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Sample records for lytic protein released

  1. Simian virus 40 late proteins possess lytic properties that render them capable of permeabilizing cellular membranes.

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    Daniels, Robert; Rusan, Nasser M; Wilbuer, Anne-Kathrin; Norkin, Leonard C; Wadsworth, Patricia; Hebert, Daniel N

    2006-07-01

    Many nonenveloped viruses have evolved an infectious cycle that culminates in the lysis or permeabilization of the host to enable viral release. How these viruses initiate the lytic event is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrated that the simian virus 40 progeny accumulated at the nuclear envelope prior to the permeabilization of the nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum, and plasma membranes at a time which corresponded with the release of the progeny. The permeabilization of these cellular membranes temporally correlated with late protein expression and was not observed upon the inhibition of their synthesis. To address whether one or more of the late proteins possessed an inherent capacity to induce membrane permeabilization, we examined the permeability of Escherichia coli that separately expressed the late proteins. VP2 and VP3, but not VP1, caused the permeabilization of bacterial membranes. Additionally, VP3 expression resulted in bacterial cell lysis. These findings demonstrate that VP3 possesses an inherent lytic property that is independent of eukaryotic signaling or cell death pathways.

  2. A Herpesviral Lytic Protein Regulates the Structure of Latent Viral Chromatin

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    Priya Raja

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Latent infections by viruses usually involve minimizing viral protein expression so that the host immune system cannot recognize the infected cell through the viral peptides presented on its cell surface. Herpes simplex virus (HSV, for example, is thought to express noncoding RNAs such as latency-associated transcripts (LATs and microRNAs (miRNAs as the only abundant viral gene products during latent infection. Here we describe analysis of HSV-1 mutant viruses, providing strong genetic evidence that HSV-infected cell protein 0 (ICP0 is expressed during establishment and/or maintenance of latent infection in murine sensory neurons in vivo. Studies of an ICP0 nonsense mutant virus showed that ICP0 promotes heterochromatin and latent and lytic transcription, arguing that ICP0 is expressed and functional. We propose that ICP0 promotes transcription of LATs during establishment or maintenance of HSV latent infection, much as it promotes lytic gene transcription. This report introduces the new concept that a lytic viral protein can be expressed during latent infection and can serve dual roles to regulate viral chromatin to optimize latent infection in addition to its role in epigenetic regulation during lytic infection. An additional implication of the results is that ICP0 might serve as a target for an antiviral therapeutic acting on lytic and latent infections.

  3. Undetectable bacterial resistance to phage lytic proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of three phage lytic proteins constructs. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes w...

  4. A subset of replication proteins enhances origin recognition and lytic replication by the Epstein-Barr virus ZEBRA protein.

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    Ayman El-Guindy

    Full Text Available ZEBRA is a site-specific DNA binding protein that functions as a transcriptional activator and as an origin binding protein. Both activities require that ZEBRA recognizes DNA motifs that are scattered along the viral genome. The mechanism by which ZEBRA discriminates between the origin of lytic replication and promoters of EBV early genes is not well understood. We explored the hypothesis that activation of replication requires stronger association between ZEBRA and DNA than does transcription. A ZEBRA mutant, Z(S173A, at a phosphorylation site and three point mutants in the DNA recognition domain of ZEBRA, namely Z(Y180E, Z(R187K and Z(K188A, were similarly deficient at activating lytic DNA replication and expression of late gene expression but were competent to activate transcription of viral early lytic genes. These mutants all exhibited reduced capacity to interact with DNA as assessed by EMSA, ChIP and an in vivo biotinylated DNA pull-down assay. Over-expression of three virally encoded replication proteins, namely the primase (BSLF1, the single-stranded DNA-binding protein (BALF2 and the DNA polymerase processivity factor (BMRF1, partially rescued the replication defect in these mutants and enhanced ZEBRA's interaction with oriLyt. The findings demonstrate a functional role of replication proteins in stabilizing the association of ZEBRA with viral DNA. Enhanced binding of ZEBRA to oriLyt is crucial for lytic viral DNA replication.

  5. Transfer of the human NKG2D ligands UL16 binding proteins (ULBP) 1-3 is related to lytic granule release and leads to ligand retransfer and killing of ULBP-recipient natural killer cells.

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    López-Cobo, Sheila; Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; García-Cuesta, Eva M; Reyburn, Hugh T; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2015-09-01

    After immune interactions, membrane fragments can be transferred between cells. This fast transfer of molecules is transient and shows selectivity for certain proteins; however, the constraints underlying acquisition of a protein are unknown. To characterize the mechanism and functional consequences of this process in natural killer (NK) cells, we have compared the transfer of different NKG2D ligands. We show that human NKG2D ligands can be acquired by NK cells with different efficiencies. The main findings are that NKG2D ligand transfer is related to immune activation and receptor-ligand interaction and that NK cells acquire these proteins during interactions with target cells that lead to degranulation. Our results further demonstrate that NK cells that have acquired NKG2D ligands can stimulate activation of autologous NK cells. Surprisingly, NK cells can also re-transfer the acquired molecule to autologous effector cells during this immune recognition that leads to their death. These data demonstrate that transfer of molecules occurs as a consequence of immune recognition and imply that this process might play a role in homeostatic tuning-down of the immune response or be used as marker of interaction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Viroporin potential of the lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP domains of the HIV-1 gp41 protein

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    Garry Robert F

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms by which HIV-1 mediates reductions in CD4+ cell levels in infected persons are being intensely investigated, and have broad implications for AIDS drug and vaccine development. Virally induced changes in membrane ionic permeability induced by lytic viruses of many families contribute to cytopathogenesis. HIV-1 induces disturbances in plasma membrane ion transport. The carboxyl terminus of TM (gp41 contains potential amphipathic α-helical motifs identified through their structural similarities to naturally occurring cytolytic peptides. These sequences have been dubbed lentiviral lytic peptides (LLP -1, -2, and -3. Results Peptides corresponding to the LLP domains (from a clade B virus partition into lipid membranes, fold into α-helices and disrupt model membrane permeability. A peptide corresponding to the LLP-1 domain of a clade D HIV-1 virus, LLP-1D displayed similar activity to the LLP-1 domain of the clade B virus in all assays, despite a lack of amino acid sequence identity. Conclusion These results suggest that the C-terminal domains of HIV-1 Env proteins may form an ion channel, or viroporin. Increased understanding of the function of LLP domains and their role in the viral replication cycle could allow for the development of novel HIV drugs.

  7. In vitro and in vivo analyses of the Bacillus anthracis spore cortex lytic protein SleL

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial endospore is the most resilient biological structure known. Multiple protective integument layers shield the spore core and promote spore dehydration and dormancy. Dormancy is broken when a spore germinates and becomes a metabolically active vegetative cell. Germination requires the breakdown of a modified layer of peptidoglycan (PG) known as the spore cortex. This study reports in vitro and in vivo analyses of the Bacillus anthracis SleL protein. SleL is a spore cortex lytic en...

  8. The phage lytic proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 display multiple active catalytic domains and do not trigger staphylococcal resistance.

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    Lorena Rodríguez-Rubio

    Full Text Available The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we analyzed the specific cleavage sites on the staphylococcal peptidoglycan produced by three phage lytic proteins. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes were the endolysin LysH5 derived from the S. aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phi-IPLA88 (phi-IPLA88 and two fusion proteins between lysostaphin and the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 (HydH5SH3b and HydH5Lyso. We determined that all catalytic domains present in these proteins were active. Additionally, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of the three phage lytic proteins constructs. Resistant S. aureus could not be identified after 10 cycles of bacterial exposure to phage lytic proteins either in liquid or plate cultures. However, a quick increase in lysostaphin resistance (up to 1000-fold in liquid culture was observed. The lack of resistant development supports the use of phage lytic proteins as future therapeutics to treat staphylococcal infections.

  9. Induction of epstein-barr virus (EBV lytic cycle in vitro causes lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage in lymphoblastoid B cell lines

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    benmansour Riadh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the oxidative modifications of lipids, proteins and DNA, potential molecular targets of oxidative stress, in two lymphoblastoid cell lines: B95-8 and Raji, after EBV lytic cycle induction. Conjugated dienes level was measured as biomarker of lipid peroxidation. Malondialdehyde adduct and protein carbonyl levels, as well as protein thiol levels were measured as biomarkers of protein oxidation. DNA fragmentation was evaluated as biomarker of DNA oxidation. Results After 48 h (peak of lytic cycle, a significant increase in conjugated dienes level was observed in B95-8 and Raji cell lines (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.019 respectively. Malondialdehyde adduct, protein carbonyl levels were increased in B95-8 and Raji cell lines after EBV lytic cycle induction as compared to controls (MDA-adduct: p = 0.008 and p = 0.006 respectively; Carbonyl: p = 0.003 and p = 0.0039 respectively. Proteins thiol levels were decreased by induction in B95-8 and Raji cell lines (p = 0.046; p = 0.002 respectively. DNA fragmentation was also detected in B95-8 and Raji cell lines after EBV lytic cycle induction as compared to controls. Conclusion The results of this study demonstrate the presence of increased combined oxidative modifications in lipids, proteins in B95-8 and Raji cells lines after EBV lytic cycle induction. These results suggest that lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA fragmentation are generally induced during EBV lytic cycle induction and probably contribute to the cytopathic effect of EBV.

  10. Role of protein kinase C in TBT-induced inhibition of lytic function and MAPK activation in human natural killer cells.

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    Abraha, Abraham B; Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret M

    2010-11-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that destroy tumor and virally infected cells. Previous studies have shown that exposure of NK cells to tributyltin (TBT) greatly diminishes their ability to destroy tumor cells (lytic function) while activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (p44/42, p38, and JNK) in NK cells. The signaling pathway that regulates NK lytic function appears to include activation of protein kinase C(PKC) as well as MAPK activity. TBT-induced activation of MAPKs would trigger a portion of the NK lytic signaling pathway, which would then leave the NK cell unable to trigger this pathway in response to a subsequent encounter with a target cell. In the present study we evaluated the involvement of PKC in inhibition of NK lysis of tumor cells and activation of MAPKs caused by TBT exposure. TBT caused a 2–3-fold activation of PKC at concentrations ranging from 50 to 300 nM (16–98 ng/ml),indicating that activation of PKC occurs in response to TBT exposure. This would then leave the NK cell unable to respond to targets. Treatment with the PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, caused an 85% decrease in the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells, validating the involvement of PKC in the lytic signaling pathway. The role of PKC in the activation of MAPKs by TBT was also investigated using bisindolylmaleimide I. The results indicated that, in NK cells where PKC activation was blocked, there was no activation of the MAPK, p44/42 in response to TBT.However, TBT-induced activation of the MAPKs, p38 and JNK did not require PKC activation. These results indicate the pivotal role of PKC in the TBT-induced loss of NK lytic function including activation of p44/42 by TBT in NK cells.

  11. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus K-bZIP Protein Is Necessary for Lytic Viral Gene Expression, DNA Replication, and Virion Production in Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cell Lines▿ †

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    Lefort, Sylvain; Flamand, Louis

    2009-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of three human proliferative disorders, namely, Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphomas (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease. Lytic DNA replication of KSHV, which is essential for viral propagation, requires the binding of at least two KSHV proteins, replication and transactivation activator (RTA) and K-bZIP, on the lytic origin of replication. Moreover, K-bZIP physically interacts with RTA and represses its tra...

  12. An Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Protein Complex Requires an Origin of Lytic Replication In Cis to Mediate Late Gene Transcription.

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    Reza Djavadian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus lytic replication is accomplished by an intricate cascade of gene expression that integrates viral DNA replication and structural protein synthesis. Most genes encoding structural proteins exhibit "true" late kinetics-their expression is strictly dependent on lytic DNA replication. Recently, the EBV BcRF1 gene was reported to encode a TATA box binding protein homolog, which preferentially recognizes the TATT sequence found in true late gene promoters. BcRF1 is one of seven EBV genes with homologs found in other β- and γ-, but not in α-herpesviruses. Using EBV BACmids, we systematically disrupted each of these "βγ" genes. We found that six of them, including BcRF1, exhibited an identical phenotype: intact viral DNA replication with loss of late gene expression. The proteins encoded by these six genes have been found by other investigators to form a viral protein complex that is essential for activation of TATT-containing reporters in EBV-negative 293 cells. Unexpectedly, in EBV infected 293 cells, we found that TATT reporter activation was weak and non-specific unless an EBV origin of lytic replication (OriLyt was present in cis. Using two different replication-defective EBV genomes, we demonstrated that OriLyt-mediated DNA replication is required in cis for TATT reporter activation and for late gene expression from the EBV genome. We further demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the late BcLF1 mRNA localizes to EBV DNA replication factories. These findings support a model in which EBV true late genes are only transcribed from newly replicated viral genomes.

  13. A decay-accelerating factor-binding strain of coxsackievirus B3 requires the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor protein to mediate lytic infection of rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

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    Shafren, D R; Williams, D T; Barry, R D

    1997-12-01

    The composition of the cellular receptor complex for coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) has been an area of much contention for the last 30 years. Recently, two individual components of a putative CVB3 cellular receptor complex have been identified as (i) decay-accelerating factor (DAF) and (ii) the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor protein (CAR). The present study elucidates the individual roles of DAF and CAR in cell entry of CVB3 Nancy. First, we confirm that the DAF-binding phenotype of CVB3 correlates to the presence of key amino acids located in the viral capsid protein, VP2. Second, using antibody blockade, we show that complete protection of permissive cells from infection by high input multiplicities of CVB3 requires a combination of both anti-DAF and anti-CAR antibodies. Finally, it is shown that expression of the CAR protein on the surface of nonpermissive DAF-expressing RD cells renders them highly susceptible to CVB3-mediated lytic infection. Therefore, although the majority of CVB3 Nancy attaches to the cell via DAF, only virus directly interacting with the CAR protein mediates lytic infection. The role of DAF in CVB3 cell infection may be analogous to that recently described for coxsackievirus A21 (D. R. Shafren, D. J. Dorahy, R. A. Ingham, G. F. Burns, and R. D. Barry, J. Virol. 71:4736-4743, 1997), in that DAF may act as a CVB3 sequestration site, enhancing viral presentation to the functional CAR protein.

  14. Induction of lytic pathways in T cell clones derived from wild-type or protein tyrosine kinase Fyn mutant mice.

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    Lancki, D W; Fields, P; Qian, D; Fitch, F W

    1995-08-01

    The OVA-reactive CD4+ Th1 clones and alloreactive CD8+ clones derived from wild-type or fyn-/- mice serve as model systems which have allowed us to investigate several aspects of the molecular events associated with T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, including 1) the differential utilization of two distinct cytolytic pathways by CD4+ Th1 clones and CD8+ CTL, 2) a comparison of the pathways of lysis induced by stimulation of the TCR or by alternative stimuli, 3) the requirement of Fyn for derivation of antigen-specific T-cell clones having properties of CD4+ Th1 and CD8+ CTL cells 4) the differential requirement of Fyn in the induction of responses by TCR and the alternative stimuli. Stimulation through the TCR, either by APC bearing relevant antigen or by immobilized anti-CD3 mAb, resulted in comparable levels of target cell lysis by clones from both wild-type and fyn-/- mice. These clones also utilize the Fas pathway to lyse target cells. Thus, Fyn does not appear to be required for expression of the Fas pathway when triggered through the TCR. In contrast, lysis of target cells by T-cell clones lacking Fyn was deficient when stimulated through Thy-1 or Ly-6C (using mAb) or with Con A or phorbol ester as compared to clones derived from wild-type mice. The basis for the defect in response to stimulation through the GPI-linked molecules appears to be a signaling defect which affects all of the functional responses we measured, while the defect in response to Con A stimulation appears to affect lysis but not lymphokine production. Thus, Fyn expression is selectively required for efficient activation of the Fas pathway of lysis through Thy-1, Ly-6C, and by Con A or phorbol ester in these T-cell clones. CD8+ clones derived from fyn-/- mutant mice, like clones derived from wild-type mice, display antigen-specific lysis, and appear to express perforin message and perforin protein. A Ca(++)-dependent (presumably perforin/exocytosis) component and Fas component of lysis was

  15. Binding of cellular export factor REF/Aly by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 protein is not required for efficient KSHV lytic replication.

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    Li, Da-Jiang; Verma, Dinesh; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2012-09-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 protein is expressed early during lytic KSHV replication, enhances expression of many KSHV genes, and is essential for virus production. ORF57 is a member of a family of proteins conserved among all human and many animal herpesviruses that are multifunctional regulators of gene expression and act posttranscriptionally to increase accumulation of their target mRNAs. The mechanism of ORF57 action is complex and may involve effects on mRNA transcription, stability, and export. ORF57 directly binds to REF/Aly, a cellular RNA-binding protein component of the TREX complex that mediates RNA transcription and export. We analyzed the effects of an ORF57 mutation known to abrogate REF/Aly binding and demonstrate that the REF-binding mutant is impaired in activation of viral mRNAs and noncoding RNAs confined to the nucleus. Although the inability to bind REF leads to decreased ORF57 activity in enhancing gene expression, there is no demonstrable effect on nuclear export of viral mRNA or the ability of ORF57 to support KSHV replication and virus production. These data indicate that REF/Aly-ORF57 interaction is not essential for KSHV lytic replication but may contribute to target RNA stability independent of effects on RNA export, suggesting a novel role for REF/Aly in viral RNA metabolism.

  16. Herpesviral ICP0 Protein Promotes Two Waves of Heterochromatin Removal on an Early Viral Promoter during Lytic Infection

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    Jennifer S. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses must contend with host cell epigenetic silencing responses acting on their genomes upon entry into the host cell nucleus. In this study, we confirmed that unchromatinized herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 genomes enter primary human foreskin fibroblasts and are rapidly subjected to assembly of nucleosomes and association with repressive heterochromatin modifications such as histone 3 (H3 lysine 9-trimethylation (H3K9me3 and lysine 27-trimethylation (H3K27me3 during the first 1 to 2 h postinfection. Kinetic analysis of the modulation of nucleosomes and heterochromatin modifications over the course of lytic infection demonstrates a progressive removal that coincided with initiation of viral gene expression. We obtained evidence for three phases of heterochromatin removal from an early gene promoter: an initial removal of histones and heterochromatin not dependent on ICP0, a second ICP0-dependent round of removal of H3K9me3 that is independent of viral DNA synthesis, and a third phase of H3K27me3 removal that is dependent on ICP0 and viral DNA synthesis. The presence of ICP0 in transfected cells is also sufficient to promote removal of histones and H3K9me3 modifications of cotransfected genes. Overall, these results show that ICP0 promotes histone removal, a reduction of H3K9me3 modifications, and a later indirect reduction of H3K27me3 modifications following viral early gene expression and DNA synthesis. Therefore, HSV ICP0 promotes the reversal of host epigenetic silencing mechanisms by several mechanisms.

  17. An improved system for the surface immobilisation of proteins on Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative cells and spores through a new spore cortex-lytic enzyme anchor.

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    Shao, Xiaohu; Ni, Hong; Lu, Ting; Jiang, Mengtian; Li, Hua; Huang, Xinfeng; Li, Lin

    2012-02-15

    An improved surface-immobilisation system was engineered to target heterologous proteins onto vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus thuringiensis plasmid-free recipient strain BMB171. The sporulation-dependent spore cortex-lytic enzyme from B. thuringiensis YBT-1520, SceA, was expressed in vegetative cells and used as the surface anchoring motif. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a Bacillus endo-β-1,3-1,4-glucanase (BglS) were used as the fusion partners to test the binding efficiency and the functional activities of immobilised surface proteins. The surface localisation of the SceA-GFP fusion protein on vegetative cells and spores was confirmed by Western blot, immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The GFP fluorescence intensity from both vegetative cells and spores was measured and compared to a previously characterised surface display system using a peptidoglycan hydrolase anchor (Mbg). Results demonstrated comparable efficiency of SceA- and Mbg-mediated immobilisation on vegetative cells but a more efficient immobilisation on spores using the SceA anchor, suggesting SceA has greater potential for spore-based applications. The SceA protein was then applied to target BglS onto vegetative cells and spores, and the surface immobilisation was verified by the substantial whole-cell enzymatic activity and enhanced whole-spore enzymatic activity compared to vegetative cells. A dually active B. thuringiensis vegetative cell and spore display system could prove especially valuable for the development of regenerable and heat-stable biocatalysts that function under adverse environmental conditions, for example, an effective feed additive for improved digestion and nutrient absorption by livestock.

  18. The novel Shewanella putrefaciens-infecting bacteriophage Spp001: genome sequence and lytic enzymes.

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    Han, Feng; Li, Meng; Lin, Hong; Wang, Jingxue; Cao, Limin; Khan, Muhammad Naseem

    2014-06-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens has been identified as a specific spoilage organism commonly found in chilled fresh fish, which contributes to the spoilage of fish products. Limiting S. putrefaciens growth can extend the shelf-life of chilled fish. Endolysins, which are lytic enzymes produced by bacteriophages, have been considered an alternative to control bacterial growth, and have been useful in various applications, including food preservation. We report here, for the first time, the complete genome sequence of a novel phage Spp001, which lyses S. putrefaciens Sp225. The Spp001 genome comprises a 54,789-bp DNA molecule with 67 open reading frames and an average total G + C content of 49.42 %. In silico analysis revealed that the Spp001 open reading frames encode various putative functional proteins, including an endolysin (ORF 62); however, no sequence for genes encoding the holin polypeptides, which work in concert with endolysins, was identified. To examine further the lytic activity of Spp001, we analyzed the lytic enzyme-containing fraction from phages released at the end of the phage lytic cycle in S. putrefaciens, using diffusion and turbidimetric assays. The results show that the partially purified extract contained endolysin, as indicated by a high hydrolytic activity towards bacterial peptidoglycan decrease in the OD590 value by 0.160 in 15 min. The results will allow further investigation of the purification of natural Spp001 endolysin, the extension of Spp001 host range, and the applications of the phage-encoded enzymes.

  19. Lytic and non-lytic permeabilization of cardiolipin-containing lipid bilayers induced by cytochrome C.

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    Jian Xu

    Full Text Available The release of cytochrome c (cyt c from mitochondria is an important early step during cellular apoptosis, however the precise mechanism by which the outer mitochondrial membrane becomes permeable to these proteins is as yet unclear. Inspired by our previous observation of cyt c crossing the membrane barrier of giant unilamellar vesicle model systems, we investigate the interaction of cyt c with cardiolipin (CL-containing membranes using the innovative droplet bilayer system that permits electrochemical measurements with simultaneous microscopy observation. We find that cyt c can permeabilize CL-containing membranes by induction of lipid pores in a dose-dependent manner, with membrane lysis eventually observed at relatively high (µM cyt c concentrations due to widespread pore formation in the membrane destabilizing its bilayer structure. Surprisingly, as cyt c concentration is further increased, we find a regime with exceptionally high permeability where a stable membrane barrier is still maintained between droplet compartments. This unusual non-lytic state has a long lifetime (>20 h and can be reversibly formed by mechanically separating the droplets before reforming the contact area between them. The transitions between behavioural regimes are electrostatically driven, demonstrated by their suppression with increasing ionic concentrations and their dependence on CL composition. While membrane permeability could also be induced by cationic PAMAM dendrimers, the non-lytic, highly permeable membrane state could not be reproduced using these synthetic polymers, indicating that details in the structure of cyt c beyond simply possessing a cationic net charge are important for the emergence of this unconventional membrane state. These unexpected findings may hold significance for the mechanism by which cyt c escapes into the cytosol of cells during apoptosis.

  20. Mechanisms of HSP72 release

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alexzander Asea

    2007-04-01

    Currently two mechanisms are recognized by which heat shock proteins (HSP) are released from cells; a passive release mechanism, including necrotic cell death, severe blunt trauma, surgery and following infection with lytic viruses, and an active release mechanism which involves the non classical protein release pathway. HSPs are released both as free HSP and within exosomes. This review covers recent findings on the mechanism by which stress induces the release of HSP72 into the circulation and the biological significance of circulating HSP72 to host defense against disease.

  1. Viral reproductive strategies: How can lytic viruses be evolutionarily competitive?

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    Komarova, Natalia L

    2007-12-21

    Viral release strategies can be roughly classified as lytic (the ones that accumulate inside the host cell and exit in a burst, killing the cell), and budding (the ones that are produced and released from the host cell gradually). Here we study the evolutionary competition between the two strategies. If all the parameters, such as the rate of viral production, cell life-span and the neutralizing capacity of the antibodies, were the same for lytic and budding viruses, the budding life-strategy would have a large evolutionary advantage. The question arises what makes lytic viruses evolutionarily competitive. We propose that it is the different removal capacity of the antibodies against budding and lytic virions. The latter exit the cell in a large burst such that the antibodies are "flooded" and a larger proportion of virions can escape the immune system and spread to new cells. We create two spatial models of virus-antibody interaction and show that for realistic parameter values, the effect of antibody flooding can indeed take place. We also argue that the lytic life cycle, including a relatively large burst-size, has evolved to promote survival in the face of antibody attack. According to the calculations, in the absence of efficient antibodies, the optimal burst size of lytic viruses would be only a few virus particles, as opposed to the observed 10(2)-10(5) viral particles. Similarly, there is an evolutionary pressure to extend the life-span as a response to antibody action.

  2. Phage lytic enzymes: a history

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David; Trudil

    2015-01-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of ‘bacteria-eaters’ or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well(Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specifi c disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay(Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes–from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  3. Radio-synthesized polyacrylamide hydrogels for proteins release

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    Ferraz, Caroline C.; Varca, Gustavo H. C.; Lopes, Patricia S.; Mathor, Monica B.; Lugão, Ademar B.

    2014-01-01

    The use of hydrogels for biomedical purposes has been extensively investigated. Pharmaceutical proteins correspond to highly active substances which may be applied for distinct purposes. This work concerns the development of radio-synthesized hydrogel for protein release, using papain and bovine serum albumin as model proteins. The polymer was solubilized (1% w/v) in water and lyophilized. The proteins were incorporated into the lyophilized polymer and the hydrogels were produced by simultaneous crosslinking and sterilization using γ-radiation under frozen conditions. The produced systems were characterized in terms of swelling degree, gel fraction, crosslinking density and evaluated according to protein release, bioactivity and cytotoxicity. The hydrogels developed presented different properties as a function of polymer concentration and the optimized results were found for the samples containing 4-5% (w/v) polyacrylamide. Protein release was controlled by the electrostatic affinity of acrylic moieties and proteins. This selection was based on the release of the proteins during the experiment period (up to 50 h), maintenance of enzyme activity and the nanostructure developed. The system was suitable for protein loading and release and according to the cytotoxic assay it was also adequate for biomedical purposes, however this method was not able to generate a matrix with controlled pore sizes.

  4. Interaction of anesthetics with neurotransmitter release machinery proteins.

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    Xie, Zheng; McMillan, Kyle; Pike, Carolyn M; Cahill, Anne L; Herring, Bruce E; Wang, Qiang; Fox, Aaron P

    2013-02-01

    General anesthetics produce anesthesia by depressing central nervous system activity. Activation of inhibitory GABA(A) receptors plays a central role in the action of many clinically relevant general anesthetics. Even so, there is growing evidence that anesthetics can act at a presynaptic locus to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our own data identified the neurotransmitter release machinery as a target for anesthetic action. In the present study, we sought to examine the site of anesthetic action more closely. Exocytosis was stimulated by directly elevating the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration at neurotransmitter release sites, thereby bypassing anesthetic effects on channels and receptors, allowing anesthetic effects on the neurotransmitter release machinery to be examined in isolation. Three different PC12 cell lines, which had the expression of different release machinery proteins stably suppressed by RNA interference, were used in these studies. Interestingly, there was still significant neurotransmitter release when these knockdown PC12 cells were stimulated. We have previously shown that etomidate, isoflurane, and propofol all inhibited the neurotransmitter release machinery in wild-type PC12 cells. In the present study, we show that knocking down synaptotagmin I completely prevented etomidate from inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Synaptotagmin I knockdown also diminished the inhibition produced by propofol and isoflurane, but the magnitude of the effect was not as large. Knockdown of SNAP-25 and SNAP-23 expression also changed the ability of these three anesthetics to inhibit neurotransmitter release. Our results suggest that general anesthetics inhibit the neurotransmitter release machinery by interacting with multiple SNARE and SNARE-associated proteins.

  5. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded protein kinase, EBV-PK, but not the thymidine kinase (EBV-TK), is required for ganciclovir and acyclovir inhibition of lytic viral production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qiao; Hagemeier, Stacy R; Fingeroth, Joyce D; Gershburg, Edward; Pagano, Joseph S; Kenney, Shannon C

    2010-05-01

    Ganciclovir (GCV) and acyclovir (ACV) are guanine nucleoside analogues that inhibit lytic herpesvirus replication. GCV and ACV must be monophosphorylated by virally encoded enzymes to be converted into nucleotides and incorporated into viral DNA. However, whether GCV and/or ACV phosphorylation in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected cells is mediated primarily by the EBV-encoded protein kinase (EBV-PK), the EBV-encoded thymidine kinase (EBV-TK), or both is controversial. To examine this question, we constructed EBV mutants containing stop codons in either the EBV-PK or EBV-TK open reading frame and selected for stable 293T clones latently infected with wild-type EBV or each of the mutant viruses. Cells were induced to the lytic form of viral replication with a BZLF1 expression vector in the presence and absence of various doses of GCV and ACV, and infectious viral titers were determined by a green Raji cell assay. As expected, virus production in wild-type EBV-infected 293T cells was inhibited by both GCV (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)] = 1.5 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 4.1 microM). However, the EBV-PK mutant (which replicates as well as the wild-type (WT) virus in 293T cells) was resistant to both GCV (IC(50) = 19.6 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 36.4 microM). Expression of the EBV-PK protein in trans restored GCV and ACV sensitivity in cells infected with the PK mutant virus. In contrast, in 293T cells infected with the TK mutant virus, viral replication remained sensitive to both GCV (IC(50) = 1.2 microM) and ACV (IC(50) = 2.8 microM), although susceptibility to the thymine nucleoside analogue, bromodeoxyuridine, was reduced. Thus, EBV-PK but not EBV-TK mediates ACV and GCV susceptibilities.

  6. The mechanism of protein release from triglyceride microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaky, A; Elbakry, A; Ehmer, A; Breunig, M; Goepferich, A

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to reveal factors that have an impact on the protein release kinetics from triglyceride microspheres prepared by spray congealing. We investigated the effect of protein particle size, morphology and distribution on protein release from microspheres by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM)(.) The microspheres were loaded with three types of model particles made of FITC-labeled bovine serum albumin: freeze dried protein, spherical particles obtained by precipitation in the presence of PEG and micronized material. Investigation by light microscopy and laser light diffraction revealed that the freeze dried material consisted mainly of app. 29 μm elongated shaped particles. The precipitated BSA consisted mainly of 9.0 μm diameter spherically shaped particles while the micronized protein prepared by jet milling consisted of 4.9 μm sized rounded particles of high uniformity. Microspheres were embedded into a cold-curing resin and cut with a microtome. Subsequent investigation by CLSM revealed major differences of distribution of the polydisperse protein particles inside the microsphere sections depending on the type of BSA that was used. Particles of micronized and precipitated protein were distributed almost throughout the microsphere cross section. The protein distribution had a marked impact on the release kinetics in phosphate buffer. Large protein particles led to a considerably faster release than small ones. By staining the release medium we demonstrated that in all three cases there was a strong correlation between protein release and buffer intrusion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dual release of proteins from porous polymeric scaffolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sohier, J.; Vlugt, T.J.H.; Cabrol, N.; Blitterswijk, van C.; Groot, de K.; Bezemer, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    To create porous scaffolds releasing in a controlled and independent fashion two different proteins, a novel approach based on protein-loaded polymeric coatings was evaluated. In this process, two water-in-oil emulsions are forced successively through a prefabricated scaffold to create coatings, con

  8. Protein antifouling and fouling-release in perfluoropolyether surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molena, Elena; Credi, Caterina; De Marco, Carmela; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano; Simeone, Giovanni

    2014-08-01

    Perfluoropolyether polymers have been described as high performance fouling-release materials for marine coatings. Moreover, they have a good potential to be exploited in the biomedical field too. In this article several perfuoropolyether photopolymers were characterized in terms of surface and mechanical properties outlining the relationship between these properties and the polymer molecular structure. In particular the anti-fouling and fouling-release performances, evaluated using Bovine Serum Albumin as testing protein, was correlated to other material properties, like a parameter considering both surface tension components γ and elastic modulus E. A good correlation between the anti-fouling/fouling-release of perfluoropolyethers and (E*γpolar)1/2 can actually be established. Our results show that perfluoropolyether photopolymers are good protein anti-fouling/fouling-release materials.

  9. TIM-family proteins inhibit HIV-1 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghua; Ablan, Sherimay D; Miao, Chunhui; Zheng, Yi-Min; Fuller, Matthew S; Rennert, Paul D; Maury, Wendy; Johnson, Marc C; Freed, Eric O; Liu, Shan-Lu

    2014-09-02

    Accumulating evidence indicates that T-cell immunoglobulin (Ig) and mucin domain (TIM) proteins play critical roles in viral infections. Herein, we report that the TIM-family proteins strongly inhibit HIV-1 release, resulting in diminished viral production and replication. Expression of TIM-1 causes HIV-1 Gag and mature viral particles to accumulate on the plasma membrane. Mutation of the phosphatidylserine (PS) binding sites of TIM-1 abolishes its ability to block HIV-1 release. TIM-1, but to a much lesser extent PS-binding deficient mutants, induces PS flipping onto the cell surface; TIM-1 is also found to be incorporated into HIV-1 virions. Importantly, TIM-1 inhibits HIV-1 replication in CD4-positive Jurkat cells, despite its capability of up-regulating CD4 and promoting HIV-1 entry. In addition to TIM-1, TIM-3 and TIM-4 also block the release of HIV-1, as well as that of murine leukemia virus (MLV) and Ebola virus (EBOV); knockdown of TIM-3 in differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) enhances HIV-1 production. The inhibitory effects of TIM-family proteins on virus release are extended to other PS receptors, such as Axl and RAGE. Overall, our study uncovers a novel ability of TIM-family proteins to block the release of HIV-1 and other viruses by interaction with virion- and cell-associated PS. Our work provides new insights into a virus-cell interaction that is mediated by TIMs and PS receptors.

  10. Survey of bacterial proteins released in cheese: a proteomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnaire, Valérie; Piot, Michel; Camier, Bénédicte; Vissers, Johannes P C; Jan, Gwénaël; Léonil, Joëlle

    2004-07-15

    During the ripening of Emmental cheese, the bacterial ecosystem confers its organoleptic characteristics to the evolving curd both by the action of the living cells, and through the release of numerous proteins, including various types of enzymes into the cheese when the cells lyse. In Emmental cheese these proteins can be released from thermophilic lactic acid bacteria used as starters like Lactobacillus helveticus, Lb delbruecki subsp. lactis and Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus and ripening bacteria such as Propionibacterium freudenreichii. The aim of this study was to obtain a proteomic view of the different groups of proteins within the cheese using proteomic tools to create a reference map. A methodology was therefore developed to reduce the complexity of cheese matrix prior to 2D-PAGE analysis. The aqueous phase of cheese was prefractionated by size exclusion chromatography, bacterial and milk proteins were separated and subsequently characterised by mass spectrometry, prior to peptide mass fingerprint and sequence homology database search. Five functional groups of proteins were identified involved in: (i) proteolysis, (ii) glycolysis, (iii) stress response, (iv) DNA and RNA repair and (v) oxidoreduction. The results revealed stress responses triggered by thermophilic lactic acid bacteria and Propionibacterium strains at the end of ripening. Information was also obtained regarding the origin and nature of the peptidases released into the cheese, thus providing a greater understanding of casein degradation mechanisms during ripening. Different peptidases arose from St thermophilus and Lb helveticus, suggesting that streptococci are involved in peptide degradation in addition to the proteolytic activity of lactobacilli.

  11. Electrospun biodegradable nanofiber nonwovens for controlled release of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maretschek, Sascha; Greiner, Andreas; Kissel, Thomas

    2008-04-21

    Electrospinning of emulsions composed of an organic poly(l-lactide) solution and an aqueous protein solution yielded protein containing nanofiber nonwovens (NNs) having a mean fiber diameter of approximately 350 nm. Cytochrome C was chosen as a hydrophilic model protein for encapsulation. SEM imaging and gas adsorption measurements were carried out to determine morphology and surface characteristics of the different nanofiber nonwovens. Transmission electron microscopy was used to clarify the localization of the protein within the NN. PLLA NNs exhibited a highly hydrophobic surface which led to a slow wetting. It was shown that the protein release was dependent on the surface tension of the release medium. Electrospinning of emulsions consisting of an organic solution of PLLA and an aqueous solution of hydrophilic polymers yielded fibers composed of a polymer blend. The resulting NNs exhibited a less hydrophobic surface, which gave us the opportunity to tailor the release profile via this technology. Furthermore it was investigated how the addition of different amounts of hydrophilic polymer to the aqueous phase influenced the morphology of the resulting NNs.

  12. Hot Melt Extrusion for Sustained Protein Release: Matrix Erosion and In Vitro Release of PLGA-Based Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossé, Anne; König, Corinna; Lamprecht, Alf; Wagner, Karl G

    2017-01-01

    The design of biodegradable implants for sustained release of proteins is a complex challenge optimizing protein polymer interaction in combination with a mini-scale process which is predictive for production. The process of hot melt extrusion (HME) was therefore conducted on 5- and 9-mm mini-scale twin screw extruders. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) implants were characterized for their erosion properties and the in vitro release of the embedded protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). The release of acidic monomers as well as other parameters (pH value, mass loss) during 16 weeks indicated a delayed onset of matrix erosion in week 3. BSA-loaded implants released 17.0% glycolic and 5.9% lactic acid after a 2-week lag time. Following a low burst release (3.7% BSA), sustained protein release started in week 4. Storage under stress conditions (30°C, 75% rH) revealed a shift of erosion onset of 1 week (BSA-loaded implants: 26.9% glycolic and 9.3% lactic acid). Coherent with the changed erosion profiles, an influence on the protein release was observed. Confocal laser scanning and Raman microscopy showed a homogenous protein distribution throughout the matrix after extrusion and during release studies. Raman spectra indicated a conformational change of the protein structure which could be one reason for incomplete protein release. The study underlined the suitability of the HME process to obtain a solid dispersion of protein inside a polymeric matrix providing sustained protein release. However, the incomplete protein release and the impact by storage conditions require thorough characterization and understanding of erosion and release mechanisms.

  13. 5-hydroxymethylation of the EBV genome regulates the latent to lytic switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Coral K; Nawandar, Dhananjay M; Henning, Amanda N; Ma, Shidong; Oetting, Kayla M; Lee, Dennis; Lambert, Paul; Johannsen, Eric C; Kenney, Shannon C

    2015-12-29

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and cellular hypermethylation are hallmarks of undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, EBV infection of normal oral epithelial cells is confined to differentiated cells and is lytic. Here we demonstrate that the EBV genome can become 5-hydroxymethylated and that this DNA modification affects EBV lytic reactivation. We show that global 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC)-modified DNA accumulates during normal epithelial-cell differentiation, whereas EBV+ NPCs have little if any 5hmC-modified DNA. Furthermore, we find that increasing cellular ten-eleven translocation (TET) activity [which converts methylated cytosine (5mC) to 5hmC] decreases methylation, and increases 5hmC modification, of lytic EBV promoters in EBV-infected cell lines containing highly methylated viral genomes. Conversely, inhibition of endogenous TET activity increases lytic EBV promoter methylation in an EBV-infected telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs) cell line where lytic viral promoters are largely unmethylated. We demonstrate that these cytosine modifications differentially affect the ability of the two EBV immediate-early proteins, BZLF1 (Z) and BRLF1 (R), to induce the lytic form of viral infection. Although methylation of lytic EBV promoters increases Z-mediated and inhibits R-mediated lytic reactivation, 5hmC modification of lytic EBV promoters has the opposite effect. We also identify a specific CpG-containing Z-binding site on the BRLF1 promoter that must be methylated for Z-mediated viral reactivation and show that TET-mediated 5hmC modification of this site in NOKs prevents Z-mediated viral reactivation. Decreased 5-hydroxymethylation of cellular and viral genes may contribute to NPC formation.

  14. Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus tegument protein ORF75 is essential for viral lytic replication and plays a critical role in the antagonization of ND10-instituted intrinsic immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Full

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear domain 10 (ND10 components are restriction factors that inhibit herpesviral replication. Effector proteins of different herpesviruses can antagonize this restriction by a variety of strategies, including degradation or relocalization of ND10 proteins. We investigated the interplay of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV infection and cellular defense by nuclear domain 10 (ND10 components. Knock-down experiments in primary human cells show that KSHV-infection is restricted by the ND10 components PML and Sp100, but not by ATRX. After KSHV infection, ATRX is efficiently depleted and Daxx is dispersed from ND10, indicating that these two ND10 components can be antagonized by KSHV. We then identified the ORF75 tegument protein of KSHV as the viral factor that induces the disappearance of ATRX and relocalization of Daxx. ORF75 belongs to a viral protein family (viral FGARATs that has homologous proteins in all gamma-herpesviruses. Isolated expression of ORF75 in primary cells induces a relocalization of PML and dispersal of Sp100, indicating that this viral effector protein is able to influence multiple ND10 components. Moreover, by constructing a KSHV mutant harboring a stop codon at the beginning of ORF75, we could demonstrate that ORF75 is absolutely essential for viral replication and the initiation of viral immediate-early gene expression. Using recombinant viruses either carrying Flag- or YFP-tagged variants of ORF75, we could further corroborate the role of ORF75 in the antagonization of ND10-mediated intrinsic immunity, and show that it is independent of the PML antagonist vIRF3. Members of the viral FGARAT family target different ND10 components, suggesting that the ND10 targets of viral FGARAT proteins have diversified during evolution. We assume that overcoming ND10 intrinsic defense constitutes a critical event in the replication of all herpesviruses; on the other hand, restriction of herpesviral replication by ND10

  15. A green-light inducible lytic system for cyanobacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Kotone; Abe, Koichi; Ferri, Stefano; Nakajima, Mitsuharu; Nakamura, Mayumi; Yoshida, Wataru; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Ikebukuro, Kazunori; Sode, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an attractive candidate for the production of biofuel because of their ability to capture carbon dioxide by photosynthesis and grow on non-arable land. However, because huge quantities of water are required for cultivation, strict water management is one of the greatest issues in algae- and cyanobacteria-based biofuel production. In this study, we aim to construct a lytic cyanobacterium that can be regulated by a physical signal (green-light illumination) for future use in the recovery of biofuel related compounds. We introduced T4 bacteriophage-derived lysis genes encoding holin and endolysin under the control of the green-light regulated cpcG2 promoter in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. When cells harboring the lysis genes were illuminated with both red and green light, we observed a considerable decrease in growth rate, a significant increase in cellular phycocyanin released in the medium, and a considerable fraction of dead cells. These effects were not observed when these cells were illuminated with only red light, or when cells not containing the lysis genes were grown under either red light or red and green light. These results indicate that our constructed green-light inducible lytic system was clearly induced by green-light illumination, resulting in lytic cells that released intracellular phycocyanin into the culture supernatant. This property suggests a future possibility to construct photosynthetic genetically modified organisms that are unable to survive under sunlight exposure. Expression of the self-lysis system with green-light illumination was also found to greatly increase the fragility of the cell membrane, as determined by subjecting the induced cells to detergent, osmotic-shock, and freeze-thaw treatments. A green-light inducible lytic system was constructed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The engineered lytic cyanobacterial cells should be beneficial for the recovery of biofuels and related compounds from cells with minimal effort

  16. Protein microspheres as suitable devices for piroxicam release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Raquel; Ferreira, Helena; Carvalho, Ana C; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2012-04-01

    Bovine serum albumin-piroxicam (BSA-piroxicam) and human serum albumin-piroxicam (HSA-piroxicam) microspheres were sonochemically prepared and characterized. The use of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) lead to an improvement of formulation characteristics, including smaller size, lower polydispersity index (PDl), higher entrapment efficiency and higher stability. The release kinetics of these proteinaceous microspheres was determined in presence of protease, indicating an anomalous drug transport mechanism (diffusion and polymer degradation). In presence of higher protease concentration, BSA microspheres exhibit Case II transport, leading to zero order release (protein degradation). These proteinaceous devices did not show cytotoxicity against human skin fibroblasts in vitro, for range concentrations below to 300 mg L(-1), greatly supporting their potential application in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  17. Differentiation-Dependent KLF4 Expression Promotes Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay M Nawandar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with B-cell and epithelial cell malignancies. EBV lytically infects normal differentiated oral epithelial cells, where it causes a tongue lesion known as oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL in immunosuppressed patients. However, the cellular mechanism(s that enable EBV to establish exclusively lytic infection in normal differentiated oral epithelial cells are not currently understood. Here we show that a cellular transcription factor known to promote epithelial cell differentiation, KLF4, induces differentiation-dependent lytic EBV infection by binding to and activating the two EBV immediate-early gene (BZLF1 and BRLF1 promoters. We demonstrate that latently EBV-infected, telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs cells undergo lytic viral reactivation confined to the more differentiated cell layers in organotypic raft culture. Furthermore, we show that endogenous KLF4 expression is required for efficient lytic viral reactivation in response to phorbol ester and sodium butyrate treatment in several different EBV-infected epithelial cell lines, and that the combination of KLF4 and another differentiation-dependent cellular transcription factor, BLIMP1, is highly synergistic for inducing lytic EBV infection. We confirm that both KLF4 and BLIMP1 are expressed in differentiated, but not undifferentiated, epithelial cells in normal tongue tissue, and show that KLF4 and BLIMP1 are both expressed in a patient-derived OHL lesion. In contrast, KLF4 protein is not detectably expressed in B cells, where EBV normally enters latent infection, although KLF4 over-expression is sufficient to induce lytic EBV reactivation in Burkitt lymphoma cells. Thus, KLF4, together with BLIMP1, plays a critical role in mediating lytic EBV reactivation in epithelial cells.

  18. POE-PEG-POE triblock copolymeric microspheres containing protein. II. Polymer erosion and protein release mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, J P; Yang, Y Y; Chung, T S; Tan, D; Ng, S; Heller, J

    2001-07-10

    The first paper of this series presented the fabrication and characterization of POE-PEG-POE triblock copolymeric microspheres containing protein. In this paper, we focus on the polymer erosion and the mechanism of protein release. Fourteen-week in vitro behaviors of POE-PEG-POE microspheres loaded with bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been monitored. SEM micrographs reveal that after 14-week incubation in PBS buffer, pH 7.4, 37 degrees C, the polymeric particles remain spherical despite mass loss of almost 90%. On the other hand, molecular weight undergoes a high initial loss of 38% and 44% during the first 2-week incubation for POE-PEG(5%)-POE and POE-PEG(10%)-POE, respectively. Then, it keeps relatively unchanged over 12 weeks. However, POE-PEG(20%)-POE copolymer provides a better compatibility between the POE and PEG blocks. Hydrolysis is homogeneous through the polymer backbone. Thus, its molecular weight remains relatively constant and mass loss shows quite sustained over the 14-week in vitro release. The similar phenomena are observed in the polydispersity index of the degrading copolymers. SDS-PAGE of the encapsulated BSA within the POE-PEG(5%)-POE microspheres displays that the structural integrity of BSA is intact for at least 8 weeks due to a mild environment provided by the copolymer. In addition, XPS and FTIR are utilized to investigate protein behaviors in the degrading microspheres. Protein release from the POE-PEG-POE microspheres shows a biphasic pattern, characterized by an initial stage followed by a non-detectable release. The non-release phase is dominated by either slow polymer degradation or dense microsphere matrix structures. The microsphere formulation is optimized and a sustained protein release over 2 weeks is achieved by using POE-PEG(20%)-POE at a high protein loading.

  19. Structure of the Bacteriophage [phi]KZ Lytic Transglycosylase gp144

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokine, Andrei; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G. (SOIBC); (Purdue)

    2008-04-02

    Lytic transglycosylases are enzymes that act on the peptidoglycan of bacterial cell walls. They cleave the glycosidic linkage between N-acetylmuramoyl and N-acetylglucosaminyl residues with the concomitant formation of a 1,6-anhydromuramoyl product. The x-ray structure of the lytic transglycosylase gp144 from the Pseudomonas bacteriophage {phi}KZ has been determined to 2.5-{angstrom} resolution. This protein is probably employed by the bacteriophage in the late stage of the virus reproduction cycle to destroy the bacterial cell wall to release the phage progeny. {phi}KZ gp144 is a 260-residue {alpha}-helical protein composed of a 70-residue N-terminal cell wall-binding domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The fold of the N-terminal domain is similar to the peptidoglycan-binding domain from Streptomyces albus G d-Ala-d-Ala carboxypeptidase and to the N-terminal prodomain of human metalloproteinases that act on extracellular matrices. The C-terminal catalytic domain of gp144 has a structural similarity to the catalytic domain of the transglycosylase Slt70 from Escherichia coli and to lysozymes. The gp144 catalytic domain has an elongated groove that can bind at least five sugar residues at sites A-E. As in other lysozymes, the peptidoglycan cleavage (catalyzed by Glu{sup 115} in gp144) occurs between sugar-binding subsites D and E. The x-ray structure of the {phi}KZ transglycosylase complexed with the chitotetraose (N-acetylglucosamine){sub 4} has been determined to 2.6-{angstrom} resolution. The N-acetylglucosamine residues of the chitotetraose bind in sites A-D.

  20. Lytic to temperate switching of viral communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, B.; Silveira, C. B.; Bailey, B. A.; Barott, K.; Cantu, V. A.; Cobián-Güemes, A. G.; Coutinho, F. H.; Dinsdale, E. A.; Felts, B.; Furby, K. A.; George, E. E.; Green, K. T.; Gregoracci, G. B.; Haas, A. F.; Haggerty, J. M.; Hester, E. R.; Hisakawa, N.; Kelly, L. W.; Lim, Y. W.; Little, M.; Luque, A.; McDole-Somera, T.; McNair, K.; de Oliveira, L. S.; Quistad, S. D.; Robinett, N. L.; Sala, E.; Salamon, P.; Sanchez, S. E.; Sandin, S.; Silva, G. G. Z.; Smith, J.; Sullivan, C.; Thompson, C.; Vermeij, M. J. A.; Youle, M.; Young, C.; Zgliczynski, B.; Brainard, R.; Edwards, R. A.; Nulton, J.; Thompson, F.; Rohwer, F.

    2016-03-01

    Microbial viruses can control host abundances via density-dependent lytic predator-prey dynamics. Less clear is how temperate viruses, which coexist and replicate with their host, influence microbial communities. Here we show that virus-like particles are relatively less abundant at high host densities. This suggests suppressed lysis where established models predict lytic dynamics are favoured. Meta-analysis of published viral and microbial densities showed that this trend was widespread in diverse ecosystems ranging from soil to freshwater to human lungs. Experimental manipulations showed viral densities more consistent with temperate than lytic life cycles at increasing microbial abundance. An analysis of 24 coral reef viromes showed a relative increase in the abundance of hallmark genes encoded by temperate viruses with increased microbial abundance. Based on these four lines of evidence, we propose the Piggyback-the-Winner model wherein temperate dynamics become increasingly important in ecosystems with high microbial densities; thus ‘more microbes, fewer viruses’.

  1. TRIM5α Promotes Ubiquitination of Rta from Epstein–Barr Virus to Attenuate Lytic Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiang-Hung; Chen, Chien-Sin; Wang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Tsai, Hsiao-Han; Liu, Shih-Tung; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2017-01-01

    Replication and transcription activator (Rta), a key protein expressed by Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) during the immediate-early stage of the lytic cycle, is responsible for the activation of viral lytic genes. In this study, GST-pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that Rta interacts in vitro and in vivo with TRIM5α, a host factor known to be involved in the restriction of retroviral infections. Confocal microscopy results revealed that Rta colocalizes with TRIM5α in the nucleus during lytic progression. The interaction involves 190 amino acids in the N-terminal of Rta and the RING domain in TRIM5α, and it was further found that TRIM5α acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase to promote Rta ubiquitination. Overexpression of TRIM5α reduced the transactivating capabilities of Rta, while reducing TRIM5α expression enhanced EBV lytic protein expression and DNA replication. Taken together, these results point to a critical role for TRIM5α in attenuating EBV lytic progression through the targeting of Rta for ubiquitination, and suggest that the restrictive capabilities of TRIM5α may go beyond retroviral infections. PMID:28105027

  2. Identification of Novel Small Organic Compounds with Diverse Structures for the Induction of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Lytic Cycle in EBV-Positive Epithelial Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chung King; Ho, Dona N; Hui, Kwai Fung; Kao, Richard Y; Chiang, Alan K S

    2015-01-01

    Phorbol esters, which are protein kinase C (PKC) activators, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, which cause enhanced acetylation of cellular proteins, are the main classes of chemical inducers of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle in latently EBV-infected cells acting through the PKC pathway. Chemical inducers which induce EBV lytic cycle through alternative cellular pathways may aid in defining the mechanisms leading to lytic cycle reactivation and improve cells' responsiveness towards lytic induction. We performed a phenotypic screening on a chemical library of 50,240 novel small organic compounds to identify novel class(es) of strong inducer(s) of EBV lytic cycle in gastric carcinoma (GC) and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells. Five hit compounds were selected after three successive rounds of increasingly stringent screening. All five compounds are structurally diverse from each other and distinct from phorbol esters or HDAC inhibitors. They neither cause hyperacetylation of histone proteins nor significant PKC activation at their working concentrations, suggesting that their biological mode of action are distinct from that of the known chemical inducers. Two of the five compounds with rapid lytic-inducing action were further studied for their mechanisms of induction of EBV lytic cycle. Unlike HDAC inhibitors, lytic induction by both compounds was not inhibited by rottlerin, a specific inhibitor of PKCδ. Interestingly, both compounds could cooperate with HDAC inhibitors to enhance EBV lytic cycle induction in EBV-positive epithelial cancer cells, paving way for the development of strategies to increase cells' responsiveness towards lytic reactivation. One of the two compounds bears structural resemblance to iron chelators and the other strongly activates the MAPK pathways. These structurally diverse novel organic compounds may represent potential new classes of chemicals that can be used to investigate any alternative mechanism(s) leading to EBV

  3. Kinetics of protein-protein complex coacervation and biphasic release of salbutamol sulfate from coacervate matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Ananya; Bindal, Sonal; Bohidar, H B

    2009-01-12

    Turbidimetric titration was used to initiate associative intermolecular interactions between a pair of protein molecules, gelatin-A and gelatin-B, having complementary charges that led to pH-induced liquid-liquid phase separation and the formation of complex coacervate. The stoichiometric binding ratio was found to be [gelatin-A]/[gelatin-B]=3:2. The size of soluble intermolecular aggregates present in the supernatant exhibited interesting time-dependent coacervation because of residual electrostatic interactions. Dynamic light scattering and turbidity studies provided a systematic account of coacervation behavior. Rheology studies attributed the softening of the coacervate matrix to the presence of encapsulated salbutamol sulfate. The in vitro drug release kinetics was probed in simulated gastric fluid medium at physiological temperature (37 degrees C), which showed biphasic behavior. The initial release kinetics exhibited an exponential growth to saturation behavior, followed by a slower logarithmic release process.

  4. Lytic clavicular lesions in fibromatosis colli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartoris, D.J.; Parker, B.R.; Mochizuki, R.M.

    1983-06-01

    Two patients with fibromatosis colli (congenital torticollis) presented with lytic lesions in the clavicle at the insertion of the fibrosed clavicular head of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Biopsy of one lesion showed intraosseous fibrosis. These lesions are probably not uncommon but radiographs are rarely performed in uncomplicated cases.

  5. Inhibition of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle by moronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fang-Rong; Hsieh, Yi-Chung; Chang, Yung-Fu; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2010-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) expresses two transcription factors, Rta and Zta, during the immediate-early stage of the lytic cycle to activate the transcription of viral lytic genes. Our immunoblotting and flow cytometry analyses find that moronic acid, found in galls of Rhus chinensis and Brazilian propolis, at 10microM inhibits the expression of Rta, Zta, and an EBV early protein, EA-D, after lytic induction with sodium butyrate. This study also finds that moronic acids inhibits the capacity of Rta to activate a promoter that contains an Rta-response element, indicating that moronic acid interferes with the function of Rta. On the other hand, moronic acid does not appear to influence with the transactivation function of Zta. Therefore, the lack of expression of Zta and EA-D after moronic acid treatment is attributable to the inhibition of the transactivation functions of Rta. Because the expression of Zta, EA-D and many EBV lytic genes depends on Rta, the treatment of P3HR1 cells with moronic acid substantially reduces the numbers of EBV particles produced by the cells after lytic induction. This study suggests that moronic acid is a new structural lead for anti-EBV drug development.

  6. Syntaxin 8 is required for efficient lytic granule trafficking in cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Shruthi S; Friedmann, Kim S; Knörck, Arne; Hoxha, Cora; Leidinger, Petra; Backes, Christina; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas; Rettig, Jens; Hoth, Markus; Qu, Bin; Schwarz, Eva C

    2016-07-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) eliminate pathogen-infected and cancerous cells mainly by polarized secretion of lytic granules (LG, containing cytotoxic molecules like perforin and granzymes) at the immunological synapse (IS). Members of the SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) family are involved in trafficking (generation, transport and fusion) of vesicles at the IS. Syntaxin 8 (Stx8) is expressed in LG and colocalizes with the T cell receptor (TCR) upon IS formation. Here, we report the significance of Stx8 for human CTL cytotoxicity. We found that Stx8 mostly localized in late, recycling endosomal and lysosomal compartments with little expression in early endosomal compartments. Down-regulation of Stx8 by siRNA resulted in reduced cytotoxicity. We found that following perforin release of the pre-existing pool upon target cell contact, Stx8 down-regulated CTL regenerate perforin pools less efficiently and thus release less perforin compared to control CTL. CD107a degranulation, real-time and end-point population cytotoxicity assays, and high resolution microscopy support our conclusion that Stx8 is required for proper and timely sorting and trafficking of cytotoxic molecules to functional LG through the endosomal pathway in human CTL.

  7. Selective release from cultured mammalian cells of heat-shock (stress) proteins that resemble glia-axon transfer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, L E; Guidon, P T

    1989-02-01

    Cultured rat embryo cells were stimulated to rapidly release a small group of proteins that included several heat-shock proteins (hsp110, hsp71, hscp73) and nonmuscle actin. The extracellular proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Heat-shocked cells released the same set of proteins as control cells with the addition of the stress-inducible hsp110 and hsp71. Release of these proteins was not blocked by either monensin or colchicine, inhibitors of the common secretory pathway. A small amount of the glucose-regulated protein grp78 was externalized by this pathway. The extracellular accumulation of these proteins was inhibited after they were synthesized in the presence of the lysine analogue aminoethyl cysteine. It is likely that the analogue-substituted proteins were misfolded and could not be released from cells, supporting our conclusion that a selective release mechanism is involved. Remarkably, actin and the squid heat-shock proteins homologous to rat hsp71 and hsp110 are also among a select group of proteins transferred from glial cells to the squid giant axon, where they have been implicated in neuronal stress responses (Tytell et al.: Brain Res., 363:161-164, 1986). Based in part on the similarities between these two sets of proteins, we hypothesized that these proteins were released from labile cortical regions of animal cells in response to perturbations of homeostasis in cells as evolutionarily distinct as cultured rat embryo cells and squid glial cells.

  8. Lytic efficacy of apoli protein E2 (ApoE2) and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) treatment with 120 kHz ultrasound in an in-vitro human clot model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Jason M.; Cheng, Jason Y.; Clark, Joseph F.; Shaw, George J.

    2005-04-01

    Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). However rt-PA has substantial side effects such as hemorrhage. This has led to interest in other potential therapies. For example, ultrasound (US) increases the lytic efficacy of rt-PA. Also, apolipoprotein E2 (ApoE2) increases rt-PA activity. This suggests combining US, ApoE2 and rt-PA to improve thrombolysis, but the efficacy is not known. Here, the lytic efficacy of apoE2, rt-PA and 120 kHz US is measured in a human clot model. Whole blood was obtained from volunteers, after local institutional approval. Clots were formed in 1.7 mm micropipettes, and placed in a water tank that allowed microscopic video imaging during US and thrombolytic exposure. Clots were treated with rt-PA ([rt-PA]=3.15 μg/ml), rt-PA and apoE2 ([apoE2]=9.8 μg/ml), or rt-PA, apoE2 and 120 kHz US (0.35 MPa, PRF=1667 Hz, 80% duty cycle) for 15 min at 37°C in human plasma. Clot lysis was visually recorded and the lysis depth (LD) determined from these data using an image analysis algorithm. LD was linear with time for all treatments (R2>=0.81), allowing the determination of a lytic rate (LR). LR was found to be 0.35+/-0.03, 1.55+/-0.11, and 0.75+/-0.04 μm/min for the rt-PA, rt-PA and apoE2, and US treated groups respectively. The thrombolytic efficacy of rt-PA is enhanced by ApoE2. The interaction of 120 kHz with apoE2 and rt-PA showed a reduced lytic efficacy compared with rt-PA and apoE2 treatment alone. It is possible that US interferes with the ApoE2-mediated activation of rt-PA.

  9. Characterization of the lytic-lysogenic switch of the lactococcal bacteriophage Tuc2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenny, JG; Leach, S; de la Hoz, AB; Venema, G; Kok, J; Fitzgerald, GF; Nauta, A; Alonso, JC; van Sinderen, D; Kenny, John G.; Hoz, Ana B. de la; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Alonso, Juan C.

    2006-01-01

    Tuc2009 is a temperate bacteriophage of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509 which encodes a CI- and Cro-type lysogenic-lytic switch region. A helix-swap of the 0 helices of the closely related Cl-type proteins from the lactococcal phages r1t and Tuc2009 revealed the crucial elements involved in

  10. Protein release from electrospun nonwovens: improving the release characteristics through rational combination of polyester blend matrices with polidocanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Sebastian; Ilko, David; Li, Linhao; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Meinel, Lorenz; Germershaus, Oliver

    2014-12-30

    Nonwoven scaffolds consisting of poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL), poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and polidocanol (PD), and loaded with lysozyme crystals were prepared by electrospinning. The composition of the matrix was varied and the effect of PD content in binary mixtures, and of PD and PLGA content in ternary mixtures regarding processability, fiber morphology, water sorption, swelling and drug release was investigated. Binary PCL/PD blend nonwovens showed a PD-dependent increase in swelling of up to 30% and of lysozyme burst release of up to 45% associated with changes of the fiber morphology. Furthermore, addition of free PD to the release medium resulted in a significant increase of lysozyme burst release from pure PCL nonwovens from approximately 2-35%. Using ternary PCL/PD/PLGA blends, matrix degradation could be significantly improved over PCL/PD blends, resulting in a biphasic release of lysozyme with constant release over 9 weeks, followed by constant release with a reduced rate over additional 4 weeks. Based on these results, protein release from PCL scaffolds is improved by blending with PD due to improved lysozyme desorption from the polymer surface and PD-dependent matrix swelling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Accelerating protein release from microparticles for regenerative medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Lisa J., E-mail: lisa.white@nottingham.ac.uk; Kirby, Giles T.S.; Cox, Helen C.; Qodratnama, Roozbeh; Qutachi, Omar; Rose, Felicity R.A.J.; Shakesheff, Kevin M.

    2013-07-01

    There is a need to control the spatio-temporal release kinetics of growth factors in order to mitigate current usage of high doses. A novel delivery system, capable of providing both structural support and controlled release kinetics, has been developed from PLGA microparticles. The inclusion of a hydrophilic PLGA–PEG–PLGA triblock copolymer altered release kinetics such that they were decoupled from polymer degradation. A quasi zero order release profile over four weeks was produced using 10% w/w PLGA–PEG–PLGA with 50:50 PLGA whereas complete and sustained release was achieved over ten days using 30% w/w PLGA–PEG–PLGA with 85:15 PLGA and over four days using 30% w/w PLGA–PEG–PLGA with 50:50 PLGA. These three formulations are promising candidates for delivery of growth factors such as BMP-2, PDGF and VEGF. Release profiles were also modified by mixing microparticles of two different formulations providing another route, not previously reported, for controlling release kinetics. This system provides customisable, localised and controlled delivery with adjustable release profiles, which will improve the efficacy and safety of recombinant growth factor delivery. Highlights: ► A new delivery system providing controlled release kinetics has been developed. ► Inclusion of hydrophilic PLGA–PEG–PLGA decoupled release kinetics from degradation. ► Using 10% triblock copolymer produced quasi zero order release over four weeks. ► Mixing microparticle formulations provided another route for controlling release. ► This system provides customisable, localised and controlled delivery of growth factors.

  12. Activation of protein kinase C inhibits synthesis and release of decidual prolactin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, I.; Costello, A.; Ganong, B.; Bell, R.M.; Handwerger, S.

    1986-08-01

    Activation of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C by diacylglycerol and phorbol esters has been shown to mediate release of hormones in many systems. To determine whether protein kinase C activation is also involved in the regulation of prolactin release from human decidual, the authors have examined the effects of various acylglycerols and phorbol esters on the synthesis and release of prolactin from cultured human decidual cells. sn-1,2-Dioctanolyglycerol (diC8), which is known to stimulate protein kinase C in other systems, inhibited prolactin release in a dose-dependent manner with maximal inhibition of 53.1% at 100 M. Diolein (100 M), which also stimulates protein kinase C activity in some systems, inhibited prolactin release by 21.3%. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, and 4US -phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, which activate protein kinase C in other systems, also inhibited the release of prolactin, which the protein kinase C inactivate 4 -phorbol-12,13-didecanoate was without effect. The inhibition of prolactin release was secondary to a decrease in prolactin synthesis. Although diC8 and PMA inhibited the synthesis and release of prolactin, these agents had no effect on the synthesis or release of trichloroacetic acid-precipitable (TVS)methionine-labeled decidual proteins and did not cause the release of the cytosolic enzymes lactic dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase. DiC8 and PMA stimulates the specific activity of protein kinase C in decidual tissue by 14.6 and 14.0-fold, respectively. The inhibition of the synthesis and release of prolactin by diC8 and phorbol esters strongly implicates protein kinase C in the regulation of the production and release of prolactin from the decidua.

  13. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases disrupt the cellulose fibers structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Garajova, Sona; Foucat, Loïc; Falourd, Xavier; Saake, Bodo; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Cathala, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a class of powerful oxidative enzymes that breakdown recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose. Here we investigate the action of LPMOs on cellulose fibers. After enzymatic treatment and dispersion, LPMO-treated fibers show intense fibrillation. Cellulose structure modifications visualized at different scales indicate that LPMO creates nicking points that trigger the disintegration of the cellulose fibrillar structure with rupture of chains and release of elementary nanofibrils. Investigation of LPMO action using solid-state NMR provides direct evidence of modification of accessible and inaccessible surfaces surrounding the crystalline core of the fibrils. The chains breakage likely induces modifications of the cellulose network and weakens fibers cohesion promoting their disruption. Besides the formation of new initiation sites for conventional cellulases, this work provides the first evidence of the direct oxidative action of LPMOs with the mechanical weakening of the cellulose ultrastructure. LPMOs can be viewed as promising biocatalysts for enzymatic modification or degradation of cellulose fibers. PMID:28071716

  14. Affinity hydrogels for controlled protein release using nucleic acid aptamers and complementary oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soontornworajit, Boonchoy; Zhou, Jing; Snipes, Matthew P; Battig, Mark R; Wang, Yong

    2011-10-01

    Biomaterials for the precise control of protein release are important to the development of new strategies for treating human diseases. This study aimed to fundamentally understand aptamer--protein dissociation triggered by complementary oligonucleotides, and to apply this understanding to develop affinity hydrogels for controlled protein release. The results showed that the oligonucleotide tails of the aptamers played a critical role in inducing intermolecular hybridization and triggering aptamer--protein dissociation. In addition, the attachment of the oligonucleotide tails to the aptamers and the increase of hybridizing length could produce a synergistic effect on the dissociation of bound proteins from their aptamers. More importantly, pegylated complementary oligonucleotides could successfully trigger protein release from the aptamer-functionalized hydrogels at multiple time points. Based on these results, it is believed that aptamer-functionalized hydrogels and complementary oligonucleotides hold great potential of controlling the release of protein drugs to treat human diseases.

