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Sample records for lytic peptide cecropin

  1. In vitro production and antifungal activity of peptide ABP-dHC-cecropin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxin; Movahedi, Ali; Xu, Junjie; Wang, Mengyang; Wu, Xiaolong; Xu, Chen; Yin, Tongming; Zhuge, Qiang

    2015-04-10

    The antimicrobial peptide ABP-dHC-cecropin A is a small cationic peptide with potent activity against a wide range of bacterial species. Evidence of antifungal activity has also been suggested; however, testing of this peptide has been limited due to the low expression of cecropin proteins in Escherichia coli. To improve expression of this peptide in E. coli, ABP-dHC-cecropin A was cloned into a pSUMO vector and transformed into E. coli, resulting in the production of a pSUMO-ABP-dHC-cecropin A fusion protein. The soluble form of this protein was then purified by Ni-IDA chromatography, yielding a total of 496-mg protein per liter of fermentation culture. The SUMO-ABP-dHC-cecropin A fusion protein was then cleaved using a SUMO protease and re-purified by Ni-IDA chromatography, yielding a total of 158-mg recombinant ABP-dHC-cecropin A per liter of fermentation culture at a purity of ≥94%, the highest yield reported to date. Antifungal activity assays performed using this purified recombinant peptide revealed strong antifungal activity against both Candida albicans and Neurospora crassa, as well as Rhizopus, Fusarium, Alternaria, and Mucor species. Combined with previous analyses demonstrating strong antibacterial activity against a number of important bacterial pathogens, these results confirm the use of ABP-dHC-cecropin A as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide, with significant therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Production of Biologically Active Cecropin A Peptide in Rice Seed Oil Bodies.

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    Laura Montesinos

    Full Text Available Cecropin A is a natural antimicrobial peptide that exhibits fast and potent activity against a broad spectrum of pathogens and neoplastic cells, and that has important biotechnological applications. However, cecropin A exploitation, as for other antimicrobial peptides, is limited by their production and purification costs. Here, we report the efficient production of this bioactive peptide in rice bran using the rice oleosin 18 as a carrier protein. High cecropin A levels were reached in rice seeds driving the expression of the chimeric gene by the strong embryo-specific oleosin 18 own promoter, and targeting the peptide to the oil body organelle as an oleosin 18-cecropin A fusion protein. The accumulation of cecropin A in oil bodies had no deleterious effects on seed viability and seedling growth, as well as on seed yield. We also show that biologically active cecropin A can be easily purified from the transgenic rice seeds by homogenization and simple flotation centrifugation methods. Our results demonstrate that the oleosin fusion technology is suitable for the production of cecropin A in rice seeds, which can potentially be extended to other antimicrobial peptides to assist their exploitation.

  3. CecropinXJ, a silkworm antimicrobial peptide, induces cytoskeleton disruption in esophageal carcinoma cells.

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    Xia, Lijie; Wu, Yanling; Kang, Su; Ma, Ji; Yang, Jianhua; Zhang, Fuchun

    2014-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides exist in the non-specific immune system of organism and participate in the innate host defense of each species. CecropinXJ, a cationic antimicrobial peptide, possesses potent anticancer activity and acts preferentially on cancer cells instead of normal cells, but the mechanism of cancer cell death induced by cecropinXJ remains largely unknown. This study was performed to investigate the cytoskeleton-disrupting effects of cecropinXJ on human esophageal carcinoma cell line Eca109 using scanning electron microscopy observation, fluorescence imaging, cell migration and invasion assays, western blotting, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. The electronic microscope and fluorescence imaging observation suggested that cecropinXJ could result in morphological changes and induce damage to microtubules and actin of Eca109 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The cell migration and invasion assays demonstrated that cecropinXJ could inhibit migration and invasion of tumor cells. Western blot and qRT-PCR analysis showed that there was obvious correlation between microtubule depolymerization and actin polymerization induced by cecropinXJ. Moreover, cecropinXJ might also cause decreased expression of α-actin, β-actin, γ-actin, α-tubulin, and β-tubulin genes in concentration- and time-dependent manners. In summary, this study indicates that cecropinXJ triggers cytotoxicity in Eca109 cells through inducing the cytoskeleton destruction and regulating the expression of cytoskeleton proteins. This cecropinXJ-mediated cytoskeleton-destruction effect is instrumental in our understanding of the detailed action of antimicrobial peptides in human cancer cells and cecropinXJ might be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of cancer in the future. © The Author 2014. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

  4. Synergistic Efficacy of Aedes aegypti Antimicrobial Peptide Cecropin A2 and Tetracycline against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zhaojun; Tharmalingam, Nagendran; Liu, Qingzhong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kim, Wooseong; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Zhang, Rijun; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2017-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance has created an urgent need for alternative drugs with new mechanisms of action. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates that could address the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria, either alone or in combination with conventional antibiotics. We studied the antimicrobial efficacy and bactericidal mechanism of cecropin A2, a 36-residue α-helical cationic peptide derived from Aedes aegypti cecropin A, focusing on the common pat...

  5. Synergistic Efficacy of Aedes aegypti Antimicrobial Peptide Cecropin A2 and Tetracycline against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Zheng, Zhaojun; Tharmalingam, Nagendran; Liu, Qingzhong; Kim, Wooseong; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Zhang, Rijun; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance has created an urgent need for alternative drugs with new mechanisms of action. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates that could address the spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria, either alone or in combination with conventional antibiotics. We studied the antimicrobial efficacy and bactericidal mechanism of cecropin A2, a 36-residue α-helical cationic peptide derived from Aedes aegypti cecropin A, focusing on the common pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The peptide showed little hemolytic activity and toxicity toward mammalian cells, and the MICs against most clinical P. aeruginosa isolates were 32 to 64 μg/ml, and its MICs versus other Gram-negative bacteria were 2 to 32 μg/ml. Importantly, cecropin A2 demonstrated synergistic activity against P. aeruginosa when combined with tetracycline, reducing the MICs of both agents by 8-fold. The combination was also effective in vivo in the P. aeruginosa/Galleria mellonella model (P < 0.001). We found that cecropin A2 bound to P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharides, permeabilized the membrane, and interacted with the bacterial genomic DNA, thus facilitating the translocation of tetracycline into the cytoplasm. In summary, the combination of cecropin A2 and tetracycline demonstrated synergistic antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo, offering an alternative approach for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. PMID:28483966

  6. Co-expression of apoptin (VP3) and antibacterial peptide cecropin B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antibacterial peptide cecropin B mutant (ABPS1) gene has a broad range of antibacterial and antiproliferative properties. Apoptin (VP3), a chicken anaemia virus-encoded protein is known to induce apoptosis in human transformed cells. To explore drug combination in human tumor cells, apoptin and ABPS1 eukaryotic ...

  7. Selective cytotoxicity of the antibacterial peptide ABP-dHC-Cecropin A and its analog towards leukemia cells.

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    Sang, Ming; Zhang, Jiaxin; Zhuge, Qiang

    2017-05-15

    Some cationic antibacterial peptides, with typical amphiphilic α-helical conformations in a membrane-mimicking environment, exhibit anticancer properties as a result of a similar mechanism of action towards both bacteria and cancer cells. We previously reported the cDNA sequence of the antimicrobial peptide ABP-dHC-Cecropin A precursor cloned from drury (Hyphantria cunea) (dHC). In the present study, we synthesized and structurally characterized ABP-dHC-Cecropin A and its analog, ABP-dHC-Cecropin A-K(24). Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that ABP-dHC-Cecropin A and its analog adopt a well-defined α-helical structure in a 50% trifluorethanol solution. The cytotoxicity and cell selectivity of these peptides were further examined in three leukemia cell lines and two non-cancerous cell lines. The MTT assay indicated both of these peptides have a concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect in leukemia cells, although the observed cytotoxicity was greater with ABP-dHC-Cecropin A-K(24) treatment, whereas they were not cytotoxic towards the non-cancerous cell lines. Moreover, ABP-dHC-Cecropin A and its analog had a lower hemolytic effect in human red blood cells. Together, these results suggest the peptides are selectively cytotoxic towards leukemia cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy determined that the peptides were concentrated at the surface of the leukemia cells, and changes in the cell membrane were determined with a permeability assay, which suggested that the anticancer activity of ABP-dHC-Cecropin A and its analog is a result of its presence at the leukemia cell membrane. ABP-dHC-Cecropin A and its analog may represent a novel anticancer agent for leukemia therapy, considering its cancer cell selectivity and relatively low cytotoxicity in normal cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression and characterization of the antimicrobial peptide ABP-dHC-cecropin A in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

