via damage mitigation in both the fuel (H2) and oxidizer (O2) turbines while achieving high performance for transient responses of the combustion chamber pressure and the O2/H2 mixture ratio. The design procedure makes use of a combination of linear and nonlinear controller synthesis techniques and also allows adaptation of the life-extending controller module to augment a conventional performance controller of the rocket engine. The nonlinear aspect of the design is achieved using non-linear parameter optimization of a prescribed control structure. Fatigue damage in fuel and oxidizer turbine blades is primarily caused by stress cycling during start-up, shutdown, and transient operations of a rocket engine. Fatigue damage in the turbine blades is one of the most serious causes for engine failure.

  11. Robust lateral pulse jet control of an atmospheric rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchett, Bradley Thomas

    Uncontrolled direct fire rockets exhibit high impact point dispersion, even at relatively short range, and as such have been employed as area weapons on the battlefield. In order to reduce the dispersion of a direct fire rocket, feedback control is employed to fire short-duration solid rocket pulses mounted near the nose of the projectile and acting perpendicular to the projectile axis of symmetry. The feedback law is developed by first determining a piece wise linear model of the projectile swerving motion, subsequently using this linear model to predict the projectile impact point both with and without control, and using the results to command pulses at appropriate times to drive the impact point closer to the specified target. Candidate optimal control laws are formed using rules based on decision grids, and a global control strategy search algorithm. The global search control law proves to be prohibitively computationally expensive for on-line implementation. The performance of the baseline control law is found to be comparable to the rule based and global search optimal control laws. The control gains of the baseline control law are optimized in the presence of parametric plant uncertainty using a Monte Carlo simulation. Performance of the system in the presence of parametric plant uncertainty using the optimized gains is deemed comparable to performance of the baseline controller with no plant uncertainty. The level of uncertainty of several plant parameters is varied in order to compare robustness of the controller when optimized with uncertainty viz. without uncertainty.

  12. MHD thrust vectoring of a rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaune, Julien; Packan, Denis; Tholin, Fabien; Chemartin, Laurent; Stillace, Thierry; Masson, Frederic

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the possibility to use MagnetoHydroDynamics (MHD) to vectorize the thrust of a solid propellant rocket engine exhaust is investigated. Using a magnetic field for vectoring offers a mass gain and a reusability advantage compared to standard gimbaled, elastomer-joint systems. Analytical and numerical models were used to evaluate the flow deviation with a 1 Tesla magnetic field inside the nozzle. The fluid flow in the resistive MHD approximation is calculated using the KRONOS code from ONERA, coupling the hypersonic CFD platform CEDRE and the electrical code SATURNE from EDF. A critical parameter of these simulations is the electrical conductivity, which was evaluated using a set of equilibrium calculations with 25 species. Two models were used: local thermodynamic equilibrium and frozen flow. In both cases, chlorine captures a large fraction of free electrons, limiting the electrical conductivity to a value inadequate for thrust vectoring applications. However, when using chlorine-free propergols with 1% in mass of alkali, an MHD thrust vectoring of several degrees was obtained.

  13. Measurements of reactive gaseous rocket injector admittances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Bell, W. A.; Zinn, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the results of an experimental study of the quantitative determination of the capabilities of the combustion processes associated with coaxial gaseous propellant rocket injectors to drive combustor pressure oscillations. The data, obtained by employing the modified impedance tube technique with compressed air as the oxidizer and acetylene gas as the fuel, describe the frequency dependence of the admittance of the combined injector-combustion process. The measured data are compared with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann analytical model utilizing different values for the characteristic combustion time tau sub b. The values of tau sub b which result in a best fit between the measured and predicted data are indicated for different equivalence ratios. It is shown that for the coaxial injector investigated in this study the tau sub b varies between 0.7 and 1.2 msec for equivalence ratios in the range of 0.57 to 1.31. In addition, the experimental data indicate that the tested injector system could drive combustion instabilities over a frequency range that is in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  14. Oxidation of Copper Alloy Candidates for Rocket Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. Thomas; Humphrey, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    The gateway to affordable and reliable space transportation in the near future remains long-lived rocket-based propulsion systems; and because of their high conductivities, copper alloys remain the best materials for lining rocket engines and dissipating their enormous thermal loads. However, Cu and its alloys are prone to oxidative degradation -- especially via the ratcheting phenomenon of blanching, which occurs in situations where the local ambient can oscillate between oxidation and reduction, as it does in a H2/02- fuelled rocket engine. Accordingly, resistance to blanching degradation is one of the key requirements for the next generation of reusable launch vehicle (RLV) liner materials. Candidate copper alloys have been studied with a view to comparing their oxidation behavior, and hence resistance to blanching, in ambients corresponding to conditions expected in rocket engine service. These candidate materials include GRCop-84 and GRCop-42 (Cu - Cr-8 - Nb-4 and Cu - Cr-4 - Nb-2 respectively); NARloy-Z (Cu-3%Ag-0.5%Y), and GlidCop (Cu-O.l5%Al2O3 ODS alloy); they represent different approaches to improving the mechanical properties of Cu without incurring a large drop in thermal conductivity. Pure Cu (OFHC-Cu) was included in the study to provide a baseline for comparison. The samples were exposed for 10 hours in the TGA to oxygen partial pressures ranging from 322 ppm to 1.0 atmosphere and at temperatures of up to 700 C, and examined by SEM-EDS and other techniques of metallography. This paper will summarize the results obtained.

  15. Produtividade da beterraba e rúcula em função da época de plantio em monocultivo e consórcio Yield of sugar beet and rocket depending on planting times in sole crop and intercropping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilson C Grangeiro

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se os rendimentos das culturas da beterraba e da rúcula em função de épocas de plantio e sistemas solteiro e consorciado, em Mossoró, de janeiro a março de 2005. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi de blocos casualizados com nove tratamentos em quatro repetições. Os tratamentos consistiram dos consórcios da beterraba com rúcula estabelecidos aos 0, 7, 14 e 21 dias após a semeadura da beterraba, monocultura da beterraba e as monoculturas da rúcula, nas mesmas épocas de estabelecimento dos cultivos consorciados. A semeadura da rúcula e beterraba realizada na mesma época proporcionaram maior massa fresca e seca da parte aérea e produtividade de rúcula, sendo respectivamente, de 50,19 g/planta; 5,86 g/planta e 1338,47 g/m². Já para a beterraba, independentemente da época de semeadura, o monocultivo foi superior ao consórcio na produção de massa fresca e de raízes. Os maiores índices de uso eficiente da terra foram obtidos no sistema de consórcio quando a semeadura da rúcula foi realizada no mesmo período (2,0 e aos sete dias (1,9 após a semeadura da beterraba.The yield of sugar beet and rocket was evaluated, as a result of planting times in sole crop and intercropping system. The experiment was carried out in Mossoró, from January to March,f 2005. The experimental design was of randomized complete blocks with nine treatments and four replications. The treatments consisted of the intercrops of sugar beet with rocket established at 0, 7, 14 and 21 days after sugar beet sowing date, as well as of sugar beet and rocket cultivated as sole crops, planted at the same times of the intercropping establishment. The highest values of fresh shoot (50.19 g/plant, dry mass (5.86 g/plant and yield (1338.47 g/m² of rocket were observed in the intercropping systems established at the same time. The highest values of shoot fresh mass and root yield of sugar beet were observed in sole crop. The highest land equivalent

  16. Advanced Computer Science on Internal Ballistics of Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Toru; Kato, Kazushige; Sekino, Nobuhiro; Tsuboi, Nobuyuki; Seike, Yoshio; Fukunaga, Mihoko; Daimon, Yu; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Asakawa, Hiroya

    In this paper, described is the development of a numerical simulation system, what we call “Advanced Computer Science on SRM Internal Ballistics (ACSSIB)”, for the purpose of improvement of performance and reliability of solid rocket motors (SRM). The ACSSIB system is consisting of a casting simulation code of solid propellant slurry, correlation database of local burning-rate of cured propellant in terms of local slurry flow characteristics, and a numerical code for the internal ballistics of SRM, as well as relevant hardware. This paper describes mainly the objectives, the contents of this R&D, and the output of the fiscal year of 2008.

  17. Novel Instrumentation for Rocket Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed SBIR Phase II program is to develop, deploy and deliver novel laser-based instruments that provide rapid, in situ, simultaneous...

  18. Intelligent Monitoring of Rocket Test Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Esteban; Rocha, Stephanie; Figueroa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Stephanie Rocha is an undergraduate student pursuing a degree in Mechanical Engineering. Esteban Duran is pursuing a degree in Computer Science. Our mentor is Fernando Figueroa. Our project involved developing Intelligent Health Monitoring at the High Pressure Gas Facility (HPGF) utilizing the software GensymG2.

  19. Novel Instrumentation for Rocket Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed SBIR Phase I program is to develop novel laser-based instruments that provide rapid, in situ, simultaneous measurements of gas...

  20. Regenerative Cooling for Liquid Rocket Engines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QiFeng

    1995-01-01

    Heat transfer in the thrust chamber is of great importance in the design of liquid propellant rocket engines.Regenerative cooling is and advanced method which can ensure not only the proper running but also higher performance of a rocket engine.The theoretical model is complicated,it relates to fluid bynamics,heat transfer,combustion.etc…,In this paper,a regenerative cooling model is presented.Effects such as radiation,heat transfer to environment,variable thermal properties and coking are included in the model.This model can be applied to all kinds of liquid propellant rocket engines as well as similar constructions.The modularized computer code is completed in the work.

  1. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, R.A.

    1983-09-27

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm/sup -1/, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs.

  2. The Norwegian Sounding Rocket and Balloon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skatteboe, Rolf

    2001-08-01

    The status and recent developments of the Norwegian Sounding Rocket and Balloon Program are presented with focus on national activities and recent achievements. The main part of the Norwegian program is sounding rocket launches conducted by Andøya Rocket Range from the launch facilities on Andøya and at Svalbard. For the majority of the programs, the scientific goal is investigation of processes in the middle and upper atmosphere. The in situ measurements are supplemented by a large number of ground-based support instruments located at the ALOMAR Observatory. The ongoing and planned projects are described and the highlights of the latest completed projects are given. The scientific program for the period 2001-2003 will be reviewed. Several new programs have been started to improve the services available to the international science comunity. The Hotel Payload project and MiniDusty are important examples that will be introduced in the paper. Available space related infrastructure is summarized.

  3. Atmospheric scavenging of solid rocket exhaust effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, D. L.; Purcell, R. Y.

    1978-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket exhaust was directly utilized to ascertain raindrop scavenging rates for hydrogen chloride. Two chambers were used to conduct the experiments; a large, rigid walled, spherical chamber stored the exhaust constituents, while the smaller chamber housing all the experiments was charged as required with rocket exhaust HCl. Surface uptake experiments demonstrated an HCl concentration dependence for distilled water. Sea water and brackish water HCl uptake was below the detection limit of the chlorine-ion analysis technique used. Plant life HCl uptake experiments were limited to corn and soybeans. Plant age effectively correlated the HCl uptake data. Metallic corrosion was not significant for single 20 minute exposures to the exhaust HCl under varying relative humidity. Characterization of the aluminum oxide particles substantiated the similarity between the constituents of the small scale rocket and the full size vehicles.

  4. Integrated Ceramic Matrix Composite and Carbon/Carbon Structures for Large Rocket Engine Nozzles and Nozzle Extensions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Low-cost access to space demands durable, cost-effective, efficient, and low-weight propulsion systems. Key components include rocket engine nozzles and nozzle...

  5. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers, Phase II Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicided niobium alloy (C103) combustion chambers have been used extensively in both NASA and DoD liquid rocket propulsion systems. Niobium alloys offer a good...

  6. A retrospective on early cryogenic primary rocket subsystem designs as integrated into rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.; Schnurstein, Robert E.

    1993-06-01

    A study (Escher and Flornes, 1966) of aerospace propulsion systems for a fully reusable earth-to-orbit space transport application that was performed in 1965-67 is reviewed. The present review provides a detailed, subject-focused technical retrospective on a key subsystem element of the rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) class of aerospace propulsion systems. The RBCC concept is considered to be a leading candidate propulsion approach for either SSTO or two-stage-to-orbit space transportaion applications.

  7. CODEX sounding rocket wire grid collimator design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, Ann; Zeiger, Ben; Rogers, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    CODEX is a sounding rocket payload designed to operate in the soft x-ray (0.1-1.0 kV) regime. The instrument has a 3.25 degree square field of view that uses a one meter long wire grid collimator to create a beam that converges to a line in the focal plane. Wire grid collimator performance is directly correlated to the geometric accuracy of actual grid features and their relative locations. Utilizing a strategic combination of manufacturing and assembly techniques, this design is engineered for precision within the confines of a typical rocket budget. Expected resilience of the collimator under flight conditions is predicted by mechanical analysis.

  8. Development and Short-Range Testing of a 100 kW Side-Illuminated Millimeter-Wave Thermal Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruccoleri, Alexander; Eilers, James A.; Lambot, Thomas; Parkin, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the phase described here of the Millimeter-Wave Thermal Launch System (MTLS) Project was to launch a small thermal rocket into the air using millimeter waves. The preliminary results of the first MTLS flight vehicle launches are presented in this work. The design and construction of a small thermal rocket with a planar ceramic heat exchanger mounted along the axis of the rocket is described. The heat exchanger was illuminated from the side by a millimeter-wave beam and fed propellant from above via a small tank containing high pressure argon or nitrogen. Short-range tests where the rocket was launched, tracked, and heated with the beam are described. The rockets were approximately 1.5 meters in length and 65 millimeters in diameter, with a liftoff mass of 1.8 kilograms. The rocket airframes were coated in aluminum and had a parachute recovery system activated via a timer and Pyrodex. At the rocket heat exchanger, the beam distance was 40 meters with a peak power intensity of 77 watts per square centimeter. and a total power of 32 kilowatts in a 30 centimeter diameter circle. An altitude of approximately 10 meters was achieved. Recommendations for improvements are discussed.

  9. Cusp Alfven and Plasma Electrodynamics Rocket (CAPER) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Launch a single rocket from Andoya Rocket Range into an active cusp event. Observe electric and magnetic fields, HF waves, electron and ion distributions and...

  10. Hydrocarbon Rocket Engine Plume Imaging with Laser Induced Incandescence Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA/ Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) needs sensors that can be operated on rocket engine plume environments to improve NASA/SSC rocket engine performance. In...

  11. Rocket-Plume Spectroscopy Simulation for Hydrocarbon-Fueled Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.

    2010-01-01

    The UV-Vis spectroscopic system for plume diagnostics monitors rocket engine health by using several analytical tools developed at Stennis Space Center (SSC), including the rocket plume spectroscopy simulation code (RPSSC), to identify and quantify the alloys from the metallic elements observed in engine plumes. Because the hydrocarbon-fueled rocket engine is likely to contain C2, CO, CH, CN, and NO in addition to OH and H2O, the relevant electronic bands of these molecules in the spectral range of 300 to 850 nm in the RPSSC have been included. SSC incorporated several enhancements and modifications to the original line-by-line spectral simulation computer program implemented for plume spectral data analysis and quantification in 1994. These changes made the program applicable to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and the Diagnostic Testbed Facility Thruster (DTFT) exhaust plume spectral data. Modifications included updating the molecular and spectral parameters for OH, adding spectral parameter input files optimized for the 10 elements of interest in the spectral range from 320 to 430 nm and linking the output to graphing and analysis packages. Additionally, the ability to handle the non-uniform wavelength interval at which the spectral computations are made was added. This allowed a precise superposition of wavelengths at which the spectral measurements have been made with the wavelengths at which the spectral computations are done by using the line-by-line (LBL) code. To account for hydrocarbon combustion products in the plume, which might interfere with detection and quantification of metallic elements in the spectral region of 300 to 850 nm, the spectroscopic code has been enhanced to include the carbon-based combustion species of C2, CO, and CH. In addition, CN and NO have spectral bands in 300 to 850 nm and, while these molecules are not direct products of hydrocarbon-oxygen combustion systems, they can show up if nitrogen or a nitrogen compound is present

  12. Fuel-Cell Power Source Based on Onboard Rocket Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathi, Gani; Narayan, Sri

    2010-01-01

    The use of onboard rocket propellants (dense liquids at room temperature) in place of conventional cryogenic fuel-cell reactants (hydrogen and oxygen) eliminates the mass penalties associated with cryocooling and boil-off. The high energy content and density of the rocket propellants will also require no additional chemical processing. For a 30-day mission on the Moon that requires a continuous 100 watts of power, the reactant mass and volume would be reduced by 15 and 50 percent, respectively, even without accounting for boiloff losses. The savings increase further with increasing transit times. A high-temperature, solid oxide, electrolyte-based fuel-cell configuration, that can rapidly combine rocket propellants - both monopropellant system with hydrazine and bi-propellant systems such as monomethyl hydrazine/ unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine (MMH/UDMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) to produce electrical energy - overcomes the severe drawbacks of earlier attempts in 1963-1967 of using fuel reforming and aqueous media. The electrical energy available from such a fuel cell operating at 60-percent efficiency is estimated to be 1,500 Wh/kg of reactants. The proposed use of zirconia-based oxide electrolyte at 800-1,000 C will permit continuous operation, very high power densities, and substantially increased efficiency of conversion over any of the earlier attempts. The solid oxide fuel cell is also tolerant to a wide range of environmental temperatures. Such a system is built for easy refueling for exploration missions and for the ability to turn on after several years of transit. Specific examples of future missions are in-situ landers on Europa and Titan that will face extreme radiation and temperature environments, flyby missions to Saturn, and landed missions on the Moon with 14 day/night cycles.

  13. Regression Rate Study in HTPB/GOX Hybrid Rocket Motors.

    OpenAIRE

    Philmon George; Krishnan, S; Lalitha Ramachandran; P. M. Varkey; Raveendran, M.

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical and experimenIal studies on hybrid rocket motor combustion research are briefly reviewed and the need for a clear understanding of hybrid rocket fuel regression rate mechanism is brought out. A test facility established at the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, for hybrid rocket motor research study is described.The results of an experimental study on hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor are presented. Fuel grains with ammonium perchlor...