  15. Design of cationic microspheres based on aminated gelatin for controlled release of peptide and protein drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kazuhiro; Chono, Sumio; Kosai, Tadashi; Seki, Toshinobu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2008-02-01

    Two different types of cationized microspheres based on a native cationic gelatin (NGMS) and aminated gelatin with ethylendiamine (CGMS) were investigated for the controlled release of three model acidic peptide/protein drugs with different molecular weights (MWs) and isoelectric points (IEPs). Recombinant human (rh)-insulin (MW: 5.8 kDa, IEP: 5.3), bovine milk lactoalbumin, BMLA (MW: 14 kDa, IEP: 4.3), and bovine serum albumin (BSA MW: 67 kDa, IEP: 4.9) were used as model acidic peptide/protein drugs. The in vitro release profiles of these acidic peptide/protein drugs from NGMS and CGMS were compared and different periods of cross-linking were obtained. The slower release of these acidic peptide/protein drugs from CGMS compared with those from NGMS with cross-linking for 48 hr. was caused by the suppression of burst release during the initial phase. The degree of suppression of burst release of the three peptide/protein drugs during the initial phase by CGMS was in the following order: (rh)-insulin > BMLA > BSA. The release of insulin with a lower molecular weight from CGMS was particularly suppressed compared with the other two drugs with higher molecular weights in the initial phase. The control of the release rate of acidic peptide/protein drugs from gelatin microsphere can be achieved by amination of gelatin. Therefore, CGMS is useful for the controlled release of acidic peptide/ protein drugs.

  16. Surface-protein interactions on different stainless steel grades: effects of protein adsorption, surface changes and metal release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Y; Wang, X; Hedberg, J; Lundin, M; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2013-04-01

    Implantation using stainless steels (SS) is an example where an understanding of protein-induced metal release from SS is important when assessing potential toxicological risks. Here, the protein-induced metal release was investigated for austenitic (AISI 304, 310, and 316L), ferritic (AISI 430), and duplex (AISI 2205) grades in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) solution containing either bovine serum albumin (BSA) or lysozyme (LSZ). The results show that both BSA and LSZ induce a significant enrichment of chromium in the surface oxide of all stainless steel grades. Both proteins induced an enhanced extent of released iron, chromium, nickel and manganese, very significant in the case of BSA (up to 40-fold increase), whereas both proteins reduced the corrosion resistance of SS, with the reverse situation for iron metal (reduced corrosion rates and reduced metal release in the presence of proteins). A full monolayer coverage is necessary to induce the effects observed.

  17. Kisspeptin regulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion in gonadotropin-releasing hormone/enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haogang Xue; Chunying Yang; Xiaodong Ge; Weiqi Sun; Chun Li; Mingyu Qi

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin is essential for activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis. In this study, we established gonadotropin-releasing hormone/enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic rats. Rats were injected with 1, 10, or 100 pM kisspeptin-10, a peptide derived from full-length kisspeptin, into the arcuate nucleus and medial preoptic area, and with the kisspeptin antagonist peptide 234 into the lateral cerebral ventricle. The results of immunohistochemical staining revealed that pulsatile luteinizing hormone secretion was suppressed after injection of antagonist peptide 234 into the lateral cerebral ventricle, and a significant increase in luteinizing hormone level was observed after kisspeptin-10 injection into the arcuate nucleus and medial preoptic area. The results of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that luteinizing hormone levels during the first hour of kisspeptin-10 infusion into the arcuate nucleus were significantly greater in the 100 pM kisspeptin-10 group than in the 10 pM kisspeptin-10 group. These findings indicate that kisspeptin directly promotes gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion and luteinizing hormone release in gonadotropin-releasing hormone/enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic rats. The arcuate nucleus is a key component of the kisspeptin-G protein-coupled receptor 54 signaling pathway underlying regulating luteinizing hormone pulse secretion.

  18. A functional protein retention and release multilayer with high stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Kun; An, Qi; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-04-01

    Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by varying the number of capping layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the protein-loaded interfacial layers could not only be used to construct catalytic-active interfaces, but also be integrated as the power-generating unit to propel a macroscopic floating device.Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by

  19. Diversity of phage infection types and associated terminology: the problem with 'Lytic or lysogenic'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Zack; Abedon, Stephen T

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses of members of domain Bacteria. These viruses play numerous roles in shaping the diversity of microbial communities, with impact differing depending on what infection strategies specific phages employ. From an applied perspective, these especially are communities containing undesired or pathogenic bacteria that can be modified through phage-mediated bacterial biocontrol, that is, through phage therapy. Here we seek to categorize phages in terms of their infection strategies as well as review or suggest more descriptive, accurate or distinguishing terminology. Categories can be differentiated in terms of (1) whether or not virion release occurs (productive infections versus lysogeny, pseudolysogeny and/or the phage carrier state), (2) the means of virion release (lytic versus chronic release) and (3) the degree to which phages are genetically equipped to display lysogenic cycles (temperate versus non-temperate phages). We address in particular the use or overuse of what can be a somewhat equivocal phrase, 'Lytic or lysogenic', especially when employed as a means of distinguishing among phages types. We suggest that the implied dichotomy is inconsistent with both modern as well as historical understanding of phage biology. We consider, therefore, less ambiguous terminology for distinguishing between 'Lytic' versus 'Lysogenic' phage types.

  20. Review on Medusa:a polymer-based sustained release technology for protein and peptide drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y-P; Meyrueix, R; Kravtzoff, R; Nicolas, F; Lundstrom, K

    2007-07-01

    The polymer-based Medusa system (Flamel Technologies) has been designed for slow release of therapeutic proteins and peptides. The Medusa II consists of a poly L-glutamate backbone grafted with hydrophobic alpha-tocopherol molecules, creating a colloidal suspension of nanoparticles (10 - 50 nm) in water. The sustained drug release is based on reversible drug interactions with hydrophobic nanodomains within the nanoparticles. In vivo, it is suggested that the therapeutic protein is displaced by endogenous proteins present in physiological fluids, leading to a slow drug release. The peak concentration is dramatically decreased and the protein release substantially extended. The Medusa technology has been applied to subcutaneous injection for several therapeutic proteins, such as IL-2 and IFN-alpha(2b), in animal models (rats, dogs, monkeys) and clinical trials in renal cancer (IL-2) and hepatitis C (IFN-alpha(2b)) patients.

  1. [Advances in effects of insecticidal crystal proteins released from transgenic Bt crops on soil ecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue-Yong; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Man; Li, He; Zhou, Lang; Tang, Zong-Wen; Cao, Fei; Li, Wei

    2011-05-01

    With the large scale cultivation of transgenic crops expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal crystal proteins in the world, the problem of environmental safety caused by these Bt crops has received extensive attention. These insecticidal crystal proteins can be released into the soil continuously in the growing period of Bt plants. If their accumulation of the insecticidal crystal proteins exceeds consumption by insect larvae and degradation by the environmental factors, these insecticidal crystal proteins could constitute a hazard to non-target insects and soil microbiota. There are three main ways to release insecticidal crystal proteins into soil for Bt plants: root exudates, pollen falling, and crop reside returning. The Bt insecticidal crystal proteins released into soil can be adsorbed rapidly by active soil particles and the absorption equilibrium attained within 1-3 h. The adsorption protects Bt insecticidal crystal proteins against soil microbial degradation or enzyme degradation, which leads to remarkable prolong of the persistence of insecticidal activity. The change of soil microorganism species is an important index for evaluating the effect of Bt plants on soil ecology. The research showed that these insecticidal crystal proteins released by the Bt plant root exudates or Bt organism had no toxicity to the soil earthworms, nematodes, protozoa, bacteria and fungi; however, it could reduce the mycelium length of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and restrain AMF to form invasion unit. The influencing degree of Bt protein on soil enzyme activity varied with the releasing modes or growth period of Bt crops. Bt Cry1Ab protein can be taken up from soil by parts of following crops; however, different results were obtained with different commercial kits. To better understand the soil ecological evaluation about the insecticidal crystal proteins released from transgenic Bt crops, this review provides a comprehensive overview about the release

  2. Involvement of Noxa in mediating cellular ER stress responses to lytic virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Noxa is a Bcl-2 homology domain-containing pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein. Noxa mRNA and protein expression are upregulated by dsRNA or virus, and ectopic Noxa expression enhances cellular sensitivity to virus or dsRNA-induced apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that Noxa null baby mouse kidney (BMK) cells are deficient in normal cytopathic response to lytic viruses, and that reconstitution of the knockout cells with wild type Noxa restored normal cytopathic responses. Noxa regulation by viru...

  3. Release behavior of non-network proteins and its relationship to the structure of heat-induced soy protein gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao; Hua, Yufei; Chen, Yeming; Kong, Xiangzhen; Zhang, Caimeng

    2015-04-29

    Heat-induced soy protein gels were prepared by heating protein solutions at 12%, 15% ,or 18% for 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 h. The release of non-network proteins from gel slices was conducted in 10 mM pH 7.0 sodium phosphate buffer. SDS-PAGE and diagonal electrophoresis demonstrated that the released proteins consisted of undenatured AB subunits and denatured proteins including monomers of A polypeptides, disulfide bond linked dimers, trimers, and polymers of A polypeptides, and an unidentified 15 kDa protein. SEC-HPLC analysis of non-network proteins revealed three major protein peaks, with molecular weights of approximately 253.9, 44.8, and 9.7 kDa. The experimental data showed that the time-dependent release of the three fractions from soy protein gels fit Fick's second law. An increasing protein concentration or heating time resulted in a decrease in diffusion coefficients of non-network proteins. A power law expression was used to describe the relationship between non-network protein diffusion coefficient and molecular weight, for which the exponent (α) shifted to higher value with an increase in protein concentration or heating time, indicating that a more compact gel structure was formed.

  4. Designer protein delivery: From natural to engineered affinity-controlled release systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakulska, Malgosia M; Miersch, Shane; Shoichet, Molly S

    2016-03-18

    Exploiting binding affinities between molecules is an established practice in many fields, including biochemical separations, diagnostics, and drug development; however, using these affinities to control biomolecule release is a more recent strategy. Affinity-controlled release takes advantage of the reversible nature of noncovalent interactions between a therapeutic protein and a binding partner to slow the diffusive release of the protein from a vehicle. This process, in contrast to degradation-controlled sustained-release formulations such as poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres, is controlled through the strength of the binding interaction, the binding kinetics, and the concentration of binding partners. In the context of affinity-controlled release--and specifically the discovery or design of binding partners--we review advances in in vitro selection and directed evolution of proteins, peptides, and oligonucleotides (aptamers), aided by computational design.

  5. DNA Damage Signaling Is Induced in the Absence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Lytic DNA Replication and in Response to Expression of ZEBRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang'ondu, Ruth; Teal, Stuart; Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Delecluse, Henri; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV), like other oncogenic viruses, modulates the activity of cellular DNA damage responses (DDR) during its life cycle. Our aim was to characterize the role of early lytic proteins and viral lytic DNA replication in activation of DNA damage signaling during the EBV lytic cycle. Our data challenge the prevalent hypothesis that activation of DDR pathways during the EBV lytic cycle occurs solely in response to large amounts of exogenous double stranded DNA products generated during lytic viral DNA replication. In immunofluorescence or immunoblot assays, DDR activation markers, specifically phosphorylated ATM (pATM), H2AX (γH2AX), or 53BP1 (p53BP1), were induced in the presence or absence of viral DNA amplification or replication compartments during the EBV lytic cycle. In assays with an ATM inhibitor and DNA damaging reagents in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, γH2AX induction was necessary for optimal expression of early EBV genes, but not sufficient for lytic reactivation. Studies in lytically reactivated EBV-positive cells in which early EBV proteins, BGLF4, BGLF5, or BALF2, were not expressed showed that these proteins were not necessary for DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle. Expression of ZEBRA, a viral protein that is necessary for EBV entry into the lytic phase, induced pATM foci and γH2AX independent of other EBV gene products. ZEBRA mutants deficient in DNA binding, Z(R183E) and Z(S186E), did not induce foci of pATM. ZEBRA co-localized with HP1β, a heterochromatin associated protein involved in DNA damage signaling. We propose a model of DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle in which ZEBRA induces ATM kinase phosphorylation, in a DNA binding dependent manner, to modulate gene expression. ATM and H2AX phosphorylation induced prior to EBV replication may be critical for creating a microenvironment of viral and cellular gene expression that enables lytic cycle progression.

  6. Controlled protein delivery from electrospun non-wovens: novel combination of protein crystals and a biodegradable release matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Sebastian; Li, Linhao; Meinel, Lorenz; Germershaus, Oliver

    2014-07-07

    Poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) is an excellent polymer for electrospinning and matrix-controlled drug delivery combining optimal processability and good biocompatibility. Electrospinning of proteins has been shown to be challenging via the use of organic solvents, frequently resulting in protein unfolding or aggregation. Encapsulation of protein crystals represents an attractive but largely unexplored alternative to established protein encapsulation techniques because of increased thermodynamic stability and improved solvent resistance of the crystalline state. We herein explore the electrospinning of protein crystal suspensions and establish basic design principles for this novel type of protein delivery system. PCL was deployed as a matrix, and lysozyme was used as a crystallizing model protein. By rational combination of lysozyme crystals 0.7 or 2.1 μm in diameter and a PCL fiber diameter between 1.6 and 10 μm, release within the first 24 h could be varied between approximately 10 and 100%. Lysozyme loading of PCL microfibers between 0.5 and 5% was achieved without affecting processability. While relative release was unaffected by loading percentage, the amount of lysozyme released could be tailored. PCL was blended with poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) to further modify the release rate. Under optimized conditions, an almost constant lysozyme release over 11 weeks was achieved.

  7. Controlled release of NELL-1 protein from chitosan/hydroxyapatite-modified TCP particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulong; Dong, Rui; Park, Yujin; Bohner, Marc; Zhang, Xinli; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia; Wu, Benjamin M

    2016-09-10

    NEL-like molecule-1 (NELL-1) is a novel osteogenic protein that showing high specificity to osteochondral cells. It was widely used in bone regeneration research by loading onto carriers such as tricalcium phosphate (TCP) particles. However, there has been little research on protein controlled release from this material and its potential application. In this study, TCP was first modified with a hydroxyapatite coating followed by a chitosan coating to prepare chitosan/hydroxyapatite-coated TCP particles (Chi/HA-TCP). The preparation was characterized by SEM, EDX, FTIR, XRD, FM and Zeta potential measurements. The NELL-1 loaded Chi/HA-TCP particles and the release kinetics were investigated in vitro. It was observed that the Chi/HA-TCP particles prepared with the 0.3% (wt/wt) chitosan solution were able to successfully control the release of NELL-1 and maintain a slow, steady release for up to 28 days. Furthermore, more than 78% of the loaded protein's bioactivity was preserved in Chi/HA-TCP particles over the period of the investigation, which was significantly higher than that of the protein released from hydroxyapatite coated TCP (HA-TCP) particles. Collectively, this study suggests that the osteogenic protein NELL-1 showed a sustained release pattern after being encapsulated into the modified Chi/HA-TCP particles, and the NELL-1 integrated composite of Chi/HA-TCP showed a potential to function as a protein delivery carrier and as an improved bone matrix for use in bone regeneration research.

  8. Interaction between protein kinase C and protein kinase A can modulate transmitter release at the rat neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santafé, M M; Garcia, N; Lanuza, M A; Tomàs, M; Tomàs, J

    2009-02-15

    We used intracellular recording to investigate the functional interaction between protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction cascades in the control of transmitter release in the neuromuscular synapses from adult rats. Our results indicate that: 1) PKA and PKC are independently involved in asynchronous release. 2) Evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release is enhanced with the PKA agonist Sp-8-BrcAMP and the PKC agonist phorbol ester (PMA). 3) PKA has a constitutive role in promoting a component of normal evoked transmitter release because, when the kinase is inhibited with H-89, the release diminishes. However, the PKC inhibitor calphostin C (CaC) does not affect ACh release. 4) PKA regulates neurotransmission without PKC involvement because, after PMA or CaC modulation of the PKC activity, coupling to the ACh release of PKA can normally be stimulated with Sp-8-BrcAMP or inhibited with H-89. 5) After PKA inhibition with H-89, PKC stimulation with PMA (or inhibition with CaC) does not lead to any change in evoked ACh release. However, in PKA-stimulated preparations with Sp-8-BrcAMP, PKC becomes tonically active, thus potentiating a component of release that can now be blocked with CaC. In normal conditions, therefore, PKA was able to modulate ACh release independently of PKC activity, whereas PKA stimulation caused the PKC coupling to evoked release. In contrast, PKA inhibition prevent PKC stimulation (with the phorbol ester) and coupling to ACh output. There was therefore some dependence of PKC on PKA activity in the fine control of the neuromuscular synaptic functionalism and ACh release.

  9. Complex viscosity induced by protein composition variation influences the aroma release of flavored stirred yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Eve, Anne; Juteau, Alexandre; Atlan, Samuel; Martin, Nathalie; Souchon, Isabelle

    2006-05-31

    Dairy protein composition is known to influence the structure and the texture characteristics of yogurt. The objective of the present work was therefore to investigate the impact of protein composition, at a constant protein level, on the physicochemical properties of 4% fat flavored stirred yogurt and, more specifically, on the rheological properties, the microstructure, and the aroma release. The results showed that caseinate-enriched yogurt generally presented changes in their microstructure network and had a higher complex viscosity than whey protein-enriched yogurt. To a lesser extent, the release of the majority of aroma compounds was lower in caseinate-enriched yogurt. It was therefore possible to quantify physicochemical interactions between aroma compounds and proteins. The influence of gel structure on the flavor release was observed and was in agreement with sensory characteristics previously studied for these products.

  10. Microstructured dextran hydrogels for burst-free sustained release of PEGylated protein drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ki Hyun; Lee, Fan; Xu, Keming; Keng, Choong Tat; Tan, Sue Yee; Tan, Yee Joo; Chen, Qingfeng; Kurisawa, Motoichi

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogels have gained significant attention as ideal delivery vehicles for protein drugs. However, the use of hydrogels for protein delivery has been restricted because their porous structures inevitably cause a premature leakage of encapsulated proteins. Here, we report a simple yet effective approach to regulate the protein release kinetics of hydrogels through the creation of microstructures, which serve as a reservoir, releasing their payloads in a controlled manner. Microstructured dextran hydrogels enable burst-free sustained release of PEGylated interferon over 3 months without compromising its bioactivity. These hydrogels substantially extend the circulation half-life of PEGylated interferon, allowing for less frequent dosing in a humanized mouse model of hepatitis C. The present approach opens up possibilities for the development of sustained protein delivery systems for a broad range of pharmaceutical and biomedical applications.

  11. NLP-12 engages different UNC-13 proteins to potentiate tonic and evoked release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhitao; Vashlishan-Murray, Amy B; Kaplan, Joshua M

    2015-01-21

    A neuropeptide (NLP-12) and its receptor (CKR-2) potentiate tonic and evoked ACh release at Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular junctions. Increased evoked release is mediated by a presynaptic pathway (egl-30 Gαq and egl-8 PLCβ) that produces DAG, and by DAG binding to short and long UNC-13 proteins. Potentiation of tonic ACh release persists in mutants deficient for egl-30 Gαq and egl-8 PLCβ and requires DAG binding to UNC-13L (but not UNC-13S). Thus, NLP-12 adjusts tonic and evoked release by distinct mechanisms.

  12. Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) releases GPI-anchored proteins from the cell surface upon lipid raft fluidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orihashi, Kaoru; Tojo, Hiromasa; Okawa, Katsuya; Tashima, Yuko; Morita, Takashi; Kondoh, Gen

    2012-03-01

    Mammalian carboxylesterase (CES) is well known as a biotransformation enzyme for prodrugs and xenobiotics. Here, we purified CES as a GPI-anchored protein (GPI-AP)-releasing factor (GPIase) that releases such protein from the cell surface. All five isoforms of CES showed this activity to various degrees. When the serine residue of the catalytic triad for esterase was replaced by alanine, esterase activity was completely disrupted, while full GPIase activity remained, suggesting that these two activities are exhibited via different mechanisms. CES6, a new class of mammalian CES, exhibited the highest GPIase activity and released specific GPI-APs from the cell surface after lipid raft fluidization. The released product contained a GPI component, indicating that GPI-AP was released by cleavage in GPI. These results revealed for the first time that CES recognizes and catalyzes macromolecule GPI-AP as well as small molecules.

  13. Midgut proteins released by microapocrine secretion in Spodoptera frugiperda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Walciane; Cardoso, Christiane; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Terra, Walter R; Ferreira, Clélia

    2013-01-01

    Microapocrine vesicles bud from the lepidopteran midgut microvilli as double membrane vesicles. To identify the proteins secreted by this process, antibodies raised against isolated microapocrine vesicles from Spodoptera frugiperda were used for screening a midgut cDNA expression library. Positive clones were sequenced, assembled and N blasted against S. frugiperda sequences obtained by pyrosequencing midgut mRNA. This procedure led to the extension of microapocrine sequences that were annotated. A similar procedure was used to identify midgut microvillar proteins that necessarily are part of the microapocrine vesicle. Forty-eight proteins were associated with microvillar membranes. They pertain to 8 functional groups: digestive enzymes, peritrophic membrane, protection, transporters, receptors, secretory machinery, cytoskeleton and signaling, and unknown. Twenty-eight proteins are putatively secreted by microapocrine secretion. Most of them are digestive enzymes, but the list also includes proteins involved in protection and in peritrophic membrane formation. Among the identified digestive enzymes, aminopeptidases are typically microvillar and group into the classes 1, 2, 3, 5, and 6. There are two amylases secreted by microapocrine secretion: one is a digestive enzyme and the other is a transporter-like amylase with no clear function. One lipase has a predicted transmembrane loop, whereas the others are supposed to be secreted by microapocrine secretion and be digestive. Trypsin is membrane bound and is delivered by microapocrine secretion, but has no predicted features to bind membranes. It may remain bound through the signal peptide till be delivered into the midgut lumen. Proteins supposed to be involved in the microapocrine secretory machinery were: calmodulin, annexin, myosin 7a, and gelsolin 1. Their putative roles are discussed, but more research is necessary to settle this subject.

  14. Role of protein kinase C in histamine release from human basophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Y; Takaishi, T; Honda, Z; Miyamoto, T

    1988-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of calcium and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C, PKC) in the modulation of histamine release from human basophils. A novel and potent inhibitor of PKC, K-252a, inhibited the release of histamine induced by anti-IgE in a dose-dependent manner with ID50 (the dose required for 50% inhibition of histamine release) of 2.2 x 10(-8) M. Histamine release stimulated with 12-0-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate(TPA) was also suppressed by K-252a with maximal inhibition of 48.0 +/- 9.3% at 10(-7) M. In contrast, K-252a did not inhibit the release of histamine in response to FMLP and ionophore A23187. Another inhibitor of PKC, H-7, exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of anti-IgE-induced histamine release with ID50 of 8.6 x 10(-4) M. H-8 and HA1004, which closely resemble H-7 in chemical structure but are less potent in inhibiting PKC, did not inhibit histamine release stimulated with anti-IgE, but rather enhanced the release at higher concentrations. These results strongly suggest that PKC activation plays a crucial role in the mediation of IgE-mediated histamine release from human basophils.

  15. Inhibition of Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Cycle by an Ethyl Acetate Subfraction Separated from Polygonum cuspidatum Root and Its Major Component, Emodin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yi Yiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polygonum cuspidatum is widely used as a medicinal herb in Asia. In this study, we examined the ethyl acetate subfraction F3 obtained from P. cuspidatum root and its major component, emodin, for their capacity to inhibit the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV lytic cycle. The cell viability was determined by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] method. The expression of EBV lytic proteins was analyzed by immunoblot, indirect immunofluorescence and flow cytometric assays. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to assess the EBV DNA replication and the transcription of lytic genes, including BRLF1 and BZLF1. Results showed that the F3 and its major component emodin inhibit the transcription of EBV immediate early genes, the expression of EBV lytic proteins, including Rta, Zta, and EA-D and reduces EBV DNA replication, showing that F3 and emodin are potentially useful as an anti-EBV drug.

  16. Release of proteins via ion exchange from albumin-heparin microspheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwon, Glen S.; Bae, You Han; Cremers, Harry; Feijen, Jan; Kim, Sung Wan

    1992-01-01

    Albumin-heparin and albumin microspheres were prepared as ion exchange gels for the controlled release of positively charged polypeptides and proteins. The adsorption isotherms of chicken egg and human lysozyme, as model proteins, on microspheres were obtained. An adsorption isotherm of chicken egg

  17. Hydrogels of collagen-inspired telechelic triblock copolymers for the sustained release of proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teles, H.M.; Vermonden, T.; Eggink, G.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the release of entrapped protein from transient gels made of thermosensitive, collagen-inspired ABA triblock copolymers with tailorable properties and with mid blocks of two different lengths (~ 37 kDa and ~ 73 kDa). These polymers were produced as heterologous proteins in recombinant yea

  18. Adsorption and protein-induced metal release from chromium metal and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, M; Hedberg, Y; Jiang, T; Herting, G; Wang, X; Thormann, E; Blomberg, E; Wallinder, I Odnevall

    2012-01-15

    A research effort is undertaken to understand the mechanism of metal release from, e.g., inhaled metal particles or metal implants in the presence of proteins. The effect of protein adsorption on the metal release process from oxidized chromium metal surfaces and stainless steel surfaces was therefore examined by quartz crystal microbalance with energy dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS). Differently charged and sized proteins, relevant for the inhalation and dermal exposure route were chosen including human and bovine serum albumin (HSA, BSA), mucin (BSM), and lysozyme (LYS). The results show that all proteins have high affinities for chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) when deposited from solutions at pH 4 and at pH 7.4 where the protein adsorbed amount was very similar. Adsorption of albumin and mucin was substantially higher at pH 4 compared to pH 7.4 with approximately monolayer coverage at pH 7.4, whereas lysozyme adsorbed in multilayers at both investigated pH. The protein-surface interaction was strong since proteins were irreversibly adsorbed with respect to rinsing. Due to the passive nature of chromium and stainless steel (AISI 316) surfaces, very low metal release concentrations from the QCM metal surfaces in the presence of proteins were obtained on the time scale of the adsorption experiment. Therefore, metal release studies from massive metal sheets in contact with protein solutions were carried out in parallel. The presence of proteins increased the extent of metals released for chromium metal and stainless steel grades of different microstructure and alloy content, all with passive chromium(III)-rich surface oxides, such as QCM (AISI 316), ferritic (AISI 430), austentic (AISI 304, 316L), and duplex (LDX 2205).

  19. Influence of olive oil phenolic compounds on headspace aroma release by interaction with whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genovese, Alessandro; Caporaso, Nicola; De Luca, Lucia; Paduano, Antonello; Sacchi, Raffaele

    2015-04-22

    The release of volatile compounds in an oil-in-water model system obtained from olive oil-whey protein (WP) pairing was investigated by considering the effect of phenolic compounds. Human saliva was used to simulate mouth conditions by retronasal aroma simulator (RAS) analysis. Twelve aroma compounds were quantified in the dynamic headspace by SPME-GC/MS. The results showed significant influences of saliva on the aroma release of virgin olive oil (VOO) volatiles also in the presence of WP. The interaction between WP and saliva leads to lower headspace release of ethyl esters and hexanal. Salivary components caused lower decrease of the release of acetates and alcohols. A lower release of volatile compounds was found in the RAS essay in comparison to that in orthonasal simulation of only refined olive oil (without addition of saliva or WP), with the exception of hexanal and 1-penten-3-one, where a significantly higher release was found. Our results suggest that the extent of retronasal odor (green, pungent) of these two volatile compounds is higher than orthonasal odor. An extra VOO was used to verify the release in model systems, indicating that WP affected aroma release more than model systems, while saliva seems to exert an opposite trend. A significant increase in aroma release was found when phenolic compounds were added to the system, probably due to the contrasting effects of binding of volatile compounds caused by WP, for the polyphenol-protein interaction phenomenon. Our study could be applied to the formulation of new functional foods to enhance flavor release and modulate the presence and concentrations of phenolics and whey proteins in food emulsions/dispersions.

  20. Investigations of Takeout proteins' ligand binding and release mechanism using molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huijing; Yu, Hui; Zhao, Xi; Liu, Xiaoguang; Feng, Xianli; Huang, Xuri

    2016-07-29

    Takeout (To) proteins exist in a diverse range of insect species. They are involved in many important processes of insect physiology and behaviors. As the ligand carriers, To proteins can transport the small molecule to the target tissues. However, ligand release mechanism of To proteins is unclear so far. In this contribution, the process and pathway of the ligand binding and release are revealed by conventional molecular dynamics simulation, steered molecular dynamics simulation and umbrella sampling methods. Our results show that the α4-side of the protein is the unique gate for the ligand binding and release. The structural analysis confirms that the internal cavity of the protein has high rigidity, which is in accordance with the recent experimental results. By using the potential of mean force calculations in combination with residue cross correlation calculation, we concluded that the binding between the ligand and To proteins is a process of conformational selection. Furthermore, the conformational changes of To proteins and the hydrophobic interactions both are the key factors for ligand binding and release.

  1. Proteomics strategy for identifying candidate bioactive proteins in complex mixtures: application to the platelet releasate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Roisin

    2010-01-01

    Proteomic approaches have proven powerful at identifying large numbers of proteins, but there are fewer reports of functional characterization of proteins in biological tissues. Here, we describe an experimental approach that fractionates proteins released from human platelets, linking bioassay activity to identity. We used consecutive orthogonal separation platforms to ensure sensitive detection: (a) ion-exchange of intact proteins, (b) SDS-PAGE separation of ion-exchange fractions and (c) HPLC separation of tryptic digests coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Migration of THP-1 monocytes in response to complete or fractionated platelet releasate was assessed and located to just one of the forty-nine ion-exchange fractions. Over 300 proteins were identified in the releasate, with a wide range of annotated biophysical and biochemical properties, in particular platelet activation, adhesion, and wound healing. The presence of PEDF and involucrin, two proteins not previously reported in platelet releasate, was confirmed by western blotting. Proteins identified within the fraction with monocyte promigratory activity and not in other inactive fractions included vimentin, PEDF, and TIMP-1. We conclude that this analytical platform is effective for the characterization of complex bioactive samples.

  2. Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Paul E Gold

    2007-01-01

    Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured...

  3. Induction of Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Replication by Recombinant Adenoviruses Expressing the Zebra Gene with EBV Specific Promoters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu CHEN; Juan YIN; Yi CHEN; Jiang ZHONG

    2005-01-01

    The latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is found in the cells of many tumors. For example, EBV is detectable in almost all cases, and in almost all tumor cells, of non-keratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma.Activating the latent virus, which will result in its lytic replication and the death of tumor cells, is a potential approach for the treatment of EBV-associated cancers. In this study, three recombinant adenoviruses were constructed to express the Zebra gene, an EBV gene responsible for switching from the latent state to lytic replication. EBV-specific promoters were used in order to limit Zebra expression in EBV-positive cells, and reduce the potential side effects. The EBV promoters used were Cp, Zp and a dual promoter combining both promoters, CpZp. The Zebra protein was detected in HEK293 cells as well as the EBV-positive D98-HR1 cells infected with recombinant viruses. An EBV lytic replication early antigen, EA-D, was also detected in infected D98-HR1, implying the initiation of lytic replication. In the cell viability assay, Zebra-expressing adenoviruses had little effect on EBV-negative HeLa cells, while significantly reducing the cell viability and proliferation of D98-HR1 cells. The results indicate that EBV virus promoters can be used in adenovirus vectors to express the Zebra gene and induce EBV lytic replication in D98-HR1 cells.

  4. Triggered drug release from dynamic microspheres via a protein conformational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, William J; Pytel, Nicholas J; Ng, Kelvin; Murphy, William L

    2010-06-11

    In this study we formed and characterized dynamic hydrogel microspheres in which a protein conformational change was used to control microsphere volume changes and the release of an encapsulated drug. In particular, a specific biochemical ligand, trifluoperazine, induced calmodulin's nanometer scale conformation change, which translated to a 48.7% microsphere volume decrease. This specific, ligand-induced volume change triggered the release of a model drug, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), at pre-determined times. After release from the microspheres, 85.6 +/- 10.5% of VEGF was in its native conformation. Taken together, these results suggest that protein conformational change could serve as a useful mechanism to control drug release from dynamic hydrogels.

  5. In Vitro Cytotoxicity and Protein Drug Release Properties of Chitosan/Heparin Microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Chitosan/heparin microspheres were prepared using the water-in-oil emulsification solvent evaporation technique. The microsphere diameters were controlled by selecting the fabrication process parameters. Scanning electron micrographs showed that the chitosan/heparin microspheres were regular and the surface morphology was smooth. Fourier transform infrared showed that the chitosan amino groups reacted with heparin carboxylic groups to form acylamides in the microspheres. Analysis of the microsphere cytotoxicity showed that they had no cytotoxic effect and behaved very similar to the negative control (polystyrene).To analyze the protein drug release profiles of the microspheres, bovine serum albumin was loaded as a model drug into the microspheres and released in vitro. Marked retardation was observed in the BSA release profiles. The results show that chitosan/heparin microspheres may provide a useful controlled release protein drug system for used in pharmaceutics.

  6. Controlled release of bovine serum albumin from hydroxyapatite microspheres for protein delivery system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonsongrit, Yaowalak [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Abe, Hiroya [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Cooperative Research Center of Life Sciences, Kobe Gakuin University, Minatojima 1-1-3, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan)], E-mail: h-abe@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sato, Kazuyoshi [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Naito, Makio [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, 11-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Cooperative Research Center of Life Sciences, Kobe Gakuin University, Minatojima 1-1-3, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan); Yoshimura, Masahiro [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Ichikawa, Hideki; Fukumori, Yoshinobu [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kobe Gakuin University, Minatojima 1-1-3, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan); Cooperative Research Center of Life Sciences, Kobe Gakuin University, Minatojima 1-1-3, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-8586 (Japan)

    2008-02-25

    Desorption behavior of a model protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA) on commercial hydroxyapatite (HAp) microspheres and its control were investigated for protein delivery system. The desorption behavior related strongly to the phosphate concentration in phosphate buffer solution: the amount of desorbed BSA increased when the phosphate concentration increased. In physiological buffer solution, which contains 10 mM phosphate, the initial burst release of BSA was observed: 70% of BSA was rapidly desorbed after 0.5 h, and 80% after 24 h. In contrast, the extremely low release profile of BSA was observed in distilled water. For the controlled release of BSA in physiological condition, the BSA-loaded HAp microspheres were encapsulated with a biodegradable polymer, poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) by a solid-in oil-in water (S/O/W) emulsion solvent evaporation method. The initial burst was significantly reduced, and the BSA release was remarkably prolonged by the encapsulation.

  7. Release of periplasmic proteins of Brucella suis upon acidic shock involves the outer membrane protein Omp25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boigegrain, Rose-Anne; Salhi, Imed; Alvarez-Martinez, Maria-Teresa; Machold, Jan; Fedon, Yann; Arpagaus, Martine; Weise, Christoph; Rittig, Michael; Rouot, Bruno

    2004-10-01

    The survival and replication of Brucella in macrophages is initially triggered by a low intraphagosomal pH. In order to identify proteins released by Brucella during this early acidification step, we analyzed Brucella suis conditioned medium at various pH levels. No significant proteins were released at pH 4.0 in minimal medium or citrate buffer, whereas in acetate buffer, B. suis released a substantial amount of soluble proteins. Comparison of 13 N-terminal amino acid sequences determined by Edman degradation with their corresponding genomic sequences revealed that all of these proteins possessed a signal peptide indicative of their periplasmic location. Ten proteins are putative substrate binding proteins, including a homologue of the nopaline binding protein of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The absence of this homologue in Brucella melitensis was due to the deletion of a 7.7-kb DNA fragment in its genome. We also characterized for the first time a hypothetical 9.8-kDa basic protein composed of five amino acid repeats. In B. suis, this protein contained 9 repeats, while 12 were present in the B. melitensis orthologue. B. suis in acetate buffer depended on neither the virB type IV secretory system nor the omp31 gene product. However, the integrity of the omp25 gene was required for release at acidic pH, while the absence of omp25b or omp25c displayed smaller effects. Together, these results suggest that Omp25 is involved in the membrane permeability of Brucella in acidic medium.

  8. Protein capsules with cross-linked, semipermeable, and enzyme-degradable surface barriers for controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianhua; Hyun, Dong Choon; Liu, Hang; Wu, Hongkai; Xia, Younan

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes a method for fabricating protein-based capsules with semipermeable and enzyme-degradable surface barriers. It involves the use of a simple fluidic device to generate water-in-oil emulsion droplets, followed by cross-linking of proteins at the water-oil interface to generate a semipermeable surface barrier. The capsules can be readily fabricated with uniform and controllable sizes and, more importantly, show selective permeability toward molecules with different molecular weights: small molecules like fluorescein sodium salt can freely diffuse through the surface barrier while macromolecules such as proteins can not. The proteins, however, can be released by digesting the surface barrier with an enzyme such as pepsin. Taken together, the capsules hold great potential for applications in controlled release, in particular, for the delivery of protein drugs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Lateral release of proteins from the TOM complex into the outer membrane of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harner, Max; Neupert, Walter; Deponte, Marcel

    2011-07-15

    The TOM complex of the outer membrane of mitochondria is the entry gate for the vast majority of precursor proteins that are imported into the mitochondria. It is made up by receptors and a protein conducting channel. Although precursor proteins of all subcompartments of mitochondria use the TOM complex, it is not known whether its channel can only mediate passage across the outer membrane or also lateral release into the outer membrane. To study this, we have generated fusion proteins of GFP and Tim23 which are inserted into the inner membrane and, at the same time, are spanning either the TOM complex or are integrated into the outer membrane. Our results demonstrate that the TOM complex, depending on sequence determinants in the precursors, can act both as a protein conducting pore and as an insertase mediating lateral release into the outer membrane.

  10. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1 an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2 a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ju; Tsai, Wan-Hua; Chen, Yu-Lian; Ko, Ying-Chieh; Chou, Sheng-Ping; Chen, Jen-Yang; Lin, Su-Fang

    2011-03-10

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1) an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2) a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  12. Protein A is released into the Staphylococcus aureus culture supernatant with an unprocessed sorting signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Dara P; Wynne, Kieran; Geoghegan, Joan A

    2015-04-01

    The immunoglobulin binding protein A (SpA) of Staphylococcus aureus is synthesized as a precursor with a C-terminal sorting signal. The sortase A enzyme mediates covalent attachment to peptidoglycan so that SpA is displayed on the surface of the bacterium. Protein A is also found in the extracellular medium, but the processes involved in its release are not fully understood. Here, we show that a portion of SpA is released into the supernatant with an intact sorting signal, indicating that it has not been processed by sortase A. Release of SpA was reduced when the native sorting signal of SpA was replaced with the corresponding region of another sortase-anchored protein (SdrE). Similarly, a reporter protein fused to the sorting signal of SpA was released to a greater extent than the same polypeptide fused to the SdrE sorting signal. Released SpA protected bacteria from killing in human blood, indicating that it contributes to immune evasion.

  13. Quantitative analysis of Nipah virus proteins released as virus-like particles reveals central role for the matrix protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eaton Bryan T

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV is an emerging paramyxovirus distinguished by its ability to cause fatal disease in both animal and human hosts. Together with Hendra virus (HeV, they comprise the genus Henipavirus in the Paramyxoviridae family. NiV and HeV are also restricted to Biosafety Level-4 containment and this has hampered progress towards examining details of their replication and morphogenesis. Here, we have established recombinant expression systems to study NiV particle assembly and budding through the formation of virus-like particles (VLPs. Results When expressed by recombinant Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (rMVA or plasmid transfection, individual NiV matrix (M, fusion (F and attachment (G proteins were all released into culture supernatants in a membrane-associated state as determined by sucrose density gradient flotation and immunoprecipitation. However, co-expression of F and G along with M revealed a shift in their distribution across the gradient, indicating association with M in VLPs. Protein release was also altered depending on the context of viral proteins being expressed, with F, G and nucleocapsid (N protein reducing M release, and N release dependent on the co-expression of M. Immunoelectron microscopy and density analysis revealed VLPs that were similar to authentic virus. Differences in the budding dynamics of NiV proteins were also noted between rMVA and plasmid based strategies, suggesting that over-expression by poxvirus may not be appropriate for studying the details of recombinant virus particle assembly and release. Conclusion Taken together, the results indicate that NiV M, F, and G each possess some ability to bud from expressing cells, and that co-expression of these viral proteins results in a more organized budding process with M playing a central role. These findings will aid our understanding of paramyxovirus particle assembly in general and could help facilitate the development of a novel vaccine

  14. Quantification of malaria parasite release from infected erythrocytes: inhibition by protein-free media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmerberg Joshua

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracellular malaria parasites leave their host erythrocytes to infect neighbouring cells after each cycle of asexual replication. No method is currently available for the direct quantification of parasite release. Method and results To quantify parasite release process, human erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum were injected into sealed chambers at optimal density, where they progressed through the end of the erythrocyte cycle. Each event of parasite release inside the chamber at the site of erythrocyte rupture leaves on the chamber wall a footprint, composed of 1 separated parasites, 2 a digestive vacuole with haemozoin, and 3 fragments of the ruptured membranes. These footprints are stable for hours, allowing precise identification using differential interference contrast (DIC microscopy. The relative rate of parasite release is defined as the percent of such footprints out of all schizonts injected and incubated into chamber at 37°C for two hours. The method is highly reproducible, easy to perform, and does not require expensive equipment. Additionally, this method allows one to analyse cell and release site morphology, which adds information about the release process and the quality of the culture. The method is used here to show that swelling of schizonts caused by protein-free media inhibits parasite release. Conclusion In this study, a novel method is described to count sites of parasite release by microscopy. Besides the direct estimation of parasite release from infected erythrocytes, this method provides a morphological evaluation of normal infected cells approaching the end of the plasmodial life cycle, or pathological forms accumulated as the result of experimental intervention in the parasite release process. One may now accurately estimate the relative parasite release rate at the time of cycle transition, without any obligatory coupling to parasite invasion.

  15. RRE-dependent HIV-1 Env RNA effects on Gag protein expression, assembly and release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Claudia S., E-mail: lopezcl@ohsu.edu [Departments of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Sloan, Rachel; Cylinder, Isabel [Departments of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Kozak, Susan L.; Kabat, David [Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239 (United States); Barklis, Eric, E-mail: barklis@ohsu.edu [Departments of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The HIV-1 Gag proteins are translated from the full-length HIV-1 viral RNA (vRNA), whereas the envelope (Env) protein is translated from incompletely spliced Env mRNAs. Nuclear export of vRNAs and Env mRNAs is mediated by the Rev accessory protein which binds to the rev-responsive element (RRE) present on these RNAs. Evidence has shown there is a direct or indirect interaction between the Gag protein, and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Our current work shows that env gene expression impacts HIV-1 Gag expression and function in two ways. At the protein level, full-length Env expression altered Gag protein expression, while Env CT-deletion proteins did not. At the RNA level, RRE-containing Env mRNA expression reduced Gag expression, processing, and virus particle release from cells. Our results support models in which Gag is influenced by the Env CT, and Env mRNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export. - Highlights: • At the protein level, full-length HIV-1 Env alters Gag protein expression. • HIV-1 Env RNA expression reduces Gag levels and virus release. • Env RNA effects on Gag are dependent on the RRE. • RRE-containing Env RNAs compete with vRNAs for nuclear export.

  16. Controlled release behaviour of protein-loaded microparticles prepared via coaxial or emulsion electrospray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Xiaoping; Liu, Wentao; Zhang, Feng; Cai, Qing; Deng, Xuliang

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles are an effective way to achieve sustained drug release. In this study, we investigated a sustained release model of PLGA microparticles with incorporated protein via either emulsion or coaxial electrospray techniques. PLGA (75:25) was used as the carrier, and bovine serum albumin as a model protein. Coaxial electrospray resulted in a type of core-shell structure with mean diameters of 2.41 ± 0.60 µm and a centralised protein distribution within the core. Emulsion electrospray formed bigger microparticles with mean diameters of 22.75 ± 8.05 µm and a heterogeneous protein distribution throughout the microparticles. The coaxial electrospray microparticles presented a much slighter burst release than the emulsion electrospray microparticles. Loading efficiency was significantly higher (p coaxial group than emulsion group. This indicated that both emulsion and coaxial electrospray could produce protein-loaded microparticles with sustained release behaviour, but the former revealed a superior approach for drug delivery.

  17. Identification of thioredoxin target disulfides in proteins released from barley aleurone layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Per; Bunkenborg, J.; Yang, Fen

    2010-01-01

    Thioredoxins are ubiquitous disulfide reductases involved in a wide range of cellular processes including DNA synthesis, oxidative stress response and apoptosis. In cereal seeds thioredoxins are proposed to facilitate the germination process by reducing disulfide bonds in storage proteins and other...... targets in the starchy endosperm. Here we have applied a thiol-specific labeling approach to identify specific disulfide targets of barley thioredoxin in proteins released from barley aleurone layers incubated in buffer containing gibberellic acid....

  18. Presynaptic Protein Synthesis Is Required for Long-Term Plasticity of GABA Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younts, Thomas J; Monday, Hannah R; Dudok, Barna; Klein, Matthew E; Jordan, Bryen A; Katona, István; Castillo, Pablo E

    2016-10-19

    Long-term changes of neurotransmitter release are critical for proper brain function. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these changes are poorly understood. While protein synthesis is crucial for the consolidation of postsynaptic plasticity, whether and how protein synthesis regulates presynaptic plasticity in the mature mammalian brain remain unclear. Here, using paired whole-cell recordings in rodent hippocampal slices, we report that presynaptic protein synthesis is required for long-term, but not short-term, plasticity of GABA release from type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1)-expressing axons. This long-term depression of inhibitory transmission (iLTD) involves cap-dependent protein synthesis in presynaptic interneuron axons, but not somata. Translation is required during the induction, but not maintenance, of iLTD. Mechanistically, CB1 activation enhances protein synthesis via the mTOR pathway. Furthermore, using super-resolution STORM microscopy, we revealed eukaryotic ribosomes in CB1-expressing axon terminals. These findings suggest that presynaptic local protein synthesis controls neurotransmitter release during long-term plasticity in the mature mammalian brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chitosan nanoparticles crosslinked by glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane for pH triggered release of protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai Wu Pan; Bei Bei Wu; Jian Min Wu

    2009-01-01

    pH-responsive-chitosan nanoparticles for the control release of protein drug were prepared by combining two-step crosslinking method, in which chitosan was subsequently crosslinked by sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) and glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). Compared with TPP crosslinked chitosan particles, the two-step crosslinked nanoparticles were not only pH-responsive but also more stable in wide pH range. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled anti-human-IgG antibody was used as a model protein drug for evaluating the control release profile of the nano-carrier. The amount of released antibody increased from 5.6% to 50% when the pH of solution shifted from 7.4 m 6.0. The results suggest the possible application of the nanoparticles as pH-responsive drug delivery materials.

  20. Hydrogel based drug carriers for controlled release of hydrophobic drugs and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ke Peng,

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare in situ forming hydrogels based on biocompatible polymers for the controlled release of hydrophobic drug and proteins. In order to load hydrophobic drug to the hydrophilic hydrogel matrix, beta-cyclodextrin and human serum albumin was introduced to the hydrogel ne

  1. A stimuli-responsive nanoparticulate system using poly(ethylenimine)-graft-polysorbate for controlled protein release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wing-Fu; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2015-12-01

    Proteins have emerged as an important class of therapeutic agents due to their high specificity in their physiological actions. Over the years, diverse protein carriers have been developed; however, some concerns, such as the relatively low loading efficiency and release sustainability, have limited the efficiency of protein delivery. This study reports the use of hydrogel nanoparticles based on a novel copolymer, poly(ethylenimine)-graft-polysorbate (PEIP), as effective protein carriers. The copolymer is fabricated by grafting poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) with polysorbate 20 using carbonyldiimidazole chemistry. Its cytotoxicity is much lower than that of unmodified PEI in RGC5 and HEK293 cells. In comparison with nanoparticles formed by unmodified PEI, our nanoparticles are not only more efficient in cellular internalization, as indicated by the 5- to 6-fold reduction in the time they take to cause 90% of cells to exhibit intracellular fluorescence, but also give a protein loading efficiency as high as 70-90%. These, together with the salt-responsiveness of the nanoparticles in protein release and the retention of the activity of the loaded protein, suggest that PEIP and its hydrogel nanoparticles warrant further development as protein carriers for therapeutic applications.

  2. Host transcript accumulation during lytic KSHV infection reveals several classes of host responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Chandriani

    Full Text Available Lytic infection by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is associated with an extensive shutoff of host gene expression, mediated chiefly by accelerated mRNA turnover due to expression of the viral SOX protein. We have previously identified a small number of host mRNAs that can escape SOX-mediated degradation. Here we present a detailed, transcriptome-wide analysis of host shutoff, with careful microarray normalization to allow rigorous determination of the magnitude and extent of transcript loss. We find that the extent of transcript reduction represents a continuum of susceptibilities of transcripts to virus-mediated shutoff. Our results affirm that the levels of over 75% of host transcripts are substantially reduced during lytic infection, but also show that another approximately 20% of cellular mRNAs declines only slightly (less than 2-fold during the course of infection. Approximately 2% of examined cellular genes are strongly upregulated during lytic infection, most likely due to transcriptional induction of mRNAs that display intrinsic SOX-resistance.

  3. Isolation and characterization of lytic phages TSE1-3 against Enterobacter cloacae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khawaja Komal Ameer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens is becoming a major challenge for patient care. The utilization of alternative therapies for infectious diseases other than antibiotics is an urgent need of today medical practice. The utilization of lytic bacteriophages and their gene products as therapeutic agents against antibiotic resistant bacteria is one of the convincing alternative approaches. Here we present the isolation and characterization of three lytic bacteriophages TSE1-3 against Enterobacter cloacae from sewage effluent. The isolates maintained antibacterial activity for 10 hours of incubation followed by the development of phage resistance. Their stability at different temperatures and pH, established their possible application in phage therapy. The highest activity of the phages was observed at 37°C and pH 7.0, while they gave lytic activity up to 60°C. The latent period of all the TSE phages was 20 minutes, while the burst size was 360 for TSE1, 270 for TSE2 and 311 for TSE3. The phages were harboring double-stranded DNA larger than 12kb in size. Further research into the phages genome and proteins, animal experiments, delivery parameters and clinical trials may lead to their utilization in phage therapy.

  4. Protein overexport in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant is not due to facilitated release of cell-surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexieva, K I; Venkov, P V

    2000-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain MW11 is a temperature-sensitive mutant which exports twenty times more proteins at 37 degrees C than parental or wild-type strains do. To understand the mechanism underlying the protein overexport in the mutant the possibility of an altered cell-wall structure leading to facilitated release of cell-surface proteins was studied. Data on calcofluor white and zymolyase sensitivities, resistance to killer 1 toxin and determination of exported acid phosphatase and invertase did not provide evidence for alterations in the cell-wall structure that could explain the protein overexport phenotype. The results were obtained in experiments when transcription of mutated gene was discontinued which permits the full expression of the protein overexport phenotype.

  5. Interactions between Surfactants in Solution and Electrospun Protein Fibers: Effects on Release Behavior and Fiber Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming; Chronakis, Ioannis S; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2016-03-07

    Intermolecular interaction phenomena occurring between endogenous compounds, such as proteins and bile salts, and electrospun compounds are so far unreported, despite the exposure of fibers to such biorelevant compounds when applied for biomedical purposes, e.g., tissue engineering, wound healing, and drug delivery. In the present study, we present a systematic investigation of how surfactants and proteins, as physiologically relevant components, interact with insulin-loaded fish sarcoplasmic protein (FSP) electrospun fibers (FSP-Ins fibers) in solution and thereby affect fiber properties such as accessible surface hydrophilicity, physical stability, and release characteristics of an encapsulated drug. Interactions between insulin-loaded protein fibers and five anionic surfactants (sodium taurocholate, sodium taurodeoxycholate, sodium glycocholate, sodium glycodeoxycholate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate), a cationic surfactant (benzalkonium chloride), and a neutral surfactant (Triton X-100) were studied. The anionic surfactants increased the insulin release in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the neutral surfactant had no significant effect on the release. Interestingly, only minute amounts of insulin were released from the fibers when benzalkonium chloride was present. The FSP-Ins fibers appeared dense after incubation with this cationic surfactant, whereas high fiber porosity was observed after incubation with anionic or neutral surfactants. Contact angle measurements and staining with the hydrophobic dye 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid indicated that the FSP-Ins fibers were hydrophobic, and showed that the fiber surface properties were affected differently by the surfactants. Bovine serum albumin also affected insulin release in vitro, indicating that also proteins may affect the fiber performance in an in vivo setting.

  6. In vivo dynamics of EBNA1-oriP interaction during latent and lytic replication of Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daikoku, Tohru; Kudoh, Ayumi; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sugaya, Yutaka; Isomura, Hiroki; Tsurumi, Tatsuya

    2004-12-24

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is required for maintenance of the viral genome DNA during the latent phase of EBV replication but continues to be synthesized after the induction of viral productive replication. An EBV genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that EBNA1 constantly binds to oriP of the EBV genome during not only latent but also lytic infection. Although the total levels of EBNA1 proved constant throughout the latter, the levels of the oriP-bound form were increased as lytic infection proceeded. EBV productive DNA replication occurs at discrete sites in nuclei, called replication compartments, where viral replication proteins are clustered. Confocal laser microscopic analyses revealed that whereas EBNA1 was distributed broadly in nuclei as fine punctate dots during the latent phase of infection, the protein became redistributed to the viral replication compartments and localized as distinct spots within and/or nearby the compartments after the induction of lytic replication. Taking these findings into consideration, oriP regions of the EBV genome might be organized by EBNA1 into replication domains that may set up scaffolding for lytic replication and transcription.

  7. Preparation of photoreactive phospholipid polymer nanoparticles to immobilize and release protein by photoirradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weixin; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-11-01

    Photoreactive and cytocompatible polymer nanoparticles for immobilizing and releasing proteins were prepared. A water-soluble and amphiphilic phospholipid polymer, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-co-n-butyl methacrylate (BMA)-co-4-(4-(1-methacryloyloxyethyl)-2-methoxy-5-nitrophenoxy) butyric acid (PL)) (PMB-PL) was synthesized. The PMB-PL underwent a cleavage reaction at the PL unit with photoirradiation at a wavelength of 365 nm. Additionally, the PMB-PL took polymer aggregate in aqueous medium and was used to modify the surface of biodegradable poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticle as an emulsifier. The morphology of the PMB-PL/PLA nanoparticle was spherical and approximately 130 nm in diameter. The carboxylic acid group in the PL unit could immobilize proteins by covalent bonding. The bound proteins were released by a photoinduced cleavage reaction. Within 60s, up to 90% of the immobilized proteins was released by photoirradiation. From these results and with an understanding of the fundamental properties of MPC polymers, we concluded that PMB-PL/PLA nanoparticles have the potential to be used as smart carriers to deliver proteins to biological systems, such as the inside of living cells.

  8. Nitroavidin as a ligand for the surface capture and release of biotinylated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolivar, Jowell G; Soper, Steven A; McCarley, Robin L

    2008-12-01

    Discussed here is the preparation, detailed purification, and evaluation of nitroavidin as a ligand for surface capture and release of biotinylated proteins. Avidin from chicken egg white was nitrated using dilute tetranitromethane solutions. UV-vis spectroscopy was used to show decreased binding of the biotin analogue, 2-(4'-hydroxyazobenzene)benzoic acid, HABA, to nitroavidin compared to binding of HABA to native avidin. From enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based assays of the modified avidin, it was found that there are approximately three tyrosine residues converted to nitrotyrosine out of the total four tyrosine residues in the protein tetramer. For the first time, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was used to demonstrate the point of nitration in nitroavidin as that of the tyrosine associated with the binding of biotin (Y33). From surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) experiments, it is shown that biotin has less binding propensity to immobilized nitroavidin (K(D) = 4.4 +/- 1.9 x 10(-6) M) than immobilized avidin (K(D) < or = 10(-11) M). Importantly, the use of pH 10 carbonate buffer as eluent resulted in facile release of bound biotin from the nitroavidin-functionalized surfaces, allowing for readily regenerated biotin capture surfaces (reversible binding surfaces). These outcomes are important for the development of protein concentration methods directed at isolation of select proteins from a large population using gentle target protein isolation/release conditions.

  9. M protein is sufficient for assembly and release of Peste des petits ruminants virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuxia; Ou, Changbo; Dou, Yongxi; Chen, Lei; Meng, Xuelian; Liu, Xingyou; Yu, Yan; Jiang, Jinqing; Ma, Jinyou; Zhang, Zhidong; Hu, Jianhe; Cai, Xuepeng

    2017-03-19

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), belonging to paramyxoviruses, has six structure proteins (such as matrix protein (M), nucleocapsid proteins (N), fusion protein (F) and hemagglutinin protein (H)) and could cause high morbidity and mortality in sheep and goats. Although a vaccine strain of PPRV has been rescued and co-expression of M and N could yield PPRV-like particles, the roles of structure proteins in virion assembly and release have not been investigated in detail. In this study, plasmids carrying PPRV cDNA sequences encoding the N, M, H, and F proteins were expressed in Vero cells. The co-expression of all four proteins resulted in the release of virus-like particles (VLPs) with similar release efficiency to that of authentic virions. Moreover, the co-expression of M together with F also resulted in efficient VLPs release. In the absence of M protein, the expression of no combination of the other proteins resulted in particle release. In summary, a VLPs production system for PPRV has been established and M protein is necessary for promoting the assembly and release of VLPs, of which the predominant protein is M protein. Further study will be focused on the immunogenicity of the VLPs.

  10. Design of whey protein nanostructures for incorporation and release of nutraceutical compounds in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Oscar L; Pereira, Ricardo N; Martins, Artur; Rodrigues, Rui; Fuciños, Clara; Teixeira, José A; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Malcata, F Xavier; Vicente, António A

    2017-05-03

    Whey proteins are widely used as nutritional and functional ingredients in formulated foods because they are relatively inexpensive, generally recognized as safe (GRAS) ingredient, and possess important biological, physical, and chemical functionalities. Denaturation and aggregation behavior of these proteins is of particular relevance toward manufacture of novel nanostructures with a number of potential uses. When these processes are properly engineered and controlled, whey proteins may be formed into nanohydrogels, nanofibrils, or nanotubes and be used as carrier of bioactive compounds. This review intends to discuss the latest understandings of nanoscale phenomena of whey protein denaturation and aggregation that may contribute for the design of protein nanostructures. Whey protein aggregation and gelation pathways under different processing and environmental conditions such as microwave heating, high voltage, and moderate electrical fields, high pressure, temperature, pH, and ionic strength were critically assessed. Moreover, several potential applications of nanohydrogels, nanofibrils, and nanotubes for controlled release of nutraceutical compounds (e.g. probiotics, vitamins, antioxidants, and peptides) were also included. Controlling the size of protein networks at nanoscale through application of different processing and environmental conditions can open perspectives for development of nanostructures with new or improved functionalities for incorporation and release of nutraceuticals in food matrices.

  11. On-chip assessment of the protein-release profile from 3D hydrogel arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Mariana B; Mano, João F

    2013-02-19

    As the formation of healthy tissue and the treatment of several diseases are often dependent on an effective and prolonged action of bioactive agents, the delivery of molecules for therapeutic or induction purposes in a tissue is a common procedure. The correct administration of those agents is often dependent on tailored delivery mechanisms from hydrogel or polymeric matrixes. To the best of our knowledge, methods for the high-throughput monitoring of bioactive agent delivery are nonexistent. The methods for the in vitro monitoring of molecule release are expensive and laborious. As a simple alternative to these methods, we propose the imprinting of superhydrophobic biomimetic surfaces with ring-shaped transparent spots with concentric superhydrophobic millimetric regions to be used as bioactive agent release study platforms. We designed an array where polymeric precursors mixed with a growth-factor model protein labeled with a fluorescent tag could be dispensed in the concentric highly repellent regions and cross-linked afterward, generating a polymeric protein-loaded sphere. The ring-shaped region was then filled with a physiological-like fluid that covered the polymeric sphere. The acquisition of sequential images of each spot over time using microscopy methods allowed one to easily monitor the protein release by image-based fluorescence quantification. As the platform is easily adaptable and amenable for future automation in order to mimic standardized organ dynamics, we concluded that the device shows applicability for rapid and efficient in vitro bioactive agent release studies.

  12. Viral protein determinants of Lassa virus entry and release from polarized epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlie, Katrin; Maisa, Anna; Freiberg, Fabian; Groseth, Allison; Strecker, Thomas; Garten, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    The epithelium plays a key role in the spread of Lassa virus. Transmission from rodents to humans occurs mainly via inhalation or ingestion of droplets, dust, or food contaminated with rodent urine. Here, we investigated Lassa virus infection in cultured epithelial cells and subsequent release of progeny viruses. We show that Lassa virus enters polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells mainly via the basolateral route, consistent with the basolateral localization of the cellular Lassa virus receptor alpha-dystroglycan. In contrast, progeny virus was efficiently released from the apical cell surface. Further, we determined the roles of the glycoprotein, matrix protein, and nucleoprotein in directed release of nascent virus. To do this, a virus-like-particle assay was developed in polarized MDCK cells based on the finding that, when expressed individually, both the glycoprotein GP and matrix protein Z form virus-like particles. We show that GP determines the apical release of Lassa virus from epithelial cells, presumably by recruiting the matrix protein Z to the site of virus assembly, which is in turn essential for nucleocapsid incorporation into virions.

  13. Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Clinton E; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E

    2007-07-24

    Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured at the site of anisomycin infusions, increased quickly by approximately 1,000-17,000%, far above the levels seen under normal conditions. NE and DA release later decreased far below baseline for several hours before recovering at 48 h. Intraamygdala injections of a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist or agonist, each timed to blunt effects of increases and decreases in NE release after anisomycin, attenuated anisomycin-induced amnesia. In addition, similar to the effects on memory seen with anisomycin, intraamygdala injections of a high dose of NE before training impaired memory tested at 48 h after training. These findings suggest that altered release of neurotransmitters may mediate amnesia produced by anisomycin and, further, raise important questions about the empirical bases for many molecular theories of memory formation.

  14. Suilysin stimulates the release of heparin binding protein from neutrophils and increases vascular permeability in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaolong Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis (S. suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS, which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin binding protein (HBP is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis.

  15. The Transcription Factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 Controls Border-Like Cell Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karve, Rucha; Suárez-Román, Frank; Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali S

    2016-07-01

    The root cap covers the tip of the root and functions to protect the root from environmental stress. Cells in the last layer of the root cap are known as border cells, or border-like cells (BLCs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These cells separate from the rest of the root cap and are released from its edge as a layer of living cells. BLC release is developmentally regulated, but the mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we show that the transcription factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 (NLP7) is required for the proper release of BLCs in Arabidopsis. Mutations in NLP7 lead to BLCs that are released as single cells instead of an entire layer. NLP7 is highly expressed in BLCs and is activated by exposure to low pH, a condition that causes BLCs to be released as single cells. Mutations in NLP7 lead to decreased levels of cellulose and pectin. Cell wall-loosening enzymes such as CELLULASE5 (CEL5) and a pectin lyase-like gene, as well as the root cap regulators SOMBRERO and BEARSKIN1/2, are activated in nlp7-1 seedlings. Double mutant analysis revealed that the nlp7-1 phenotype depends on the expression level of CEL5 Mutations in NLP7 lead to an increase in susceptibility to a root-infecting fungal pathogen. Together, these data suggest that NLP7 controls the release of BLCs by acting through the cell wall-loosening enzyme CEL5.

  16. Optimized loading and sustained release of hydrophilic proteins from internally nanostructured particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemelli, Angela; Maurer, Manuela; Geier, Roman; Glatter, Otto

    2012-12-11

    In this study, we demonstrate that emulsified microemulsions and micellar cubosomes are suitable as sustained delivery vehicles for water-soluble proteins. Through structural modifications, the loading efficiency of two model proteins, namely bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cytochrome c could be remarkably increased. A procedure for preparing these particles loaded with optimized amounts of sensitive substances is presented. Loading and dispersion at low temperatures is performed in two successive steps. First, a water-in-oil microemulsion is loaded with the proteins. Subsequently, this phase is dispersed in water resulting in particles with microemulsion and micellar cubic internal structure and a size of approximately 620 nm. This two-step method ensures optimal loading of the particles with the proteins. These nanostructured particles are able to sustain the release of the water-soluble BSA and cytochrome c. Within one day, less than 10% of BSA and 15% of cytochrome c are released. The release rate of cytochrome c is influenced by the nanostructure of the particles.

  17. Protein corona change the drug release profile of nanocarriers: the "overlooked" factor at the nanobio interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Shahed; Serpooshan, Vahid; Sakhtianchi, Ramin; Müller, Beate; Landfester, Katharina; Crespy, Daniel; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    The emergence of nanocarrier systems in drug delivery applications has ushered in rapid development of new classes of therapeutic agents which can provide an essential breakthrough in the fight against refractory diseases. However, successful clinical application of nano-drug delivery devices has been limited mainly due to the lack of control on sustained release of therapeutics from the carriers. A wide range of sophisticated approaches employs the formation of crosslinkable, non-crosslinkable, stimuli-responsive polymer nanocarriers in order to enhance their delivery efficiency. Despite the extensive research conducted on the development of various nanocarriers, the effect of the biological milieu on the drug release profile of these constructs is not yet fully investigated. In particular, the formation of a protein corona on the surface of nanocarriers, when they interact with living organisms in vivo is largely decisive for their biological function. Using a number of synthetized (i.e., superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and polymeric nanocapsules) and commercialized nanocarriers (i.e., Abraxane®, albumin-bound paclitaxel drug), this study demonstrates that the protein corona can shield the nanocarriers and, consequently, alters the release profile of the drugs from the nanocarriers. More specifically, the protein corona could significantly reduce the burst effect of either protein conjugated nanocarriers or carriers with surface loaded drug (i.e., SPIONs). However, the corona shell only slightly changed the release profile of polymeric nanocapsules. Therefore, the intermediary, buffer effect of the protein shells on the surface of nanoscale carriers plays a crucial role in their successful high-yield applications in vivo.

  18. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase pathway induces apoptosis and prevents Epstein Barr virus reactivation in Raji cells exposed to lytic cycle inducing compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Renzo Livia

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EBV lytic cycle activators, such as phorbol esters, anti-immunoglobulin, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ, sodium butyrate, induce apoptosis in EBV-negative but not in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma (BL cells. To investigate the molecular mechanisms allowing EBV-infected cells to be protected, we examined the expression of viral and cellular antiapoptotic proteins as well as the activation of signal transduction pathways in BL-derived Raji cells exposed to lytic cycle inducing agents. Results Our data show that, following EBV activation, the latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 and the cellular anti-apoptotic proteins MCL-1 and BCL-2 were quickly up-regulated and that Raji cells remained viable even when exposed simultaneously to P(BU2, sodium butyrate and TGFβ. We report here that inhibition of p38 pathway, during EBV activation, led to a three fold increment of apoptosis and largely prevented lytic gene expression. Conclusion These findings indicate that, during the switch from the latent to the lytic phase of EBV infection, p38 MAPK phosphorylation plays a key role both for protecting the host cells from apoptosis as well as for inducing viral reactivation. Because Raji cells are defective for late antigens expression, we hypothesize that the increment of LMP1 gene expression in the early phases of EBV lytic cycle might contribute to the survival of the EBV-positive cells.