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    Sang, Ming; Wei, Hui; Zhang, Jiaxin; Wei, Zhiheng; Wu, Xiaolong; Chen, Yan; Zhuge, Qiang

    2017-12-01

    ABP-dHC-cecropin A is a linear cationic peptide that exhibits antimicrobial properties. To explore a new approach for expression of ABP-dHC-cecropin A using the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, we cloned the ABP-dHC-cecropin A gene into the vector pPICZαA. The SacI-linearized plasmid pPICZαA-ABP-dHC-cecropin A was then transformed into P. pastoris GS115 by electroporation. Expression was induced after a 96-h incubation with 0.5% methanol at 20 °C in a culture supplied with 2% casamino acids to avoid proteolysis. Under these conditions, approximately 48 mg of ABP-dHC-cecropin A was secreted into 1L (4 × 250-mL)of medium. Recombinant ABP-dHC-cecropin A was purified using size-exclusion chromatography, and 21 mg of pure active ABP-dHC-cecropin A was obtained from 1L (4 × 250-mL)of culture. Electrophoresis on 4-20% gradient gels indicated that recombinant ABP-dHC-cecropin A was secreted as a protein approximately 4 kDa in size. Recombinant ABP-dHC-cecropin A was successfully expressed, as the product displayed antibacterial and antifungal activities (based on an antibacterial assay, scanning electron microscopy, and antifungal assay) indistinguishable from those of the synthesized protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [The obtainment and characteristics of Kalanchoe pinnata L. plants expressing the artificial gene of the cecropin P1 antimicrobial peptide].

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    Zakharchenko, N S; Rukavtsova, E B; Shevchuk, T V; Furs, O V; Pigoleva, S V; Lebedeva, A A; Chulina, I A; Baidakova, L K; Bur'yanov, Ya I

    2016-01-01

    Kalanchoe pinnata L. plants bearing an artificial CP1 gene encoding the cecropin P1 antimicrobial peptide have been obtained. The presence of the CP1 gene in the plant genome has been confirmed by PCR. Cecropin P1 synthesis in transgenic plants has been shown by MALDI mass spectrometry and Western blotting. The obtained plants have been highly resistant to bacterial and fungal phytopathogens, and their extracts have demonstrated antimicrobial activity towards human and animal pathogens. It has been shown that transgenic plants bearing the CP1 gene can be colonized by the beneficial associative microorganisms Methylovorus mays.

  10. 35S Promoter Methylation in Kanamycin-Resistant Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe pinnata L.) Plants Expressing the Antimicrobial Peptide Cecropin P1 Transgene.

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    Shevchuk, T V; Zakharchenko, N S; Tarlachkov, S V; Furs, O V; Dyachenko, O V; Buryanov, Y I

    2016-09-01

    Transgenic kalanchoe plants (Kalanchoe pinnata L.) expressing the antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 gene (cecP1) under the control of the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter and the selective neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) gene under the control of the nopaline synthase gene promoter were studied. The 35S promoter methylation and the cecropin P1 biosynthesis levels were compared in plants growing on media with and without kanamycin. The low level of active 35S promoter methylation further decreases upon cultivation on kanamycin-containing medium, while cecropin P1 synthesis increases.

  11. Stable isotope-assisted NMR characterization of interaction between lipid A and sarcotoxin IA, a cecropin-type antibacterial peptide

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    Yagi-Utsumi, Maho [Institute for Molecular Science and Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki 444-8787 (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Yoshiki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Boonsri, Pornthip [Institute for Molecular Science and Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki 444-8787 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Iguchi, Takeshi [Bioscience Research Laboratory, Fujiya Co., Ltd., Hadano, Kanagawa 257-0031 (Japan); Okemoto, Kazuo [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, National Institute of Infectious Disease, Tokyo 162-8640 (Japan); Natori, Shunji [National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba 305-8602 (Japan); Kato, Koichi, E-mail: kkatonmr@ims.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular Science and Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience, National Institutes of Natural Sciences, Okazaki 444-8787 (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); The Glycoscience Institute, Ochanomizu University, Tokyo 135-0064 (Japan); GLYENCE Co., Ltd., Nagoya 474-0858 (Japan)

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Recombinant sarcotoxin IA was successfully produced with {sup 13}C- and {sup 15}N-labeling. ► Sarcotoxin IA adopts an N-terminal α-helix upon binding to lipid A-embedding micelles. ► Two lysine residues are involved in lipid A-mediated antibacterial activities. -- Abstract: Sarcotoxin IA is a 39-residue cecropin-type peptide from Sarcophaga peregrina. This peptide exhibits antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria through its interaction with lipid A, a core component of lipopolysaccharides. To acquire detailed structural information on this specific interaction, we performed NMR analysis using bacterially expressed sarcotoxin IA analogs with {sup 13}C- and {sup 15}N-labeling along with lipid A-embedding micelles composed of dodecylphosphocholine. By inspecting the stable isotope-assisted NMR data, we revealed that the N-terminal segment (Leu3–Arg18) of sarcotoxin IA formed an amphiphilic α-helix upon its interaction with the aqueous micelles. Furthermore, chemical shift perturbation data indicated that the amino acid residues displayed on this α-helix were involved in the specific interaction with lipid A. On the basis of these data, we successfully identified Lys4 and Lys5 as key residues in the interaction with lipid A and the consequent antibacterial activity. Therefore, these results provide unique information for designing chemotherapeutics based on antibacterial peptide structures.

  12. Immunomodulating and Revascularizing Activity of Kalanchoe pinnata Synergize with Fungicide Activity of Biogenic Peptide Cecropin P1

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    N. S. Zakharchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously transgenic Kalanchoe pinnata plants producing an antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 (CecP1 have been reported. Now we report biological testing K. pinnata extracts containing CecP1 as a candidate drug for treatment of wounds infected with Candida albicans. The drug constitutes the whole juice from K. pinnata leaves (not ethanol extract sterilized with nanofiltration. A microbicide activity of CecP1 against an animal fungal pathogen in vivo was demonstrated for the first time. However, a favorable therapeutic effect of the transgenic K. pinnata extract was attributed to a synergism between the fungicide activity of CecP1 and wound healing (antiscar, revascularizing, and immunomodulating effect of natural biologically active components of K. pinnata. A commercial fungicide preparation clotrimazole eliminated C. albicans cells within infected wounds in rats with efficiency comparable to CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extract. But in contrast to K. pinnata extract, clotrimazole did not exhibit neither wound healing activity nor remodeling of the scar matrix. Taken together, our results allow assumption that CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extracts should be considered as a candidate drug for treatment of dermatomycoses, wounds infected with fungi, and bedsores.

  13. Immunomodulating and Revascularizing Activity of Kalanchoe pinnata Synergize with Fungicide Activity of Biogenic Peptide Cecropin P1.

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    Zakharchenko, N S; Belous, A S; Biryukova, Y K; Medvedeva, O A; Belyakova, A V; Masgutova, G A; Trubnikova, E V; Buryanov, Y I; Lebedeva, A A

    2017-01-01

    Previously transgenic Kalanchoe pinnata plants producing an antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 (CecP1) have been reported. Now we report biological testing K. pinnata extracts containing CecP1 as a candidate drug for treatment of wounds infected with Candida albicans. The drug constitutes the whole juice from K. pinnata leaves (not ethanol extract) sterilized with nanofiltration. A microbicide activity of CecP1 against an animal fungal pathogen in vivo was demonstrated for the first time. However, a favorable therapeutic effect of the transgenic K. pinnata extract was attributed to a synergism between the fungicide activity of CecP1 and wound healing (antiscar), revascularizing, and immunomodulating effect of natural biologically active components of K. pinnata . A commercial fungicide preparation clotrimazole eliminated C. albicans cells within infected wounds in rats with efficiency comparable to CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extract. But in contrast to K. pinnata extract, clotrimazole did not exhibit neither wound healing activity nor remodeling of the scar matrix. Taken together, our results allow assumption that CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extracts should be considered as a candidate drug for treatment of dermatomycoses, wounds infected with fungi, and bedsores.

  14. Inhibition of Plant-Pathogenic Bacteria by Short Synthetic Cecropin A-Melittin Hybrid Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Ferre, Rafael; Badosa, Esther; Feliu, Lidia; Planas, Marta; Montesinos, Emili; Bardají, Eduard

    2006-01-01

    Short peptides of 11 residues were synthesized and tested against the economically important plant pathogenic bacteria Erwinia amylovora, Pseudomonas syringae, and Xanthomonas vesicatoria and compared to the previously described peptide Pep3 (WKLFKKILKVL-NH2). The antimicrobial activity of Pep3 and 22 analogues was evaluated in terms of the MIC and the 50% effective dose (ED50) for growth. Peptide cytotoxicity against human red blood cells and peptide stability toward protease degradation wer...