  14. Liquid rocket combustion chamber acoustic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Magno de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, many solid and liquid rocket motors have experienced combustion instabilities. Among other causes, there is the interaction of acoustic modes with the combustion and/or fluid dynamic processes inside the combustion chamber. Studies have been showing that, even if less than 1% of the available energy is diverted to an acoustic mode, combustion instability can be generated. On one hand, this instability can lead to ballistic pressure changes, couple with other propulsion systems such as guidance or thrust vector control, and in the worst case, cause motor structural failure. In this case, measures, applying acoustic techniques, must be taken to correct/minimize these influences on the combustion. The combustion chamber acoustic behavior in operating conditions can be estimated by considering its behavior in room conditions. In this way, acoustic tests can be easily performed, thus identifying the cavity modes. This paper describes the procedures to characterize the acoustic behavior in the inner cavity of four different configurations of a combustion chamber. Simple analytical models are used to calculate the acoustic resonance frequencies and these results are compared with acoustic natural frequencies measured at room conditions. Some comments about the measurement procedures are done, as well as the next steps for the continuity of this research. The analytical and experimental procedures results showed good agreement. However, limitations on high frequency band as well as in the identification of specific kinds of modes indicate that numerical methods able to model the real cavity geometry and an acoustic experimental modal analysis may be necessary for a more complete analysis. Future works shall also consider the presence of passive acoustic devices such as baffles and resonators capable of introducing damping and avoiding or limiting acoustic instabilities.

  15. Effects of rocket engines on laser during lunar landing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Xiong, E-mail: wanxiong1@126.com [Key Laboratory of Space Active Opto-Electronics Technology, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200083 (China); Key Laboratory of Nondestructive Test (Ministry of Education), Nanchang Hangkong University, Nanchang 330063 (China); Shu, Rong; Huang, Genghua [Key Laboratory of Space Active Opto-Electronics Technology, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2013-11-15

    In the Chinese moon exploration project “ChangE-3”, the laser telemeter and lidar are important equipments on the lunar landing vehicle. A low-thrust vernier rocket engine works during the soft landing, whose plume may influence on the laser equipments. An experiment has first been accomplished to evaluate the influence of the plume on the propagation characteristics of infrared laser under the vacuum condition. Combination with our theoretical analysis has given an appropriate assessment of the plume's effects on the infrared laser hence providing a valuable basis for the design of lunar landing systems.

  16. Near-term lunar nuclear thermal rocket engine options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; Scheil, Christine M.; Collins, John T.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is an attractive candidate propulsion system option for manned planetary missions. Its high performance capability for such missions translates into a substantial reduction in low-earth-orbit (LEO) required mass and trip times with increased operational flexibility. This study examined NTR engine options that could support near-term lunar mission operations. Expander and gas generator cycle, solid-core NERVA derivative reactor-based NTR engines were investigated. Weight, size, operational characteristics, and design features for representative NTR engine concepts are presented. The impact of using these NTR engines for a typical lunar mission scenario is also examined.

  17. On the hydrodynamics of rocket propellant engine inducers and turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Agostino, L.

    2013-12-01

    The lecture presents an overview of some recent results of the work carried out at Alta on the hydrodynamic design and rotordynamic fluid forces of cavitating turbopumps for liquid propellant feed systems of modern rocket engines. The reduced order models recently developed for preliminary geometric definition and noncavitating performance prediction of tapered-hub axial inducers and centrifugal turbopumps are illustrated. The experimental characterization of the rotordynamic forces acting on a whirling four-bladed, tapered-hub, variable-pitch high-head inducer, under different load and cavitation conditions is presented. Future perspectives of the work to be carried out at Alta in this area of research are briefly illustrated.

  18. 14 CFR 437.67 - Tracking a reusable suborbital rocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tracking a reusable suborbital rocket. 437... a reusable suborbital rocket. A permittee must— (a) During permitted flight, measure in real time the position and velocity of its reusable suborbital rocket; and (b) Provide position and...

  19. Specific Impulses Losses in Solid Propellant Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-17

    to use the collision function form proposed by Golovin to simplify this production term: 4C><=) <P- .: Accordingly: m hence, by integration: Now, we...November 21, 1940 in Paris, Seine. VFirst Thesis. "Contribution to the Study of Specific i Impulse Loss in Solid Propellant Rockets." Second Thesis

  20. An Analysis of Rocket Propulsion Testing Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Carmen; Rahman, Shamim

    2010-01-01

    The primary mission at NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) is rocket propulsion testing. Such testing is commonly characterized as one of two types: production testing for certification and acceptance of engine hardware, and developmental testing for prototype evaluation or research and development (R&D) purposes. For programmatic reasons there is a continuing need to assess and evaluate the test costs for the various types of test campaigns that involve liquid rocket propellant test articles. Presently, in fact, there is a critical need to provide guidance on what represents a best value for testing and provide some key economic insights for decision-makers within NASA and the test customers outside the Agency. Hence, selected rocket propulsion test databases and references have been evaluated and analyzed with the intent to discover correlations of technical information and test costs that could help produce more reliable and accurate cost projections in the future. The process of searching, collecting, and validating propulsion test cost information presented some unique obstacles which then led to a set of recommendations for improvement in order to facilitate future cost information gathering and analysis. In summary, this historical account and evaluation of rocket propulsion test cost information will enhance understanding of the various kinds of project cost information; identify certain trends of interest to the aerospace testing community.

  1. The rocket problem in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Henriques, Pedro G

    2011-01-01

    We derive the covariant optimality conditions for rocket trajectories in general relativity, with and without a bound on the magnitude of the proper acceleration. The resulting theory is then applied to solve two specific problems: the minimum fuel consumption transfer between two galaxies in a FLRW model, and between two stable circular orbits in the Schwarzschild spacetime.

  2. Rocket and Laboratory Studies in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Paul D.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA Grant NAG5-5122 and covers the period from March 1, 1997 to February 28, 2001. This grant was a continuation of a program in rocket and laboratory studies in ultraviolet astronomy that was supported by NASA grant NAG5-619. As of March 1, 2001, this program is continuing under grant NAG5-5315. During the period of the grant, annual status reports have been submitted detailing the scientific achievements and current objectives of each report period. These will not be repeated here. Among the highlights of the program are four successful rocket launches including participation in the campaign to study comet Hale-Bopp in April 1997. We have continued our emphasis on long-slit spectroscopy of extended sources in the shorter wavelength far-ultraviolet, necessitating the development of evacuated telescope/spectrograph payloads. Finally, we also note the use of our ultraviolet calibration facilities in support of other sounding rocket investigators and for other space missions such as the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer. We include a list of the sounding rocket launches performed under NASA sponsorship during this period, a list of Ph.D. degrees awarded to students who worked in this program, and a summary bibliography of publications between 1997 and 2001.

  3. NASA Sounding Rocket Program educational outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberspeaker, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    Educational and public outreach is a major focus area for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The NASA Sounding Rocket Program (NSRP) shares in the belief that NASA plays a unique and vital role in inspiring future generations to pursue careers in science, mathematics, and technology. To fulfill this vision, the NASA Sounding Rocket Program engages in a host of student flight projects providing unique and exciting hands-on student space flight experiences. These projects include single stage Orion missions carrying "active" high school experiments and "passive" Explorer School modules, university level Orion and Terrier-Orion flights, and small hybrid rocket flights as part of the Small-scale Educational Rocketry Initiative (SERI) currently under development. Efforts also include educational programs conducted as part of major campaigns. The student flight projects are designed to reach students ranging from Kindergarteners to university undergraduates. The programs are also designed to accommodate student teams with varying levels of technical capabilities - from teams that can fabricate their own payloads to groups that are barely capable of drilling and tapping their own holes. The program also conducts a hands-on student flight project for blind students in collaboration with the National Federation of the Blind. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is proud of its role in inspiring the "next generation of explorers" and is working to expand its reach to all regions of the United States and the international community as well.

  4. Government Relations: It's Not Rocket Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radway, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Many people in the early childhood education field are afraid of government relations work, intimidated by politicians, and believe the whole process is unseemly. The author asserts that they should not be afraid nor be intimidated because government relations is not rocket science and fundamentally officeholders are no different from the rest of…

  5. Simulation of Airplane and Rocket Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahbah, Magdy M.; Berning, Michael J.; Choy, Tony S.

    1987-01-01

    Simulation and Optimization of Rocket Trajectories program (SORT) contains comprehensive mathematical models for simulating aircraft dynamics, freely falling objects, and many types of ballistic trajectories. Provides high-fidelity, three-degrees-of-freedom simulation for atmospheric and exoatmospheric flight. It numerically models vehicle subsystems and vehicle environment. Used for wide range of simulations. Written in machine-independent FORTRAN 77.

  6. Infrared spectroradiometer for rocket exhaust analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herget, W. F.

    1968-01-01

    Infrared spectroradiometer measures high-resolution spectral absorption, emission, temperature, and concentration of chemical species in radically symmetric zones of the exhaust plumes of large rocket engines undergoing static firing tests. Measurements are made along predetermined lines of sight through the plume.

  7. Rocketing into the future the history and technology of rocket planes

    CERN Document Server

    van Pelt, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Rocketing into the Future journeys into the exciting world of rocket planes, examining the exotic concepts and actual flying vehicles that have been devised over the last one hundred years. Lavishly illustrated with over 150 photographs, it recounts the history of rocket planes from the early pioneers who attached simple rockets on to their wooden glider airplanes to the modern world of high-tech research vehicles. The book then looks at the possibilities for the future. The technological and economic challenges of the Space Shuttle proved insurmountable, and thus the program was unable to fulfill its promise of low-cost access to space. However, the burgeoning market of suborbital space tourism may yet give the necessary boost to the development of a truly reusable spaceplane.

  8. Thermal Barrier Coatings on Copper Substrates for Rocket Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloesser, Jana; Fedorova, Tatiana; Bäker, Martin; Rösler, Joachim

    Currently a new generation of relaunchable space transportation system using liquid hydrogen/ liquid oxygen rocket engines is under development. The inner combustion chamber is exposed to extreme thermal loads and environmental attack during starts. To prevent failure of the cooling channels, a thermal barrier coating to provide thermal and oxidation protection could be applied. Thermal barrier coatings are state of the art for gas turbines and this concept should be transferred to copper substrates in rocket engine applications. The thermomechanical loading conditions are quite different from the gas turbine applications as heat fluxes and temperature gradients are much higher while overall service time is much shorter. As a start for optimization of a suitable coating, a material system known for gas turbines is employed. In this work a thermal barrier coating system is applied by atmospheric plasma spraying to the copper-based high strength alloy Cu-1%Cr-0.3%Zr. The bond coat consists of a NiCrAlY alloy, while partially stabilized zirconia is used as a top coat. Spraying parameter optimization for the new substrate is described. The reached coating system is tested in thermal cycling experiments, where no failure of the coating could be detected. In oxidation experiments good environmental protection of the coating is shown.

  9. Research on Instantaneous Thrust Measurement for Attitude-control Solid Rocket Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Hua-bing; WANG Jian-ping; LIN Feng; XU Wen-gan

    2008-01-01

    In order to measure the instantaneous thrust of a certain attitude-control solid rocket motor, based on the analysis of the measurement principles, the difference between the instantaneous thrust and steady thrust measurements is pointed out. According to the measurement characteristics, a dynamic digital filter compensation method is presented. Combined the identification-modeling, dynamic compensation and simulation, the system's dynamic mathematic model is established. And then, a compensation digital filter is also designed. Thus, the dynamic response of the system is improved and the instantaneous thrust measurement can be implemented. The measurement results for the rocket motor show that the digital filter compensation is effective in the instantaneous thrust measurement.

  10. Flutter Analysis of RX-420 Balistic Rocket Fin Involving Rigid Body Modes of Rocket Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Novi Andria

    2013-01-01

    Flutter is a phenomenon that has brought a catastrophic failure to the flight vehicle structure. In this experiment, flutter was analyzed for its symmetric and antisymmetric configuration to understand the effect of rocket rigid modes to the fin flutter characteristic. This research was also expected to find out the safety level of RX-420 structure design. The analysis was performed using half rocket model. Fin structure used in this research was a fin which has semispan 600 mm, thickness 12 ...

  11. Influence of gunpowder start system on starting performance of liquid rocket engines%火药起动系统对发动机起动性能的影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙海雨; 刘志让

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at the pumping pressure open cycle liquid rocket engine which is started by solid start cartridge (SSC), the performance of the start system is studied in this paper. The simulated model of SSC in the start system and the numerical model of the powder gas pipeline were established to simulate the process of gunpowder start. The influence of SSC and gas pipeline parameters on start performance of engine is analyzed to ensure the main influence parameters and regular patterns. It is found that the powder quantity of SSC and the diameter of the first throat in the powder gas pipeline are the most effective factors to the engine's start characteristic. The diameter of the powder gas pipeline's second throat and the diameter of the powder gas pipeline's outlet are the least ones in the case of that the powder gas pipeline's flow field keeps rated condition. The simulated result of the start system was proven in engine hot tests.%针对采用火药起动器起动的泵压开式循环液体火箭发动机,对其起动系统进行了分析和研究。建立了液体火箭发动机火药起动器计算模型和起动系统燃气管路流场计算模型。将所建立的起动系统模型应用于发动机系统仿真,对发动机火药起动过程进行仿真,分析了起动系统中火药起动器参数和燃气管路参数对发动机起动性能的影响,确定了主要影响参数和影响规律。火药起动器火药药柱内径、火药药柱长度以及燃气管路火药起动器喷管喉部直径为强影响因素;燃气管路涡轮喷嘴喉部直径和管路出口直径在确保发动机火药起动主要工况段燃气管路流场流态为额定工况流态的前提下,为弱影响因素。试验数据验证表明,发动机起动系统的仿真结果正确、可信。

  12. Development of Kabila rocket: A radioisotope heated thermionic plasma rocket engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalomba Mboyi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new type of plasma rocket engine, the Kabila rocket, using a radioisotope heated thermionic heating chamber instead of a conventional combustion chamber or catalyst bed is introduced and it achieves specific impulses similar to the ones of conventional solid and bipropellant rockets. Curium-244 is chosen as a radioisotope heat source and a thermal reductive layer is also used to obtain precise thermionic emissions. The self-sufficiency principle is applied by simultaneously heating up the emitting material with the radioisotope decay heat and by powering the different valves of the plasma rocket engine with the same radioisotope decay heat using a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. This rocket engine is then benchmarked against a 1 N hydrazine thruster configuration operated on one of the Pleiades-HR-1 constellation spacecraft. A maximal specific impulse and power saving of respectively 529 s and 32% are achieved with helium as propellant. Its advantages are its power saving capability, high specific impulses and simultaneous ease of storage and restart. It can however be extremely voluminous and potentially hazardous. The Kabila rocket is found to bring great benefits to the existing spacecraft and further research should optimize its geometric characteristics and investigate the physical principals of its operation.

  13. An open cycle gas core fusion rocket for space exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammash, T.; Godfrey, T.

    A nuclear propulsion system that utilizes fusion reactions to heat a plasma in a magnetically confined device is examined as a potential rocket. It makes use of a high density plasma in a magnetic mirror geometry with a collision mean free path much shorter than its length. Under these conditions the plasma behaves like a fluid with confinement properties dictated by gasdynamic laws. Accordingly, the plasma escape from the device is analogous to the flow of a gas into vacuum from a vessel with a hole. Such a system is capable of producing a very high specific impulse albeit at modest thrust. One approach for enhancing the thrust is to use an auxiliary hydrogen propellant that could be regeneratively heated before it is introduced into the reactor chamber. As is flows past the fusion plasma it will be further heated by the radiation (bremsstrahlung and synchrotron) emanating from the plasma, and upon emergence from the nozzle it will generate the desired thrust. The system thus functions much like an open cycle gas core rocket with very attractive propulsive capabilities. In this paper we present the underlying physics principles of such a concept and assess its capability by applying the results to a round trip mission to Mars. It is shown that the propulsion parameters exceed those of a gas core fission reactor and without many of major hydrodynamic problems confronted by the latter.

  14. Rocket impact on panel structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerheijm, J.; Rhijnsburger, M.P.M.; Vegt, I.; Tyler Street, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Passive protection systems for expeditionary forces camps are studied by TNO on behalf of the Netherland’s MODCorps of Engineers. This paper will first address the inventory of the internationally available knowledge on threat versus protection systems. Next the results of an exploratory experimenta

  15. Measurements of temperature profiles at the exit of small rockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, M; Harshbarger, F C

    1966-02-01

    The sodium line reversal technique was used to determine the reversal temperature profile across the exit of small rockets. Measurements were made on one 73-kg thrust rocket, and two 23-kg thrust rockets with different injectors. The large rocket showed little variation of reversal temperature across the plume. However, the 23-kg rockets both showed a large decrease of reversal temperature from the axis to the edge of the plume. In addition, the sodium line reversal technique of temperature measurement was compared with an infrared technique developed in these laboratories.

  16. Mixing and reaction processes in rocket based combined cycle and conventional rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Matthew Kurt

    Raman spectroscopy was used to make species measurements in two rocket engines. An airbreathing rocket, the rocket based combined cycle (RBCC) engine, and a conventional rocket were investigated. A supersonic rocket plume mixing with subsonic coflowing air characterizes the ejector mode of the RBCC engine. The mixing length required for the air and plume to become homogenous is a critical dimension. For the conventional rocket experiments, a gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen single-element shear coaxial injector was used. Three chamber Mach number conditions, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3, were chosen to assess the effect of Mach number on mixing. The flow within the chamber was entirely subsonic. For the RBCC experiments, vertical Raman line measurements were made at multiple axial locations downstream from the rocket nozzle plane. Species profiles assessed the mixing progress between the supersonic plume and subsonic air. For the conventional rocket, Raman line measurements were made downstream from the injector face. The goal was to evaluate the effect of increased chamber Mach number on injector mixing/reaction. For both engines, quantitative and qualitative information was collected for computational fluid dynamics (CFD development. The RBCC experiments were conducted for three distinct geometries. The primary flow path was a diffuse and afterburner design with a direct-connect air supply. A sea-level static (SLS) version and a thermally choked variant were also tested. The experimental results show that mixing length increases with additional coflow air in the DAB geometry. Operation of variable rocket mixture ratios at identical air flow rates did not significantly affect the mixing length. The thermally choked variant had a longer mixing length compared to the DAB geometry, and the SLS modification had a shorter mixing length due to a reduced air flow. The conventional rocket studies focused on the effect of chamber Mach number on primary injector mixing. Chamber Mach

  17. Overview of initial research into the effects of strong vortex flow on hybrid rocket combustion and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloyer, P.; Knuth, William H.; Goodman, J.