  19. Controlled release process to recover heterologous glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchored proteins from CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennard, M L; Food, M R; Jefferies, W A; Piret, J M

    1993-08-05

    A semicontinuous process has been developed to recover heterologous proteins at increased concentrations and purities. Proteins attached to mammalian cell membranes by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors can be selectively released into the supernatant by the enzyme phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, genetically engineered to express the GPI anchored, human melanoma antigen (p97), were used as a model system. These cells were grown in protein containing growth medium. During a brief harvesting phase the medium was replaced by phosphate buffered saline (PBS) containing 10 mU/mL of PI-PLC and the GPI anchored protein was cleaved from the cell surface and recovered in soluble form at up to 30% purity. After harvesting, the cells were returned to growth medium where the protein was re-expressed within 40 h. The growth rate, viability, and protein production of cells, repeatedly harvested over a 44-day period, were not adversely affected. This continuous cyclic harvesting process allowed recovery of a heterologous protein at high purity and concentrations and could be applied to the recovery of other GPI anchored proteins and genetically engineered GPI anchored fusion proteins. (c) 1993 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. A bacterial protein enhances the release and efficacy of liposomal cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Ian; Huang, Xin; Bettegowda, Chetan; Diaz, Luis A; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Zhou, Shibin; Vogelstein, Bert

    2006-11-24

    Clostridium novyi-NT is an anaerobic bacterium that can infect hypoxic regions within experimental tumors. Because C. novyi-NT lyses red blood cells, we hypothesized that its membrane-disrupting properties could be exploited to enhance the release of liposome-encapsulated drugs within tumors. Here, we show that treatment of mice bearing large, established tumors with C. novyi-NT plus a single dose of liposomal doxorubicin often led to eradication of the tumors. The bacterial factor responsible for the enhanced drug release was identified as a previously unrecognized protein termed liposomase. This protein could potentially be incorporated into diverse experimental approaches for the specific delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to tumors.

  1. Counterions release from electrostatic complexes of polyelectrolytes and proteins of opposite charge : a direct measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Gummel, Jérémie; Boué, François

    2009-01-01

    Though often considered as one of the main driving process of the complexation of species of opposite charges, the release of counterions has never been experimentally directly measured on polyelectrolyte/proteins complexes. We present here the first structural determination of such a release by Small Angle Neutron Scattering in complexes made of lysozyme, a positively charged protein and of PSS, a negatively charged polyelectrolyte. Both components have the same neutron density length, so their scattering can be switched off simultaneously in an appropriate "matching" solvent; this enables determination of the spatial distribution of the single counterions within the complexes. The counterions (including the one subjected to Manning condensation) are expelled from the cores where the species are at electrostatic stoichiometry.

  2. Release of free amino acids upon oxidation of peptides and proteins by hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fobang; Lai, Senchao; Tong, Haijie; Lakey, Pascale S J; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Weller, Michael G; Pöschl, Ulrich; Kampf, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    Hydroxyl radical-induced oxidation of proteins and peptides can lead to the cleavage of the peptide, leading to a release of fragments. Here, we used high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and pre-column online ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) derivatization-based amino acid analysis by HPLC with diode array detection and fluorescence detection to identify and quantify free amino acids released upon oxidation of proteins and peptides by hydroxyl radicals. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), ovalbumin (OVA) as model proteins, and synthetic tripeptides (comprised of varying compositions of the amino acids Gly, Ala, Ser, and Met) were used for reactions with hydroxyl radicals, which were generated by the Fenton reaction of iron ions and hydrogen peroxide. The molar yields of free glycine, aspartic acid, asparagine, and alanine per peptide or protein varied between 4 and 55%. For protein oxidation reactions, the molar yields of Gly (∼32-55% for BSA, ∼10-21% for OVA) were substantially higher than those for the other identified amino acids (∼5-12% for BSA, ∼4-6% for OVA). Upon oxidation of tripeptides with Gly in C-terminal, mid-chain, or N-terminal positions, Gly was preferentially released when it was located at the C-terminal site. Overall, we observe evidence for a site-selective formation of free amino acids in the OH radical-induced oxidation of peptides and proteins, which may be due to a reaction pathway involving nitrogen-centered radicals.

  3. A CO2-switchable polymer brush for reversible capture and release of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Surjith; Tong, Xia; Dory, Yves L; Lepage, Martin; Zhao, Yue

    2013-01-01

    We report on a polymer brush that can be switched between extended (hydrated) and collapsed (dehydrated) chain conformational states just by passing CO(2) and an inert gas like N(2) in solution alternately. This conformational change allows for reversible adsorption and release of a protein. In contrast to adding acids and bases for pH change, using gases as the trigger makes it possible to repeat the switching cycle many times without salt accumulation.

  4. Protein Adsorption into Mesopores: A Combination of Electrostatic Interaction, Counterion Release and van der Waals Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Moerz, Sebastian T

    2015-01-01

    Bovine heart cytochrome c has been immobilized into the mesoporous silica host material SBA-15 in both its native folded and urea-unfolded state. The comparison of the two folding states' behavior casts doubt on the commonly used explanation of cytochrome c adsorption, i.e. the electrostatic interaction model. A detailed investigation of the protein binding as a function of pH and ionic strength of the buffer solution reveals the complex nature of the protein-silica interaction. Electrostatic interaction, van der Waals forces and entropic contributions by counterion release each contribute to adsorption on the silica pore walls.

  5. Deletion of Corticotropin-releasing Factor Binding Protein Selectively Impairs Maternal, but not Intermale Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Gammie, Stephen C.; Seasholtz, Audrey F.; Stevenson, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) is a secreted protein that acts to bind and limit the activity of the neuropeptides, CRF and urocortin (Ucn) 1. We previously selected for high maternal defense (protection of offspring) in mice and found CRF-BP to be elevated in the CNS of selected mice. We also previously determined that both CRF and Ucn 1 are potent inhibitors of offspring protection when administered centrally. Thus, elevated CRF-BP could promote defense by lim...

  6. Painful Lytic Lesions of the Foot : A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Vaishya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of lytic lesions in the bones of foot raises a number of diagnostic possibilities ranging from infection, inflammatory pathology to neoplastic conditions. Although the radiological picture is not pathognomonic of any pathology, clinical history and histopathological examination can help to clinch the diagnosis. We present a case of multiple lytic lesions of the foot and discuss possible differential diagnoses. The patient was diagnosed as a case of madura foot and the lesions responded to surgical debridement and anti-fungal treatment with a good functional outcome. Madura foot is an uncommon, chronic granulomatous fungal or bacterial infection with a predilection in people who walk barefoot. Although known for a specific geographical distribution, madura foot should be kept as a possible diagnosis in patients presenting with lytic lesions of the foot due to population emigration across the world.

  7. Preparation and characterization of polyclonal antibody against Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic gene encoding RTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weifei; Tang, Qiao; Shen, Chenyou; Qin, Di; Lu, Chun; Yan, Qin

    2015-11-01

    Replication and transcription activator (RTA) is a critical lytic protein encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). To prepare rabbit polyclonal antibody against RTA, three antigenic polypeptides of KSHV RTA were initially synthesized. The fragment of RTA was cloned into p3FlagBsd to construct the recombinant plasmid, pRTA-Flag. 293 T and EA.hy926 cells were transfected with pRTA-Flag to obtain RTA-Flag fusion protein, which was detected using anti-Flag antibody. Next, New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with keyhole limpet hemocyanin-conjugated peptides to generate polyclonal antibodies against RTA. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to characterize the polyclonal antibodies, and the titers of the polyclonal antibodies against RTA were greater than 1:11,000. Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay revealed that the prepared antibody reacted specifically with the RTA-Flag fusion protein as well as the native viral protein in KSHV-infected primary effusion lymphoma cells. Collectively, our work successfully constructed the recombinant expression vector, pRTA-Flag, and prepared the polyclonal antibody against RTA, which was valuable for investigating the biochemical and biological functions of the critical KSHV lytic gene.

  8. Screening of the Human Kinome Identifies MSK1/2-CREB1 as an Essential Pathway Mediating Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Replication during Primary Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fan; Sawant, Tanvee Vinod; Lan, Ke; Lu, Chun; Jung, Jae U.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses often hijack cellular pathways to facilitate infection and replication. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic gammaherpesvirus etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, a vascular tumor of endothelial cells. Despite intensive studies, cellular pathways mediating KSHV infection and replication are still not well defined. Using an antibody array approach, we examined cellular proteins phosphorylated during primary KSHV infection of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Enrichment analysis identified integrin/mitogen-activated protein kinase (integrin/MAPK), insulin/epidermal growth factor receptor (insulin/EGFR), and JAK/STAT as the activated networks during primary KSHV infection. The transcriptional factor CREB1 (cyclic AMP [cAMP]-responsive element-binding protein 1) had the strongest increase in phosphorylation. While knockdown of CREB1 had no effect on KSHV entry and trafficking, it drastically reduced the expression of lytic transcripts and proteins and the production of infectious virions. Chemical activation of CREB1 significantly enhanced viral lytic replication. In contrast, CREB1 neither influenced the expression of the latent gene LANA nor affected KSHV infectivity. Mechanistically, CREB1 was not activated through the classic cAMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway or via the AKT, MK2, and RSK pathways. Rather, CREB1 was activated by the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases 1 and 2 (MSK1/2). Consequently, chemical inhibition or knockdown of MSKs significantly inhibited the KSHV lytic replication program; however, it had a minimal effect on LANA expression and KSHV infectivity. Together, these results identify the MSK1/2-CREB1 proteins as novel essential effectors of KSHV lytic replication during primary infection. The differential effect of the MSK1/2-CREB1 pathway on the expression of viral latent and lytic genes might control the robustness of viral lytic replication, and therefore the

  9. The algae-lytic ability of bacterium DC10 and the influence of environmental factors on the ability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Shunyu; LIU Yongding; SHEN Yinwu; LI Genbao

    2005-01-01

    A lysing-bacterium DC10, isolated from Dianchi Lake of Yunnan Province, was characterized to be Pseudomonas sp. It was able to lyse some algae well, such as Microcystis viridis, Selenastrum capricornutum, and so on. In this study, it was shown that the bacterium lysed the algae by releasing a substance; the best lytic effects were achieved at Iow temperatures and in the dark. Different concentrations of CaCI2 and NaNO3 influenced the lytic effects;the ability to lyse algae decreased in the following order: pH 4 > pH 9 > pH 7 > pH 5.5. It was significant to develop a special technology with this kind of bacterium for controlling the bloomforming planktonic microalgae.

  10. GDP Release Preferentially Occurs on the Phosphate Side in Heterotrimeric G-proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louet, Maxime; Martinez, Jean; Floquet, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    After extra-cellular stimulation of G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs), GDP/GTP exchange appears as the key, rate limiting step of the intracellular activation cycle of heterotrimeric G-proteins. Despite the availability of a large number of X-ray structures, the mechanism of GDP release out of heterotrimeric G-proteins still remains unknown at the molecular level. Starting from the available X-ray structure, extensive unconstrained/constrained molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the complete membrane-anchored Gi heterotrimer complexed to GDP, for a total simulation time overcoming 500 ns. By combining Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD) and free energy profiles reconstruction by umbrella sampling, our data suggest that the release of GDP was much more favored on its phosphate side. Interestingly, upon the forced extraction of GDP on this side, the whole protein encountered large, collective motions in perfect agreement with those we described previously including a domain to domain motion between the two ras-like and helical sub-domains of Gα. PMID:22829757

  11. Long-Term Controlled Protein Release from Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Hydrogels by Modulating Mesh Size and Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xinming; Lee, Soah; Bararpour, Layla; Yang, Fan

    2015-12-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels are popular biomaterials for protein delivery to guide desirable cellular fates and tissue repair. However, long-term protein release from PEG-based hydrogels remains challenging. Here, we report a PEG-based hydrogel platform for long term protein release, which allows efficient loading of proteins via physical entrapment. Tuning hydrogel degradation led to increase in hydrogel mesh size and gradual release of protein over 60 days of with retained bioactivity. Importantly, this platform does not require the chemical modification of loaded proteins, and may serve as a versatile tool for long-term delivery of a wide range of proteins for drug-delivery and tissue-engineering applications.

  12. Remodelling of cortical actin where lytic granules dock at natural killer cell immune synapses revealed by super-resolution microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice C N Brown

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are innate immune cells that secrete lytic granules to directly kill virus-infected or transformed cells across an immune synapse. However, a major gap in understanding this process is in establishing how lytic granules pass through the mesh of cortical actin known to underlie the NK cell membrane. Research has been hampered by the resolution of conventional light microscopy, which is too low to resolve cortical actin during lytic granule secretion. Here we use two high-resolution imaging techniques to probe the synaptic organisation of NK cell receptors and filamentous (F-actin. A combination of optical tweezers and live cell confocal microscopy reveals that microclusters of NKG2D assemble into a ring-shaped structure at the centre of intercellular synapses, where Vav1 and Grb2 also accumulate. Within this ring-shaped organisation of NK cell proteins, lytic granules accumulate for secretion. Using 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM to gain super-resolution of ~100 nm, cortical actin was detected in a central region of the NK cell synapse irrespective of whether activating or inhibitory signals dominate. Strikingly, the periodicity of the cortical actin mesh increased in specific domains at the synapse when the NK cell was activated. Two-colour super-resolution imaging revealed that lytic granules docked precisely in these domains which were also proximal to where the microtubule-organising centre (MTOC polarised. Together, these data demonstrate that remodelling of the cortical actin mesh occurs at the central region of the cytolytic NK cell immune synapse. This is likely to occur for other types of cell secretion and also emphasises the importance of emerging super-resolution imaging technology for revealing new biology.

  13. Remodelling of cortical actin where lytic granules dock at natural killer cell immune synapses revealed by super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alice C N; Oddos, Stephane; Dobbie, Ian M; Alakoskela, Juha-Matti; Parton, Richard M; Eissmann, Philipp; Neil, Mark A A; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M W; Davis, Ilan; Davis, Daniel M

    2011-09-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate immune cells that secrete lytic granules to directly kill virus-infected or transformed cells across an immune synapse. However, a major gap in understanding this process is in establishing how lytic granules pass through the mesh of cortical actin known to underlie the NK cell membrane. Research has been hampered by the resolution of conventional light microscopy, which is too low to resolve cortical actin during lytic granule secretion. Here we use two high-resolution imaging techniques to probe the synaptic organisation of NK cell receptors and filamentous (F)-actin. A combination of optical tweezers and live cell confocal microscopy reveals that microclusters of NKG2D assemble into a ring-shaped structure at the centre of intercellular synapses, where Vav1 and Grb2 also accumulate. Within this ring-shaped organisation of NK cell proteins, lytic granules accumulate for secretion. Using 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) to gain super-resolution of ~100 nm, cortical actin was detected in a central region of the NK cell synapse irrespective of whether activating or inhibitory signals dominate. Strikingly, the periodicity of the cortical actin mesh increased in specific domains at the synapse when the NK cell was activated. Two-colour super-resolution imaging revealed that lytic granules docked precisely in these domains which were also proximal to where the microtubule-organising centre (MTOC) polarised. Together, these data demonstrate that remodelling of the cortical actin mesh occurs at the central region of the cytolytic NK cell immune synapse. This is likely to occur for other types of cell secretion and also emphasises the importance of emerging super-resolution imaging technology for revealing new biology.

  14. Core-shell microparticles for protein sequestration and controlled release of a protein-laden core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinker, Torri E; Philbrick, Brandon D; Temenoff, Johnna S

    2016-12-21

    Development of multifunctional biomaterials that sequester, isolate, and redeliver cell-secreted proteins at a specific timepoint may be required to achieve the level of temporal control needed to more fully regulate tissue regeneration and repair. In response, we fabricated core-shell heparin-poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG) microparticles (MPs) with a degradable PEG-based shell that can temporally control delivery of protein-laden heparin MPs. Core-shell MPs were fabricated via a re-emulsification technique and the number of heparin MPs per PEG-based shell could be tuned by varying the mass of heparin MPs in the precursor PEG phase. When heparin MPs were loaded with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and then encapsulated into core-shell MPs, degradable core-shell MPs initiated similar C2C12 cell alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as the soluble control, while non-degradable core-shell MPs initiated a significantly lower response (85+19% vs. 9.0+4.8% of the soluble control, respectively). Similarly, when degradable core-shell MPs were formed and then loaded with BMP-2, they induced a ∼7-fold higher C2C12 ALP activity than the soluble control. As C2C12 ALP activity was enhanced by BMP-2, these studies indicated that degradable core-shell MPs were able to deliver a bioactive, BMP-2-laden heparin MP core. Overall, these dynamic core-shell MPs have the potential to sequester, isolate, and then redeliver proteins attached to a heparin core to initiate a cell response, which could be of great benefit to tissue regeneration applications requiring tight temporal control over protein presentation.

  15. Enzymatic Release and Characterization of Novel Bioactive Peptides from Milk Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Gobba, Cristian

    Milk is considered the most complete food, providing most of the nutrients needed. Milk proteins are not only important for their function as a source of amino acids, but they are also a source of bioactive peptides. These are short amino acid sequences with different activities that have......-inhibitory, antioxidant and antimicrobial peptides) released from milk proteins by mean of enzyme-catalysed hydrolysis. Goat milk fractions (produced using microfiltration membranes) and bovine casein were used as substrates. The goat milk fractions (retentate, permeate and skimmed milk) were hydrolysed with two...... protein hydrolysates made in other studies. Regarding radical scavenging activity, the bovine casein hydrolysates also showed a positive correlation between extent of hydrolysis and activity, although the difference between the unhydrolysed sample and the hydrolysates was less marked. The goat milk...

  16. Enzymatic Release and Characterization of Novel Bioactive Peptides from Milk Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Gobba, Cristian

    -inhibitory, antioxidant and antimicrobial peptides) released from milk proteins by mean of enzyme-catalysed hydrolysis. Goat milk fractions (produced using microfiltration membranes) and bovine casein were used as substrates. The goat milk fractions (retentate, permeate and skimmed milk) were hydrolysed with two...... protein hydrolysates made in other studies. Regarding radical scavenging activity, the bovine casein hydrolysates also showed a positive correlation between extent of hydrolysis and activity, although the difference between the unhydrolysed sample and the hydrolysates was less marked. The goat milk...... hydrolysates, instead, showed a difference between the fractions more than the degree of hydrolysis, the retentate being the most active radical scavenger regardless the degree of hydrolysis and enzyme used. Both hydrolysates are among the most active radical scavenging milk protein hydrolysates known...

  17. Whey protein concentrate doped electrospun poly(epsilon-caprolactone) fibers for antibiotic release improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Said Mahmoud; Ahmed, Hanaa; Tian, Chang; Tu, Qin; Guo, Yadan; Wang, Jinyi

    2016-07-01

    Design and fabrication of scaffolds using appropriate biomaterials are a key step for the creation of functionally engineered tissues and their clinical applications. Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), a biodegradable and biocompatible material with negligible cytotoxicity, is widely used to fabricate nanofiber scaffolds by electrospinning for the applications of pharmaceutical products and wound dressings. However, the use of PCL as such in tissue engineering is limited due to its poor bioregulatory activity, high hydrophobicity, lack of functional groups and neutral charge. With the attempt to found nanofiber scaffolds with antibacterial activity for skin tissue engineering, in this study, whey protein concentrate (WPC) was used to modify the PCL nanofibers by doping it in the PCL electrospun solution. By adding proteins into PCL nanofibers, the degradability of the fibers may be increased, and this further allows an antibiotic incorporated in the fibers to be efficiently released. The morphology, wettability and degradation of the as-prepared PCL/WPC nanofibers were carefully characterized. The results showed that the PCL/WPC nanofibers possessed good morphology and wettability, as well as high degradation ability to compare with the pristine PCL fibers. Afterwords, tetracycline hydrochloride as a model antibiotic drug was doped in the PCL/WPC nanofibers. In vitro drug release assays demonstrated that PCL/WPC nanofibers had higher antibiotic release capability than the PCL nanofibers. Also, antibacterial activity evaluation against various bacteria showed that the drug-doped PCL/WPC fibers possessed more efficient antibacterial activity than the PCL nanofibers.

  18. Evaluation of BSA protein release from hollow hydroxyapatite microspheres into PEG hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hailuo; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Brown, Roger F; Day, Delbert E

    2013-05-01

    Implants that simultaneously function as an osteoconductive matrix and as a device for local drug or growth factor delivery could provide an attractive system for bone regeneration. In our previous work, we prepared hollow hydroxyapatite (abbreviated HA) microspheres with a high surface area and mesoporous shell wall and studied the release of a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), from the microspheres into phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The present work is an extension of our previous work to study the release of BSA from similar HA microspheres into a biocompatible hydrogel, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). BSA-loaded HA microspheres were placed in a PEG solution which was rapidly gelled using ultraviolet radiation. The BSA release rate into the PEG hydrogel, measured using a spectrophotometric method, was slower than into PBS, and it was dependent on the initial BSA loading and on the microstructure of the microsphere shell wall. A total of 35-40% of the BSA initially loaded into the microspheres was released into PEG over ~14 days. The results indicate that these hollow HA microspheres have promising potential as an osteoconductive device for local drug or growth factor delivery in bone regeneration and in the treatment of bone diseases.

  19. Block copolymer micelles as nanocontainers for controlled release of proteins from biocompatible oil phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew C; Bershteyn, Anna; Tan, Wuisiew; Hammond, Paula T; Cohen, Robert E; Irvine, Darrell J

    2009-04-13

    Biocompatible oils are used in a variety of medical applications ranging from vaccine adjuvants to vehicles for oral drug delivery. To enable such nonpolar organic phases to serve as reservoirs for delivery of hydrophilic compounds, we explored the ability of block copolymer micelles in organic solvents to sequester proteins for sustained release across an oil-water interface. Self-assembly of the block copolymer, poly(-caprolactone)-block-poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (PCL-b-P2VP), was investigated in toluene and oleic acid, a biocompatible naturally occurring fatty acid. Micelle formation in toluene was characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging of micelles cast onto silicon substrates. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy confirmed a spherical morphology in oleic acid. Studies of homopolymer solubility implied that micelles in oleic acid consist of a P2VP corona and a PCL core, while P2VP formed the core of micelles assembled in toluene. The loading of two model proteins (ovalbumin (ova) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) into micelles was demonstrated with loadings as high as 7.8% wt of protein per wt of P2VP in oleic acid. Characterization of block copolymer morphology in the two solvents after protein loading revealed spherical particles with similar size distributions to the as-assembled micelles. Release of ova from micelles in oleic acid was sustained for 12-30 h upon placing the oil phase in contact with an aqueous bath. Unique to the situation of micelle assembly in an oily phase, the data suggest protein is sequestered in the P2VP corona block of PCL-b-P2VP micelles in oleic acid. More conventionally, protein loading occurs in the P2VP core of micelles assembled in toluene.

  20. Orchestrated content release from Drosophila glue-protein vesicles by a contractile actomyosin network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousso, Tal; Schejter, Eyal D; Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2016-02-01

    Releasing content from large vesicles measuring several micrometres in diameter poses exceptional challenges to the secretory system. An actomyosin network commonly coats these vesicles, and is thought to provide the necessary force mediating efficient cargo release. Here we describe the spatial and temporal dynamics of the formation of this actomyosin coat around large vesicles and the resulting vesicle collapse, in live Drosophila melanogaster salivary glands. We identify the Formin family protein Diaphanous (Dia) as the main actin nucleator involved in generating this structure, and uncover Rho as an integrator of actin assembly and contractile machinery activation comprising this actomyosin network. High-resolution imaging reveals a unique cage-like organization of myosin II on the actin coat. This myosin arrangement requires branched-actin polymerization, and is critical for exerting a non-isotropic force, mediating efficient vesicle contraction.

  1. Monoclonal antibody targeting chikungunya virus envelope 1 protein inhibits virus release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masrinoul, Promsin; Puiprom, Orapim; Tanaka, Atsushi; Kuwahara, Miwa; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Okabayashi, Tamaki

    2014-09-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes an acute clinical illness characterized by sudden high fever, intense joint pain, and skin rash. Recent outbreaks of chikungunya disease in Africa and Asia are a major public health concern; however, there is currently no effective licensed vaccine or specific treatment. This study reported the development of a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb), CK47, which recognizes domain III within the viral envelope 1 protein and inhibited the viral release process, thereby preventing the production of progeny virus. The MAb had no effect on virus entry and replication processes. Thus, CK47 may be a useful tool for studying the mechanisms underlying CHIKV release and may show potential as a therapeutic agent.

  2. Bacteriophage and impurity carryover and total organic carbon release during extended protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt

    2009-05-01

    In the biopharmaceutical industry, column chromatography residuals are routinely assessed by the direct measurement of mock eluates. In this study, we evaluated virus and other impurity carryover between protein A cycles and the feasibility of using a total organic carbon (TOC) analyzer to monitor for column impurity leakage as a correlate for actual measured carryover in mock eluates. Commercial process intermediates were used in scaled down studies of two protein A media, ProSep A (Millipore, Bedford, MA, USA) and MabSelect SuRe (GE Healthcare, Uppsala, Sweden). The chromatography system was programmed to run up to 200 normal load/elution cycles with periodic blank cycles to measure protein and phage carryover, and water flush cycles to measure TOC release. Sustained phage carryover was evident in each study. Carryover and TOC release was lowest in the case where cleaning was most stringent (50 mM NaOH/0.5 M Na(2)SO(4) with MabSelect SuRe). The TOC analysis at this time does not appear to be a viable practical means of measuring impurity carryover; direct measurements in mock eluates appears to be more predictive of column performance.

  3. Evaluation of the Components Released by Wine Yeast Strains on Protein Haze Formation in White Wine

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    Ellen Cristine Giese

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultures of 23 indigenous yeast strains (22 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and a non-Saccharomyces, Torulaspora delbrueckii, isolated from fermentation tanks at wineries in Castilla-La Mancha (Spain, and were performed under winemaking conditions using a synthetic must. Polysaccharide analysis and turbidity assays were conducted so as to observe the capacity of the released mannoproteins against protein haze formation in white wine, and 3 strains (2 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and T. delbrueckii were chosen for further experiments. The action of a commercial b-glucanolytic enzyme preparation (Lallzyme BETA®, and a β-(1→3-glucanase preparation from Trichoderma harzianum Rifai were evaluated to release polysaccharides from the different yeast strains’ cell walls. Protection against protein haze formation was strain dependent, and only two strains (Sc2 and Sc4 presented >50% stabilization in comparison to controls. Addition of β-glucanases did not increase the concentrations of polysaccharides in the fermentation musts; however, a significant increase of polymeric mannose (mannoproteins was detected using an enzymatic assay following total acid hydrolysis of the soluble polysaccharides. Enzymatic treatment presented positive effects and decreased protein haze formation in white wine. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v8i6.869

  4. Electrospinning of alginate/soy protein isolated nanofibers and their release characteristics for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratchada Wongkanya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural polymer-based nanofibers with functions of loading and releasing bioactive cues or drugs have recently gained interest for biomedical applications. Nanotopography and large surface area to volume ratio of hydrophilic polymer fibers promote their use as carriers of hydrophilic drugs. Here, sodium alginate (SA and soy protein isolated (SPI blended fibers encapsulated with vancomycin were fabricated via electrospinning with the assistance of poly(ethylene oxide (PEO. Morphological results showed submicron-sized, smooth and uniform as-spun SA/PEO/SPI fibers with an average diameter of 200 nm. Beads on the fiber mats were formed with increasing SPI content in the blending system. The optimal polymer composition of the electrospinning solution was determined as 5.6/2.4/2 SA/PEO/SPI. Polymer blends were maintained after ionic “cross-linking”, as indicated by the FTIR result. Investigation of release characteristic of vancomycin-loaded SA/PEO/SPI electrospun fibers exhibited initial burst release followed by a controlled release after 2 days of immersion in a phosphate buffered saline. The release rate of SA/PEO/SPI fibers was significantly slower than that of SA/PEO fibers, and drug-loaded fibers inhibited bacterial growth against Staphylococcus aureus after 24 h of incubation. Non-toxicity and biocompatibility of the fibers were confirmed by an indirect cytotoxicity test using human dermal fibroblasts. These results suggest that the vancomycin-loaded SA/PEO/SPI blended fibers are a promising nanomaterial for use in biomedical fields such as scaffolds for tissue engineering and drug delivery systems.

  5. Combinatorial Synthesis of and high-throughput protein release from polymer film and nanoparticle libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Latrisha K; Chavez-Santoscoy, Ana V; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2012-09-06

    Polyanhydrides are a class of biomaterials with excellent biocompatibility and drug delivery capabilities. While they have been studied extensively with conventional one-sample-at-a-time synthesis techniques, a more recent high-throughput approach has been developed enabling the synthesis and testing of large libraries of polyanhydrides(1). This will facilitate more efficient optimization and design process of these biomaterials for drug and vaccine delivery applications. The method in this work describes the combinatorial synthesis of biodegradable polyanhydride film and nanoparticle libraries and the high-throughput detection of protein release from these libraries. In this robotically operated method (Figure 1), linear actuators and syringe pumps are controlled by LabVIEW, which enables a hands-free automated protocol, eliminating user error. Furthermore, this method enables the rapid fabrication of micro-scale polymer libraries, reducing the batch size while resulting in the creation of multivariant polymer systems. This combinatorial approach to polymer synthesis facilitates the synthesis of up to 15 different polymers in an equivalent amount of time it would take to synthesize one polymer conventionally. In addition, the combinatorial polymer library can be fabricated into blank or protein-loaded geometries including films or nanoparticles upon dissolution of the polymer library in a solvent and precipitation into a non-solvent (for nanoparticles) or by vacuum drying (for films). Upon loading a fluorochrome-conjugated protein into the polymer libraries, protein release kinetics can be assessed at high-throughput using a fluorescence-based detection method (Figures 2 and 3) as described previously(1). This combinatorial platform has been validated with conventional methods(2) and the polyanhydride film and nanoparticle libraries have been characterized with (1)H NMR and FTIR. The libraries have been screened for protein release kinetics, stability and

  6. Estrogen stimulates release of secreted amyloid precursor protein from primary rat cortical neurons via protein kinase C pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun ZHANG; Ying HUANG; Yi-chun ZHU; Tai YAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanism of the action of estrogen, which stimulates the release of secreted amyloid precursor protein α (sAPPα) and decreases the gen eration of amyloid-β protein (Aβ), a dominant component in senile plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Methods: Experiments were carried out inprimary rat cortical neurons, and Western blot was used to detect sAPPα in aculture medium and the total amount of cellular amyloid precursor protein (APP) in neurons. Results: 17β-Estradiol (but not 17α-estradiol) and β-estradiol 6-(Ocarboxymethyl) oxime: BSA increased the secretion of sAPPα and this effect was blocked by protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor calphostin C, but not by the classical estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. Meanwhile, 17β-estradiol did not alter the synthesis of cellular APP. Conclusion: The effect of 17β-estradiol on sAPPα secretion is likely mediated through the membrane binding sites, and needs molecular configuration specificity of the ligand. Furthermore, the action of the PKC dependent pathway might be involved in estrogen-induced sAPPα secretion.

  7. Substance P induces tumor necrosis factor-alpha release from human skin via mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, T; Hide, M; Koro, O; Yamamoto, S

    2000-06-16

    Substance P plays an important role in neurogenic inflammation with granulocyte infiltration. To investigate cytokines involved in the substance P-induced inflammation and the mechanism of cell activation, we studied the release of TNF (tumor necrosis factor)-alpha and histamine from human skin slices in response to substance P and antigen. Substance P induced the release of histamine and TNF-alpha in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations from 0.8 to 100 microM. PD 098059 (2'-amino-3'-methoxyflavone) selectively inhibited the release of TNF-alpha, but not the release of histamine induced by either substance P or antigen. SB 203580 ([4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-++ +imida zole]) slightly inhibited TNF-alpha release induced by antigen, but not that induced by substance P, and slightly enhanced histamine release induced by either stimulation. The release of TNF-alpha in response to either stimulation was inhibited by 1 nM-1 microM dexamethasone, but histamine release was not affected. These results suggest that substance P, in addition to antigen, induced TNF-alpha release from human skin by a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, predominantly extracellular signaling-regulated protein kinase (ERK)-dependent, and dexamethasone-sensitive pathway, which is separate from that for histamine release from mast cells.

  8. Cellular and subcellular localization of Ras guanyl nucleotide-releasing protein in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, P; Vallée, A; Mechawar, N; Dower, N A; Stone, J C; Richardson, P M; Dunn, R J

    2001-01-01

    Ras guanyl nucleotide-releasing protein (RasGRP) is a recently discovered Ras guanyl nucleotide exchange factor that is expressed in selected regions of the rodent CNS, with high levels of expression in the hippocampus. Biochemical studies suggest that RasGRP can activate the Ras signal pathway in response to changes in diacylglycerol and possibly calcium. To investigate potential sites for RasGRP signaling, we have determined the cellular and subcellular localization of RasGRP protein in adult rat hippocampus, and have also examined the appearance of RasGRP mRNA and protein during hippocampal development. RasGRP immunoreactivity is predominately localized to those neurons participating in the direct cortico-hippocampo-cortical loop. In both hippocampal and entorhinal neurons, RasGRP protein appeared to be localized to both dendrites and somata, but not to axons. Electron microscopy of hippocampal pyramidal cells confirmed RasGRP immunoreactivity in neuronal cell bodies and dendrites, where it appeared to be associated with microtubules. The localization of RasGRP to dendrites suggests a role for this pathway in the regulation of dendritic function. Examination of developing hippocampal structures indicated that RasGRP mRNA and protein appear synchronously during the first 2 weeks of postnatal development as these neurons become fully mature. This result indicates that the RasGRP signal transduction pathway is not required during early hippocampal development, but is a feature of mature neurons during the later stages of development.

  9. PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A LYTIC METHICILLIN RESISTANT-STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS BACTERIOPHAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Al-Yousef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A marked increase in the infection incidence caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains has been noted in medical practice in recent years. This study was conducted to study the biological and characterize of MRSA-phage. Methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus was detected and confirmed by determining of the MIC of oxacillin by the standard agar dilution method. Phage was biologically purified using single plaque technique, then phage characterization were studied using host range, adsorption time, particle morphology and its structural protein. MRSA phage showing lytic nature was purified by repeated plating after picking of single isolated plaques. This phage is active against all 11 isolates either of S. aureus or MRSA tested as hosts. Phage produced clear plaques indicating their lytic nature. This phage was concentrated employing polyethylene glycol (PEG-NaCl precipitation method. Morphologically, MRSA Phage has a hexagonal head having a long non-contractile tail, indicating his icosahedral nature. Adsorption studies showed 100% adsorption of MRSA-Phage after 35 minutes of exposure. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE experimentation indicated that the phage particles contain one major structural protein (about 30 Kda.

  10. The FIKK kinase of Toxoplasma gondii is not essential for the parasite's lytic cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skariah, S; Walwyn, O; Engelberg, K; Gubbels, M-J; Gaylets, C; Kim, N; Lynch, B; Sultan, A; Mordue, D G

    2016-05-01

    FIKK kinases are a novel family of kinases unique to the Apicomplexa. While most apicomplexans encode a single FIKK kinase, Plasmodium falciparum expresses 21 and piroplasms do not encode a FIKK kinase. FIKK kinases share a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain, but the N-terminal region is highly variable and contains no known functional domains. To date, FIKK kinases have been primarily studied in P. falciparum and Plasmodium berghei. Those that have been studied are exported from the parasite and associate with diverse locations in the infected erythrocyte cytosol or membrane. Deletion of individual P. falciparum FIKK kinases indicates that they may play a role in modification of the infected erythrocyte. The current study characterises the single FIKK gene in Toxoplasma gondii to evaluate the importance of the FIKK kinase in an apicomplexan that has a single FIKK kinase. The TgFIKK gene encoded a protein of approximately 280kDa. Endogenous tagging of the FIKK protein with Yellow Fluorescent Protein showed that the FIKK protein exclusively localised to the posterior end of tachyzoites. A Yellow Fluorescent Protein-tagged FIKK and a Ty-tagged FIKK both co-localised with T. gondii membrane occupation and recognition nexus protein to the basal complex and were localised apical to inner membrane complex protein-5 and Centrin2. Deletion of TgFIKK, surprisingly, had no detectable effect on the parasite's lytic cycle in vitro in human fibroblast cells or in acute virulence in vivo. Thus, our results clearly show that while the FIKK kinase is expressed in tachyzoites, it is not essential for the lytic cycle of T. gondii. Copyright © 2016 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Noncanonical microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in lytic infection of murine gammaherpesvirus.

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    Jing Xia

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA and endogenous small interfering RNA (endo-siRNA are two essential classes of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs in eukaryotes. The class of miRNA is diverse and there exist noncanonical miRNAs that bypass the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway. In order to identify noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs responding to virus infection and study their potential function, we sequenced small-RNA species from cells lytically infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68. In addition to three novel canonical miRNAs in mouse, two antisense miRNAs in virus and 25 novel noncanonical miRNAs, including miRNAs derived from transfer RNAs, small nucleolar RNAs and introns, in the host were identified. These noncanonical miRNAs exhibited features distinct from that of canonical miRNAs in lengths of hairpins, base pairings and first nucleotide preference. Many of the novel miRNAs are conserved in mammals. Besides several known murine endo-siRNAs detected by the sequencing profiling, a novel locus in the mouse genome was identified to produce endo-siRNAs. This novel endo-siRNA locus is comprised of two tandem inverted B4 short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs. Unexpectedly, the SINE-derived endo-siRNAs were found in a variety of sequencing data and virus-infected cells. Moreover, a murine miRNA was up-regulated more than 35 fold in infected than in mock-treated cells. The putative targets of the viral and the up-regulated murine miRNAs were potentially involved in processes of gene transcription and protein phosphorylation, and localized to membranes, suggesting their potential role in manipulating the host basal immune system during lytic infection. Our results extended the number of noncanonical miRNAs in mammals and shed new light on their potential functions of lytic infection of MHV68.

  12. Investigation of protein distribution in solid lipid particles and its impact on protein release using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip C.; Birch, Ditlev; Saarinen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain new insights into protein distribution in solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) and subsequent release mechanisms using a novel label-free chemical imaging method, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Lysozyme-loaded SLMs were prepared using...... different lipids with lysozyme incorporated either as an aqueous solution or as a solid powder. Lysozyme distribution in SLMs was investigated using CARS microscopy with supportive structural analysis using electron microscopy. The release of lysozyme from SLMs was investigated in a medium simulating......-destructive method for elucidating the distribution of lysozyme in SLMs. The interpretation of protein distribution and release during lipolysis enabled elucidation of protein release mechanisms. In future, CARS microscopy analysis could facilitate development of a wide range of protein-lipid matrices with tailor...

  13. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of KSHV-Infected Cells Reveals Roles of ORF45-Activated RSK during Lytic Replication.

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    Denis Avey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV is an oncogenic virus which has adapted unique mechanisms to modulate the cellular microenvironment of its human host. The pathogenesis of KSHV is intimately linked to its manipulation of cellular signaling pathways, including the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway. We have previously shown that KSHV ORF45 contributes to the sustained activation of both ERK and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK, a major functional mediator of ERK/MAPK signaling during KSHV lytic replication. ORF45-activated RSK is required for optimal KSHV lytic gene expression and progeny virion production, though the underlying mechanisms downstream of this activation are still unclear. We hypothesized that the activation of RSK by ORF45 causes differential phosphorylation of cellular and viral substrates, affecting biological processes essential for efficient KSHV lytic replication. Accordingly, we observed widespread and significant differences in protein phosphorylation upon induction of lytic replication. Mass-spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic screening identified putative substrates of ORF45-activated RSK in KSHV-infected cells. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that nuclear proteins, including several transcriptional regulators, were overrepresented among these candidates. We validated the ORF45/RSK-dependent phosphorylation of several putative substrates by employing KSHV BAC mutagenesis, kinase inhibitor treatments, and/or CRISPR-mediated knockout of RSK in KSHV-infected cells. Furthermore, we assessed the consequences of knocking out these substrates on ORF45/RSK-dependent regulation of gene expression and KSHV progeny virion production. Finally, we show data to support that ORF45 regulates the translational efficiency of a subset of viral/cellular genes with complex secondary structure in their 5' UTR. Altogether, these data shed light on the mechanisms by which KSHV ORF45

  14. Biomimetic aqueous-core lipid nanoballoons integrating a multiple emulsion formulation: a suitable housing system for viable lytic bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcão, Victor M; Glasser, Cássia A; Chaud, Marco V; del Fiol, Fernando S; Tubino, Matthieu; Vila, Marta M D C

    2014-11-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains and the weak penetration of antibiotics into bacterial biofilms put an emphasis in the need for safe and effective alternatives for antimicrobial treatments. The application of strictly lytic bacteriophages (or phages) has been proposed as an alternative (or complement) to conventional antibiotics, allowing release of the natural predators of bacteria directly to the site of infection. In the present research effort, production of bacteriophage derivatives (starting from lytic phage particle isolates), encompassing full stabilization of their three-dimensional structure, has been attempted via housing said bacteriophage particles within lipid nanovesicles integrating a multiple water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsion. As a proof-of-concept for the aforementioned strategy, bacteriophage particles with broad lytic spectrum were entrapped within the aqueous core of lipid nanoballoons integrating a W/O/W multiple emulsion. Long-term storage of the multiple emulsions produced did not lead to leaching of phage particles, thus proving the effectiveness of the encapsulation procedure.

  15. Pore size is a critical parameter for obtaining sustained protein release from electrochemically synthesized mesoporous silicon microparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester L. Pastor

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silicon has become a material of high interest for drug delivery due to its outstanding internal surface area and inherent biodegradability. We have previously reported the preparation of mesoporous silicon microparticles (MS-MPs synthesized by an advantageous electrochemical method, and showed that due to their inner structure they can adsorb proteins in amounts exceeding the mass of the carrier itself. Protein release from these MS-MPs showed low burst effect and fast delivery kinetics with complete release in a few hours. In this work, we explored if tailoring the size of the inner pores of the particles would retard the protein release process. To address this hypothesis, three new MS-MPs prototypes were prepared by electrochemical synthesis, and the resulting carriers were characterized for morphology, particle size, and pore structure. All MS-MP prototypes had 90 µm mean particle size, but depending on the current density applied for synthesis, pore size changed between 5 and 13 nm. The model protein α-chymotrypsinogen was loaded into MS-MPs by adsorption and solvent evaporation. In the subsequent release experiments, no burst release of the protein was detected for any prototype. However, prototypes with larger pores (>10 nm reached 100% release in 24–48 h, whereas prototypes with small mesopores (<6 nm still retained most of their cargo after 96 h. MS-MPs with ∼6 nm pores were loaded with the osteogenic factor BMP7, and sustained release of this protein for up to two weeks was achieved. In conclusion, our results confirm that tailoring pore size can modify protein release from MS-MPs, and that prototypes with potential therapeutic utility for regional delivery of osteogenic factors can be prepared by convenient techniques.

  16. An Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) mutant with enhanced BZLF1 expression causes lymphomas with abortive lytic EBV infection in a humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Yu, Xianming; Mertz, Janet E; Gumperz, Jenny E; Reinheim, Erik; Zhou, Ying; Tang, Weihua; Burlingham, William J; Gulley, Margaret L; Kenney, Shannon C

    2012-08-01

    Immunosuppressed patients are at risk for developing Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-positive lymphomas that express the major EBV oncoprotein, LMP1. Although increasing evidence suggests that a small number of lytically infected cells may promote EBV-positive lymphomas, the impact of enhanced lytic gene expression on the ability of EBV to induce lymphomas is unclear. Here we have used immune-deficient mice, engrafted with human fetal hematopoietic stem cells and thymus and liver tissue, to compare lymphoma formation following infection with wild-type (WT) EBV versus infection with a "superlytic" (SL) mutant with enhanced BZLF1 (Z) expression. The same proportions (2/6) of the WT and SL virus-infected animals developed B-cell lymphomas by day 60 postinfection; the remainder of the animals had persistent tumor-free viral latency. In contrast, all WT and SL virus-infected animals treated with the OKT3 anti-CD3 antibody (which inhibits T-cell function) developed lymphomas by day 29. Lymphomas in OKT3-treated animals (in contrast to lymphomas in the untreated animals) contained many LMP1-expressing cells. The SL virus-infected lymphomas in both OKT3-treated and untreated animals contained many more Z-expressing cells (up to 30%) than the WT virus-infected lymphomas, but did not express late viral proteins and thus had an abortive lytic form of EBV infection. LMP1 and BMRF1 (an early lytic viral protein) were never coexpressed in the same cell, suggesting that LMP1 expression is incompatible with lytic viral reactivation. These results show that the SL mutant induces an "abortive" lytic infection in humanized mice that is compatible with continued cell growth and at least partially resistant to T-cell killing.

  17. Melatonin attenuates hypochlorous acid-mediated heme destruction, free iron release, and protein aggregation in hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Dhiman; Abdulhamid, Ibrahim; Diamond, Michael P; Saed, Ghassan M; Abu-Soud, Husam M

    2012-09-01

    In inflammatory diseases, where hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is elevated, iron homeostasis is disturbed, resulting in accumulation of free iron. Free iron is toxic by virtue of its ability to generate free radicals through the Fenton reaction. HOCl is generated by myeloperoxidase, (MPO) using chloride and hydrogen peroxide as substrates. Recent studies demonstrate that HOCl binds to the heme moiety of hemoglobin (Hb), which generates a transient ferric species whose formation and decay kinetics indicate it participates in protein aggregation, heme destruction, and free iron release. Here, we show that melatonin prevents HOCl-mediated Hb heme destruction and protein aggregation, using a combination of UV-vis spectrophotometry, ferrozine colorimetric assay, and in-gel heme staining. We also show that melatonin treatment prevents HOCl-mediated loss of red blood cell (RBC) viability, indicating biologic relevance of this finding. The mechanism by which melatonin prevents HOCl-mediated Hb heme destruction is by direct scavenging of HOCl and/or through the destabilization of the higher Hb oxidative states intermediates, ferryl porphyrin radical cation Hb-Fe(IV)=O(+π•) and Hb-Fe(IV)=O, which are formed through the reaction of HOCl with Hb. Our work establishes a direct mechanistic link between melatonin and its protective effect in chronic inflammatory diseases. Collectively, in addition to acting as an antioxidant and as a MPO inhibitor, melatonin can also exert its protective effect by inhibiting HOCl-mediated heme destruction of hemoproteins and subsequent free iron release.

  18. CTCF and Rad21 act as host cell restriction factors for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV lytic replication by modulating viral gene transcription.

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    Da-Jiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is a human herpesvirus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma and is associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases. KSHV reactivation from latency and virion production is dependent on efficient transcription of over eighty lytic cycle genes and viral DNA replication. CTCF and cohesin, cellular proteins that cooperatively regulate gene expression and mediate long-range DNA interactions, have been shown to bind at specific sites in herpesvirus genomes. CTCF and cohesin regulate KSHV gene expression during latency and may also control lytic reactivation, although their role in lytic gene expression remains incompletely characterized. Here, we analyze the dynamic changes in CTCF and cohesin binding that occur during the process of KSHV viral reactivation and virion production by high resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq and show that both proteins dissociate from viral genomes in kinetically and spatially distinct patterns. By utilizing siRNAs to specifically deplete CTCF and Rad21, a cohesin component, we demonstrate that both proteins are potent restriction factors for KSHV replication, with cohesin knockdown leading to hundred-fold increases in viral yield. High-throughput RNA sequencing was used to characterize the transcriptional effects of CTCF and cohesin depletion, and demonstrated that both proteins have complex and global effects on KSHV lytic transcription. Specifically, both proteins act as positive factors for viral transcription initially but subsequently inhibit KSHV lytic transcription, such that their net effect is to limit KSHV RNA accumulation. Cohesin is a more potent inhibitor of KSHV transcription than CTCF but both proteins are also required for efficient transcription of a subset of KSHV genes. These data reveal novel effects of CTCF and cohesin on transcription from a relatively small genome that resemble their effects on the cellular

  19. Thermal stability, storage and release of proteins with tailored fit in silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Chu; Smith, Tristan; Hicks, Robert H.; Doekhie, Aswin; Koumanov, Francoise; Wells, Stephen A.; Edler, Karen J.; van den Elsen, Jean; Holman, Geoffrey D.; Marchbank, Kevin J.; Sartbaeva, Asel

    2017-04-01

    Biological substances based on proteins, including vaccines, antibodies, and enzymes, typically degrade at room temperature over time due to denaturation, as proteins unfold with loss of secondary and tertiary structure. Their storage and distribution therefore relies on a “cold chain” of continuous refrigeration; this is costly and not always effective, as any break in the chain leads to rapid loss of effectiveness and potency. Efforts have been made to make vaccines thermally stable using treatments including freeze-drying (lyophilisation), biomineralisation, and encapsulation in sugar glass and organic polymers. Here for the first time we show that proteins can be enclosed in a deposited silica “cage”, rendering them stable against denaturing thermal treatment and long-term ambient-temperature storage, and subsequently released into solution with their structure and function intact. This “ensilication” method produces a storable solid protein-loaded material without the need for desiccation or freeze-drying. Ensilication offers the prospect of a solution to the “cold chain” problem for biological materials, in particular for vaccines.

  20. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus spontaneous lytic infection involves ERK1/2 and PI3-K/Akt signaling in EBV-positive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sufang; Li, Hongde; Chen, Lin; Yang, Lifang; Li, Lili; Tao, Yongguan; Li, Wei; Li, Zijian; Liu, Haidan; Tang, Min; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Cao, Ya

    2013-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation into the lytic cycle plays certain roles in the development of EBV-associated diseases, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma and lymphoma. In this study, we investigated the effects of the tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on EBV spontaneous lytic infection and the mechanism(s) involved in EBV-positive cells. We found that EGCG could effectively inhibit the constitutive lytic infection of EBV at the DNA, gene transcription and protein levels by decreasing the phosphorylation and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt. By using cellular signaling pathway-specific inhibitors, we also explored the signaling mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of EGCG on EBV spontaneous lytic infection in cell models. Results show that specific inhibitors of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase (MEK) (PD98059) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase [PI3-K (LY294002)] markedly downregulated gene transcription and expression of BZLF1 and BMRF1 indicating that the MEK/ERK1/2 and PI3-K/Akt pathways are involved in the EBV spontaneous lytic cycle cascade. Therefore, one of the mechanisms by which EGCG inhibits EBV spontaneous lytic infection appears to involve the suppression of the activation of MEK/ERK1/2 and PI3-K/Akt signaling.

  1. Increased CD8+ T cell response to Epstein-Barr virus lytic antigens in the active phase of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela F Angelini

    Full Text Available It has long been known that multiple sclerosis (MS is associated with an increased Epstein-Barr virus (EBV seroprevalence and high immune reactivity to EBV and that infectious mononucleosis increases MS risk. This evidence led to postulate that EBV infection plays a role in MS etiopathogenesis, although the mechanisms are debated. This study was designed to assess the prevalence and magnitude of CD8+ T-cell responses to EBV latent (EBNA-3A, LMP-2A and lytic (BZLF-1, BMLF-1 antigens in relapsing-remitting MS patients (n = 113 and healthy donors (HD (n = 43 and to investigate whether the EBV-specific CD8+ T cell response correlates with disease activity, as defined by clinical evaluation and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Using HLA class I pentamers, lytic antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses were detected in fewer untreated inactive MS patients than in active MS patients and HD while the frequency of CD8+ T cells specific for EBV lytic and latent antigens was higher in active and inactive MS patients, respectively. In contrast, the CD8+ T cell response to cytomegalovirus did not differ between HD and MS patients, irrespective of the disease phase. Marked differences in the prevalence of EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses were observed in patients treated with interferon-β and natalizumab, two licensed drugs for relapsing-remitting MS. Longitudinal studies revealed expansion of CD8+ T cells specific for EBV lytic antigens during active disease in untreated MS patients but not in relapse-free, natalizumab-treated patients. Analysis of post-mortem MS brain samples showed expression of the EBV lytic protein BZLF-1 and interactions between cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and EBV lytically infected plasma cells in inflammatory white matter lesions and meninges. We therefore propose that inability to control EBV infection during inactive MS could set the stage for intracerebral viral reactivation and disease relapse.

  2. Global mRNA degradation during lytic gammaherpesvirus infection contributes to establishment of viral latency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin M Richner

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available During a lytic gammaherpesvirus infection, host gene expression is severely restricted by the global degradation and altered 3' end processing of mRNA. This host shutoff phenotype is orchestrated by the viral SOX protein, yet its functional significance to the viral lifecycle has not been elucidated, in part due to the multifunctional nature of SOX. Using an unbiased mutagenesis screen of the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 SOX homolog, we isolated a single amino acid point mutant that is selectively defective in host shutoff activity. Incorporation of this mutation into MHV68 yielded a virus with significantly reduced capacity for mRNA turnover. Unexpectedly, the MHV68 mutant showed little defect during the acute replication phase in the mouse lung. Instead, the virus exhibited attenuation at later stages of in vivo infections suggestive of defects in both trafficking and latency establishment. Specifically, mice intranasally infected with the host shutoff mutant accumulated to lower levels at 10 days post infection in the lymph nodes, failed to develop splenomegaly, and exhibited reduced viral DNA levels and a lower frequency of latently infected splenocytes. Decreased latency establishment was also observed upon infection via the intraperitoneal route. These results highlight for the first time the importance of global mRNA degradation during a gammaherpesvirus infection and link an exclusively lytic phenomenon with downstream latency establishment.

  3. The effect of protein corona on doxorubicin release from the magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourjavadi, Ali, E-mail: purjavad@sharif.edu; Tehrani, Zahra Mazaheri; Mahmoudi, Negar [Sharif University of Technology, Polymer Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    In the present work, biocompatible superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated by mesoporous silica were used as drug nanocarriers for doxorubicin (Dox; an anticancer drug) delivery. In biological media, the interaction of protein corona layer with the surface of nanoparticles is inevitable. For this reason, we studied the effect of protein corona on drug release from magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNs) in human plasma medium. Besides, we used hydrophilic and biocompatible polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG), to decrease protein corona effects. The results showed the increased Dox release from PEGylated MMSNs compared with bare MMSNs. This result indicated that the coating of PEG reduced the wrapping of the protein corona around the nanoparticles. This phenomenon caused increase in Dox release.

  4. Cortex Peptidoglycan Lytic Activity in Germinating Bacillus anthracis Spores▿

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial endospore dormancy and resistance properties depend on the relative dehydration of the spore core, which is maintained by the spore membrane and its surrounding cortex peptidoglycan wall. During spore germination, the cortex peptidoglycan is rapidly hydrolyzed by lytic enzymes packaged into the dormant spore. The peptidoglycan structures in both dormant and germinating Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores were analyzed. The B. anthracis dormant spore peptidoglycan was similar to that fo...

  5. Recombinant chymosin used for exact and complete removal of a prochymosin derived fusion tag releasing intact native target protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Sune; Lamberth, Kasper; Nielsen, Lise-Lotte B

    2009-01-01

    Fusion tags add desirable properties to recombinant proteins, but they are not necessarily acceptable in the final products. Ideally, fusion tags should be removed releasing the intact native protein with no trace of the tag. Unique endoproteinases with the ability to cleave outside their own...... characteristics for the exact removal of fusion tags. It is readily available in highly purified recombinant versions approved by the FDA for preparation of food for human consumption. We suggest that one should consider extending the use of chymosin to the preparation of pharmaceutical proteins....... recognition sequence can potentially cleave at the boundary of any native protein. Chymosin was recently shown to cleave a pro-chymosin derived fusion tag releasing native target proteins. In our hands, however, not all proteins are chymosin-resistant under the acidic cleavage conditions (pH 4.5) used...

  6. Controlled release of protein from biodegradable multi-sensitive injectable poly(ether-urethane) hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomeng; Wang, Yangyun; Chen, Jiaming; Wang, Yinong; Ma, Jianbiao; Wu, Guolin

    2014-03-12

    The synthesis and characterization of multi-sensitive polymers for use as injectable hydrogels for controlled protein/drug delivery is reported. A series of biodegradable multi-sensitive poly(ether-urethane)s were prepared through a simple one-pot condensation of poly(ethylene glycol), 2,2'-dithiodiethanol, N-methyldiethanolamine, and hexamethylene diisocyanate. The sol-gel phase transition behaviors of the obtained copolymers were investigated. Experimental results showed that the aqueous medium comprising the multi-segment copolymers underwent a sol-to-gel phase transition with increasing temperature and pH. At a certain concentration, the copolymer solution could immediately change to a gel under physiological conditions (37 °C and pH 7.4), indicating their suitability as in situ injectable hydrogels in vivo. Insulin was used as a model protein drug for evaluation of the injectable hydrogels as a site-specific drug delivery system. The controlled release of insulin from the hydrogel devices was demonstrated by degradation of the copolymer, which is modulated via the 2,2'-dithiodiethanol content in the poly(ether-urethane)s. These hydrogels having multi-responsive properties may prove to be promising candidates for injectable and controllable protein drug delivery devices.

  7. Multiple Lytic Origins of Replication Are Required for Optimal Gammaherpesvirus Fitness In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Sattler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An unresolved question in herpesvirus biology is why some herpesviruses contain more than one lytic origin of replication (oriLyt. Using murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68 as model virus containing two oriLyts, we demonstrate that loss of either of the two oriLyts was well tolerated in some situations but not in others both in vitro and in vivo. This was related to the cell type, the organ or the route of inoculation. Depending on the cell type, different cellular proteins, for example Hexim1 and Rbbp4, were found to be associated with oriLyt DNA. Overexpression or downregulation of these proteins differentially affected the growth of mutants lacking either the left or the right oriLyt. Thus, multiple oriLyts are required to ensure optimal fitness in different cell types and tissues.

  8. Electrospinning of Cross-Linked Magnetic Chitosan Nanofibers for Protein Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicknejad, Ehsan Tayerani; Ghoreishi, Seyyed Mohammad; Habibi, Neda

    2015-12-01

    A poly(vinylalcohol) (PVA) electrospun/magnetic/chitosan nanocomposite fibrous cross-linked network was fabricated using in situ cross-linking electrospinning technique and used for bovine serum albumin (BSA) loading and release applications. Sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) and glutaraldehyde (GA) were used as cross-linkers which modified magnetic-Fe3O4 chitosan as Fe3O4/CS/TPP and Fe3O4/CS/GA, respectively. BSA was used as a model protein drugs which was encapsulated to form Fe3O4/CS/TPP/BSA and Fe3O4/CS/GA/BSA nanoparticles. The composites were electrospun with PVA to form nanofibers. Nanofibers were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The characterization results suggest that Fe3O4 nanoparticles with average size of 45 nm were successfully bound on the surface of chitosan. The cross-linked nanofibers were found to contain uniformly dispersed Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The size and morphology of the nanofibers network was controlled by varying the cross-linker type. FTIR data show that these two polymers have intermolecular interactions. The sample with TPP cross-linker showed an enhancement of the controlled release properties of BSA during 30-h experimental investigation. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. A pediatric non-protein losing Menetrier's disease successfully treated with octreotide long acting release

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Di Nardo; Salvatore Oliva; Marina Aloi; Federica Ferrari; Simone Frediani; Adriana Marcheggiano; Salvatore Cucchiara

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric Menetrier's disease (MD) is an uncommon,acute,self-limited hypertrophic gastropathy characterized by enlarged gastric folds associated with epithelial hyperplasia and usually accompanied by protein losing gastropathy.Gastric cytomegalovirus infection is found in one third of MD children and its treatment is often associated with remission.Diagnosis often requires fullthickness biopsy due to inability to detect typical histological findings with conventional endoscopic biopsy.We report an uncommon case of non self-limited pediatric MD needing endoscopic mucosal resection for diagnosis which was then successfully treated with octreotide long-acting release (LAR).To the best of our knowledge,this is the first pediatric MD case successfully treated with octreotide LAR.Our experience suggests octreotide LAR as treatment for refractory MD before gastrectomy.

  10. Bacteriophages and Phage-Derived Proteins – Application Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes – peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases – that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general. PMID:25666799

  11. Bacteriophages and phage-derived proteins--application approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna; Majkowska-Skrobek, Grazyna; Maciejewska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the bacterial resistance, especially to most commonly used antibiotics has proved to be a severe therapeutic problem. Nosocomial and community-acquired infections are usually caused by multidrug resistant strains. Therefore, we are forced to develop an alternative or supportive treatment for successful cure of life-threatening infections. The idea of using natural bacterial pathogens such as bacteriophages is already well known. Many papers have been published proving the high antibacterial efficacy of lytic phages tested in animal models as well as in the clinic. Researchers have also investigated the application of non-lytic phages and temperate phages, with promising results. Moreover, the development of molecular biology and novel generation methods of sequencing has opened up new possibilities in the design of engineered phages and recombinant phage-derived proteins. Encouraging performances were noted especially for phage enzymes involved in the first step of viral infection responsible for bacterial envelope degradation, named depolymerases. There are at least five major groups of such enzymes - peptidoglycan hydrolases, endosialidases, endorhamnosidases, alginate lyases and hyaluronate lyases - that have application potential. There is also much interest in proteins encoded by lysis cassette genes (holins, endolysins, spanins) responsible for progeny release during the phage lytic cycle. In this review, we discuss several issues of phage and phage-derived protein application approaches in therapy, diagnostics and biotechnology in general.

  12. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) binding protein: a novel regulator of CRF and related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, D P; De Souza, E B; Lowry, P J; Potter, E; Sawchenko, P; Vale, W W

    1995-10-01

    A 37-kDa corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) was purified from human plasma by repeated affinity purification and subsequently sequenced and cloned. The human and rat CRF-BP cDNAs encode proteins of 322 amino acids with one putative signal sequence, one N-glycosylation site, and 10 conserved cysteines. Human CRF-BP binds human CRF with high affinity but has low affinity for the ovine peptide. In contrast, sheep CRF-BP binds human and ovine CRF with high affinity. The CRF-BP gene consists of seven exons and six introns and is located on chromosome 13 and loci 5q of the mouse and human genomes, respectively. CRF-BP inhibits the adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) releasing properties of CRF in vitro. CRF-BP dimerizes after binding CRF and clears the peptide from blood. This clearance mechanism protects the maternal pituitary gland from elevated plasma CRF levels found during the third trimester of human pregnancy. CRF-BP is expressed in the brains of all species so far tested but is uniquely expressed in human liver and placenta. In brain, CRF-BP is membrane associated and is predominantly expressed in the cerebral cortex and subcortical limbic structures. In some brain areas CRF-BP colocalizes with CRF and CRF receptors. The protein is also present in pituitary corticotropes, where it is under positive glucocorticoid control, and is likely to locally modulate CRF-induced ACTH secretion. The ligand requirements of the CRF receptor and the CRF-BP can be distinguished in that central human CRF fragments, such as CRF (6-33) and CRF (9-33), have high affinity for CRF-BP but low affinity for the CRF receptor. The binding protein's ability to inhibit CRF-induced ACTH secretion can be reversed by CRF (6-33) and CRF (9-33), suggesting that ligand inhibitors may have utility in elevating free CRF levels in disease states associated with decreased CRF. Thus, by controlling the amount of free CRF which activates CRF receptors, it is likely that the CRF

  13. Comparing encapsulation efficiency and ultrasound-triggered release for protein between phospholipid-based microbubbles and liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cui-Tao; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Gao, Hui-Sheng; Tian, Ji-Lai; Zhou, Zhi-Cai; Zhao, Gang-Tao; Tang, Qin-Qin; Jin, Zhuo; Xu, Yan-Yan; Huang, Pin-Tong; Han, Jing; Wang, Liang; Li, Xiao-Kun

    2010-01-01

    This work was to compare the encapsulation efficiency and ultrasound-triggered release for protein between microbubbles and liposomes. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model. Final ratios between BSA and HPC in microbubbles and liposomes were 1:5, 1:7 and 1:10, respectively. Morphologic characteristics and contrast enhancement of loaded microbubbles and liposomes were measured. Encapsulation efficiency and ultrasound-stimulated release profile were detected. The mean size of loaded microbubbles and liposomes was 3.4 microm and 1.7 microm, respectively. Encapsulation efficiency of microbubbles had an inverse relationship with the ratio between BSA and HPC, while loaded liposomes remained nearly unchanged in the designed range of the ratio between BSA and HPC. Microbubbles resulted in significant enhancement of CnTi images. After ultrasound, more than 90% of the entrapped BSA was released from microbubbles, but less than 5% of BSA released from liposomes. Microbubbles are a promising delivery system for proteins.

  14. The Release of Egg White Lysozyme Containing EDTA from Composite Edible Film Based on Whey Protein, Konjac Flour and Lipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulia W. Apriliyani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this research were to find out the effect of EDTA addition on antibacterial spectrum broadening of lysozyme on Gram negative bacteria and the release of lysozyme from composite edible film made of whey protein, konjac glucomannan and several lipids type and content. The research were conducted with 2 steps. Step I: The addition of EDTA on lysozyme aquaeous (Lysozyme (mg/mL: EDTA (mg/mL = 11.14:8.14; 11.14:11.14 and 11.14:14.14 using Randomyzed Block Design, the variables were, antibacterial of lysozyme on Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Escherichia coli. Step II: Lipid content (5 and 10% and kind of lipid (butter, margarine, palm oil and beeswax using nested Randomyzed Block Design, the variables were lysozyme release, Water Vapor Permeability (WVP, protein solublity and microstructure of composite edible film. The results were, step I: the treatment didn’t gave significantly effect (p>0.05 on lysozyme activity. EDTA decrease cell membrane stabilization and lysozyme made lysis of cell membrane. EDTA chelate Ca2+ and Mg2+ salts as bridge between Lypopolysachcharide (LPS in outer membrane so LPS released from cell wall of Gram negative bacteria. Step II: The treatment didn’t gave significantly effect (p>0.05 on release of lysozyme and water vapour permeability, but gave significantly effect (p<0.05 on protein solubility. The release of lysozyme from composite edible film gave the best lysozyme release from beeswax 10% addition.

  15. pHAST (pH-Driven Aptamer Switch for Thrombin) Catch-and-Release of Target Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, E M; Bolzon, R; Mezin, P; Frahm, G; Johnston, M; DeRosa, M C

    2016-06-15

    A pH-driven DNA nanomachine based on the human α-thrombin binding aptamer was designed for the specific catch-and-release of human α-thrombin at neutral and acidic pH, respectively. In neutral conditions, the thrombin aptamer component of the nanomachine is exposed and exists in the G-quadruplex conformation required to bind to the target protein. At slightly acidic pH, the polyadenine tail of the nanomachine becomes partially protonated and A+(anti)•G(syn) mispairing results in a conformational change, causing the target protein to be released. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to monitor conformational switching over multiple pH cycles. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and fluorescence anisotropy were used to show pH dependent protein binding and release by the nanomachine. This approach could be applied generally to existing G-rich aptamers to develop novel biosensors, theranostics, and nanoswitches.