  15. Small lytic peptides escape the inhibitory effect of heparan sulfate on the surface of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Several naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs), including bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB), display promising anticancer activities. These peptides are unaffected by multidrug resistance mechanisms and have been shown to induce a protective immune response against solid tumors, thus making them interesting candidates for developing novel lead structures for anticancer treatment. Recently, we showed that the anticancer activity by LfcinB was inhibited by the presence of heparan sulfate (HS) on the surface of tumor cells. Based on extensive structure-activity relationship studies performed on LfcinB, shorter and more potent peptides have been constructed. In the present study, we have investigated the anticancer activity of three chemically modified 9-mer peptides and the influence of HS and chondroitin sulfate (CS) on their cytotoxic activity. Methods Various cell lines and red blood cells were used to investigate the anticancer activity and selectivity of the peptides. The cytotoxic effect of the peptides against the different cell lines was measured by use of a colorimetric MTT viability assay. The influence of HS and CS on their cytotoxic activity was evaluated by using HS/CS expressing and HS/CS deficient cell lines. The ability of soluble HS and CS to inhibit the cytotoxic activity of the peptides and the peptides' affinity for HS and CS were also investigated. Results The 9-mer peptides displayed selective anticancer activity. Cells expressing HS/CS were equally or more susceptible to the peptides than cells not expressing HS/CS. The peptides displayed a higher affinity for HS compared to CS, and exogenously added HS inhibited the cytotoxic effect of the peptides. Conclusions In contrast to the previously reported inhibitory effect of HS on LfcinB, the present study shows that the cytotoxic activity of small lytic peptides was increased or not affected by cell surface HS. PMID:21453492

  16. Small lytic peptides escape the inhibitory effect of heparan sulfate on the surface of cancer cells

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    Lindin Inger

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs, including bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB, display promising anticancer activities. These peptides are unaffected by multidrug resistance mechanisms and have been shown to induce a protective immune response against solid tumors, thus making them interesting candidates for developing novel lead structures for anticancer treatment. Recently, we showed that the anticancer activity by LfcinB was inhibited by the presence of heparan sulfate (HS on the surface of tumor cells. Based on extensive structure-activity relationship studies performed on LfcinB, shorter and more potent peptides have been constructed. In the present study, we have investigated the anticancer activity of three chemically modified 9-mer peptides and the influence of HS and chondroitin sulfate (CS on their cytotoxic activity. Methods Various cell lines and red blood cells were used to investigate the anticancer activity and selectivity of the peptides. The cytotoxic effect of the peptides against the different cell lines was measured by use of a colorimetric MTT viability assay. The influence of HS and CS on their cytotoxic activity was evaluated by using HS/CS expressing and HS/CS deficient cell lines. The ability of soluble HS and CS to inhibit the cytotoxic activity of the peptides and the peptides' affinity for HS and CS were also investigated. Results The 9-mer peptides displayed selective anticancer activity. Cells expressing HS/CS were equally or more susceptible to the peptides than cells not expressing HS/CS. The peptides displayed a higher affinity for HS compared to CS, and exogenously added HS inhibited the cytotoxic effect of the peptides. Conclusions In contrast to the previously reported inhibitory effect of HS on LfcinB, the present study shows that the cytotoxic activity of small lytic peptides was increased or not affected by cell surface HS.

  17. Protozoacidal Trojan-Horse: use of a ligand-lytic peptide for selective destruction of symbiotic protozoa within termite guts.

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    Sethi, Amit; Delatte, Jennifer; Foil, Lane; Husseneder, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    For novel biotechnology-based termite control, we developed a cellulose bait containing freeze-dried genetically engineered yeast which expresses a protozoacidal lytic peptide attached to a protozoa-recognizing ligand. The yeast acts as a 'Trojan-Horse' that kills the cellulose-digesting protozoa in the termite gut, which leads to the death of termites, presumably due to inefficient cellulose digestion. The ligand targets the lytic peptide specifically to protozoa, thereby increasing its protozoacidal efficiency while protecting non-target organisms. After ingestion of the bait, the yeast propagates in the termite's gut and is spread throughout the termite colony via social interactions. This novel paratransgenesis-based strategy could be a good supplement for current termite control using fortified biological control agents in addition to chemical insecticides. Moreover, this ligand-lytic peptide system could be used for drug development to selectively target disease-causing protozoa in humans or other vertebrates.

  18. Bactericide, Immunomodulating, and Wound Healing Properties of Transgenic Kalanchoe pinnata Synergize with Antimicrobial Peptide Cecropin P1 In Vivo

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    A. A. Lebedeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Procedure of manufacturing K. pinnata water extracts containing cecropin P1 (CecP1 from the formerly described transgenic plants is established. It included incubation of leaves at +4°C for 7 days, mechanical homogenization of leaves using water as extraction solvent, and heating at +70°C for inactivating plant enzymes. Yield of CecP1 (after heating and sterilizing filtration was 0.3% of total protein in the extract. The water extract of K. pinnata + CecP1 exhibits favorable effect on healing of wounds infected with S. aureus (equal to Cefazolin and with a combination of S. aureus with P. aeruginosa (better than Cefazolin. Wild-type K. pinnata extract exhibited evident microbicide activity against S. aureus with P. aeruginosa but it was substantially strengthened in K. pinnata + CecP1 extract. K. pinnata extracts (both wild-type and transgenic did not exhibit general toxicity and accelerated wound recovery. Due to immunomodulating activity, wild-type K. pinnata extract accelerated granulation of the wound bed and marginal epithelialization even better than K. pinnata + CecP1 extract. Immunomodulating and microbicide activity of K. pinnata synergizes with microbicide activity of CecP1 accelerating elimination of bacteria.

  19. Bactericide, Immunomodulating, and Wound Healing Properties of Transgenic Kalanchoe pinnata Synergize with Antimicrobial Peptide Cecropin P1 In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, A A; Zakharchenko, N S; Trubnikova, E V; Medvedeva, O A; Kuznetsova, T V; Masgutova, G A; Zylkova, M V; Buryanov, Y I; Belous, A S

    2017-01-01

    Procedure of manufacturing K. pinnata water extracts containing cecropin P1 (CecP1) from the formerly described transgenic plants is established. It included incubation of leaves at +4°C for 7 days, mechanical homogenization of leaves using water as extraction solvent, and heating at +70°C for inactivating plant enzymes. Yield of CecP1 (after heating and sterilizing filtration) was 0.3% of total protein in the extract. The water extract of K. pinnata + CecP1 exhibits favorable effect on healing of wounds infected with S. aureus (equal to Cefazolin) and with a combination of S. aureus with P. aeruginosa (better than Cefazolin). Wild-type K. pinnata extract exhibited evident microbicide activity against S. aureus with P. aeruginosa but it was substantially strengthened in K. pinnata + CecP1 extract. K. pinnata extracts (both wild-type and transgenic) did not exhibit general toxicity and accelerated wound recovery. Due to immunomodulating activity, wild-type K. pinnata extract accelerated granulation of the wound bed and marginal epithelialization even better than K. pinnata + CecP1 extract. Immunomodulating and microbicide activity of K. pinnata synergizes with microbicide activity of CecP1 accelerating elimination of bacteria.

  20. Cecropins from Plutella xylostella and Their Interaction with Metarhizium anisopliae.

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    Lina Ouyang

    Full Text Available Cecropins are the most potent induced peptides to resist invading microorganisms. In the present study, two full length cDNA encoding cecropin2 (Px-cec2 and cecropin3 (Px-cec3 were obtained from P. xylostella by integrated analysis of genome and transcriptome data. qRT-PCR analysis revealed the high levels of transcripts of Px-cecs (Px-cec1, Px-cec2 and Px-cec3 in epidermis, fat body and hemocytes after 24, 30 and 36 h induction of Metarhizium anisopliae, respectively. Silencing of Spätzle and Dorsal separately caused the low expression of cecropins in the fat body, epidermis and hemocytes, and made the P.xylostella larvae more susceptible to M. anisopliae. Antimicrobial assays demonstrated that the purified recombinant cecropins, i.e., Px-cec1, Px-cec2 and Px-cec3, exerted a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against fungi, as well as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Especially, Px-cecs showed higher activity against M. anisopliae than another selected fungi isolates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM revealed that cecropins exerted the vital morphological alterations to the spores of M. anisopliae. Based on our results, cecropins played an imperative role in resisting infection of M. anisopliae, which will provide the foundation of biological control of insect pests by using cecorpins as a target in the future.