    1993-01-01

    An examination of the effect of vortex flow on hybrid rocket combustion and performance is underway. Emphasis is on response of the fuel regression rate when subjected to vortex flow. Initial results show that there is a definite effect of the vortex on fuel regression rate. Future work will focus on quantitatively measuring this regression rate. This work is part of an overall program to develop an ultra low cost fuel system for hybrid rocket engines.

  18. The next generation rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beichel, Rudi; O'Brien, Charles J.; Taylor, James P.

    This paper examines propulsion system technologies for earth-to-orbit vehicles, and describes several propulsion system concepts which could support the recommendations of the Commission for Space Development for the year 2000. The hallmark of that system must and will be reliability. Reliability will be obtained through a very structured design approach, coupled with a rational, cost effective, development and qualification program. To improve the next generation space transportation propulsion systems we need to select the very best of alternative power and performance cycles and engine physical concepts with a rigid requirement to achieve a robust, dependable, affordable propulsion system. For example, engine concepts using either propellants or non-propellant fluids for cooling and/or power drive offer the potential to provide smooth, controlled engine starts, low turbine temperatures, etc. as required for long life turbomachinery. Concepts examined are LOX/LH 2, |LOX/LH 2 + hydrocarbon, and LOX/LH 2 + hydrocarbon + Al dual expander engines, separate LOX/LH 2 and LOX/hydrocarbon engines, and variable mixture ratio engines. A fully reusable propulsion system that is perceived to be very low risk and low in operation cost is described.

  19. Axisymmetric Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2005-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred considerable interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models. In recent work by the author, a quasi-one-dimensional, finite rate chemistry CFD model was utilized to study the gasdynamics and performance characteristics of PDREs over a range of blowdown pressure ratios from 1-1000. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and enable first-order parametric studies of the effect of several nozzle and extension geometries on PDRE performance over a wide range of conditions. However, the quasi-one-dimensional approach is limited in that it cannot properly capture the multidimensional blast wave and flow expansion downstream of the PDRE, nor can it resolve nozzle flow separation if present. Moreover, the previous work was limited to single-pulse calculations. In this paper, an axisymmetric finite rate chemistry model is described and utilized to study these issues in greater detail. Example Mach number contour plots showing the multidimensional blast wave and nozzle exhaust plume are shown. The performance results are compared with the quasi-one-dimensional results from the previous paper. Both Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions are calculated in order to determine the effect of viscous

  20. Rocket center Peenemünde — Personal memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Konrad; Stuhlinger, Ernst

    Von Braun built his first rockets as a young teenager. At 14, he started making plans for rockets for human travel to the Moon and Mars. The German Army began a rocket program in 1929. Two years later, Colonel (later General) Becker contacted von Braun who experimented with rockets in Berlin, gave him a contract in 1932, and, jointly with the Air Force, in 1936 built the rocket center Peenemünde where von Braun and his team developed the A-4 (V-2) rocket under Army auspices, while the Air Force developed the V-1 (buzz bomb), wire-guided bombs, and rocket planes. Albert Speer, impressed by the work of the rocketeers, allowed a modest growth of the Peenemünde project; this brought Dannenberg to the von Braun team in 1940. Hitler did not believe in rockets; he ignored the A-4 project until 1942 when he began to support it, expecting that it could turn the fortunes of war for him. He drastically increased the Peenemünde work force and allowed the transfer of soldiers from the front to Peenemünde; that was when Stuhlinger, in 1943, came to Peenemünde as a Pfc.-Ph.D. Later that year, Himmler wrenched the authority over A-4 production out of the Army's hands, put it under his command, and forced production of the immature rocket at Mittelwerk, and its military deployment against targets in France, Belgium, and England. Throughout the development of the A-4 rocket, von Braun was the undisputed leader of the project. Although still immature by the end of the war, the A-4 had proceeded to a status which made it the first successful long-range precision rocket, the prototype for a large number of military rockets built by numerous nations after the war, and for space rockets that launched satellites and traveled to the Moon and the planets.

  1. Analytical study of nozzle performance for nuclear thermal rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.; Kacynski, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear propulsion has been identified as one of the key technologies needed for human exploration of the Moon and Mars. The Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) uses a nuclear reactor to heat hydrogen to a high temperature followed by expansion through a conventional convergent-divergent nozzle. A parametric study of NTR nozzles was performed using the Rocket Engine Design Expert System (REDES) at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The REDES used the JANNAF standard rigorous methodology to determine nozzle performance over a range of chamber temperatures, chamber pressures, thrust levels, and different nozzle configurations. A design condition was set by fixing the propulsion system exit radius at five meters and throat radius was varied to achieve a target thrust level. An adiabatic wall was assumed for the nozzle, and its length was assumed to be 80 percent of a 15 degree cone. The results conclude that although the performance of the NTR, based on infinite reaction rates, looks promising at low chamber pressures, finite rate chemical reactions will cause the actual performance to be considerably lower. Parameters which have a major influence on the delivered specific impulse value include the chamber temperature and the chamber pressures in the high thrust domain. Other parameters, such as 2-D and boundary layer effects, kinetic rates, and number of nozzles, affect the deliverable performance of an NTR nozzle to a lesser degree. For a single nozzle, maximum performance of 930 seconds and 1030 seconds occur at chamber temperatures of 2700 and 3100 K, respectively.

  2. Advanced Deuterium Fusion Rocket Propulsion For Manned Deep Space Missions

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Dr Friedwardt

    2009-01-01

    Excluding speculations about future breakthrough discoveries in physics, it is shown that with what is at present known, and also what is technically feasible, manned space flight to the limits of the solar system and beyond deep into the Oort cloud is quite well possible. Using deuterium as the rocket fuel of choice, abundantly available on the comets of the Oort cloud, rockets driven by deuterium fusion, can there be refueled. To obtain a high thrust with a high specific impulse, favors the propulsion by deuterium micro-bombs, and it is shown that the ignition of deuterium micro-bombs is possible by intense GeV proton beams, generated in space by using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated billion volt capacitor. The cost to develop this kind of propulsion system in space would be very high, but it can also be developed on earth by a magnetically insulated Super Marx Generator. Since the ignition of deuterium is theoretically possible with the Super Marx Generator, rather than deuterium-tritium ...

  3. Experimental and computational data from a small rocket exhaust diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Samuel E.

    1993-06-01

    The Diagnostics Testbed Facility (DTF) at the NASA Stennis Space Center in Mississippi is a versatile facility that is used primarily to aid in the development of nonintrusive diagnostics for liquid rocket engine testing. The DTF consists of a fixed, 1200 lbf thrust, pressure fed, liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen rocket engine, and associated support systems. An exhaust diffuser has been fabricated and installed to provide subatmospheric pressures at the exit of the engine. The diffuser aerodynamic design was calculated prior to fabrication using the PARC Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics code. The diffuser was then fabricated and tested at the DTF. Experimental data from these tests were acquired to determine the operational characteristics of the system and to correlate the actual and predicted flow fields. The results show that a good engineering approximation of overall diffuser performance can be made using the PARC Navier-Stokes code and a simplified geometry. Correlations between actual and predicted cell pressure and initial plume expansion in the diffuser are good; however, the wall pressure profiles do not correlate as well with the experimental data.

  4. LASL nuclear rocket propulsion program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, R.E.

    1956-04-01

    The immediate objective of the LASL nuclear propulsion (Rover) program is the development of a heat exchanger reactor system utilizing uranium-graphite fuel elements and ammonia propellant. This program is regarded as the first step in the development of nuclear propulsion systems for missiles. The major tasks of the program include the investigation of materials at high temperatures, development of fuel elements, investigation of basic reactor characteristics, investigation of engine control problems, detailed engine design and ground testing. The organization and scheduling of the initial development program have been worked out in some detail. Only rather general ideas exist concerning the projection of this work beyond 1958.

  5. Design of a Novel Gaseous Hydrogen-Oxygen Rocket Injector Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    An overview of activities supporting the design of a gaseous hydrogen-oxygen rocket injector element is presented in viewgraph form. The purpose of the research was to find a viable design for a rocket gas-gas injector that mixes fuel and oxidizer thoroughly and quickly. Computational fluid dynamics analyses were used with reacting flow to evaluate design options for mixing, temperature distribution, and combustion efficiency. A design was found that is an improvement over designs derived from liquid systems and is far better than traditional shear-coax.

  6. Capacity control of power stations by O 2/H 2 rocket combustor technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternfeld, Ing. H. J.

    1995-10-01

    The concept of a hydrogen/oxygen spinning reserve system is described. The novel component of this concept is a socalled hydrogen/oxygen steam generator derived from modern H 2/O 2 rocket combustor technology. With the HYDROSS-project the DLR and German power plant industries as well as electric utilities have converted the rocket combustor technology to a power plant component. The status of the project as well as technical problems encountered with the conversion are described. Finally, future options for utilizing H 2/O 2 steam generator technology for stand-by and peak-load power plants are discussed.

  7. Inexpensive photodiode arrays for use in rocket plume and hot source monitoring and diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Dallas; Shanks, Robert; Cole, Reagan; Hudson, M. Keith

    2003-09-01

    The spectroscopic analysis of plume emissions is a non-intrusive method which has been used to check for fatigue and possible damage throughout the pumps and other mechanisms in a rocket motor or engine. These components are made of various alloys. Knowing the composition of the alloys and for which parts they are used, one can potentially determine from the emissions in the plume which component is failing. Currently, optical multichannel analyser systems are being used which utilize charge coupled devices, cost tens of thousands of dollars, are somewhat delicate, and usually require cooling. We have developed two rugged instruments using less expensive linear photodiode arrays as detectors. A high-resolution system was used to detect atomic emission lines while a low-resolution system was used to detect molecular emission bands. We have also written data acquisition software and built electronic circuits to control the arrays and collect data. While the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has used similar systems for characterization of the space shuttle main engine, the emissions from other rocket systems have not been surveyed so well. The two instruments described will be utilized to study hybrid rocket emissions at the University of Arkansas-Little Rock hybrid rocket facility.

  8. Facility for cold flow testing of solid rocket motor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchus, D. L.; Hill, O. E.; Whitesides, R. Harold

    1992-02-01

    A new cold flow test facility was designed and constructed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center for the purpose of characterizing the flow field in the port and nozzle of solid propellant rocket motors (SRM's). A National Advisory Committee was established to include representatives from industry, government agencies, and universities to guide the establishment of design and instrumentation requirements for the new facility. This facility design includes the basic components of air storage tanks, heater, submicron filter, quiet control valve, venturi, model inlet plenum chamber, solid rocket motor (SRM) model, exhaust diffuser, and exhaust silencer. The facility was designed to accommodate a wide range of motor types and sizes from small tactical motors to large space launch boosters. This facility has the unique capability of testing ten percent scale models of large boosters such as the new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM), at full scale motor Reynolds numbers. Previous investigators have established the validity of studying basic features of solid rocket motor development programs include the acquisition of data to (1) directly evaluate and optimize the design configuration of the propellant grain, insulation, and nozzle; and (2) provide data for validation of the computational fluid dynamics, (CFD), analysis codes and the performance analysis codes. A facility checkout model was designed, constructed, and utilized to evaluate the performance characteristics of the new facility. This model consists of a cylindrical chamber and converging/diverging nozzle with appropriate manifolding to connect it to the facility air supply. It was designed using chamber and nozzle dimensions to simulate the flow in a 10 percent scale model of the ASRM. The checkout model was recently tested over the entire range of facility flow conditions which include flow rates from 9.07 to 145 kg/sec (20 to 320 Ibm/sec) and supply pressure from 5.17 x 10 exp 5 to 8.27 x 10 exp 6 Pa. The

  9. Nuclear rocket using indigenous Martian fuel NIMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrin, Robert

    1991-01-01

    In the 1960's, Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) engines were developed and ground tested capable of yielding isp of up to 900 s at thrusts up to 250 klb. Numerous trade studies have shown that such traditional hydrogen fueled NTR engines can reduce the inertial mass low earth orbit (IMLEO) of lunar missions by 35 percent and Mars missions by 50 to 65 percent. The same personnel and facilities used to revive the hydrogen NTR can also be used to develop NTR engines capable of using indigenous Martian volatiles as propellant. By putting this capacity of the NTR to work in a Mars descent/acent vehicle, the Nuclear rocket using Indigenous Martian Fuel (NIMF) can greatly reduce the IMLEO of a manned Mars mission, while giving the mission unlimited planetwide mobility.

  10. Ignition transient analysis of solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Samuel S.

    1991-01-01

    Measurement data on the performance of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor show wide variations in the head-end pressure changes and the total thrust build-up during the ignition transient periods. To analyze the flow and thermal behavior in the tested solid rocket motors, a 1-dimensional, ideal gas flow model via the SIMPLE algorithm was developed. Numerical results showed that burning patterns in the star-shaped head-end segment of the propellant and the erosive burning rate are two important factors controlling the ignition transients. The objective of this study is to extend the model to include the effects of aluminum particle commonly used in solid propellants. To treat the effects of aluminum-oxide particles in the combustion gas, conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the particles are added in the numerical formulation and integrated by an inter-phase-slip algorithm.

  11. Performance Charts for Multistage Rocket Boosters

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, John S.; Weber, Richard J.

    1961-01-01

    Charts relating the stage propellant fractions are given for two-and three-stage rockets launching payloads into nominal low-altitude circular orbits about the earth. A simple method is described for extending these data to higher orbit or escape missions. Various combinations of stages using RP - liquid-oxygen and hydrogen - liquid-oxygen propellants are considered. However, the results can be generalized with little error to any other propellant combination.Charts relating the stage propellant fractions are given for two-and three-stage rockets launching payloads into nominal low-altitude circular orbits about the earth. A simple method is described for extending these data to higher orbit or escape missions. Various combinations of stages using RP - liquid-oxygen and hydrogen - liquid-oxygen propellants are considered. However, the results can be generalized with little error to any other propellant combination.

  12. Origin of how steam rockets can reduce space transport cost by orders of magnitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppero, Anthony; Larson, Thomas K.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.; Werner, James E.; Rice, John W.; Hill, Thomas J.; Richins, William D.; Parlier, Lynn

    1999-01-01

    A brief sketch shows the origin of why and how thermal rocket propulsion has the unique potential to dramatically reduce the cost of space transportation for most inner solar system missions of interest. Orders of magnitude reduction in cost are apparently possible when compared to all processes requiring electrolysis for the production of rocket fuels or propellants and to all electric propulsion systems. An order of magnitude advantage can be attributed to rocket propellant tank factors associated with storing water propellant, compared to cryogenic liquids. An order of magnitude can also be attributed to the simplicity of the extraction and processing of ice on the lunar surface, into an easily stored, non-cryogenic rocket propellant (water). A nuclear heated thermal rocket can deliver thousands of times its mass to Low Earth Orbit from the Lunar surface, providing the equivalent to orders of magnitude drop in launch cost for mass in Earth orbit. Mass includes water ice. These cost reductions depend (exponentially) on the mission delta-v requirements being less than about 6 km/s, or about 3 times the specific velocity of steam rockets (2 km/s, from Isp 200 sec). Such missions include: from the lunar surface to Low Lunar Orbit, (LLO), from LLO to lunar escape, from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO), from LEO to Earth Escape, from LEO to Mars Transfer Orbit, from LLO to GEO, missions returning payloads from about 10% of the periodic comets using propulsive capture to orbits around Earth itself, and fast, 100 day missions from Lunar Escape to Mars. All the assertions depend entirely and completely on the existence of abundant, nearly pure ice at the permanently dark North and South Poles of the Moon.

  13. Nonpropagation Test Program for M55 Stab Detonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    carton, and five cartons per wooden bux. MRC provided the dial indexing integrity test fixture and tube-to-dial inter- face adapter. A Deltron Fluid ...dial nest Integrity test setup 23 Solenoid valve •- Skinner M/odel EG7 •-Deltron fluid products Office 0.79 a•m -’•"(0.031in- metering valve 0-23684...Radford, VA 24141 Commander Sunflower Army munition Plant ATTN: SARSU-S Lawrence, KS 66044 Commander Volunteer Army Amnition Plant ATTN: SARVO-S

  14. Ultrasonic Weld Sealing of M55 Stab Detonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    barium nitrate, and graphite Lead styphnate , tetracene, barium nitrate NOL-130 5 1. Elimination of the lacquer application with its attendant...chlorate FFFFG Magnesium and barium peroxide Boron, lead dioxide, and Viton A AIA (ferric oxide, zirconium) Potassium chlorate, sulfur, and dyes...Tungsten, barium perchlorate, and ammon- ium perchlorate Manganese, barium chromate, and lead chromate Magnesium, sodium nitrate, organic binder 75

  15. Identification of Noise Sources During Rocket Engine Test Firings and a Rocket Launch Using a Microphone Phased-Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Jayanta; Mosher, Robert N.; Porter, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    A 70 microphone, 10-foot by 10-foot, microphone phased array was built for use in the harsh environment of rocket launches. The array was setup at NASA Wallops launch pad 0A during a static test firing of Orbital Sciences' Antares engines, and again during the first launch of the Antares vehicle. It was placed 400 feet away from the pad, and was hoisted on a scissor lift 40 feet above ground. The data sets provided unprecedented insight into rocket noise sources. The duct exit was found to be the primary source during the static test firing; the large amount of water injected beneath the nozzle exit and inside the plume duct quenched all other sources. The maps of the noise sources during launch were found to be time-dependent. As the engines came to full power and became louder, the primary source switched from the duct inlet to the duct exit. Further elevation of the vehicle caused spilling of the hot plume, resulting in a distributed noise map covering most of the pad. As the entire plume emerged from the duct, and the ondeck water system came to full power, the plume itself became the loudest noise source. These maps of the noise sources provide vital insight for optimization of sound suppression systems for future Antares launches.