  16. Solid lipid particles for oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs I - Elucidating the release mechanism of lysozyme during lipolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten B; Zhang, L.; Yang, M

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of protein release from solid lipid particles was investigated by a new lipolysis model in a biorelevant medium containing both bile salts and phospholipids. Lysozyme, a model protein, was formulated into solid lipid particles using four different types of lipids, two triglycerides...... with different chain-length of fatty acyl groups i.e. trimyristin (TG14) and tristearin (TG18), and two lipid blends dominated by diglycerides and monoglycerides, respectively. The release of lysozyme from the solid lipid particles and the lipid hydrolysis process were assessed in the lipolysis model, while...... the drug release mechanism from solid lipid particles and can potentially be used in rational selection of lipid excipients for oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs....

  17. Two isoforms of eukaryotic phospholipase C in Paramecium affecting transport and release of GPI-anchored proteins in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöppel, Christine; Müller, Alexandra; Marker, Simone; Simon, Martin

    2009-10-01

    Surface proteins anchored by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) residue in the cell membrane are widely distributed among eukaryotic cells. The GPI anchor is cleavable by a phospholipase C (PLC) leading to the release of such surface proteins, and this process is postulated to be essential in several systems. For higher eukaryotes, the responsible enzymes have not been characterized in any detail as yet. Here we characterize six PLCs in the ciliated protozoan, Paramecium, which, in terms of catalytic domains and architecture, all show characteristics of PLCs involved in signal transduction in higher eukaryotes. We show that some of these endogenous PLCs can release GPI-anchored surface proteins in vitro: using RNA(i) to reduce PLC expression results in the same effects as the application of PLC inhibitors. With two enzymes, PLC2 and PLC6, RNA(i) phenotypes show strong defects in release of GPI-anchored surface proteins in vivo. Moreover, these RNA(i) lines also show abnormal surface protein distribution, suggesting that GPI cleavage may influence trafficking of anchored proteins. As we find GFP fusion proteins in the cytosol and in the surface protein extracts, these PLCs obviously show unconventional translocation mechanisms. This is the first molecular data on endogenous Paramecium PLCs with the described properties affecting GPI anchors in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Flavor release and perception of flavored whey protein gels: Perception is determined by texture rather than by release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, K.G.C.; Boelrijk, A.E.M.; Alting, A.C.; Mil, van P.J.J.M.; Burger, J.J.; Gruppen, H.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Smit, G.

    2002-01-01

    Five whey protein gels, with different gel hardnesses and waterholding capacities, were flavored with ethylbutyrate or diacetyl and evaluated by a 10-person panel to study the relation between the gel structure and the sensory perception, as well as the nosespace flavor concentration during eating.

  19. Flavor release and perception of flavored whey protein gels: Perception is determined by texture rather than by release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, K.G.C.; Boelrijk, A.E.M.; Alting, A.C.; Mil, van P.J.J.M.; Burger, J.J.; Gruppen, H.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Smit, G.

    2002-01-01

    Five whey protein gels, with different gel hardnesses and waterholding capacities, were flavored with ethylbutyrate or diacetyl and evaluated by a 10-person panel to study the relation between the gel structure and the sensory perception, as well as the nosespace flavor concentration during eating.

  20. Interaction of Fibrinogen and Muramidase-released Protein Promotes the Development of Streptococcus suis Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junping eWang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Muramidase-released protein (MRP is as an important virulence marker of Streptococcus suis (S. suis serotype 2. Our previous works have shown that MRP can bind human fibrinogen (hFg; however, the function of this interaction in S.suis meningitis is not known. In this study, we found that the deletion of mrp significantly impairs the hFg-mediated adherence and traversal ability of S. suis across human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3. Measurement of the permeability to Lucifer yellow in vitro and Evans blue extravasation in vivo show that the MRP-hFg interaction significantly increases the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. In the mouse meningitis model, wild type S. suis caused higher bacterial loads in the brain and more severe histopathological signs of meningitis than the mrp mutant at day 3 post-infection. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence observations reveal that the MRP-hFg interaction can destroy the cell adherens junction protein p120-catenin of hCMEC/D3. These results indicate that the MRP-hFg interaction is important in the development of S. suis meningitis.

  1. Trypanosome lytic factor, an antimicrobial high-density lipoprotein, ameliorates Leishmania infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Samanovic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Trypanosome Lytic Factor (TLF is a minor sub-fraction of human high-density lipoprotein that provides innate immunity by completely protecting humans from infection by most species of African trypanosomes, which belong to the Kinetoplastida order. Herein, we demonstrate the broader protective effects of human TLF, which inhibits intracellular infection by Leishmania, a kinetoplastid that replicates in phagolysosomes of macrophages. We show that TLF accumulates within the parasitophorous vacuole of macrophages in vitro and reduces the number of Leishmania metacyclic promastigotes, but not amastigotes. We do not detect any activation of the macrophages by TLF in the presence or absence of Leishmania, and therefore propose that TLF directly damages the parasite in the acidic parasitophorous vacuole. To investigate the physiological relevance of this observation, we have reconstituted lytic activity in vivo by generating mice that express the two main protein components of TLFs: human apolipoprotein L-I and haptoglobin-related protein. Both proteins are expressed in mice at levels equivalent to those found in humans and circulate within high-density lipoproteins. We find that TLF mice can ameliorate an infection with Leishmania by significantly reducing the pathogen burden. In contrast, TLF mice were not protected against infection by the kinetoplastid Trypanosoma cruzi, which infects many cell types and transiently passes through a phagolysosome. We conclude that TLF not only determines species specificity for African trypanosomes, but can also ameliorate an infection with Leishmania, while having no effect on T. cruzi. We propose that TLFs are a component of the innate immune system that can limit infections by their ability to selectively damage pathogens in phagolysosomes within the reticuloendothelial system.

  2. Revisiting the Cellulosimicrobium cellulans yeast-lytic β-1,3-glucanases toolbox: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrer Pau

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cellulosimicrobium cellulans (also known with the synonyms Cellulomonas cellulans, Oerskovia xanthineolytica, and Arthrobacter luteus is an actinomycete that excretes yeast cell wall lytic enzyme complexes containing endo-β-1,3-glucanases [EC 3.2.1.39 and 3.2.1.6] as key constituents. Three genes encoding endo-β-1,3-glucanases from two C. cellulans strains have been cloned and characterised over the past years. The βglII and βglIIA genes from strain DSM 10297 (also known as O. xanthineolytica LL G109 encoded proteins of 40.8 and 28.6 kDa, respectively, whereas the β-1,3-glucanase gene from strain ATCC 21606 (also known as A. luteus 73–14 encoded a 54.5 kDa protein. Alignment of their deduced amino acid sequences reveal that βglII and βglIIA have catalytic domains assigned to family 16 of glycosyl hydrolases, whereas the catalytic domain from the 54.5 kDa glucanase belongs to family 64. Notably, both βglII and the 54.5 kDa β-1,3-glucanase are multidomain proteins, having a lectin-like C-terminal domain that has been assigned to family 13 of carbohydrate binding modules, and that confers to β-1,3-glucanases the ability to lyse viable yeast cells. Furthermore, βglII may also undergo posttranslational proteolytic processing of its C-terminal domain, resulting in a truncated enzyme retaining its glucanase activity but with very low yeast-lytic activity. In this review, the diversity in terms of structural and functional characteristics of the C. cellulans β-1,3-glucanases has been compiled and compared.

  3. A photo-cleavable biotin affinity tag for the facile release of a photo-crosslinked carbohydrate-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tsung-Che; Adak, Avijit K; Lin, Ting-Wei; Li, Pei-Jhen; Chen, Yi-Ju; Lai, Chain-Hui; Liang, Chien-Fu; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2016-03-15

    The use of photo-crosslinking glycoprobes represents a powerful strategy for the covalent capture of labile protein complexes and allows detailed characterization of carbohydrate-mediated interactions. The selective release of target proteins from solid support is a key step in functional proteomics. We envisaged that light activation can be exploited for releasing labeled protein in a dual photo-affinity probe-based strategy. To investigate this possibility, we designed a trifunctional, galactose-based, multivalent glycoprobe for affinity labeling of carbohydrate-binding proteins. The resulting covalent protein-probe adduct is attached to a photo-cleavable biotin affinity tag; the biotin moiety enables specific presentation of the conjugate on streptavidin-coated beads, and the photolabile linker allows the release of the labeled proteins. This dual probe promotes both the labeling and the facile cleavage of the target protein complexes from the solid surfaces and the remainder of the cell lysate in a completely unaltered form, thus eliminating many of the common pitfalls associated with traditional affinity-based purification methods.

  4. Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Stimulates Dopamine Release from PC12 Cells via Ca(2+)-Independent Phospholipase A₂ Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jihui; Maeng, Jeehye; Kim, Hwa-Jung

    2016-10-24

    The translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP), initially identified as a tumor- and growth-related protein, is also known as a histamine-releasing factor (HRF). TCTP is widely distributed in the neuronal systems, but its function is largely uncharacterized. Here, we report a novel function of TCTP in the neurotransmitter release from a neurosecretory, pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Treatment with recombinant TCTP (rTCTP) enhanced both basal and depolarization (50 mM KCl)-evoked [³H]dopamine release in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Interestingly, even though rTCTP induced the increase in intracellular calcium levels ([Ca(2+)]i), the rTCTP-driven effect on dopamine release was mediated by a Ca(2+)-independent pathway, as evidenced by the fact that Ca(2+)-modulating agents such as Ca(2+) chelators and a voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+)-channel blocker did not produce any changes in rTCTP-evoked dopamine release. In a study to investigate the involvement of phospholipase A₂ (PLA₂) in rTCTP-induced dopamine release, the inhibitor for Ca(2+)-independent PLA₂ (iPLA₂) produced a significant inhibitory effect on rTCTP-induced dopamine release, whereas this release was not significantly inhibited by Ca(2+)-dependent cytosolic PLA₂ (cPLA₂) and secretory PLA₂ (sPLA₂) inhibitors. We found that rTCTP-induced dopamine release from neuronal PC12 cells was modulated by a Ca(2+)-independent mechanism that involved PLA₂ in the process, suggesting the regulatory role of TCTP in the neuronal functions.

  5. Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Stimulates Dopamine Release from PC12 Cells via Ca2+-Independent Phospholipase A2 Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihui Seo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP, initially identified as a tumor- and growth-related protein, is also known as a histamine-releasing factor (HRF. TCTP is widely distributed in the neuronal systems, but its function is largely uncharacterized. Here, we report a novel function of TCTP in the neurotransmitter release from a neurosecretory, pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells. Treatment with recombinant TCTP (rTCTP enhanced both basal and depolarization (50 mM KCl-evoked [3H]dopamine release in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Interestingly, even though rTCTP induced the increase in intracellular calcium levels ([Ca2+]i, the rTCTP-driven effect on dopamine release was mediated by a Ca2+-independent pathway, as evidenced by the fact that Ca2+-modulating agents such as Ca2+ chelators and a voltage-gated L-type Ca2+-channel blocker did not produce any changes in rTCTP-evoked dopamine release. In a study to investigate the involvement of phospholipase A2 (PLA2 in rTCTP-induced dopamine release, the inhibitor for Ca2+-independent PLA2 (iPLA2 produced a significant inhibitory effect on rTCTP-induced dopamine release, whereas this release was not significantly inhibited by Ca2+-dependent cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2 and secretory PLA2 (sPLA2 inhibitors. We found that rTCTP-induced dopamine release from neuronal PC12 cells was modulated by a Ca2+-independent mechanism that involved PLA2 in the process, suggesting the regulatory role of TCTP in the neuronal functions.

  6. Expression and release of IL-18 binding protein in response to IFN-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulukat, J; Bosmann, M; Nold, M; Garkisch, S; Kämpfer, H; Frank, S; Raedle, J; Zeuzem, S; Pfeilschifter, J; Mühl, H

    2001-12-15

    IL-18 and IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP) are two newly described opponents in the cytokine network. Local concentrations of these two players may determine biological functions of IL-18 in the context of inflammation, infection, and cancer. As IL-18 appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease and may modulate tumor growth, we investigated the IL-18/IL-18BPa system in the human colon carcinoma/epithelial cell line DLD-1. In this study, we report that IFN-gamma induces expression and release of IL-18BPa from DLD-1 cells. mRNA induction and secretion of IL-18BPa immunoreactivity were associated with an activity that significantly impaired release of IFN-gamma by IL-12/IL-18-stimulated PBMC. Inducibility of IL-18BPa by IFN-gamma was also observed in LoVo, Caco-2, and HCT116 human colon carcinoma cell lines and in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. Induction of IL-18BPa in colon carcinoma/epithelial cell lines was suppressed by coincubation with sodium butyrate. IFN-gamma-mediated IL-18BPa and its suppression by sodium butyrate were confirmed in organ cultures of intestinal colonic biopsy specimens. In contrast, sodium butyrate did not modulate expression of IL-18. The present data suggest that IFN-gamma may limit biological functions of IL-18 at sites of colonic immune activation by inducing IL-18BPa production. Down-regulation of IL-18BPa by sodium butyrate suggests that reinforcement of local IL-18 activity may contribute to actions of this short-chain fatty acid in the colonic microenvironment.

  7. Abortive lytic Epstein–Barr virus replication in tonsil-B lymphocytes in infectious mononucleosis and a subset of the chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerner AM

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A Martin Lerner,1 Safedin Beqaj21Department of Medicine, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Rochester, MI, USA; 2Pathology Inc, Torrance, CA, USAAbstract: A systematic 2001–2007 review of 142 chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS patients identified 106 CFS patients with elevated serum IgG antibodies to the herpesviruses Epstein–Barr virus (EBV, cytomegalovirus, or human herpesvirus (HHV 6 in single or multiple infections, with no other co-infections detected. We named these 106 patients group-A CFS. Eighty-six of these 106 group-A CFS patients (81% had elevated EBV early antibody, early antigen (diffuse, serum titers. A small group of six patients in the group-A EBV subset of CFS, additionally, had repetitive elevated-serum titers of antibody to the early lytic replication-encoded proteins, EBV dUTPase, and EBV DNA polymerase. The presence of these serum antibodies to EBV dUTPase and EBV DNA polymerase indicated EBV abortive lytic replication in these 6 CFS patients. None of 20 random control people (age- and sex-matched, with blood drawn at a commercial laboratory had elevated serum titers of antibody to EBV dUTPase or EBV DNA polymerase (P < 0.01. This finding needs verification in a larger group of EBV CFS subset patients, but if corroborated, it may represent a molecular marker for diagnosing the EBV subset of CFS. We review evidence that EBV abortive lytic replication with unassembled viral proteins in the blood may be the same in infectious mononucleosis (IM and a subset of CFS. EBV-abortive lytic replication in tonsil plasma cells is dominant in IM. No complete lytic virion is in the blood of IM or CFS patients. Complications of CFS and IM include cardiomyopathy and encephalopathy. Circulating abortive lytic-encoded EBV proteins (eg, EBV dUTPase, EBV DNA polymerase, and others may be common to IM and CFS. The intensity and duration of the circulating EBV-encoded proteins might differentiate the IM and EBV subsets of CFS

  8. Identification of the major proteins of an immune modulating fraction from adult Fasciola hepatica released by Nonidet P40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphew, Russell M; Hamilton, Clare M; Wright, Hazel A; Dowling, David J; O'Neill, Sandra M; Brophy, Peter M

    2013-01-31

    Fasciola hepatica NP-40 released protein extract (FhNPE) exhibits potent Th1 immunosuppressive properties in vitro and in vivo. However, the protein composition of this active fraction, responsible for Th1 immune modulatory activity, has yet to be resolved. Therefore, FhNPE, a Nonidet P-40 extract, was subjected to a proteomic analysis in order to identify individual protein components. This was performed using an in house F. hepatica EST database following 2D electrophoresis combined with de novo sequencing based mass spectrometry. The identified proteins, a mixture of excretory/secretory and membrane-associated proteins, are associated with stress response and chaperoning, energy metabolism and cytoskeletal components. The immune modulatory properties of these identified protein(s) are discussed and HSP70 from F. hepatica is highlighted as a potential host immune modulator for future study.

  9. DNA intercalators induce specific release of HMG 14, HMG 17 and other DNA-binding proteins from chicken erythrocyte chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, H; Maier, G; Ponstingl, H; Nordheim, A

    1985-01-01

    Chicken erythrocyte nuclei were incubated with DNA intercalating agents in order to isolate from chromatin specific DNA-binding proteins whose binding specificity may be determined by DNA secondary and/or tertiary structure. The intercalating agents ethidium bromide (EtBr) and propidium iodide induce the specific release of high mobility group proteins HMG 14 and HMG 17 under low ionic strength conditions. Chloroquine (CQ) intercalation also results in the selective liberation of HMG 14 and HMG 17, but, in addition, selectively releases other nuclear proteins (including histone H1A) in a pH- and ionic strength-dependent fashion. The use of this new 'elutive intercalation' technique for the isolation and purification of 'sequence-specific' and 'helix-specific' DNA-binding proteins is suggested. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:4092697

  10. Tunable Controlled Release of Bioactive SDF-1α via Protein Specific Interactions within Fibrin/Nanoparticle Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, D; Fauer, C; Mulleneux, H L; Stabenfeldt, S E

    2015-10-31

    The chemokine, stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α), is a key regulator of the endogenous neural progenitor/stem cell-mediated regenerative response after neural injury. Increased and sustained bioavailability of SDF-1α in the peri-injury region is hypothesized to modulate this endogenous repair response. Here, we describe poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles capable of releasing bioactive SDF-1α in a sustained manner over 60days after a burst of 23%. Moreover, we report a biphasic cellular response to SDF-1α concentrations thus the large initial burst release in an in vivo setting may result in supratherapeutic concentrations of SDF-1α. Specific protein-protein interactions between SDF-1α and fibrin (as well as its monomer, fibrinogen) were exploited to control the magnitude of the burst release. Nanoparticles embedded in fibrin significantly reduced the amount of SDF-1α released after 72 hrs as a function of fibrin density. Therefore, the nanoparticle/fibrin composites represented a means to independently tune the magnitude of the burst phase release from the nanoparticles while perserving a bioactive depot of SDF-1α for release over 60days.

  11. Identification of the major proteins of an immune modulating fraction from adult Fasciola hepatica released by Nonidet P40

    OpenAIRE

    Morphew, R.M.; Hamilton, C M; Wright, H. A.; Dowling, D. J.; O’Neill, S. M.; Brophy, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica NP-40 released antigens (FhTeg) exhibit potent Th1 immunosuppressive properties in vitro and in vivo. However, the protein composition of this active fraction, responsible for Th1 immune modulatory activity, has yet to be resolved. Therefore, FhTeg, a Nonidet P-40 extract, was subjected to a proteomic analysis in order to identify individual protein components. This was performed using an in house F. hepatica EST database following 2D electrophoresis combined with de novo se...

  12. Isolation and characterization of a T7-like lytic phage for Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the proven relevance of Pseudomonas fluorescens as a spoilage microorganism in milk, fresh meats and refrigerated food products and the recognized potential of bacteriophages as sanitation agents, so far no phages specific for P. fluorescens isolates from dairy industry have been closely characterized in view of their lytic efficiency. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a lytic phage capable to infect a variety of P. fluorescens strains isolated from Portuguese and United States dairy industries. Results Several phages were isolated which showed a different host spectrum and efficiency of lysis. One of the phages, phage ϕIBB-PF7A, was studied in detail due to its efficient lysis of a wide spectrum of P. fluorescens strains and ribotypes. Phage ϕIBB-PF7A with a head diameter of about 63 nm and a tail size of about 13 × 8 nm belongs morphologically to the Podoviridae family and resembles a typical T7-like phage, as analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The phage growth cycle with a detected latent period of 15 min, an eclipse period of 10 min, a burst size of 153 plaque forming units per infected cell, its genome size of approximately 42 kbp, and the size and N-terminal sequence of one of the protein bands, which gave similarity to the major capsid protein 10A, are consistent with this classification. Conclusion The isolated T7-like phage, phage ϕIBB-PF7A, is fast and efficient in lysing different P. fluorescens strains and may be a good candidate to be used as a sanitation agent to control the prevalence of spoilage causing P. fluorescens strains in dairy and food related environments.

  13. Structural characterization of Lytic Polysaccharide MonoOxygenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Kristian Erik Høpfner

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a new class of copper-containingmetalloenzymes that have been found to oxidatively degrade polysaccharides (and recently alsooligosaccharides). They dependent on redox partners to provide them with electrons and they utilizemolecular oxygen to cleave......) and their interaction with substratehave been structurally characterized. A number of structures of LsAA9A have been obtained in complexwith a range of cellulosic- and hemicellulosic substrates and with the active site Cu in different redox state.Two of the LsAA9A structures with the active site Cu in essentially a Cu...

  14. Azotobacter vinelandii metal storage protein: "classical" inorganic chemistry involved in Mo/W uptake and release processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemberg, Jörg; Schneider, Klaus; Fenske, Dirk; Müller, Achim

    2008-03-03

    The release of Mo (as molybdate) from the Mo storage protein (MoSto), which is unique among all existing metalloproteins, is strongly influenced by temperature and pH value; other factors (incubation time, protein concentration, degree of purity) have minor, though significant effects. A detailed pH titration at 12 degrees C revealed that three different steps can be distinguished for the Mo-release process. A proportion of approximately 15% at pH 6.8-7.0, an additional 25% at pH 7.2-7.5 and ca. 50% (up to 90% in total) at pH 7.6-7.8. This triphasic process supports the assumption of the presence of different types of molybdenum-oxide-based clusters that exhibit different pH lability. The complete release of Mo was achieved by increasing the temperature to 30 degrees C and the pH value to >7.5. The Mo-release process does not require ATP; on the contrary, ATP prevents, or at least reduces the degree of metal release, depending on the concentration of the nucleotide. From this point of view, the intracellular ATP concentration is suggested to play-in addition to the pH value-an indirect but crucial role in controlling the extent of Mo release in the cell. The binding of molybdenum to the apoprotein (reconstitution process) was confirmed to be directly dependent on the presence of a nucleotide (preferably ATP) and MgCl2. Maximal reincorporation of Mo required 1 mM ATP, which could partly be replaced by GTP. When the storage protein was purified in the presence of ATP and MgCl2 (1 mM each), the final preparation contained 80 Mo atoms per protein molecule. Maximal metal loading (110-115 atoms/MoSto molecule) was only achieved, if Mo was first completely released from the native protein and subsequently (re-) bound under optimal reconstitution conditions: 1 h incubation at pH 6.5 and 12 degrees C in the presence of ATP, MgCl2 and excess molybdate. A corresponding tungsten-containing storage protein ("WSto") could not only be synthesized in vivo by growing cells, but

  15. Double walled POE/PLGA microspheres: encapsulation of water-soluble and water-insoluble proteins and their release properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Meng; Yang, Yi-Yan; Chaw, Cheng-Shu; Goh, Suat-Hong; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Ng, Steve; Heller, Jorge

    2003-04-29

    The poly(orthoester) (POE)-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (50:50) (PLGA) double-walled microspheres with 50% POE in weight were loaded with hydrophilic bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hydrophobic cyclosporin A (CyA). Most of the BSA and CyA was entrapped within the shell and core, respectively, because of the difference in their hydrophilicity. The morphologies and release mechanisms of proteins-loaded double-walled POE/PLGA microspheres were investigated. Scanning electron microscope studies revealed that the CyA-BSA-loaded double-walled POE/PLGA microspheres yielded a more porous surface and PLGA shell than those without BSA. The neat POE and PLGA yielded slow and incomplete CyA and BSA release. In contrast, nearly complete BSA and more than 95% CyA were released in a sustained manner from the double-walled POE/PLGA microspheres. Both the BSA- and CyA-BSA-loaded POE/PLGA microspheres yielded a sustained BSA release over 5 days. The CyA release pattern of the CyA-loaded double-walled POE/PLGA microspheres was biphasic, characterized by a slow release over 15 days followed by a sustained release over 27 days. However, the CyA-BSA-loaded double-walled POE/PLGA microspheres provided a more constant and faster CyA release due to their more porous shell. In the CyA-BSA-loaded double-walled POE/PLGA microspheres system, the PLGA layer acted as a carrier for BSA and mild reservoir for CyA. During the first 5 days, most BSA was released from the shell but only 14% CyA was left from the microspheres. Subsequently, more than 80% CyA were released in the next 25 days. The distinct structure of double-walled POE/PLGA microspheres would make an interesting device for controlled delivery of therapeutic agents.

  16. Cross talk between EBV and telomerase: the role of TERT and NOTCH2 in the switch of latent/lytic cycle of the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunco, S; Celeghin, A; Gianesin, K; Dolcetti, R; Indraccolo, S; De Rossi, A

    2015-05-28

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated malignancies, as well as lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), obtained in vitro by EBV infection of B cells, express latent viral proteins and maintain their ability to grow indefinitely through inappropriate activation of telomere-specific reverse transcriptase (TERT), the catalytic component of telomerase. Our previous studies demonstrated that high levels of TERT expression in LCLs prevent the activation of EBV lytic cycle, which is instead triggered by TERT silencing. As lytic infection promotes the death of EBV-positive tumor cells, understanding the mechanism(s) by which TERT affects the latent/lytic status of EBV may be important for setting new therapeutic strategies. BATF, a transcription factor activated by NOTCH2, the major NOTCH family member in B cells, negatively affects the expression of BZLF1, the master regulator of viral lytic cycle. We therefore analyzed the interplay between TERT, NOTCH and BATF in LCLs and found that high levels of endogenous TERT are associated with high NOTCH2 and BATF expression levels. In addition, ectopic expression of TERT in LCLs with low levels of endogenous telomerase was associated with upregulation of NOTCH2 and BATF at both mRNA and protein levels. By contrast, infection of LCLs with retroviral vectors expressing functional NOTCH2 did not alter TERT transcript levels. Luciferase reporter assays, demonstrated that TERT significantly activated NOTCH2 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that NF-κB pathway is involved in TERT-induced NOTCH2 activation. Lastly, pharmacologic inhibition of NOTCH signaling triggers the EBV lytic cycle, leading to the death of EBV-infected cells. Overall, these results indicate that TERT contributes to preserve EBV latency in B cells mainly through the NOTCH2/BAFT pathway, and suggest that NOTCH2 inhibition may represent an appealing therapeutic strategy against EBV-associated malignancies.

  17. Role of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase in interleukin-6 release from isolated mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glund, Stephan; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Long, Yun Chau;

    2009-01-01

    IL-6 is released from skeletal muscle during exercise and has consequently been implicated to mediate beneficial effects on whole-body metabolism. Using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR), a pharmacological activator of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), we tested...... the hypothesis that AMPK modulates IL-6 release from isolated muscle. Skeletal muscle from AMPKalpha2 kinase-dead transgenic, AMPKalpha1 knockout (KO) and AMPKgamma3 KO mice and respective wild-type littermates was incubated in vitro, in the absence or presence of 2 mmol/liter AICAR. Skeletal muscle from wild......-type mice was also incubated with the AMPK activator A-769662. Incubation of mouse glycolytic extensor digitorum longus and oxidative soleus muscle for 2 h was associated with profound IL-6 mRNA production and protein release, which was suppressed by AICAR (P

  18. Controlled-release and preserved bioactivity of proteins from (self-assembled core-shell double-walled microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan W

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Weien Yuan1,2, Zhenguo Liu11Department of Neurology, Xinhua Hospital, affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2School of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: In order to address preserved protein bioactivities and protein sustained-release problems, a method for preparing double-walled microspheres with a core (protein-loaded nanoparticles with a polymer-suspended granule system-formed core and a second shell (a polymer-formed shell for controlled drug release and preserved protein bioactivities has been developed using (solid-in-oil phase-in-hydrophilic oil-in-water (S/O/Oh/W phases. The method, based on our previous microsphere preparation method (solid-in-oil phase-in-hydrophilic oil-in-water (S/O/Oh/W, employs different concentric poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide, poly(D,L-lactide, and protein-loaded nanoparticles to produce a suspended liquid which then self-assembles to form shell-core microspheres in the hydrophilic oil phase, which are then solidified in the water phase. Variations in the preparation parameters allowed complete encapsulation by the shell phase, including the efficient formation of a poly(D,L-lactide shell encapsulating a protein-loaded nanoparticle-based poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide core. This method produces core-shell double-walled microspheres that show controlled protein release and preserved protein bioactivities for 60 days. Based upon these results, we concluded that the core-shell double-walled microspheres might be applied for tissue engineering and therapy for chronic diseases, etc.Keywords: protein delivery, protein stability, core-shell microspheres, dextran nanoparticles

  19. Flavor release and perception of flavored whey protein gels: perception is determined by texture rather than by release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weel, Koen G C; Boelrijk, Alexandra E M; Alting, Arno C; Van Mil, Peter J J M; Burger, Jack J; Gruppen, Harry; Voragen, Alphons G J; Smit, Gerrit

    2002-08-28

    Five whey protein gels, with different gel hardnesses and waterholding capacities, were flavored with ethylbutyrate or diacetyl and evaluated by a 10-person panel to study the relation between the gel structure and the sensory perception, as well as the nosespace flavor concentration during eating. The sensory perception of the flavor compounds was measured by the time-intensity method, while simultaneously the nosespace flavor concentration was monitored by the MS-Nose. The nosespace flavor concentration was found to be independent of the gel hardness or waterholding capacity. However, significant changes in flavor intensity between the gels were perceived by the majority of the panelists, despite the fact that the panelists were instructed to focus only on flavor perception and to not take texture into account. From these observations it is concluded that the texture of gels determines perception of flavor intensity rather than the in-nose flavor concentration.

  20. Tailored protein release from biodegradable poly(ε-caprolactone-PEG)- b-poly(ε-caprolactone) multiblock-copolymer implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stankovic, Milica; Tomar, Jasmine; Hiemstra, Christine; Steendam, Rob; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the in vitro release of proteins from novel, biodegradable phase-separated poly(ε-caprolactone-PEG)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone), [PCL-PEG]-b-[PCL]) multiblock copolymers with different block ratios and with a low melting temperature (49-55 °C) was studied. The effect of block ratio and

  1. Subtype-specific suppression of Shiga toxin 2 released from Escherichia coli upon exposure to protein synthesis inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene Gantzhorn; Hansen, Claus; Riise, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Shiga toxins (Stx) are important virulence factors in the pathogenesis of severe disease including hemolytic-uremic syndrome, caused by Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). STEC strains increase the release of Stx in vitro following the addition of fluoroquinolones, whereas protein synthesis...

  2. Energy efficient bead milling of microalgae: Effect of bead size on disintegration and release of proteins and carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, P.R.; Suarez Garcia, E.; Safi, Carl; Yonathan, K.; Olivieri, G.; Barbosa, M.J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Eppink, M.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    The disintegration of three industry relevant algae (Chlorella vulgaris, Neochloris oleoabundans and Tetraselmis suecica) was studied in a lab scale bead mill at different bead sizes (0.3–1 mm). Cell disintegration, proteins and carbohydrates released into the water phase followed a first order

  3. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric (Van Andel)

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  4. Diurnal rhythm in expression and release of yolk protein in the testis of Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwica, Joanna; Joachimiak, Ewa; Polanska, Marta A; Majewska, Magdalena M; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M; Bebas, Piotr

    2011-04-01

    Circadian clocks (oscillators) regulate multiple life functions in insects. The circadian system located in the male reproductive tract of Lepidoptera is one of the best characterized peripheral oscillators in insects. Our previous research on the cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis, demonstrated that this oscillator controls the rhythm of sperm release from the testis and coordinates sperm maturation in the upper vas deferens (UVD). We demonstrated previously that a protein that functions as yolk protein in females is also produced in cyst cells surrounding sperm bundles in the testis, and is released into the UVD. Here, we investigated the temporal expression of the yolk protein 2 (yp2) gene at the mRNA and protein level in the testis of S. littoralis, and inquired whether their expression is regulated by PER-based molecular oscillator. We describe a circadian rhythm of YP2 accumulation in the UVD seminal fluid, where this protein interacts with sperm in a circadian fashion. However, we also demonstrate that yp2 mRNA and YP2 protein levels within cyst cells show only a diurnal rhythm in light/dark (LD) cycles. These rhythms do not persist in constant darkness (DD), suggesting that they are non-circadian. Interestingly, the per gene mRNA and protein levels in cyst cells are rhythmic in LD but not in DD. Nevertheless, per appears to be involved in the diurnal timing of YP2 protein accumulation in cyst cells.

  5. Hemoglobin is a co-factor of human trypanosome lytic factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Widener

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosome lytic factor (TLF is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL subclass providing innate protection to humans against infection by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Two primate-specific plasma proteins, haptoglobin-related protein (Hpr and apolipoprotein L-1 (ApoL-1, have been proposed to kill T. b. brucei both singularly or when co-assembled into the same HDL. To better understand the mechanism of T. b. brucei killing by TLF, the protein composition of TLF was investigated using a gentle immunoaffinity purification technique that avoids the loss of weakly associated proteins. HDL particles recovered by immunoaffinity absorption, with either anti-Hpr or anti-ApoL-1, were identical in protein composition and specific activity for T. b. brucei killing. Here, we show that TLF-bound Hpr strongly binds Hb and that addition of Hb stimulates TLF killing of T. b. brucei by increasing the affinity of TLF for its receptor, and by inducing Fenton chemistry within the trypanosome lysosome. These findings suggest that TLF in uninfected humans may be inactive against T. b. brucei prior to initiation of infection. We propose that infection of humans by T. b. brucei causes hemolysis that triggers the activation of TLF by the formation of Hpr-Hb complexes, leading to enhanced binding, trypanolytic activity, and clearance of parasites.

  6. Role of protein kinase C-delta in isoproterenol-induced amylase release in rat parotid acinar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiya, Hiroshi; Satoh, Keitaro; Matsuki-Fukushima, Miwako; Qi, Bing; Guo, Ming-Yu; Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko

    2009-01-01

    In parotid acinar cells, beta-adrenergic receptor activation results in accumulation of intracellular cAMP. Subsequently, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is activated and consequently amylase release is provoked. In this paper, we investigated involvement of protein kinase C-delta (PKC delta), a novel isoform of PKC, in amylase release induced by beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Amylase release stimulated with the beta-agonist isoproterenol (IPR) was inhibited by rottlerin, an inhibitor of PKC delta. IPR activated PKC delta and the effect of IPR were inhibited by a PKA inhibitor, H89. Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS), a major cellular substrate for PKC, was detected in rat parotid acinar cells, and a MARCKS inhibitor, MARCKS-related peptide, inhibited the IPR-induced amylase release. IPR stimulated MARCKS phosphorylation, which was found to be inhibited by H89 and rottlerin. These observations suggest that PKC delta activation is a downstream pathway of PKA activation and is involved in amylase release via MARCKS phosphorylation in rat parotid acinar cells stimulated with beta-adrenergic agonist.

  7. A Conserved Hydrophobic Core in Gαi1 Regulates G Protein Activation and Release from Activated Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ali I; Lokits, Alyssa D; Gilbert, James A; Iverson, T M; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi E

    2016-09-09

    G protein-coupled receptor-mediated heterotrimeric G protein activation is a major mode of signal transduction in the cell. Previously, we and other groups reported that the α5 helix of Gαi1, especially the hydrophobic interactions in this region, plays a key role during nucleotide release and G protein activation. To further investigate the effect of this hydrophobic core, we disrupted it in Gαi1 by inserting 4 alanine amino acids into the α5 helix between residues Gln(333) and Phe(334) (Ins4A). This extends the length of the α5 helix without disturbing the β6-α5 loop interactions. This mutant has high basal nucleotide exchange activity yet no receptor-mediated activation of nucleotide exchange. By using structural approaches, we show that this mutant loses critical hydrophobic interactions, leading to significant rearrangements of side chain residues His(57), Phe(189), Phe(191), and Phe(336); it also disturbs the rotation of the α5 helix and the π-π interaction between His(57) and Phe(189) In addition, the insertion mutant abolishes G protein release from the activated receptor after nucleotide binding. Our biochemical and computational data indicate that the interactions between α5, α1, and β2-β3 are not only vital for GDP release during G protein activation, but they are also necessary for proper GTP binding (or GDP rebinding). Thus, our studies suggest that this hydrophobic interface is critical for accurate rearrangement of the α5 helix for G protein release from the receptor after GTP binding.

  8. Inhibition of host protein synthesis by Sindbis virus: correlation with viral RNA replication and release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Miguel A; García-Moreno, Manuel; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Infection of mammalian cells by Sindbis virus (SINV) profoundly blocks cellular mRNA translation. Experimental evidence points to viral non-structural proteins (nsPs), in particular nsP2, as the mediator of this inhibition. However, individual expression of nsP1, nsP2, nsP3 or nsP1-4 does not block cellular protein synthesis in BHK cells. Trans-complementation of a defective SINV replicon lacking most of the coding region for nsPs by the co-expression of nsP1-4 propitiates viral RNA replication at low levels, and inhibition of cellular translation is not observed. Exit of nuclear proteins including T-cell intracellular antigen and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein is clearly detected in SINV-infected cells, but not upon the expression of nsPs, even when the defective replicon was complemented. Analysis of a SINV variant with a point mutation in nsP2, exhibiting defects in the shut-off of host protein synthesis, indicates that both viral RNA replication and the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm are greatly inhibited. Furthermore, nucleoside analogues that inhibit cellular and viral RNA synthesis impede the blockade of host mRNA translation, in addition to the release of nuclear proteins. Prevention of the shut-off of host mRNA translation by nucleoside analogues is not due to the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, as this prevention is also observed in PKR(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not phosphorylate eIF2α after SINV infection. Collectively, our observations are consistent with the concept that for the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis to occur, viral RNA replication must take place at control levels, leading to the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm.

  9. Controlled protein release from electrospun biodegradable fiber mesh composed of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene oxide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taek Gyoung; Lee, Doo Sung; Park, Tae Gwan

    2007-06-29

    A blend mixture of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was electrospun to produce fibrous meshes that could release a protein drug in a controlled manner. Various biodegradable polymers, such as poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA), poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL), and poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) were dissolved, along with PEO and lysozyme, in a mixture of chloroform and dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The mixture was electrospun to produce lysozyme loaded fibrous meshes. Among the polymers, the PCL/PEO blend meshes showed good morphological stability upon incubation in the buffer solution, resulting in controlled release of lysozyme over an extended period with reduced initial bursts. With varying the PCL/PEO blending ratio, the release rate of lysozyme from the corresponding meshes could be readily modulated. The lysozyme release was facilitated by increasing the amount of PEO, indicating that entrapped lysozyme was mainly released out by controlled dissolution of PEO from the blend meshes. Lysozyme released from the electrospun fibers retained sufficient catalytic activity.

  10. Genome wide nucleosome mapping for HSV-1 shows nucleosomes are deposited at preferred positions during lytic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F; Chen, Eric Z; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W; Isett, R Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A; Fraser, Nigel W

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200 bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6 hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152 kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes.

  11. Supercritical synthesis of poly (2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)/ferrite nanocomposites for real-time monitoring of protein release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Gunjan; Zaidi, M G H

    2015-06-01

    A supercritical carbon dioxide (SCC)-assisted process was developed to synthesize protein-supported poly (2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)/ferrite nanocomposites (PNCs). The process involve 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile-initiated in situ polymerization of 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate in presence of ferrite nanoparticles and bisacrylamide at 90 ± 1 °C, 1200 psi over 6 h in SCC. This was followed by subsequent loading of bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein over PNCs in phosphate buffer (PBS, pH 7.4) at 1200 psi, 35 ± 1 °C over additional 2 h in SCC. The formation of PNCs was ascertained through ultraviolet-visible, Fourier transform-infrared, X-ray diffraction spectra, transmission electron, atomic force microscopy and magnetometry. The developed process extends large scale production of nanomagnetic PNCs suitable as carrier for protein release applications with optimal release properties. The release of protein from PNCs under in vitro in PBS down to nanomolar range with high temporal resolution, speed and reproducibility was quantified through square wave voltammetry.

  12. Activation of phagocytic cells by Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms: effects of extracellular matrix proteins and the bacterial stress protein GroEL on netosis and MRP-14 release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Gaida, Matthias M; Meyle, Eva; Prior, Birgit; Hänsch, Gertrud M

    2016-07-01

    The recognition and phagocytosis of free-swimming (planktonic) bacteria by polymorphonuclear neutrophils have been investigated in depth. However, less is known about the neutrophil response towards bacterial biofilms. Our previous work demonstrated that neutrophils recognize activating entities within the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of biofilms (the bacterial heat shock protein GroEL) and that this process does not require opsonization. Aim of this study was to evaluate the release of DNA by neutrophils in response to biofilms, as well as the release of the inflammatory cytokine MRP-14. Neutrophils were stimulated with Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms, planktonic bacteria, extracted EPS and GroEL. Release of DNA and of MRP-14 was evaluated. Furthermore, tissue samples from patients suffering from biofilm infections were collected and evaluated by histology. MRP-14 concentration in blood samples was measured. We were able to show that biofilms, the EPS and GroEL induce DNA release. MRP-14 was only released after stimulation with EPS, not GroEL. Histology of tissue samples revealed MRP-14 positive cells in association with neutrophil infiltration and MRP-14 concentration was elevated in blood samples of patients suffering from biofilm infections. Our data demonstrate that neutrophil-activating entities are present in the EPS and that GroEL induces DNA release by neutrophils.

  13. Analysis of the embryo proteome of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) seeds reveals a distinct class of proteins regulating dormancy release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowski, Tomasz Andrzej; Staszak, Aleksandra Maria

    2016-05-20

    Acer pseudoplatanus seeds are characterized by a deep physiological embryo dormancy that requires a few weeks of cold stratification in order to promote germination. Understanding the function of proteins and their related metabolic pathways, in conjunction with the plant hormones implicated in the breaking of seed dormancy, would expand our knowledge pertaining to this process. In this study, a proteomic approach was used to analyze the changes occurring in seeds in response to cold stratification, which leads to dormancy release. In addition, the involvement of abscisic (ABA) and gibberellic acids (GA) was also examined. Fifty-three proteins showing significant changes were identified by mass spectrometry. An effect of ABA on protein variation was observed at the beginning of stratification, while the influence of GA on protein abundance was observed during the middle phase of stratification. The majority of proteins associated with dormancy breaking in the presence of only water, and also ABA or GA, were classified as being involved in metabolism and genetic information processing. For metabolic-related proteins, the effect of ABA on protein abundance was stimulatory for half of the proteins and inhibitory for half of the proteins. On the other hand, the effect on genetic information processing related proteins was stimulatory. GA was found to upregulate both metabolic-related and genetic information processing-related proteins. While seed dormancy breaking depends on proteins involved in a variety of processes, proteins associated with methionine metabolism (adenosine kinase, methionine synthase) and glycine-rich RNA binding proteins appear to be of particular importance.

  14. Effects of Chitosan Concentration on the Protein Release Behaviour of Electrospun Poly(ε-caprolactone/Chitosan Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Roozbahani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ε-caprolactone/chitosan (PCL/chitosan blend nanofibers with different ratios of chitosan were electrospun from a formic acid/acetic acid (FA/AA solvent system. Bovine serum albumin (BSA was used as a model protein to incorporate biochemical cues into the nanofibrous scaffolds. The morphological characteristics of PCL/chitosan and PCL/chitosan/BSA Nanofibers were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR was used to detect the presence of polymeric ingredients and BSA in the Nanofibers. The effects of the polymer blend ratio and BSA concentration on the morphological characteristics and consequently on the BSA release pattern were evaluated. The average fiber diameter and pore size were greater in Nanofibers containing BSA. The chitosan ratio played a significant role in the BSA release profile from the PCL/chitosan/BSA blend. Nanofibrous scaffolds with higher chitosan ratios exhibited less intense bursts in the BSA release profile.

  15. Release retardation of model protein on polyelectrolyte-coated PLGA nano- and microparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Nugraha

    Full Text Available PEM capsules have been proposed for vehicles of drug microencapsulation, with the release triggered by pH, salt, magnetic field, or light. When built on another carrier encapsulating drugs, such as nanoparticles, it could provide additional release barrier to the releasing drug, providing further control to drug release. Although liposomes have received considerable attention with PEM coating for sustained drug release, similar results employing PEM built on poly(lactic-co-lycolic acid (PLGA particles is scant. In this work, we demonstrate that the build-up pH and polyelectrolyte pairs of PEM affect the release retardation of BSA from PLGA particles. PAH/PSS pair, the most commonly used polyelectrolyte pair, was used in comparison with PLL/DES. In addition, we also demonstrate that the release retardation effect of PEM-coated PLGA particles diminishes as the particle size increases. We attribute this to the diminishing relative thickness of the PEM coating with respect to the size of the particle as the particle size increases, reducing the diffusional resistance of the PEM.

  16. Release retardation of model protein on polyelectrolyte-coated PLGA nano- and microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, Chandra; Bora, Meghali; Venkatraman, Subbu S

    2014-01-01

    PEM capsules have been proposed for vehicles of drug microencapsulation, with the release triggered by pH, salt, magnetic field, or light. When built on another carrier encapsulating drugs, such as nanoparticles, it could provide additional release barrier to the releasing drug, providing further control to drug release. Although liposomes have received considerable attention with PEM coating for sustained drug release, similar results employing PEM built on poly(lactic-co-lycolic acid) (PLGA) particles is scant. In this work, we demonstrate that the build-up pH and polyelectrolyte pairs of PEM affect the release retardation of BSA from PLGA particles. PAH/PSS pair, the most commonly used polyelectrolyte pair, was used in comparison with PLL/DES. In addition, we also demonstrate that the release retardation effect of PEM-coated PLGA particles diminishes as the particle size increases. We attribute this to the diminishing relative thickness of the PEM coating with respect to the size of the particle as the particle size increases, reducing the diffusional resistance of the PEM.

  17. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabishvili, Maia; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Kropinski, Andrew M; Mast, Jan; De Vos, Daniel; Verbeken, Gilbert; Noben, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively), high burst size (125 and 145, respectively), stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  18. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Merabishvili

    Full Text Available Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively, high burst size (125 and 145, respectively, stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  19. Increased Lytic Efficiency of Bovine Macrophages Trained with Killed Mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste, Ramon A.; Alonso-Hearn, Marta; Garrido, Joseba M.; Abendaño, Naiara; Sevilla, Iker A.; Gortazar, Christian; de la Fuente, José; Dominguez, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity is evolutionarily conserved in multicellular organisms and was considered to lack memory until very recently. One of its more characteristic mechanisms is phagocytosis, the ability of cells to engulf, process and eventually destroy any injuring agent. We report the results of an ex vivo experiment in bovine macrophages in which improved clearance of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) was induced by pre-exposure to a heat killed M. bovis preparation. The effects were independent of humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses and lasted up to six months. Specifically, our results demonstrate the existence of a training effect in the lytic phase of phagocytosis that can be activated by killed mycobacteria, thus suggesting a new mechanism of vaccine protection. These findings are compatible with the recently proposed concept of trained immunity, which was developed to explain the observation that innate immune responses provide unspecific protection against pathogens including other than those that originally triggered the immune response. PMID:27820836

  20. Structural characterization of Lytic Polysaccharide MonoOxygenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Kristian Erik Høpfner

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a new class of copper-containingmetalloenzymes that have been found to oxidatively degrade polysaccharides (and recently alsooligosaccharides). They dependent on redox partners to provide them with electrons and they utilizemolecular oxygen to cleave......) and their interaction with substratehave been structurally characterized. A number of structures of LsAA9A have been obtained in complexwith a range of cellulosic- and hemicellulosic substrates and with the active site Cu in different redox state.Two of the LsAA9A structures with the active site Cu in essentially a Cu......(II) state show differences in thenature of the Cu-ligand with and without cellulosic substrate bound and provide structural insight into themechanistic action of LPMOs. Interestingly, for an LsAA9A complex structure with a hemicellulosicsubstrate (xylooligosaccharide) a corresponding difference...

  1. A comparative study on the activity of fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for the depolymerization of cellulose in soybean spent flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brian C; Agger, Jane Wittrup; Zhang, Zhenghong; Wichmann, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S

    2017-09-08

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-dependent enzymes capable of the oxidative breakdown of polysaccharides. They are of industrial interest due to their ability to enhance the enzymatic depolymerization of recalcitrant substrates by glycoside hydrolases. In this paper, twenty-four lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) expressed in Trichoderma reesei were evaluated for their ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides in soybean spent flakes, an abundant and industrially relevant substrate. TrCel61A, a soy-polysaccharide-active AA9 LPMO from T. reesei, was used as a benchmark in this evaluation. In total, seven LPMOs demonstrated activity on pretreated soy spent flakes, with the products from enzymatic treatments evaluated using mass spectrometry and high performance anion exchange chromatography. The hydrolytic boosting effect of the top-performing enzymes was evaluated in combination with endoglucanase and beta-glucosidase. Two enzymes (TrCel61A and Aspte6) showed the ability to release more than 36% of the pretreated soy spent flake glucose - a greater than 75% increase over the same treatment without LPMO addition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Study on the rheological properties and volatile release of cold-set emulsion-filled protein gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Like; Roos, Yrjö H; Miao, Song

    2014-11-26

    Emulsion-filled protein gels (EFP gels) were prepared through a cold-set gelation process, and they were used to deliver volatile compounds. An increase in the whey protein isolate (WPI) content from 4 to 6% w/w did not show significant effect on the gelation time, whereas an increase in the oil content from 5 to 20% w/w resulted in an earlier onset of gelation. Gels with a higher WPI content had a higher storage modulus and water-holding capacity (WHC), and they presented a higher force and strain at breaking, indicating that a more compact gel network was formed. An increase in the oil content contributed to gels with a higher storage modulus and force at breaking; however, this increase did not affect the WHC of the gels, and gels with a higher oil content became more brittle, resulting in a decreased strain at breaking. GC headspace analysis showed that volatiles released at lower rates and had lower air-gel partition coefficients in EFP gels than those in ungelled counterparts. Gels with a higher WPI content had lower release rates and partition coefficients of the volatiles. A change in the oil content significantly modified the partition of volatiles at equilibrium, but it produced a minor effect on the release rate of the volatiles. The findings indicated that EFP gels could be potentially used to modulate volatile release by varying the rheological properties of the gel.

  3. Interactions between Surfactants in Solution and Electrospun Protein Fibers: Effects on Release Behavior and Fiber Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    ), a cationic surfactant (benzalkonium chloride), and a neutral surfactant (Triton X-100) were studied. The anionic surfactants increased the insulin release in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the neutral surfactant had no significant effect on the release. Interestingly, only minute amounts...... of insulin were released from the fibers when benzalkonium chloride was present. The FSP-Ins fibers appeared dense after incubation with this cationic surfactant, whereas high fiber porosity was observed after incubation with anionic or neutral surfactants. Contact angle measurements and staining...

  4. Extracytoplasmic proteases determining the cleavage and release of secreted proteins, lipoproteins, and membrane proteins in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnappa, Laxmi; Dreisbach, Annette; Otto, Andreas; Goosens, Vivianne J; Cranenburgh, Rocky M; Harwood, Colin R; Becher, Dörte; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2013-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are known to export many proteins to the cell wall and growth medium, and accordingly, many studies have addressed the respective protein export mechanisms. In contrast, very little is known about the subsequent fate of these proteins. The present studies were therefore aimed

  5. Global Analysis of Palmitoylated Proteins in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foe, Ian T; Child, Matthew A; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Krishnamurthy, Shruthi; van der Linden, Wouter A; Ward, Gary E; Martin, Brent R; Bogyo, Matthew

    2015-10-14

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as palmitoylation are critical for the lytic cycle of the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. While palmitoylation is involved in invasion, motility, and cell morphology, the proteins that utilize this PTM remain largely unknown. Using a chemical proteomic approach, we report a comprehensive analysis of palmitoylated proteins in T. gondii, identifying a total of 282 proteins, including cytosolic, membrane-associated, and transmembrane proteins. From this large set of palmitoylated targets, we validate palmitoylation of proteins involved in motility (myosin light chain 1, myosin A), cell morphology (PhIL1), and host cell invasion (apical membrane antigen 1, AMA1). Further studies reveal that blocking AMA1 palmitoylation enhances the release of AMA1 and other invasion-related proteins from apical secretory organelles, suggesting a previously unrecognized role for AMA1. These findings suggest that palmitoylation is ubiquitous throughout the T. gondii proteome and reveal insights into the biology of this important human pathogen.

  6. Evaluation of folic acid release from spray dried powder particles of pectin-whey protein nano-capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadpour, Elham; Jafari, Seid-Mahdi; Maghsoudlou, Yahya

    2017-02-01

    Our main goal was to evaluate release kinetics of nano-encapsulated folic acid within a double W1/O/W2 emulsion. First, W1/O nano-emulsions loaded with folic acid were prepared and re-emulsified into an aqueous phase (W2) containing single whey protein concentrate (WPC) layer or double layer complex of WPC-pectin to form W1/O/W2 emulsions. Final double emulsions were spray dried and their microstructure was analyzed in terms of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Also the release trends of folic acid were determined and fitted with experimental models of zero and first order, Higuchi, and Hixson-Crowell. It was revealed that folic acid nano-capsules made with Span as the surfactant had the lowest release rate in acidic conditions (pH=4) and highest release in the alkaline conditions (pH=11). The best model fitting for folic acid release data was observed for single layer WPC encapsulated powders with the highest R(2). Our FTIR data showed there was no chemical interaction between WPC and pectin in double layered capsules and based on SEM results, single WPC layered capsules resulted in smooth and uniform particles which by incorporating pectin, some wrinkles and shrinkage were found in the surface of spray dried powder particles.

  7. Redox proteomics of the inflammatory secretome identifies a common set of redoxins and other glutathionylated proteins released in inflammation, influenza virus infection and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Checconi

    Full Text Available Protein cysteines can form transient disulfides with glutathione (GSH, resulting in the production of glutathionylated proteins, and this process is regarded as a mechanism by which the redox state of the cell can regulate protein function. Most studies on redox regulation of immunity have focused on intracellular proteins. In this study we have used redox proteomics to identify those proteins released in glutathionylated form by macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS after pre-loading the cells with biotinylated GSH. Of the several proteins identified in the redox secretome, we have selected a number for validation. Proteomic analysis indicated that LPS stimulated the release of peroxiredoxin (PRDX 1, PRDX2, vimentin (VIM, profilin1 (PFN1 and thioredoxin 1 (TXN1. For PRDX1 and TXN1, we were able to confirm that the released protein is glutathionylated. PRDX1, PRDX2 and TXN1 were also released by the human pulmonary epithelial cell line, A549, infected with influenza virus. The release of the proteins identified was inhibited by the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (DEX, which also inhibited tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α release, and by thiol antioxidants (N-butanoyl GSH derivative, GSH-C4, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC, which did not affect TNF-α production. The proteins identified could be useful as biomarkers of oxidative stress associated with inflammation, and further studies will be required to investigate if the extracellular forms of these proteins has immunoregulatory functions.

  8. Involvement of Noxa in mediating cellular ER stress responses to lytic virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosebeck, Shaun; Sudini, Kuladeep; Chen, Tiannan; Leaman, Douglas W

    2011-09-01

    Noxa is a Bcl-2 homology domain-containing pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein. Noxa mRNA and protein expression are upregulated by dsRNA or virus, and ectopic Noxa expression enhances cellular sensitivity to virus or dsRNA-induced apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that Noxa null baby mouse kidney (BMK) cells are deficient in normal cytopathic response to lytic viruses, and that reconstitution of the knockout cells with wild-type Noxa restored normal cytopathic responses. Noxa regulation by virus mirrored its regulation by proteasome inhibitors or ER stress inducers and the ER stress response inhibitor salubrinal protected cells against viral cytopathic effects. Noxa mRNA and protein were synergistically upregulated by IFN or dsRNA when combined with ER stress inducers, leading to Noxa/Mcl-1 interaction, activation of Bax and pro-apoptotic caspases, degradation of Mcl-1, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and initiation of apoptosis. These data highlight the importance of ER stress in augmenting the expression of Noxa following viral infection.

  9. Tick saliva increases production of three chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a histamine-releasing cytokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhansová, H; Bopp, T; Schmitt, E; Kopecký, J

    2015-02-01

    The effect of Ixodes ricinus tick saliva on the production of various cytokines and chemokines by mouse splenocytes was tested by a cytokine array. We demonstrated a strong upregulation of three chemokines, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), thymus-derived chemotactic agent 3 (TCA-3) and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2). MCP-1 could be induced by tick saliva itself. While TCA-3 and MIP-2 are engaged in Th2 polarization of the host immune response associated with tick feeding, MCP-1 may act as a histamine release factor, increasing blood flow into the feeding lesion thus facilitating tick engorgement in the late, rapid feeding phase.

  10. Biodegradable Magnetic Silica@Iron Oxide Nanovectors with Ultra-Large Mesopores for High Protein Loading, Magnetothermal Release, and Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Omar, Haneen

    2016-11-29

    The delivery of large cargos of diameter above 15 nm for biomedical applications has proved challenging since it requires biocompatible, stably-loaded, and biodegradable nanomaterials. In this study, we describe the design of biodegradable silica-iron oxide hybrid nanovectors with large mesopores for large protein delivery in cancer cells. The mesopores of the nanomaterials spanned from 20 to 60 nm in diameter and post-functionalization allowed the electrostatic immobilization of large proteins (e.g. mTFP-Ferritin, ~ 534 kDa). Half of the content of the nanovectors was based with iron oxide nanophases which allowed the rapid biodegradation of the carrier in fetal bovine serum and a magnetic responsiveness. The nanovectors released large protein cargos in aqueous solution under acidic pH or magnetic stimuli. The delivery of large proteins was then autonomously achieved in cancer cells via the silica-iron oxide nanovectors, which is thus a promising for biomedical applications.

  11. Biocompatibility of a coacervate-based controlled release system for protein delivery to the injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauck, Britta M; Novosat, Tabitha L; Oudega, Martin; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of protein-based therapies for treating injured nervous tissue is limited by the short half-life of free proteins in the body. Affinity-based biomaterial delivery systems provide sustained release of proteins, thereby extending the efficacy of such therapies. Here, we investigated the biocompatibility of a novel coacervate delivery system based on poly(ethylene argininylaspartate diglyceride) (PEAD) and heparin in the damaged spinal cord. We found that the presence of the [PEAD:heparin] coacervate did not affect the macrophage response, glial scarring or nervous tissue loss, which are hallmarks of spinal cord injury. Moreover, the density of axons, including serotonergic axons, at the injury site and the recovery of motor and sensorimotor function were comparable in rats with and without the coacervate. These results revealed the biocompatibility of our delivery system and supported its potential to deliver therapeutic proteins to the injured nervous system.

  12. Cholesterol Alters the Dynamics of Release in Protein Independent Cell Models for Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafinobar, Neda; Mellander, Lisa J.; Kurczy, Michael E.; Dunevall, Johan; Angerer, Tina B.; Fletcher, John S.; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2016-09-01

    Neurons communicate via an essential process called exocytosis. Cholesterol, an abundant lipid in both secretory vesicles and cell plasma membrane can affect this process. In this study, amperometric recordings of vesicular dopamine release from two different artificial cell models created from a giant unilamellar liposome and a bleb cell plasma membrane, show that with higher membrane cholesterol the kinetics for vesicular release are decelerated in a concentration dependent manner. This reduction in exocytotic speed was consistent for two observed modes of exocytosis, full and partial release. Partial release events, which only occurred in the bleb cell model due to the higher tension in the system, exhibited amperometric spikes with three distinct shapes. In addition to the classic transient, some spikes displayed a current ramp or plateau following the maximum peak current. These post spike features represent neurotransmitter release from a dilated pore before constriction and show that enhancing membrane rigidity via cholesterol adds resistance to a dilated pore to re-close. This implies that the cholesterol dependent biophysical properties of the membrane directly affect the exocytosis kinetics and that membrane tension along with membrane rigidity can influence the fusion pore dynamics and stabilization which is central to regulation of neurochemical release.

  13. Release and protein binding of components from resin based composites in native saliva and other extraction media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothmund, Lena; Shehata, Mostafa; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Schweikl, Helmut; Carell, Thomas; Geurtsen, Werner; Hellwig, Elmar; Hickel, Reinhard; Reichl, Franz-Xaver; Högg, Christof

    2015-05-01

    Unpolymerized (co)monomers and additives can be released from resin based composites (RBCs) and can enter the human organism. In this study, the binding of ingredients from composites to salivary proteins and plasma proteins was investigated. The composites investigated were Admira(®) flow, Venus(®) Diamond flow, Filtek™ Supreme XTE flow, Tetric EvoCeram(®), Tetric EvoFlow(®). The samples (n=4) were polymerized according to the instructions of the manufacturer of RBCs. The samples were immersed into native saliva, protein-free saliva (artificial saliva), water and ethyl acetate, and incubated at 37°C for 24h or 72h. The eluates were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. To determine the binding to salivary proteins, the concentration of (co)monomers and additives detected in native saliva was compared to the concentration of (co)monomers and additives detected in protein-free saliva, water and ethyl acetate respectively. To assess the affinity of TEGDMA, EGDMA, DEGDMA, PMGDMA, BPA, and DCHP to human serum albumin (HSA) and human α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), a plasma protein binding assay (ABNOVA, Transil XL PPB Prediction Kit TMP-0212-2096) was performed. The statistical significance (psaliva was significantly lower than the concentration released in protein-free saliva or water (Admira(®) flow: concentration of TEGDMA after 72h: 0.08 mmol/L (native saliva), 0.34 mmol/L (protein-free saliva), 0.39 mmol/L (water)). The concentrations of HEMA, EGDMA, DDDMA and CQ released in native saliva remained even below the detection limit, compared to the other extraction media. Protein binding of the tested methacrylates to HSA+AGP was 82-85%, the binding of DCHP was 96.6%, and the binding of BPA was 95.2%. Artificial saliva or water as extraction medium does not reflect the real physiological situation in the body. Salivary and plasma proteins may bind (co)monomers and additives and may thereby contribute to a lower bioavailability of leachables from RBCs

  14. Dipicolinic Acid Release by Germinating Clostridium difficile Spores Occurs through a Mechanosensing Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Classically, dormant endospores are defined by their resistance properties, particularly their resistance to heat. Much of the heat resistance is due to the large amount of dipicolinic acid (DPA) stored within the spore core. During spore germination, DPA is released and allows for rehydration of the otherwise-dehydrated core. In Bacillus subtilis, 7 proteins are encoded by the spoVA operon and are important for DPA release. These proteins receive a signal from the activated germinant receptor and release DPA. This DPA activates the cortex lytic enzyme CwlJ, and cortex degradation begins. In Clostridium difficile, spore germination is initiated in response to certain bile acids and amino acids. These bile acids interact with the CspC germinant receptor, which then transfers the signal to the CspB protease. Activated CspB cleaves the cortex lytic enzyme, pro-SleC, to its active form. Subsequently, DPA is released from the core. C. difficile encodes orthologues of spoVAC, spoVAD, and spoVAE. Of these, the B. subtilis SpoVAC protein was shown to be capable of mechanosensing. Because cortex degradation precedes DPA release during C. difficile spore germination (opposite of what occurs in B. subtilis), we hypothesized that cortex degradation would relieve the osmotic constraints placed on the inner spore membrane and permit DPA release. Here, we assayed germination in the presence of osmolytes, and we found that they can delay DPA release from germinating C. difficile spores while still permitting cortex degradation. Together, our results suggest that DPA release during C. difficile spore germination occurs though a mechanosensing mechanism. IMPORTANCE Clostridium difficile is transmitted between hosts in the form of a dormant spore, and germination by C. difficile spores is required to initiate infection, because the toxins that are necessary for disease are not deposited on the spore form. Importantly, the C. difficile spore germination pathway

  15. Produção, purificação, clonagem e aplicação de enzimas líticas Production, purification, cloning and application of lytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Francisco Fleuri

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Lytic enzymes such as beta-1,3 glucanases, proteases and chitinases are able to hydrolyse, respectively, beta-1,3 glucans, mannoproteins and chitin, as well as the cell walls of many yeast species. Lytic enzymes are useful in a great variety of applications including the preparation of protoplasts; the extraction of proteins, enzymes, pigments and functional carbohydrates; pre-treatment for the mechanical rupture of cells; degradation of residual yeast cell mass for the preparation of animal feed; analysis of the yeast cell wall structure and composition; study of the yeast cell wall synthesis and the control of pathogenic fungi. This review presents the most important aspects with respect to lytic enzymes, especially their production, purification, cloning and application.

  16. A regulator of G Protein signaling, RGS3, inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-stimulated luteinizing hormone (LH secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musgrove Lois C

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Luteinizing hormone secreted by the anterior pituitary gland regulates gonadal function. Luteinizing hormone secretion is regulated both by alterations in gonadotrope responsiveness to hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone and by alterations in gonadotropin releasing hormone secretion. The mechanisms that determine gonadotrope responsiveness are unknown but may involve regulators of G protein signaling (RGSs. These proteins act by antagonizing or abbreviating interaction of Gα proteins with effectors such as phospholipase Cβ. Previously, we reported that gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated second messenger inositol trisphosphate production was inhibited when RGS3 and gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor cDNAs were co-transfected into the COS cell line. Here, we present evidence for RGS3 inhibition of gonadotropin releasing hormone-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from cultured rat pituitary cells. Results A truncated version of RGS3 (RGS3T = RGS3 314–519 inhibited gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated inositol trisphosphate production more potently than did RSG3 in gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor-bearing COS cells. An RSG3/glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein bound more 35S-Gqα than any other member of the G protein family tested. Adenoviral-mediated RGS3 gene transfer in pituitary gonadotropes inhibited gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated luteinizing hormone secretion in a dose-related fashion. Adeno-RGS3 also inhibited gonadotropin releasing hormone stimulated 3H-inositol phosphate accumulation, consistent with a molecular site of action at the Gqα protein. Conclusions RGS3 inhibits gonadotropin releasing hormone-stimulated second messenger production (inositol trisphosphate as well as luteinizing hormone secretion from rat pituitary gonadotropes apparently by binding and suppressing the transduction properties of Gqα protein function. A version of RGS3 that is amino

  17. Protein alterations induced by long-term agonist treatment of HEK293 cells expressing thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor and G11alpha protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drastichova, Zdenka; Bourova, Lenka; Hejnova, Lucie; Jedelsky, Petr; Svoboda, Petr; Novotny, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether sustained stimulation with thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), a peptide with important physiological functions, can possibly affect expression of plasma membrane proteins in HEK293 cells expressing high levels of TRH receptor and G(11)alpha protein. Our previous experiments using silver-stained two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoretograms did not reveal any significant changes in an overall composition of membrane microdomain proteins after long-term treatment with TRH of these cells (Matousek et al. 2005 Cell Biochem Biophys 42: 21-40). Here we used a purified plasma membrane fraction prepared by Percoll gradient centrifugation and proteins resolved by 2D electrophoresis were stained with SYPRO Ruby gel stain. The high enrichment in plasma membrane proteins of this preparation was confirmed by a multifold increase in the number of TRH receptors and agonist stimulated G-protein activity, compared to postnuclear supernatant. By a combination of these approaches we were able to determine a number of clearly discernible protein changes in the plasma membrane-enriched fraction isolated from cells treated with TRH (1 x 10(-5) M, 16 h): 4 proteins disappeared, the level of 18 proteins decreased and the level of 39 proteins increased. Our concomitant immunochemical determinations also indicated a clear down-regulation of G(q/11)alpha proteins in preparations from hormone-treated cells. In parallel, we observed decrease in caspase 3 and alterations in some other apoptotic marker proteins, which were in line with the presumed antiapoptotic effect of TRH.