  1. Testing protozoacidal activity of ligand-lytic peptides against termite gut protozoa in vitro (protozoa culture) and in vivo (microinjection into termite hindgut).

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    Husseneder, Claudia; Sethi, Amit; Foil, Lane; Delatte, Jennifer

    2010-12-29

    We are developing a novel approach to subterranean termite control that would lead to reduced reliance on the use of chemical pesticides. Subterranean termites are dependent on protozoa in the hindguts of workers to efficiently digest wood. Lytic peptides have been shown to kill a variety of protozoan parasites (Mutwiri et al. 2000) and also protozoa in the gut of the Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus (Husseneder and Collier 2009). Lytic peptides are part of the nonspecific immune system of eukaryotes, and destroy the membranes of microorganisms (Leuschner and Hansel 2004). Most lytic peptides are not likely to harm higher eukaryotes, because they do not affect the electrically neutral cholesterol-containing cell membranes of higher eukaryotes (Javadpour et al. 1996). Lytic peptide action can be targeted to specific cell types by the addition of a ligand. For example, Hansel et al. (2007) reported that lytic peptides conjugated with cancer cell membrane receptor ligands could be used to destroy breast cancer cells, while lytic peptides alone or conjugated with non-specific peptides were not effective. Lytic peptides also have been conjugated to human hormones that bind to receptors on tumor cells for targeted destruction of prostate and testicular cancer cells (Leuschner and Hansel 2004). In this article we present techniques used to demonstrate the protozoacidal activity of a lytic peptide (Hecate) coupled to a heptapeptide ligand that binds to the surface membrane of protozoa from the gut of the Formosan subterranean termite. These techniques include extirpation of the gut from termite workers, anaerobic culture of gut protozoa (Pseudotrichonympha grassii, Holomastigotoides hartmanni,Spirotrichonympha leidyi), microscopic confirmation that the ligand marked with a fluorescent dye binds to the termite gut protozoa and other free-living protozoa but not to bacteria or gut tissue. We also demonstrate that the same ligand coupled to a lytic

  2. High-level SUMO-mediated fusion expression of ABP-dHC-cecropin A from multiple joined genes in Escherichia coli.

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    Zhang, Jiaxin; Movahedi, Ali; Wei, Zhiheng; Sang, Ming; Wu, Xiaolong; Wang, Mengyang; Wei, Hui; Pan, Huixin; Yin, Tongming; Zhuge, Qiang

    2016-09-15

    The antimicrobial peptide ABP-dHC-cecropin A is a small cationic peptide with potent activity against a wide range of bacterial species. Evidence of antifungal activity has also been suggested; however, evaluation of this peptide has been limited due to the low expression of cecropin proteins in Escherichia coli. To improve the expression level of ABP-dHC-cecropin A in E. coli, tandem repeats of the ABP-dHC-cecropin A gene were constructed and expressed as fusion proteins (SUMO-nABP-dHC-cecropin, n = 1, 2, 3, 4) via pSUMO-nABP-dHC-cecropin A vectors (n = 1, 2, 3, 4). Comparison of the expression levels of soluble SUMO-nABP-dHC-cecropin A fusion proteins (n = 1, 2, 3, 4) suggested that BL21 (DE3)/pSUMO-3ABP-dHC-cecropin A is an ideal recombinant strain for ABP-dHC-cecropin A production. Under the selected conditions of cultivation and isopropylthiogalactoside (IPTG) induction, the expression level of ABP-dHC-cecropin A was as high as 65 mg/L, with ∼21.3% of the fusion protein in soluble form. By large-scale fermentation, protein production reached nearly 300 mg/L, which is the highest yield of ABP-dHC-cecropin A reported to date. In antibacterial experiments, the efficacy was approximately the same as that of synthetic ABP-dHC-cecropin A. This method provides a novel and effective means of producing large amounts of ABP-dHC-cecropin A. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. COMPARATIVE ACTIVITY OF CECROPIN A AND POLYMYXIN B AGAINST FROG BACTERIAL PATHOGENS

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    Ermin Schadich

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of two antimicrobial peptides, cecropin A and polymyxin B against different bacterial pathogens associated with bacterial dermatosepticemia, a fatal bacterial infectious disease of frogs was investigated. The peptides were tested in serial of concentrations (100-0.19 µg/ml for growth inhibition of seven pathogens: Aeromonas hydrophila, Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis and Serratia liquefaciens. Their antimicrobial activity was compared with that of two antimicrobial peptides from frog skin, magainin 2 and aurein 2.1. Both cecropin A and polymyxin B, completely inhibited the growth of three pathogens: C. freundii, K. pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa at a concentration some sixteen times less than two skin peptides. Furthermore, cecropin A inhibited the growth of three pathogens resistant to the two skin peptides, A. hydrophila, C. meningosepticum and P. mirabilis. Polymyxin B also inhibited the growth of three pathogens resistant to the skin peptides, A. hydrophila, C. meningosepticum and S. liquefaciens. Cecropin A and polymyxin B have marked antibacterial activity against different frog bacterial pathogens indicating potential for therapeutic measures.Keywords: frogs, antimicrobial, bacteria, cecropin, polymyxin, resistance

  4. Interaction of Cecropin B with Zwitterionic and Negatively Charged Lipid Bilayers Immobilized at Gold Electrode Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhaniewicz, Joanna; Szyk-Warszyńska, Lilianna; Warszyński, Piotr; Sęk, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Membranolytic properties of cationic antimicrobial peptide cecropin B were investigated using electrochemical techniques, atomic force microscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Two types of artificial lipid bilayers supported on gold electrode were used as model systems composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and cholesterol (Chol) at 7:3 molar ratio and L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (E. coli) (PE), L-α-phosphatidylglycerol sodium salt (E. coli) (PG) at 8:2 molar ratio. Thus the lipid content was intended to represent either mammalian or bacterial membrane respectively. Model bilayers were exposed to cecropin B at 1 μM concentration and the changes in bilayer structure, permeability and morphology were monitored as a function of time. We have found that cecropin B does not show any pronounced effect on POPC/Chol bilayer, while PE/PG system was strongly affected in the presence of the peptide. This observation suggests that cecropin B shows some selectivity with respect to lipid composition of the membrane. In case of PE/PG membrane, we have observed that peptide action involves electrostatically driven adsorption of the cecropin B at the top of the bilayer with simultaneous fluidization and swelling of the membrane. The latter may facilitate the rearrangement and insertion of the molecules into the core of the lipid bilayer, which leads to further rupture and degradation of the film through formation of mixed peptide-lipid aggregates.

  5. Modeling of the Ebola Virus Delta Peptide Reveals a Potential Lytic Sequence Motif

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    William R. Gallaher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses, such as Ebola and Marburg viruses, cause severe outbreaks of human infection, including the extensive epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD in West Africa in 2014. In the course of examining mutations in the glycoprotein gene associated with 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV sequences, a differential level of conservation was noted between the soluble form of glycoprotein (sGP and the full length glycoprotein (GP, which are both encoded by the GP gene via RNA editing. In the region of the proteins encoded after the RNA editing site sGP was more conserved than the overlapping region of GP when compared to a distant outlier species, Tai Forest ebolavirus. Half of the amino acids comprising the “delta peptide”, a 40 amino acid carboxy-terminal fragment of sGP, were identical between otherwise widely divergent species. A lysine-rich amphipathic peptide motif was noted at the carboxyl terminus of delta peptide with high structural relatedness to the cytolytic peptide of the non-structural protein 4 (NSP4 of rotavirus. EBOV delta peptide is a candidate viroporin, a cationic pore-forming peptide, and may contribute to EBOV pathogenesis.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of cecropin B from Bombyx mori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhongyuan; Zhou, Qiangjun; Mao, Xinfang; Zheng, Xiangdong; Guo, Jiubiao; Zhang, Fuchun; Wen, Tingyi; Pang, Hai

    2010-01-01

    Cecropin B derived from the hemolymph of Bombyx mori has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal diffracted to 1.43 Å resolution using X-ray radiation. Cecropin B is a 37-residue cationic antimicrobial peptide derived from the haemolymph of Bombyx mori. The precise mechanism by which cecropins exert their antimicrobial and cytolytic activities is not well understood. Crystals of cecropin B were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant at 289 K. The crystal diffracted to 1.43 Å resolution using X-ray radiation and belonged to the orthorhombic space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 15.08, b = 22.75, c = 30.20 Å, α = 96.9, β = 103.1, γ = 96.5°. The asymmetric unit contained only one molecule of cecropin B, with a calculated Matthews coefficient of 2.48 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 50.4%