  16. CAC - NUCLEAR THERMAL ROCKET CORE ANALYSIS CODE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most important factors in the development of nuclear rocket engine designs is to be able to accurately predict temperatures and pressures throughout a fission nuclear reactor core with axial hydrogen flow through circular coolant passages. CAC is an analytical prediction program to study the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics of a circular coolant passage. CAC predicts as a function of time axial and radial fluid conditions, passage wall temperatures, flow rates in each coolant passage, and approximate maximum material temperatures. CAC incorporates the hydrogen properties model STATE to provide fluid-state relations, thermodynamic properties, and transport properties of molecular hydrogen in any fixed ortho-para combination. The program requires the general core geometry, the core material properties as a function of temperature, the core power profile, and the core inlet conditions as function of time. Although CAC was originally developed in FORTRAN IV for use on an IBM 7094, this version is written in ANSI standard FORTRAN 77 and is designed to be machine independent. It has been successfully compiled on IBM PC series and compatible computers running MS-DOS with Lahey F77L, a Sun4 series computer running SunOS 4.1.1, and a VAX series computer running VMS 5.4-3. CAC requires 300K of RAM under MS-DOS, 422K of RAM under SunOS, and 220K of RAM under VMS. No sample executable is provided on the distribution medium. Sample input and output data are included. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. CAC was developed in 1966, and this machine independent version was released in 1992. IBM-PC and IBM are registered trademarks of International Business Machines. Lahey F77L is a registered trademark of Lahey Computer Systems, Inc. SunOS is a trademark of Sun Microsystems, Inc. VMS is a trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  17. Failure characteristics analysis and fault diagnosis for liquid rocket engines

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This book concentrates on the subject of health monitoring technology of Liquid Rocket Engine (LRE), including its failure analysis, fault diagnosis and fault prediction. Since no similar issue has been published, the failure pattern and mechanism analysis of the LRE from the system stage are of particular interest to the readers. Furthermore, application cases used to validate the efficacy of the fault diagnosis and prediction methods of the LRE are different from the others. The readers can learn the system stage modeling, analyzing and testing methods of the LRE system as well as corresponding fault diagnosis and prediction methods. This book will benefit researchers and students who are pursuing aerospace technology, fault detection, diagnostics and corresponding applications.

  18. Numerical Simulations of Flow and Fuel Regression Rate Coupling in Hybrid Rocket Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius STOIA-DJESKA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The hybrid propulsion offers some remarkable advantages like high safety and high specific impulse and thus it is considered a promising technology for the next generation launchers and space systems. The purpose of this work is to validate a design tool for hybrid rocket motors (HRM through numerical simulations.

  19. Thermographic inspection of solid-fuel rocket booster field joint components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Karen G.; Crisman, Elton M.

    1990-01-01

    Thermographic nondestructive evaluation techniques were investigated for possible application on Space Shuttle solid rocket booster field joint hardware. This investigation included evaluation of the clevis and tang mating surfaces for scratches and measurement of grease film thickness. The field joint insulation system was inspected for voids and disbonds.

  20. Study of solid rocket motor for space shuttle booster, Volume 3: Program acquisition planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The program planning acquisition functions for the development of the solid propellant rocket engine for the space shuttle booster is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) program management, (2) contracts administration, (3) systems engineering, (4) configuration management, and (5) maintenance engineering. The plans for manufacturing, testing, and operations support are included.

  1. Coupled simulation of CFD-flight-mechanics with a two-species-gas-model for the hot rocket staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Reimann, Bodo; Eggers, Thino

    2016-11-01

    The hot rocket staging is to separate the lowest stage by directly ignite the continuing-stage-motor. During the hot staging, the rocket stages move in a harsh dynamic environment. In this work, the hot staging dynamics of a multistage rocket is studied using the coupled simulation of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Flight Mechanics. Plume modeling is crucial for a coupled simulation with high fidelity. A 2-species-gas model is proposed to simulate the flow system of the rocket during the staging: the free-stream is modeled as "cold air" and the exhausted plume from the continuing-stage-motor is modeled with an equivalent calorically-perfect-gas that approximates the properties of the plume at the nozzle exit. This gas model can well comprise between the computation accuracy and efficiency. In the coupled simulations, the Navier-Stokes equations are time-accurately solved in moving system, with which the Flight Mechanics equations can be fully coupled. The Chimera mesh technique is utilized to deal with the relative motions of the separated stages. A few representative staging cases with different initial flight conditions of the rocket are studied with the coupled simulation. The torque led by the plume-induced-flow-separation at the aft-wall of the continuing-stage is captured during the staging, which can assist the design of the controller of the rocket. With the increasing of the initial angle-of-attack of the rocket, the staging quality becomes evidently poorer, but the separated stages are generally stable when the initial angle-of-attack of the rocket is small.

  2. Net-Shape HIP Powder Metallurgy Components for Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bampton, Cliff; Goodin, Wes; VanDaam, Tom; Creeger, Gordon; James, Steve

    2005-01-01

    True net shape consolidation of powder metal (PM) by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) provides opportunities for many cost, performance and life benefits over conventional fabrication processes for large rocket engine structures. Various forms of selectively net-shape PM have been around for thirty years or so. However, it is only recently that major applications have been pursued for rocket engine hardware fabricated in the United States. The method employs sacrificial metallic tooling (HIP capsule and shaped inserts), which is removed from the part after HIP consolidation of the powder, by selective acid dissolution. Full exploitation of net-shape PM requires innovative approaches in both component design and materials and processing details. The benefits include: uniform and homogeneous microstructure with no porosity, irrespective of component shape and size; elimination of welds and the associated quality and life limitations; removal of traditional producibility constraints on design freedom, such as forgeability and machinability, and scale-up to very large, monolithic parts, limited only by the size of existing HIP furnaces. Net-shape PM HIP also enables fabrication of complex configurations providing additional, unique functionalities. The progress made in these areas will be described. Then critical aspects of the technology that still require significant further development and maturation will be discussed from the perspective of an engine systems builder and end-user of the technology.

  3. Using Innovative Technologies for Manufacturing and Evaluating Rocket Engine Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Erin M.; Hardin, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the manufacturing and evaluation techniques that are currently used for rocket engine component production are traditional methods that have been proven through years of experience and historical precedence. As we enter into a new space age where new launch vehicles are being designed and propulsion systems are being improved upon, it is sometimes necessary to adopt new and innovative techniques for manufacturing and evaluating hardware. With a heavy emphasis on cost reduction and improvements in manufacturing time, manufacturing techniques such as Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) and white light scanning are being adopted and evaluated for their use on J-2X, with hopes of employing both technologies on a wide variety of future projects. DMLS has the potential to significantly reduce the processing time and cost of engine hardware, while achieving desirable material properties by using a layered powdered metal manufacturing process in order to produce complex part geometries. The white light technique is a non-invasive method that can be used to inspect for geometric feature alignment. Both the DMLS manufacturing method and the white light scanning technique have proven to be viable options for manufacturing and evaluating rocket engine hardware, and further development and use of these techniques is recommended.

  4. Vertical Wind Tunnel for Prediction of Rocket Flight Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoani Bryson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A customized vertical wind tunnel has been built by the University of Canterbury Rocketry group (UC Rocketry. This wind tunnel has been critical for the success of UC Rocketry as it allows the optimization of avionics and control systems before flight. This paper outlines the construction of the wind tunnel and includes an analysis of flow quality including swirl. A minimal modelling methodology for roll dynamics is developed that can extrapolate wind tunnel behavior at low wind speeds to much higher velocities encountered during flight. The models were shown to capture the roll flight dynamics in two rocket launches with mean roll angle errors varying from 0.26° to 1.5° across the flight data. The identified model parameters showed consistent and predictable variations over both wind tunnel tests and flight, including canard–fin interaction behavior. These results demonstrate that the vertical wind tunnel is an important tool for the modelling and control of sounding rockets.

  5. Russian Nuclear Rocket Engine Design for Mars Exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vadim Zakirov; Vladimir Pavshook

    2007-01-01

    This paper is to promote investigation into the nuclear rocket engine (NRE) propulsion option that is considered as a key technology for manned Mars exploration. Russian NRE developed since the 1950 s in the former Soviet Union to a full-scale prototype by the 1990 s is viewed as advantageous and the most suitable starting point concept for manned Mars mission application study. The main features of Russian heterogeneous core NRE design are described and the most valuable experimental performance results are summarized. These results have demonstrated the significant specific impulse performance advantage of the NRE over conventional liquid rocket engine (LRE) propulsion technologies. Based on past experience,the recent developments in the field of high-temperature nuclear fuels, and the latest conceptual studies, the developed NRE concept is suggested to be upgraded to the nuclear power and propulsion system (NPPS),more suitable for future manned Mars missions. Although the NRE still needs development for space application, the problems are solvable with additional effort and funding.

  6. Evaluation of Vortex Chamber Concepts for Liquid Rocket Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Huu Phuoc; Knuth, Williams; Michaels, Scott; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Rocket-based combined-cycle engines (RBBC) being considered at NASA for future generation launch vehicles feature clusters of small rocket thrusters as part of the engine components. Depending on specific RBBC concepts, these thrusters may be operated at various operating conditions including power level and/or propellant mixture ratio variations. To pursue technology developments for future launch vehicles, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is examining vortex chamber concepts for the subject cycle engine application. Past studies indicated that the vortex chamber schemes potentially have a number of advantages over conventional chamber methods. Due to the nature of the vortex flow, relatively cooler propellant streams tend to flow along the chamber wall. Hence, the thruster chamber can be operated without the need of any cooling techniques. This vortex flow also creates strong turbulence, which promotes the propellant mixing process. Consequently, the subject chamber concepts not only offer the system simplicity but they also would enhance the combustion performance. The test results showed that the chamber performance was markedly high even at a low chamber length-to- diameter ratio (L/D). This incentive can be translated to a convenience in the thrust chamber packaging.

  7. JANNAF "Test and Evaluation Guidelines for Liquid Rocket Engines": Status and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Douglas; VanLerberghe, Wayne M.; Rahman, Shamim A.

    2017-01-01

    For many decades, the U.S. rocket propulsion industrial base has performed remarkably in developing complex liquid rocket engines that can propel critical payloads into service for the nation, as well as transport people and hardware for missions that open the frontiers of space exploration for humanity. This has been possible only at considerable expense given the lack of detailed guidance that captures the essence of successful practices and knowledge accumulated over five decades of liquid rocket engine development. In an effort to provide benchmarks and guidance for the next generation of rocket engineers, the Joint Army Navy NASA Air Force (JANNAF) Interagency Propulsion Committee published a liquid rocket engine (LRE) test and evaluation (T&E) guideline document in 2012 focusing on the development challenges and test verification considerations for liquid rocket engine systems. This document has been well received and applied by many current LRE developers as a benchmark and guidance tool, both for government-driven applications as well as for fully commercial ventures. The USAF Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC) has taken an additional near-term step and is directing activity to adapt and augment the content from the JANNAF LRE T&E guideline into a standard for potential application to future USAF requests for proposals for LRE development initiatives and launch vehicles for national security missions. A draft of this standard was already sent out for review and comment, and is intended to be formally approved and released towards the end of 2017. The acceptance and use of the LRE T&E guideline is possible through broad government and industry participation in the JANNAF liquid propulsion committee and associated panels. The sponsoring JANNAF community is expanding upon this initial baseline version and delving into further critical development aspects of liquid rocket propulsion testing at the integrated stage level as well as engine component level, in

  8. Boiler and Pressure Balls Monopropellant Thermal Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, William D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The proposed technology is a rocket engine cycle utilizing as the propulsive fluid a low molecular weight, cryogenic fluid, typically liquid hydrogen, pressure driven, heated, and expelled through a nozzle to generate high velocity and high specific impulse discharge gas. The proposed technology feeds the propellant through the engine cycle without the use of a separate pressurization fluid and without the use of turbomachinery. Advantages of the proposed technology are found in those elements of state-of-the-art systems that it avoids. It does not require a separate pressurization fluid or a thick-walled primary propellant tank as is typically required for a classical pressure-fed system. Further, it does not require the acceptance of intrinsic reliability risks associated with the use of turbomachinery

  9. Reducing the risk to Mars: The gas core nuclear rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, S. D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1998-01-01

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas-core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The authors have completed a comparative study of the potential impact that a GCNR could have on a manned Mars mission. The total IMLEO, transit times, and accumulated radiation dose to the crew will be compared with the NASA Design Reference Missions.

  10. Thermal Design for the Micro-X Rocket Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfinger, D. C.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Danowski, M.; Heine, S. N. T.

    2016-08-01

    Micro-X is a NASA funded, rocket borne X-ray imaging spectrometer that uses transition edge sensors (TESs) to do high-resolution microcalorimetry. The TESs are cooled by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator, whose salt pill functions as a heat sink for the detectors. We have made a thermal model of the cryostat with SPICE for the purposes of understanding its behavior at low temperatures. Implementing modifications based on this model has further allowed us to cool the system down to a lower temperature than had previously been accessible and to improve its low-temperature hold time. These modifications include a variety of schemes for power through heat sinks and tweaking the conductance between the cold baths and the refrigerated hardware. We present an overview of the model and its constituent parameters, information about thermal modifications, and a summary of results from thermal tests of the entire system.

  11. Cathodic Protection Deployment on Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Lee M.

    1998-01-01

    Corrosion protection of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters incorporates the use of cathodic protection(anodes) in concert with several coatings systems. The SRB design has large carbon/carbon composites(motor nozzle) electrically connected to an aluminum alloy structure. Early in the STS program, the aluminum structures incurred tremendous corrosive attack due primarily to the galvanic couple to the carbon/carbon nozzle at coating damage locations. Also contributing to the galvanic corrosion problem were stainless steel and titanium alloy components housed within the aluminum structures and electrically connected to the aluminum structures. This paper will highlight the evolution in the protection of the aluminum structures, providing historical information and summary data from the operation of the corrosion protection systems. Also, data and information will be included regarding the evaluation and deployment of inorganic zinc rich primers as anode area on the aluminum structures.

  12. The optimisation of low-acceleration interstellar relativistic rocket trajectories using genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Kenneth K. H.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2017-04-01

    A vast wealth of literature exists on the topic of rocket trajectory optimisation, particularly in the area of interplanetary trajectories due to its relevance today. Studies on optimising interstellar and intergalactic trajectories are usually performed in flat spacetime using an analytical approach, with very little focus on optimising interstellar trajectories in a general relativistic framework. This paper examines the use of low-acceleration rockets to reach galactic destinations in the least possible time, with a genetic algorithm being employed for the optimisation process. The fuel required for each journey was calculated for various types of propulsion systems to determine the viability of low-acceleration rockets to colonise the Milky Way. The results showed that to limit the amount of fuel carried on board, an antimatter propulsion system would likely be the minimum technological requirement to reach star systems tens of thousands of light years away. However, using a low-acceleration rocket would require several hundreds of thousands of years to reach these star systems, with minimal time dilation effects since maximum velocities only reached about 0.2 c . Such transit times are clearly impractical, and thus, any kind of colonisation using low acceleration rockets would be difficult. High accelerations, on the order of 1 g, are likely required to complete interstellar journeys within a reasonable time frame, though they may require prohibitively large amounts of fuel. So for now, it appears that humanity's ultimate goal of a galactic empire may only be possible at significantly higher accelerations, though the propulsion technology requirement for a journey that uses realistic amounts of fuel remains to be determined.

  13. Regression Rate Study in HTPB/GOX Hybrid Rocket Motors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philmon George

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical and experimenIal studies on hybrid rocket motor combustion research are briefly reviewed and the need for a clear understanding of hybrid rocket fuel regression rate mechanism is brought out. A test facility established at the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, for hybrid rocket motor research study is described.The results of an experimental study on hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor are presented. Fuel grains with ammonium perchlorate "additive" have shownenhanced oxidizermass flux dependence. Smallergrains have higher regression rates than those of the larger ones.

  14. Unsupervised Anomaly Detection for Liquid-Fueled Rocket Prop...

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Title: Unsupervised Anomaly Detection for Liquid-Fueled Rocket Propulsion Health Monitoring. Abstract: This article describes the results of applying four...

  15. Potential Climate and Ozone Impacts From Hybrid Rocket Engine Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M.

    2009-12-01

    Hybrid rocket engines that use N2O as an oxidizer and a solid hydrocarbon (such as rubber) as a fuel are relatively new. Little is known about the composition of such hybrid engine emissions. General principles and visual inspection of hybrid plumes suggest significant soot and possibly NO emissions. Understanding hybrid rocket emissions is important because of the possibility that a fleet of hybrid powered suborbital rockets will be flying on the order of 1000 flights per year by 2020. The annual stratospheric emission for these rockets would be about 10 kilotons, equal to present day solid rocket motor (SRM) emissions. We present a preliminary analysis of the magnitude of (1) the radiative forcing from soot emissions and (2) the ozone depletion from soot and NO emissions associated with such a fleet of suborbital hybrid rockets. Because the details of the composition of hybrid emissions are unknown, it is not clear if the ozone depletion caused by these hybrid rockets would be more or less than the ozone depletion from SRMs. We also consider the climate implications associated with the N2O production and use requirements for hybrid rockets. Finally, we identify the most important data collection and modeling needs that are required to reliably assess the complete range of environmental impacts of a fleet of hybrid rockets.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Rocket Exhaust Interaction with Lunar Soil Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rocket plume impingement may cause significant damage and contaminate co-landed spacecraft and surrounding habitat structures during Lunar landing operations. Under...

  17. Numerical Simulation of Rocket Exhaust Interaction with Lunar Soil Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Rocket plume impingement can cause significant damage and contaminate co-landing spacecraft and surrounding habitat structures during lunar landing operations. CFDRC...

  18. Coning motion stability of wrap around fin rockets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO XueRui; YANG ShuXing; XU Yong

    2007-01-01

    Both the asymptotical stability criterion and the bounded stability criterion of the coning motion for wrap around fin (WAF) rockets are proposed through the analysis of coning motion equations, which can be easily used to determine the existence of the coning motion during the rocket design. The correctness of the criterions is verified by mathematical simulation examples of a WAF rocket with different setting angles. It is also found that the setting angle of WAF has great effects on the rolling moment and side moment of the rocket.