  18. Complete Genome Sequences of Lytic Bacteriophages of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamales, Julio; Vasquez, Ignacio; Santos, Leonardo; Segovia, Cristopher; Ayala, Manuel; Alvarado, Romina; Nuñez, Pablo; Santander, Javier

    2016-06-02

    Three bacteriophages, f20-Xaj, f29-Xaj, and f30-Xaj, with lytic activity against Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis were isolated from walnut trees (VIII Bío Bío Region, Chile). These lytic bacteriophages have double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes of 43,851 bp, 41,865 bp, and 44,262 bp, respectively. These are the first described bacteriophages with lytic activity against X. arboricola pv. juglandis that can be utilized as biocontrol agents.

  19. Specific association of growth-associated protein 43 with calcium release units in skeletal muscles of lower vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.A. Caprara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43, is a strictly conserved protein among vertebrates implicated in neuronal development and neurite branching. Since GAP43 structure contains a calmodulin-binding domain, this protein is able to bind calmodulin and gather it nearby membrane network, thus regulating cytosolic calcium and consequently calcium-dependent intracellular events. Even if for many years GAP43 has been considered a neuronal-specific protein, evidence from different laboratories described its presence in myoblasts, myotubes and adult skeletal muscle fibers. Data from our laboratory showed that GAP43 is localized between calcium release units (CRUs and mitochondria in mammalian skeletal muscle suggesting that, also in skeletal muscle, this protein can be a key player in calcium/calmodulin homeostasis. However, the previous studies could not clearly distinguish between a mitochondrion- or a triad-related positioning of GAP43. To solve this question, the expression and localization of GAP43 was studied in skeletal muscle of Xenopus and Zebrafish known to have triads located at the level of the Z-lines and mitochondria not closely associated with them. Western blotting and immunostaining experiments revealed the expression of GAP43 also in skeletal muscle of lower vertebrates (like amphibians and fishes, and that the protein is localized closely to the triad junction. Once more, these results and GAP43 structural features, support an involvement of the protein in the dynamic intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, a common conserved role among the different species.

  20. Hydrogel Layers on the Surface of Polyester-Based Materials for Improvement of Their Biointeractions and Controlled Release of Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Korzhikov-Vlakh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The modification of bioresorbable polyester surfaces in order to alter their biointeractions presents an important problem in biomedical polymer science. In this study, the covalent modification of the surface of poly(lactic acid-based (PLA-based films with poly(acryl amide and sodium alginate hydrogels was performed to change the non-specific polyester interaction with proteins and cells, as well as to make possible the covalent attachment of low-molecular weight ligands and to control protein release. The effect of such modification on the film surface properties was studied. Parameters such as swelling, water contact angle, surface area, and binding capacity of low-molecular weight substances were evaluated and compared. The comparative study of adsorption of model protein (BSA on the surface of non-modified and modified films was investigated and the protein release was evaluated. Cell viability on the surface of hydrogel-coated films was also tested. The developed approach could be applied for the modification of PLA-based scaffolds for tissue engineering and will be further studied for molecular-imprinting of biomolecules on the surface of polyester-based materials for control of biointeractions.

  1. Outer membrane protein A, peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein, and murein lipoprotein are released by Escherichia coli bacteria into serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, J; Loiselle, P M; Tehan, M M; Allaire, J E; Boyle, L A; Kurnick, J T; Andrews, D M; Sik Kim, K; Warren, H S

    2000-05-01

    Complexes containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and three outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are released by gram-negative bacteria incubated in human serum and into the circulation in an experimental model of sepsis. The same OMPs are bound by immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the cross-protective antiserum raised to Escherichia coli J5 (anti-J5 IgG). This study was performed to identify the three OMPs. The 35-kDa OMP was identified as outer membrane protein A (OmpA) by immunoblotting studies using OmpA-deficient bacteria and recombinant OmpA protein. The 18-kDa OMP was identified as peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) based on peptide sequences from the purified protein and immunoblotting studies using PAL-deficient bacteria. The 5- to 9-kDa OMP was identified as murein lipoprotein (MLP) based on immunoblotting studies using MLP-deficient bacteria. The studies identify the OMPs released into human serum and into the circulation in an experimental model of sepsis as OmpA, PAL, and MLP.

  2. A new method for the production of gelatin microparticles for controlled protein release from porous polymeric scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkizilcik, Asya; Tuzlakoglu, Kadriye

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering using scaffolds and growth factors is a crucial approach in bone regeneration and repair. The combination of bioactive agents carrying microparticles with porous scaffolds can be an efficient solution when controlled release of bio-signalling molecules is required. The present study was based on a recent approach using a biodegradable scaffold and protein-loaded microparticles produced in an innovative manner in which protein loss is minimized during the loading process. Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-loaded gelatin microparticles were obtained by grinding freeze-dried membranes of gelatin and BSA. Porous scaffolds (250-355 µm pore size) produced from a polyactide (PLLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) blend by salt leaching/supercritical CO₂ methods were used for the experiments. Gelatin microparticles containing three different BSA amounts were incorporated into the porous scaffolds by using a surfactant. In vitro release profiles showed up to 90% protein loading efficiency. This novel method appears to be an effective approach for producing particles that can minimize protein loss during the loading process.

  3. Ceramide induces release of mitochondrial proapoptotic proteins in caspase-dependent and -independent manner in HT-29 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the release of mitochondrial proapoptotic intermembrane space proteins induced by exogenous C2-ceramide in human colon carcinoma (HT-29) cell line was investigated. HT-29 cells were treated with 12.5, 25 and 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide in vitro. Flow cytometer was used to detect the mitochondrial membrane potential (△Ψm). Subcellular fractions were extracted by Mitochondrial/Cytosol Fractionation Kit after C2-ceramide treatment for 24 h. SDS-PAGE was used to determine the level of cytochrome c (Cyt c), high temperature requirement A2 (HtrA2) and second mitochondrial-derived activator of caspases (Smac) released from mitochondria, the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and caspase-3 for 24 h. The results showed that △Ψm began to decrease from 6 h after 25 and 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide treatment (P<0.05) and cyclosporin A (CsA) could inhibit the collapse of △Ψm through regulating mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore. There was no effect of C2-ceramide on the expression of Cyt c, HtrA2 and Smac in the total levels. 12.5, 25 and 50 μmol/L C2-ceramide could induce Cyt c, HtrA2 and Smac to release from mitochondria to cytosol and down-regulate the expression of XIAP (P<0.05). Also there was expression of cleaved caspase-3 with C2-ceramide treatment. After the treatment with caspase inhibitor, C2-ceramide still induced the release of Cyt c and HtrA2, but Smac did not. Therefore, C2-ceramide could induce apoptosis of HT-29 cells through the mitochondria pathway. The release of Cyt c, HtrA2 and Smac from mitochondria did not occur via the same mechanism, the release of Cyt c and HtrA2 was caspase-independent and the release of Smac was caspase-dependent.

  4. Preparation and In Vitro Release of Drug-Loaded Microparticles for Oral Delivery Using Wholegrain Sorghum Kafirin Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther T. L. Lau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kafirin microparticles have been proposed as an oral nutraceutical and drug delivery system. This study investigates microparticles formed with kafirin extracted from white and raw versus cooked red sorghum grains as an oral delivery system. Targeted delivery to the colon would be beneficial for medication such as prednisolone, which is used in the management of inflammatory bowel disease. Therefore, prednisolone was loaded into microparticles of kafirin from the different sources using phase separation. Differences were observed in the protein content, in vitro protein digestibility, and protein electrophoretic profile of the various sources of sorghum grains, kafirin extracts, and kafirin microparticles. For all of the formulations, the majority of the loaded prednisolone was not released in in vitro conditions simulating the upper gastrointestinal tract, indicating that most of the encapsulated drug could reach the target area of the lower gastrointestinal tract. This suggests that these kafirin microparticles may have potential as a colon-targeted nutraceutical and drug delivery system.

  5. A low molecular weight ES-20 protein released in vivo and in vitro with diagnostic potential in lymph node tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shende N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine role of antigens released in vivo and in vitro in immunodiagnosis of tuberculosis (TB. Methods: In vivo released circulating tuberculosis antigen (CTA was obtained from TB sera by ammonium sulphate precipitation and in vitro released excretory-secretory (ES antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate. CTA and ES antigens were fractionated by SDS-PAGE and electro-eluted gel fractions were analysed for antigen by ELISA. Results: Low molecular weight proteins CTA-9 and ES-9 showed high titre of antigen activity. To explore the diagnostic potential of low molecular weight ES antigen, M. tuberculosis ES antigen was further fractionated by gel filtration chromatography followed by purification on anion exchange column using fast protein liquid chromatography and a highly seroreactive ESG-5D (ES-20 antigen was obtained. Competitive inhibition showed that CTA-9 and ES-9 antigens inhibit the binding of ES-20 antigen to its antibody. Seroanalysis showed sensitivity of 83 and 80% for ES-20 antigen and antibody detection, respectively, in pulmonary TB and 90% in lymph node TB. Conclusions: Seroreactivity studies using M. tuberculosis ES-20 antigen showed usefulness in detection of TB; in particular, lymph node TB.

  6. Properties of Brucella-phages lytic for non-smooth Brucella strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbel, M J

    1984-01-01

    A series of host-range mutants has been selected for brucella-phage R. Two of these mutants designated R/O and R/C have been used for typing purposes. Phage R/O is lytic for non-smooth strains of Brucella abortus and for B. ovis. It is genetically unstable however and produces mutants lytic for smooth B. obortus and B. suis. Phage R/C is lytic for non-smooth B. abortus and for B. ovis and B. canis. It is much more stable than phages R or R/O and shows little or no lytic activity on smooth Brucella strains. It has been effective in differentiating B. canis from B. suis in tests on a limited number of strains. In their properties, all of the brucella-phages of the R series resemble their parent phage.

  7. Microencapsulation of dodecyl acetate by complex coacervation of whey protein with acacia gum and its release behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You Tong Yu; Li Na Liu; Xiao Li Zhu; Xiang Zheng Kong

    2012-01-01

    Complex coacervation of whey protein (WP) with acacia gum (AG) was carried out in water with the presence of dodecyl acetate (DA),a component of insect sex pheromones,in order to obtain microeapsules with DA as the core material and WP-AG coacervate as the wall materials.Through variations in wall/core ratios,concentrations of the wall materials in capsule preparations,DA encapsulation was optimized,which showed a high DA encapsulation was achieved when coacervation was conducted at pH 3.5 with wall/core mass ratio at 3 combined with concentration of wall materials at 1.0 wt%.Morphology and the structure of DA loaded microcapsules were examined by scanning electron microscope,which showed the microcapsules were of core/shell structure with DA encapsulated in the inner of the microcapsules.DA release was examined and the behavior of the release was discussed.

  8. Protein kinase C α regulates nuclear pri-microRNA 15a release as part of endothelin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Brandenstein, Melanie; Depping, Reinhard; Schäfer, Ekaterine; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Fries, Jochen W U

    2011-10-01

    Endothelin-1 induced signaling is characterized by an early induction of a nuclear factor-kappa B p65/mitogen-activated phosphokinase p38 transcription complex via its A-receptor versus a late induction via diacylglycerol, and protein kinase C. A possible interaction between these two pathways and a potential function for protein kinase C in this context has not previously been elucidated. Here we report that in Caki-1 tumor cells, protein kinase C α is a part of the transcription complex. With importin α4 and α5 as chaperones, the transcription complex transmigrates into the nucleus. Protein kinase C α blocks the nuclear release of pri-microRNA 15a by direct binding shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and Duolink immune histology. The expression levels of miRNA 15a can be further manipulated by transfection of si-protein kinase C α, or an expression vector containing protein kinase C α or miRNA 15. The miRNA 15a regulation by protein kinase C α is detectable in different malignant human tumor cell lines (renal cell carcinoma, breast carcinoma, and melanoma). Furthermore, all three cell lines harbor both endothelin receptors (ETAR/ETBR). Specific blockage of each receptor leads to major reduction of miRNA 15a expression due to increased nuclear protein kinase C α translocation. We conclude that the nuclear binding of pri-microRNA 15a is a novel function of protein kinase C α, which plays an important role in endothelin-1 mediated signaling. Since several endothelin-sensitive, malignant tumor cell lines harbor this regulation, it could indicate a more general role in tumor biology.

  9. Sustained release of bone morphogenetic protein 2 via coacervate improves the osteogenic potential of muscle-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongshuai; Johnson, Noah Ray; Usas, Arvydas; Lu, Aiping; Poddar, Minakshi; Wang, Yadong; Huard, Johnny

    2013-09-01

    Muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) isolated from mouse skeletal muscle by a modified preplate technique exhibit long-term proliferation, high self-renewal, and multipotent differentiation capabilities in vitro. MDSCs retrovirally transduced to express bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) can differentiate into osteocytes and chondrocytes and enhance bone and articular cartilage repair in vivo, a feature that is not observed with nontransduced MDSCs. These results emphasize that MDSCs require prolonged exposure to BMPs to undergo osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. A sustained BMP protein delivery approach provides a viable and potentially more clinically translatable alternative to genetic manipulation of the cells. A unique growth factor delivery platform comprised of native heparin and a synthetic polycation, poly(ethylene argininylaspartate diglyceride) (PEAD), was used to bind, protect, and sustain the release of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in a temporally and spatially controlled manner. Prolonged exposure to BMP2 released by the PEAD:heparin delivery system promoted the differentiation of MDSCs to an osteogenic lineage in vitro and induced the formation of viable bone at an ectopic site in vivo. This new strategy represents an alternative approach for bone repair mediated by MDSCs while bypassing the need for gene therapy.

  10. Equine tetherin blocks retrovirus release and its activity is antagonized by equine infectious anemia virus envelope protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Hu, Zhe; Gu, Qinyong; Wu, Xingliang; Zheng, Yong-Hui; Wei, Ping; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Human tetherin is a host restriction factor that inhibits replication of enveloped viruses by blocking viral release. Tetherin has an unusual topology that includes an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, a single transmembrane domain, an extracellular domain, and a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Tetherin is not well conserved across species, so it inhibits viral replication in a species-specific manner. Thus, studies of tetherin activities from different species provide an important tool for understanding its antiviral mechanism. Here, we report cloning of equine tetherin and characterization of its antiviral activity. Equine tetherin shares 53%, 40%, 36%, and 34% amino acid sequence identity with feline, human, simian, and murine tetherins, respectively. Like the feline tetherin, equine tetherin has a shorter N-terminal domain than human tetherin. Equine tetherin is localized on the cell surface and strongly blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) release from virus-producing cells. The antiviral activity of equine tetherin is neutralized by EIAV envelope protein, but not by the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu, which is a human tetherin antagonist, and EIAV envelope protein does not counteract human tetherin. These results shed new light on our understanding of the species-specific tetherin antiviral mechanism.

  11. DNA aptamer release from the DNA-SWNT hybrid by protein recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Chang-Hyuk; Jung, Seungwon; Bae, Jaehyun; Kim, Gunn; Ihm, Jisoon; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-02-14

    Here we show the formation of the complex between a DNA aptamer and a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and its reaction with its target protein. The aptamer, which is specifically bound with thrombin, the target protein in this study, easily wraps and disperses the SWNT by noncovalent π-π stacking.

  12. Effect of whey protein on the In Vivo Release of Aldehydes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, K.G.C.; Boelrijk, A.E.M.; Burger, J.J.; Claassen, N.E.; Gruppen, H.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    Retention of aldehydes by whey proteins in solutions buffered at a range of pH values was studied under static and dynamic headspace conditions and in vivo in exhaled air. Static headspace measurements showed a clear increase in retention in the presence of whey proteins for aldehydes with longer ca

  13. Targeted mass spectrometry analysis of neutrophil-derived proteins released during sepsis progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, E; Davidova, A; Mörgelin, M; Linder, A; Larsen, M; Qvortrup, K; Nordenfelt, P; Shannon, O; Dzupova, O; Holub, M; Malmström, J; Herwald, H

    2014-12-01

    Early diagnosis of severe infectious diseases is essential for timely implementation of lifesaving therapies. In a search for novel biomarkers in sepsis diagnosis we focused on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Notably, PMNs have their protein cargo readily stored in granules and following systemic stimulation, an immediate increase of neutrophil-borne proteins can be observed into the circulation of sepsis patients. We applied a combination of mass spectrometry (MS) based approaches, LC-MS/MS and selected reaction monitoring (SRM), to characterise and quantify the neutrophil proteome in healthy or disease conditions. With this approach we identified a neutrophil-derived protein abundance pattern in blood plasma consisting of 20 proteins that can be used as a protein signature for severe infectious diseases. Our results also show that SRM is highly sensitive, specific, and reproducible and, thus, a promising technology to study a complex, dynamic and multifactorial disease such as sepsis.

  14. Specific functions of the Rep and Rep' proteins of porcine circovirus during copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    The roles of two porcine circovirus replication initiator proteins, Rep and Rep', in generating copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication intermediates were determined. Rep uses the supercoiled closed-circular genome (ccc) to initiate leading-strand synthesis (identical to copy-release replica...

  15. Enhancement of Lytic Activity by Leptin Is Independent From Lipid Rafts in Murine Primary Splenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Aurore; Noacco, Audrey; Talvas, Jérémie; Caldefie-Chézet, Florence; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Farges, Marie-Chantal

    2017-01-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic adipokine, is known as a regulator of food intake, but it is also involved in inflammation, immunity, cell proliferation, and survival. Leptin receptor is integrated inside cholesterol-rich microdomains called lipid rafts, which, if disrupted or destroyed, could lead to a perturbation of lytic mechanism. Previous studies also reported that leptin could induce membrane remodeling. In this context, we studied the effect of membrane remodeling in lytic activity modulation induced by leptin. Thus, primary mouse splenocytes were incubated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (β-MCD), a lipid rafts disrupting agent, cholesterol, a major component of cell membranes, or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a membrane stabilizer agent for 1 h. These treatments were followed by splenocyte incubation with leptin (absence, 10 and 100 ng/ml). Unlike β-MCD or cholesterol, UDCA was able to block leptin lytic induction. This result suggests that leptin increased the lytic activity of primary spleen cells against syngenic EO771 mammary cancer cells independently from lipid rafts but may involve membrane fluidity. Furthermore, natural killer cells were shown to be involved in the splenocyte lytic activity. To our knowledge it is the first publication in primary culture that provides the link between leptin lytic modulation and membrane remodeling. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 101-109, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Two different conformations in hepatitis C virus p7 protein account for proton transport and dye release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Siok Wan; Surya, Wahyu; Vararattanavech, Ardcharaporn; Torres, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    The p7 protein from the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a 63 amino acid long polypeptide that is essential for replication, and is involved in protein trafficking and proton transport. Therefore, p7 is a possible target for antivirals. The consensus model for the channel formed by p7 protein is a hexameric or heptameric oligomer of α-helical hairpin monomers, each having two transmembrane domains, TM1 and TM2, where the N-terminal TM1 would face the lumen of this channel. A reported high-throughput functional assay to search for p7 channel inhibitors is based on carboxyfluorescein (CF) release from liposomes after p7 addition. However, the rationale for the dual ability of p7 to serve as an ion or proton channel in the infected cell, and to permeabilize membranes to large molecules like CF is not clear. We have recreated both activities in vitro, examining the conformation present in these assays using infrared spectroscopy. Our results indicate that an α-helical form of p7, which can transport protons, is not able to elicit CF release. In contrast, membrane permeabilization to CF is observed when p7 contains a high percentage of β-structure, or when using a C-terminal fragment of p7, encompassing TM2. We propose that the reported inhibitory effect of some small compounds, e.g., rimantadine, on both CF release and proton transport can be explained via binding to the membrane-inserted C-terminal half of p7, increasing its rigidity, in a similar way to the influenza A M2-rimantadine interaction.

  17. Determination of lytic enzyme activities of indigenous Trichoderma isolates from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, Saeed Ahmad; Tabassum, Ayesha; Hameed, Abdul; Hassan, Fayyaz Ul; Afzal, Aftab; Khan, Sabaz Ali; Ahmed, Rafiq; Shahzad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated lytic enzyme activities in three indigenous Trichoderma strains namely, Trichoderma asperellum, Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma sp. Native Trichoderma strains and a virulent strain of Rhizoctonia solani isolated from infected bean plants were also included in the study. Enzyme activities were determined by measuring sugar reduction by dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method using suitable substrates. The antagonists were cultured in minimal salt medium with the following modifications: medium A (1 g of glucose), medium B (0.5 g of glucose + 0.5 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia), medium C (1.0 g of deactivated respective antagonist mycelium) and medium D (1 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia). T asperellum showed presence of higher amounts of chitinases, β-1, 3-glucanases and xylanases in extracellular protein extracts from medium D as compared to medium A. While, the higher activities of glucosidases and endoglucanses were shown in medium D extracts by T. harzianum. β-glucosidase activities were lower compared with other enzymes; however, activities of the extracts of medium D were significantly different. T. asperellum exhibited maximum inhibition (97.7%). On the other hand, Trichoderma sp. did not show any effect on mycelia growth of R. solani on crude extract.

  18. Determination of lytic enzyme activities of indigenous Trichoderma isolates from Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, Saeed Ahmad; Tabassum, Ayesha; Hameed, Abdul; Hassan, Fayyaz ul; Afzal, Aftab; Khan, Sabaz Ali; Ahmed, Rafiq; Shahzad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated lytic enzyme activities in three indigenous Trichoderma strains namely, Trichoderma asperellum, Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma sp. Native Trichoderma strains and a virulent strain of Rhizoctonia solani isolated from infected bean plants were also included in the study. Enzyme activities were determined by measuring sugar reduction by dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method using suitable substrates. The antagonists were cultured in minimal salt medium with the following modifications: medium A (1 g of glucose), medium B (0.5 g of glucose + 0.5 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia), medium C (1.0 g of deactivated respective antagonist mycelium) and medium D (1 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia). T asperellum showed presence of higher amounts of chitinases, β-1, 3-glucanases and xylanases in extracellular protein extracts from medium D as compared to medium A. While, the higher activities of glucosidases and endoglucanses were shown in medium D extracts by T. harzianum. β-glucosidase activities were lower compared with other enzymes; however, activities of the extracts of medium D were significantly different. T. asperellum exhibited maximum inhibition (97.7%). On the other hand, Trichoderma sp. did not show any effect on mycelia growth of R. solani on crude extract. PMID:26691463

  19. Identification of a membrane-bound prepore species clarifies the lytic mechanism of actinoporins

    CERN Document Server

    Morante, Koldo; Gil-Cartón, David; Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Sot, Jesús; Scheuring, Simon; Valle, Mikel; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M

    2016-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFT) are cytolytic proteins belonging to the molecular warfare apparatus of living organisms. The assembly of the functional transmembrane pore requires several intermediate steps ranging from a water-soluble monomeric species to the multimeric ensemble inserted in the cell membrane. The non-lytic oligomeric intermediate known as prepore plays an essential role in the mechanism of insertion of the class of $\\beta$-PFT. However, in the class of $\\alpha$-PFT like the actinoporins produced by sea anemones, evidence of membrane-bound prepores is still lacking. We have employed single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to identify, for the first time, a prepore species of the actinoporin fragaceatoxin C (FraC) bound to lipid vesicles. The size of the prepore coincides that of the functional pore, except for the transmembrane region, which is absent in the prepore. Biochemical assays indicated that, in the prepore species, the N-terminus is not inserte...

  20. Chromatin Modulation of Herpesvirus Lytic Gene Expression: Managing Nucleosome Density and Heterochromatic Histone Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Kristie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Like their cellular hosts, herpesviruses are subject to the regulatory impacts of chromatin assembled on their genomes. Upon infection, these viruses are assembled into domains of chromatin with heterochromatic signatures that suppress viral gene expression or euchromatic characteristics that promote gene expression. The organization and modulation of these chromatin domains appear to be intimately linked to the coordinated expression of the different classes of viral genes and thus ultimately play an important role in the progression of productive infection or the establishment and maintenance of viral latency. A recent report from the Knipe laboratory (J. S. Lee, P. Raja, and D. M. Knipe, mBio 7:e02007-15, 2016 contributes to the understanding of the dynamic modulation of chromatin assembled on the herpes simplex virus genome by monitoring the levels of characteristic heterochromatic histone modifications (histone H3 lysine 9 and 27 methylation associated with a model viral early gene during the progression of lytic infection. Additionally, this study builds upon previous observations that the viral immediate-early protein ICP0 plays a role in reducing the levels of heterochromatin associated with the early genes.

  1. RIM-binding protein links synaptic homeostasis to the stabilization and replenishment of high release probability vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Martin; Genç, Özgür; Davis, Graeme W

    2015-03-04

    Here we define activities of RIM-binding protein (RBP) that are essential for baseline neurotransmission and presynaptic homeostatic plasticity. At baseline, rbp mutants have a ∼10-fold decrease in the apparent Ca(2+) sensitivity of release that we attribute to (1) impaired presynaptic Ca(2+) influx, (2) looser coupling of vesicles to Ca(2+) influx, and (3) limited access to the readily releasable vesicle pool (RRP). During homeostatic plasticity, RBP is necessary for the potentiation of Ca(2+) influx and the expansion of the RRP. Remarkably, rbp mutants also reveal a rate-limiting stage required for the replenishment of high release probability (p) vesicles following vesicle depletion. This rate slows ∼4-fold at baseline and nearly 7-fold during homeostatic signaling in rbp. These effects are independent of altered Ca(2+) influx and RRP size. We propose that RBP stabilizes synaptic efficacy and homeostatic plasticity through coordinated control of presynaptic Ca(2+) influx and the dynamics of a high-p vesicle pool.

  2. Effects of ethanol on aggregation, serotonin release, and amyloid precursor protein processing in rat and human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Daniela; Humpel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    It is known that oxidative stress leads to amyloid precursor protein (APP) dysregulation in platelets. Ethanol (EtOH) is a vascular risk factor and induces oxidative stress. The aim of the present study was thus to investigate whether EtOH affects APP processing in rat and human platelets. Platelets were exposed to 50 mM EtOH with and without 2 mM calcium-chloride (CaCl₂) for 20 or 180 minutes at 37°C. Platelet aggregation, serotonin release and APP isoforms 130 and 106/110 kDa were analyzed. As a control, 100 mM H₂O₂ was tested in rat platelets. Our data show that EtOH alone did not affect any of the analyzed parameters, whereas CaCl₂ significantly increased aggregation of rat and human platelets. In addition, CaCl₂ alone enhanced serotonin release in rat platelets. EtOH counteracted CaCl₂-induced aggregation and serotonin release. In the presence of CaCl₂, EtOH reduced the 130 kDa APP isoform in rat and human platelets. In conclusion, this study shows that in the presence of CaCl₂, EtOH affects the platelet function and APP processing in rat and human platelets.

  3. Novel multilayer microcapsules based on soy protein isolate fibrils and high methoxyl pectin: Production, characterization and release modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansarifar, Elham; Mohebbi, Mohebbat; Shahidi, Fakhri; Koocheki, Arash; Ramezanian, Navid

    2017-04-01

    In this study, novel microcapsules were produced through the layer by layer adsorption of food-grade and plant-based polyelectrolytes, soy protein isolate (SPI) fibrils and high methoxyl pectin (HMP). The physical properties of the fibrils were investigated by TEM and AFM and the properties of the microcapsules such as size, uniformity, zeta potential, morphology, functional groups, modeling and the release kinetics of limonene were examined. The results revealed that SPI-fibrils had a thickness varying from 1 to 10nm and strand like structure. SEM images showed that the microcapsules were spherical and the thickness increased by the number of layers which led to the improvement of shell strength. The FTIR results confirmed that HMP and SPI-fibrils were adsorbed layer by layer as the walls of microcapsules and presence of limonene was stable into microcapsules. By increasing the number of layers of the shell from 2 to 6, the release rate of limonene decreased significantly. The index n in Rigter-Peppas model indicates that the release mechanism of limonene from multilayer microcapsules followed a non-Fick law. This method of microcapsule production is very simple and could be readily industrialized, especially for the manufacture of food products for vegetarians. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Aroma release and retronasal perception during and after consumption of flavored whey protein gels with different textures. 1. in vivo release analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Montserrat; Moran, Noelia; Jordan, Alfons; Buettner, Andrea

    2005-01-26

    The influence of gel texture on retronasal aroma release during mastication was followed by means of real-time proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry and compared to sensory perception of overall aroma intensity. A clear correlation was found between individual-specific consumption patterns and the respective physicochemical release patterns in vivo. A modified data analysis approach was used to monitor the aroma changes during the mastication process. It was found that the temporal resolution of the release profile played an important role in adequate description of the release processes. On the basis of this observation, a hypothesis is presented for the observed differences in intensity rating.

  5. Ultra Structural Characterisation of Tetherin - a Protein Capable of Preventing Viral Release from the Plasma Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra K. Gupta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin is an antiviral restriction factor made by mammalian cells to protect them from viral infection. It prevents newly formed virus particles from leaving infected cells. Its antiviral mechanism appears to be remarkably uncomplicated. In 2 studies published in PLoS Pathogens electron microscopy is used to support the hypothesis that the tethers that link HIV-1 virions to tetherin expressing cells contain tetherin and are likely to contain tetherin alone. They also show that the HIV-1 encoded tetherin antagonist that is known to cause tetherin degradation, Vpu, serves to reduce the amount of tetherin in the particles thereby allowing their release.

  6. [Advances in safety studies of soil Bt toxin proteins released from transgenic Bt crops].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yaoyu; Jiang, Mingxing; Cheng, Jia; Jiang, Yonghou

    2003-11-01

    Commercialized transgenic Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) crops are permitted for field growth in a large scale, which leads to significant issues of ecological risk assessment in soil ecosystem. In this paper, some general safety problems involving in the soil Bt active toxins released from insect-resistant transgenic Bt crops in the forms of plant residues, root exudates and pollens were reviewed, including their adsorption by soil active-particles, their insecticidal activity, persistence, and biodegradation by soil microbes, and their effects on soil organisms.

  7. Human Polycomb group EED protein negatively affects HIV-1 assembly and release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlix Jean-Luc

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human EED protein, a member of the superfamily of Polycomb group (PcG proteins with WD-40 repeats, has been found to interact with three HIV-1 components, namely the structural Gag matrix protein (MA, the integrase enzyme (IN and the Nef protein. The aim of the present study was to analyze the possible biological role of EED in HIV-1 replication, using the HIV-1-based vector HIV-Luc and EED protein expressed by DNA transfection of 293T cells. Results During the early phase of HIV-1 infection, a slight negative effect on virus infectivity occurred in EED-expressing cells, which appeared to be dependent on EED-MA interaction. At late times post infection, EED caused an important reduction of virus production, from 20- to 25-fold as determined by CAp24 immunoassay, to 10- to 80-fold based on genomic RNA levels, and this decrease was not due to a reduction of Gag protein synthesis. Coexpression of WTNef, or the non-N-myristoylated mutant NefG2A, restored virus yields to levels obtained in the absence of exogenous EED protein. This effect was not observed with mutant NefΔ57 mimicking the Nef core, or with the lipid raft-retargeted fusion protein LAT-Nef. LATAA-Nef, a mutant defective in the lipid raft addressing function, had the same anti-EED effect as WTNef. Cell fractionation and confocal imaging showed that, in the absence of Nef, EED mainly localized in membrane domains different from the lipid rafts. Upon co-expression with WTNef, NefG2A or LATAA-Nef, but not with NefΔ57 or LAT-Nef, EED was found to relocate into an insoluble fraction along with Nef protein. Electron microscopy of HIV-Luc producer cells overexpressing EED showed significant less virus budding at the cell surface compared to control cells, and ectopic assembly and clustering of nuclear pore complexes within the cytoplasm. Conclusion Our data suggested that EED exerted an antiviral activity at the late stage of HIV-1 replication, which included genomic

  8. Potentiation of glutamate release caused by delta—methrin and the possible mechanism associated with carbon monoxide pathway and protein kinase C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AiBM; LiuYG

    2002-01-01

    The acute neurotoxicity of delta-methrin is thought to be associated with the release of grutamate from synaptosomes in brain.However,the mechanism how delta-methrin enhances the glutamate release has still not been elucidated.Here we report that both carbon monoxide(CO) and the activator of protein kinase C(PKC),similarly to delta-methrin,potentiate the Ca2+-dependent glutamate release from rat cerebral cortical synaptosomes,otherwise,the release of glutamate is inhibited by zinc proporphyrin-9(ZnPP-9) and inhibitors of PKC or of protein kinase G(PKG).In addition,the inhibitors of ZnPP-9 PKC and PKG seem to weaken the enhancement of glutamate releas caused by delta-methrin.So,we conclude that CO signal transduction pathway and PKC mediate the glutamate release from synptosomes by delta-methrin.

  9. Phorbol esters and neurotransmitter release: more than just protein kinase C?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silinsky, Eugene M; Searl, Timothy J

    2003-01-01

    This review focuses on the effects of phorbol esters and the role of phorbol ester receptors in the secretion of neurotransmitter substances. We begin with a brief background on the historical use of phorbol esters as tools to decipher the role of the enzyme protein kinase C in signal transduction cascades. Next, we illustrate the structural differences between active and inactive phorbol esters and the mechanism by which the binding of phorbol to its recognition sites (C1 domains) on a particular protein acts to translocate that protein to the membrane. We then discuss the evidence that the most important nerve terminal receptor for phorbol esters (and their endogenous counterpart diacylglycerol) is likely to be Munc13. Indeed, Munc13 and its invertebrate homologues are the main players in priming the secretory apparatus for its critical function in the exocytosis process. PMID:12711617

  10. Distribution of corticotropin-releasing factor neurons in the mouse brain: a study using corticotropin-releasing factor-modified yellow fluorescent protein knock-in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junko; Konno, Kohtarou; Talukder, Ashraf Hossain; Fuse, Toshimitsu; Abe, Manabu; Uchida, Katsuya; Horio, Shuhei; Sakimura, Kenji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Itoi, Keiichi

    2017-05-01

    We examined the morphological features of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in a mouse line in which modified yellow fluorescent protein (Venus) was expressed under the CRF promoter. We previously generated the CRF-Venus knock-in mouse, in which Venus is inserted into the CRF gene locus by homologous recombination. In the present study, the neomycin phosphotransferase gene (Neo), driven by the pgk-1 promoter, was deleted from the CRF-Venus mouse genome, and a CRF-Venus∆Neo mouse was generated. Venus expression is much more prominent in the CRF-Venus∆Neo mouse when compared to the CRF-Venus mouse. In addition, most Venus-expressing neurons co-express CRF mRNA. Venus-expressing neurons constitute a discrete population of neuroendocrine neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) that project to the median eminence. Venus-expressing neurons were also found in brain regions outside the neuroendocrine PVH, including the olfactory bulb, the piriform cortex (Pir), the extended amygdala, the hippocampus, the neocortices, Barrington's nucleus, the midbrain/pontine dorsal tegmentum, the periaqueductal gray, and the inferior olivary nucleus (IO). Venus-expressing perikarya co-expressing CRF mRNA could be observed clearly even in regions where CRF-immunoreactive perikarya could hardly be identified. We demonstrated that the CRF neurons contain glutamate in the Pir and IO, while they contain gamma-aminobutyric acid in the neocortex, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the hippocampus, and the amygdala. A population of CRF neurons was demonstrated to be cholinergic in the midbrain tegmentum. The CRF-Venus∆Neo mouse may be useful for studying the structural and functional properties of CRF neurons in the mouse brain.

  11. Discovery and industrial applications of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Katja S

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) has opened up a vast area of research covering several fields of application. The biotech company Novozymes A/S holds patents on the use of these enzymes for the conversion of steam-pre-treated plant residues such as straw to free sugars. These patents predate the correct classification of LPMOs and the striking synergistic effect of fungal LPMOs when combined with canonical cellulases was discovered when fractions of fungal secretomes were evaluated in industrially relevant enzyme performance assays. Today, LPMOs are a central component in the Cellic CTec enzyme products which are used in several large-scale plants for the industrial production of lignocellulosic ethanol. LPMOs are characterized by an N-terminal histidine residue which, together with an internal histidine and a tyrosine residue, co-ordinates a single copper atom in a so-called histidine brace. The mechanism by which oxygen binds to the reduced copper atom has been reported and the general mechanism of copper-oxygen-mediated activation of carbon is being investigated in the light of these discoveries. LPMOs are widespread in both the fungal and the bacterial kingdoms, although the range of action of these enzymes remains to be elucidated. However, based on the high abundance of LPMOs expressed by microbes involved in the decomposition of organic matter, the importance of LPMOs in the natural carbon-cycle is predicted to be significant. In addition, it has been suggested that LPMOs play a role in the pathology of infectious diseases such as cholera and to thus be relevant in the field of medicine. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  12. Growth hormone release from chicken anterior pituitary cells in primary culture: TRH and hpGRF synergy, protein synthesis, and cyclic adenosine 3'5'-monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, F M; Malamed, S; Scanes, C G

    1989-01-01

    Our earlier work showed that the effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor (hpGRF) on growth hormone (GH) release are synergistic (greater than additive) in a primary culture of chicken adenohypophyseal cells. The purpose of the present studies was to investigate the possible participation of protein synthesis and cyclic adenosine 3'5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in GH release. Following culture (48 hr), cells were incubated for 2 hr with test agents. Cycloheximide (an inhibitor of protein synthesis) had no effect on basal (absence of test agent) GH release or hpGRF-induced GH release. However, cycloheximide abolished the synergy between TRH and hpGRF. Although neither TRH nor hpGRF alone stimulated GH production (intracellular GH plus GH release) during a 2-hr incubation period, in combination these secretagogues increased total GH. These findings suggest that GH release from the chicken somatotroph under conditions of TRH and hpGRF synergy requires protein synthesis. In other studies, cells were exposed to agents inducing the formation of cAMP and either TRH or hpGRF. 8 Br-cAMP (10(-3) M), forskolin (10(-6) M), or isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX; 10(-3) M) alone stimulated GH release to values between 30 and 50% over the basal value. The combined effects of each of these agents and TRH on GH release were synergistic. Similarly, IBMX and hpGRF exerted synergistic effects on GH release. In contrast, no synergy was shown between hpGRF and either 8 Br-cAMP or forskolin; their combined actions were less than additive.

  13. Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-2 Attenuation of Protein Kinase C-Induced Inflammation in Human Ovarian Granulosa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ning Chao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and interleukin-8 (IL-8 are two important inflammatory mediators in ovulation. Ghrelin may modulate inflammatory signaling via growth hormone secretagogue receptors. We investigated the role of ghrelin in KGN human ovarian granulosa cells using protein kinase C (PKC activator phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (PDD and synthetic ghrelin analog growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2. GHRP-2 attenuated PDD-induced expression of protein and mRNA, the promoter activity of COX-2 and IL-8 genes, and the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and IL-8. GHRP-2 promoted the degradation of PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 proteins with the involvement of proteasomal and lysosomal pathways. PDD-mediated COX-2 production acts via the p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB pathways; PDD-mediated IL-8 production acts via the p38, JNK and ERK pathways. GHRP-2 reduced the PDD-induced phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and activator protein 1 (AP-1 reporter activation and PDD-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and reporter activation. The inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1 and protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A reduced the inhibitory effect of GHRP-2 on PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 expression. Our findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory role for ghrelin (GHRP-2 in PKC-mediated inflammation of granulosa cells, at least in part, due to its inhibitory effect on PKC-induced activation of p38, JNK and NF-κB, possibly by targeting to MKP-1 and PP2A.

  14. Targeted mass spectrometry analysis of neutrophil-derived proteins released during sepsis progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, E; Davidova, A; Mörgelin, M

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis of severe infectious diseases is essential for timely implementation of lifesaving therapies. In a search for novel biomarkers in sepsis diagnosis we focused on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). Notably, PMNs have their protein cargo readily stored in granules and following sy...

  15. Inflammatory Cytokines Stimulate Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Expression and Release from Pancreatic Beta Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urizar, Adriana Ibarra; Friberg, Josefine; Christensen, Dan Ploug;

    2016-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) play important roles in the progressive loss of beta-cell mass and function during development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We have recently showed that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -4...

  16. Absorption of a mutagenic metabolite released from protein-bound residues of furazolidone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Bruchem, van G.D.; Sonne, K.; Enninga, I.C.; Rhijn, van J.A.; Heskamp, H.; Huveneers-Oorsprong, M.B.M.; Hoeven, van der J.C.M.; Kuiper, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    The use of nitrofurans as veterinary drugs has been banned in the EU since 1993 due to doubts on the safety of the protein-bound residues of these drugs in edible products. Following treatment of pigs with the veterinary drug furazolidone free 3-amino-2-oxazolidinone (AOZ), the side-chain of the dru

  17. Distribution of capsular types and production of muramidase-released protein (MRP) and extracellular factor (EF) of Streptococcus suis strains isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Smith, H.E.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Peperkamp, K.; Vecht, U.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus suis strains (n=411), isolated from diseased pigs in seven European countries were serotyped using specific antisera against serotype 1 to 28, and were phenotyped on the basis of their muramidase-released-protein (MRP) and extracellular-factor protein (EF) production. Overall, S. suis

  18. Lytic effects of normal serum on isolated postonchospheral and metacestode stages of Taenia taeniaeformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conder, G A; Picone, J; Geary, A M; deHoog, J; Williams, J F

    1983-06-01

    Postonchospheral stages of Taenia taeniaeformis liberated from rat livers by enzymatic digestion at 1 to 10 days postinfection (DPI) and metacestodes dissected from infected livers at 22, 34, and 69 DPI were exposed in vitro to immune rat serum (IRS) and to normal serum from rats (NRS), human beings (NHS), or guinea pigs (NGS). The onset of rapid and destructive tegumental changes in all organisms exposed to any of the sera was demonstrated to be complement-dependent because the reaction was: (a) inhibited by treatment of serum at 56 C for 30 min; (b) inhibited by prior incubation of serum with zymosan or with complement-fixing, soluble products derived from larvae of T. taeniaeformis maintained in vitro (IVP); and (c) abolished by the addition of EDTA. Lytic effects occurred on exposure to agammaglobulinemic sheep serum, and lysis in the presence of IRS and NRS was shown to result in consumption of available hemolytic complement. Surface changes consisted of vesiculation in the microvillar or microthrix layers followed by sloughing of the tegument, eventually leading to collapse of the cystic bladder and cessation of flame cell activity, or, in the case of early postonchospheral forms, complete disintegration of the organism. When IVP was added to NHS, reduction of hemolytic complement activity was associated with the electrophoretic conversion of C3, and Factor B, but there was little or no consumption of C1. The observations support the hypothesis that complement-mediated effector mechanisms must be counteracted to ensure survival of parasites in vivo, and that the capacity for release of soluble nonspecific complement-fixing factors by taeniid larvae may have an important role to play in this process.

  19. Effect of temperature on the production of cellulases, xylanases and lytic enzymes by selected Trichoderma reesei mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Janas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of temperature in the rangę of 26-38°C on the production of cellulases, xylanases and lytic enzymes by four mutant strains of Trichoderma reesei was analysed. On the basis of these investigations three thermosensitive strains (M-7. RUT C 30 and VTT-D-78085 which showed reduced excretion of the above mentioned enzymes as well as protein and a thermoresistant mutant (VTT-D-79I24 which grew within a temperature range of 26-34°C were characterized. Higher temperature caused an increase in the level of xylanolytic enzymes produced by the four mutants. In addition. it effected the complex composition of cellulolytic enzymes secreted by VTT-D-79l 24 (i.c. increased and reduced excertion of (β-glucosidase and β-1,4-endoglucanase respectively.

  20. The effect of remaining SDS on protein release in later leaching steps of deproteinized natural rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adisara Yooyanyong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of remaining sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS used in washing steps on further leaching of proteins from the deproteinized rubber films was investigated. High-Ammonia Natural Rubber Latex (HANRL was diluted with 0.01% w/v potassium hydroxide solution to obtain about 30% dry rubber content (DRC and it is called diluted NRL. The untreated NRL was directly casted to a film (sample 0. Sample 1 was prepared by centrifugation of diluted NRL at 5000 rpm for 1 min. Sample 1-2 was prepared by washing Sample 1 with 0.5%wt SDS solution. Sample 1-3 was prepared by washing Sample 1-2 with 0.1%wt SDS solution. After that they were casted into films. The dried films were checked for the extractable protein (EP content by modified Lowry method and nitrogen content according to SMR: Bulletin No.7-1992. The EP content of Sample 1 film was less than the untreated (Sample 0 one but the EP content was increased after washing with 0.5%wt SDS solution and then dropped slightly after washing again with 0.1%wt SDS solution. In contrast, nitrogen content and FTIR spectra confirmed that the total amount of proteins in films was decreased when they underwent more treating steps. This finding suggested that although overall protein content decreased, the remaining SDS on the films could facilitate further leaching of EP from the film surface when it was in contact with extraction medium (PBS or synthetic sweat under condition with shear force. The use of this deproteinized film should, therefore, be done with care.

  1. Small Heat Shock Proteins Can Release Light Dependence of Tobacco Seed during Germination1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination. PMID:25604531

  2. Small heat shock proteins can release light dependence of tobacco seed during germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyun Jo; Park, Soo Min; Kim, Keun Pill; Suh, Mi Chung; Lee, Mi Ok; Lee, Seong-Kon; Xinli, Xia; Hong, Choo Bong

    2015-03-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) function as ATP-independent molecular chaperones, and although the production and function of sHSPs have often been described under heat stress, the expression and function of sHSPs in fundamental developmental processes, such as pollen and seed development, have also been confirmed. Seed germination involves the breaking of dormancy and the resumption of embryo growth that accompany global changes in transcription, translation, and metabolism. In many plants, germination is triggered simply by imbibition of water; however, different seeds require different conditions in addition to water. For small-seeded plants, like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), light is an important regulator of seed germination. The facts that sHSPs accumulate during seed development, sHSPs interact with various client proteins, and seed germination accompanies synthesis and/or activation of diverse proteins led us to investigate the role of sHSPs in seed germination, especially in the context of light dependence. In this study, we have built transgenic tobacco plants that ectopically express sHSP, and the effect was germination of the seeds in the dark. Administering heat shock to the seeds also resulted in the alleviation of light dependence during seed germination. Subcellular localization of ectopically expressed sHSP was mainly observed in the cytoplasm, whereas heat shock-induced sHSPs were transported to the nucleus. We hypothesize that ectopically expressed sHSPs in the cytoplasm led the status of cytoplasmic proteins involved in seed germination to function during germination without additional stimulus and that heat shock can be another signal that induces seed germination.

  3. Efficacy of lytic Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduor, Joseph Michael Ochieng'; Onkoba, Nyamongo; Maloba, Fredrick; Arodi, Washingtone Ouma; Nyachieo, Atunga

    2016-11-24

    The use of bacteriophages as an alternative treatment method against multidrug-resistant bacteria has not been explored in Kenya. This study sought to determine the efficacy of environmentally obtained lytic bacteriophage against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MDRSA) bacterium in mice. Staphylococcus aureus bacterium and S. aureus-specific lytic phage were isolated from sewage and wastewater collected within Nairobi County, Kenya. Thirty mice were randomly assigned into three groups: MDRSA infection group (n = 20), phage-infection group (n = 5), and non-infection group (n = 5). The MDRSA infection group was further subdivided into three groups: clindamycin treatment (8 mg/kg; n = 5), lytic phage treatment (108 PFU/mL (n = 5), and a combination treatment of clindamycin and lytic phage (n = 5). Treatments were done at either 24 or 72 hours post-infection (p.i), and data on efficacy, bacterial load, and animal physical health were collected. Treatment with phage was more effective (100%) than with clindamycin (62.25% at 24 hours p.i and 87.5% at 72 hours p.i.) or combination treatment (75% at 24 hours p.i. and 90% at 72 hours p.i.) (p aureus lytic bacteriophage has therapeutic potential against MDRSA bacterium in mice.

  4. Role of the mu 1 protein in reovirus stability and capacity to cause chromium release from host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, J W; Fields, B N

    1996-01-01

    The reovirus M2 gene is associated with the capacity of type 3 strain Abney (T3A) intermediate subviral particles (ISVPs) to permeabilize cell membranes as measured by chromium (51Cr) release (P. Lucia-Jandris, J. W. Hooper, and B. N. Fields, J. Virol. 67:5339-5345, 1993). In addition, reovirus mutants with lesions in the M2 gene can be selected by heating virus at 37 degrees C for 20 min in 33% ethanol (D. R. Wessner and B. N. Fields, J. Virol. 67:2442-2447, 1993). In this report we investigated the mechanism by which the reovirus M2 gene product (the mu 1 protein) influences the capacity of reovirus ISVPs to permeabilize membranes, using ethanol-selected T3A mutants. Each of three T3A ethanol-resistant mutants isolated (JH2, JH3, and JH4) exhibited a decreased capacity to cause 51Cr release relative to that of wild-type T3A. Sequence analysis of the M2 genes of wild-type T3A and the T3A mutants indicated that each mutant possesses a single amino acid substitution in a central region of the 708-amino-acid mu 1 protein: JH2 (residue 466, Tyr to Cys), JH3 (residue 459, Lys to Glu), and JH4 (residue 497 Pro to Ser). Assays performed with reovirus natural isolates, reassortants, and a set of previously characterized type 3 strain Dearing (T3D) ethanol-resistant mutants revealed a strong correlation between ethanol sensitivity and the capacity to cause 51Cr release. We found that ISVPs generated from the T3A and T3D mutants were stable when heated to 50 degrees C, whereas wild-type T3A ISVPs are inactivated under these conditions. Together, these data suggest that amino acid substitutions in a central region of the mu 1 protein affect the capacity of the ISVP to permeabilize L-cell membranes by altering the stability of the virus particle.

  5. Preparation of protein-loaded PLGA-PVP blend nanoparticles by nanoprecipitation method: entrapment, Initial burst and drug release kinetic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahryar Shakeri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Despite of wide range applications of polymeric nanoparticles in protein delivery, there are some problems for the field of protein entrapment, initial burst and controlled release profile.   Materials and Methods: In this study, we investigated the influence of some changes in PLGA nanoparticles formulation to improve the initial and controlled release profile. Selected parameters were: pluronic F127, polysorbate 80 as surfactant, pH of inner aqueous phase, L/G ratio of PLGA polymer, volume of inner aqueous phase and addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone as an excipient. FITC-HSA was used as a model hydrophilic drug. The nanoparticles were prepared by nanoprecipitation.   Results:  Initial release of FITC-HSA from PLGA-tween 80 nanoparticles (opt-4, 61% was faster than control (PLGA-pluronic after 2.30 h of incubation. Results showed that decrease in pH of inner aqueous phase to pI of protein can decrease IBR but the release profile of protein is the same as control. Release profile with three phases including a initial burst b plateau and c final release phase was observed when we changed volume of inner aqueous phase and L/G ratio in formulation. Co-entrapment of HSA with PVP and pluronic reduced the IBR and controlled release profile in opt-19. Encapsulation efficiency was more than 97% and nanoparticles size and zeta potentials were mono-modal and -18.99 mV, respectively.   Conclusion:  In this research, we optimized a process for preparation of PLGA-PVP-pluronic nanoparticles of diameter less than 300 nm using nanoprecipitation method. This formulation showed a decreased initial burst and long lasting controlled release profile for FITC-HSA as a model drug for proteins.

  6. Characterizing exogenous mRNA delivery, trafficking, cytoplasmic release and RNA-protein correlations at the level of single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschman, Jonathan L; Bhosle, Sushma; Vanover, Daryll; Blanchard, Emmeline L; Loomis, Kristin H; Zurla, Chiara; Murray, Kathryn; Lam, Blaine C; Santangelo, Philip J

    2017-07-07

    The use of synthetic messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) to express specific proteins is a highly promising therapeutic and vaccine approach that avoids many safety issues associated with viral or DNA-based systems. However, in order to optimize mRNA designs and delivery, technology advancements are required to study fundamental mechanisms of mRNA uptake and localization at the single-cell and tissue level. Here, we present a single RNA sensitive fluorescent labeling method which allows us to label and visualize synthetic mRNA without significantly affecting function. This approach enabled single cell characterization of mRNA uptake and release kinetics from endocytic compartments, the measurement of mRNA/protein correlations, and motivated the investigation of mRNA induced cellular stress, all important mechanisms influencing protein production. In addition, we demonstrated this approach can facilitate near-infrared imaging of mRNA localization in vivo and in ex-vivo tissue sections, which will facilitate mRNA trafficking studies in pre-clinical models. Overall, we demonstrate the ability to study fundamental mechanisms necessary to optimize delivery and therapeutic strategies, in order to design the next generation of novel mRNA therapeutics and vaccines. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 modulates NOD2-induced cytokine release and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne R Spalinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Variations within the gene locus encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22 are associated with the risk to develop inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. PTPN22 is involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell receptor signaling, but although it is highly expressed in innate immune cells, its function in other signaling pathways is less clear. Here, we study whether loss of PTPN22 controls muramyl-dipeptide (MDP-induced signaling and effects in immune cells. MATERIAL & METHODS: Stable knockdown of PTPN22 was induced in THP-1 cells by shRNA transduction prior to stimulation with the NOD2 ligand MDP. Cells were analyzed for signaling protein activation and mRNA expression by Western blot and quantitative PCR; cytokine secretion was assessed by ELISA, autophagosome induction by Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC were obtained from PTPN22 knockout mice or wild-type animals. RESULTS: MDP-treatment induced PTPN22 expression and activity in human and mouse cells. Knockdown of PTPN22 enhanced MDP-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-isoforms p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase as well as canonical NF-κB signaling molecules in THP-1 cells and BMDC derived from PTPN22 knockout mice. Loss of PTPN22 enhanced mRNA levels and secretion of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8 and TNF in THP-1 cells and PTPN22 knockout BMDC. Additionally, loss of PTPN22 resulted in increased, MDP-mediated autophagy in human and mouse cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that PTPN22 controls NOD2 signaling, and loss of PTPN22 renders monocytes more reactive towards bacterial products, what might explain the association of PTPN22 variants with IBD pathogenesis.

  8. OSCAR Is a Receptor for Surfactant Protein D That Activates TNF-α Release from Human CCR2+ Inflammatory Monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrow, Alexander D; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Bugatti, Mattia;

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is critical for maintenance of lung homeostasis and provides a first line of defense to pathogens at mucosal surfaces. Polymorphisms in the SP-D-encoding gene SFTPD have been associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ulcerative colitis. Identification...... of recombinant SP-D and captured native SP-D from human bronchoalveolar lavage. OSCAR localized in an intracellular compartment of alveolar macrophages together with SP-D. Moreover, we found OSCAR on the surface of interstitial lung and blood CCR2(+) inflammatory monocytes, which secreted TNF-α when exposed...... therapeutic target in chronic inflammatory diseases of the lung as well as other diseases involving tissue accumulation of SP-D, infiltration of inflammatory monocytes, and release of TNF-α....

  9. Bile Acids Trigger GLP-1 Release Predominantly by Accessing Basolaterally Located G Protein-Coupled Bile Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brighton, Cheryl A.; Rievaj, Juraj; Kuhre, Rune E.;

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are well-recognized stimuli of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion. This action has been attributed to activation of the G protein-coupled bile acid receptor GPBAR1 (TGR5), although other potential bile acid sensors include the nuclear farnesoid receptor and the apical sodium......-coupled bile acid transporter ASBT. The aim of this study was to identify pathways important for GLP-1 release and to determine whether bile acids target their receptors on GLP-1-secreting L-cells from the apical or basolateral compartment. Using transgenic mice expressing fluorescent sensors specifically in L...... to either TLCA or TDCA. We conclude that the action of bile acids on GLP-1 secretion is predominantly mediated by GPBAR1 located on the basolateral L-cell membrane, suggesting that stimulation of gut hormone secretion may include postabsorptive mechanisms....

  10. Exosomes released by EBV-infected nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells convey the viral Latent Membrane Protein 1 and the immunomodulatory protein galectin 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirashima Mitsuomi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPC are consistently associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Their malignant epithelial cells contain the viral genome and express several antigenic viral proteins. However, the mechanisms of immune escape in NPCs are still poorly understood. EBV-transformed B-cells have been reported to release exosomes carrying the EBV-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 which has T-cell inhibitory activity. Although this report suggested that NPC cells could also produce exosomes carrying immunosuppressive proteins, this hypothesis has remained so far untested. Methods Malignant epithelial cells derived from NPC xenografts – LMP1-positive (C15 or negative (C17 – were used to prepare conditioned culture medium. Various microparticles and vesicles released in the culture medium were collected and fractionated by differential centrifugation. Exosomes collected in the last centrifugation step were further purified by immunomagnetic capture on beads carrying antibody directed to HLA class II molecules. Purified exosomes were visualized by electron microscopy and analysed by western blotting. The T-cell inhibitory activities of recombinant LMP1 and galectin 9 were assessed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells activated by CD3/CD28 cross-linking. Results HLA-class II-positive exosomes purified from C15 and C17 cell supernatants were containing either LMP1 and galectin 9 (C15 or galectin 9 only (C17. Recombinant LMP1 induced a strong inhibition of T-cell proliferation (IC50 = 0.17 nM. In contrast recombinant galectin 9 had a weaker inhibitory effect (IC50 = 46 nM with no synergy with LMP1. Conclusion This study provides the proof of concept that NPC cells can release HLA class-II positive exosomes containing galectin 9 and/or LMP1. It confirms that the LMP1 molecule has intrinsic T-cell inhibitory activity. These findings will encourage investigations of tumor exosomes in the blood of NPC patients and

  11. Identification of Leishmania proteins preferentially released in infected cells using change mediated antigen technology (CMAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kima, Peter E; Bonilla, J Alfredo; Cho, Eumin; Ndjamen, Blaise; Canton, Johnathan; Leal, Nicole; Handfield, Martin

    2010-10-05

    Although Leishmania parasites have been shown to modulate their host cell's responses to multiple stimuli, there is limited evidence that parasite molecules are released into infected cells. In this study, we present an implementation of the change mediated antigen technology (CMAT) to identify parasite molecules that are preferentially expressed in infected cells. Sera from mice immunized with cell lysates prepared from L. donovani or L. pifanoi-infected macrophages were adsorbed with lysates of axenically grown amastigotes of L. donovani or L. pifanoi, respectively, as well as uninfected macrophages. The sera were then used to screen inducible parasite expression libraries constructed with genomic DNA. Eleven clones from the L. pifanoi and the L. donovani screen were selected to evaluate the characteristics of the molecules identified by this approach. The CMAT screen identified genes whose homologs encode molecules with unknown function as well as genes that had previously been shown to be preferentially expressed in the amastigote form of the parasite. In addition a variant of Tryparedoxin peroxidase that is preferentially expressed within infected cells was identified. Antisera that were then raised to recombinant products of the clones were used to validate that the endogenous molecules are preferentially expressed in infected cells. Evaluation of the distribution of the endogenous molecules in infected cells showed that some of these molecules are secreted into parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs) and that they then traffic out of PVs in vesicles with distinct morphologies. This study is a proof of concept study that the CMAT approach can be applied to identify putative Leishmania parasite effectors molecules that are preferentially expressed in infected cells. In addition we provide evidence that Leishmania molecules traffic out of the PV into the host cell cytosol and nucleus.

  12. Identification of Leishmania proteins preferentially released in infected cells using change mediated antigen technology (CMAT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E Kima

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Although Leishmania parasites have been shown to modulate their host cell's responses to multiple stimuli, there is limited evidence that parasite molecules are released into infected cells. In this study, we present an implementation of the change mediated antigen technology (CMAT to identify parasite molecules that are preferentially expressed in infected cells. Sera from mice immunized with cell lysates prepared from L. donovani or L. pifanoi-infected macrophages were adsorbed with lysates of axenically grown amastigotes of L. donovani or L. pifanoi, respectively, as well as uninfected macrophages. The sera were then used to screen inducible parasite expression libraries constructed with genomic DNA. Eleven clones from the L. pifanoi and the L. donovani screen were selected to evaluate the characteristics of the molecules identified by this approach. The CMAT screen identified genes whose homologs encode molecules with unknown function as well as genes that had previously been shown to be preferentially expressed in the amastigote form of the parasite. In addition a variant of Tryparedoxin peroxidase that is preferentially expressed within infected cells was identified. Antisera that were then raised to recombinant products of the clones were used to validate that the endogenous molecules are preferentially expressed in infected cells. Evaluation of the distribution of the endogenous molecules in infected cells showed that some of these molecules are secreted into parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs and that they then traffic out of PVs in vesicles with distinct morphologies. This study is a proof of concept study that the CMAT approach can be applied to identify putative Leishmania parasite effectors molecules that are preferentially expressed in infected cells. In addition we provide evidence that Leishmania molecules traffic out of the PV into the host cell cytosol and nucleus.

  13. Natural terpenes prevent mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and release of apoptotic proteins during nimesulide-hepatotoxicity in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available Nimesulide, an anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug, is reported to cause severe hepatotoxicity. In this study, molecular mechanisms involved in deranged oxidant-antioxidant homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction during nimesulide-induced hepatotoxicity and its attenuation by plant derived terpenes, camphene and geraniol has been explored in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Hepatotoxicity due to nimesulide (80 mg/kg BW was evident from elevated SGPT, SGOT, bilirubin and histo-pathological changes. Antioxidants and key redox enzymes (iNOS, mtNOS, Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD, GPx and GR were altered significantly as assessed by their mRNA expression, Immunoblot analysis and enzyme activities. Redox imbalance along with oxidative stress was evident from decreased NAD(PH and GSH (56% and 74% respectively; P<0.001, increased superoxide and secondary ROS/RNS generation along with oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules. Nimesulide reduced mitochondrial activity, depolarized mitochondria and caused membrane permeability transition (MPT followed by release of apoptotic proteins (AIF; apoptosis inducing factor, EndoG; endonuclease G, and Cyto c; cytochrome c. It also significantly activated caspase-9 and caspase-3 and increased oxidative DNA damage (level of 8-Oxoguanine glycosylase; P<0.05. A combination of camphene and geraniol (CG; 1:1, when pre-administered in rats (10 mg/kg BW, accorded protection against nimesulide hepatotoxicity in vivo, as evident from normalized serum biomarkers and histopathology. mRNA expression and activity of key antioxidant and redox enzymes along with oxidative stress were also normalized due to CG pre-treatment. Downstream effects like decreased mitochondrial swelling, inhibition in release of apoptotic proteins, prevention of mitochondrial depolarization along with reduction in oxidized NAD(PH and increased mitochondrial electron flow further supported protective action of selected terpenes against nimesulide toxicity. Therefore

  14. Nanofibrous yet injectable polycaprolactone-collagen bone tissue scaffold with osteoprogenitor cells and controlled release of bone morphogenetic protein-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Gayathri; Bialorucki, Callan [Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Yildirim-Ayan, Eda, E-mail: eda.yildirimayan@utoledo.edu [Department of Bioengineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we developed a nanofibrous, yet injectable orthobiologic tissue scaffold that is capable of hosting osteoprogenitor cells and controlling kinetic release profile of the encapsulated pro-osteogenic factor without diminishing its bioactivity over 21 days. This innovative injectable scaffold was synthesized by incorporating electrospun and subsequently O{sub 2} plasma-functionalized polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers within the collagen type-I solution along with MC3T3-E1 cells (pre-osteoblasts) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2). Through changing the PCL nanofiber concentration within the injectable scaffolds, we were able to tailor the mechanical strength, protein retention capacity, bioactivity preservation, and osteoinductive potential of the scaffolds. The nanofibrous internal structure of the scaffold allowed us to use a low dose of BMP2 (200 ng/ml) to achieve osteoblastic differentiation in in vitro culture. The osteogenesis capacity of the injectable scaffolds were evaluated though measuring MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation, ALP activity, matrix mineralization, and early- and late-osteoblast specific gene expression profiles over 21 days. The results demonstrated that the nanofibrous injectable scaffold provides not only an osteoinductive environment for osteoprogenitor cells to differentiate, but also a suitable biomechanical and biochemical environment to act as a reservoir for osteogenic factors with controlled release profile. - Highlights: • Injectable nanofibrous scaffold with osteoprogenitor cells and BMP2 was synthesized. • PCL nanofiber concentration within collagen scaffold affected the BMP2 retention and bioactivity. • Optimal PCL concentration was identified for mechanical stability, injectability, and osteogenic activity. • Scaffolds exhibited long-term osteoinductive capacity for bone repair and regeneration.

  15. The Lytic SA Phage Demonstrate Bactericidal Activity against Mastitis Causing Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ameer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the major causative agent of mastitis among dairy animals as it causes intramammary gland infection. Due to antibiotic resistance and contamination of antibiotics in the milk of diseased animals; alternative therapeutic agents are required to cure mastitis. Lytic bacteriophages and their gene products can be potential therapeutic agents against bacteria as they are host specific and less harmful than antibiotics. In this study, Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from milk samples of the infected animals and identified biochemically. SA phage was isolated from sewage water showing lytic activity against Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The highest lytic activity of bacteriophages was observed at 37°C and pH 7, and the most suitable storage condition was at 4°C. SA phage efficiently reduced bacterial growth in the bacterial reduction assay. The characterization and bacterial growth reduction activity of the bacteriophages against Staphylococcus aureus signifies their underlying potential of phage therapy against mastitis.

  16. In vitro cytocidal effect of lytic peptides on several transformed mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, J M; Julian, G R; Jeffers, G W; White, K L; Enright, F M

    1989-01-01

    Several types of transformed mammalian cells, derived from established cell lines, were found to be lysed in vitro by three novel lytic peptides (SB-37, SB-37*, and Shiva-1). This is in contrast with the behavior of normal cells, where the observed lytic activity of the peptides is greatly reduced. Based on experiments utilizing compounds which disrupt the cytoskeleton (colchicine and cytochalasin-D), it is surmised that alterations in the cytoskeleton of transformed cells increase their sensitivity to the cytolytic activity exerted by the peptides, primarily by causing a loss of osmotic integrity. Thus, a stable and regenerative cytoskeletal system, as that possessed by normal cells, would seem requisite to withstanding the lytic effects of the peptides.

  17. Label-free Detection of Protein Released during Platelet Activation by CNT-Enhanced Love Mode SAW Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huiyan; Zu, Hongfei; Wang, Qing-Ming; Zhao, Gangyi; Wang, Jamesu H-C

    2014-09-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been applied in a series of clinical treatments. PRP contains high-concentrated platelets, which, when activated, could secret a variety of growth factors and cytokines, to promote and/or enhance healing of injured tissues. Non-activated platelets suspension could be prepared by an isolation method of centrifugation and washing currently. However, it is not clear whether platelets, if any, are already activated during this process and there is no simple method to monitor their activation accordingly. Shear-Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave sensors (SH-SAW, Love Mode) are promising in fundamental biology as well as biomedical engineering, detecting cell behaviors in liquid in a non-invasive, simple and quantitative manner. In this study, Love mode sensors are adopted for the label-free detection of protein secreted by platelets. Carbon nanotube (CNT) is reported as an advisable platform of both non-specific protein adsorption and specific protein binding. For further improvement of Love mode sensor performance, novel CNT -coated parylene-C film is prepared on its surface as both the acoustic-wave-guiding layer and bio-interface layer. The S21 loss curves of Love mode sensors were recorded and the corresponding resonance frequencies were extracted. The results showed that the CNT-enhanced sensor possessed an increased resonance frequency shift when compared to normal sensor with single parylene-C film under identical collagen concentrations. Then, the modified sensor is used for label-free detection of protein released by various concentrations of platelets. The results revealed high sensitivity and consistency, indicating the potential of CNT-enhanced Love mode sensors in cell-based applications.

  18. In vitro slow-release urea contained in rice straw-based diets to increase efficiency of rumen microbial protein synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Dede Kardaya; K. G. Wiryawan; A. Parakkasi; H.M Winugroho

    2010-01-01

    Effect of slow-release urea on efficiency of rumen microbial protein synthesis (EMPS) was examined using an in vitro technique. The objective of this experiment was to reveal the in vitro slow-release urea characteristics of zinc-urea, zeolites-urea, and zeolites-zinc-urea in relation to EMPS observed in different incubation time. The experimental design employed was randomized block design with 4 x 3 factorial plus a control treatment, and conducted in two replications. Factors were various ...