  7. Genetically Engineered Yeast Expressing a Lytic Peptide from Bee Venom (Melittin) Kills Symbiotic Protozoa in the Gut of Formosan Subterranean Termites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husseneder, Claudia; Donaldson, Jennifer R; Foil, Lane D

    2016-01-01

    The Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, is a costly invasive urban pest in warm and humid regions around the world. Feeding workers of the Formosan subterranean termite genetically engineered yeast strains that express synthetic protozoacidal lytic peptides has been shown to kill the cellulose digesting termite gut protozoa, which results in death of the termite colony. In this study, we tested if Melittin, a natural lytic peptide from bee venom, could be delivered into the termite gut via genetically engineered yeast and if the expressed Melittin killed termites via lysis of symbiotic protozoa in the gut of termite workers and/or destruction of the gut tissue itself. Melittin expressing yeast did kill protozoa in the termite gut within 56 days of exposure. The expressed Melittin weakened the gut but did not add a synergistic effect to the protozoacidal action by gut necrosis. While Melittin could be applied for termite control via killing the cellulose-digesting protozoa in the termite gut, it is unlikely to be useful as a standalone product to control insects that do not rely on symbiotic protozoa for survival.

  8. Molecular structure, chemical synthesis, and antibacterial activity of ABP-dHC-cecropin A from drury (Hyphantria cunea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxin; Movahedi, Ali; Wang, Xiaoli; Wu, Xiaolong; Yin, Tongming; Zhuge, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    The increasing resistance of bacteria and fungi to currently available antibiotics is a major concern worldwide, leading to enormous efforts to develop new antibiotics with new modes of actions. In this paper, cDNA encoding cecropin A was amplified from drury (Hyphantria cunea) (dHC) pupa fatbody total RNA using RT-PCR. The full-length dHC-cecropin A cDNA encoded a protein of 63 amino acids with a predicted 26-amino acid signal peptide and a 37-amino acid functional domain. We synthesized the antibacterial peptide (ABP) from the 37-amino acid functional domain (ABP-dHC-cecropin A), and amidated it via the C-terminus. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed its molecular weight to be 4058.94. The ABP-dHC-cecropin A was assessed in terms of its protein structure using bioinformatics and CD spectroscopy. The protein's secondary structure was predicted to be α-helical. In an antibacterial activity analysis, the ABP-dHC-cecropin A exhibited strong antibacterial activity against E. coli K12D31 and Agrobacterium EHA105. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The anticancer activity of lytic peptides is inhibited by heparan sulfate on the surface of the tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) with antitumor activity constitute a promising group of novel anticancer agents. These peptides induce lysis of cancer cells through interactions with the plasma membrane. It is not known which cancer cell membrane components influence their susceptibility to CAPs. We have previously shown that CAPs interact with the two glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS), which are present on the surface of most cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the two GAGs in the cytotoxic activity of CAPs. Methods Various cell lines, expressing different levels of cell surface GAGs, were exposed to bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) and the designer peptide, KW5. The cytotoxic effect of the peptides was investigated by use of the colorimetric MTT viability assay. The cytotoxic effect on wild type CHO cells, expressing normal amounts of GAGs on the cell surface, and the mutant pgsA-745, that has no expression of GAGs on the cell surface, was also investigated. Results We show that cells not expressing HS were more susceptible to CAPs than cells expressing HS at the cell surface. Further, exogenously added heparin inhibited the cytotoxic effect of the peptides. Chondroitin sulfate had no effect on the cytotoxic activity of KW5 and only minor effects on LfcinB cytotoxicity. Conclusion Our results show for the first time that negatively charged molecules at the surface of cancer cells inhibit the cytotoxic activity of CAPs. Our results indicate that HS at the surface of cancer cells sequesters CAPs away from the phospholipid bilayer and thereby impede their ability to induce cytolysis. PMID:19527490

  10. The anticancer activity of lytic peptides is inhibited by heparan sulfate on the surface of the tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekdal Øystein

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs with antitumor activity constitute a promising group of novel anticancer agents. These peptides induce lysis of cancer cells through interactions with the plasma membrane. It is not known which cancer cell membrane components influence their susceptibility to CAPs. We have previously shown that CAPs interact with the two glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, heparan sulfate (HS and chondroitin sulfate (CS, which are present on the surface of most cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the two GAGs in the cytotoxic activity of CAPs. Methods Various cell lines, expressing different levels of cell surface GAGs, were exposed to bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB and the designer peptide, KW5. The cytotoxic effect of the peptides was investigated by use of the colorimetric MTT viability assay. The cytotoxic effect on wild type CHO cells, expressing normal amounts of GAGs on the cell surface, and the mutant pgsA-745, that has no expression of GAGs on the cell surface, was also investigated. Results We show that cells not expressing HS were more susceptible to CAPs than cells expressing HS at the cell surface. Further, exogenously added heparin inhibited the cytotoxic effect of the peptides. Chondroitin sulfate had no effect on the cytotoxic activity of KW5 and only minor effects on LfcinB cytotoxicity. Conclusion Our results show for the first time that negatively charged molecules at the surface of cancer cells inhibit the cytotoxic activity of CAPs. Our results indicate that HS at the surface of cancer cells sequesters CAPs away from the phospholipid bilayer and thereby impede their ability to induce cytolysis.

  11. Insect-derived cecropins display activity against Acinetobacter baumannii in a whole-animal high-throughput Caenorhabditis elegans model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayamani, Elamparithi; Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-03-01

    The rise of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and a concomitant decrease in antibiotic treatment options warrants a search for new classes of antibacterial agents. We have found that A. baumannii is pathogenic and lethal to the model host organism Caenorhabditis elegans and have exploited this phenomenon to develop an automated, high-throughput, high-content screening assay in liquid culture that can be used to identify novel antibiotics effective against A. baumannii. The screening assay involves coincubating C. elegans with A. baumannii in 384-well plates containing potential antibacterial compounds. At the end of the incubation period, worms are stained with a dye that stains only dead animals, and images are acquired using automated microscopy and then analyzed using an automated image analysis program. This robust assay yields a Z' factor consistently greater than 0.7. In a pilot experiment to test the efficacy of the assay, we screened a small custom library of synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) that were synthesized using publicly available sequence data and/or transcriptomic data from immune-challenged insects. We identified cecropin A and 14 other cecropin or cecropin-like peptides that were able to enhance C. elegans survival in the presence of A. baumannii. Interestingly, one particular hit, BR003-cecropin A, a cationic peptide synthesized by the mosquito Aedes aegypti, showed antibiotic activity against a panel of Gram-negative bacteria and exhibited a low MIC (5 μg/ml) against A. baumannii. BR003-cecropin A causes membrane permeability in A. baumannii, which could be the underlying mechanism of its lethality. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Effects of alterations of the E. coli lipopolysaccharide layer on membrane permeabilization events induced by Cecropin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anurag; Weisshaar, James C

    2018-04-22

    The outermost layer of Gram negative bacteria is composed of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) network that forms a dense protective hydrophilic barrier against entry of hydrophobic drugs. At low μM concentrations, a large family of cationic polypeptides known as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are able to penetrate the LPS layer and permeabilize the outer membrane (OM) and the cytoplasmic membrane (CM), causing cell death. Cecropin A is a well-studied cationic AMP from moth. Here a battery of time-resolved, single-cell microscopy experiments explores how deletion of sugar layers and/or phosphoryl negative charges from the core oligosaccharide layer (core OS) of K12 E. coli alters the timing of OM and CM permeabilization induced by Cecropin A. Deletion of sugar layers, or phosphoryl charges, or both from the core OS shortens the time to the onset of OM permeabilization to periplasmic GFP and also the lag time between OM permeabilization and CM permeabilization. Meanwhile, the 12-h minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) changes only twofold with core OS alterations. The results suggest a two-step model in which the core oligosaccharide layers act as a kinetic barrier to penetration of Cecropin A to the lipid A outer leaflet of the OM. Once a threshold concentration has built up at the lipid A leaflet, nucleation occurs and the OM is locally permeabilized to GFP and, by inference, to Cecropin A. Whenever Cecropin A permeabilizes the OM, CM permeabilization always follows, and cell growth subsequently halts and never recovers on the 45 min observation timescale. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cecropins as a marker of Spodoptera frugiperda immunosuppression during entomopathogenic bacterial challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvic, B; Jouan, V; Essa, N; Girard, P-A; Pagès, S; Abi Khattar, Z; Volkoff, N-A; Givaudan, A; Destoumieux-Garzon, D; Escoubas, J-M