  19. Coning motion stability of wrap around fin rockets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Both the asymptotical stability criterion and the bounded stability criterion of the coning motion for wrap around fin(WAF) rockets are proposed through the analy-sis of coning motion equations,which can be easily used to determine the exis-tence of the coning motion during the rocket design. The correctness of the crite-rions is verified by mathematical simulation examples of a WAF rocket with differ-ent setting angles. It is also found that the setting angle of WAF has great effects on the rolling moment and side moment of the rocket.

  20. Romanian MRE Rocket Engines Program - An Early Endeavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugescu, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    -channel and 5 digital-channel data measuring and recording system. The first hot test firing of the MRE-1B motor took place successfully on April 9th, 1969 in Bucharest, at the "Elie Carafoli" Chair of UPB. The research program continued with the development of a series of solid, double base propellant rocket and ram-rocket motors, with emphasize on the optimization of the gasdynamic contour of the engine, in order to increase the flight performances. Increments of up to 8% in specific thrust were measured on the test stand, with mass savings and no extra costs. The test firing of the first Romanian, air-breathing ram-rocket engine took place successfully in august 1987 at the Chemical Works in Fagaras, Romania. Astronautics", founded in Bucharest. The principles and history of the "MRE" research program are presented in the proposed paper.

  1. Ontogenic profiling of glucosinolates, flavonoids, and other secondary metabolites in Eruca sativa (salad rocket), Diplotaxis erucoides (wall rocket), Diplotaxis tenuifolia (wild rocket), and Bunias orientalis (Turkish rocket).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard N; Rosa, Eduardo A S; Mellon, Fred A; Kroon, Paul A

    2006-05-31

    As an influence of the Mediterranean diet, rocket species such as Eruca sativa L., Diplotaxis species, and Bunias orientalis L. are eaten all over the world at different ontogenic stages in salads and soups. They are all species within the plant order Capparales (glucosinolate-containing species), and all are from the family Brassicaceae. Predominantly, the leaves of these species are eaten raw or cooked, although Eruca flowers are also consumed. There is considerable potential with raw plant material for a higher exposure to bioactive phytochemicals such as glucosinolates, their hydrolysis products, and also phenolics, flavonoids, and vitamins such as vitamin C. These compounds are susceptible to ontogenic variation, and the few published studies that have addressed this topic have been inconsistent. Thus, an ontogenic study was performed and all samples were analyzed using a previously developed robust liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the identification and quantification of the major phytochemicals in all tissues of the rocket species. Seeds and roots of both Eruca and Diplotaxis contained predominantly 4-methylthiobutylglucosinolate. Leaves of Eruca and Diplotaxis contained high amounts of 4-mercaptobutylglucosinolate with lower levels of 4-methylthiobutlyglucosinolate and 4-methylsulfinylbutylglucosinolate. Flowers of Eruca and Diplotaxiscontained predominantly 4-methylsulfinylbutyl-glucosinolate. In addition, roots of both Diplotaxisspecies contained 4-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate but 4-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate was absent from roots of Eruca. Seeds and seedlings of all Eruca contained N-heterocyclic compounds but no sinapine, whereas Diplotaxis contained sinapine but not the N-heterocycles. In all tissues of B. orientalis, 4-hydroxybenzylglucosinolate and 4-methylsulfinyl-3-butenylglucosinolate were predominant. All rocket tissues, except roots, contained significant levels of polyglycosylated flavonoids, with/without hydroxycinnamoyl

  2. Lyman alpha coronagraph research sounding rocket program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, W. H.; Kohl, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The ultraviolet light coronagraph was developed and successfully flown on three rocket flights on 13 April 1979, 16 February 1980 and 20 July 1982. During each of these flights, the Ultraviolet Light Coronagraph was flown jointly with the White Light Coronagraph provided by the High Altitude Observatory. Ultraviolet diagnostic techniques and instrumentation for determining the basic plasma parameters of solar wind acceleration regions in the extended corona were developed and verified and the understanding of the physics of the corona through the performance, analysis and interpretation of solar observations advanced. Valuable UV diagnostics can be performed in the absence of a natural solar eclipse.

  3. Air expansion in the water rocket

    CERN Document Server

    Romanelli, Alejandro; Madina, Federico González

    2012-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics of the water rocket in the thrust phase, taking into account the expansion of the air with water vapor, vapor condensation and the energy taken from the environment. We set up a simple experimental device with a stationary bottle and verified that the gas expansion in the bottle is well approximated by a polytropic process $PV^\\beta$= constant, where the parameter $\\beta$ depends on the initial conditions. We find an analytical expression for $\\beta $ that only depends on the thermodynamic initial conditions and is in good agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Analysis of a Radioisotope Thermal Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Rodriguez, Jonathan P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    The Triton Hopper is a concept for a vehicle to explore the surface of Neptunes moon Triton, which uses a radioisotope heated rocket engine and in-situ propellant acquisition. The initial Triton Hopper conceptual design stores pressurized Nitrogen in a spherical tank to be used as the propellant. The aim of the research was to investigate the benefits of storing propellant at ambient temperature and heating it through a thermal block during engine operation, as opposed to storing gas at a high temperature.

  5. Realization and simulation of rocket servo system based on PID control--improved expert adaptive PID control%PID控制在火箭炮伺服系统中的仿真实现--改进的专家自适应PID控制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张原; 黄文静; 桑路路

    2013-01-01

    Given that the traditional PID control system can not give consideration to the static performance and dynamic perfor-mance, this paper presents a new practical design of PID control algorithm based on the analysis of both traditional PID control-ler and expert adaptive controller, which can be used in the field of servo rocket system. In addition, this paper studies how to de-sign the type of improved expert adaptive controller suitable for the controlled plant. The simulation of traditional PID control method and improved expert adaptive PID control method are implemented based on MATLAB/Simulink. Meanwhile, the simu-lation results explain that improved expert adaptive controller is an effective method to be used in the servo rocket system.%  针对传统PID(Proportional-Integral-Derivative)控制无法兼顾部分系统的静态性能和动态性能,结合专家PID控制原理,提出了一种改进的专家自适应PID控制器的设计方案,对某火箭炮伺服系统进行仿真跟踪。给出了伺服系统的分析设计过程,利用MATLAB/Simulink完成了改进的专家自适应PID控制器在某伺服系统中的仿真应用,得到了良好的跟踪特性图,说明了该方法的有效性。

  6. Real-time diagnostics for a reusable rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, T. H.; Merrill, W.; Duyar, A.

    1992-01-01

    A hierarchical, decentralized diagnostic system is proposed for the Real-Time Diagnostic System component of the Intelligent Control System (ICS) for reusable rocket engines. The proposed diagnostic system has three layers of information processing: condition monitoring, fault mode detection, and expert system diagnostics. The condition monitoring layer is the first level of signal processing. Here, important features of the sensor data are extracted. These processed data are then used by the higher level fault mode detection layer to do preliminary diagnosis on potential faults at the component level. Because of the closely coupled nature of the rocket engine propulsion system components, it is expected that a given engine condition may trigger more than one fault mode detector. Expert knowledge is needed to resolve the conflicting reports from the various failure mode detectors. This is the function of the diagnostic expert layer. Here, the heuristic nature of this decision process makes it desirable to use an expert system approach. Implementation of the real-time diagnostic system described above requires a wide spectrum of information processing capability. Generally, in the condition monitoring layer, fast data processing is often needed for feature extraction and signal conditioning. This is usually followed by some detection logic to determine the selected faults on the component level. Three different techniques are used to attack different fault detection problems in the NASA LeRC ICS testbed simulation. The first technique employed is the neural network application for real-time sensor validation which includes failure detection, isolation, and accommodation. The second approach demonstrated is the model-based fault diagnosis system using on-line parameter identification. Besides these model based diagnostic schemes, there are still many failure modes which need to be diagnosed by the heuristic expert knowledge. The heuristic expert knowledge is

  7. Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Development Risk Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tony

    2014-01-01

    There are clear advantages of development of a Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) for a crewed mission to Mars. NTR for in-space propulsion enables more ambitious space missions by providing high thrust at high specific impulse (approximately 900 sec) that is 2 times the best theoretical performance possible for chemical rockets. Missions can be optimized for maximum payload capability to take more payload with reduced total mass to orbit; saving cost on reduction of the number of launch vehicles needed. Or missions can be optimized to minimize trip time significantly to reduce the deep space radiation exposure to the crew. NTR propulsion technology is a game changer for space exploration. However, "NUCLEAR" is a word that is feared and vilified by some groups and the hostility towards development of any nuclear systems can meet great opposition by the public as well as from national leaders and people in authority. Communication of nuclear safety will be critical to the success of the development of the NTR. Why is there a fear of nuclear? A bomb that can level a city is a scary weapon. The first and only times the Nuclear Bomb was used in a war was on Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War 2. The "Little Boy" atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945 and the "Fat Man" on Nagasaki 3 days later on August 9th. Within the first 4 months of bombings, 90- 166 thousand people died in Hiroshima and 60-80 thousand died in Nagasaki. It is important to note for comparison that over 500 thousand people died and 5 million made homeless due to strategic bombing (approximately 150 thousand tons) of Japanese cities and war assets with conventional non-nuclear weapons between 1942- 1945. A major bombing campaign of "firebombing" of Tokyo called "Operation Meetinghouse" on March 9 and 10 consisting of 334 B-29's dropped approximately1,700 tons of bombs around 16 square mile area and over 100 thousand people have been estimated to have died. The declaration of death is very

  8. GreenCube and RocketCube: Low-Resource Sensorcraft for Atmospheric and Ionospheric Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracikowski, P. J.; Lynch, K. A.; Slagle, A. K.; Fagin, M. H.; Currey, S. R.; Siddiqui, M. U.

    2009-12-01

    In situ atmospheric and ionospheric studies benefit greatly from the ability to separate variations in space from variations in time. Arrays of many probes are a method of doing this, but because of the technical character and expense of developing large arrays, so far probe arrays have been the domain of well-funded science missions. CubeSats and low-resource craft (``Picosats") are an avenue for bringing array-based studies of the atmosphere and ionosphere into the mainstream. The Lynch Rocket Lab at Dartmouth College is attempting to develop the instruments, experience, and heritage to implement arrays of many low-resource sensorcraft while doing worthwhile science in the development process. We are working on two CubeSat projects to reach this goal: GreenCube for atmospheric studies and RocketCube for ionospheric studies. GreenCube is an undergraduate student-directed high-altitude balloon-borne 3U CubeSat. GreenCube I was a bus, telemetry, and mechanical system development project. GreenCube I flew in the fall of 2008. The flight was successfully recovered and tracked over the 97km range and through the 29km altitude rise. GreenCube I carried six thermal housekeeping sensors, a GPS, a magnetometer, and a HAM radio telemetry system with a reporting rate of once every 30 seconds. The velocity profile obtained from the GPS data implies the presence of atmospheric gravity waves during the flight. GreenCube II flew in August 2009 with the science goal of detecting atmospheric gravity waves over the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Two balloons with identical payloads were released 90 seconds apart to make 2-point observations. Each payload carried a magnetometer, 5 thermistors for ambient temperature readings, a GPS, and an amateur radio telemetry system with a 7 second reporting cadence. A vertically oriented video camera on one payload and a horizontally oriented video camera on the other recorded the characteristics of gravity waves in the nearby clouds. We

  9. Analysis on the adiabatic condition of the recirculation pipe in the LOX/RP1 rocket engine chill-down system%液氧煤油发动机预冷系统回流管绝热影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李军; 孙礼杰; 张亮

    2011-01-01

    The circulation chill - down of a cryogenic rocket engine is affected by many factors. Theoretical analysis and experiments research were carried out for the study of the influence of the recirculation pipe adiabatic condition on the chill - down effect. The significant data and conclusions obatained can lead help for the design of the chill - down system.%低温液体火箭发动机循环预冷受多因素影响,针对液氧煤油发动机自然循环系统回流管绝热条件对预冷效果的影响进行理论分析和试验研究,得到了有意义的数据和结论,对后续型号自然循环预冷系统设计提供了依据.

  10. Linear quadratic servo control of a reusable rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    The paper deals with the development of a design method for a servo component in the frequency domain using singular values and its application to a reusable rocket engine. A general methodology used to design a class of linear multivariable controllers for intelligent control systems is presented. Focus is placed on performance and robustness characteristics, and an estimator design performed in the framework of the Kalman-filter formalism with emphasis on using a sensor set different from the commanded values is discussed. It is noted that loop transfer recovery modifies the nominal plant noise intensities in order to obtain the desired degree of robustness to uncertainty reflected at the plant input. Simulation results demonstrating the performance of the linear design on a nonlinear engine model over all power levels during mainstage operation are discussed.

  11. Approaches to Low Fuel Regression Rate in Hybrid Rocket Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Pastrone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid rocket engines are promising propulsion systems which present appealing features such as safety, low cost, and environmental friendliness. On the other hand, certain issues hamper the development hoped for. The present paper discusses approaches addressing improvements to one of the most important among these issues: low fuel regression rate. To highlight the consequence of such an issue and to better understand the concepts proposed, fundamentals are summarized. Two approaches are presented (multiport grain and high mixture ratio which aim at reducing negative effects without enhancing regression rate. Furthermore, fuel material changes and nonconventional geometries of grain and/or injector are presented as methods to increase fuel regression rate. Although most of these approaches are still at the laboratory or concept scale, many of them are promising.

  12. Investigation of the cooling film distribution in liquid rocket engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Antonio Silva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of the investigation of a cooling method widely used in the combustion chambers, which is called cooling film, and it is applied to a liquid rocket engine that uses as propellants liquid oxygen and kerosene. Starting from an engine cooling, whose film is formed through the fuel spray guns positioned on the periphery of the injection system, the film was experimentally examined, it is formed by liquid that seeped through the inner wall of the combustion chamber. The parameter used for validation and refinement of the theoretical penetration of the film was cooling, as this parameter is of paramount importance to obtain an efficient thermal protection inside the combustion chamber. Cold tests confirmed a penetrating cold enough cooling of the film for the length of the combustion chamber of the studied engine.

  13. VSB-30 sounding rocket: history of flight performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Jung

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The VSB-30 vehicle is a two-stage, unguided, rail launched sounding rocket, consisting of two solid propellant motors, payload, with recovery and service system. By the end of 2010, ten vehicles had already been launched, three from Brazil (Alcântara and seven from Sweden (Esrange. The objective of this paper is to give an overview of the main characteristics of the first ten flights of the VSB-30, with emphasis on performance and trajectory data. The circular 3σ dispersion area for payload impact point has around 50 km of radius. In most launchings of such vehicle, the impact of the payload fell within 2 sigma. This provides the possibility for further studies to decrease the area of dispersion from the impact point.

  14. Characterization of coaxial rocket injector sprays under high pressure environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, S. V.; Wang, G.; Brena De La Rosa, A.; Rudoff, R. C.; Isakovic, A.; Bachalo, W. D.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of elevated environment pressures on the atomization characteristics of a single element, scaled-down, shear-coaxial rocket injector has been investigated. In this study, the shear coaxial injector was operated with water and air as simulants for conventionally used liquid oxygen and hydrogen gas, respectively. The experiments were conducted in a specially designed high pressure rig. A two-component PDPA/DSA system was used to study the spray characteristics at different chamber pressures ranging from atmospheric to 100 psig. The study showed an overall increase in the droplet sizes at higher chamber pressures. This phenomenon is attributed to a decrease in the secondary atomization effects at higher chamber pressures which, in turn, is directly related to a decrease in the shear experienced by the droplets as they move axially through the pressure chamber.

  15. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William

    2013-01-01

    A key technology element in Nuclear Thermal Propulsion is the development of fuel materials and components which can withstand extremely high temperatures while being exposed to flowing hydrogen. NTREES provides a cost effective method for rapidly screening of candidate fuel components with regard to their viability for use in NTR systems. The NTREES is designed to mimic the conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel elements and other components would be subjected to during reactor operation. The NTREES consists of a water cooled ASME code stamped pressure vessel and its associated control hardware and instrumentation coupled with inductive heaters to simulate the heat provided by the fission process. The NTREES has been designed to safely allow hydrogen gas to be injected into internal flow passages of an inductively heated test article mounted in the chamber.

  16. CANSAT: Design of a Small Autonomous Sounding Rocket Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Joshua; Duda, Michael; Garnand-Royo, Jeff; Jones, Alexa; Pickering, Todd; Tutko, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    CanSat is an international student design-build-launch competition organized by the American Astronautical Society (AAS) and American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The competition is also sponsored by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), AGI, Orbital Sciences Corporation, Praxis Incorporated, and SolidWorks. Specifically, the 2009 Virginia Tech CanSat Team is funded by BAE Systems, Incorporated of Manassas, Virginia. The objective of the 2009 CanSat competition is to complete remote sensing missions by designing a small autonomous sounding rocket payload. The payload designed will follow and perform to a specific set of mission requirements for the 2009 competition. The competition encompasses a complete life-cycle of one year which includes all phases of design, integration, testing, reviews, and launch.

  17. Physiological and phytosanitary potential of rocket seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucilayne Fernandes Vieira

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the physiological and sanitary quality of seeds of rocket; the research was done at the Laboratory of Seed Analysis and greenhouse of the Department of Plant Science, Federal University of Pelotas (UFPel. Four lots of the cultivar "Antonella'' were tested for following features: initial and final moisture content, germination rate, first count of germination, accelerated aging with saline solution, dry matter contents, seedling shoot and root length, emergence speed index, emergence of seedlings in substrate, electrical conductivity and sanitary condition. A completely randomized design with four replications was used for all tests done and means were compared by Tukey test (P≤0.05. For all tests performed it was concluded that despite changes in the ranking of the best lots, there was agreement regarding the indication of the inferiority of the lot 3 in all tests and it was also observed that the incidence of fungi associated with seeds of rocket interfere with the physiological quality of the lots.