  19. Utility value of a T-cell interferon-γ release assay based on recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis 11kD protein in the diagnosis of tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽帆

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of a T-cell interferon-γrelease assay based on recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB)11kD protein for diagnosing tuberculosis.Methods This prospective study enrolled inpatients with suspected tuberculosis at PUMCH to examine the diagnostic sensitivity,specificity,predictive value(PV)and likelihood ratio(LR)of T-cell interferon-γrelease assays based on recombinant MTB-11kD

  20. A whole blood in vitro cytokine release assay with aqueous monoclonal antibody presentation for the prediction of therapeutic protein induced cytokine release syndrome in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Babette; Morgan, Hannah; Krieg, Jennifer; Gani, Zaahira; Milicov, Adriana; Warncke, Max; Brennan, Frank; Jones, Stewart; Sims, Jennifer; Kiessling, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    The administration of several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to humans has been associated with acute adverse events characterized by clinically significant release of cytokines in the blood. The limited predictive value of toxicology species in this field has triggered intensive research to establish human in vitro assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells or blood to predict cytokine release in humans. A thorough characterization of these assays is required to understand their predictive value for hazard identification and risk assessment in an optimal manner, and to highlight potential limitations of individual assay formats. We have characterized a whole human blood cytokine release assay with only minimal dilution by the test antibodies (95% v/v blood) in aqueous presentation format, an assay which has so far received less attention in the scientific world with respect to the evaluation of its suitability to predict cytokine release in humans. This format was compared with a human PBMC assay with immobilized mAbs presentation already well-characterized by others. Cytokine secretion into plasma or cell culture supernatants after 24h incubation with the test mAbs (anti-CD28 superagonist TGN1412-like material (TGN1412L), another anti-CD28 superagonistic mAb (ANC28.1), a T-cell depleting mAb (Orthoclone™), and a TGN1412 isotype-matched control (Tysabri™) not associated with clinically-relevant cytokine release) was detected by a multiplex assay based on electrochemiluminescent excitation. We provide proof that this whole blood assay is a suitable new method for hazard identification of safety-relevant cytokine release in the clinic based on its ability to detect the typical cytokine signatures found in humans for the tested mAbs and on a markedly lower assay background and cytokine release with the isotype-matched control mAb Tysabri™ - a clear advantage over the PBMC assay. Importantly, quantitative and qualitative differences in the relative cytokine

  1. Poly(vinyl alcohol) nanofibers by electrospinning as a protein delivery system and the retardation of enzyme release by additional polymer coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jun; Aigner, Achim; Czubayko, Frank; Kissel, Thomas; Wendorff, Joachim H; Greiner, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Protein-loaded (bovine serum albumin (BSA) or luciferase) poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanofibers were obtained by electrospinning. Poly(p-xylylene) (PPX, also coined as parylene) coated PVA/BSA nanofibers were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The release of BSA from PVA nanofibers under physiological conditions was monitored by absorption spectroscopy. Burst release of BSA was noted with uncoated PVA nanofibers. In contrast, PPX-coated nanofibers exhibited a significantly retarded release of BSA depending on the coating thickness of PPX (ranging from 40 to 300 nm). Luciferase was used here as model enzyme, which after electrospinning retained its enzyme activity. This preservation of enzyme activity and the continuous release of the intact enzyme from the immersed fibers meets a fundamental prerequisite for the application of enzymes or other sensitive agents released from electrospun nanofibers under physiological conditions.

  2. In vitro cytocidal effect of novel lytic peptides on Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, J M; Burton, C A; Barr, S B; Jeffers, G W; Julian, G R; White, K L; Enright, F M; Klei, T R; Laine, R A

    1988-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma cruzi were killed by two novel lytic peptides (SB-37 and Shiva-1) in vitro. Human erythrocytes infected with P. falciparum, and Vero cells infected with T. cruzi, were exposed to these peptides. The result, in both cases, was a significant decrease in the level of parasite infection. Furthermore, the peptides had a marked cytocidal effect on trypomastigote stages of T. cruzi in media, whereas host eukaryotic cells were unaffected by the treatments. In view of the worldwide prevalence of these protozoan diseases and the lack of completely suitable treatments, lytic peptides may provide new and unique chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of these infections.

  3. Listeria monocytogenes has a functional chitinolytic system and an active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paspaliari, Dafni Katerina; Loose, Jennifer S. M.; Larsen, Marianne Halberg

    2015-01-01

    B) and a multi-modular lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LmLPMO10). These enzymes have been related to virulence and their role in chitin metabolism is poorly understood. It is thus of interest to functionally characterize the individual enzymes in order to shed light on their roles in vivo. Our results......Chitinases and chitin-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are most commonly associated with chitin metabolism, but are also reported as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. Listeria monocytogenes, a well-known virulent bacterium, possesses two chitinases (ChiA and Chi...

  4. The extracellular release of Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 nuclear protein is mediated by acetylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutinho Carneiro, Vitor; Moraes Maciel, Renata de; Caetano de Abreu da Silva, Isabel; Furtado Madeira da Costa, Rodrigo [Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Programa de Biotecnologia e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590 (Brazil); Neto Paiva, Claudia; Torres Bozza, Marcelo [Departamento de Imunologia, Instituto de Microbiologia Professor Paulo de Goes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590 (Brazil); Rosado Fantappie, Marcelo, E-mail: fantappie@bioqmed.ufrj.br [Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, Programa de Biotecnologia e Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, CCS, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro 21941-590 (Brazil)

    2009-12-25

    Schistosoma mansoni HMGB1 (SmHMGB1) was revealed to be a substrate for the parasite histone acetyltransferases SmGCN5 and SmCBP1. We found that full-length SmHMGB1, as well as its HMG-box B (but not HMG-box A) were acetylated in vitro by SmGCN5 and SmCBP1. However, SmCBP1 was able to acetylate both substrates more efficiently than SmGCN5. Interestingly, the removal of the C-terminal acidic tail of SmHMGB1 (SmHMGB1{Delta}C) resulted in increased acetylation of the protein. We showed by mammalian cell transfection assays that SmHMGB1 and SmHMGB1{Delta}C were transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm after sodium butyrate (NaB) treatment. Importantly, after NaB treatment, SmHMGB1 was also present outside the cell. Together, our data suggest that acetylation of SmHMGB1 plays a role in cellular trafficking, culminating with its secretion to the extracellular milieu. The possible role of SmHMGB1 acetylation in the pathogenesis of schistosomiasis is discussed.

  5. Regional Variation in Lytic and Lysogenic Viral Infection in the Southern Ocean and Its Contribution to Biogeochemical Cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, C.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2012-01-01

    Lytic and lysogenic viral infection was investigated throughout the Southern Ocean at sites spanning the sub-Antarctic zone, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, and an Antarctic continental sea. Higher lytic virus activity was recorded in the more productive sub-Antarctic zone than in the iron-limite

  6. Influence of heavy metals on biosynthesis, activity of lytic enzymes and growthstimulating factor of Streptomyces recifensis var. lyticus P-29

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. P. Kilochok

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Influence of heavy metals on growth, biosynthesis, lytic action and growthstimulating activity enzymes complex of Streptomyces recifensis var. lyticus was studied. It was showed that salt of plumbum' has positive influence as on biosynthesis hydrolases (lytic endopeptidases, proteinases, amylases as well increase growthstimulating activity of preparation relatively the yeast

  7. Induction of serine racemase expression and D-serine release from microglia by secreted amyloid precursor protein (sAPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengzhou; Basile, Anthony S; Barger, Steven W

    2007-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves neuronal loss and reduction of synaptic density in specific brain region. Some of the neuronal deaths are associated with excitotoxicity. We previously reported that amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) induced release of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) co-agonists, including glutamate and D-serine. The induction of D-serine production by Abeta involves transcriptional and/or translational regulation of serine racemase gene. Similarly, we report here that conditioned medium from microglia treated with secreted amyloid precursor protein (sAPP) contained elevated levels of D-serine. In microglia, sAPP increased the steady-state dimeric protein level of serine racemase. Promoter-reporter and mRNA analyses suggested that serine racemase is transcriptionally induced by sAPP. These data extend the link between excitotoxicity and neuroinflammation. D-serine may cooperate with glutamate to link neuroinflammation with excitotoxicity, suggesting a pathogenic mechanism applicable to neuronal death in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Laser-Triggered Small Interfering RNA Releasing Gold Nanoshells against Heat Shock Protein for Sensitized Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Siwen; Zhang, Min; Ma, Yi; Liu, Yuxi; Gao, Weidong; Zhang, Jiaqi; Gu, Yueqing

    2017-02-01

    The resistance of cancer cells to photothermal therapy is closely related to the overexpression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are abnormally upregulated when cells are under lethal stresses. Common strategies that use small molecule inhibitors against HSPs to enhance hyperthermia effect lack spatial and temporal control of drug release, leading to unavoidable systemic toxicity. Herein, a versatile photothermal platform is developed which is composed of a hollow gold nanoshell core densely packed with small interfering RNAs against heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). Upon near infrared light irradiation, the small interfering RNAs can detach from gold surface specifically and escape from endosomes for Hsp70 silencing. Meanwhile, the temperature increases for hyperthermia therapy due to the high photothermal efficiency of the nanoshells. Efficient downregulation of Hsp70 after light activation is achieved in vitro and in vivo. Ultimately, the light-controlled dual functional nanosystem, with the effects of Hsp70 silencing and temperature elevation, results in sensitized photothermal therapy in nude mice model under mild temperature. This strategy smartly combines the localized photothermal therapy with controlled Hsp70 silencing, and has great potential for clinical translation with a simple and easily controlled structure.

  9. Actin related protein complex subunit 1b controls sperm release, barrier integrity and cell division during adult rat spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anita; Dumasia, Kushaan; Deshpande, Sharvari; Gaonkar, Reshma; Balasinor, N H

    2016-08-01

    Actin remodeling is a vital process for signaling, movement and survival in all cells. In the testes, extensive actin reorganization occurs at spermatid-Sertoli cell junctions during sperm release (spermiation) and at inter Sertoli cell junctions during restructuring of the blood testis barrier (BTB). During spermiation, tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs), rich in branched actin networks, ensure recycling of spermatid-Sertoli cell junctional molecules. Similar recycling occurs during BTB restructuring around the same time as spermiation occurs. Actin related protein 2/3 complex is an essential actin nucleation and branching protein. One of its subunits, Arpc1b, was earlier found to be down-regulated in an estrogen-induced rat model of spermiation failure. Also, Arpc1b was found to be estrogen responsive through estrogen receptor beta in seminiferous tubule culture. Here, knockdown of Arpc1b by siRNA in adult rat testis led to defects in spermiation caused by failure in TBC formation. Knockdown also compromised BTB integrity and caused polarity defects of mature spermatids. Apart from these effects pertaining to Sertoli cells, Arpc1b reduction perturbed ability of germ cells to enter G2/M phase thus hindering cell division. In summary, Arpc1b, an estrogen responsive gene, is a regulator of spermiation, mature spermatid polarity, BTB integrity and cell division during adult spermatogenesis.

  10. killerFLIP: a novel lytic peptide specifically inducing cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennarun, B; Gaidos, G; Bucur, O; Tinari, A; Rupasinghe, C; Jin, T; Dewar, R; Song, K; Santos, M T; Malorni, W; Mierke, D; Khosravi-Far, R

    2013-10-31

    One of the objectives in the development of effective cancer therapy is induction of tumor-selective cell death. Toward this end, we have identified a small peptide that, when introduced into cells via a TAT cell-delivery system, shows a remarkably potent cytoxicity in a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in vivo, whereas sparing normal cells and tissues. This fusion peptide was named killerFLIP as its sequence was derived from the C-terminal domain of c-FLIP, an anti-apoptotic protein. Using structure activity analysis, we determined the minimal bioactive core of killerFLIP, namely killerFLIP-E. Structural analysis of cells using electron microscopy demonstrated that killerFLIP-E triggers cell death accompanied by rapid (within minutes) plasma membrane permeabilization. Studies of the structure of the active core of killerFLIP (-E) indicated that it possesses amphiphilic properties and self-assembles into micellar structures in aqueous solution. The biochemical properties of killerFLIP are comparable to those of cationic lytic peptides, which participate in defense against pathogens and have also demonstrated anticancer properties. We show that the pro-cell death effects of killerFLIP are independent of its sequence similarity with c-FLIPL as killerFLIP-induced cell death was largely apoptosis and necroptosis independent. A killerFLIP-E variant containing a scrambled c-FLIPL motif indeed induced similar cell death, suggesting the importance of the c-FLIPL residues but not of their sequence. Thus, we report the discovery of a promising synthetic peptide with novel anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Natural killer lytic-associated molecule plays a role in controlling tumor dissemination and metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Glenn Hoover

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer lytic-associated molecule (NKLAM is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that plays a major role in the cytolytic activity of NK cells. NKLAM is rapidly synthesized and then targeted to the granule membranes of NK cells upon NK activation. Previous studies have shown an essential role for NKLAM in NK killing activity in vitro. These findings were extended to an in vivo model of NK-mediated tumor killing in which NKLAM-deficient knockout (KO mice injected with B16 melanoma cells were found to have significantly higher numbers of pulmonary tumor nodules than wild type (WT mice. To further investigate the role of NKLAM and NK function in tumor immunity in vivo, we utilized additional tumor models to compare tumor development and progression in NKLAM KO and WT mice. Primary tumor growth, dissemination, and metastasis of RMA-S lymphoma cells and E0771 breast cancer cells were evaluated. Both tumor cell lines were stably transfected with constructs that allow expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP, which serves as a tumor-specific marker. Intravenous injection of NK-sensitive RMA-S lymphoma cells resulted in greater dissemination of lymphoma cells in NKLAM KO mice than in WT mice. Lymphoma cells were found in the lymph nodes and bone marrow of NKLAM KO mice two weeks after injection; few detectable tumor cells remained in WT mice. E0771 syngeneic breast cancer cells were injected into the mammary pads of NKLAM KO and WT mice. Primary tumor growth was greater in NKLAM KO than in WT mice. More significantly, there were four to five fold more tumor cells in the blood and lungs of NKLAM KO than in WT mice two weeks after injection of tumor cells into the mammary pad. These results indicate that NKLAM plays a role in tumor development in vivo, especially in controlling tumor dissemination and metastasis to distant sites.

  12. RTA Occupancy of the Origin of Lytic Replication during Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from B Cell Latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis L. Santana

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available RTA, the viral Replication and Transcription Activator, is essential for rhadinovirus lytic gene expression upon de novo infection and reactivation from latency. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS/toll-like receptor (TLR4 engagement enhances rhadinovirus reactivation. We developed two new systems to examine the interaction of RTA with host NF-kappaB (NF-κB signaling during murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 infection: a latent B cell line (HE-RIT inducible for RTA-Flag expression and virus reactivation; and a recombinant virus (MHV68-RTA-Bio that enabled in vivo biotinylation of RTA in BirA transgenic mice. LPS acted as a second stimulus to drive virus reactivation from latency in the context of induced expression of RTA-Flag. ORF6, the gene encoding the single-stranded DNA binding protein, was one of many viral genes that were directly responsive to RTA induction; expression was further increased upon treatment with LPS. However, NF-κB sites in the promoter of ORF6 did not influence RTA transactivation in response to LPS in HE-RIT cells. We found no evidence for RTA occupancy of the minimal RTA-responsive region of the ORF6 promoter, yet RTA was found to complex with a portion of the right origin of lytic replication (oriLyt-R that contains predicted RTA recognition elements. RTA occupancy of select regions of the MHV-68 genome was also evaluated in our novel in vivo RTA biotinylation system. Streptavidin isolation of RTA-Bio confirmed complex formation with oriLyt-R in LPS-treated primary splenocytes from BirA mice infected with MHV68 RTA-Bio. We demonstrate the utility of reactivation-inducible B cells coupled with in vivo RTA biotinylation for mechanistic investigations of the interplay of host signaling with RTA.

  13. RTA Occupancy of the Origin of Lytic Replication during Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from B Cell Latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Alexis L.; Oldenburg, Darby G.; Kirillov, Varvara; Malik, Laraib; Dong, Qiwen; Sinayev, Roman; Marcu, Kenneth B.; White, Douglas W.; Krug, Laurie T.

    2017-01-01

    RTA, the viral Replication and Transcription Activator, is essential for rhadinovirus lytic gene expression upon de novo infection and reactivation from latency. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/toll-like receptor (TLR)4 engagement enhances rhadinovirus reactivation. We developed two new systems to examine the interaction of RTA with host NF-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling during murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection: a latent B cell line (HE-RIT) inducible for RTA-Flag expression and virus reactivation; and a recombinant virus (MHV68-RTA-Bio) that enabled in vivo biotinylation of RTA in BirA transgenic mice. LPS acted as a second stimulus to drive virus reactivation from latency in the context of induced expression of RTA-Flag. ORF6, the gene encoding the single-stranded DNA binding protein, was one of many viral genes that were directly responsive to RTA induction; expression was further increased upon treatment with LPS. However, NF-κB sites in the promoter of ORF6 did not influence RTA transactivation in response to LPS in HE-RIT cells. We found no evidence for RTA occupancy of the minimal RTA-responsive region of the ORF6 promoter, yet RTA was found to complex with a portion of the right origin of lytic replication (oriLyt-R) that contains predicted RTA recognition elements. RTA occupancy of select regions of the MHV-68 genome was also evaluated in our novel in vivo RTA biotinylation system. Streptavidin isolation of RTA-Bio confirmed complex formation with oriLyt-R in LPS-treated primary splenocytes from BirA mice infected with MHV68 RTA-Bio. We demonstrate the utility of reactivation-inducible B cells coupled with in vivo RTA biotinylation for mechanistic investigations of the interplay of host signaling with RTA. PMID:28212352

  14. Increased plasma ghrelin suppresses insulin release in wethers fed with a high-protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T; Sato, K; Kato, S; Yonezawa, T; Kobayashi, Y; Ohtani, Y; Ohwada, S; Aso, H; Yamaguchi, T; Roh, S G; Katoh, K

    2014-06-01

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional peptide that promotes an increase of food intake and stimulates GH secretion. Ghrelin secretion is regulated by nutritional status and nutrients. Although a high-protein (HP) diet increases plasma ghrelin secretion in mammals, the mechanisms and the roles of the elevated ghrelin concentrations due to a HP diet have not been fully established. To clarify the roles of elevated acylated ghrelin upon intake of a HP diet, we investigated the regulation of ghrelin concentrations in plasma and tissues in wethers fed with either the HP diet or the control (CNT) diet for 14 days, and examined the action of the elevated plasma ghrelin by using a ghrelin-receptor antagonist. The HP diet gradually increased the plasma acylated-ghrelin concentrations, but the CNT diet did not. Although the GH concentrations did not vary significantly across the groups, an injection of ghrelin-receptor antagonist enhanced insulin levels in circulation in the HP diet group. In the fundus region of the stomach, the ghrelin levels did not differ between the HP and CNT diet groups, whereas ghrelin O-acyltransferase mRNA levels were higher in the group fed with HP diet than those of the CNT diet group were. These results indicate that the HP diet elevated the plasma ghrelin levels by increasing its synthesis; this elevation strongly suppresses the appearance of insulin in the circulation of wethers, but it is not involved in GH secretion. Overall, our findings indicate a role of endogenous ghrelin action in secretion of insulin, which acts as a regulator after the consumption of a HP diet.

  15. Release of Tissue-specific Proteins into Coronary Perfusate as a Model for Biomarker Discovery in Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordwell, Stuart; Edwards, Alistair; Liddy, Kiersten

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis of acute coronary syndromes is based on protein biomarkers, such as the cardiac troponins (cTnI/cTnT) and creatine kinase (CK-MB) that are released into the circulation. Biomarker discovery is focused on identifying very low abundance tissue-derived analytes from within albumin-rich pla......Diagnosis of acute coronary syndromes is based on protein biomarkers, such as the cardiac troponins (cTnI/cTnT) and creatine kinase (CK-MB) that are released into the circulation. Biomarker discovery is focused on identifying very low abundance tissue-derived analytes from within albumin...

  16. Milk production efficiency improvement in buffaloes through the use of slow ammonia release and protected protein supplement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.W. Scott

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of feeding Slow Ammonia Release and Protected Protein supplement (SARPP on blood urea nitrogen (BUN and urinary levels of allantoins as well as on quantity and quality of milk, a feeding trial was conducted on 24 lactating buffaloes. Animals were divided into three similar groups, fed on standard basal ration. Animals in group-I were fed 1.0 kg untreated rapeseed meal containing 50 g untreated urea, animals in group II were fed 1.0 kg treated rapeseed meal containing 50 g untreated urea and animals in group III were fed 1.0 kg treated rapeseed meal containing 50 g treated urea (SARPP supplement, in place of one kg compound cattle feed. Levels of BUN and allantoins in urine were 10.33, 10.48 & 9.64 (P<0.05 mg/dl and 2.35, 3.03 & 5.23 (P<0.01 mmol/litre in groups I, II and III, respectively. Daily average milk yield was 6.46, 7.42 (P<0.05 and 7.70 (P<0.01 kg in groups I, II and III, respectively. Average fat and protein % were 6.64 & 3.41, 6.81 (P<0.05 & 3.53 and 6.95 (P<0.05 & 3.57 in groups I, II and III, respectively. On feeding SARPP supplement, crop residues and dietary proteins could be utilized in a more efficient manner in buffaloes.

  17. Accommodating the bacterial decoding release factor as an alien protein among the RNAs at the active site of the ribosome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elizabeth S Poole; David J Young; Marjan E Askarian-Amiri; Debbie-Jane G Scarlett; Warren P Tate

    2007-01-01

    The decoding release factor (RF) triggers termination of protein synthesis by functionally mimicking a tRNA to span the decoding centre and the peptidyl transferase centre (PTC) of the ribosome. Structurally, it must fit into a site crafted for a tRNA and surrounded by five other RNAs, namely the adjacent peptidyl tRNA carrying the completed polypeptide, the mRNA and the three rRNAs. This is achieved by extending a structural domain from the body of the protein that results in a critical conformational change allowing it to contact the PTC. A structural model of the bacterial termination complex with the accommodated RF shows that it makes close contact with the first, second and third bases of the stop codon in the mRNA with two separate loops of structure: the anticodon loop and the loop at the tip of helix a5. The anticodon loop also makes contact with the base following the stop codon that is known to strongly influence termination efficiency. It confirms the close contact of domain 3 of the protein with the key RNA structures of the PTC. The mRNA signal for termination includes sequences upstream as well as downstream of the stop codon, and this may reflect structural restrictions for specific combinations of tRNA and RF to be bound onto the ribosome together. An unbiased SELEX approach has been investigated as a tool to identify potential rRNA-binding contacts of the bacterial RF in its different binding conformations within the active centre of the ribosome.

  18. The Molecular Switch of Telomere Phages: High Binding Specificity of the PY54 Cro Lytic Repressor to a Single Operator Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Andre Hammerl

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperate bacteriophages possess a molecular switch, which regulates the lytic and lysogenic growth. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54 and ɸKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB comprising genes for the prophage repressor, the lytic repressor and a putative antiterminator. The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI, Cro and Q, respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ɸKO2 are also reminiscent of lambda-like phages. By contrast, in silico analyses revealed the presence of only one operator (O\\(_{\\rm{R}}\\3 in PY54. The purified PY54 Cro protein was used for EMSA studies demonstrating that it exclusively binds to a 16-bp palindromic site (O\\(_{\\rm{R}}\\3 upstream of the prophage repressor gene. The O\\(_{\\rm{R}}\\3 operator sequences of PY54 and ɸKO2/N15 only differ by their peripheral base pairs, which are responsible for Cro specificity. PY54 cI and cro transcription is regulated by highly active promoters initiating the synthesis of a homogenious species of leaderless mRNA. The location of the PY54 Cro binding site and of the identified promoters suggests that the lytic repressor suppresses cI transcription but not its own synthesis. The results indicate an unexpected diversity of the growth regulation mechanisms in lambda-related phages.

  19. Thrombin Receptor-Activating Protein (TRAP-Activated Akt Is Involved in the Release of Phosphorylated-HSP27 (HSPB1 from Platelets in DM Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhiko Tokuda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is generally known that heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 is phosphorylated through p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase. We have previously reported that HSP27 is released from human platelets associated with collagen-induced phosphorylation. In the present study, we conducted an investigation into the effect of thrombin receptor-activating protein (TRAP on the release of HSP27 in platelets in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM patients. The phosphorylated-HSP27 levels induced by TRAP were directly proportional to the aggregation of platelets. The levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 (Ser-78 were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-p38 MAP kinase and phosphorylated-Akt in the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP but not with those of phosphorylated-p44/p42 MAP kinase. The levels of HSP27 released from the TRAP (10 µM-stimulated platelets were correlated with the levels of phosphorylated-HSP27 in the platelets. The released platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB levels were in parallel with the HSP27 levels released from the platelets stimulated by 10 µM TRAP. Although the area under the curve (AUC of small aggregates (9–25 µm induced by 10 µM TRAP showed no significant correlation with the released HSP27 levels, AUC of medium aggregates (25–50 µm, large aggregates (50–70 µm and light transmittance were significantly correlated with the released HSP27 levels. TRAP-induced phosphorylation of HSP27 was truly suppressed by deguelin, an inhibitor of Akt, in the platelets from a healthy subject. These results strongly suggest that TRAP-induced activation of Akt in addition to p38 MAP kinase positively regulates the release of phosphorylated-HSP27 from human platelets, which is closely related to the platelet hyper-aggregation in type 2 DM patients.

  20. A Leucine Residue in the C Terminus of Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Matrix Protein Is Essential for Efficient Virus-Like Particle and Virion Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangyuan; Zhang, Shengwei; Ding, Binbin; Yang, Xiaodan; Chen, Longyun; Yan, Qin; Jiang, Yanliang; Zhong, Yi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxovirus particles, like other enveloped virus particles, are formed by budding from membranes of infected cells, and matrix (M) proteins are critical for this process. To identify the M protein important for this process, we have characterized the budding of the human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) M protein. Our results showed that expression of the HPIV3 M protein alone is sufficient to initiate the release of virus-like particles (VLPs). Electron microscopy analysis confirmed that VLPs are morphologically similar to HPIV3 virions. We identified a leucine (L302) residue within the C terminus of the HPIV3 M protein that is critical for M protein-mediated VLP production by regulating the ubiquitination of the M protein. When L302 was mutated into A302, ubiquitination of M protein was defective, the release of VLPs was abolished, and the membrane binding and budding abilities of M protein were greatly weakened, but the ML302A mutant retained oligomerization activity and had a dominant negative effect on M protein-mediated VLP production. Furthermore, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor also inhibited M protein-mediated VLP production and viral budding. Finally, recombinant HPIV3 containing the ML302A mutant could not be rescued. These results suggest that L302 acts as a critical regulating signal for the ubiquitination of the HPIV3 M protein and virion release. IMPORTANCE Human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3) is an enveloped virus with a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA genome. It can cause severe respiratory tract diseases, such as bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and croup in infants and young children. However, no valid antiviral therapy or vaccine is currently available. Thus, further elucidation of its assembly and budding will be helpful in the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we show that a leucine residue (L302) located at the C terminus of the HPIV3 M protein is essential for efficient production of virus-like particles

  1. Effectiveness of lytic bacteriophages in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations introduced through cross-contamination on fresh cut lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous research has shown that lytic bacteriophages (phages) can kill E. coli O157:H7 on produce surfaces. The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield) at 10^8 PFU/m...

  2. Specific functions of the Rep and Rep׳ proteins of porcine circovirus during copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Andrew K

    2015-07-01

    The roles of two porcine circovirus replication initiator proteins, Rep and Rep׳, in generating copy-release and rolling-circle DNA replication intermediates were determined. Rep uses the supercoiled closed-circular genome (ccc) to initiate leading-strand synthesis (identical to copy-release replication) and generates the single-stranded circular (ssc) genome from the displaced DNA strand. In the process, a minus-genome primer (MGP) necessary for complementary-strand synthesis, from ssc to ccc, is synthesized. Rep׳ cleaves the growing nascent-strand to regenerate the parent ccc molecule. In the process, a Rep׳-DNA hybrid containing the right palindromic sequence (at the origin of DNA replication) is generated. Analysis of the virus particle showed that it is composed of four components: ssc, MGP, capsid protein and a novel Rep-related protein (designated Protein-3).

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of a Lytic Siphoviridae Bacteriophage Infecting Several Serovars of Salmonella enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Rubina; Lombardi, Serena; Iodice, Maria Grazia; Riccardi, Marita Georgia; Orsini, Massimiliano; Bolletti Censi, Sergio; Galiero, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriophage 100268_sal2 was isolated from water buffalo feces in southern Italy, exhibiting lytic activity against several subspecies of Salmonella enterica. This bacteriophage belongs to the Siphoviridae family and has a 125,114-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome containing 188 coding sequences (CDSs). PMID:27688334

  4. Oncogenic Herpesvirus Utilizes Stress-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoints for Efficient Lytic Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Balistreri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV causes Kaposi's sarcoma and certain lymphoproliferative malignancies. Latent infection is established in the majority of tumor cells, whereas lytic replication is reactivated in a small fraction of cells, which is important for both virus spread and disease progression. A siRNA screen for novel regulators of KSHV reactivation identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 as a negative regulator of viral reactivation. Depletion of MDM2, a repressor of p53, favored efficient activation of the viral lytic transcription program and viral reactivation. During lytic replication cells activated a p53 response, accumulated DNA damage and arrested at G2-phase. Depletion of p21, a p53 target gene, restored cell cycle progression and thereby impaired the virus reactivation cascade delaying the onset of virus replication induced cytopathic effect. Herpesviruses are known to reactivate in response to different kinds of stress, and our study now highlights the molecular events in the stressed host cell that KSHV has evolved to utilize to ensure efficient viral lytic replication.

  5. Crystal structure and mechanism of the lytic transglycosylase MltA from Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straaten, Karin

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the determination and analysis of the 3D-structure of the lytic transglycosylase MltA from Escherichia coli by X-ray crystallography. This work aims to further increase our knowledge of the molecular details of the cleaving mechanism and the typical 1,6- anhydromuropeptide prod

  6. Structure and boosting activity of a starch-degrading lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo Leggio, Leila; Simmons, Thomas J.; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro

    2015-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered enzymes that oxidatively deconstruct polysaccharides. LPMOs are fundamental in the effective utilization of these substrates by bacteria and fungi; moreover, the enzymes have significant industrial importance. We report here...... substrate to maltose by β-amylase. The detailed structure of the enzyme's active site yields insights into the mechanism of action of this important class of enzymes....

  7. Pain relief with percutaneous trochanteroplasty in a patient with bilateral trochanteric myelomatous lytic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahezi, Sayed E; Silva, Kyle; Najafi, Shervin

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematologic malignancy associated with destructive bone loss. Lytic lesions, a hallmark of this cancer, can result in significant morbidity because of associated pain and structural osseous compromise. Osteoplasty has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of myelomatous pain within the axial skeleton; however, there is limited evidence supporting the utility of osteoplasty to treat extra-spinal lesions. We describe a 67 year-old woman with stable IgA lambda multiple myeloma with sentinel bilateral greater trochanteric lytic lesions that was referred to our interventional pain management clinic for evaluation of bilateral lateral hip pain. Conservative treatment options including physical therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral opiates, and local corticosteroid injections to bilateral trochanteric bursae failed to offer pain relief. The patient underwent minimally invasive percutaneous trochanteroplasty with concomitant core biopsy of her bilateral trochanteric lytic lesions. The intended goals of this novel procedure were to determine the cause of the suspected lytic lesions, provide pain relief, and offer structural stability by safely implanting bone cement as part of a fracture prevention strategy. At 12 month follow-up, the patient's pain improved by 70% and she no longer required the use of pain medication. The patient also displayed a significant improvement in her day-to-day functioning and quality of life.

  8. The importance of lytic and nonlytic immune responses in viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wodarz, Dominik; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2002-01-01

    Antiviral immune effector mechanisms can be divided broadly into lytic and nonlytic components. We use mathematical models to investigate the fundamental question of which type of response is required to combat different types of viral infection. According to our model, the relative roles...

  9. Oncogenic Herpesvirus Utilizes Stress-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoints for Efficient Lytic Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistreri, Giuseppe; Viiliäinen, Johanna; Turunen, Mikko; Diaz, Raquel; Lyly, Lauri; Pekkonen, Pirita; Rantala, Juha; Ojala, Krista; Sarek, Grzegorz; Teesalu, Mari; Denisova, Oxana; Peltonen, Karita; Julkunen, Ilkka; Varjosalo, Markku; Kainov, Denis; Kallioniemi, Olli; Laiho, Marikki; Taipale, Jussi; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Ojala, Päivi M

    2016-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) causes Kaposi's sarcoma and certain lymphoproliferative malignancies. Latent infection is established in the majority of tumor cells, whereas lytic replication is reactivated in a small fraction of cells, which is important for both virus spread and disease progression. A siRNA screen for novel regulators of KSHV reactivation identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 as a negative regulator of viral reactivation. Depletion of MDM2, a repressor of p53, favored efficient activation of the viral lytic transcription program and viral reactivation. During lytic replication cells activated a p53 response, accumulated DNA damage and arrested at G2-phase. Depletion of p21, a p53 target gene, restored cell cycle progression and thereby impaired the virus reactivation cascade delaying the onset of virus replication induced cytopathic effect. Herpesviruses are known to reactivate in response to different kinds of stress, and our study now highlights the molecular events in the stressed host cell that KSHV has evolved to utilize to ensure efficient viral lytic replication.

  10. Crystal structure and mechanism of the lytic transglycosylase MltA from Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straaten, Karin

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the determination and analysis of the 3D-structure of the lytic transglycosylase MltA from Escherichia coli by X-ray crystallography. This work aims to further increase our knowledge of the molecular details of the cleaving mechanism and the typical 1,6- anhydromuropeptide prod

  11. STUDIES ON THE BACTERIOPHAGE OF D'HERELLE : I. IS THE LYTIC PRINCIPLE VOLATILE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, J J; Korb, C

    1925-01-01

    The lytic principle concerned in the phenomenon of transmissible lysis is not volatile. The results which have been taken to indicate volatility are, in our opinion, to be attributed to the transfer to the distillate of minute droplets of the original active filtrate.

  12. Ionotropic Cross-linked Carbo-protein Micro Matrix System: An Approach for Improvement of Drug Release, Compaction and Tableting behavior of Losartan Potassium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandai, Madhusmruti; Chakraborty, Santanu; Ghosh, Ashoke Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research work is to develop carbo-protein polymeric complex based sustain release microspheres of losartan potassium and investigate the ability of this dosage form to improve the flowability, compressibility and tableting properties of losartan potassium. The influence of silk sericin, alginate and its blend on various physicochemical parameters and in vitro drug release pattern were studied to optimize the concentration of polymeric blend required for 12 h. sustain release. Optimized batch was subjected to different flowability, compressibility and tableting properties studies to observe the effects of carbo-protein microspheres on flow properties. Results indicated that the concentration of sericin was found to be the main influential factor for prolonged drug release. Different micromeritic studies revealed that the poor flowability and compressibility properties of pure losartan potassium were significantly improved by this algino-sericin microspheric dosage form. Research findings also revealed that plasticity, die filling behavior and tableting properties of the pure drug were significantly improved by this microsphere formulation. So these prospective results concluded that carbo-protein polymeric microspheres helps to sustain the drug release for prolong hours as well as improve the flowability, compressibility and tableting properties of losartan potassium.

  13. Protein breakdown and release of β-casomorphins during in vitro gastro-intestinal digestion of sterilised model systems of liquid infant formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Stefano; Stuknytė, Milda; Masotti, Fabio; De Noni, Ivano

    2017-02-15

    Protein modifications occurring during sterilisation of infant formulas can affect protein digestibility and release of bioactive peptides. The effect of glycation and cross-linking on protein breakdown and release of β-casomorphins was evaluated during in vitro gastro-intestinal digestion (GID) of six sterilised model systems of infant formula. Protein degradation during in vitro GID was evaluated by SDS-PAGE and by measuring the nitrogen content of ultrafiltration (3kDa) permeates before and after in vitro GID of model IFs. Glycation strongly hindered protein breakdown, whereas cross-linking resulting from β-elimination reactions had a negligible effect. Only β-casomorphin 7 (β-CM7) was detected (0.187-0.858mgL(-1)) at the end of the intestinal digestion in all untreated IF model systems. The level of β-CM7 in the sterilised model systems prepared without addition of sugars ranged from 0.256 to 0.655mgL(-1). The release of this peptide during GID was hindered by protein glycation.

  14. The release characteristics of a model protein from self-assembled succinimide-terminated poly(lactide-co-glycolide ethylene oxide fumarate) nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Angel E.; He, Xuezhong; Xu, Weijie; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2008-08-01

    Lactide-co-glycolide-based functionalized nanoparticles (NPs), because of their high surface areas for conjugation and biodegradability, are attractive as carriers for stabilization and sustained delivery of therapeutic agents and protein drugs. The objective of this work was to compare the release characteristics of model molecules encapsulated in NPs produced from poly(lactide-co-glycolide fumarate) (PLGF) macromer with those of model molecules conjugated to NPs produced from succinimide (NHS)-terminated PLGF-NHS macromer. Poly(lactide fumarate) (PLAF), PLGF and poly(lactide-co-ethylene oxide fumarate) (PLEOF) macromers were synthesized by condensation polymerization. The hydroxyl end-groups of PLAF and PLGF macromers were reacted with N,N'-disuccinimidyl carbonate (DSC) to produce succinimide-terminated PLAF-NHS and PLGF-NHS macromers. The macromers were self-assembled by dialysis to form NPs. The amphiphilic PLEOF macromer was used as the surfactant to stabilize the NPs in the process of self-assembly. 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) was used as a model small molecule for encapsulation in PLAF or PLGF NPs and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein for conjugation to PLAF-NHS and PLGF-NHS NPs. The profile of release of the encapsulated PAN from PLAF and PLGF NPs was non-linear and consisted of a burst release followed by a period of sustained release. The release profile for BSA, conjugated to PLAF-NHS and PLGF-NHS NPs, was linear up to complete degradation of the NPs. PLGF and PLAF NPs degraded in 15 and 28 days, respectively, while PLGF-NHS and PLAF-NHS NPs degraded in 25 and 38 days, which demonstrated that the release was dominated by erosion of the matrix. PLAF-NHS and PLGF-NHS NPs are potentially useful as carriers for sustained in situ release of protein drugs.

  15. Protection of pigs against challenge with virulent Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strains by a muramidase-released protein and extracellular factor vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisselink, H.J.; Vecht, U.; Stockhofe Zurwieden, N.; Smith, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of a muramidase-released protein (MRP) and extracellular factor (EF) vaccine in preventing infection and disease in pigs challenged either with a homologous or a heterologous Streptococcus suis serotype 2 strain (MRP EF ) was compared with the efficacy of a vaccine containing formalin-k

  16. Prostaglandins but not leukotrienes alter extracellular matrix protein deposition and cytokine release in primary human airway smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ly, David; Burgess, Janette K.; Brock, Thomas G.; Lee, Tak H.; Black, Judith L.; Oliver, Brian G. G.

    2012-01-01

    Van Ly D, Burgess JK, Brock TG, Lee TH, Black JL, Oliver BG. Prostaglandins but not leukotrienes alter extracellular matrix protein deposition and cytokine release in primary human airway smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 303: L239-L250, 2012. First published Ma

  17. Pneumocystis carinii major surface glycoprotein induces interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 release from a human alveolar epithelial cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Lundgren, Bettina; Shelhamer, J H

    1999-01-01

    (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) from an alveolar epithelial cell line (A549). RESULTS: Incubation of A549 cells with MSG in concentrations from 0.4 to 10 microg mL-1 for 24 h caused dose-dependent increases in IL-8 release (3.4-fold above control, P

  18. Characterization and lytic activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens phages from sewage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananthi Radhakrishnan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens phages from sewage were tested against P. fluorescens isolates of soil and sewage. The phages were characterized as to host range, morphology, structural proteins and genome fingerprint. Of the seven phages isolated, one was found to be abundant in sewage (5.9×10(7 pfu/mL, having broad host range, and distinct protein and DNA profile when compared to the other six phages. DNA restriction and protein profiles of the phages and their morphology indicate the diversity in the sewage environment. None of the isolates from the rhizosphere regions of various cultivated soils were susceptible to phages isolated from sewage.

  19. Fungus induces the release of IL- 8 in human corneal epithelial cells, via Dectin-1-mediated protein kinase C pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Dong; Peng; Gui-Qiu; Zhao; Jing; Lin; Nan; Jiang; Qiang; Xu; Cheng-Cheng; Zhu; Jian-Qiu; Qu; Lin; Cong; Hui; Li

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify whether Aspergillus fumigatus(A.fumigatus) hyphae antigens induced the release of interleukin-8(IL-8) in anti-fungal innate immunity of cultured human corneal epithelial cells(HCECs) and determine the involvement of intracellular signalling pathways. METHODS: HCECs were treated with A. fumigatus hyphae antigens with different concentrations and time.The cytoplasmic calcium of HCECs were assessed by fluorescence imaging. Western blot was used to detect the expression of Ca2 +-dependent protein kinase C(PKC). The IL-8 levels were determined by specific human IL-8 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA) and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR). Using a series of pharmacological inhibitors, we examined the upstream signalling pathway responsible for IL-8 expression in response to A.fumigatus hyphae antigens. RESULTS: Cells exposed to A. fumigatus hyphae antigens showed higher level of IL-8 m RNA expression and protein production. We demonstrated here that stimulation of HCECs with A. fumigatus hyphae triggers an intracellular Ca2 +flux and results in the activation of Ca2 +-dependent PKC(α, βⅠ and βⅡ) which can be attenuated by pre-treatment of cells with laminarin,suggesting that Dectin-1 signals pathway induced cytoplasmic calcium and influence the activation of PKC in HCECs. Inhibitors of Ca2 +-dependent PKC(Ro-31-8220 and Go6976) significantly abolished hyphae-induced expression of IL-8.CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that A. fumigatushyphae-induced IL-8 expression was regulated by the activation of Dectin-1-mediated Ca2 +-dependent PKC in HCECs.

  20. NO-Releasing Enmein-Type Diterpenoid Derivatives with Selective Antiproliferative Activity and Effects on Apoptosis-Related Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahong Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of nine enmein-type ent-kaurane diterpenoid and furoxan-based nitric oxide (NO donor hybrids (10a–i were designed and synthesized from commercially available oridonin (1. These hybrids were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against Bel-7402, K562, MGC-803, and CaEs-17 human cancer cell lines and L-02 normal liver cells. The antiproliferative activity against tumor cells was stronger than the lead compound 1 and parent molecule 9 in most cases. Especially, compound 10f showed the strongest activity against human hepatocarcinoma Bel-7402 cell line with an IC50 of 0.81 μM and could also release 33.7 μmol/L NO at the time point of 60 min. Compounds 10a–i also showed cytotoxic selectivity between tumor and normal liver cells with IC50 ranging from 22.1 to 33.9 μM. Furthermore, the apoptotic properties on Bel-7402 cells revealed that 10f could induce S phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis at low micromolar concentrations. The effects of 10f on apoptosis-related proteins were also investigated. The potent antiproliferative activities and mechanistic studies warrant further preclinical investigations.

  1. Different role of cAMP dependent protein kinase and CaMKII in H3 receptor regulation of histamine synthesis and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Delgado, D; Gómez-Ramírez, J; Torrent-Moreno, A; González-Sepúlveda, M; Blanco, I; Ortiz, J

    2009-12-15

    Histamine H(3) autoreceptors induce a negative feedback on histamine synthesis and release. While it is known that cAMP/cAMP dependent protein kinase (PKA) and Ca(2+)/CaMKII transduction pathways mediate H(3) effects on histamine synthesis, the pathways regulating neuronal histamine release are poorly known. Given the potential use of H(3) ligands in cognitive diseases, we have developed a technique for the determination of H(3) effects on histamine synthesis and release in brain cortical miniprisms. Potassium-induced depolarization effects were impaired by blockade of calcium entry through N and P/Q channels, as well as of CaMKII, but release was not affected by activators or inhibitors of the cAMP/PKA pathway (1-methyl-3-isobutylxanthine (IBMX), N6,2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate sodium salt (db-cAMP) or myristoyl PKA inhibitor peptide 14-22 (PKI(14-22)). In contrast, forskolin stimulated histamine release, although independently of PKA. Stimulation of histamine H(3) receptors with the agonist imetit markedly reduced the depolarization increase of histamine release, apparently through P/Q calcium channel inhibition. The H(3) antagonist/inverse agonist thioperamide modestly stimulated histamine release. Thioperamide effect on release was not modified by the PKA inhibitor PKI(14-22), but it was blocked by the CaMKII inhibitor KN-62. These results indicate that H(3) autoreceptors regulate neuronal histamine release (1) independently of the cAMP/PKA cascade, and (2) through modulation of calcium entry and CaMKII activation during depolarization.

  2. Examination of an aloe vera galacturonate polysaccharide capable of in situ gelation for the controlled release of protein therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConaughy, Shawn David

    A therapeutic delivery platform has been investigated with the ultimate goal of designing a sustained protein release matrix utilizing an in-situ gelling, acidic polysaccharide derived from the Aloe vera plant. The Aloe vera polysaccharide (AvP) has been examined in order to determine how chemical composition, structure, molecular weight and solution behavior affect gelation and protein/peptide delivery. Correlations are drawn between structural characteristics and solution behavior in order to determine the impact of polymer conformation and solvation on gel formation under conditions designed to simulate nasal applications. Steady state and dynamic rheology, classic and dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, pulse field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy have been employed to gain insight into the effects of galacturonic acid content, degree of methylation, entanglement and ionic strength on both solution behavior and the hydrogel state which ultimately governs protein/peptide release. This dissertation is divided into two sections. In the first section, a series of Aloe vera polysaccharides (AvP), from the pectin family have been structurally characterized indicating high galacturonic acid (GalA) content, low degree of methylester substitution (DM), low numbers of rhamnose residues and high molecular weight with respect to pectins extracted from traditional sources. The behavior of AvP was examined utilizing dilute solution, low-shear rheological techniques for specific molecular weight samples at selected conditions of ionic strength. From these dilute aqueous solution studies, the Mark-Houwink-Sakurada (MHS) constants (K and alpha), persistence length (Lp) and inherent chain stiffness (B parameter) were determined, indicating an expanded random coil in aqueous salt solutions. The critical concentration for transition from dilute to concentrated solution, C e, was determined by measuring both the zero shear viscosity and

  3. Cello-oligosaccharide oxidation reveals differences between two lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (family GH61) from Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bey, Mathieu; Zhou, Simeng; Poidevin, Laetitia; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Sigoillot, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    The genome of the coprophilic ascomycete Podospora anserina encodes 33 different genes encoding copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) from glycoside hydrolase family 61 (GH61). In this study, two of these enzymes (P. anserina GH61A [PaGH61A] and PaGH61B), which both harbored a family 1 carbohydrate binding module, were successfully produced in Pichia pastoris. Synergistic cooperation between PaGH61A or PaGH61B with the cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus on cellulose resulted in the formation of oxidized and nonoxidized cello-oligosaccharides. A striking difference between PaGH61A and PaGH61B was observed through the identification of the products, among which were doubly and triply oxidized cellodextrins, which were released only by the combination of PaGH61B with CDH. The mass spectrometry fragmentation patterns of these oxidized products could be consistent with oxidation at the C-6 position with a geminal diol group. The different properties of PaGH61A and PaGH61B and their effect on the interaction with CDH are discussed in regard to the proposed in vivo function of the CDH/GH61 enzyme system in oxidative cellulose hydrolysis.

  4. Pneumocystis carinii major surface glycoprotein induces interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 release from a human alveolar epithelial cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Lundgren, Bettina; Shelhamer, J H;

    1999-01-01

    (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) from an alveolar epithelial cell line (A549). RESULTS: Incubation of A549 cells with MSG in concentrations from 0.4 to 10 microg mL-1 for 24 h caused dose-dependent increases in IL-8 release (3.4-fold above control, P ..., suggesting that MSG stimulates A549 cells in part through carbohydrate moieties. Dexamethasone significantly inhibited MSG-induced IL-8 release in concentrations of 10-6-10-8 mol L-1 compared with control experiments (P

  5. S-Layered Aneurinibacillus and Bacillus spp. Are Susceptible to the Lytic Action of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Membrane Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Mayer, A.; Messner, P.; Sára, M.; Sleytr, U. B.; Beveridge, T. J.

    1998-01-01

    When S-layered strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus and Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus, possessing S-layers of different lattice type and lattice constant as well as S-(glyco)protein chemistry, and isogenic S-layerless variants were subjected to membrane vesicles (MVs) from P. aeruginosa during plaque assays on plates or CFU measurements on cell suspensions, all bacterial types lysed. Electron microscopy of negative stains, thin sections, and immunogold-labelled MV preparations revealed that the vesicles adhered to all bacterial surfaces, broke open, and digested the underlying peptidoglycan-containing cell wall of all cell types. Reassembled S-layer did not appear to be affected by MVs, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the S-(glyco)proteins remained intact. meso-Diaminopimelic acid, as a peptidoglycan breakdown product, was found in all culture supernatants after MV attack. These results suggest that even though MVs are much larger than the channels which penetrate these proteinaceous arrays, S-layers on gram-positive bacteria do not form a defensive barrier against the lytic action of MVs. The primary mode of attack is by the liberation from the MVs of a peptidoglycan hydrolase, which penetrates through the S-layer to digest the underlying peptidoglycan-containing cell wall. The S-layer is not affected by MV protease. PMID:9573179

  6. Serotonin modulates transmitter release at central Lymnaea synapses through a G-protein-coupled and cAMP-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCamphill, P K; Dunn, T W; Syed, N I

    2008-04-01

    Neuromodulation is central to all nervous system function, although the precise mechanisms by which neurotransmitters affect synaptic efficacy between central neurons remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we examined the neuromodulatory action of serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] at central synapses between identified neurons from the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Using whole-cell voltage-clamp and sharp electrode recording, we show that 5-HT strongly depresses synaptic strength between cultured, cholinergic neuron visceral dorsal 4 (VD4 - presynaptic) and its serotonergic target left pedal dorsal 1 (LPeD1 - postsynaptic). This inhibition was accompanied by a reduction in synaptic depression, but had no effect on postsynaptic input resistance, indicating a presynaptic origin. In addition, serotonin inhibited the presynaptic calcium current (I(Ca)) on a similar time course as the change in synaptic transmission. Introduction of a non-condensable GDP analog, GDP-beta-S, through the presynaptic pipette inhibited the serotonin-mediated effect on I(Ca.) Similar results were obtained with a membrane-impermeable inactive cAMP analog, 8OH-cAMP. Furthermore, stimulation of the serotonergic postsynaptic cell also inhibited presynaptic currents, indicating the presence of a negative feedback loop between LPeD1 and VD4. Taken together, this study provides direct evidence for a negative feedback mechanism, whereby the activity of a presynaptic respiratory central pattern-generating neuron is regulated by its postsynaptic target cell. We demonstrate that either serotonin or LPeD1 activity-induced depression of presynaptic transmitter release from VD4 involves voltage-gated calcium channels and is mediated through a G-protein-coupled and cAMP-mediated system.

  7. The brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein, BIG2, regulates the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Aminul; Shen, Xiaoyan; Hiroi, Toyoko; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha; Levine, Stewart J

    2007-03-30

    The type I, 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR1) is released from cells to the extracellular space where it can bind and modulate TNF bioactivity. Extracellular TNFR1 release occurs by two distinct pathways: the inducible proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains and the constitutive release of full-length TNFR1 in exosome-like vesicles. Regulation of both TNFR1 release pathways appears to involve the trafficking of cytoplasmic TNFR1 vesicles. Vesicular trafficking is controlled by ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), which are active in the GTP-bound state and inactive when bound to GDP. ARF activation is enhanced by guanine nucleotide-exchange factors that catalyze replacement of GDP by GTP. We investigated whether the brefeldin A (BFA)-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange proteins, BIG1 and/or BIG2, are required for TNFR1 release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Effects of specific RNA interference (RNAi) showed that BIG2, but not BIG1, regulated the release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles, whereas neither BIG2 nor BIG1 was required for the IL-1beta-induced proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains. BIG2 co-localized with TNFR1 in diffusely distributed cytoplasmic vesicles, and the association between BIG2 and TNFR1 was disrupted by BFA. Consistent with the preferential activation of class I ARFs by BIG2, ARF1 and ARF3 participated in the extracellular release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles in a nonredundant and additive fashion. We conclude that the association between BIG2 and TNFR1 selectively regulates the extracellular release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles from human vascular endothelial cells via an ARF1- and ARF3-dependent mechanism.

  8. Abortive lytic reactivation of KSHV in CBF1/CSL deficient human B cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Scholz

    Full Text Available Since Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV establishes a persistent infection in human B cells, B cells are a critical compartment for viral pathogenesis. RTA, the replication and transcription activator of KSHV, can either directly bind to DNA or use cellular DNA binding factors including CBF1/CSL as DNA adaptors. In addition, the viral factors LANA1 and vIRF4 are known to bind to CBF1/CSL and modulate RTA activity. To analyze the contribution of CBF1/CSL to reactivation in human B cells, we have successfully infected DG75 and DG75 CBF1/CSL knock-out cell lines with recombinant KSHV.219 and selected for viral maintenance by selective medium. Both lines maintained the virus irrespective of their CBF1/CSL status. Viral reactivation could be initiated in both B cell lines but viral genome replication was attenuated in CBF1/CSL deficient lines, which also failed to produce detectable levels of infectious virus. Induction of immediate early, early and late viral genes was impaired in CBF1/CSL deficient cells at multiple stages of the reactivation process but could be restored to wild-type levels by reintroduction of CBF1/CSL. To identify additional viral RTA target genes, which are directly controlled by CBF1/CSL, we analyzed promoters of a selected subset of viral genes. We show that the induction of the late viral genes ORF29a and ORF65 by RTA is strongly enhanced by CBF1/CSL. Orthologs of ORF29a in other herpesviruses are part of the terminase complex required for viral packaging. ORF65 encodes the small capsid protein essential for capsid shell assembly. Our study demonstrates for the first time that in human B cells viral replication can be initiated in the absence of CBF1/CSL but the reactivation process is severely attenuated at all stages and does not lead to virion production. Thus, CBF1/CSL acts as a global hub which is used by the virus to coordinate the lytic cascade.

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α plays roles in Epstein-Barr virus's natural life cycle and tumorigenesis by inducing lytic infection through direct binding to the immediate-early BZLF1 gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Richard J; Yu, Xianming; Cordes, Blue-Leaf A; Sathiamoorthi, Saraniya; Iempridee, Tawin; Nawandar, Dhananjay M; Ma, Shidong; Romero-Masters, James C; McChesney, Kyle G; Lin, Zhen; Makielski, Kathleen R; Lee, Denis L; Lambert, Paul F; Johannsen, Eric C; Kenney, Shannon C; Mertz, Janet E

    2017-06-01

    When confronted with poor oxygenation, cells adapt by activating survival signaling pathways, including the oxygen-sensitive transcriptional regulators called hypoxia-inducible factor alphas (HIF-αs). We report here that HIF-1α also regulates the life cycle of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Incubation of EBV-positive gastric carcinoma AGS-Akata and SNU-719 and Burkitt lymphoma Sal and KemIII cell lines with a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, L-mimosine or deferoxamine, or the NEDDylation inhibitor MLN4924 promoted rapid and sustained accumulation of both HIF-1α and lytic EBV antigens. ShRNA knockdown of HIF-1α significantly reduced deferoxamine-mediated lytic reactivation. HIF-1α directly bound the promoter of the EBV primary latent-lytic switch BZLF1 gene, Zp, activating transcription via a consensus hypoxia-response element (HRE) located at nt -83 through -76 relative to the transcription initiation site. HIF-1α did not activate transcription from the other EBV immediate-early gene, BRLF1. Importantly, expression of HIF-1α induced EBV lytic-gene expression in cells harboring wild-type EBV, but not in cells infected with variants containing base-pair substitution mutations within this HRE. Human oral keratinocyte (NOK) and gingival epithelial (hGET) cells induced to differentiate by incubation with either methyl cellulose or growth in organotypic culture accumulated both HIF-1α and Blimp-1α, another cellular factor implicated in lytic reactivation. HIF-1α activity also accumulated along with Blimp-1α during B-cell differentiation into plasma cells. Furthermore, most BZLF1-expressing cells observed in lymphomas induced by EBV in NSG mice with a humanized immune system were located distal to blood vessels in hypoxic regions of the tumors. Thus, we conclude that HIF-1α plays central roles in both EBV's natural life cycle and EBV-associated tumorigenesis. We propose that drugs that induce HIF-1α protein accumulation are good candidates for development of a lytic

  10. A comparative study on the activity of fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for the depolymerization of cellulose in soybean spent flakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Zhang, Zhenghong

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-dependent enzymes capable of the oxidative breakdown of polysaccharides. They are of industrial interest due to their ability to enhance the enzymatic depolymerization of recalcitrant substrates by glycoside hydrolases. In this paper, twenty-...

  11. Lytic and lysogenic infection of diverse Escherichia coli and Shigella strains with a verocytotoxigenic bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, C E; Stanley, K N; Allison, H E; Flint, H J; Stewart, C S; Sharp, R J; Saunders, J R; McCarthy, A J

    2001-09-01

    A verocytotoxigenic bacteriophage isolated from a strain of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157, into which a kanamycin resistance gene (aph3) had been inserted to inactivate the verocytotoxin gene (vt2), was used to infect Enterobacteriaceae strains. A number of Shigella and E. coli strains were susceptible to lysogenic infection, and a smooth E. coli isolate (O107) was also susceptible to lytic infection. The lysogenized strains included different smooth E. coli serotypes of both human and animal origin, indicating that this bacteriophage has a substantial capacity to disseminate verocytotoxin genes. A novel indirect plaque assay utilizing an E. coli recA441 mutant in which phage-infected cells can enter only the lytic cycle, enabling detection of all infective phage, was developed.

  12. Oxygen Activation at the Active Site of a Fungal Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, William B; Agarwal, Pratul K; Meilleur, Flora

    2017-01-16

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases have attracted vast attention owing to their abilities to disrupt glycosidic bonds via oxidation instead of hydrolysis and to enhance enzymatic digestion of recalcitrant substrates including chitin and cellulose. We have determined high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of an enzyme from Neurospora crassa in the resting state and of a copper(II) dioxo intermediate complex formed in the absence of substrate. X-ray crystal structures also revealed "pre-bound" molecular oxygen adjacent to the active site. An examination of protonation states enabled by neutron crystallography and density functional theory calculations identified a role for a conserved histidine in promoting oxygen activation. These results provide a new structural description of oxygen activation by substrate free lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases and provide insights that can be extended to reactivity in the enzyme-substrate complex. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. The HSV-1 Latency-Associated Transcript Functions to Repress Latent Phase Lytic Gene Expression and Suppress Virus Reactivation from Latently Infected Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Michael P; Hann, William; Shivkumar, Maitreyi; Harman, Laura E R; Connor, Viv; Coleman, Heather M; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes life-long latent infection within sensory neurons, during which viral lytic gene expression is silenced. The only highly expressed viral gene product during latent infection is the latency-associated transcript (LAT), a non-protein coding RNA that has been strongly implicated in the epigenetic regulation of HSV-1 gene expression. We have investigated LAT-mediated control of latent gene expression using chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses and LAT-negative viruses engineered to express firefly luciferase or β-galactosidase from a heterologous lytic promoter. Whilst we were unable to determine a significant effect of LAT expression upon heterochromatin enrichment on latent HSV-1 genomes, we show that reporter gene expression from latent HSV-1 genomes occurs at a greater frequency in the absence of LAT. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter viruses we have observed that HSV-1 gene expression decreases during long-term latent infection, with a most marked effect during LAT-negative virus infection. Finally, using a fluorescent mouse model of infection to isolate and culture single latently infected neurons, we also show that reactivation occurs at a greater frequency from cultures harbouring LAT-negative HSV-1. Together, our data suggest that the HSV-1 LAT RNA represses HSV-1 gene expression in small populations of neurons within the mouse TG, a phenomenon that directly impacts upon the frequency of reactivation and the maintenance of the transcriptionally active latent reservoir.

  14. Participation of the lytic replicon in bacteriophage P1 plasmid maintenance.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    P1 bacteriophage carries at least two replicons: a plasmid replicon and a viral lytic replicon. Since the isolated plasmid replicon can maintain itself stably at the low copy number characteristic of intact P1 prophage, it has been assumed that this replicon is responsible for driving prophage replication. We provide evidence that when replication from the plasmid replicon is prevented, prophage replication continues, albeit at a reduced rate. The residual plasmid replication is due to incomp...

  15. How Cancer Cells Become Resistant to Cationic Lytic Peptides: It's the Sugar!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Joshua G

    2017-02-16

    In this issue of Cell Chemical Biology, Ishikawa et al. (2017) demonstrate that the loss of cell-surface anionic saccharides can impart resistance toward anticancer peptides. This study provides the first insight into potential resistance mechanisms toward cationic lytic peptides and highlights the important, yet previously unappreciated, role cell-surface glycans can play in cellular resistance mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of the Spore Cortex Lytic Enzyme SleB in Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of the disease anthrax and poses a threat due to its potential to be used as a biological weapon. The spore form of this bacterium is an extremely resistant structure, making spore decontamination exceptionally challenging. During spore germination, nutrient germinants interact with Ger receptors, triggering a cascade of events. A crucial event in this process is degradation of the cortex peptidoglycan by germination-specific lytic enzymes (GSLEs),...

  17. Monocyte-induced development of Th17 cells and the release of S100 proteins are involved in the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Katharina; Foell, Dirk; Vogl, Thomas; Mezger, Markus; Wittkowski, Helmut; Fend, Falko; Federmann, Birgit; Gille, Christian; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Lang, Peter; Handgretinger, Rupert; Andreas Bethge, Wolfgang; Holzer, Ursula

    2014-10-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. However, the pathophysiology of GvHD remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the induction of Th17 cells by monocytes of patients with GvHD in vitro, demonstrating that monocytes isolated from patients with acute skin and intestinal GvHD stage I-IV and chronic GvHD induce significantly increased levels of Th17 cells compared with patients without GvHD. S100 proteins are known to act as innate amplifier of inflammation. We therefore investigated the presence of S100 proteins in the stool, serum, and bowel tissue of patients with GvHD and the influence of S100 proteins on the induction of Th17 cells. Elevated levels of S100 proteins could be detected in patients with acute GvHD, demonstrating the release of these phagocyte-specific proteins during GvHD. Furthermore, stimulation of monocytes with S100 proteins was found to promote Th17 development, emphasizing the role of S100 proteins in Th17-triggered inflammation. Altogether, our results indicate that induction of Th17 cells by activated monocytes and the stimulatory effects of proinflammatory S100 proteins might play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of acute GvHD. Regarding our data, S100 proteins might be novel markers for the diagnosis and follow-up of GvHD.

  18. Activation of protein kinase C delta following cerebral ischemia leads to release of cytochrome C from the mitochondria via bad pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunjan R Dave

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria following cerebral ischemia is a key event leading to cell death. The goal of the present study was to determine the mechanisms involved in post-ischemic activation of protein kinase c delta (δPKC that lead to cytochrome c release. METHODS/FINDINGS: We used a rat model of cardiac arrest as an in vivo model, and an in vitro analog, oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD in rat hippocampal synaptosomes. Cardiac arrest triggered translocation of δPKC to the mitochondrial fraction at 1 h reperfusion. In synaptosomes, the peptide inhibitor of δPKC blocked OGD-induced translocation to the mitochondria. We tested two potential pathways by which δPKC activation could lead to cytochrome c release: phosphorylation of phospholipid scramblase-3 (PLSCR3 and/or protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A. Cardiac arrest increased levels of phosphorlyated PLSCR3; however, inhibition of δPKC translocation failed to affect the OGD-induced increase in PLSCR3 in synaptosomal mitochondria suggesting the post-ischemic phosphorylation of PLSCR3 is not mediated by δPKC. Inhibition of either δPKC or PP2A decreased cytochrome c release from synaptosomal mitochondria. Cardiac arrest results in the dephosphorylation of Bad and Bax, both downstream targets of PP2A promoting apoptosis. Inhibition of δPKC or PP2A prevented OGD-induced Bad, but not Bax, dephosphorylation. To complement these studies, we used proteomics to identify novel mitochondrial substrates of δPKC. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that δPKC initiates cytochrome c release via phosphorylation of PP2A and subsequent dephosphorylation of Bad and identified δPKC, PP2A and additional mitochondrial proteins as potential therapeutic targets for ischemic neuroprotection.

  19. Purification and Properties of Clostridium perfringens Spore Lytic Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    sacs was effective. Further purification was obtained using carboxymethylcellulose and Sephadex G-100 chromatography. At this point the purified produce...Concentrated culture supernatant fluid (CSF) containing the initiation protein (IP) was prepared from 7 h cultures of C perfringens NCTC 8798 grown in DS...four different methods (a) 0.05 M DTT, (b) 0.05 M DTT plus 0.5% (w/v) SDS, both prepared in 0.05 M glycine-NaOH buffer, with the pH adjusted to 10.0

  20. Murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 hijacks MAVS and IKKbeta to initiate lytic replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Dong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Upon viral infection, the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS-IKKbeta pathway is activated to restrict viral replication. Manipulation of immune signaling events by pathogens has been an outstanding theme of host-pathogen interaction. Here we report that the loss of MAVS or IKKbeta impaired the lytic replication of gamma-herpesvirus 68 (gammaHV68, a model herpesvirus for human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein-Barr virus. gammaHV68 infection activated IKKbeta in a MAVS-dependent manner; however, IKKbeta phosphorylated and promoted the transcriptional activation of the gammaHV68 replication and transcription activator (RTA. Mutational analyses identified IKKbeta phosphorylation sites, through which RTA-mediated transcription was increased by IKKbeta, within the transactivation domain of RTA. Moreover, the lytic replication of recombinant gammaHV68 carrying mutations within the IKKbeta phosphorylation sites was greatly impaired. These findings support the conclusion that gammaHV68 hijacks the antiviral MAVS-IKKbeta pathway to promote viral transcription and lytic infection, representing an example whereby viral replication is coupled to host immune activation.

  1. KSHV Targeted Therapy: An Update on Inhibitors of Viral Lytic Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Coen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is the causative agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman’s disease. Since the discovery of KSHV 20 years ago, there is still no standard treatment and the management of virus-associated malignancies remains toxic and incompletely efficacious. As the majority of tumor cells are latently infected with KSHV, currently marketed antivirals that target the virus lytic cycle have shown inconsistent results in clinic. Nevertheless, lytic replication plays a major role in disease progression and virus dissemination. Case reports and retrospective studies have pointed out the benefit of antiviral therapy in the treatment and prevention of KSHV-associated diseases. As a consequence, potent and selective antivirals are needed. This review focuses on the anti-KSHV activity, mode of action and current status of antiviral drugs targeting KSHV lytic cycle. Among these drugs, different subclasses of viral DNA polymerase inhibitors and compounds that do not target the viral DNA polymerase are being discussed. We also cover molecules that target cellular kinases, as well as the potential of new drug targets and animal models for antiviral testing.