    2012-06-01

    An antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the cecropin family was isolated by HPLC from plasma of the insect pest, Spodoptera frugiperda. Its molecular mass is 3910.9 Da as determined by mass spectrometry. Thanks to the EST database Spodobase, we were able to describe 13 cDNAs encoding six different cecropins which belong to the sub-families CecA, CecB, CecC and CecD. The purified peptide identified as CecB1 was chemically synthesized (syCecB1). It was shown to be active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi. Two closely related entomopathogenic bacteria, Xenorhabdus nematophila F1 and Xenorhabdus mauleonii VC01(T) showed different susceptibility to syCecB1. Indeed, X. nematophila was sensitive to syCecB1 whereas X. mauleonii had a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) eight times higher. Interestingly, injection of live X. nematophila into insects did not induce the expression of AMPs in hemolymph. This effect was not observed when this bacterium was heat-killed before injection. On the opposite, both live and heat-killed X. mauleonii induced the expression of AMPs in the hemolymph of S. frugiperda. The same phenomenon was observed for another immune-related protein lacking antimicrobial activity. Altogether, our data suggest that Xenorhabdus strains have developed different strategies to supplant the humoral defense mechanisms of S. frugiperda, either by increasing their resistance to AMPs or by preventing their expression during such host-pathogen interaction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Structure-activity relationships of the antimicrobial peptide arasin 1 - and mode of action studies of the N-terminal, proline-rich region.

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    Victoria S Paulsen

    Full Text Available Arasin 1 is a 37 amino acid long proline-rich antimicrobial peptide isolated from the spider crab, Hyas araneus. In this work the active region of arasin 1 was identified through structure-activity studies using different peptide fragments derived from the arasin 1 sequence. The pharmacophore was found to be located in the proline/arginine-rich NH(2 terminus of the peptide and the fragment arasin 1(1-23 was almost equally active to the full length peptide. Arasin 1 and its active fragment arasin 1(1-23 were shown to be non-toxic to human red blood cells and arasin 1(1-23 was able to bind chitin, a component of fungal cell walls and the crustacean shell. The mode of action of the fully active N-terminal arasin 1(1-23 was explored through killing kinetic and membrane permeabilization studies. At the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC, arasin 1(1-23 was not bactericidal and had no membrane disruptive effect. In contrast, at concentrations of 5×MIC and above it was bactericidal and interfered with membrane integrity. We conclude that arasin 1(1-23 has a different mode of action than lytic peptides, like cecropin P1. Thus, we suggest a dual mode of action for arasin 1(1-23 involving membrane disruption at peptide concentrations above MIC, and an alternative mechanism of action, possibly involving intracellular targets, at MIC.

  15. Antitumor effects of cecropin B-LHRH’ on drug-resistant ovarian and endometrial cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaoyong; Shen, Bo; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Xiaohui; Ye, Yiqing; Wang, Fengmei; Zhang, Xinmei

    2016-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptor (LHRHr) represents a promising therapeutic target for treating sex hormone-dependent tumors. We coupled cecropin B, an antimicrobial peptide, to LHRH’, a form of LHRH modified at carboxyl-terminal residues 4–10, which binds to LHRHr without interfering with luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion. This study aimed to assess the antitumor effects of cecropin B-LHRH’ (CB-LHRH’) in drug-resistant ovarian and endometrial cancers. To evaluate the antitumor effects of CB-LHRH’, three drug resistant ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV-3, ES-2, NIH:OVCAR-3) and an endometrial cancer cell line (HEC-1A) were treated with CB-LHRH’. Cell morphology changes were assessed using inverted and electron microscopes. In addition, cell growth and cell cytotoxicity were measured by MTT assay and LDH release, respectively. In addition, hemolysis was measured. Furthermore, radioligand receptor binding, hypersensitization and minimal inhibitory concentrations (against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii) were determined. Finally, the impact on tumor growth in BALB/c-nu mice was assessed in an ES-2 xenograft model. CB-LHRH’ bound LHRHr with high-affinity (dissociation constant, Kd = 0.252 ± 0.061nM). Interestingly, CB-LHRH’ significantly inhibited the cell viability of SKOV-3, ES-2, NIH:OVCAR-3 and HEC-1A, but not that of normal eukaryotic cells. CB-LHRH’ was active against bacteria at micromolar concentrations, and caused no hypersensitivity in guinea pigs. Furthermore, CB-LHRH’ inhibited tumor growth with a 23.8 and 20.4 % reduction in tumor weight at 50 and 25 mg/kg.d, respectively. CB-LHRH’ is a candidate for targeted chemotherapy against ovarian and endometrial cancers

  16. Bombyx mori cecropin A has a high antifungal activity to entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dingding; Geng, Tao; Hou, Chengxiang; Huang, Yuxia; Qin, Guangxing; Guo, Xijie

    2016-05-25

    A cDNA encoding cecropin A (CecA) was cloned from the larvae of silkworm, Bombyx mori, using RT-PCR. It encodes a protein of 63 amino acids, containing a 22 amino acid signal peptide and a 37 amino acid mat peptide of functional domain. The CecA secondary structure contains two typical amphiphilic α-helices. Real-time qPCR analysis revealed that CecA was expressed in all the tissues tested, including cuticle, fat body, hemocytes, Malpighian tubule, midgut and silk gland in the silkworm larvae with the highest expression in the fat body and hemocytes. The gene expression of B. mori CecA was rapidly induced by Beauveria bassiana challenge and reached maximum levels at 36h after inoculation in third instar larvae. In the fifth instar larvae infected with B. bassiana, the relative expression level of CecA was upregulated in fat body and hemocytes, but not in cuticle, Malpighian tubule, midgut and silk gland. The cDNA segment of the CecA was inserted into the expression plasmid pET-30a(+) to construct a recombinant expression plasmid. Western blot results revealed that his-tagged fusion protein was successfully expressed and purified. Then the mat peptide of CecA was chemically synthesized with C-terminus amidation for in vivo antifungal assay and purity achieved 93.7%. Mass spectrometry and SDS-PAGE showed its molecular weight to be 4046.95Da. Antifungal assays indicated that the B. mori CecA had a high antifungal activity to entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana both in vitro and in vivo in the silkworm larvae. This is the first report that the CecA is effective to inhibit B. bassiana inside the body of silkworm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Deletion of HAPS_2096 Increases Sensitivity to Cecropin B in Haemophilus parasuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanjie; Hu, Han; Li, Zhonghua; Huang, Jiacheng; Cai, Xuwang; Wang, Chunmei; He, Qigai; Cao, Jiyue

    2015-01-01

    Cecropin B (CB) is a very effective natural antimicrobial peptide that has shown great potential for future antimicrobial drug development. HAPS_2096 is a Haemophilus parasuis gene that encodes the periplasmic substrate-binding protein of an ATP-binding cassette-type amino acid transporter. In this research, we constructed and verified an HAPS_2096 deletion mutant and a complementary HAPS_2096 mutant of H. parasuis JS0135. A bactericidal assay revealed that the HAPS_2096 deletion mutant was significantly more sensitive than the wild-type strain to 0.25-0.5 µg/ml CB. However, the gene complementation alleviated the CB sensitivity of the mutant. Immunoelectron microscopy observation following a 30-min treatment with a sublethal concentration of CB (0.25 μg/ml) revealed more extensive morphological damage in the mutant strain than in the wild-type strain. Hence, our results suggest that the HAPS_2096 gene contributes to H. parasuis resistance to CB. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Phage lytic enzymes: a history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudil, David

    2015-02-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of 'bacteria-eaters' or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well (Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specific disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay (Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes-from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  19. [Potentialization of antibiotics by lytic enzymes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisou, J; Babin, P; Babin, R

    1975-01-01

    Few lytic enzymes, specially papaine and lysozyme, acting on the membrane and cell wall structures facilitate effects of bacitracine, streptomycine and other antibiotics. Streptomycino resistant strains became sensibles to this antibiotic after contact with papaine and lysozyme. The results of tests in physiological suspensions concern only the lytic activity of enzymes. The results on nutrient medium concern together lytic, and antibiotic activities.