  18. Liquid fuel injection elements for rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, George B., Jr. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Thrust chambers for liquid propellant rocket engines include three principal components. One of these components is an injector which contains a plurality of injection elements to meter the flow of propellants at a predetermined rate, and fuel to oxidizer mixture ratio, to introduce the mixture into the combustion chamber, and to cause them to be atomized within the combustion chamber so that even combustion takes place. Evolving from these injectors are tube injectors. These tube injectors have injection elements for injecting the oxidizer into the combustion chamber. The oxidizer and fuel must be metered at predetermined rates and mixture ratios in order to mix them within the combustion chamber so that combustion takes place smoothly and completely. Hence tube injectors are subject to improvement. An injection element for a liquid propellant rocket engine of the bipropellant type is provided which includes tangential fuel metering orifices, and a plurality of oxidizer tube injection elements whose injection tubes are also provided with tangential oxidizer entry slots and internal reed valves.

  19. Characterization of nal powders for rocket propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merotto, L.; Galfetti, L.; Colombo, G.; DeLuca, L. T.

    2011-10-01

    Nanosized metal powders are known to significantly improve both solid and hybrid rocket performance, but have some drawbacks in terms of cost, safety, and possible influence on propellant mechanical properties. Performance enhancement through nanosized metal or metal hydride addition to solid fuels is currently under investigation also for hybrid propulsion. Therefore, a preburning characterization of the powders used in solid propellant or fuel manufacturing is useful to assess their effects on the ballistic properties and engine performance. An investigation concerning the comparative characterization of several aluminum powders having different particle size, age, and coating is presented. Surface area, morphology, chemical species concentration and characteristics, surface passivation layers, surface and subsurface chemical composition, ignition temperature and ignition delay are investigated. The aim of this characterization is to experimentally assess the effect of the nAl powder properties on ballistic characteristics of solid fuels and solidrocket composite-propellant performance, showing an increase in terms of Is caused by the decrease of two-phase losses in solid and a possible significant rf increase in hybrid rockets.

  20. Solid Rocket Launch Vehicle Explosion Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, E. H.; Blackwood, J. M.; Hays, M. J.; Skinner, T.

    2014-01-01

    Empirical explosion data from full scale solid rocket launch vehicle accidents and tests were collected from all available literature from the 1950s to the present. In general data included peak blast overpressure, blast impulse, fragment size, fragment speed, and fragment dispersion. Most propellants were 1.1 explosives but a few were 1.3. Oftentimes the data from a single accident was disjointed and/or missing key aspects. Despite this fact, once the data as a whole was digitized, categorized, and plotted clear trends appeared. Particular emphasis was placed on tests or accidents that would be applicable to scenarios from which a crew might need to escape. Therefore, such tests where a large quantity of high explosive was used to initiate the solid rocket explosion were differentiated. Also, high speed ground impacts or tests used to simulate such were also culled. It was found that the explosions from all accidents and applicable tests could be described using only the pressurized gas energy stored in the chamber at the time of failure. Additionally, fragmentation trends were produced. Only one accident mentioned the elusive "small" propellant fragments, but upon further analysis it was found that these were most likely produced as secondary fragments when larger primary fragments impacted the ground. Finally, a brief discussion of how this data is used in a new launch vehicle explosion model for improving crew/payload survival is presented.

  1. Development Testing of 1-Newton ADN-Based Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anflo, K.; Gronland, T.-A.; Bergman, G.; Nedar, R.; Thormählen, P.

    2004-10-01

    With the objective to reduce operational hazards and improve specific and density impulse as compared with hydrazine, the Research and Development (R&D) of a new monopropellant for space applications based on AmmoniumDiNitramide (ADN), was first proposed in 1997. This pioneering work has been described in previous papers1,2,3,4 . From the discussion above, it is clear that cost savings as well as risk reduction are the main drivers to develop a new generation of reduced hazard propellants. However, this alone is not enough to convince a spacecraft builder to choose a new technology. Cost, risk and schedule reduction are good incentives, but a spacecraft supplier will ask for evidence that this new propulsion system meets a number of requirements within the following areas: This paper describes the ongoing effort to develop a storable liquid monopropellant blend, based on AND, and its specific rocket engines. After building and testing more than 20 experimental rocket engines, the first Engineering Model (EM-1) has now accumulated more than 1 hour of firing-time. The results from test firings have validated the design. Specific impulse, combustion stability, blow-down capability and short pulse capability are amongst the requirements that have been demonstrated. The LMP-103x propellant candidate has been stored for more than 1 year and initial material compatibility screening and testing has started. 1. Performance &life 2. Impact on spacecraft design &operation 3. Flight heritage Hereafter, the essential requirements for some of these areas are outlined. These issues are discussed in detail in a previous paper1 . The use of "Commercial Of The Shelf" (COTS) propulsion system components as much as possible is essential to minimize the overall cost, risk and schedule. This leads to the conclusion that the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 5 has been reached for the thruster and propellant. Furthermore, that the concept of ADN-based propulsion is feasible.

  2. Using Innovative Technologies for Manufacturing Rocket Engine Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, E. M.; Eddleman, D. E.; Reynolds, D. C.; Hardin, N. A.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the manufacturing techniques that are currently used for rocket engine component production are traditional methods that have been proven through years of experience and historical precedence. As the United States enters into the next space age where new launch vehicles are being designed and propulsion systems are being improved upon, it is sometimes necessary to adopt innovative techniques for manufacturing hardware. With a heavy emphasis on cost reduction and improvements in manufacturing time, rapid manufacturing techniques such as Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) are being adopted and evaluated for their use on NASA s Space Launch System (SLS) upper stage engine, J-2X, with hopes of employing this technology on a wide variety of future projects. DMLS has the potential to significantly reduce the processing time and cost of engine hardware, while achieving desirable material properties by using a layered powder metal manufacturing process in order to produce complex part geometries. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently hot-fire tested a J-2X gas generator (GG) discharge duct that was manufactured using DMLS. The duct was inspected and proof tested prior to the hot-fire test. Using a workhorse gas generator (WHGG) test fixture at MSFC's East Test Area, the duct was subjected to extreme J-2X hot gas environments during 7 tests for a total of 537 seconds of hot-fire time. The duct underwent extensive post-test evaluation and showed no signs of degradation. DMLS manufacturing has proven to be a viable option for manufacturing rocket engine hardware, and further development and use of this manufacturing method is recommended.

  3. Numerical Simulation of a Liquid Propellant Rocket Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicolas M.C. Salvador; Marcelo M. Morales; Carlos E.S.S. Migueis; Demétrio Bastos-Netto

    2001-01-01

    This work presents a numerical simulation of the flow field in a liquid propellant rocket engine chamber and exit nozzle using techniques to allow the results to be taken as starting points for designing those propulsive systems.This was done using a Finite Volume method simulating the different flow regimes which usually take place in those systems. As the flow field has regions ranging from the low subsonic to the supersonic regimes, the numerical code used, initially developed for compressible flows only, was modified to work, proficiently in the whole velocity range. It is well known that codes have been developed in CFD, for either compressible or incompressible flows, the joint treatment of both together being complex even today, given the small number of references available in this area. Here an existing code for compressible flow was used and primitive variables,the pressure, the Cartesian components of the velocity and the temperature instead of the conserved variables were introduced in the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. This was done to permit the treatment at any Mach number. Unstructured meshes with adaptive refinements were employed here. The convective terms were treated with upwind first and second order methods. The numerical stability was kept with artificial dissipation and in the spatial coverage one used a five stage Runge-Kutta scheme for the Fluid Mechanics and the VODE (Value of Ordinary Differential Equations) scheme along with the Chemkin II in the chemical reacting solution. During the development of this code simulating the flow in a rocket engine, comparison tests were made with several different types of internal and extemal flows, at different velocities, seeking to establish the confidence level of the techniques being used. These comparisons were done with existing theoretical results and with other codes already validated and well accepted by the CFD community.

  4. A DYNAMIC MODEL FOR ROCKET LAUNCHER WITH COUPLED RIGID AND FLEXIBLW MOTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ding-guo; XIAO Jian-qiang

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of a coupled rigid-flexible rocket launcher is reported. The coupled rigid-flexible rocket launcher is divided into two subsystems, one is a system of rigid bodies,the other a flexible launch tube which can undergo large overall motions spatially. First, the mathematical models for these two subsystems were established respectively. Then the dynamic model for the whole system was obtained by considering the coupling effect between these two subsystems. The approach, which divides a complex system into several simple subsystems first and then obtains the dynamic model for the whole system via combining the existing dynamic models for simple subsystems, can make the modeling procedure efficient and convenient.

  5. Regression rate behaviors of HTPB-based propellant combinations for hybrid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingliang; Tian, Hui; Li, Yuelong; Yu, Nanjia; Cai, Guobiao

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to characterize the regression rate behavior of hybrid rocket motor propellant combinations, using hydrogen peroxide (HP), gaseous oxygen (GOX), nitrous oxide (N2O) as the oxidizer and hydroxyl-terminated poly-butadiene (HTPB) as the based fuel. In order to complete this research by experiment and simulation, a hybrid rocket motor test system and a numerical simulation model are established. Series of hybrid rocket motor firing tests are conducted burning different propellant combinations, and several of those are used as references for numerical simulations. The numerical simulation model is developed by combining the Navies-Stokes equations with the turbulence model, one-step global reaction model, and solid-gas coupling model. The distribution of regression rate along the axis is determined by applying simulation mode to predict the combustion process and heat transfer inside the hybrid rocket motor. The time-space averaged regression rate has a good agreement between the numerical value and experimental data. The results indicate that the N2O/HTPB and GOX/HTPB propellant combinations have a higher regression rate, since the enhancement effect of latter is significant due to its higher flame temperature. Furthermore, the containing of aluminum (Al) and/or ammonium perchlorate(AP) in the grain does enhance the regression rate, mainly due to the more energy released inside the chamber and heat feedback to the grain surface by the aluminum combustion.

  6. Effects of neutral gas release on current collection during the CHARGE-2 rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, B. E.; Banks, P. M.; Neubert, T.; Williamson, P. R.; Myers, Neil B.; Raitt, W. John; Sasaki, S.

    1990-01-01

    Observations of current collection enhancements due to cold nitrogen gas control jet emissions from a highly charged rocket payload in the ionosphere are reported. These observations were made during the second cooperative high altitude rocket gun experiment (CHARGE-2) which was an electrically tethered mother/daughter payload system. The current collection enhancement was observed at the daughter payload located 100 to 400 m away from the mother which was firing an energetic electron beam. The authors interpret these results in terms of an electrical discharge forming in close proximity to the daughter during the short periods of gas emission. The results indicate that it is possible to enhance the electron current collection capability of positively charged vehicles by means of deliberate neutral gas releases into an otherwise undisturbed space plasma. These results can also be compared with recent laboratory observations of hollow cathode plasma contactors operating in the ignited mode. Experimental observations of current collection enhancements due to cold nitrogen gas control jet emissions from a highly charged, isolated daughter payload in the nighttime ionosphere were made. These observations were derived from the second cooperative high altitude rocket gun experiment (CHARGE-2) which was an electrically tethered mother-daughter payload system. The rocket flew from White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) in December, 1985. The rocket achieved an altitude of 261 km and carried a 1 keV electron beam emitting up to 48 mA of current (Myers, et al., 1989a). The mother payload, carried the electron beam source, while the daughter acted as a remote current collection and observation platform and reached a distance of 426 m away from the main payload. Gas emissions at the daughter were due to periodic thruster jet firings to maintain separation velocity between the two payloads.

  7. Measurement and Characterization of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Plume Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Jeremy; Hobbs, Chris; Plotkin, Ken; Pilkey, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    Lift-off acoustic environments generated by the future Ares I launch vehicle are assessed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) acoustics team using several prediction tools. This acoustic environment is directly caused by the Ares I First Stage booster, powered by the five-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRMV). The RSRMV is a larger-thrust derivative design from the currently used Space Shuttle solid rocket motor, the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). Lift-off acoustics is an integral part of the composite launch vibration environment affecting the Ares launch vehicle and must be assessed to help generate hardware qualification levels and ensure structural integrity of the vehicle during launch and lift-off. Available prediction tools that use free field noise source spectrums as a starting point for generation of lift-off acoustic environments are described in the monograph NASA SP-8072: "Acoustic Loads Generated by the Propulsion System." This monograph uses a reference database for free field noise source spectrums which consist of subscale rocket motor firings, oriented in horizontal static configurations. The phrase "subscale" is appropriate, since the thrust levels of rockets in the reference database are orders of magnitude lower than the current design thrust for the Ares launch family. Thus, extrapolation is needed to extend the various reference curves to match Ares-scale acoustic levels. This extrapolation process yields a subsequent amount of uncertainty added upon the acoustic environment predictions. As the Ares launch vehicle design schedule progresses, it is important to take every opportunity to lower prediction uncertainty and subsequently increase prediction accuracy. Never before in NASA s history has plume acoustics been measured for large scale solid rocket motors. Approximately twice a year, the RSRM prime vendor, ATK Launch Systems, static fires an assembled RSRM motor in a horizontal configuration at their test facility

  8. Project Stratos; reaching space with a student-built rocket

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haneveer, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the spring of 2009 a team of 15 TU Delft students travelled to Kiruna, Sweden with only one goal: to launch the rocket Stratos I they had been working on for 2 years to an altitude of over 12km, thereby claiming the European Amateur Rocket Altitude record. These students were part of Delft

  9. Project Stratos; reaching space with a student-built rocket

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haneveer, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the spring of 2009 a team of 15 TU Delft students travelled to Kiruna, Sweden with only one goal: to launch the rocket Stratos I they had been working on for 2 years to an altitude of over 12km, thereby claiming the European Amateur Rocket Altitude record. These students were part of Delft Aerosp

  10. The Effect of Atmospheric Pressure on Rocket Thrust -- Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    The first of a two-part question asks: Does the total thrust of a rocket depend on the surrounding pressure? The answer to this question is provided, with accompanying diagrams of rockets. The second part of the question (and answer) are provided in v20 n7, p479, Oct 1982 of this journal. (Author/JN)

  11. Some cases of vertical ascent of a rocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Narsing Rao

    1960-07-01

    Full Text Available The differential equations of motion of vertically ascending rocket are integrated in closed form in terms of Bessel functions. During burning the drag co-efficient and acceleration due to gravity are assumed to be constant. Four different cases of motion are treated under different assumptions regarding the law of mass-variations of the rocket.

  12. The open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine - Some engineering considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, M. F.; Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.; Sirocky, P. J., Jr.; Iwanczyk, L. C.

    1971-01-01

    A preliminary design study of a conceptual 6000-MW open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine system was made. The engine has a thrust of 44,200 lb and a specific impulse of 4400 sec. The nuclear fuel is uranium-235 and the propellant is hydrogen. Critical fuel mass was calculated for several reactor configurations. Major components of the reactor (reflector, pressure vessel) and the waste heat rejection system were considered conceptually and were sized.

  13. Introduction to the Special Issue on Sounding Rockets and Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Christe, Steven; Pfaff, Rob; Garcia, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rocket technology, originally developed for military applications, has provided a low-cost observing platform to carry critical and rapid-response scientific investigations for over 70 years. Even with the development of launch vehicles that could put satellites into orbit, high altitude sounding rockets have remained relevant. In addition to science observations, sounding rockets provide a unique technology test platform and a valuable training ground for scientists and engineers. Most importantly, sounding rockets remain the only way to explore the tenuous regions of the Earth's atmosphere (the upper stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower ionosphere/thermosphere) above balloon altitudes ($\\sim$40 km) and below satellite orbits ($\\sim$160 km). They can lift remote sensing telescope payloads with masses up to 400 kg to altitudes of 350 km providing observing times of up to 6 minutes above the blocking influence of Earth's atmosphere. Though a number of sounding rocket research programs exist around the world, th...

  14. Artist's Concept of Magnetic Launch Assisted Air-Breathing Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts a Magnetic Launch Assist vehicle in orbit. Formerly referred to as the Magnetic Levitation (Maglev) system, the Magnetic Launch Assist system is a launch system developed and tested by engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) that could levitate and accelerate a launch vehicle along a track at high speeds before it leaves the ground. Using electricity and magnetic fields, a Magnetic Launch Assist system would drive a spacecraft along a horizontal track until it reaches desired speeds. The system is similar to high-speed trains and roller coasters that use high-strength magnets to lift and propel a vehicle a couple of inches above a guideway. A full-scale, operational track would be about 1.5-miles long, capable of accelerating a vehicle to 600 mph in 9.5 seconds, and the vehicle would then shift to rocket engines for launch into orbit. The major advantages of launch assist for NASA launch vehicles is that it reduces the weight of the take-off, the landing gear, the wing size, and less propellant resulting in significant cost savings. The US Navy and the British MOD (Ministry of Defense) are planning to use magnetic launch assist for their next generation aircraft carriers as the aircraft launch system. The US Army is considering using this technology for launching target drones for anti-aircraft training.

  15. Deposit formation in hydrocarbon rocket fuels: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roback, R.; Szetela, E. J.; Spadaccini, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study deposit formation in hydrocarbon fuels under flow conditions that exist in high-pressure, rocket engine cooling systems. A high pressure fuel coking test apparatus was designed and developed and was used to evaluate thermal decomposition (coking) limits and carbon deposition rates in heated copper tubes for two hydrocarbon rocket fuels, RP-1 and commercial-grade propane. Tests were also conducted using JP-7 and chemically-pure propane as being representative of more refined cuts of the baseline fuels. A parametric evaluation of fuel thermal stability was performed at pressures of 136 atm to 340 atm, bulk fuel velocities in the range 6 to 30 m/sec, and tube wall temperatures in the range 422 to 811K. In addition, the effect of the inside wall material on deposit formation was evaluated in selected tests which were conducted using nickel-plated tubes. The results of the tests indicated that substantial deposit formation occurs with RP-1 fuel at wall temperatures between 600 and 800K, with peak deposit formation occurring near 700K. No improvements were obtained when de-oxygenated JP-7 fuel was substituted for RP-1. The carbon deposition rates for the propane fuels were generally higher than those obtained for either of the kerosene fuels at any given wall temperature. There appeared to be little difference between commercial-grade and chemically-pure propane with regard to type and quantity of deposit. The results of tests conducted with RP-1 indicated that the rate of deposit formation increased slightly with pressure over the range 136 atm to 340 atm. Finally, plating the inside wall of the tubes with nickel was found to significantly reduce carbon deposition rates for RP-1 fuel.