  2. Composite Magnetite and Protein Containing CaCO3 Crystals. External Manipulation and Vaterite → Calcite Recrystallization-Mediated Release Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeeva, Alena; Sergeev, Roman; Lengert, Ekaterina; Zakharevich, Andrey; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan; Gorin, Dmitry; Sergeev, Sergey; Volodkin, Dmitry

    2015-09-30

    Biocompatibility and high loading capacity of mesoporous CaCO3 vaterite crystals give an option to utilize the polycrystals for a wide range of (bio)applications. Formation and transformations of calcium carbonate polymorphs have been studied for decades, aimed at both basic and applied research interests. Here, composite multilayer-coated calcium carbonate polycrystals containing Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles and model protein lysozyme are fabricated. The structure of the composite polycrystals and vaterite → calcite recrystallization kinetics are studied. The recrystallization results in release of both loaded protein and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (magnetic manipulation is thus lost). Fe3O4 nanoparticles enhance the recrystallization that can be induced by reduction of the local pH with citric acid and reduction of the polycrystal crystallinity. Oppositely, the layer-by-layer assembled poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) polyelectrolyte coating significantly inhibits the vaterite → calcite recrystallization (from hours to days) most likely due to suppression of the ion exchange giving an option to easily tune the release kinetics for a wide time scale, for example, for prolonged release. Moreover, the recrystallization of the coated crystals results in formulation of multilayer capsules keeping the feature of external manipulation. This study can help to design multifunctional microstructures with tailor-made characteristics for loading and controlled release as well as for external manipulation.

  3. Hypericin, the active component of St. John's wort, inhibits glutamate release in the rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes via a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi; Wang, Su-Jane

    2010-05-25

    Changes in central glutamate neurotransmission are involved in the pathophysiology of depression and in the mechanism of antidepressants. In this study, the effect of hypericin, a major active constituent of St. John's wort that is widely used in the treatment of depression, on the release of glutamate from nerve terminals purified from rat cerebral cortex was examined. Result showed that hypericin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by 4-aminopyridine in a concentration-dependent manner. Further experiments revealed that hypericin-mediated inhibition of glutamate release (i) results from a reduction of vesicular exocytosis, not from an inhibition of Ca2+-independent efflux via glutamate transporter; (ii) is not due to an alternation of nerve terminal excitability; (iii) is associated with a decrease in presynaptic N- and P/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel activity; and (iv) appears to involve the suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. These results are the first to suggest that, in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals, hypericin suppresses voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity and in so doing inhibits evoked glutamate release. This finding may provide important information regarding the beneficial effects of St. John's wort in the brain.

  4. Lytic activity of the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 of Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donovan David M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a food-borne pathogen and the most common cause of infections in hospitalized patients. The increase in the resistance of this pathogen to antibacterials has made necessary the development of new anti-staphylococcal agents. In this context, bacteriophage lytic enzymes such as endolysins and structural peptidoglycan (PG hydrolases have received considerable attention as possible antimicrobials against gram-positive bacteria. Results S. aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 (phiIPLA88 contains a virion-associated muralytic enzyme (HydH5 encoded by orf58, which is located in the morphogenetic module. Comparative bioinformatic analysis revealed that HydH5 significantly resembled other peptidoglycan hydrolases encoded by staphylococcal phages. The protein consists of 634 amino acid residues. Two putative lytic domains were identified: an N-terminal CHAP (cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase domain (135 amino acid residues, and a C-terminal LYZ2 (lysozyme subfamily 2 domain (147 amino acid residues. These domains were also found when a predicted three-dimensional structure of HydH5 was made which provided the basis for deletion analysis. The complete HydH5 protein and truncated proteins containing only each catalytic domain were overproduced in E. coli and purified from inclusion bodies by subsequent refolding. Truncated and full-length HydH5 proteins were all able to bind and lyse S. aureus Sa9 cells as shown by binding assays, zymogram analyses and CFU reduction analysis. HydH5 demonstrated high antibiotic activity against early exponential cells, at 45°C and in the absence of divalent cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+. Thermostability assays showed that HydH5 retained 72% of its activity after 5 min at 100°C. Conclusions The virion-associated PG hydrolase HydH5 has lytic activity against S. aureus, which makes it attractive as antimicrobial for food biopreservation and anti

  5. Gastric acid induces mucosal H2S release in rats by upregulating mRNA and protein expression of cystathionine gamma lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mard, Seyyed Ali; Veisi, Ali; Ahangarpour, Akram; Gharib-Naseri, Mohammad Kazem

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) protects the gastric mucosa against gastric acid and other noxious stimulants by several mechanisms but until now the effect of gastric acid on H2S production has not been evaluated. This study was performed to determine the effect of basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion on mRNA and protein expression of cystathionine gamma lyase (CSE) and cystathionine beta synthase (CBS), and on mucosal release of H2S in rats. Seventy-two male rats were randomly assigned into 9 groups (8 in each)-control, distention, and pentagastrin-induced gastric acid secretion groups. The effects of 15% alcohol solution, propargylglycine (PAG), L-NAME, and pantoprazole were also investigated. Under anesthesia, animals underwent tracheostomy and midline laparotomy. A catheter was inserted into the stomach through the duodenum for gastric washout. At the end of the experiments, the animals were killed and the gastric mucosa was collected to measure H2S concentration and to quantify mRNA expression of CSE and CBS by quantitative real-time PCR, and expression of their proteins by western blot. Basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion increased mucosal levels of H2S, and mRNA and protein expression of CSE. Pantoprazole and L-NAME reversed H2S release and restored protein expression of CSE to the control level. Pantoprazole, but not propargylglycine, pretreatment inhibited the elevated level of protein expression of eNOS in response to distention-induced gastric acid secretion. Our findings indicated that NO mediated the stimulatory effect of gastric acid on H2S release and protein expression of CSE.

  6. Whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized oil powders for topical application-release and transdermal delivery of salicylic acid from oil powders compared to redispersed powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzé, Magdalena; Otto, Anja; Jordaan, Anine; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2015-08-01

    Oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions are commonly converted into solid-like powders in order to improve their physical and chemical stabilities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized o/w emulsions could be converted into stable oil powders by means of freeze-drying. Moreover, during this study, the effects of pH and polymer type on release and trans(dermal) delivery of salicylic acid, a model drug, from these oil powders were investigated and compared to those of the respective template emulsions and redispersed oil powders. Physical characterization of the various formulations was performed, such as droplet size analysis and oil leakage, and relationships drawn with regards to release and trans(dermal) delivery. The experimental outcomes revealed that the oil powders could be redispersed in water without changing the release characteristics of salicylic acid. pH and polymer type affected the release of salicylic acid from the oil powders, template emulsions, and redispersed powders similarly. Contrary, the transdermal delivery from the oil powders and from their respective redispersed oil powders was differently affected by pH and polymer type. It was hypothesized that the release had been influenced by the electrostatic interactions between salicylic acid and emulsifiers, whereas the transdermal performance could have been determined by the particle or aggregate sizes of the formulations.

  7. The role of hyaluronic acid inclusion on the energetics of encapsulation and release of a protein molecule from chitosan-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qadi, Sonia; Alatorre-Meda, Manuel; Martin-Pastor, Manuel; Taboada, Pablo; Remuñán-López, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    The synergistic effects of the polysaccharides chitosan (CS) and hyaluronic acid (HA) formulated into hybrid nanoparticles are promising for drug delivery. In the present work, we performed a detailed analysis of the molecular interactions involved in the TPP-assisted ionotropic gelation of CS hybrid nanoparticles with the objective of investigating the impact of HA inclusion on the particle formulation and on the in vitro release of insulin (INS) as a protein cargo. To do that, an in-depth thermodynamic study was carried out by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Such analysis allowed us to elucidate the type and extent of interactions established by INS within the hybrid nanoparticles and to get further knowledge on the nature of its release mechanism in vitro. Overall, INS release from the CS nanoparticles was thermodynamically driven, and when including HA a weaker INS binding to the nanoparticles, hence, a faster release rate in vitro were observed. As a negative polyelectrolyte, HA might have sterically blocked the activated sites of CS, such as the amino groups, through chain entanglement, thereby, attenuating the competitive binding interactions of INS. As a consequence, INS might have experienced a spatial exclusion onto the surface of the hybrid nanoparticles to a greater extent which, in turn, would explain its initial abrupt release.

  8. sarA negatively regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation by modulating expression of 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein and autolysis‐dependent release of eDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christner, Martin; Heinze, Constanze; Busch, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation is essential for Staphylococcus epidermidis pathogenicity in implant‐associated infections. Nonetheless, large proportions of invasive Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates fail to form a biofilm in vitro. We here tested the hypothesis that this apparent paradox is related...... virulence. Genetic analysis revealed that inactivation of sarA induced biofilm formation via overexpression of the giant 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp), serving as an intercellular adhesin. In addition to Embp, increased extracellular DNA (eDNA) release significantly contributed...

  9. The C Terminus of the Herpes Simplex Virus UL25 Protein Is Required for Release of Viral Genomes from Capsids Bound to Nuclear Pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Jamie B; Daniel, Gina R; Falck-Pedersen, Erik; Huet, Alexis; Smith, Greg A; Conway, James F; Homa, Fred L

    2017-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) capsid is released into the cytoplasm after fusion of viral and host membranes, whereupon dynein-dependent trafficking along microtubules targets it to the nuclear envelope. Binding of the capsid to the nuclear pore complex (NPC) is mediated by the capsid protein pUL25 and the capsid-tethered tegument protein pUL36. Temperature-sensitive mutants in both pUL25 and pUL36 dock at the NPC but fail to release DNA. The uncoating reaction has been difficult to study due to the rapid release of the genome once the capsid interacts with the nuclear pore. In this study, we describe the isolation and characterization of a truncation mutant of pUL25. Live-cell imaging and immunofluorescence studies demonstrated that the mutant was not impaired in penetration of the host cell or in trafficking of the capsid to the nuclear membrane. However, expression of viral proteins was absent or significantly delayed in cells infected with the pUL25 mutant virus. Transmission electron microscopy revealed capsids accumulated at nuclear pores that retained the viral genome for at least 4 h postinfection. In addition, cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstructions of virion capsids did not detect any obvious differences in the location or structural organization for the pUL25 or pUL36 proteins on the pUL25 mutant capsids. Further, in contrast to wild-type virus, the antiviral response mediated by the viral DNA-sensing cyclic guanine adenine synthase (cGAS) was severely compromised for the pUL25 mutant. These results demonstrate that the pUL25 capsid protein has a critical role in releasing viral DNA from NPC-bound capsids.IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is the causative agent of several pathologies ranging in severity from the common cold sore to life-threatening encephalitic infection. Early steps in infection include release of the capsid into the cytoplasm, docking of the capsid at a nuclear pore, and release of the viral genome into the nucleus

  10. Biomagnetic of Apatite-Coated Cobalt Ferrite: A Core-Shell Particle for Protein Adsorption and pH-Controlled Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, I-Ming; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Hoonsawat, Rassmidara; Pon-On, Weeraphat

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle composite with a cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4, (CF)) core and an apatite (Ap) coating was synthesized using a biomineralization process in which a modified simulated body fluid (1.5SBF) solution is the source of the calcium phosphate for the apatite formation. The core-shell structure formed after the citric acid-stabilized cobalt ferrite (CFCA) particles were incubated in the 1.5 SBF solution for 1 week. The mean particle size of CFCA-Ap is about 750 nm. A saturation magnetization of 15.56 emug(-1) and a coercivity of 1808.5 Oe were observed for the CFCA-Ap obtained. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the model protein to study the adsorption and release of the proteins by the CFCA-Ap particles. The protein adsorption by the CFCA-Ap particles followed a more typical Freundlich than Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The BSA release as a function of time became less rapid as the CFCA-Ap particles were immersed in higher pH solution, thus indicating that the BSA release is dependent on the local pH.

  11. Biomagnetic of Apatite-Coated Cobalt Ferrite: A Core–Shell Particle for Protein Adsorption and pH-Controlled Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle composite with a cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4, (CF)) core and an apatite (Ap) coating was synthesized using a biomineralization process in which a modified simulated body fluid (1.5SBF) solution is the source of the calcium phosphate for the apatite formation. The core–shell structure formed after the citric acid–stabilized cobalt ferrite (CFCA) particles were incubated in the 1.5 SBF solution for 1 week. The mean particle size of CFCA-Ap is about 750 nm. A saturation magnetization of 15.56 emug-1 and a coercivity of 1808.5 Oe were observed for the CFCA-Ap obtained. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the model protein to study the adsorption and release of the proteins by the CFCA-Ap particles. The protein adsorption by the CFCA-Ap particles followed a more typical Freundlich than Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The BSA release as a function of time became less rapid as the CFCA-Ap particles were immersed in higher pH solution, thus indicating that the BSA release is dependent on the local pH. PMID:27502643

  12. Biomagnetic of Apatite-Coated Cobalt Ferrite: A Core–Shell Particle for Protein Adsorption and pH-Controlled Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamra Nateetip

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Magnetic nanoparticle composite with a cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4, (CF core and an apatite (Ap coating was synthesized using a biomineralization process in which a modified simulated body fluid (1.5SBF solution is the source of the calcium phosphate for the apatite formation. The core–shell structure formed after the citric acid–stabilized cobalt ferrite (CFCA particles were incubated in the 1.5 SBF solution for 1 week. The mean particle size of CFCA-Ap is about 750 nm. A saturation magnetization of 15.56 emug-1 and a coercivity of 1808.5 Oe were observed for the CFCA-Ap obtained. Bovine serum albumin (BSA was used as the model protein to study the adsorption and release of the proteins by the CFCA-Ap particles. The protein adsorption by the CFCA-Ap particles followed a more typical Freundlich than Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The BSA release as a function of time became less rapid as the CFCA-Ap particles were immersed in higher pH solution, thus indicating that the BSA release is dependent on the local pH.

  13. The Rice Dynamin-Related Protein OsDRP1E Negatively Regulates Programmed Cell Death by Controlling the Release of Cytochrome c from Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xueping

    2017-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) mediated by mitochondrial processes has emerged as an important mechanism for plant development and responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. However, the role of translocation of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol during PCD remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the rice dynamin-related protein 1E (OsDRP1E) negatively regulates PCD by controlling mitochondrial structure and cytochrome c release. We used a map-based cloning strategy to isolate OsDRP1E from the lesion mimic mutant dj-lm and confirmed that the E409V mutation in OsDRP1E causes spontaneous cell death in rice. Pathogen inoculation showed that dj-lm significantly enhances resistance to fungal and bacterial pathogens. Functional analysis of the E409V mutation showed that the mutant protein impairs OsDRP1E self-association and formation of a higher-order complex; this in turn reduces the GTPase activity of OsDRP1E. Furthermore, confocal microscopy showed that the E409V mutation impairs localization of OsDRP1E to the mitochondria. The E409V mutation significantly affects the morphogenesis of cristae in mitochondria and causes the abnormal release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into cytoplasm. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the mitochondria-localized protein OsDRP1E functions as a negative regulator of cytochrome c release and PCD in plants. PMID:28081268

  14. Human Herpesvirus 6B Downregulates Expression of Activating Ligands during Lytic Infection To Escape Elimination by Natural Killer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedel, Dominik; Tai, Julie; Levi-Schaffer, Francesca; Dovrat, Sarah; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2016-11-01

    The Herpesviridae family consists of eight viruses, most of which infect a majority of the human population. One of the less-studied members is human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) (Roseolovirus), which causes a mild, well-characterized childhood disease. Primary HHV-6 infection is followed by lifelong latency. Reactivation frequently occurs in immunocompromised patients, such as those suffering from HIV infection or cancer or following transplantation, and causes potentially life-threatening complications. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms that HHV-6 utilizes to remain undetected by natural killer (NK) cells, which are key participants in the innate immune response to infections. We revealed viral mechanisms which downregulate ligands for two powerful activating NK cell receptors: ULBP1, ULBP3, and MICB, which trigger NKG2D, and B7-H6, which activates NKp30. Accordingly, this downregulation impaired the ability of NK cells to recognize HHV-6-infected cells. Thus, we describe for the first time immune evasion mechanisms of HHV-6 that protect lytically infected cells from NK elimination. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) latently infects a large portion of the human population and can reactivate in humans lacking a functional immune system, such as cancer or AIDS patients. Under these conditions, it can cause life-threatening diseases. To date, the actions and interplay of immune cells, and particularly cells of the innate immune system, during HHV-6 infection are poorly defined. In this study, we aimed to understand how cells undergoing lytic HHV-6 infection interact with natural killer (NK) cells, innate lymphocytes constituting the first line of defense against viral intruders. We show that HHV-6 suppresses the expression of surface proteins that alert the immune cells by triggering two major receptors on NK cells, NKG2D and NKp30. As a consequence, HHV-6 can replicate undetected by the innate immune system and potentially spread infection throughout the body. This

  15. Ubiquitin initiates sorting of Golgi and plasma membrane proteins into the vacuolar degradation pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheuring David

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In yeast and mammals, many plasma membrane (PM proteins destined for degradation are tagged with ubiquitin. These ubiquitinated proteins are internalized into clathrin-coated vesicles and are transported to early endosomal compartments. There, ubiquitinated proteins are sorted by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT machinery into the intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes. Degradation of these proteins occurs after endosomes fuse with lysosomes/lytic vacuoles to release their content into the lumen. In plants, some PM proteins, which cycle between the PM and endosomal compartments, have been found to be ubiquitinated, but it is unclear whether ubiquitin is sufficient to mediate internalization and thus acts as a primary sorting signal for the endocytic pathway. To test whether plants use ubiquitin as a signal for the degradation of membrane proteins, we have translationally fused ubiquitin to different fluorescent reporters for the plasma membrane and analyzed their transport. Results Ubiquitin-tagged PM reporters localized to endosomes and to the lumen of the lytic vacuole in tobacco mesophyll protoplasts and in tobacco epidermal cells. The internalization of these reporters was significantly reduced if clathrin-mediated endocytosis was inhibited by the coexpression of a mutant of the clathrin heavy chain, the clathrin hub. Surprisingly, a ubiquitin-tagged reporter for the Golgi was also transported into the lumen of the vacuole. Vacuolar delivery of the reporters was abolished upon inhibition of the ESCRT machinery, indicating that the vacuolar delivery of these reporters occurs via the endocytic transport route. Conclusions Ubiquitin acts as a sorting signal at different compartments in the endomembrane system to target membrane proteins into the vacuolar degradation pathway: If displayed at the PM, ubiquitin triggers internalization of PM reporters into the endocytic transport route

  16. Novel Biochemical and Structural Insights into the Interaction of Myristoylated Cargo with Unc119 Protein and Their Release by Arl2/3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Mamta; Fansa, Eyad K; Kösling, Stefanie K; Mejuch, Tom; Waldmann, Herbert; Wittinghofer, Alfred

    2016-09-23

    Primary cilia are highly specialized small antenna-like cellular protrusions that extend from the cell surface of many eukaryotic cell types. The protein content inside cilia and cytoplasm is very different, but details of the sorting process are not understood for most ciliary proteins. Recently, we have shown that prenylated proteins are sorted according to their affinity to the carrier protein PDE6δ and the ability of Arl3 but not Arl2 to release high affinity cargo inside the cilia (Fansa, E. K., Kösling, S. K., Zent, E., Wittinghofer, A., and Ismail, S. (2016) Nat. Commun. 7, 11366). Here we address the question whether a similar principle governs the transport of myristoylated cargo by the carrier proteins Unc119a and Unc119b. We thus analyzed the binding strength of N-terminal myristoylated cargo peptides (GNAT1, NPHP3, Cystin1, RP2, and Src) to Unc119a and Unc119b proteins. The affinity between myristoylated cargo and carrier protein, Unc119, varies between subnanomolar and micromolar. Peptides derived from ciliary localizing proteins (GNAT1, NPHP3, and Cystin1) bind with high affinity to Unc119 proteins, whereas a peptide derived from a non-ciliary localizing protein (Src) has low affinity. The peptide with intermediate affinity (RP2) is localized at the ciliary transition zone as a gate keeper. We show that the low affinity peptides are released by both Arl2·GppNHp and Arl3·GppNHp, whereas the high affinity peptides are exclusively released by only Arl3·GppNHp. Determination of the x-ray structure of myristoylated NPHP3 peptide in complex with Unc119a reveals the molecular details of high affinity binding and suggests the importance of the residues at the +2 and +3 positions relative to the myristoylated glycine for high and low affinities. The mutational analysis of swapping the residues at the +2 and +3 positions between high and low affinity peptides results in reversing their affinities for Unc119a and leads to a partial mislocalization of a low

  17. A novel inhibitory mechanism of mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis by a herpesviral protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinghui Feng

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Upon viral infection, cells undergo apoptosis as a defense against viral replication. Viruses, in turn, have evolved elaborate mechanisms to subvert apoptotic processes. Here, we report that a novel viral mitochondrial anti-apoptotic protein (vMAP of murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (gammaHV-68 interacts with Bcl-2 and voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1 in a genetically separable manner. The N-terminal region of vMAP interacted with Bcl-2, and this interaction markedly increased not only Bcl-2 recruitment to mitochondria but also its avidity for BH3-only pro-apoptotic proteins, thereby suppressing Bax mitochondrial translocation and activation. In addition, the central and C-terminal hydrophobic regions of vMAP interacted with VDAC1. Consequently, these interactions resulted in the effective inhibition of cytochrome c release, leading to the comprehensive inhibition of mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis. Finally, vMAP gene was required for efficient gammaHV-68 lytic replication in normal cells, but not in mitochondrial apoptosis-deficient cells. These results demonstrate that gammaHV-68 vMAP independently targets two important regulators of mitochondrial apoptosis-mediated intracellular innate immunity, allowing efficient viral lytic replication.

  18. A novel inhibitory mechanism of mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis by a herpesviral protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pinghui; Liang, Chengyu; Shin, Young C; Xiaofei, E; Zhang, Weijun; Gravel, Robyn; Wu, Ting-ting; Sun, Ren; Usherwood, Edward; Jung, Jae U

    2007-12-01

    Upon viral infection, cells undergo apoptosis as a defense against viral replication. Viruses, in turn, have evolved elaborate mechanisms to subvert apoptotic processes. Here, we report that a novel viral mitochondrial anti-apoptotic protein (vMAP) of murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (gammaHV-68) interacts with Bcl-2 and voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) in a genetically separable manner. The N-terminal region of vMAP interacted with Bcl-2, and this interaction markedly increased not only Bcl-2 recruitment to mitochondria but also its avidity for BH3-only pro-apoptotic proteins, thereby suppressing Bax mitochondrial translocation and activation. In addition, the central and C-terminal hydrophobic regions of vMAP interacted with VDAC1. Consequently, these interactions resulted in the effective inhibition of cytochrome c release, leading to the comprehensive inhibition of mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis. Finally, vMAP gene was required for efficient gammaHV-68 lytic replication in normal cells, but not in mitochondrial apoptosis-deficient cells. These results demonstrate that gammaHV-68 vMAP independently targets two important regulators of mitochondrial apoptosis-mediated intracellular innate immunity, allowing efficient viral lytic replication.

  19. Cadmium-induced calcium release and prostaglandin E[sub 2] production in neonatal mouse calvaria are dependent on cox-2 induction and protein kinase C activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romare, A. (Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Univ. of Linkoeping (Sweden)); Lundholm, C.E. (Department of Pharmacology, Univ. of Linkoeping (Sweden) Astra Haessle AB, Regulatory Affairs, Moendal (Sweden))

    The mechanisms by which cadmium (Cd) causes skeletal impairment have not been fully clarified. Release of calcium from neonatal mouse calvaria in organ culture is stimulated by submicromolar concentrations of Cd, an effect that is associated with increased production of prostaglandin E[sub 2] (PGE[sub 2]). The prostaglandin-synthesising enzyme cyclooxygenase (cox) exists in two forms, one constitutive (cox-1) and the other inducible (cox-2). Cox-2 can be induced by mitogenic stimuli and inflammatory cytokines, such as parathyroid hormone (PTH), interleukin-1[alpha] and tumour necrosis factor-[alpha]. Cd potently activates protein kinase C (PKC), which in turn induces cox-2 production in several cell types. Our aim was to determine whether Cd-induced Ca release and PGE[sub 2] production in neonatal mouse calvaria involve induction of cox-2 and, if so, to ascertain whether that effect is mediated by activation of PKC. Cd dose-dependently stimulated Ca release from cultured neonatal mouse calvaria, with a maximal effect at 0.4-0.8 [mu]M. Different sensitivity was observed to Cd-induced Ca release between two breeds of mice suggesting that the susceptibility to Cd may be genetically determined. Dexamethasone (10 [mu]M) added to the culture medium abolished the Ca releasing effect of Cd, an effect not overcome by addition of arachidonic acid (10 [mu]M). The cox-2-selective inhibitors NS-398 and DFU and the less selective inhibitor meloxicam, potently impeded Cd-induced Ca release (IC[sub 50] of 1 nM, 41 nM and 7 nM, respectively) and calvarial production of PGE[sub 2]. Cd-induced and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 20 nM)-induced Ca release was inhibited by the PKC inhibitor calphostin C (0.5 [mu]M) and by NS-398. The effects of PMA and Cd on Ca release were not additive, suggesting that both operated via the PKC pathway. We suggest that Cd-induced Ca release from neonatal mouse calvaria in culture depends on induction of cox-2 that occurs via the PKC signalling

  20. Cadmium-induced calcium release and prostaglandin E{sub 2} production in neonatal mouse calvaria are dependent on cox-2 induction and protein kinase C activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romare, A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Univ. of Linkoeping (Sweden); Lundholm, C.E. [Department of Pharmacology, Univ. of Linkoeping (Sweden)]|[Astra Haessle AB, Regulatory Affairs, Moendal (Sweden)

    1999-06-01

    The mechanisms by which cadmium (Cd) causes skeletal impairment have not been fully clarified. Release of calcium from neonatal mouse calvaria in organ culture is stimulated by submicromolar concentrations of Cd, an effect that is associated with increased production of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}). The prostaglandin-synthesising enzyme cyclooxygenase (cox) exists in two forms, one constitutive (cox-1) and the other inducible (cox-2). Cox-2 can be induced by mitogenic stimuli and inflammatory cytokines, such as parathyroid hormone (PTH), interleukin-1{alpha} and tumour necrosis factor-{alpha}. Cd potently activates protein kinase C (PKC), which in turn induces cox-2 production in several cell types. Our aim was to determine whether Cd-induced Ca release and PGE{sub 2} production in neonatal mouse calvaria involve induction of cox-2 and, if so, to ascertain whether that effect is mediated by activation of PKC. Cd dose-dependently stimulated Ca release from cultured neonatal mouse calvaria, with a maximal effect at 0.4-0.8 {mu}M. Different sensitivity was observed to Cd-induced Ca release between two breeds of mice suggesting that the susceptibility to Cd may be genetically determined. Dexamethasone (10 {mu}M) added to the culture medium abolished the Ca releasing effect of Cd, an effect not overcome by addition of arachidonic acid (10 {mu}M). The cox-2-selective inhibitors NS-398 and DFU and the less selective inhibitor meloxicam, potently impeded Cd-induced Ca release (IC{sub 50} of 1 nM, 41 nM and 7 nM, respectively) and calvarial production of PGE{sub 2}. Cd-induced and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 20 nM)-induced Ca release was inhibited by the PKC inhibitor calphostin C (0.5 {mu}M) and by NS-398. The effects of PMA and Cd on Ca release were not additive, suggesting that both operated via the PKC pathway. We suggest that Cd-induced Ca release from neonatal mouse calvaria in culture depends on induction of cox-2 that occurs via the PKC signalling

  1. Glucose-induced incretin hormone release and inactivation are differently modulated by oral fat and protein in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, P Thomas; Winzell, Maria Sörhede; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2006-01-01

    -1 (GLP-1). To explore this, we examined the release and inactivation of GIP and GLP-1 after administration of glucose with or without OA or WP through gastric gavage in anesthetized C57BL/6J mice. Insulin responses to glucose (75 mg) were 3-fold augmented by addition of WP (75 mg; P

  2. Sorbin and SH3 domain-containing protein 2 is released from infarcted heart in the very early phase: proteomic analysis of cardiac tissues from patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Yu; Ito, Shinji; Abiru, Hitoshi; Kotani, Hirokazu; Ozeki, Munetaka; Tamaki, Keiji; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki

    2013-12-16

    Few proteomic studies have examined human cardiac tissue following acute lethal infarction. Here, we applied a novel proteomic approach to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human tissue and aimed to reveal the molecular changes in the very early phase of acute myocardial infarction. Heart tissue samples were collected from 5 patients who died within 7 hours of myocardial infarction and from 5 age- and sex-matched control cases. Infarcted and control myocardia were histopathologically diagnosed and captured using laser microdissection. Proteins were extracted using an originally established method and analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The label-free quantification demonstrated that the levels of 21 proteins differed significantly between patients and controls. In addition to known biomarkers, the sarcoplasmic protein sorbin and SH3 domain-containing protein 2 (SORBS2) was greatly reduced in infarcted myocardia. Immunohistochemical analysis of cardiac tissues confirmed the decrease, and Western blot analysis showed a significant increase in serum sorbin and SH3 domain-containing protein 2 in acute myocardial infarction patients (n=10) compared with control cases (n=11). Our advanced comprehensive analysis using patient tissues and serums indicated that sarcoplasmic sorbin and SH3 domain-containing protein 2 is released from damaged cardiac tissue into the bloodstream upon lethal acute myocardial infarction. The proteomic strategy presented here is based on precise microscopic findings and is quite useful for candidate biomarker discovery using human tissue samples stored in depositories.

  3. Activation of PI3K/AKT and ERK MAPK signal pathways is required for the induction of lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus by herpes simplex virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Zhigang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is causally linked to several acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL and a subset of multicentric Castleman's disease. Regulation of viral lytic replication is critical to the initiation and progression of KS. Recently, we reported that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 was an important cofactor that activated lytic cycle replication of KSHV. Here, we further investigated the possible signal pathways involved in HSV-1-induced reactivation of KSHV. Results By transfecting a series of dominant negative mutants and protein expressing constructs and using pharmacologic inhibitors, we found that either Janus kinase 1 (JAK1/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 or JAK1/STAT6 signaling failed to regulate HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. However, HSV-1 infection of BCBL-1 cells activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (PKB, also called AKT pathway and inactivated phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β. PTEN/PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathway was found to be involved in HSV-1-induced KSHV reactivation. Additionally, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway also partially contributed to HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. Conclusions HSV-1 infection stimulated PI3K/AKT and ERK MAPK signaling pathways that in turn contributed to KSHV reactivation, which provided further insights into the molecular mechanism controlling KSHV lytic replication, particularly in the context of HSV-1 and KSHV co-infection.

  4. Phosphorylation substrates for protein kinase C in intact pituitary cells: characterization of a receptor-mediated event using novel gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strulovici, B.; Tahilramani, R.; Nestor, J.J. Jr.

    1987-09-22

    The involvement of protein kinase C in the signal transduction of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) action was investigated with a GnRH superagonist, partial agonists, and antagonists in intact rat pituitary cells. Exposure of /sup 32/P-labeled cells to GnRH or to the superagonist (D-Nal(2)/sup 6/)GnRH induced the enhanced phosphorylation of 42-, 34-, 11-, and 10-kDa proteins and the dephosphorylation of a 15-kDa protein as assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/autoradiography. This effect was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by potent GnRG antagonists. Downregulation of protein kinase C by prolonged incubation of the pituitary cells with high concentrations of active phorbol esters abolished protein kinase C activity and also prevented the phosphorylation induced by GnRN, or (D-Nal(2)/sup 6/)GnRH. The same effect was obtained by preincubating the cells with the protein kinase C inhibitor H-7. In this study the authors identify for the first time physiological substrates for protein kinase C in intact pituitary cells. They demonstrate a close quantitative correlation between the extent of translocation of protein kinase C, levels of phosphorylation of specific substrates in the intact cells, and the biological activity of the GnRH analogues with varying affinity for the GnRH receptor. These data strengthen the contention that the physiological effects of GnRH are primarily mediated via the phosphatidylinositol/Ca/sup 2 +/ signal transfer system and represent a first step toward defining the physiological substrates of protein kinase C and their role in the cascade of events that starts upon binding of GnRH to its receptor.

  5. Whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized emulsions: Effect of polymer type and pH on release and topical delivery of salicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combrinck, Johann; Otto, Anja; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2014-06-01

    Emulsions are widely used as topical formulations in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. They are thermodynamically unstable and require emulsifiers for stabilization. Studies have indicated that emulsifiers could affect topical delivery of actives, and this study was therefore designed to investigate the effects of different polymers, applied as emulsifiers, as well as the effects of pH on the release and topical delivery of the active. O/w emulsions were prepared by the layer-by-layer technique, with whey protein forming the first layer around the oil droplets, while either chitosan or carrageenan was subsequently adsorbed to the protein at the interface. Additionally, the emulsions were prepared at three different pH values to introduce different charges to the polymers. The active ingredient, salicylic acid, was incorporated into the oil phase of the emulsions. Physical characterization of the resulting formulations, i.e., droplet size, zeta potential, stability, and turbidity in the water phase, was performed. Release studies were conducted, after which skin absorption studies were performed on the five most stable emulsions, by using Franz type diffusion cells and utilizing human, abdominal skin membranes. It was found that an increase in emulsion droplet charge could negatively affect the release of salicylic acid from these formulations. Contrary, positively charged emulsion droplets were found to enhance dermal and transdermal delivery of salicylic acid from emulsions. It was hypothesized that electrostatic complex formation between the emulsifier and salicylic acid could affect its release, whereas electrostatic interaction between the emulsion droplets and skin could influence dermal/transdermal delivery of the active.

  6. Tracking micro-optical resonances for identifying and sensing novel procaspase-3 protein marker released from cell cultures in response to toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Jen; Xiang, Wei; Klucken, Jochen; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The response of cells to toxins is commonly investigated by detecting intracellular markers for cell death, such as caspase proteins. This requires the introduction of labels by the permeabilization or complete lysis of cells. Here we introduce a non-invasive tool for monitoring a caspase protein in the extracellular medium. The tool is based on highly sensitive optical micro-devices, referred to as whispering-gallery mode biosensors (WGMBs). WGMBs are functionalized with antibodies for the specific and label-free detection of procaspase-3 released from human embryonic kidney HEK293 and neuroglioma H4 cells after introducing staurosporine and rotenone toxins, respectively. Additional tests show that the extracellular accumulation of procaspase-3 is concomitant with a decrease in cell viability. The hitherto unknown release of procaspase-3 from cells in response to toxins and its accumulation in the medium is further investigated by Western blot, showing that the extracellular detection of procaspase-3 is interrelated with cytotoxicity of alpha-synuclein protein (aSyn) overexpressed in H4 cells. These studies provide evidence for procaspase-3 as a novel extracellular biomarker for cell death, with applications in cytotoxicity tests. Such WGMBs could be applied to further identify as-yet unknown extracellular biomarkers using established antibodies against intracellular antigens.

  7. Structure and boosting activity of a starch-degrading lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Leggio, Leila; Simmons, Thomas J; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Frandsen, Kristian E H; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Stringer, Mary A; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S; De Maria, Leonardo; Harris, Paul V; Soong, Chee-Leong; Dupree, Paul; Tryfona, Theodora; Lenfant, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2015-01-22

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered enzymes that oxidatively deconstruct polysaccharides. LPMOs are fundamental in the effective utilization of these substrates by bacteria and fungi; moreover, the enzymes have significant industrial importance. We report here the activity, spectroscopy and three-dimensional structure of a starch-active LPMO, a representative of the new CAZy AA13 family. We demonstrate that these enzymes generate aldonic acid-terminated malto-oligosaccharides from retrograded starch and boost significantly the conversion of this recalcitrant substrate to maltose by β-amylase. The detailed structure of the enzyme's active site yields insights into the mechanism of action of this important class of enzymes.

  8. Regulation of latency to lytic life cycle:multiple tricks by KSHV RTA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiemin Wong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010The herpesviruses are large enveloped DNA viruses that infect a wide spectrum hosts including human being. A key characteristic of all herpesviruses is their ability to establish life-time latency within the infected host and to periodically reactivate and enter the iytic replication to produce infectious virus progeny. During latency the 120-300 kb double-stranded DNA genomes of these viruses are maintained as multiple copies of circular episomes within the nuclei of the host cells. Lytic replication is marked by an increase in viral gene expression and the production of infectious virus progeny.

  9. Percutaneous aspiration biopsy in cervical spine lytic lesions. Indications and technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tampieri, D.; Weill, A.; Melanson, D.; Ethier, R. (Montreal Neurological Inst. and Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Neuroradiology)

    1991-02-01

    We describe the technique and the results of the percutaneous aspiration biopsy (PAB) in a series of 9 patients presenting with neck pain and different degrees of myelopathy, in whom the cervical spine X-ray demonstrated lytic lesions of unknown origin. PAB is a useful, relatively safe technique, and leads to histological diagnosis between metastatic and inflammatory processes. Furthermore, in inflammatory lesions with negative hemoculture, PAB may help in detecting the micro-organism responsible and therefore allow a better antibiotic treatment. (orig.).

  10. The structure of a LysM domain from E. coli membrane-bound lytic murein transglycosylase D (MltD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, A; Bycroft, M

    2000-06-16

    The LysM domain is a widespread protein module. It was originally identified in enzymes that degrade bacterial cell walls but is also present in many other bacterial proteins. Several proteins that contain the domain, such as Staphylococcal IgG binding proteins and Escherichia coli intimin, are involved in bacterial pathogenesis. LysM domains are also found in some eukaryotic proteins, apparently as a result of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria. The available evidence suggests that the LysM domain is a general peptidoglycan-binding module. We have determined the structure of this domain from E. coli membrane-bound lytic murein transglycosylase D. The LysM domain has a betaalphaalphabeta secondary structure with the two helices packing onto the same side of an anti- parallel beta sheet. The structure shows no similarity to other bacterial cell surface domains. A potential binding site in a shallow groove on surface of the protein has been identified. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Different effect of glutamine on macrophage tumor necrosis factor-alpha release and heat shock protein 72 expression in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mengfan Liang; Xuemin Wang; Yuan Yuan; Quanhong Zhou; Chuanyao Tong; Wei Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage plays a vital role in sepsis. However, the modulatory effect of glutamine (Gln) on macrophage/ monocyte-mediate cytokines release is still controver-sial. Thus, we investigated the effect of Gin on macro-phage tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release and heat shock protein (HSP) 72 expression in vivo and in vitro. Data from our study indicated that the increase of HSP72 expression was significant at 8 mM of Gln 4 h after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and became independent of Gin concentrations at 24 h, whereas TNF-α release was dose- and time-dependent on Gln. Heat stress (HS) induced more HSP72 and less TNF-α production compared with the non-HS group. However, the production of TNF-α in cells pretreated with HS was increased with increasing concentrations of Gln. Treatment with various concentrations of Gin for 1 h and then 0.5 mM Gin for 4h led to an increase in HSP72 expression, but not in TNF-α production. In sepsis model mice, Gin treatment led to a significantly lower intracellular TNF-α level and an increase in HSP72 expression in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Our results demonstrate that Gin directly increases TNF-α release of LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macro-phages in a dose-dependent manner, and also decreases mouse peritoneal macrophages TNF-α release in the sepsis model. Taken together, our data suggest that there may be more additional pathways by which Gln modulates cytokine production besides HSP72 expression in macrophage during sepsis.

  12. Continuous release of bone morphogenetic protein-2 through nano-graphene oxide-based delivery influences the activation of the NF-κB signal transduction pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Cheng; Feng, Jun; Lin, Xiangjin; Bao, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been used as a delivery vehicle for small molecule drugs and nucleotides. To further investigate GO as a smart biomaterial for the controlled release of cargo molecules, we hypothesized that GO may be an appropriate delivery vehicle because it releases bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). GO characterization indicated that the size distribution of the GO flakes ranged from 81.1 nm to 45,749.7 nm, with an approximate thickness of 2 nm. After BMP2 adsorption onto GO, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermal gravimetric analysis were performed. Compared to GO, BMP2-GO did not induce significant changes in the characteristics of the materials. GO continuously released BMP2 for at least 40 days. Bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) and chondrocytes were treated with BMP2-GO in interleukin-1 media and assessed in terms of cell viability, flow cytometric characterization, and expression of particular mRNA. Compared to GO, BMP2-GO did not induce any significant changes in biocompatibility. We treated osteoarthritic rats with BMP2 and BMP2-GO, which showed significant differences in Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) scores (P<0.05). Quantitative assessment revealed significant differences compared to that using BMP2 and BMP2-GO (P<0.05). These findings indicate that GO may be potentially used to control the release of carrier materials. The combination of BMP2 and GO slowed the progression of NF-κB-activated degenerative changes in osteoarthritis. Therefore, we infer that our BMP2-GO strategy could alleviate the NF-κB pathway by inducing continuous BMP2 release.

  13. A Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived soluble protein, p40, stimulates ligand release from intestinal epithelial cells to transactivate epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fang; Liu, Liping; Dempsey, Peter J; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Raines, Elaine W; Wilson, Carole L; Cao, Hailong; Cao, Zheng; Liu, LinShu; Polk, D Brent

    2013-10-18

    p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble protein, ameliorates intestinal injury and colitis, reduces apoptosis, and preserves barrier function by transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of this study is to determine the mechanisms by which p40 transactivates the EGFR in intestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that p40-conditioned medium activates EGFR in young adult mouse colon epithelial cells and human colonic epithelial cell line, T84 cells. p40 up-regulates a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 17 (ADAM17) catalytic activity, and broad spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitors block EGFR transactivation by p40 in these two cell lines. In ADAM17-deficient mouse colonic epithelial (ADAM17(-/-) MCE) cells, p40 transactivation of EGFR is blocked, but can be rescued by re-expression with WT ADAM17. Furthermore, p40 stimulates release of heparin binding (HB)-EGF, but not transforming growth factor (TGF)α or amphiregulin, in young adult mouse colon cells and ADAM17(-/-) MCE cells overexpressing WT ADAM17. Knockdown of HB-EGF expression by siRNA suppresses p40 effects on transactivating EGFR and Akt, preventing apoptosis, and preserving tight junction function. The effects of p40 on HB-EGF release and ADAM17 activation in vivo are examined after administration of p40-containing pectin/zein hydrogel beads to mice. p40 stimulates ADAM17 activity and EGFR activation in colonic epithelial cells and increases HB-EGF levels in blood from WT mice, but not from mice with intestinal epithelial cell-specific ADAM17 deletion. Thus, these data define a mechanism of a probiotic-derived soluble protein in modulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis through ADAM17-mediated HB-EGF release, leading to transactivation of EGFR.

  14. Identification of the Receptor-Binding Protein in Lytic Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold Piotr; Hammer, Karin; Neve, Horst;

    2013-01-01

    Two phages, P793 and ΦLN04, sharing 80.1% nucleotide sequence identity but having different strains of Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides as hosts, were selected for identification of the host determinant gene. Construction of chimeric phages leading to the expected switch in host range identified t...

  15. Molecular Characterization of Podoviridae Bacteriophages Virulent for Clostridium perfringens and Comparison of Their Predicted Lytic Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne disease as well as non-food-borne human, animal and poultry diseases. There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control ba...

  16. BACTERIOCINS AND BACTERIOPHAGE LYTIC PROTEINS AS ALTERNATIVES TO ANTIBIOTICS FROM RUSSIAN FEDERATION AND USA COLLABORATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel anti-microbial peptides (bacteriocins) were isolated and characterized in collaborative research between PMSRU, ARS-USDA scientists and representatives of the State Research Center for Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology (SRCAMB) in Obolensk, Russian Federation. The bacteriocins are effect...

  17. Protein Characterization of Extracellular Microvesicles/Exosomes Released from Cytotoxin-Challenged Rat Cerebrocortical Mixed Culture and Mouse N2a Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhwani; Manek, Rachna; Raghavan, Vijaya; Wang, Kevin K

    2017-03-10

    A number of neuronal and glial proteins were previously found to be released in free-standing soluble form from cultured brain cells into cell-conditioned media. Here, we sought to examine if similar proteins are also contained in neural and astroglial cell-released extracellular microvesicles/exosomes (MV/E). In this study, MV/E were isolated from cell-conditioned media from control and cytotoxin-challenged rat cerebrocortical mixed culture (CTX) and mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells. Cytotoxin challenges included pro-necrosis calcium ionophore A23187, pro-apoptosis staurosporine (STS), and excitotoxin N-methyl-D-aspartate. Based on established nanoparticle characterization method (dynamic light scattering, NanoTracker, and transmission electron microscopy), we confirmed that these released vesicles are in fact characteristic representation of MV/E by morphology (lipid bilayered vesicles) and by particle size (132-142 nm for CTX and 49-77 nm for N2a cells). We indeed identified neural cell body protein UCH-L1, axonal injury marker αII-spectrin and its breakdown products (SBDPs), astroglial markers GFAP and its breakdown products (GFAP-BDP), dendritic protein BIII-tubulin, synaptic protein synaptophysin, and exosome marker Alix in microvesicles from CTX and/or N2a cells. Furthermore, SBDPs, GFAP-BDP, UCH-L1, and synaptophysin are especially dominant in MV/E isolated from cytotoxin-treated CTX cells. Similarly, SBDPs, βIII-tubulin, and UCH-L1 are more prominently observed in cytotoxin-challenged N2a cells. Lastly, when isolated MV/E from A23187- or STS-challenged N2a cells were introduced to healthy N2a culture, they are capable of evoking cytotoxicity in the latter. Taken together, our study identified that microvesicles/exosomes isolated form healthy and injured brain cells contain certain neural and astroglial proteins, as well as possibly other cytotoxic factors that are capable of propagating cytotoxic effects.

  18. Binding and Release between Polymeric Carrier and Protein Drug: pH-Mediated Interplay of Coulomb Forces, Hydrogen Bonding, van der Waals Interactions, and Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Sergio; Chen, Fan; Seal, Prasenjit; Stenzel, Martina H; Smith, Sean C

    2017-10-02

    The accelerating search for new types of drugs and delivery strategies poses challenge to understanding the mechanism of delivery. To this end, a detailed atomistic picture of binding between the drug and carrier is quintessential. Although many studies focus on the electrostatics of drug-vector interactions, it has also been pointed out that entropic factors relating to water and counterions can play an important role. By carrying out extensive molecular dynamics simulations and subsequently validating with experiments, we shed light herein on the binding in aqueous solution between a protein drug and polymeric carrier. We examined the complexation between the polymer poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether acrylate-b-poly(carboxyethyl acrylate (PEGMEA-b-PCEA) and the protein egg white lysozyme, a system that acts as a model for polymer-vector/protein-drug delivery systems. The complexation has been visualized and characterized using contact maps and hydrogen bonding analyses for five independent simulations of the complex, each running over 100 ns. Binding at physiological pH is, as expected, mediated by Coulombic attraction between the positively charged protein and negatively charged carboxylate groups on the polymer. However, we find that consideration of electrostatics alone is insufficient to explain the complexation behavior at low pH. Intracomplex hydrogen bonds, van der Waals interactions, as well as water-water interactions dictate that the polymer does not release the protein at pH 4.8 or indeed at pH 3.2 even though the Coulombic attractions are largely removed as carboxylate groups on the polymer become titrated. Experiments in aqueous solution carried out at pH 7.0, 4.5, and 3.0 confirm the veracity of the computed binding behavior. Overall, these combined simulation and experimental results illustrate that coulomb interactions need to be complemented with consideration of other entropic forces, mediated by van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding

  19. Whey Protein/Polysaccharide-Stabilized Oil Powders for Topical Application—Release and Transdermal Delivery of Salicylic Acid from Oil Powders Compared to Redispersed Powders

    OpenAIRE

    Kotzé, Magdalena; Otto, Anja; Jordaan, Anine; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2015-01-01

    Oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions are commonly converted into solid-like powders in order to improve their physical and chemical stabilities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether whey protein/polysaccharide-stabilized o/w emulsions could be converted into stable oil powders by means of freeze-drying. Moreover, during this study, the effects of pH and polymer type on release and trans(dermal) delivery of salicylic acid, a model drug, from these oil powders were investigated and compared...

  20. Protozoacidal Trojan-Horse: use of a ligand-lytic peptide for selective destruction of symbiotic protozoa within termite guts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Amit; Delatte, Jennifer; Foil, Lane; Husseneder, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    For novel biotechnology-based termite control, we developed a cellulose bait containing freeze-dried genetically engineered yeast which expresses a protozoacidal lytic peptide attached to a protozoa-recognizing ligand. The yeast acts as a 'Trojan-Horse' that kills the cellulose-digesting protozoa in the termite gut, which leads to the death of termites, presumably due to inefficient cellulose digestion. The ligand targets the lytic peptide specifically to protozoa, thereby increasing its protozoacidal efficiency while protecting non-target organisms. After ingestion of the bait, the yeast propagates in the termite's gut and is spread throughout the termite colony via social interactions. This novel paratransgenesis-based strategy could be a good supplement for current termite control using fortified biological control agents in addition to chemical insecticides. Moreover, this ligand-lytic peptide system could be used for drug development to selectively target disease-causing protozoa in humans or other vertebrates.

  1. Genomic sequence and evolution of marine cyanophage P60: a new insight on lytic and lysogenic phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Lu, Jingrang

    2002-05-01

    The genome of cyanophage P60, a lytic virus which infects marine Synechococcus WH7803, was completely sequenced. The P60 genome contained 47,872 bp with 80 potential open reading frames that were mostly similar to the genes found in lytic phages like T7, phi-YeO3-12, and SIO1. The DNA replication system, consisting of primase-helicase and DNA polymerase, appeared to be more conserved in podoviruses than in siphoviruses and myoviruses, suggesting that DNA replication genes could be the critical elements for lytic phages. Strikingly high sequence similarities in the regions coding for nucleotide metabolism were found between cyanophage P60 and marine unicellular cyanobacteria.

  2. Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 ORF48 Is an RTA-Responsive Gene Product and Functions in both Viral Lytic Replication and Latency during In Vivo Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jing; Han, Chuanhui; Gong, Danyang; Liu, Ping; Zhou, Sheng; Deng, Hongyu

    2015-06-01

    Replication and transcription activator (RTA) of gammaherpesvirus is an immediate early gene product and regulates the expression of many downstream viral lytic genes. ORF48 is also conserved among gammaherpesviruses; however, its expression regulation and function remained largely unknown. In this study, we characterized the transcription unit of ORF48 from murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) and analyzed its transcriptional regulation. We showed that RTA activates the ORF48 promoter via an RTA-responsive element (48pRRE). RTA binds to 48pRRE directly in vitro and also associates with ORF48 promoter in vivo. Mutagenesis of 48pRRE in the context of the viral genome demonstrated that the expression of ORF48 is activated by RTA through 48pRRE during de novo infection. Through site-specific mutagenesis, we generated an ORF48-null virus and examined the function of ORF48 in vitro and in vivo. The ORF48-null mutation remarkably reduced the viral replication efficiency in cell culture. Moreover, through intranasal or intraperitoneal infection of laboratory mice, we showed that ORF48 is important for viral lytic replication in the lung and establishment of latency in the spleen, as well as viral reactivation from latency. Collectively, our study identified ORF48 as an RTA-responsive gene and showed that ORF48 is important for MHV-68 replication both in vitro and in vivo. The replication and transcription activator (RTA), conserved among gammaherpesviruses, serves as a molecular switch for the virus life cycle. It works as a transcriptional regulator to activate the expression of many viral lytic genes. However, only a limited number of such downstream genes have been uncovered for MHV-68. In this study, we identified ORF48 as an RTA-responsive gene of MHV-68 and mapped the cis element involved. By constructing a mutant virus that is deficient in ORF48 expression and through infection of laboratory mice, we showed that ORF48 plays important roles in different stages of

  3. Degradation of phosphorylated p53 by viral protein-ECS E3 ligase complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Sato

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available p53-signaling is modulated by viruses to establish a host cellular environment advantageous for their propagation. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV lytic program induces phosphorylation of p53, which prevents interaction with MDM2. Here, we show that induction of EBV lytic program leads to degradation of p53 via an ubiquitin-proteasome pathway independent of MDM2. The BZLF1 protein directly functions as an adaptor component of the ECS (Elongin B/C-Cul2/5-SOCS-box protein ubiquitin ligase complex targeting p53 for degradation. Intringuingly, C-terminal phosphorylation of p53 resulting from activated DNA damage response by viral lytic replication enhances its binding to BZLF1 protein. Purified BZLF1 protein-associated ECS could be shown to catalyze ubiquitination of phospho-mimetic p53 more efficiently than the wild-type in vitro. The compensation of p53 at middle and late stages of the lytic infection inhibits viral DNA replication and production during lytic infection, suggesting that the degradation of p53 is required for efficient viral propagation. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a role for the BZLF1 protein-associated ECS ligase complex in regulation of p53 phosphorylated by activated DNA damage signaling during viral lytic infection.

  4. Factors affecting protein release from alginate-chitosan coacervate microcapsules during production and gastric/intestinal simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, G W; Drolet, C; Scott, S L; de la Noüe, J

    2001-12-13

    A series of experiments was performed to evaluate the influence of a number of physico-chemical factors on the diffusion of a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), from dried chitosan-coated alginate microcapsules. Diffusion of BSA was quantified during the microcapsule manufacture processes (gelation, washing, rinsing) and during incubation in conditions simulating the pH encountered during the gastric (0.1 N HCl; pH 1.5) and intestinal (200 mM Tris-HCl; pH 7.5) phases of digestion. Factors tested included alginate and chitosan concentration, calcium chloride (CaCl2) concentration in the gelation medium, loading rate, chitosan molecular mass and pH of the gelation medium. Microcapsule size and gelation time were altered in order to determine their effects on protein retention. Alginate and chitosan concentration significantly influenced BSA retention during microcapsule manufacture and acid incubation, as did calcium chloride concentration in the gelation medium (P<0.05). BSA retention during manufacture was not significantly altered by protein loading rate or pH of the encapsulation medium, however, protein retention during acid incubation decreased significantly with increasing protein loading rate and encapsulation medium pH (P<0.05). Microcapsules that were washed with acetone following manufacture demonstrated significantly increased protein retention during acid incubation (P<0.05). In microcapsules that had been acetone-dried to a point whereby their mass was reduced to 10% of that immediately following encapsulation, protein retention was over 80% following 24-h acid incubation vs. only 20% protein retention from non acetone-dried microcapsules. The presence of calcium in the neutral buffer medium significantly reduced BSA diffusion in a concentration-dependent manner (P<0.05).

  5. Calcium Signaling throughout the Toxoplasma gondii Lytic Cycle: A STUDY USING GENETICALLY ENCODED CALCIUM INDICATORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges-Pereira, Lucas; Budu, Alexandre; McKnight, Ciara A; Moore, Christina A; Vella, Stephen A; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Liu, Jing; Garcia, Celia R S; Pace, Douglas A; Moreno, Silvia N J

    2015-11-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that invades host cells, creating a parasitophorous vacuole where it communicates with the host cell cytosol through the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. The lytic cycle of the parasite starts with its exit from the host cell followed by gliding motility, conoid extrusion, attachment, and invasion of another host cell. Here, we report that Ca(2+) oscillations occur in the cytosol of the parasite during egress, gliding, and invasion, which are critical steps of the lytic cycle. Extracellular Ca(2+) enhances each one of these processes. We used tachyzoite clonal lines expressing genetically encoded calcium indicators combined with host cells expressing transiently expressed calcium indicators of different colors, and we measured Ca(2+) changes in both parasites and host simultaneously during egress. We demonstrated a link between cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations in the host and in the parasite. Our approach also allowed us to measure two new features of motile parasites, which were enhanced by Ca(2+) influx. This is the first study showing, in real time, Ca(2+) signals preceding egress and their direct link with motility, an essential virulence trait.

  6. CTCF interacts with the lytic HSV-1 genome to promote viral transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Fengchao; Li, Xin; Vladimirova, Olga; Hu, Benxia; Chen, Guijun; Xiao, Yu; Singh, Vikrant; Lu, Danfeng; Li, Lihong; Han, Hongbo; Wickramasinghe, J. M. A. S. P.; Smith, Sheryl T.; Zheng, Chunfu; Li, Qihan; Lieberman, Paul M.; Fraser, Nigel W.; Zhou, Jumin

    2017-01-01

    CTCF is an essential chromatin regulator implicated in important nuclear processes including in nuclear organization and transcription. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen, which enters productive infection in human epithelial and many other cell types. CTCF is known to bind several sites in the HSV-1 genome during latency and reactivation, but its function has not been defined. Here, we report that CTCF interacts extensively with the HSV-1 DNA during lytic infection by ChIP-seq, and its knockdown results in the reduction of viral transcription, viral genome copy number and virus yield. CTCF knockdown led to increased H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, and a reduction of RNA pol II occupancy on viral genes. Importantly, ChIP-seq analysis revealed that there is a higher level of CTD Ser2P modified RNA Pol II near CTCF peaks relative to the Ser5P form in the viral genome. Consistent with this, CTCF knockdown reduced the Ser2P but increased Ser5P modified forms of RNA Pol II on viral genes. These results suggest that CTCF promotes HSV-1 lytic transcription by facilitating the elongation of RNA Pol II and preventing silenced chromatin on the viral genome. PMID:28045091

  7. Parosteal osteosarcoma dedifferentiating into telangiectatic osteosarcoma: importance of lytic changes and fluid cavities at imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azura, M. [Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Musculoskeletal Oncological Surgery Department, Bologna (Italy); University of Malaya, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Vanel, D. [Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Istituti Rizzoli, Anatomia Patologica, Bologna (Italy); Alberghini, M. [Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Picci, P.; Staals, E.; Mercuri, M. [Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Musculoskeletal Oncological Surgery Department, Bologna (Italy)

    2009-07-15

    This study was performed to assess the imaging findings in cases of parosteal osteosarcoma dedifferentiated into telangiectatic osteosarcoma. Parosteal osteosarcoma is a low-grade well-differentiated malignant tumor. Dedifferentiation into a more aggressive lesion is frequent and usually visible on imaging as a central lytic area in a sclerotic mass. Only one case of differentiation into a telangiectatic osteosarcoma has been reported. As it has practical consequences, with a need for aggressive chemotherapy, we looked for this rather typical imaging pattern. Review of 199 cases of surface osteosarcomas (including 86 parosteal, of which 23 were dedifferentiated) revealed lesions suggesting a possible telangiectatic osteosarcoma on imaging examinations in five cases (cavities with fluid). Histology confirmed three cases (the two other only had hematoma inside a dedifferentiated tumor). There were three males, aged 24, 28, and 32. They had radiographs and CT, and two an MR examination. Lesions involved the distal femur, proximal tibia, and proximal humerus. The parosteal osteosarcoma was a sclerotic, regular mass, attached to the cortex. A purely lytic mass, partially composed of fluid cavities was easily detected on CT and MR. It involved the medullary cavity twice, and remained outside the bone once. Histology confirmed the two components in each case. Two patients died of pulmonary metastases and one is alive. Knowledge of this highly suggestive pattern should help guide the initial biopsy to diagnose the two components of the tumor, and guide aggressive treatment. (orig.)

  8. Overexpression of antimicrobial lytic peptides protects grapevine from Pierce's disease under greenhouse but not field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijian T; Hopkins, Donald L; Gray, Dennis J

    2015-10-01

    Pierce's disease (PD) caused by Xylella fastidiosa prevents cultivation of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and susceptible hybrids in the southeastern United States and poses a major threat to the grape industry of California and Texas. Genetic resistance is the only proven control of X. fastidiosa. Genetic engineering offers an alternative to heretofore ineffective conventional breeding in order to transfer only PD resistance traits into elite cultivars. A synthetic gene encoding lytic peptide LIMA-A was introduced into V. vinifera and a Vitis hybrid to assess in planta inhibition of X. fastidiosa. Over 1050 independent transgenic plant lines were evaluated in the greenhouse, among which nine lines were selected and tested under naturally-inoculated field conditions. These selected plant lines in the greenhouse remain disease-free for 10 years, to date, even with multiple manual pathogen inoculations. However, all these lines in the field, including a grafted transgenic rootstock, succumbed to PD within 7 years. We conclude that in planta production of antimicrobial lytic peptides does not provide durable PD resistance to grapevine under field conditions.

  9. Preliminary survey of local bacteriophages with lytic activity against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latz, Simone; Wahida, Adam; Arif, Assuda; Häfner, Helga; Hoß, Mareike; Ritter, Klaus; Horz, Hans-Peter

    2016-10-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) represent a potential alternative for combating multi-drug resistant bacteria. Because of their narrow host range and the ever emergence of novel pathogen variants the continued search for phages is a prerequisite for optimal treatment of bacterial infections. Here we performed an ad hoc survey in the surroundings of a University hospital for the presence of phages with therapeutic potential. To this end, 16 aquatic samples of different origins and locations were tested simultaneously for the presence of phages with lytic activity against five current, but distinct strains each from the ESKAPE-group (i.e., Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter cloacae). Phages could be isolated for 70% of strains, covering all bacterial species except S. aureus. Apart from samples from two lakes, freshwater samples were largely devoid of phages. By contrast, one liter of hospital effluent collected at a single time point already contained phages active against two-thirds of tested strains. In conclusion, phages with lytic activity against nosocomial pathogens are unevenly distributed across environments with the prime source being the immediate hospital vicinity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Investigating the lytic activity and structural properties of Staphylococcus aureus phenol soluble modulin (PSM) peptide toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laabei, Maisem; Jamieson, W David; Yang, Yi; van den Elsen, Jean; Jenkins, A Toby A

    2014-12-01

    The ubiquitous bacterial pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, expresses a large arsenal of virulence factors essential for pathogenesis. The phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) are a family of cytolytic peptide toxins which have multiple roles in staphylococcal virulence. To gain an insight into which specific factors are important in PSM-mediated cell membrane disruption, the lytic activity of individual PSM peptides against phospholipid vesicles and T cells was investigated. Vesicles were most susceptible to lysis by the PSMα subclass of peptides (α1-3 in particular), when containing between 10 and 30mol% cholesterol, which for these vesicles is the mixed solid ordered (so)-liquid ordered (lo) phase. Our results show that the PSMβ class of peptides has little effect on vesicles at concentrations comparable to that of the PSMα class and exhibited no cytotoxicity. Furthermore, within the PSMα class, differences emerged with PSMα4 showing decreased vesicle and cytotoxic activity in comparison to its counterparts, in contrast to previous studies. In order to understand this, peptides were studied using helical wheel projections and circular dichroism measurements. The degree of amphipathicity, alpha-helicity and properties such as charge and hydrophobicity were calculated, allowing a structure-function relationship to be inferred. The degree of alpha-helicity of the peptides was the single most important property of the seven peptides studied in predicting their lytic activity. These results help to redefine this class of peptide toxins and also highlight certain membrane parameters required for efficient lysis.

  11. Effect of metals on the lytic cycle of the coccolithovirus, EhV86.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha eGledhill

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we show that metals, and in particular copper (Cu, can disrupt the lytic cycle in the Emiliania huxleyi - EhV86 host-virus system. Numbers of virus particles produced per E. huxleyi cell and E. huxleyi lysis rates were reduced by Cu at total metal concentrations over 500 nM in the presence of EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and 250 nM in the absence of EDTA in acute short term exposure experiments. Zinc (Zn, cadmium (Cd and cobalt (Co were not observed to affect the lysis rate of EhV86 in these experiments. The cellular glutathione (GSH content increased in virus infected cells, but not as a result of metal exposure. In contrast, the cellular content of phytochelatins (PCs increased only in response to metal exposure. The increase in gluthatione content is consistent with increases in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS on viral infection, while increases in PC content are likely linked to metal homeostasis and indicate that metal toxicity to the host was not affected by viral infection. We propose that Cu prevents lytic production of EhV86 by interfering with virus DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis through a transcriptional block, which ultimately suppresses the formation of ROS, a biochemical response required for successful virus infection.

  12. CGRP stimulation of iNOS and NO release from trigeminal ganglion glial cells involves mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vause, C V; Durham, P L

    2009-08-01

    Clinical and basic science data support an integral role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the pathophysiology of temporomandibular joint disorders. Recently, we have shown that CGRP can stimulate the synthesis and release of nitric oxide (NO) from trigeminal ganglion glial cells. The goal of this study was to determine the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in CGRP regulation of iNOS expression and NO release from cultured trigeminal ganglion glial cells from Sprague-Dawley rats. CGRP treatment for 2 h significantly increased activity of the MAPK reporter genes, Elk, ATF-2, and CHOP. In addition, CGRP increased nuclear staining for the active forms of the MAPKs: extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun amino-terminal kinase, and p38. This stimulatory event was not observed in cultures pre-treated with the CGRP receptor antagonist peptide CGRP(8-37). Similarly, pre-treatment with selective MAPK inhibitors repressed increases in reporter gene activity as well as CGRP-induced increases in iNOS expression and NO release mediated by MAPKs. In addition, over-expression of MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1), MEK3, MEK6, and MEK kinase significantly increased iNOS expression and NO production in glial cells. Results from our study provide evidence that CGRP binding to its receptor can stimulate iNOS gene expression via activation of MAPK pathways in trigeminal ganglion glial cells.

  13. Bronchogenic adenocarcinoma presenting as a synchronous solitary lytic skull lesion with ischaemic stroke--case report and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, David

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a rare case of metastatic bronchogenic adenocarcinoma in a 55-year-old man presenting with concomittant solitary lytic skull lesion and ischaemic stroke. Metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma is known to present as lytic skull lesions. Primary brain tumours are also known to cause ischaemic brain injury. An underlying stroke risk may be exagerated by cranial tumour surgery. Patients with brain tumours are well known to be predisposed to an increased risk of developing thromboembolic disease. It is unusual to see metastatic bronchogenic adenocarcinoma presenting as ischaemic stroke with a background of concomittant cerebral metastasis. The aetio-pathogenesis of this rare occurrence is discussed with a review of literature.

  14. MID2 can substitute for MID1 and control exocytosis of lytic granules in cytotoxic T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Hansen, Ann K; Meroni, Germana;

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that the E3 ubiquitin ligase midline 1 (MID1) is upregulated in murine cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL), where it controls exocytosis of lytic granules and the killing capacity. Accordingly, CTL from MID1 knock-out (MID1(-/-)) mice have a 25-30% reduction in exocytosis of lytic...... granules and cytotoxicity compared to CTL from wild-type (WT) mice. We wondered why the MID1 gene knock-out did not affect exocytosis and cytotoxicity more severely and speculated whether MID2, a close homologue of MID1, might partially compensate for the loss of MID1 in MID1(-/-) CTL. Here, we showed...

  15. The use of lytic bacteriophages to reduce E. coli O157:H7 on fresh cut lettuce introduced through cross-contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield) at 108 PFU/ml or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either 1) spraying on to lettuce piec...

  16. Phage lysin LysK can be truncated to its CHAP domain and retain lytic activity against live antibiotic-resistant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, Marianne; O'Flynn, Gary; Garry, Jennifer; Cooney, Jakki; Coffey, Aidan; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2009-02-01

    A truncated derivative of the phage endolysin LysK containing only the CHAP (cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase) domain exhibited lytic activity against live clinical staphylococcal isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This is the first known report of a truncated phage lysin which retains high lytic activity against live staphylococcal cells.