  20. Reactivation and Lytic Replication of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneja, Kawalpreet K.; Yuan, Yan

    2017-01-01

    The life cycle of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) consists of two phases, latent and lytic. The virus establishes latency as a strategy for avoiding host immune surveillance and fusing symbiotically with the host for lifetime persistent infection. However, latency can be disrupted and KSHV is reactivated for entry into the lytic replication. Viral lytic replication is crucial for efficient dissemination from its long-term reservoir to the sites of disease and for the spread of the virus to new hosts. The balance of these two phases in the KSHV life cycle is important for both the virus and the host and control of the switch between these two phases is extremely complex. Various environmental factors such as oxidative stress, hypoxia, and certain chemicals have been shown to switch KSHV from latency to lytic reactivation. Immunosuppression, unbalanced inflammatory cytokines, and other viral co-infections also lead to the reactivation of KSHV. This review article summarizes the current understanding of the initiation and regulation of KSHV reactivation and the mechanisms underlying the process of viral lytic replication. In particular, the central role of an immediate-early gene product RTA in KSHV reactivation has been extensively investigated. These studies revealed multiple layers of regulation in activation of RTA as well as the multifunctional roles of RTA in the lytic replication cascade. Epigenetic regulation is known as a critical layer of control for the switch of KSHV between latency and lytic replication. The viral non-coding RNA, PAN, was demonstrated to play a central role in the epigenetic regulation by serving as a guide RNA that brought chromatin remodeling enzymes to the promoters of RTA and other lytic genes. In addition, a novel dimension of regulation by microPeptides emerged and has been shown to regulate RTA expression at the protein level. Overall, extensive investigation of KSHV reactivation and lytic replication has revealed

  1. Expression profiling of Bombyx mori gloverin2 gene and its synergistic antifungal effect with cecropin A against Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Dingding; Geng, Tao; Hou, Chengxiang; Qin, Guangxing; Gao, Kun; Guo, Xijie

    2017-02-05

    Gloverin2 is a cationic and glycine-rich antimicrobial peptide whose expression can be induced in fat body of silkworm (Bombyx mori) larvae exposed to bacteria. The purpose of this study is to identify the roles of Bombyx mori gloverin2 (Bmgloverin2) during entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana infection. Fluorescent quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that the relative expression level of Bmgloverin2 gene was up-regulated in the silkworm larvae infected by B. bassiana. The cDNA of Bmgloverin2 was cloned from the silkworm by RT-PCR and the DNA segment of the Bmgloverin2 peptide (without signal peptide sequence) was inserted into pCzn1 expression plasmid and expressed in E. coli ArcticExpress (DE3). SDS-PAGE results revealed that soluble recombinant Bmgloverin2 was successfully expressed and purified. Polyclonal antibody against the Bmgloverin2 was successfully produced with the expressed recombinant protein. Western blot analysis indicated that Bmgloverin2 could be detected in the fat body of silkworm larvae infected with B. bassiana, suggesting that the expression of Bmgloverin2 could be induced by B. bassiana infection in silkworm. Antifungal assays indicated that the Bmgloverin2 had a synergistic antifungal activity with B. mori cecropin A (BmCecA) to entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana both in vitro and in vivo in the silkworm larvae. This is the first report that Bmgloverin2 exhibits synergistic effect with BmCecA in antifungal activity against B. bassiana. The study demonstrates that Bmgloverin2 is an antifungal protein which plays an important role in synergistic antifungal activity with other antimicrobial peptide in silkworm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene Expression Profiling of Cecropin B-Resistant Haemophilus parasuis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Chunmei; Chen, Fangzhou; Hu, Han; Li, Wentao; Wang, Yang; Chen, Pin; Liu, Yingyu; Ku, Xugang; He, Qigai; Chen, Huanchun; Xue, Feiqun

    2014-01-01

    Synthetically designed antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) present the potential of replacing antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial infections. However, microbial resistance to AMPs has been reported and little is known regarding the underlying mechanism of such resistance. The naturally occurring AMP

  3. Design and expression of a retro doublet of cecropin with enhanced activity

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, Mauricio; Arenas, Gloria; Marshall, Sergio H

    2008-01-01

    Novel doublet molecules of cecropin A from Drosophila melanogaster were designed and constructed combining the regular (CECdir) with the inverted (CECret) coding sequence of the standard CEC A1 gene resulting in the following configurations: CECdir-CECret and CECret-CECdir. These two recombinant molecules were generated using a three-primer driven PCR reaction yielding composite single functional aminoacidic molecules with the coding sequences of CECdir linked in frame with the coding sequenc...

  4. Differential Change Patterns of Main Antimicrobial Peptide Genes During Infection of Entomopathogenic Nematodes and Their Symbiotic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsouei, Reyhaneh; Karimi, Javad; Ghadamyari, Mohammad; Hosseini, Mojtaba

    2017-08-01

    The expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the main humoral defense reactions of insects during infection by entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) and their symbiont is addressed herein. Three AMPs, attacin, cecropin, and spodoptericin, were evaluated in the fifth instar larvae of Spodoptera exigua Hübner (beet armyworm) when challenged with Steinernema carpocapsae or Heterorhabditis bacteriophora. The results indicated that attacin was expressed to a greater extent than either cecropin or spodoptericin. While spodoptericin was expressed to a much lesser extent, this AMP was induced against Gram-positive bacteria, and thus not expressed after penetration of Xenorhabdus nematophila and Photorhabdus luminescens. Attacin and cecropin in the larvae treated with S. carpocapsae at 8 hr post-injection (PI) attained the maximum expression levels and were 138.42-fold and 65.84-fold greater than those of larvae infected with H. bacteriophora, respectively. Generally, the ability of H. bacteriophora to suppress attacin, cecropin, and spodoptericin was greater than that of S. carpocapsae. According to the results, the expression of AMPs by Sp. exigua larvae against S. carpocapsae was determined in the 4 statuses of monoxenic nematode, axenic nematode, live symbiotic bacterium, and dead symbiotic bacterium. The expression of attacin in larvae treated with a monoxenic nematode and live bacterium at 8 and 2 hr PI, respectively, were increased to the maximum amount. Live X. nematophila was the strongest agent for the suppression of attacin. The expression of cecropin against monoxenic nematodes and live symbiotic bacteria at 8 and 4 hr PI, respectively, reached the maximum amount while the expression levels of attacin and cecropin for axenic nematodes were lesser and stable. The results highlighted that the ability of P. luminescens in AMPs suppression was much more than X. nematophila. The results also showed that the effect of symbiotic bacterium in suppressing attacin and

  5. Targeting Interleukin-4 Receptor Alpha by Hybrid Peptide for Novel Biliary Tract Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahori Seto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the interleukin-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα is highly expressed on the surface of various human solid tumors. We previously designed novel IL-4Rα-lytic hybrid peptide composed of binding peptide to IL-4Rα and cell-lytic peptide and reported that the designed IL-4Rα-lytic hybrid peptide exhibited cytotoxic and antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo against the human pancreatic cancer cells expressing IL-4Rα. Here, we evaluated the antitumor activity of the IL-4Rα-lytic hybrid peptide as a novel molecular targeted therapy for human biliary tract cancer (BTC. The IL-4Rα-lytic hybrid peptide showed cytotoxic activity in six BTC cell lines with a concentration that killed 50% of all cells (IC50 as low as 5 μM. We also showed that IL-4Rα-lytic hybrid peptide in combination with gemcitabine exhibited synergistic cytotoxic activity in vitro. In addition, intravenous administration of IL-4Rα-lytic hybrid peptide significantly inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft model of human BTC in vivo. Taken together, these results indicated that the IL-4Rα-lytic hybrid peptide is a potent agent that might provide a novel therapy for patients with BTC.

  6. Constructing bioactive peptides with pH-dependent activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zhigang; Volk, Melanie; Shah, Khushali; Clerkin, Kevin; Liang, Jun F

    2009-08-01

    Many bioactive peptides are featured by their arginine and lysine rich contents. In this study, lysine and arginine residues in lytic peptides were selectively replaced by histidines. Although resulting histidine-containing lytic peptides had decreased activity, they did show pH-dependent cytotoxicity. The activity of the constructed histidine-containing lytic peptides increased 2-8 times as the solution pH changed from 7.4 to 5.5. More importantly, these histidine-containing peptides maintain the same cell killing mechanism as their parent peptides by causing cell lysis. Both the activity and pH-sensitivity of histidine-containing peptides are tunable by adjusting histidine substitution numbers and positions. This study has presented a general strategy to create bioactive peptides with desired pH-sensitivity to meet the needs of various applications such as cancer treatments.