  16. Using Innovative Techniques for Manufacturing Rocket Engine Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Erin M.; Reynolds, David C.; Eddleman, David E.; Hardin, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Many of the manufacturing techniques that are currently used for rocket engine component production are traditional methods that have been proven through years of experience and historical precedence. As we enter into a new space age where new launch vehicles are being designed and propulsion systems are being improved upon, it is sometimes necessary to adopt new and innovative techniques for manufacturing hardware. With a heavy emphasis on cost reduction and improvements in manufacturing time, manufacturing techniques such as Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) are being adopted and evaluated for their use on J-2X, with hopes of employing this technology on a wide variety of future projects. DMLS has the potential to significantly reduce the processing time and cost of engine hardware, while achieving desirable material properties by using a layered powder metal manufacturing process in order to produce complex part geometries. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has recently hot-fire tested a J-2X gas generator discharge duct that was manufactured using DMLS. The duct was inspected and proof tested prior to the hot-fire test. Using the Workhorse Gas Generator (WHGG) test setup at MSFC?s East Test Area test stand 116, the duct was subject to extreme J-2X gas generator environments and endured a total of 538 seconds of hot-fire time. The duct survived the testing and was inspected after the test. DMLS manufacturing has proven to be a viable option for manufacturing rocket engine hardware, and further development and use of this manufacturing method is recommended.

  17. Technique for the optimization of the powerhead configuration and performance of liquid rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Germain, Brad David

    The development and optimization of liquid rocket engines is an integral part of space vehicle design, since most Earth-to-orbit launch vehicles to date have used liquid rockets as their main propulsion system. Rocket engine design tools range in fidelity from very simple conceptual level tools to full computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The level of fidelity of interest in this research is a design tool that determines engine thrust and specific impulse as well as models the powerhead of the engine. This is the highest level of fidelity applicable to a conceptual level design environment where faster running analyses are desired. The optimization of liquid rocket engines using a powerhead analysis tool is a difficult problem, because it involves both continuous and discrete inputs as well as a nonlinear design space. Example continuous inputs are the main combustion chamber pressure, nozzle area ratio, engine mixture ratio, and desired thrust. Example discrete variable inputs are the engine cycle (staged-combustion, gas generator, etc.), fuel/oxidizer combination, and engine material choices. Nonlinear optimization problems involving both continuous and discrete inputs are referred to as Mixed-Integer Nonlinear Programming (MINLP) problems. Many methods exist in literature for solving MINLP problems; however none are applicable for this research. All of the existing MINLP methods require the relaxation of the discrete variables as part of their analysis procedure. This means that the discrete choices must be evaluated at non-discrete values. This is not possible with an engine powerhead design code. Therefore, a new optimization method was developed that uses modified response surface equations to provide lower bounds of the continuous design space for each unique discrete variable combination. These lower bounds are then used to efficiently solve the optimization problem. The new optimization procedure was used to find optimal rocket engine designs

  18. Rocket Engine Innovations Advance Clean Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    During launch countdown, at approximately T-7 seconds, the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs) roar to life. When the controllers indicate normal operation, the solid rocket boosters ignite and the shuttle blasts off. Initially, the SSMEs throttle down to reduce stress during the period of maximum dynamic pressure, but soon after, they throttle up to propel the orbiter to 17,500 miles per hour. In just under 9 minutes, the three SSMEs burn over 1.6 million pounds of propellant, and temperatures inside the main combustion chamber reach 6,000 F. To cool the engines, liquid hydrogen circulates through miles of tubing at -423 F. From 1981to 2011, the Space Shuttle fleet carried crew and cargo into orbit to perform a myriad of unprecedented tasks. After 30 years and 135 missions, the feat of engineering known as the SSME boasted a 100-percent flight success rate.

  19. Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, R.A.; Nestor, C.W.; Thompson, C.V.; Gayle, T.M.; Ma, C.Y.; Tomkins, B.A.; Moody, R.L.

    1991-12-09

    The overall objective of the work described in this report is four-fold: to (a) develop a standardized and experimentally validated approach to the sampling and chemical and physical characterization of the exhaust products of scaled-down rocket launch motors fired under experimentally controlled conditions at the Army's Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama; (b) determine the composition of the exhaust produces; (c) assess the accuracy of a selected existing computer model for predicting the composition of major and minor chemical species; (d) recommended alternations to both the sampling and analysis strategy and the computer model in order to achieve greater congruence between chemical measurements and computer prediction. 34 refs., 2 figs., 35 tabs.

  20. Lunar mission design using Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancati, Michael L.; Collins, John T.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    1991-01-01

    The NERVA-class Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR), with performance nearly double that of advanced chemical engines, has long been considered an enabling technology for human missions to Mars. NTR engines address the demanding trip time and payload delivery needs of both cargo-only and piloted flights. But NTR can also reduce the Earth launch requirements for manned lunar missions. First use of NTR for the Moon would be less demanding and would provide a test-bed for early operations experience with this powerful technology. Study of application and design options indicates that NTR propulsion can be integrated with the Space Exploration Initiative scenarios to deliver performance gains while managing controlled, long-term disposal of spent reactors to highly stable orbits.

  1. Electronic timer for sounding rocket payload use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. P.

    1986-01-01

    An electronic timer has been developed for sounding rocket use. The timer uses CMOS technology for low power consumption and has a battery back-up to keep the timing circuit active in case of a dropout on the payload power bus. Time-event decoding is done by programming EPROM's which enable a +28 volt dc sourcing output. There are 32 discrete outputs which can provide +28 volt dc into a minimum load impedance of 150 ohms. Inputs are designed to operate on standard CMOS voltage levels, but they can withstand +28 volts dc without damage. The timer can be started by either 'G' or lift-off switch closure or umbilical release at lift-off.

  2. Innovative Metallized Formulations for Solid Rocket Propulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luigi T DeLUCA; Luciano GALFETTI; Filippo MAGGI; Giovanni COLOMBO; Alice REINA; Stefano DOSSI; Daniele CONSONNI; Melissa BRAMBILLA

    2012-01-01

    Several metallized solid rocket propellants,AP/Metal/HTPB in the ratio 68/18/1 4,were experimentally analyzed at the Space Propulsion Laboratory of Politecnico di Milano.Effects of the metals (micrometric and nanometric Al,B,Mg,and a variety of dual metals) on the performance of the propellant were studied and contrasted to a conventional micrometric aluminum (30 μm average grain size) taken as reference.It is shown that the propellant microstructure plays a fundamental role in controlling the critical aggregation/agglomeration phenomena occurring below and near the burning surface.Two specific effects of microstructure in terms of steady burning rate and average agglomerate size are illustrated.

  3. Integrated model of a composite propellant rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    The combustion of composite solid propellants was investigated and an available numerical model was improved for taking into account the change of pressure, when the process occurs in a confined environment, as inside a rocket. The pressure increase upon ignition is correctly described by the improved model for both sandwich and dispersed particles propellants. In the latter case, self-induced fluctuations in the pressure and in all other computed variables occur, as consequence of the periodic rise and depletion of oxidizer particles from the binder matrix. The comparison with the results of the constant pressure model shows a different fluctuating profile of gas velocity, with a possible second order effect induced by the pressure fluctuations.

  4. CFD Simulation of Liquid Rocket Engine Injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Richard; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen; Garcia, Roberto (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Detailed design issues associated with liquid rocket engine injectors and combustion chamber operation require CFD methodology which simulates highly three-dimensional, turbulent, vaporizing, and combusting flows. The primary utility of such simulations involves predicting multi-dimensional effects caused by specific injector configurations. SECA, Inc. and Engineering Sciences, Inc. have been developing appropriate computational methodology for NASA/MSFC for the past decade. CFD tools and computers have improved dramatically during this time period; however, the physical submodels used in these analyses must still remain relatively simple in order to produce useful results. Simulations of clustered coaxial and impinger injector elements for hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels, which account for real fluid properties, is the immediate goal of this research. The spray combustion codes are based on the FDNS CFD code' and are structured to represent homogeneous and heterogeneous spray combustion. The homogeneous spray model treats the flow as a continuum of multi-phase, multicomponent fluids which move without thermal or velocity lags between the phases. Two heterogeneous models were developed: (1) a volume-of-fluid (VOF) model which represents the liquid core of coaxial or impinger jets and their atomization and vaporization, and (2) a Blob model which represents the injected streams as a cloud of droplets the size of the injector orifice which subsequently exhibit particle interaction, vaporization, and combustion. All of these spray models are computationally intensive, but this is unavoidable to accurately account for the complex physics and combustion which is to be predicted, Work is currently in progress to parallelize these codes to improve their computational efficiency. These spray combustion codes were used to simulate the three test cases which are the subject of the 2nd International Workshop on-Rocket Combustion Modeling. Such test cases are considered by

  5. Assumed PDF modeling in rocket combustor simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempke, M.; Gerlinger, P.; Aigner, M.

    2013-03-01

    In order to account for the interaction between turbulence and chemistry, a multivariate assumed PDF (Probability Density Function) approach is used to simulate a model rocket combustor with finite-rate chemistry. The reported test case is the PennState preburner combustor with a single shear coaxial injector. Experimental data for the wall heat flux is available for this configuration. Unsteady RANS (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes) simulation results with and without the assumed PDF approach are analyzed and compared with the experimental data. Both calculations show a good agreement with the experimental wall heat flux data. Significant changes due to the utilization of the assumed PDF approach can be observed in the radicals, e. g., the OH mass fraction distribution, while the effect on the wall heat flux is insignificant.

  6. Heat transfer in rocket combustion chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P.; Cheng, G.; Farmer, R.

    1993-01-01

    Complexities of liquid rocket engine heat transfer which involve the injector faceplate and film cooled walls are being investigated by computational analysis. A conjugate heat transfer analysis was used to describe localized heating phenomena associated with particular injector configurations and film coolant flows. These components were analyzed, and the analyses verified when appropriate test data were available. The component analyses are being synthesized into an overall flowfield/heat transfer model. A Navier-Stokes flow solver, the FDNS code, was used to make the analyses. Particular attention was given to the representation of the thermodynamic properties of the fluid streams. Unit flow models of specific coaxial injector elements have been developed and are being used to describe the flame structure near the injector faceplate.

  7. Rockets: Physical science teacher's guide with activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Gregory L.; Rosenberg, Carla R. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This guide begins with background information sections on the history of rocketry, scientific principles, and practical rocketry. The sections on scientific principles and practical rocketry are based on Isaac Newton's three laws of motion. These laws explain why rockets work and how to make them more efficient. The background sections are followed with a series of physical science activities that demonstrate the basic science of rocketry. Each activity is designed to be simple and take advantage of inexpensive materials. Construction diagrams, materials and tools lists, and instructions are included. A brief discussion elaborates on the concepts covered in the activities and is followed with teaching notes and discussion questions. The guide concludes with a glossary of terms, suggested reading list, NASA educational resources, and an evaluation questionnaire with a mailer.

  8. Rocket observations of the diffuse ultraviolet background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, P.; Bowyer, S.; Kimble, R.; Jelinsky, P.; Grewing, M.; Kraemer, G.; Wulf-Mathies, C.

    1984-01-01

    The objective of the experiment reported here was to obtain additional information on the absolute intensity level and spatial variation of the diffuse ultraviolet background and thereby gain insight into the origin of this radiation. The experiment used three ultraviolet sensitive photometers placed in the focal plane of a 95-cm, f/2.8 normal incidence telescope flown on board an Aries sounding rocket. The measured intensities clearly refute the hypothesis of an isotropic background, the intensities of the high galactic latitude being definitely lower than the intensities seen at intermediate latitudes. Moreover, the count rates in all three channels along the slow scan exhibit local enhancements as well as an overall trend. In general, the spatial variations exhibited by the data correlate with the line of sight of neutral hydrogen column density as determined from 21-cm radio observations. This fact demonstrates that there is a galactic component to the diffuse ultraviolet radiation field.

  9. Ablative Rocket Deflector Testing and Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Lott, Jeffrey W.; Raines, Nickey

    2010-01-01

    A deflector risk mitigation program was recently conducted at the NASA Stennis Space Center. The primary objective was to develop a database that characterizes the behavior of industry-grade refractory materials subjected to rocket plume impingement conditions commonly experienced on static test stands. The program consisted of short and long duration engine tests where the supersonic exhaust flow from the engine impinged on an ablative panel. Quasi time-dependent erosion depths and patterns generated by the plume impingement were recorded for a variety of different ablative materials. The erosion behavior was found to be highly dependent on the material s composition and corresponding thermal properties. For example, in the case of the HP CAST 93Z ablative material, the erosion rate actually decreased under continued thermal heating conditions due to the formation of a low thermal conductivity "crystallization" layer. The "crystallization" layer produced near the surface of the material provided an effective insulation from the hot rocket exhaust plume. To gain further insight into the complex interaction of the plume with the ablative deflector, computational fluid dynamic modeling was performed in parallel to the ablative panel testing. The results from the current study demonstrated that locally high heating occurred due to shock reflections. These localized regions of shock-induced heat flux resulted in non-uniform erosion of the ablative panels. In turn, it was observed that the non-uniform erosion exacerbated the localized shock heating causing eventual plume separation and reversed flow for long duration tests under certain conditions. Overall, the flow simulations compared very well with the available experimental data obtained during this project.

  10. Fundamental rocket injector/spray programs at the Phillips Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    The performance and stability of liquid rocket engines is determined to a large degree by atomization, mixing, and combustion processes. Control over these processes is exerted through the design of the injector. Injectors in liquid rocket engines are called upon to perform many functions. They must first of all mix the propellants to provide suitable performance in the shortest possible length. For main injectors, this is driven by the tradeoff between the combustion chamber performance, stability, efficiency, and its weight and cost. In gas generators and preburners, however, it is also driven by the possibility of damage to downstream components, for example piping and turbine blades. This can occur if unburned fuel and oxidant later react to create hot spots. Weight and cost considerations require that the injector design be simple and lightweight. For reusable engines, the injectors must also be durable and easily maintained. Suitable atomization and mixing must be produced with as small a pressure drop as possible, so that the size and weight of pressure vessels and turbomachinery can be minimized. However, the pressure drop must not be so small as to promote feed system coupled instabilities. Another important function of the injectors is to ensure that the injector face plate and the chamber and nozzle walls are not damaged. Typically this requires reducing the heat transfer to an acceptable level and also keeping unburned oxygen from chemically attacking the walls, particularly in reusable engines. Therefore the mixing distribution is often tailored to be fuel-rich near the walls. Wall heat transfer can become catastrophically damaging in the presence of acoustic instabilities, so the injector must prevent these from occurring at all costs. In addition to acoustic stability (but coupled with it), injectors must also be kinetically stable. That is, the flame itself must maintain ignition in the combustion chamber. This is not typically a problem with main

  11. The sounding rocket as pedagogical tool: a report from ten years of experience with the S.P.I.R.T. undergraduate sounding rocket program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Timothy F.

    2005-08-01

    The Student Projects Involving Rocket Investigation Techniques (SPIRIT) program is a long-term, experimential learning, project-based program for undergraduates at Penn State University. Students in 5 functional teams design and build the experiments, but also the structure and rocket systems of a scientific payload. The payloads that emerge from three years of student work show extraordinary creativity. The scientific results, however, have been uneven. This suggests that the highest value of the program is in its educational impact and in the opportunity it provides for development of sounding rocket instruments and research techniques. In this paper, we review the goals and the results of the program from a teaching perspective. We report the results of past and ongoing assessments and present conclusions as to the value and limitations of the program. The SPIRIT program has been popular with students and the university administration. It is relatively inexpensive to run. The willingness of NASA Wallops Island personnel to mentor young students has been critical to the educational success of the program.

  12. Beginnings of rocket development in the czech lands (Czechoslovakia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavec, Michal

    2011-11-01

    Although the first references are from the 15th Century when both Hussites and crusaders are said to have used rockets during the Hussite Wars (also known as the Bohemian Wars) there is no strong evidence that rockets were actually used at that time. It is worth noting that Konrad Kyeser, who described several rockets in his Bellifortis manuscript written 1402-1405, served as advisor to Bohemian King Wenceslas IV. Rockets were in fact used as fireworks from the 16th century in noble circles. Some of these were built by Vavřinec Křička z Bitý\\vsky, who also published a book on fireworks, in which he described how to build rockets for firework displays. Czech soldiers were also involved in the creation of a rocket regiment in the Austrian (Austro-Hungarian) army in the first half of the 19th century. The pioneering era of modern rocket development began in the Czech lands during the 1920s. The first rockets were succesfully launched by Ludvík Očenášek in 1930 with one of them possibly reaching an altitude of 2000 metres. Vladimír Mandl, lawyer and author of the first book on the subject of space law, patented his project for a stage rocket (vysokostoupající raketa) in 1932, but this project never came to fruition. There were several factories during the so-called Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia in 1939-1945, when the Czech lands were occupied by Nazi Germany, where parts for German Mark A-4/V-2 rockets were produced, but none of the Czech technicians or constructors were able to build an entire rocket. The main goal of the Czech aircraft industry after WW2 was to revive the stagnant aircraft industry. There was no place to create a rocket industry. Concerns about a rocket industry appeared at the end of the 1950s. The Political Board of the Central Committee of the Czechoslovak Communist Party started to study the possibilities of creating a rocket industry after the first flight into space and particularly after US nuclear weapons were based in Italy

  13. Conceptual designs for antiproton space propulsion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassenti, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    Five conceptual designs for antimatter space propulsion systems were compared in terms of their performance characteristics. The systems examined included solid-core liquid-propellant rockets; magnetically confined gaseous-core rockets using liquid or solid propellants; plasma-core rockets; pion rockets, which are driven directly by the mass annihilation products; and ram-augmented rockets, in which antiproton annihilation is used to heat hydrogen collected in interstellar space. It was found that, in general, as the specific impulse of the propulsion system increases, the thrust decreases. The comparison between designs showed that only fusion rockets have the capability to compete in performance with mass annihilation rockets. For very-high-speed interstellar missions, pion rockets, which can have a specific impulse of 20 million sec (although with a thrust-to-engine mass ratios of only 0.01 G) will offer best performance. 36 refs.