  17. Continuous release of bone morphogenetic protein-2 through nano-graphene oxide-based delivery influences the activation of the NF-κB signal transduction pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong C

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cheng Zhong,1 Jun Feng,2 Xiangjin Lin,1,* Qi Bao3,4,* 1Department of Orthopaedic, First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, 3Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, 4Institute of Gastroenterology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Graphene oxide (GO has been used as a delivery vehicle for small molecule drugs and nucleotides. To further investigate GO as a smart biomaterial for the controlled release of cargo molecules, we hypothesized that GO may be an appropriate delivery vehicle because it releases bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2. GO characterization indicated that the size distribution of the GO flakes ranged from 81.1 nm to 45,749.7 nm, with an approximate thickness of 2 nm. After BMP2 adsorption onto GO, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and thermal gravimetric analysis were performed. Compared to GO, BMP2-GO did not induce significant changes in the characteristics of the materials. GO continuously released BMP2 for at least 40 days. Bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs and chondrocytes were treated with BMP2-GO in interleukin-1 media and assessed in terms of cell viability, flow cytometric characterization, and expression of particular mRNA. Compared to GO, BMP2-GO did not induce any significant changes in biocompatibility. We treated osteoarthritic rats with BMP2 and BMP2-GO, which showed significant differences in Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI scores (P<0.05. Quantitative assessment revealed significant differences compared to that using BMP2 and BMP2-GO (P<0.05. These findings indicate that GO may be potentially used to control the release of carrier materials. The combination of BMP2 and GO slowed the

  18. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand release by substrate-specific a disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAMs) involves different protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes depending on the stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Michelle; Dubbin, Karen; D'Aiello, Antonio; Hartmann, Monika; Lodish, Harvey; Herrlich, Andreas

    2011-05-20

    The dysregulation of EGF family ligand cleavage has severe consequences for the developing as well as the adult organism. Therefore, their production is highly regulated. The limiting step is the ectodomain cleavage of membrane-bound precursors by one of several a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) metalloproteases, and understanding the regulation of cleavage is an important goal of current research. We have previously reported that in mouse lung epithelial cells, the pro-EGF ligands TGFα, neuregulin 1β (NRG), and heparin-binding EGF are differentially cleaved depending on the cleavage stimulus (Herrlich, A., Klinman, E., Fu, J., Sadegh, C., and Lodish, H. (2008) FASEB J.). In this study in mouse embryonic fibroblasts that lack different ADAMs, we show that induced cleavage of EGF ligands can involve the same substrate-specific metalloprotease but does require different stimulus-dependent signaling pathways. Cleavage was stimulated by phorbol ester (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a mimic of diacylglycerol and PKC activator), hypertonic stress, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced G protein-coupled receptor activation, or by ionomycin-induced intracellular calcium release. Although ADAMs showed substrate preference (ADAM17, TGFα and heparin-binding EGF; and ADAM9, NRG), substrate cleavage differed substantially with the stimulus, and cleavage of the same substrate depended on the presence of different, sometimes multiple, PKC isoforms. For instance, classical PKC was required for TPA-induced but not hypertonic stress-induced cleavage of all EGF family ligands. Inhibition of PKCζ enhanced NRG release upon TPA stimulation, but it blocked NRG release in response to hypertonic stress. Our results suggest a model in which substantial regulation of ectodomain cleavage occurs not only on the metalloprotease level but also on the level of the substrate or of a third protein.

  19. Functional Elucidation of Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii Nematocyst Venoms’ Lytic Activity Using Mass Spectrometry and Zymography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medusozoans utilize explosively discharging penetrant nematocysts to inject venom into prey. These venoms are composed of highly complex proteins and peptides with extensive bioactivities, as observed in vitro. Diverse enzymatic toxins have been putatively identified in the venom of jellyfish, Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii, through examination of their proteomes and transcriptomes. However, functional examination of putative enzymatic components identified in proteomic approaches to elucidate potential bioactivities is critically needed. Methods: In this study, enzymatic toxins were functionally identified using a combined approach consisting of in gel zymography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. The potential roles of metalloproteinases and lipases in hemolytic activity were explored using specific inhibitors. Results: Zymography indicated that nematocyst venom possessed protease-, lipase- and hyaluronidase-class activities. Further, proteomic approaches using LC-MS/MS indicated sequence homology of proteolytic bands observed in zymography to extant zinc metalloproteinase-disintegrins and astacin metalloproteinases. Moreover, pre-incubation of the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat with N. nomurai nematocyst venom resulted in an approximate 62% reduction of hemolysis compared to venom exposed sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that metalloproteinases contribute to hemolytic activity. Additionally, species within the molecular mass range of 14–18 kDa exhibited both egg yolk and erythrocyte lytic activities in gel overlay assays. Conclusion: For the first time, our findings demonstrate the contribution of jellyfish venom metalloproteinase and suggest the involvement of lipase species to hemolytic activity. Investigations of this relationship will facilitate a better understanding of the constituents and toxicity of jellyfish venom.

  20. An antisense RNA in a lytic cyanophage links psbA to a gene encoding a homing endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Andrew D; Gierga, Gregor; Clokie, Martha R J; Evans, David J; Hess, Wolfgang R; Scanlan, David J

    2010-09-01

    Cyanophage genomes frequently possess the psbA gene, encoding the D1 polypeptide of photosystem II. This protein is believed to maintain host photosynthetic capacity during infection and enhance phage fitness under high-light conditions. Although the first documented cyanophage-encoded psbA gene contained a group I intron, this feature has not been widely reported since, despite a plethora of new sequences becoming available. In this study, we show that in cyanophage S-PM2, this intron is spliced during the entire infection cycle. Furthermore, we report the widespread occurrence of psbA introns in marine metagenomic libraries, and with psbA often adjacent to a homing endonuclease (HE). Bioinformatic analysis of the intergenic region between psbA and the adjacent HE gene F-CphI in S-PM2 showed the presence of an antisense RNA (asRNA) connecting these two separate genetic elements. The asRNA is co-regulated with psbA and F-CphI, suggesting its involvement with their expression. Analysis of scaffolds from global ocean survey datasets shows this asRNA to be commonly associated with the 3' end of cyanophage psbA genes, implying that this potential mechanism of regulating marine 'viral' photosynthesis is evolutionarily conserved. Although antisense transcription is commonly found in eukaryotic and increasingly also in prokaryotic organisms, there has been no indication for asRNAs in lytic phages so far. We propose that this asRNA also provides a means of preventing the formation of mobile group I introns within cyanophage psbA genes.

  1. Expression, biosynthesis and release of preadipocyte factor-1/ delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 in pancreatic -cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, B N; Carlsson, C; Møldrup, A

    2003-01-01

    Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1)/delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 (FA1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like family. It is widely expressed in embryonic tissues, whereas in adults it is confined to the adrenal gland, the anterior pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, the testis and the ov......Preadipocyte factor-1 (Pref-1)/delta-like protein/fetal antigen-1 (FA1) is a member of the epidermal growth factor-like family. It is widely expressed in embryonic tissues, whereas in adults it is confined to the adrenal gland, the anterior pituitary, the endocrine pancreas, the testis...

  2. Corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulates mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 expression via a PLC/PKC-dependent signaling pathway in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Hui; Xu, Yongjun; Chen, Yanming; Zhang, Yanmin; Ni, Xin

    2012-10-15

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) has been shown to modulate dendritic development in hippocampus. Mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 (MKLP1) plays key roles in dendritic differentiation. In the present study, we examined the effects of CRH on MKLP1 expression in cultured hippocampal neurons and determine subsequent signaling pathways involved. CRH dose-dependently increased MKLP1 mRNA and protein expression. This effect can be reversed by CRHR1 antagonist but not by CRHR2 antagonist. CRHR1 knockdown impaired this effect of CRH. CRH stimulated GTP-bound Gαs protein and phosphorylated phospholipase C (PLC)-β3 expression, which were blocked by CRHR1 antagonist. Transfection of GP antagonist-2A, an inhibitory peptide of Gαq protein, blocked CRH-induced phosphorylated PLC-β3 expression. PLC and PKC inhibitors completely blocked whereas adenylyl cyclase (AC) and PKA inhibitors did not affect CRH-induced MKLP1 expression. Our results indicate that CRH act on CRHR1 to induce MKLP1 expression via PLC/PKC signaling pathway. CRH may regulate MKLP1 expression, thereby modulating dendritic development.

  3. A concerted mechanism for opening the GDP binding pocket and release of the nucleotide in hetero-trimeric G-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louet, Maxime; Perahia, David; Martinez, Jean; Floquet, Nicolas

    2011-08-05

    G-protein hetero-trimers play a fundamental role in cell function. Their dynamic behavior at the atomic level remains to be understood. We have studied the Gi hetero-trimer through a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and normal mode analyses. We showed that these big proteins could undergo large-amplitude conformational changes, without any energy penalty and with an intrinsic dynamics centered on their GDP binding pocket. Among the computed collective motions, one of the modes (mode 17) was particularly able to significantly open both the base and the phosphate sides of the GDP binding pocket. This mode describing mainly a motion between the Ras-like and the helical domains of G(α) was in close agreement with some available X-ray data and with many other biochemical/biophysical observations including the kink of helix α5. The use of a new protocol, which allows extraction of the GDP ligand along the computed normal modes, supported that the exit of GDP was largely coupled to an opening motion along mode 17. We propose for the first time a "concerted mechanism" model in which the opening of the GDP pocket and the kink of the α5 helix occur concomitantly and favor GDP release from G(αβγ) complexes. This model is discussed in the context of the G-protein-coupled receptor/G-protein interaction close to the cell membrane. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pretreatment of plasma samples by a novel hollow fiber centrifugal ultrafiltration technique for the determination of plasma protein binding of three coumarins using acetone as protein binding releasing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junmei; Shi, Qingwen; Jiang, Ye; Liu, Yan

    2015-09-15

    A novel and practical sample pretreatment method based on hollow fiber centrifugal ultrafiltration (HFCF-UF) was developed to determine plasma protein binding by using HPLC. The samples for analyzing unbound and total concentrations could be prepared in parallel simultaneously by the same device. It only required centrifugation for a short time and the filtrate could be injected directly for HPLC analysis without further treatment. Coumarins were selected as the model drugs. Acetone was chosen as the releasing agent to free the binding drug from the drug-protein complex for the total drug concentration determination. Non-specific bindings (NSBs) between the analytes and hollow fiber membrane materials were investigated. The type and volume of protein binding releaser were optimized. Additionally, centrifugal speed and centrifugal time were considered. Under the optimized conditions, the absolute recovery rates of the unbound and total concentrations were in the range of 97.5-100.9% for the three analytes. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.0135-0.0667μgmL(-1). In vitro plasma protein binding of the three coumarins was determined at three concentrations using the validated method and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 3.4%. Compared with traditional method, the HFCF-UF method is simple to run, no specialized equipment requirement and is a more accurate plasma pretreatment procedure with almost excellent drug-protein binding equilibrium. Therefore, this method can be applied to determine the plasma protein binding in clinical practice. It also provides a reliable alternative for accurate monitoring of unbound or total drug concentration in therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM).

  5. Epstein-Barr Virus Immediate-Early Protein Zta Co-Opts Mitochondrial Single-Stranded DNA Binding Protein To Promote Viral and Inhibit Mitochondrial DNA Replication▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedmer, Andreas; Wang, Pu; Zhou, Jing; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Disruption of cellular metabolic processes and usurpation of host proteins are hallmarks of herpesvirus lytic infection. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic replication is initiated by the immediate-early protein Zta. Zta is a multifunctional DNA binding protein that stimulates viral gene transcription, nucleates a replication complex at the viral origin of lytic replication, and inhibits cell cycle proliferation. To better understand these functions and identify cellular collaborators of Zta, we purified an epitope-tagged version of Zta in cells capable of supporting lytic replication. FLAG-tagged Zta was purified from a nuclear fraction using FLAG antibody immunopurification and peptide elution. Zta-associated proteins were isolated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. The Zta-associated proteins included members of the HSP70 family and various single-stranded DNA and RNA binding proteins. The nuclear replication protein A subunits (RPA70 and RPA32) and the human mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein (mtSSB) were confirmed by Western blotting to be specifically enriched in the FLAG-Zta immunopurified complex. mtSSB coimmunoprecipitated with endogenous Zta during reactivation of EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Small interfering RNA depletion of mtSSB reduced Zta-induced lytic replication of EBV but had only a modest effect on transcription activation function. A point mutation in the Zta DNA binding domain (C189S), which is known to reduce lytic cycle replication, eliminated mtSSB association with Zta. The predominantly mitochondrial localization of mtSSB was shifted to partly nuclear localization in cells expressing Zta. Mitochondrial DNA synthesis and genome copy number were reduced by Zta-induced EBV lytic replication. We conclude that Zta interaction with mtSSB serves the dual function of facilitating viral and blocking mitochondrial DNA replication. PMID:18305033

  6. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early protein Zta co-opts mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein to promote viral and inhibit mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedmer, Andreas; Wang, Pu; Zhou, Jing; Rennekamp, Andrew J; Tiranti, Valeria; Zeviani, Massimo; Lieberman, Paul M

    2008-05-01

    Disruption of cellular metabolic processes and usurpation of host proteins are hallmarks of herpesvirus lytic infection. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic replication is initiated by the immediate-early protein Zta. Zta is a multifunctional DNA binding protein that stimulates viral gene transcription, nucleates a replication complex at the viral origin of lytic replication, and inhibits cell cycle proliferation. To better understand these functions and identify cellular collaborators of Zta, we purified an epitope-tagged version of Zta in cells capable of supporting lytic replication. FLAG-tagged Zta was purified from a nuclear fraction using FLAG antibody immunopurification and peptide elution. Zta-associated proteins were isolated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. The Zta-associated proteins included members of the HSP70 family and various single-stranded DNA and RNA binding proteins. The nuclear replication protein A subunits (RPA70 and RPA32) and the human mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein (mtSSB) were confirmed by Western blotting to be specifically enriched in the FLAG-Zta immunopurified complex. mtSSB coimmunoprecipitated with endogenous Zta during reactivation of EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma and lymphoblastoid cell lines. Small interfering RNA depletion of mtSSB reduced Zta-induced lytic replication of EBV but had only a modest effect on transcription activation function. A point mutation in the Zta DNA binding domain (C189S), which is known to reduce lytic cycle replication, eliminated mtSSB association with Zta. The predominantly mitochondrial localization of mtSSB was shifted to partly nuclear localization in cells expressing Zta. Mitochondrial DNA synthesis and genome copy number were reduced by Zta-induced EBV lytic replication. We conclude that Zta interaction with mtSSB serves the dual function of facilitating viral and blocking mitochondrial DNA replication.

  7. Microspheres based on biodegradable functionalized poly(alpha-hydroxy) acids for the controlled release of bioactive proteins and peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghassemi, A.H.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmaceutical peptides/proteins have proven to be potent molecules for the treatment of a great variety of chronic and life threatening diseases. These molecules however demand a suitable formulation for their successful delivery. For formulation and delivery of such molecules the parenteral route

  8. Protein-releasing polymeric scaffolds induce fibrochondrocytic differentiation of endogenous cells for knee meniscus regeneration in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang H; Rodeo, Scott A; Fortier, Lisa Ann; Lu, Chuanyong; Erisken, Cevat; Mao, Jeremy J

    2014-12-10

    Regeneration of complex tissues, such as kidney, liver, and cartilage, continues to be a scientific and translational challenge. Survival of ex vivo cultured, transplanted cells in tissue grafts is among one of the key barriers. Meniscus is a complex tissue consisting of collagen fibers and proteoglycans with gradient phenotypes of fibrocartilage and functions to provide congruence of the knee joint, without which the patient is likely to develop arthritis. Endogenous stem/progenitor cells regenerated the knee meniscus upon spatially released human connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and transforming growth factor-β3 (TGFβ3) from a three-dimensional (3D)-printed biomaterial, enabling functional knee recovery. Sequentially applied CTGF and TGFβ3 were necessary and sufficient to propel mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells, as a heterogeneous population or as single-cell progenies, into fibrochondrocytes that concurrently synthesized procollagens I and IIα. When released from microchannels of 3D-printed, human meniscus scaffolds, CTGF and TGFβ3 induced endogenous stem/progenitor cells to differentiate and synthesize zone-specific type I and II collagens. We then replaced sheep meniscus with anatomically correct, 3D-printed scaffolds that incorporated spatially delivered CTGF and TGFβ3. Endogenous cells regenerated the meniscus with zone-specific matrix phenotypes: primarily type I collagen in the outer zone, and type II collagen in the inner zone, reminiscent of the native meniscus. Spatiotemporally delivered CTGF and TGFβ3 also restored inhomogeneous mechanical properties in the regenerated sheep meniscus. Survival and directed differentiation of endogenous cells in a tissue defect may have implications in the regeneration of complex (heterogeneous) tissues and organs.

  9. In vitro slow-release urea contained in rice straw-based diets to increase efficiency of rumen microbial protein synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dede Kardaya

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Effect of slow-release urea on efficiency of rumen microbial protein synthesis (EMPS was examined using an in vitro technique. The objective of this experiment was to reveal the in vitro slow-release urea characteristics of zinc-urea, zeolites-urea, and zeolites-zinc-urea in relation to EMPS observed in different incubation time. The experimental design employed was randomized block design with 4 x 3 factorial plus a control treatment, and conducted in two replications. Factors were various urea sources (urea, zinc-urea, zeolites-urea, and zeolites-zinc-urea and molasses concentrations (0%, 6%, and 12% in rice straw-based diets. The control treatment was the rice straw-based diets containing neither urea nor molasses. Diets consisting of 45% rice straw and 55% concentrates (DM basis were formulated to have similar N and TDN levels. Responses of parameters measured were subjected to MANOVA using the GLM procedure of SPSS 16.00 and differences among mean values, if applicable, were examined using HSD-test. Orthogonal comparisons were used to determine the effects of the control treatment vs. various urea sources. Results indicated that treatment of UZ combined with 6% of molasses showed the highest microbial biomass production (2.71 mg/l at 24 hours fermentation period with its peak production estimation (3.2 mg/l reached at 33.5 hours of fermentation period. Moreover, UZ treatment resulted in the highest microbial protein synthesis (1,381.45 ± 77.1 mg/l at 24 hours fermentation period with its peak microbial protein synthesis estimation (1,756.04 mg/l reached at 33.7 hours of fermentation period. The highest EMPS (25.98 ± 1.21 mg/100 mg OMD was achieved when ration contained 6% of molasses.

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Lytic Properties of Bacteriophages Specific for M. haemolytica Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Urban-Chmiel

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was isolation and morphological characterization of temperate bacteriophages obtained from M. haemolytica strains and evaluation of their lytic properties in vitro against M. haemolytica isolated from the respiratory tract of calves.The material for the study consisted of the reference strain M. haemolytica serotype 1 (ATCC® BAA-410™, reference serotypes A1, A2, A5, A6, A7, A9 and A11, and wild-type isolates of M. haemolytica. Bacteriophages were induced from an overnight bacterial starter culture of all examined M. haemolytica strains treated with mitomycin C. The lytic properties and host ranges were determined by plaque assays. The morphology of the bacteriophages was examined in negative-stained smears with 5% uranyl acetate solution using a transmission electron microscope. The genetic analysis of the bacteriophages was followed by restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA. This was followed by analysis of genetic material by polymerase chain reaction (PCR.Eight bacteriophages were obtained, like typical of the families Myoviridae, Siphoviridae and Podoviridae. Most of the bacteriophages exhibited lytic properties against the M. haemolytica strains. Restriction analysis revealed similarities to the P2-like phage obtained from the strain M. haemolytica BAA-410. The most similar profiles were observed in the case of bacteriophages φA1 and φA5. All of the bacteriophages obtained were characterized by the presence of additional fragments in the restriction profiles with respect to the P2-like reference phage. In the analysis of PCR products for the P2-like reference phage phi-MhaA1-PHL101 (DQ426904 and the phages of the M. haemolytica serotypes, a 734-bp phage PCR product was obtained. The primers were programmed in Primer-Blast software using the structure of the sequence DQ426904 of reference phage PHL101.The results obtained indicate the need for further research aimed at isolating and characterizing

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Lytic Properties of Bacteriophages Specific for M. haemolytica Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej; Stęgierska, Diana; Dec, Marta; Dudzic, Anna; Puchalski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was isolation and morphological characterization of temperate bacteriophages obtained from M. haemolytica strains and evaluation of their lytic properties in vitro against M. haemolytica isolated from the respiratory tract of calves. The material for the study consisted of the reference strain M. haemolytica serotype 1 (ATCC®) BAA-410™, reference serotypes A1, A2, A5, A6, A7, A9 and A11, and wild-type isolates of M. haemolytica. Bacteriophages were induced from an overnight bacterial starter culture of all examined M. haemolytica strains treated with mitomycin C. The lytic properties and host ranges were determined by plaque assays. The morphology of the bacteriophages was examined in negative-stained smears with 5% uranyl acetate solution using a transmission electron microscope. The genetic analysis of the bacteriophages was followed by restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA. This was followed by analysis of genetic material by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Eight bacteriophages were obtained, like typical of the families Myoviridae, Siphoviridae and Podoviridae. Most of the bacteriophages exhibited lytic properties against the M. haemolytica strains. Restriction analysis revealed similarities to the P2-like phage obtained from the strain M. haemolytica BAA-410. The most similar profiles were observed in the case of bacteriophages φA1 and φA5. All of the bacteriophages obtained were characterized by the presence of additional fragments in the restriction profiles with respect to the P2-like reference phage. In the analysis of PCR products for the P2-like reference phage phi-MhaA1-PHL101 (DQ426904) and the phages of the M. haemolytica serotypes, a 734-bp phage PCR product was obtained. The primers were programmed in Primer-Blast software using the structure of the sequence DQ426904 of reference phage PHL101. The results obtained indicate the need for further research aimed at isolating and characterizing bacteriophages

  12. Effects of Chitosan Concentration on the Protein Release Behaviour of Electrospun Poly(ε-caprolactone)/Chitosan Nanofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Roozbahani; Naznin Sultana; Davood Almasi; Farnaz Naghizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ε-caprolactone)/chitosan (PCL/chitosan) blend nanofibers with different ratios of chitosan were electrospun from a formic acid/acetic acid (FA/AA) solvent system. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein to incorporate biochemical cues into the nanofibrous scaffolds. The morphological characteristics of PCL/chitosan and PCL/chitosan/BSA Nanofibers were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to detect the p...

  13. Lytic HSV-1 infection induces the multifunctional transcription factor Early Growth Response-1 (EGR-1 in rabbit corneal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McFerrin Harris E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1 infections can cause a number of diseases ranging from simple cold sores to dangerous keratitis and lethal encephalitis. The interaction between virus and host cells, critical for viral replication, is being extensively investigated by many laboratories. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that HSV-1 lytic infection triggers the expression of important multi-functional transcription factor Egr1. The mechanisms of induction are mediated, at least in part, by signaling pathways such as NFκB and CREB. Methods SIRC, VERO, and 293HEK cell lines were infected with HSV-1, and the Egr-1 transcript and protein were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. The localization and expression profile of Egr-1 were investigated further by immunofluorescence microscopy analyses. The recruitment of transcription factors to the Egr-1 promoter during infection was studied by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP. Various inhibitors and dominant-negative mutant were used to assess the mechanisms of Egr-1 induction and their effects were addressed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Western blot analyses showed that Egr-1 was absent in uninfected cells; however, the protein was detected 24-72 hours post treatment, and the response was directly proportional to the titer of the virus used for infection. Using recombinant HSV-1 expressing EGFP, Egr-1 was detected only in the infected cells. ChIP assays demonstrated that NFкB and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB were recruited to the Egr-1 promoter upon infection. Additional studies showed that inhibitors of NFкB and dominant-negative CREB repressed the Egr-1 induction by HSV-1 infection. Conclusion Collectively, these results demonstrate that Egr-1 is expressed rapidly upon HSV-1 infection and that this novel induction could be due to the NFкB/CREB-mediated transactivation. Egr-1 induction might play a key role in the viral gene

  14. Hepatocyte growth factor pathway upregulation in the bone marrow microenvironment in multiple myeloma is associated with lytic bone disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ida B; Christensen, Jacob H; Lyng, Maria Bibi

    2013-01-01

    Lytic bone disease (LBD) in multiple myeloma (MM) is caused by osteoclast hyperactivation and osteoblast inhibition. Based on in vitro studies, the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) pathway is thought to be central in osteoblast inhibition. We evaluated the gene expression of the HGF pathway in vivo...

  15. Lytic infection of Lactococcus lactis by bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 triggers alternative transcriptional host responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Zomer, Aldert; Mahony, Jennifer; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-08-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed throughout lytic infection. Whole-genome microarrays performed at various time points postinfection demonstrated a rather modest impact on host transcription. The majority of changes in the host transcriptome occur during late infection stages; few changes in host gene transcription occur during the immediate and early infection stages. Alterations in the L. lactis UC509.9 transcriptome during lytic infection appear to be phage specific, with relatively few differentially transcribed genes shared between cells infected with Tuc2009 and those infected with c2. Despite the apparent lack of a coordinated general phage response, three themes common to both infections were noted: alternative transcription of genes involved in catabolic flux and energy production, differential transcription of genes involved in cell wall modification, and differential transcription of genes involved in the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. The transcriptional profiles of both bacteriophages during lytic infection generally correlated with the findings of previous studies and allowed the confirmation of previously predicted promoter sequences. In addition, the host transcriptional response to lysogenization with Tuc2009 was monitored along with tiling array analysis of Tuc2009 in the lysogenic state. Analysis identified 44 host genes with altered transcription during lysogeny, 36 of which displayed levels of transcription significantly reduced from those for uninfected cells.

  16. Probing the structure of glucan lyases – the lytic members of GH31 - by sequence analysis, circular dichroism and proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Heidi; Lo Leggio, Leila; Yu, Shukun

    2005-01-01

    Glucan lyase (GL) is a polysaccharide lyase with unique characteristics. It is involved in an alternative pathway for the degradation of alpha-glucans, the anhydrofructose pathway. Sequence similarity suggests that this lytic enzyme belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 31, for which until very r...

  17. Lytic Infection of Lactococcus lactis by Bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 Triggers Alternative Transcriptional Host Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainsworth, S.; Zomer, A.L.; Mahony, J.; Sinderen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed thro

  18. Epiphyseal involvement in Erdheim-Chester disease: radiographic and scintigraphic findings in a case with lytic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Hernandez, G.; Tajahuerce-Romera, G.M.; Latorre-Ibanez, M.D.; Lara-Pomares, A. [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Provincial de Castellon (Spain); Vila-Fayos, V. [Servicio de Reumatologia, Hospital Comarcal de Vinaroz (Spain)

    2000-08-01

    We reported a symmetric increase of activity in lower links secondary to Erdheim-Chester disease and demonstrated by bone scans and radiographs. An inusual scintigraphic and radiographic appearance with epiphyseal involvement and lytic lesions is described. Differential diagnosis of bone scan and radiographic findings is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Oxidative cleavage and hydrolytic boosting of cellulose in soybean spent flakes by Trichoderma reesei Cel61A lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Wichmann, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    The auxiliary activity family 9 (AA9) copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) from Trichoderma reesei (EG4; TrCel61A) was investigated for its ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides from soybean. The substrate specificity of the enzyme was assessed against a variety...

  20. Lytic Infection of Lactococcus lactis by Bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 Triggers Alternative Transcriptional Host Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainsworth, S.; Zomer, A.L.; Mahony, J.; Sinderen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed

  1. High resolution crystal structures of the Escherichia coli lytic transglycosylase Slt70 and its complex with a peptidoglycan fragment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, Erik J. van; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W.H.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1999-01-01

    The 70 kDa soluble lytic transglycosylase (Slt70) from Escherichia coli is an exo-muramidase, that catalyses the cleavage of the glycosidic bonds between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetylglucosamine residues in peptidoglycan, the main structural component of the bacterial cell wall. This cleavage is

  2. Probing the structure of glucan lyases – the lytic members of GH31 - by sequence analysis, circular dichroism and proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Heidi; Lo Leggio, Leila; Yu, Shukun

    2005-01-01

    Glucan lyase (GL) is a polysaccharide lyase with unique characteristics. It is involved in an alternative pathway for the degradation of alpha-glucans, the anhydrofructose pathway. Sequence similarity suggests that this lytic enzyme belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 31, for which until very r...

  3. Isolation and characterization of lytic vibriophage against Vibrio cholerae O1 from environmental water samples in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fendi, Ali; Shueb, Rafidah Hanim; Ravichandran, Manickam; Yean, Chan Yean

    2014-10-01

    Water samples from a variety of sources in Kelantan, Malaysia (lakes, ponds, rivers, ditches, fish farms, and sewage) were screened for the presence of bacteriophages infecting Vibrio cholerae. Ten strains of V. cholerae that appeared to be free of inducible prophages were used as the host strains. Eleven bacteriophage isolates were obtained by plaque assay, three of which were lytic and further characterized. The morphologies of the three lytic phages were similar with each having an icosahedral head (ca. 50-60 nm in diameter), a neck, and a sheathed tail (ca. 90-100 nm in length) characteristic of the family Myoviridae. The genomes of the lytic phages were indistinguishable in length (ca. 33.5 kb), nuclease sensitivity (digestible with DNase I, but not RNase A or S1 nuclease), and restriction enzyme sensitivity (identical banding patterns with HindIII, no digestion with seven other enzymes). Testing for infection against 46 strains of V. cholerae and 16 other species of enteric bacteria revealed that all three isolates had a narrow host range and were only capable of infecting V. cholerae O1 El Tor Inaba. The similar morphologies, indistinguishable genome characteristics, and identical host ranges of these lytic isolates suggests that they represent one phage, or several very closely related phages, present in different water sources. These isolates are good candidates for further bio-phage-control studies. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Selective peptide inhibitors of antiapoptotic cellular and viral Bcl-2 proteins lead to cytochrome c release during latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrer, Christine M; Foight, Glenna W; Keating, Amy E; Chan, Gary C

    2016-01-04

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is associated with B-cell lymphomas including primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV establishes latency within B cells by modulating or mimicking the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family of proteins to promote cell survival. Our previous BH3 profiling analysis, a functional assay that assesses the contribution of Bcl-2 proteins towards cellular survival, identified two Bcl-2 proteins, cellular Mcl-1 and viral KsBcl-2, as potential regulators of mitochondria polarization within a latently infected B-cell line, Bcbl-1. In this study, we used two novel peptide inhibitors identified in a peptide library screen that selectively bind KsBcl-2 (KL6-7_Y4eK) or KsBcl-2 and Mcl-1 (MS1) in order to decipher the relative contribution of Mcl-1 and KsBcl-2 in maintaining mitochondrial membrane potential. We found treatment with KL6-7_Y4eK and MS1 stimulated a similar amount of cytochrome c release from mitochondria isolated from Bcbl-1 cells, indicating that inhibition of KsBcl-2 alone is sufficient for mitochondrial outer membrane permiabilzation (MOMP) and thus apoptosis during a latent B cell infection. In turn, this study also identified and provides a proof-of-concept for the further development of novel KsBcl-2 inhibitors for the treatment of KSHV-associated B-cell lymphomas via the targeting of latently infected B cells.

  5. Uncleaved BAP31 in association with A4 protein at the endoplasmic reticulum is an inhibitor of Fas-initiated release of cytochrome c from mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Nguyen, Mai; Breckenridge, David G; Stojanovic, Marina; Clemons, Paul A; Kuppig, Stephan; Shore, Gordon C

    2003-04-18

    BAP31 is a polytopic integral protein of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and, like BID, is a preferred substrate of caspase-8. Upon Fas/CD95 stimulation, BAP31 is cleaved within its cytosolic domain, generating proapoptotic p20 BAP31. In human KB epithelial cells expressing the caspase-resistant mutant crBAP31, Fas stimulation resulted in cleavage of BID and insertion of BAX into mitochondrial membrane, but subsequent oligomerization of BAX and BAK, egress of cytochrome c to the cytosol, and apoptosis were impaired. Bap31-null mouse cells expressing crBAP31 cannot generate the endogenous p20 BAP31 cleavage product, yet crBAP31 conferred resistance to cellular condensation and cytochrome c release in response to activation of ectopic FKBPcasp8 by FK1012z. Full-length BAP31, therefore, is a direct inhibitor of these caspase-8-initiated events, acting independently of its ability to sequester p20, with which it interacts. Employing a novel split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid screen for BAP31-interacting membrane proteins, the putative ion channel protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, A4, was detected and identified as a constitutive binding partner of BAP31 in human cells. Ectopic A4 that was introduced into A4-deficient cells cooperated with crBAP31 to resist Fas-induced egress of cytochrome c from mitochondria and cytoplasmic apoptosis.

  6. Lack of Outer Membrane Protein A Enhances the Release of Outer Membrane Vesicles and Survival of Vibrio cholerae and Suppresses Viability of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Priya Valeru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the diarrhoeal disease cholera, survives in aquatic environments. The bacterium has developed a survival strategy to grow and survive inside Acanthamoeba castellanii. It has been shown that V. cholerae expresses outer membrane proteins as virulence factors playing a role in the adherence to interacted host cells. This study examined the role of outer membrane protein A (OmpA and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs in survival of V. cholerae alone and during its interaction with A. castellanii. The results showed that an OmpA mutant of V. cholerae survived longer than wild-type V. cholerae when cultivated alone. Cocultivation with A. castellanii enhanced the survival of both bacterial strains and OmpA protein exhibited no effect on attachment, engulfment, and survival inside the amoebae. However, cocultivation of the OmpA mutant of V. cholerae decreased the viability of A. castellanii and this bacterial strain released more OMVs than wild-type V. cholerae. Surprisingly, treatment of amoeba cells with OMVs isolated from the OmpA mutant significantly decreased viable counts of the amoeba cells. In conclusion, the results might highlight a regulating rule for OmpA in survival of V. cholerae and OMVs as a potent virulence factor for this bacterium towards eukaryotes in the environment.

  7. Quantitative Persulfide Site Identification (qPerS-SID) Reveals Protein Targets of H2S Releasing Donors in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longen, Sebastian; Richter, Florian; Köhler, Yvette; Wittig, Ilka; Beck, Karl-Friedrich; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-07-14

    H2S is an important signalling molecule involved in diverse biological processes. It mediates the formation of cysteine persulfides (R-S-SH), which affect the activity of target proteins. Like thiols, persulfides show reactivity towards electrophiles and behave similarly to other cysteine modifications in a biotin switch assay. In this manuscript, we report on qPerS-SID a mass spectrometry-based method allowing the isolation of persulfide containing peptides in the mammalian proteome. With this method, we demonstrated that H2S donors differ in their efficacy to induce persulfides in HEK293 cells. Furthermore, data analysis revealed that persulfide formation affects all subcellular compartments and various cellular processes. Negatively charged amino acids appeared more frequently adjacent to cysteines forming persulfides. We confirmed our proteomic data using pyruvate kinase M2 as a model protein and showed that several cysteine residues are prone to persulfide formation finally leading to its inactivation. Taken together, the site-specific identification of persulfides on a proteome scale can help to identify target proteins involved in H2S signalling and enlightens the biology of H2S and its releasing agents.

  8. "Lytic" lesions in autologous bone grafts: demonstration of medullary air pockets on post mortem computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotman, A; Hamilton, K; O'Donnell, C

    2007-12-01

    Donor bone grafts are an important aspect of orthopaedic surgery. The use of plain film as a pathological screening tool before donor bone dispatch has revealed "lytic" lesions in proximal humeri. Donor demographics did not support the diagnosis of myeloma and subsequent computed tomography (CT) scans of these bones identified the lesions as air, not pathology. In total, 27 long bones were scanned and 100% (27/27 cases) exhibited air within the trabecular bone. Three distinct patterns were found: ovoid, linear/branching, and broad channel. A longitudinal course of CT scans was performed to identify at which stage air appeared within the bone. Pre-retrieval, preprocessing, and postprocessing scans revealed that air originated between the retrieval and preprocessing stages of donor bone preparation. There may be multiple aetiology of this phenomenon, including bone retrieval and natural decomposition.

  9. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases: a crystallographer's view on a new class of biomass-degrading enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian E. H. Frandsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs are a new class of microbial copper enzymes involved in the degradation of recalcitrant polysaccharides. They have only been discovered and characterized in the last 5–10 years and have stimulated strong interest both in biotechnology and in bioinorganic chemistry. In biotechnology, the hope is that these enzymes will finally help to make enzymatic biomass conversion, especially of lignocellulosic plant waste, economically attractive. Here, the role of LPMOs is likely to be in attacking bonds that are not accessible to other enzymes. LPMOs have attracted enormous interest since their discovery. The emphasis in this review is on the past and present contribution of crystallographic studies as a guide to functional understanding, with a final look towards the future.

  10. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein induces release of histamine and interleukin-6 through G protein-mediated MAPKs and PI3K/Akt pathways in HMC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chung-Che; Kuo, Ting-Yu; Hong, Zhi-Wei; Yeh, Ying-Chieh; Shih, Kuo-Shun; Du, Shin-Yi; Fu, Hua-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) activates several innate leukocytes including neutrophils, monocytes, and mast cells. It has been reported that HP-NAP induces degranulation and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion of rat peritoneal mast cells. However, the molecular mechanism is not very clear. Here, we show that HP-NAP activates human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1) cells to secrete histamine and IL-6. The secretion depends on pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive heterotrimeric G proteins but not on Toll-like receptor 2. Moreover, HP-NAP induces PTX-sensitive G protein-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and Akt in HMC-1 cells. Inhibition of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) suppresses HP-NAP-induced release of histamine and IL-6 from HMC-1 cells. Thus, the activation of HMC-1 cells by HP-NAP is through Gi-linked G protein-coupled receptor-mediated MAPKs and PI3K/Akt pathways.

  11. Combinatorial Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation of a biodegradable polymer and fibronectin for protein immobilization and controlled release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sima, F., E-mail: felix.sima@inflpr.ro [Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Măgurele (Romania); Axente, E.; Iordache, I.; Luculescu, C. [Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Măgurele (Romania); Gallet, O. [ERRMECE, Cergy-Pontoise University, Cergy-Pontoise (France); Anselme, K. [IS2M, CNRS UMR7361, Haute-Alsace University, Mulhouse (France); Mihailescu, I.N. [Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Măgurele (Romania)

    2014-07-01

    Defined protein quantities were embedded in situ in a biodegradable polymer coating during simultaneous laser vaporization of two targets. Fibronectin (FN) and poly-DL-lactide (PDLLA) were transferred and immobilized concomitantly by Combinatorial Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation onto solid substrates. The film surface with gradient of composition was characterized by optical, scanning electron microscopy and profilometry. Micrometric FN packages were visualized in the polymeric matrix by confocal microscopy. The composition of FN was investigated by FTIR and μFTIR analyses in a polymeric matrix with different thickness.

  12. In vitro management of hospital Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm using indigenous T7-like lytic phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiwale, Sangeeta; Tamboli, Nilofer; Thorat, Kiran; Kulkarni, Rajendra; Ackermann, Hans; Kapadnis, Balasaheb

    2011-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen capable of forming biofilm and contaminating medical settings, is responsible for 65% mortality in the hospitals all over the world. This study was undertaken to isolate lytic phages against biofilm forming Ps. aeruginosa hospital isolates and to use them for in vitro management of biofilms in the microtiter plate. Multidrug resistant strains of Ps. aeruginosa were isolated from the hospital environment in and around Pimpri-Chinchwad, Maharashtra by standard microbiological methods. Lytic phages against these strains were isolated from the Pavana river water by double agar layer plaque assay method. A wide host range phage bacterial virus Ps. aeruginosa phage (BVPaP-3) was selected. Electron microscopy revealed that BVPaP-3 phage is a T7-like phage and is a relative of phage species gh-1. A phage at MOI-0.001 could prevent biofilm formation by Ps. aeruginosa hospital strain-6(HS6) on the pegs within 24 h. It could also disperse pre-formed biofilms of all hospital isolates (HS1-HS6) on the pegs within 24 h. Dispersion of biofilm was studied by monitoring log percent reduction in cfu and log percent increase in pfu of respective bacterium and phage on the peg as well as in the well. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that phage BVPaP-3 indeed causes biofilm reduction and bacterial cell killing. Laboratory studies prove that BVPaP-3 is a highly efficient phage in preventing and dispersing biofilms of Ps. aeruginosa. Phage BVPaP-3 can be used as biological disinfectant to control biofilm problem in medical devices.

  13. Broad-range lytic bacteriophages that kill Staphylococcus aureus local field strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abatángelo, Virginia; Peressutti Bacci, Natalia; Boncompain, Carina A; Amadio, Ariel A; Carrasco, Soledad; Suárez, Cristian A; Morbidoni, Héctor R

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a very successful opportunistic pathogen capable of causing a variety of diseases ranging from mild skin infections to life-threatening sepsis, meningitis and pneumonia. Its ability to display numerous virulence mechanisms matches its skill to display resistance to several antibiotics, including β-lactams, underscoring the fact that new anti-S. aureus drugs are urgently required. In this scenario, the utilization of lytic bacteriophages that kill bacteria in a genus -or even species- specific way, has become an attractive field of study. In this report, we describe the isolation, characterization and sequencing of phages capable of killing S. aureus including methicillin resistant (MRSA) and multi-drug resistant S. aureus local strains from environmental, animal and human origin. Genome sequencing and bio-informatics analysis showed the absence of genes encoding virulence factors, toxins or antibiotic resistance determinants. Of note, there was a high similarity between our set of phages to others described in the literature such as phage K. Considering that reported phages were obtained in different continents, it seems plausible that there is a commonality of genetic features that are needed for optimum, broad host range anti-staphylococcal activity of these related phages. Importantly, the high activity and broad host range of one of our phages underscores its promising value to control the presence of S. aureus in fomites, industry and hospital environments and eventually on animal and human skin. The development of a cocktail of the reported lytic phages active against S. aureus-currently under way- is thus, a sensible strategy against this pathogen.

  14. Lytic Characteristics and Identification of Two Alga-lysing Bacterial Strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Haiyan; HU Wenrong

    2006-01-01

    All previously reported bacterial species which are capable of lysing harmful algae have been isolated from coastal environments in which harmful algae blooms have occurred. Due to the low concentration of alga-lysing bacteria in an algal bloom, it is difficult to isolate the alga-lysing bacteria by existing methods. In this paper, two algae-lysing bacterial strains,P01 and P03, have been isolated from a biosystem immobilized on a sponge that was highly effective in removing algae and microcystins. Their lysing modes and effects on Microcystis aeruginosa have been studied. The results show that the degradation processes of these two strains for M. aeruginosa accorded with a first-order reaction model when the chlorophylla concentration was in the range from 0 to 1000 μg L-1. The degradation rate constants were 0.106 7, 0.127 4 and 0.279 2 for P01and0.0683, 0.0744 and 0.02897 for P03, when the bacterial densities were 8.6 × 105, 8.6 × 106 and 8.6 × 107cells mL 1, respectively. Moreover, the two bacterial strains had favourable lytic effects not only on M. aeruginosa, but also on Chlorella and Scene-desmus. Their lytic effect on M. aeruginosa did not require physical cell to cell contact, but proceeded by the production of an extracellular product. The bacterial strains were identified as Bacillus species by PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene, BLAST analysis, and comparison with sequences in the GenBank nucleotide database.

  15. Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC inhibits lytic replication of gamma oncogenic herpesviruses in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedman Herman

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major psychoactive cannabinoid compound of marijuana, delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, has been shown to modulate immune responses and lymphocyte function. After primary infection the viral DNA genome of gamma herpesviruses persists in lymphoid cell nuclei in a latent episomal circular form. In response to extracellular signals, the latent virus can be activated, which leads to production of infectious virus progeny. Therefore, we evaluated the potential effects of THC on gamma herpesvirus replication. Methods Tissue cultures infected with various gamma herpesviruses were cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of THC and the amount of viral DNA or infectious virus yield was compared to those of control cultures. The effect of THC on Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV replication was measured by the Gardella method and replication of herpesvirus saimiri (HVS of monkeys, murine gamma herpesvirus 68 (MHV 68, and herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1 was measured by yield reduction assays. Inhibition of the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter activity was measured by the dual luciferase method. Results Micromolar concentrations of THC inhibit KSHV and EBV reactivation in virus infected/immortalized B cells. THC also strongly inhibits lytic replication of MHV 68 and HVS in vitro. Importantly, concentrations of THC that inhibit virus replication of gamma herpesviruses have no effect on cell growth or HSV-1 replication, indicating selectivity. THC was shown to selectively inhibit the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter of KSHV and MHV 68. Conclusions THC specifically targets viral and/or cellular mechanisms required for replication and possibly shared by these gamma herpesviruses, and the endocannabinoid system is possibly involved in regulating gamma herpesvirus latency and lytic replication. The immediate early gene ORF 50 promoter activity was specifically inhibited by THC

  16. Staphylococcus aureus protein A binding to osteoblast tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 results in activation of nuclear factor kappa B and release of interleukin-6 in bone infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claro, Tânia; Widaa, Amro; McDonnell, Cormac; Foster, Timothy J; O'Brien, Fergal J; Kerrigan, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the major pathogen among the staphylococci and the most common cause of bone infections. These infections are mainly characterized by bone destruction and inflammation, and are often debilitating and very difficult to treat. Previously we demonstrated that S. aureus protein A (SpA) can bind to osteoblasts, which results in inhibition of osteoblast proliferation and mineralization, apoptosis, and activation of osteoclasts. In this study we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to demonstrate that osteoblast tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR-1) is responsible for the recognition of and binding to SpA. TNFR-1 binding to SpA results in the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). In turn, NFκB translocates to the nucleus of the osteoblast, which leads to release of interleukin 6 (IL-6). Silencing TNFR-1 in osteoblasts or disruption of the spa gene in S. aureus prevented both NFκB activation and IL-6 release. As well as playing a key role in proinflammatory reactions, IL-6 is also an important osteotropic factor. Release of IL-6 from osteoblasts results in the activation of the bone-resorbing cells, the osteoclasts. Consistent with our results described above, both silencing TNFR-1 in osteoblasts and disruption of spa in S. aureus prevented osteoclast activation. These studies are the first to demonstrate the importance of the TNFR-1-SpA interaction in bone infection, and may help explain the mechanism through which osteoclasts become overactivated, leading to bone destruction. Anti-inflammatory drug therapy could be used either alone or in conjunction with antibiotics to treat osteomyelitis or for prophylaxis in high-risk patients.

  17. Release of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) from 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) activates hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein (HEXIM1) transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pingyang; Xiang, Yanhui; Fujinaga, Koh; Bartholomeeusen, Koen; Nilson, Kyle A; Price, David H; Peterlin, B Matija

    2014-04-04

    By phosphorylating negative elongation factors and the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII), positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is composed of CycT1 or CycT2 and CDK9, activates eukaryotic transcription elongation. In growing cells, it is found in active and inactive forms. In the former, free P-TEFb is a potent transcriptional coactivator. In the latter, it is inhibited by HEXIM1 or HEXIM2 in the 7SK small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), which contains, additionally, 7SK snRNA, methyl phosphate-capping enzyme (MePCE), and La-related protein 7 (LARP7). This P-TEFb equilibrium determines the state of growth and proliferation of the cell. In this study, the release of P-TEFb from the 7SK snRNP led to increased synthesis of HEXIM1 but not HEXIM2 in HeLa cells, and this occurred only from an unannotated, proximal promoter. ChIP with sequencing revealed P-TEFb-sensitive poised RNA polymerase II at this proximal but not the previously annotated distal HEXIM1 promoter. Its immediate upstream sequences were fused to luciferase reporters and were found to be responsive to many P-TEFb-releasing compounds. The superelongation complex subunits AF4/FMR2 family member 4 (AFF4) and elongation factor RNA polymerase II 2 (ELL2) were recruited to this proximal promoter after P-TEFb release and were required for its transcriptional effects. Thus, P-TEFb regulates its own equilibrium in cells, most likely to maintain optimal cellular homeostasis.

  18. Interaction with extracellular matrix proteins influences Lsh/Ity/Bcg (candidate Nramp) gene regulation of macrophage priming/activation for tumour necrosis factor-alpha and nitrite release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formica, S; Roach, T I; Blackwell, J M

    1994-05-01

    The murine resistance gene Lsh/Ity/Bcg regulates activation of macrophages for tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-dependent production of nitric oxide mediating antimicrobial activity against Leishmania, Salmonella and Mycobacterium. As Lsh is differentially expressed in macrophages from different tissue sites, experiments were performed to determine whether interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins would influence the macrophage TNF-alpha response. Plating of bone marrow-derived macrophages onto purified fibrinogen or fibronectin-rich L929 cell-derived matrices, but not onto mannan, was itself sufficient to stimulate TNF-alpha release, with significantly higher levels released from congenic B10.L-Lshr compared to C57BL/10ScSn (Lshs) macrophages. Only macrophages plated onto fibrinogen also released measurable levels of nitrites, again higher in Lshr compared to Lshs macrophages. Addition of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but not bacterial lipopolysaccharide or mycobacterial lipoarabinomannan, as a second signal enhanced the TNF-alpha and nitrite responses of macrophages plated onto fibrinogen, particularly in the Lshr macrophages. Interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin also primed macrophages for an enhanced TNF-alpha response to leishmanial parasites, but this was only translated into enhanced nitrite responses in the presence of IFN-gamma. In these experiments, Lshr macrophages remained superior in their TNF-alpha responses throughout, but to a degree which reflected the magnitude of the difference observed on ECM alone. Hence, the specificity for the enhanced TNF-alpha responses of Lshr macrophages lay in their interaction with fibrinogen and fibronectin ECM, while a differential nitrite response was only observed with fibrinogen and/or IFN-gamma. The results are discussed in relation to the possible function of the recently cloned candidate gene Nramp, which has structural identity to eukaryote transporters and an N-terminal cytoplasmic

  19. Protein kinase C and extracellular signal-regulated kinase regulate movement, attachment, pairing and egg release in Schistosoma mansoni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Ressurreição

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases C (PKCs and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs are evolutionary conserved cell signalling enzymes that coordinate cell function. Here we have employed biochemical approaches using 'smart' antibodies and functional screening to unravel the importance of these enzymes to Schistosoma mansoni physiology. Various PKC and ERK isotypes were detected, and were differentially phosphorylated (activated throughout the various S. mansoni life stages, suggesting isotype-specific roles and differences in signalling complexity during parasite development. Functional kinase mapping in adult worms revealed that activated PKC and ERK were particularly associated with the adult male tegument, musculature and oesophagus and occasionally with the oesophageal gland; other structures possessing detectable activated PKC and/or ERK included the Mehlis' gland, ootype, lumen of the vitellaria, seminal receptacle and excretory ducts. Pharmacological modulation of PKC and ERK activity in adult worms using GF109203X, U0126, or PMA, resulted in significant physiological disturbance commensurate with these proteins occupying a central position in signalling pathways associated with schistosome muscular activity, neuromuscular coordination, reproductive function, attachment and pairing. Increased activation of ERK and PKC was also detected in worms following praziquantel treatment, with increased signalling associated with the tegument and excretory system and activated ERK localizing to previously unseen structures, including the cephalic ganglia. These findings support roles for PKC and ERK in S. mansoni homeostasis, and identify these kinase groups as potential targets for chemotherapeutic treatments against human schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease of enormous public health significance.

  20. Phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein C releases myosin heads from the surface of cardiac thick filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensler, Robert W.; Craig, Roger; Moss, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) has a key regulatory role in cardiac contraction, but the mechanism by which changes in phosphorylation of cMyBP-C accelerate cross-bridge kinetics remains unknown. In this study, we isolated thick filaments from the hearts of mice in which the three serine residues (Ser273, Ser282, and Ser302) that are phosphorylated by protein kinase A in the m-domain of cMyBP-C were replaced by either alanine or aspartic acid, mimicking the fully nonphosphorylated and the fully phosphorylated state of cMyBP-C, respectively. We found that thick filaments from the cMyBP-C phospho-deficient hearts had highly ordered cross-bridge arrays, whereas the filaments from the cMyBP-C phospho-mimetic hearts showed a strong tendency toward disorder. Our results support the hypothesis that dephosphorylation of cMyBP-C promotes or stabilizes the relaxed/superrelaxed quasi-helical ordering of the myosin heads on the filament surface, whereas phosphorylation weakens this stabilization and binding of the heads to the backbone. Such structural changes would modulate the probability of myosin binding to actin and could help explain the acceleration of cross-bridge interactions with actin when cMyBP-C is phosphorylated because of, for example, activation of β1-adrenergic receptors in myocardium. PMID:28167762

  1. Gp130-dependent release of acute phase proteins is linked to the activation of innate immune signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Luchtefeld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated levels of acute phase proteins (APP are often found in patients with cardiovascular diseases. In a previous study, we demonstrated the importance of the IL-6-gp130 axis -as a key regulator of inflammatory acute phase signaling in hepatocytes-for the development of atherosclerosis. BACKGROUND/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gp130-dependent gene expression was analyzed in a previously established hepatocyte-specific gp130 knockout mouse model. We performed whole transcriptome analysis in isolated hepatocytes to measure tissue specific responses after proinflammatory stimulus with IL-6 across different time points. Our analyses revealed an unexpected small gene cluster that requires IL-6 stimulus for early activation. Several of the genes in this cluster are involved in different cell defense mechanisms. Thus, stressors that trigger both general stress and inflammatory responses lead to activation of a stereotypic innate cellular defense response. Furthermore, we identified a potential biomarker Lipocalin (LCN 2 for the gp130 dependent early inflammatory response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest a complex network of tightly linked genes involved in the early activation of different parts of the innate immune response including acute phase proteins, complement and coagulation cascade.

  2. Isolation and characterization of φkm18p, a novel lytic phage with therapeutic potential against extensively drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwan-Han Shen

    Full Text Available AIMS: To isolate phages against extensively drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB and characterize the highest lytic capability phage as a model to evaluate the potential on phage therapy. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eight phages were isolated from hospital sewage and showed narrow host spectrum. Phage φkm18p was able to effectively lyse the most XDRAB. It has a dsDNA genome of 45 kb in size and hexagonal head of about 59 nm in diameter and no tail. Bacterial population decreased quickly from 10(8 CFU ml(-1 to 10(3 CFU ml(-1 in 30 min by φkm18p. The 185 kDa lysis protein encoded by φkm18p genome was detected when the extracted protein did not boil before SDS-PAGE; it showed that the lysis protein is a complex rather than a monomer. Phage φkm18p improved human lung epithelial cells survival rates when they were incubated with A. baumannii. Combination of phages (φkm18p, φTZ1 and φ314 as a cocktail could lyse all genotype-varying XDRAB isolates. CONCLUSION: Infections with XDRAB are extremely difficult to treat and development of a phage cocktails therapy could be a therapeutic alternative in the future. Phage φkm18p is a good candidate for inclusion in phage cocktails.

  3. Core-Shell Soy Protein-Soy Polysaccharide Complex (Nano)particles as Carriers for Improved Stability and Sustained Release of Curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei-Ping; Ou, Shi-Yi; Tang, Chuan-He

    2016-06-22

    Using soy protein isolate (SPI) and soy-soluble polysaccharides (SSPS) as polymer matrixes, this study reported a novel process to fabricate unique core-shell complex (nano)particles to perform as carriers for curcumin (a typical poorly soluble bioactive). In the process, curcumin-SPI nanocomplexes were first formed at pH 7.0 and then coated by SSPS. At this pH, the core-shell complex was formed in a way the SPI nanoparticles might be incorporated into the interior of SSPS molecules without distinctly affecting the size and morphology of particles. The core-shell structure was distinctly changed by adjusting pH from 7.0 to 4.0. At pH 4.0, SSPS was strongly bound to the surface of highly aggregated SPI nanoparticles, and as a consequence, much larger complexes were formed. The bioaccessibility of curcumin in the SPI-curcumin complexes was unaffected by the SSPS coating. However, the core-shell complex formation greatly improved the thermal stability and controlled release properties of encapsulated curcumin. The improvement was much better at pH 4.0 than that at pH 7.0. All of the freeze-dried core-shell complex preparations exhibited good redispersion behavior. The findings provide a simple approach to fabricate food-grade delivery systems for improved water dispersion, heat stability, and even controlled release of poorly soluble bioactives.

  4. Programmed necrosis induced by asbestos in human mesothelial cells causes high-mobility group box 1 protein release and resultant inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haining; Rivera, Zeyana; Jube, Sandro; Nasu, Masaki; Bertino, Pietro; Goparaju, Chandra; Franzoso, Guido; Lotze, Michael T.; Krausz, Thomas; Pass, Harvey I.; Bianchi, Marco E.; Carbone, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Asbestos carcinogenesis has been linked to the release of cytokines and mutagenic reactive oxygen species (ROS) from inflammatory cells. Asbestos is cytotoxic to human mesothelial cells (HM), which appears counterintuitive for a carcinogen. We show that asbestos-induced HM cell death is a regulated form of necrosis that links to carcinogenesis. Asbestos-exposed HM activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, secrete H2O2, deplete ATP, and translocate high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, and into the extracellular space. The release of HMGB1 induces macrophages to secrete TNF-α, which protects HM from asbestos-induced cell death and triggers a chronic inflammatory response; both favor HM transformation. In both mice and hamsters injected with asbestos, HMGB1 was specifically detected in the nuclei, cytoplasm, and extracellular space of mesothelial and inflammatory cells around asbestos deposits. TNF-α was coexpressed in the same areas. HMGB1 levels in asbestos-exposed individuals were significantly higher than in nonexposed controls (P asbestos-related disease, and provide mechanistic links between asbestos-induced cell death, chronic inflammation, and carcinogenesis. Chemopreventive approaches aimed at inhibiting the chronic inflammatory response, and especially blocking HMGB1, may decrease the risk of malignant mesothelioma among asbestos-exposed cohorts. PMID:20616036

  5. Differential synthesis and release of IL-18 and IL-18 Binding Protein from human platelets and their implications for HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Ossama; Samarani, Suzanne; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Tremblay, Cecile; Amre, Devendra; Ahmad, Ali

    2017-02-01

    IL-18 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine belonging to the IL-1 family and is produced in the body from macrophages, epithelial and dendritic cells, keratinocytes, adrenal cortex etc. The cytokine is produced as an inactive precursor that is cleaved inside cells into its mature form by activated caspase 1, which exists as an inactive precursor in human cells and requires assembly of an inflammasomes for its activation. We show here for the first time that human platelets contain transcripts for the IL-18 gene. They synthesize the cytokine de novo, process and release it upon activation. The activation also results in the assembly of an inflammasome and activation of caspase-1. Platelets also contain the IL-18 antagonist, the IL-18-Binding Protein (IL-18BP); however, it is not synthesized in them de novo, is present in pre-made form and is released irrespective of platelet activation. IL-18 and IL-18BP co-localize to α granules inside platelets and are secreted out with different kinetics. Platelet activation contributes to plasma concentrations in healthy individuals, as their plasma samples contain abundant IL-18, while their platelet-poor plasma samples contain very little amounts of the cytokine. The plasma and PPP samples from these donors, however, contain comparable amounts of IL-18BP. Unlike healthy individuals, the platelet-poor plasma from HIV-infected individuals contains significant amounts of IL-18. Our findings have important implications for viral infections and other human diseases that are accompanied by platelet activation.

  6. Dendrite-derived supernumerary axons on adult axotomized motor neurons possess proteins that are essential for the initiation and propagation of action potentials and synaptic vesicle release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meehan, Claire Francesca; MacDermid, Victoria E; Montague, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    on these processes matches the arrangement of these channels that is necessary for the initiation and conduction of action potentials. At terminal bouton-like structures they possess key proteins necessary for the release of synaptic vesicles (SV2 and synaptophysin). Thus, axon-like processes emanating from the tips......Axotomy can trigger profound alterations in the neuronal polarity of adult neurons in vivo. This can manifest itself in the development of new axon-like processes emanating from the tips of distal dendrites. Previously, these processes have been defined as axonal based on their axonal morphology....... This study extends this definition to determine whether, more importantly, these processes possess the prerequisite molecular machinery to function as axons. Using a combination of intracellular labeling and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate that the distribution of voltage-gated sodium channels...

  7. Modulating protein release profiles by incorporating hyaluronic acid into PLGA microparticles Via a spray dryer equipped with a 3-fluid nozzle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wan, Feng; Maltesen, Morten Jonas; Andersen, Sune Klint

    2014-01-01

    obtained. Addition of HA in inner feed solutions increased the feed viscosity, but with no influence on the surface tension. All inner feed solutions showed non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior and the rheological properties were not time dependent. The CLSM and XPS analyses suggested a core-shell like...... with or without HA were prepared using a spray dryer equipped with a 3-fluid nozzle. The effects of HA on the surface tension and the rheological behavior of the inner feed solution were investigated. The physicochemical properties of the resulting microparticles were characterized using scanning electron......: The present work demonstrates the potential of HA to modulate protein release profile from PLGA microparticle formulations produced via spray drying using 3-fluid nozzle....

  8. Codon optimization of the adenoviral fiber negatively impacts structural protein expression and viral fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Eneko; Martí-Solano, Maria; Fillat, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    Codon usage adaptation of lytic viruses to their hosts is determinant for viral fitness. In this work, we analyzed the codon usage of adenoviral proteins by principal component analysis and assessed their codon adaptation to the host. We observed a general clustering of adenoviral proteins according to their function. However, there was a significant variation in the codon preference between the host-interacting fiber protein and the rest of structural late phase proteins, with a non-optimal codon usage of the fiber. To understand the impact of codon bias in the fiber, we optimized the Adenovirus-5 fiber to the codon usage of the hexon structural protein. The optimized fiber displayed increased expression in a non-viral context. However, infection with adenoviruses containing the optimized fiber resulted in decreased expression of the fiber and of wild-type structural proteins. Consequently, this led to a drastic reduction in viral release. The insertion of an exogenous optimized protein as a late gene in the adenovirus with the optimized fiber further interfered with viral fitness. These results highlight the importance of balancing codon usage in viral proteins to adequately exploit cellular resources for efficient infection and open new opportunities to regulate viral fitness for virotherapy and vaccine development.

  9. Biomimetic coating of organic polymers with a protein-functionalized layer of calcium phosphate: the surface properties of the carrier influence neither the coating characteristics nor the incorporation mechanism or release kinetics of the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Liu, Yuelian; Iizuka, Tateyuki; Hunziker, Ernst B

    2010-12-01

    Polymers that are used in clinical practice as bone-defect-filling materials possess many essential qualities, such as moldability, mechanical strength and biodegradability, but they are neither osteoconductive nor osteoinductive. Osteoconductivity can be conferred by coating the material with a layer of calcium phosphate, which can be rendered osteoinductive by functionalizing it with an osteogenic agent. We wished to ascertain whether the morphological and physicochemical characteristics of unfunctionalized and bovine-serum-albumin (BSA)-functionalized calcium-phosphate coatings were influenced by the surface properties of polymeric carriers. The release kinetics of the protein were also investigated. Two sponge-like materials (Helistat® and Polyactive®) and two fibrous ones (Ethisorb™ and poly[lactic-co-glycolic acid]) were tested. The coating characteristics were evaluated using state-of-the-art methodologies. The release kinetics of BSA were monitored spectrophotometrically. The characteristics of the amorphous and the crystalline phases of the coatings were not influenced by either the surface chemistry or the surface geometry of the underlying polymer. The mechanism whereby BSA was incorporated into the crystalline layer and the rate of release of the truly incorporated depot were likewise unaffected by the nature of the polymeric carrier. Our biomimetic coating technique could be applied to either spongy or fibrous bone-defect-filling organic polymers, with a view to rendering them osteoconductive and osteoinductive.

  10. Effect of the cortex-lytic enzyme SleC from non-food-borne Clostridium perfringens on the germination properties of SleC-lacking spores of a food poisoning isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2010-11-01

    The hallmark of bacterial spore germination is peptidoglycan cortex hydrolysis by cortex-lytic enzymes. In spores of Clostridium perfringens wild-type strain SM101, which causes food poisoning, the sole essential cortex-lytic enzyme SleC is activated by a unique serine protease CspB. Interestingly, the non-food-borne wild-type strain F4969 encodes a significantly divergent SleC variant (SleCF4969) and 3 serine proteases (CspA, CspB, and CspC). Consequently, in this study we evaluated the functional compatibility of SleCF4969 and SleCSM101 by complementing the germination phenotypes of SM101ΔsleC spores with sleCF4969. Our results show that although pro-SleCF4969 was processed into mature SleCF4969 in the SM101ΔsleC spores, it partially restored spore germination with nutrient medium, with a mixture of ʟ-asparagine and KCl, or with a 1:1 chelate of Ca2+ and dipicolinic acid. While the amount of dipicolinic acid released was lower, the amount of hexosamine-containing material released during germination of SM101ΔsleC(sleCF4969) spores was similar to the amount released during germination of SM101 wild-type spores. The viability of SM101ΔsleC(sleCF4969) spores was 8- and 3-fold lower than that of SM101 and F4969 spores, respectively. Together, these data indicate that the peptidoglycan cortex hydrolysis machinery in the food poisoning isolate SM101 is functionally divergent than that in the non-food-borne isolate F4969.

  11. Corticotropin-releasing hormone, its binding protein and receptors in human cervical tissue at preterm and term labor in comparison to non-pregnant state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byström Birgitta

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm birth is still the leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. The level of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH is known to be significantly elevated in the maternal plasma at preterm birth. Although, CRH, CRH-binding protein (CRH-BP, CRH-receptor 1 (CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 have been identified both at mRNA and protein level in human placenta, deciduas, fetal membranes, endometrium and myometrium, no corresponding information is yet available on cervix. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the levels of the mRNA species coding for CRH, CRH-BP, CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 in human cervical tissue and myometrium at preterm and term labor and not in labor as well as in the non-pregnant state, and to localize the corresponding proteins employing immunohistochemical analysis. Methods Cervical, isthmic and fundal (from non-pregnant subjects only biopsies were taken from 67 women. Subjects were divided in 5 groups: preterm labor (14, preterm not in labor (7, term labor (18, term not in labor (21 and non-pregnant (7. Real-time RT-PCR was employed for quantification of mRNA levels and the corresponding proteins were localized by immunohistochemical analysis. Results The levels of CRH-BP, CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 mRNA in the pregnant tissues were lower than those in non-pregnant subjects. No significant differences were observed between preterm and term groups. CRH-BP and CRH-R2 mRNA and the corresponding proteins were present at lower levels in the laboring cervix than in the non-laboring cervix, irrespective of gestational age. In most of the samples, with the exception of four myometrial biopsies the level of CRH mRNA was below the limit of detection. All of these proteins could be detected and localized in the cervix and the myometrium by immunohistochemical analysis. Conclusion Expression of CRH-BP, CRH-R1 and CRH-R2 in uterine tissues is down-regulated during pregnancy. The most pronounced down-regulation of CRH-BP and CRH-R2

  12. Regulatory role of PI3K-protein kinase B on the release of interleukin-1β in peritoneal macrophages from the ascites of cirrhotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Abellán, A; Ruiz-Alcaraz, A J; Antón, G; Miras-López, M; Francés, R; Such, J; Martínez-Esparza, M; García-Peñarrubia, P

    2014-12-01

    Great effort has been paid to identify novel targets for pharmaceutical intervention to control inflammation associated with different diseases. We have studied the effect of signalling inhibitors in the secretion of the proinflammatory and profibrogenic cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β in monocyte-derived macrophages (M-DM) obtained from the ascites of cirrhotic patients and compared with those obtained from the blood of healthy donors. Peritoneal M-DM were isolated from non-infected ascites of cirrhotic patients and stimulated in vitro with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and heat-killed Candida albicans in the presence or absence of inhibitors for c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K). The IL1B and CASP1 gene expression were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The expression of IL-1β and caspase-1 were determined by Western blot. IL-1β was also assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in cell culture supernatants. Results revealed that MEK1 and JNK inhibition significantly reduced the basal and stimulated IL-1β secretion, while the p38 MAPK inhibitor had no effect on IL-1β levels. On the contrary, inhibition of PI3K increased the secretion of IL-1β from stimulated M-DM. The activating effect of PI3K inhibitor on IL-1β release was mediated mainly by the enhancement of the intracellular IL-1β and caspase-1 content release to the extracellular medium and not by increa