  14. Introduction to the Special Issue on Sounding Rockets and Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, Steven; Zeiger, Ben; Pfaff, Rob; Garcia, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Rocket technology, originally developed for military applications, has provided a low-cost observing platform to carry critical and rapid-response scientific investigations for over 70 years. Even with the development of launch vehicles that could put satellites into orbit, high altitude sounding rockets have remained relevant. In addition to science observations, sounding rockets provide a unique technology test platform and a valuable training ground for scientists and engineers. Most importantly, sounding rockets remain the only way to explore the tenuous regions of the Earth’s atmosphere (the upper stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower ionosphere/thermosphere) above balloon altitudes (˜40km) and below satellite orbits (˜160km). They can lift remote sensing telescope payloads with masses up to 400kg to altitudes of 350km providing observing times of up to 6min above the blocking influence of Earth’s atmosphere. Though a number of sounding rocket research programs exist around the world, this article focuses on the NASA Sounding Rocket Program, and particularly on the astrophysical and solar sounding rocket payloads.

  15. Investigations of Rocket Engine Combustion Emissions During ACCENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M. N.; Friedl, R. R.

    2001-12-01

    The composition of rocket combustion emissions and the atmospheric processes that determine their stratospheric impacts are poorly understood. While present day rocket emissions do not significantly affect stratospheric chemistry, the potential for vigorous growth of the space transportation industry in coming decades suggests that rocket emissions and their stratospheric impacts should be better understood. A variety of in-situ measurements and modeling results were obtained during the Atmospheric Chemistry of Combustion Emissions Near the Tropopause (ACCENT) effort that will be used to evaluate the role of rocket exhaust in perturbing ozone chemistry in plume wakes and in the global stratosphere. We present a review of the ACCENT rocket emissions science objectives, summarize data obtained during the WB-57F plume wake sorties, and briefly discuss how the data will help resolve several outstanding questions regarding the impact of rocket emissions on the stratosphere. These include measurement of the emission indices for several important rocket engine combustion products and validation of plume wake chemistry models.

  16. Launch Vehicles Based on Advanced Hybrid Rocket Motors: An Enabling Technology for the Commercial Small and Micro Satellite Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabeyoglu, Arif; Tuncer, Onur; Inalhan, Gokhan

    2016-07-01

    Mankind is relient on chemical propulsion systems for space access. Nevertheless, this has been a stagnant area in terms of technological development and the technology base has not changed much almost for the past forty years. This poses a vicious circle for launch applications such that high launch costs constrain the demand and low launch freqencies drive costs higher. This also has been a key limiting factor for small and micro satellites that are geared towards planetary science. Rather this be because of the launch frequencies or the costs, the access of small and micro satellites to orbit has been limited. With today's technology it is not possible to escape this circle. However the emergence of cost effective and high performance propulsion systems such as advanced hybrid rockets can decrease launch costs by almost an order or magnitude. This paper briefly introduces the timeline and research challenges that were overcome during the development of advanced hybrid LOX/paraffin based rockets. Experimental studies demonstrated effectiveness of these advanced hybrid rockets which incorporate fast burning parafin based fuels, advanced yet simple internal balistic design and carbon composite winding/fuel casting technology that enables the rocket motor to be built from inside out. A feasibility scenario is studied using these rocket motors as building blocks for a modular launch vehicle capable of delivering micro satellites into low earth orbit. In addition, the building block rocket motor can be used further solar system missions providing the ability to do standalone small and micro satellite missions to planets within the solar system. This enabling technology therefore offers a viable alternative in order to escape the viscous that has plagued the space launch industry and that has limited the small and micro satellite delivery for planetary science.

  17. Rocket nozzle thermal shock tests in an arc heater facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, James H.; Williamson, Ronald A.

    1986-01-01

    A rocket motor nozzle thermal structural test technique that utilizes arc heated nitrogen to simulate a motor burn was developed. The technique was used to test four heavily instrumented full-scale Star 48 rocket motor 2D carbon/carbon segments at conditions simulating the predicted thermal-structural environment. All four nozzles survived the tests without catastrophic or other structural failures. The test technique demonstrated promise as a low cost, controllable alternative to rocket motor firing. The technique includes the capability of rapid termination in the event of failure, allowing post-test analysis.

  18. Flow separation in rocket nozzles under high altitude condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, R.; Génin, C.

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of flow separation in rocket nozzles is crucial for rocket engine design and optimum performance. Typically, flow separation is studied under sea-level conditions. However, this disregards the change of the ambient density during ascent of a launcher. The ambient flow properties are an important factor concerning the design of altitude-adaptive rocket nozzles like the dual bell nozzle. For this reason an experimental study was carried out to study the influence of the ambient density on flow separation within conventional nozzles.

  19. Improving of Hybrid Rocket Engine on the Basis of Optimizing Design Fuel Grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriekov, K. M.; Ushkin, M. P.

    2015-09-01

    This article examines the processes intrachamber in hybrid rocket engine (HRE) and the comparative assessment of the use of solid rocket motors (SRM) and HRE for meteorological rockets with a mass of payload of the 364 kg. Results of the research showed the possibility of a significant increase in the ballistic effectiveness of meteorological rocket.

  20. On the history of the development of solid-propellant rockets in the Soviet Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobedonostsev, Y. A.

    1977-01-01

    Pre-World War II Soviet solid-propellant rocket technology is reviewed. Research and development regarding solid composite preparations of pyroxyline TNT powder is described, as well as early work on rocket loading calculations, problems of flight stability, and aircraft rocket launching and ground rocket launching capabilities.

  1. Burn-back Equations for High Volumetric Loading Single-grain Dual-thrust Rocket Propellant Configuration (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Shekhar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Dual-thrust mode is adopted in solid propellant rocket propulsion through tailoring of burning area, nozzle, rocket motor chamber, propellant type, multiple propellant blocks. In the present study, mathematical formulation has been evolved for generation of burning surface area with web burnt for a simple central blind hole in a solid cylindrical propellant geometry with proper partial inhibition on external and lateral surfaces. The burn-back equation has been validated by static firing and parametric study was conducted to understand effect of various control geometrical parameters. The system is utilised for high volumetric loading, single propellant, single composition, single-chamber, single nozzle dual-thrust mode of burning profiles in rocket application.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(2, pp.165-170, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.41

  2. Integrated propulsion and power modeling for bimodal nuclear thermal rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Joshua

    Bimodal nuclear thermal rocket (BNTR) engines have been shown to reduce the weight of space vehicles to the Moon, Mars, and beyond by utilizing a common reactor for propulsion and power generation. These savings lead to reduced launch vehicle costs and/or increased mission safety and capability. Experimental work of the Rover/NERVA program demonstrated the feasibility of NTR systems for trajectories to Mars. Numerous recent studies have demonstrated the economic and performance benefits of BNTR operation. Relatively little, however, is known about the reactor-level operation of a BNTR engine. The objective of this dissertation is to develop a numerical BNTR engine model in order to study the feasibility and component-level impact of utilizing a NERVA-derived reactor as a heat source for both propulsion and power. The primary contribution is to provide the first-of-its-kind model and analysis of a NERVA-derived BNTR engine. Numerical component models have been modified and created for the NERVA reactor fuel elements and tie tubes, including 1-D coolant thermodynamics and radial thermal conduction with heat generation. A BNTR engine system model has been created in order to design and analyze an engine employing an expander-cycle nuclear rocket and Brayton cycle power generator using the same reactor. Design point results show that a 316 MWt reactor produces a thrust and specific impulse of 66.6 kN and 917 s, respectively. The same reactor can be run at 73.8 kWt to produce the necessary 16.7 kW electric power with a Brayton cycle generator. This demonstrates the feasibility of BNTR operation with a NERVA-derived reactor but also indicates that the reactor control system must be able to operate with precision across a wide power range, and that the transient analysis of reactor decay heat merits future investigation. Results also identify a significant reactor pressure-drop limitation during propulsion and power-generation operation that is caused by poor tie tube

  3. Safety Analysis of Liquid Rocket Engine Using Bayesian Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua-wei; YAN Zhi-qiang

    2007-01-01

    Safety analysis for liquid rocket engine has a great meaning for shortening development cycle, saving development expenditure and reducing development risk. The relationship between the structure and component of liquid rocket engine is much more complex, furthermore test data are absent in development phase. Thereby, the uncertainties exist in safety analysis for liquid rocket engine. A safety analysis model integrated with FMEA(failure mode and effect analysis)based on Bayesian networks (BN) is brought forward for liquid rocket engine, which can combine qualitative analysis with quantitative decision. The method has the advantages of fusing multi-information, saving sample amount and having high veracity. An example shows that the method is efficient.

  4. Economical Mars Exploration Supported by a Nuclear Thermal Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, S. D.; O'Brien, R. C.

    2012-06-01

    A nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) developed for human Mars missions could act as a "mother ship" and carry multiple unmanned platforms to Mars for independent deployment. Use of the NTR could increase the science per dollar for each Earth launch.

  5. Propellant Flow Actuated Piezoelectric Rocket Engine Igniter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spark ignition of a bi-propellant rocket engine is a classic, proven, and generally reliable process. However, timing can be critical, and the control logic,...

  6. SpaceX rocket fuel plan under scrutiny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2016-12-01

    NASA's International Space Station advisory committee has raised concerns about SpaceX's plans to fuel rockets that are used to ferry astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) while the crew is onboard.

  7. Taming Liquid Hydrogen: The Centaur Upper Stage Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The Centaur is one of the most powerful rockets in the world. As an upper-stage rocket for the Atlas and Titan boosters it has been a reliable workhorse for NASA for over forty years and has played an essential role in many of NASA's adventures into space. In this CD-ROM you will be able to explore the Centaur's history in various rooms to this virtual museum. Visit the "Movie Theater" to enjoy several video documentaries on the Centaur. Enter the "Interview Booth" to hear and read interviews with scientists and engineers closely responsible for building and operating the rocket. Go to the "Photo Gallery" to look at numerous photos of the rocket throughout its history. Wander into the "Centaur Library" to read various primary documents of the Centaur program. Finally, stop by the "Observation Deck" to watch a virtual Centaur in flight.

  8. Rocket Fuel Synthesis by Fisher-Tropsch Process Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — While In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) studies for Mars return have emphasized methane fuel, only modest work has been done to develop the methane-powered rocket...

  9. Scale-Up of GRCop: From Laboratory to Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David L.

    2016-01-01

    GRCop is a high temperature, high thermal conductivity copper-based series of alloys designed primarily for use in regeneratively cooled rocket engine liners. It began with laboratory-level production of a few grams of ribbon produced by chill block melt spinning and has grown to commercial-scale production of large-scale rocket engine liners. Along the way, a variety of methods of consolidating and working the alloy were examined, a database of properties was developed and a variety of commercial and government applications were considered. This talk will briefly address the basic material properties used for selection of compositions to scale up, the methods used to go from simple ribbon to rocket engines, the need to develop a suitable database, and the issues related to getting the alloy into a rocket engine or other application.

  10. Dynamical Model of Rocket Propellant Loading with Liquid Hydrogen

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A dynamical model describing the multi-stage process of rocket propellant loading has been developed. It accounts for both the nominal and faulty regimes of...

  11. Oxidizer heat exchangers for rocket engine operation in idle modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanic, P. G.; Kmiec, T. D.

    1987-01-01

    The heat exchanger concept is discussed together with its role in rocket engine operation in idle modes. Two heat exchanger designs (low and high heat transfer) utilizing different approaches to achieve stable oxygen vaporization are presented as well as their performance test results. It is concluded that compact and lightweight heat exchangers can be used in a stable manner under the 'idle' operating conditions expected with the RL10 rocket engine.

  12. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Hybrid Rocket Motors Transient Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Barato, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    As the space business is shifting from pure performances to affordability a renewed interest is growing about hybrid rocket propulsion. Hybrid rocket motors are attractive for their inherent advantages like simplicity, reliability, safety and reduced costs. Moreover hybrid motors are easy to throttle and thus they are ideal candidate when soft-landing or energy management capabilities are required. This thesis is mainly involved with a theoretical/numerical study of hybrid transie...

  13. Canada's first three-stage rocket - The Bristol Aerospace Black Brant X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevier, H. G.

    1981-09-01

    The Canada, Sweden, and U.S. NASA program to develop a three-stage atmospheric sounding rocket capable of indefinite holds at T-90 sec while awaiting the desired geophysical events to unfold is described. The Black Brant X rocket employs a shortened BBVC motor for the second stage, a Terrier motor for the first stage, and a drag ring for second and third stage separation. Aerodynamics studies comprised calculation of the aeroelastic static margin, trajectory analysis, and a NASA-Goddard dynamics analysis, while further investigations covered the payload support systems and trajectory control. The first two payloads weighed 217 kg, comprising both scientific equipment and vehicle performance monitoring packages. Payload dispersion on the proving flight of the Black Brant X was 40 km, within scientific tolerances, and the impact point was within 9 km of the targeted area.

  14. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) for the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, D. L.; Blacklock, K.; Langhenry, M. T.

    1988-01-01

    The recertification of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) and Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) has included an extensive rewriting of the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL). The evolution of the groundrules and methodology used in the analysis is discussed and compared to standard FMEA techniques. Especially highlighted are aspects of the FMEA/CIL which are unique to the analysis of an SRM. The criticality category definitions are presented and the rationale for assigning criticality is presented. The various data required by the CIL and contribution of this data to the retention rationale is also presented. As an example, the FMEA and CIL for the SRM nozzle assembly is discussed in detail. This highlights some of the difficulties associated with the analysis of a system with the unique mission requirements of the Space Shuttle.

  15. State-space analysis of the dynamic characteristics of a variable thrust liquid propellant rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Lin

    This paper states the application of state-space method to the analysis of the dynamic characteristics of a variable thrust liquid propellant rocket engine and presents a set of state equations for describing the dynamic process of the engine. An efficient numerical method for solving these system equations is developed. The theoretical solutions agree well with the experimental data. The analysis leads to the following conclusion: the set coefficient of the pulse width, the working frequency of the solenoid valves and the deviation of the critical working points of these valves are important parameters for determining the dynamic response time and the control precision of this engine. The methods developed in this paper may be used effectively in the analysis of dynamic characteristics of variable thrust liquid propellant rocket engines.

  16. Biological and ecophysiological reactions of white wall rocket (Diplotaxis erucoides L.) grown on sewage sludge compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korboulewsky, Nathalie; Bonin, Gilles; Massiani, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effects of sewage sludge compost on white wall rocket (Diplotaxis erucoides L.) compared with mineral fertilization and control (without any fertilizer) in a greenhouse experiment. The plants grown on the compost-amended soil showed a different growth dynamic: a significant delay in flowering and a bigger root system. Both the compost and the fertilization treatments increased biomass and seed yield. Heavy metal (Cu, Cd, Zn, Ni) distribution within the plant was in the following order: roots > leaves > stems, except for zinc which was homogeneously distributed. The balance of mineral nutrition was not affected by treatments. Zinc was the trace element which was most taken up. Unlike many species of Brassicaceae, white wall rocket is not a hyperaccumulator. Although sewage sludge compost improved plant growth, delay in flowering shows that it is necessary to take precautions when spreading sewage sludge in natural areas.

  17. FDNS CFD Code Benchmark for RBCC Ejector Mode Operation: Continuing Toward Dual Rocket Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jeff; Ruf, Joseph H.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis results are compared with benchmark quality test data from the Propulsion Engineering Research Center's (PERC) Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) experiments to verify fluid dynamic code and application procedures. RBCC engine flowpath development will rely on CFD applications to capture the multi -dimensional fluid dynamic interactions and to quantify their effect on the RBCC system performance. Therefore, the accuracy of these CFD codes must be determined through detailed comparisons with test data. The PERC experiments build upon the well-known 1968 rocket-ejector experiments of Odegaard and Stroup by employing advanced optical and laser based diagnostics to evaluate mixing and secondary combustion. The Finite Difference Navier Stokes (FDNS) code [2] was used to model the fluid dynamics of the PERC RBCC ejector mode configuration. Analyses were performed for the Diffusion and Afterburning (DAB) test conditions at the 200-psia thruster operation point, Results with and without downstream fuel injection are presented.

  18. Structural and mechanical design challenges of space shuttle solid rocket boosters separation and recovery subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodis, W. R.; Runkle, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The design of the space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) subsystems for reuse posed some unique and challenging design considerations. The separation of the SRBs from the cluster (orbiter and external tank) at 150,000 ft when the orbiter engines are running at full thrust meant the two SRBs had to have positive separation forces pushing them away. At the same instant, the large attachments that had reacted launch loads of 7.5 million pounds thrust had to be servered. These design considerations dictated the design requirements for the pyrotechnics and separation rocket motors. The recovery and reuse of the two SRBs meant they had to be safely lowered to the ocean, remain afloat, and be owed back to shore. In general, both the pyrotechnic and recovery subsystems have met or exceeded design requirements. In twelve vehicles, there has only been one instance where the pyrotechnic system has failed to function properly.

  19. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics and Optimum Fracture Control Analytical Procedures for a Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1977-01-01

    A methodology for the reliability analysis of a reusable solid rocket motor case is discussed. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and probability distribution for initial flaw sizes. The developed reliability analysis is used to select the structural design variables of the solid rocket motor case on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds during the projected design life of the case. Effects of failure prevention plans such as nondestructive inspection and the material erosion between missions are also considered in the developed procedure for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure can be modified to consider other similar structures of reusable space vehicle systems with different failure prevention plans.

  20. The Geminid meteor shower during the ECOMA sounding rocket campaign: specular and head echo radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stober

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The ECOMA (Existence of Charge state Of meteoric smoke particles in the Middle Atmosphere sounding rocket campaign was conducted during the Geminid meteor shower in December 2010 in order to explore whether there is a change of the properties of meteoric smoke particles due to the stream. In parallel to the rocket flights, three radars monitored the Geminid activity located at the launch site in Northern Norway and in Northern Germany to gain information about the meteor flux into the atmosphere. The results presented here are based on specular meteor radar observations measuring the radiant position, the velocity and the meteor flux into the atmosphere during the Geminids. Further, the MAARSY (Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System radar was operated to conduct meteor head echo experiments. The interferometric capabilities of MAARSY permit measuring the meteor trajectories within the radar beam and to determine the source radiant and geocentric meteor velocity, as well as to compute the meteor orbit.