  7. Translocation of cell-penetrating peptides into Candida fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zifan; Karlsson, Amy J

    2017-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small peptides capable of crossing cellular membranes while carrying molecular cargo. Although they have been widely studied for their ability to translocate nucleic acids, small molecules, and proteins into mammalian cells, studies of their interaction with fungal cells are limited. In this work, we evaluated the translocation of eleven fluorescently labeled peptides into the important human fungal pathogens Candida albicans and C. glabrata and explored the mechanisms of translocation. Seven of these peptides (cecropin B, penetratin, pVEC, MAP, SynB, (KFF) 3 K, and MPG) exhibited substantial translocation (>80% of cells) into both species in a concentration-dependent manner, and an additional peptide (TP-10) exhibiting strong translocation into only C. glabrata. Vacuoles were involved in translocation and intracellular trafficking of the peptides in the fungal cells and, for some peptides, escape from the vacuoles and localization in the cytosol were correlated to toxicity toward the fungal cells. Endocytosis was involved in the translocation of cecropin B, MAP, SynB, MPG, (KFF) 3 K, and TP-10, and cecropin B, penetratin, pVEC, and MAP caused membrane permeabilization during translocation. These results indicate the involvement of multiple translocation mechanisms for some CPPs. Although high levels of translocation were typically associated with toxicity of the peptides toward the fungal cells, SynB was translocated efficiently into Candida cells at concentrations that led to minimal toxicity. Our work highlights the potential of CPPs in delivering antifungal molecules and other bioactive cargo to Candida pathogens. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes EBV lytic replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Gwen Marie; Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K; Rowe, David T; Wadowsky, Robert M; Rosendorff, Adam

    2011-11-17

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers a homeostatic cellular response in mammalian cells to ensure efficient folding, sorting, and processing of client proteins. In lytic-permissive lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), pulse exposure to the chemical ER-stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) followed by recovery resulted in the activation of the EBV immediate-early (BRLF1, BZLF1), early (BMRF1), and late (gp350) genes, gp350 surface expression, and virus release. The protein phosphatase 1 a (PP1a)-specific phosphatase inhibitor Salubrinal (SAL) synergized with TG to induce EBV lytic genes; however, TG treatment alone was sufficient to activate EBV lytic replication. SAL showed ER-stress-dependent and -independent antiviral effects, preventing virus release in human LCLs and abrogating gp350 expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-treated B95-8 cells. TG resulted in sustained BCL6 but not BLIMP1 or CD138 expression, which is consistent with maintenance of a germinal center B-cell, rather than plasma-cell, phenotype. Microarray analysis identified candidate genes governing lytic replication in LCLs undergoing ER stress.

  9. Rational site-directed mutations of the LLP-1 and LLP-2 lentivirus lytic peptide domains in the intracytoplasmic tail of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 indicate common functions in cell-cell fusion but distinct roles in virion envelope incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Vandana; Sarkar, Surojit; Gupta, Phalguni; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2003-03-01

    Two highly conserved cationic amphipathic alpha-helical motifs, designated lentivirus lytic peptides 1 and 2 (LLP-1 and LLP-2), have been characterized in the carboxyl terminus of the transmembrane (TM) envelope glycoprotein (Env) of lentiviruses. Although various properties have been attributed to these domains, their structural and functional significance is not clearly understood. To determine the specific contributions of the Env LLP domains to Env expression, processing, and incorporation and to viral replication and syncytium induction, site-directed LLP mutants of a primary dualtropic infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolate (ME46) were examined. Substitutions were made for highly conserved arginine residues in either the LLP-1 or LLP-2 domain (MX1 or MX2, respectively) or in both domains (MX4). The HIV-1 mutants with altered LLP domains demonstrated distinct phenotypes. The LLP-1 mutants (MX1 and MX4) were replication defective and showed an average of 85% decrease in infectivity, which was associated with an evident decrease in gp41 incorporation into virions without a significant decrease in Env expression or processing in transfected 293T cells. In contrast, MX2 virus was replication competent and incorporated a full complement of Env into its virions, indicating a differential role for the LLP-1 domain in Env incorporation. Interestingly, the replication-competent MX2 virus was impaired in its ability to induce syncytia in T-cell lines. This defect in cell-cell fusion did not correlate with apparent defects in the levels of cell surface Env expression, oligomerization, or conformation. The lack of syncytium formation, however, correlated with a decrease of about 90% in MX2 Env fusogenicity compared to that of wild-type Env in quantitative luciferase-based cell-cell fusion assays. The LLP-1 mutant MX1 and MX4 Envs also exhibited an average of 80% decrease in fusogenicity. Altogether, these results demonstrate for the first time that

  10. A novel inclusion complex (β-CD/ABP-dHC-cecropin A) with antibiotic propertiess for use as an anti-Agrobacterium additive in transgenic poplar rooting medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxin; Li, Jianfeng; Movahedi, Ali; Sang, Ming; Xu, Chen; Xu, Junjie; Wei, Zhiheng; Yin, Tongming; Zhuge, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    The increasing resistance of bacteria and fungi to currently available antibiotics is a major concern worldwide, leading to enormous effort to develop novel antibiotics with new modes of action.We recently reported that ABP-dHC-cecropin A exhibited strong antibacterial and antifungal activity, making it a candidate antibiotic substitute. In this study, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) combined with ABP-dHC-cecropin A enhanced the physical and chemical properties of ABP-dHC-cecropin A but did not significantly decrease its antibacterial activity. Thus, β-CD/ABP-dHC-cecropin A should be considered a novel antibacterial drug. We used β-CD/ABP-dHC-cecropin A as an anti-Agrobacterium compound to supplementtransgenic poplar medium. Sideeffects of the inclusion complex had little impact on plantgrowth. Thus, β-CD/ABP-dHC-cecropin A may be used as traditional antibiotics forpoplar transplantation with greater antibbacterial effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Isolation of lytic bacteriophage against Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers-Stomps, C; Høj, L; Bourne, D G; Hall, M R; Owens, L

    2010-05-01

    The isolation of lytic bacteriophage of Vibrio harveyi with potential for phage therapy of bacterial pathogens of phyllosoma larvae from the tropical rock lobster Panulirus ornatus. Water samples from discharge channels and grow-out ponds of a prawn farm in northeastern Australia were enriched for 24 h in a broth containing four V. harveyi strains. The bacteriophage-enriched filtrates were spotted onto bacterial lawns demonstrating that the bacteriophage host range for the samples included strains of V. harveyi, Vibrio campbellii, Vibrio rotiferianus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio proteolyticus. Bacteriophage were isolated from eight enriched samples through triple plaque purification. The host range of purified phage included V. harveyi, V. campbellii, V. rotiferianus and V. parahaemolyticus. Transmission electron microscope examination revealed that six purified phage belonged to the family Siphoviridae, whilst two belonged to the family Myoviridae. The Myoviridae appeared to induce bacteriocin production in a limited number of host bacterial strains, suggesting that they were lysogenic rather than lytic. A purified Siphoviridae phage could delay the entry of a broth culture of V. harveyi strain 12 into exponential growth, but could not prevent the overall growth of the bacterial strain. Bacteriophage with lytic activity against V. harveyi were isolated from prawn farm samples. Purified phage of the family Siphoviridae had a clear lytic ability and no apparent transducing properties, indicating they are appropriate for phage therapy. Phage resistance is potentially a major constraint to the use of phage therapy in aquaculture as bacteria are not completely eliminated. Phage therapy is emerging as a potential antibacterial agent that can be used to control pathogenic bacteria in aquaculture systems. The development of phage therapy for aquaculture requires initial isolation and determination of the bacteriophage host range, with subsequent creation of

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes EBV lytic replication

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Gwen Marie; Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K.; Rowe, David T.; Wadowsky, Robert M.; Rosendorff, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers a homeostatic cellular response in mammalian cells to ensure efficient folding, sorting, and processing of client proteins. In lytic-permissive lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), pulse exposure to the chemical ER-stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) followed by recovery resulted in the activation of the EBV immediate-early (BRLF1, BZLF1), early (BMRF1), and late (gp350) genes, gp350 surface expression, and virus release. The protein phosphatase 1 a (PP1a)...

  13. Antimicrobial peptides interact with peptidoglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelay, Om P.; Peterson, Christian A.; Snavely, Mary E.; Brown, Taylor C.; TecleMariam, Ariam F.; Campbell, Jennifer A.; Blake, Allison M.; Schneider, Sydney C.; Cremeens, Matthew E.

    2017-10-01

    Traditional therapeutics are losing effectiveness as bacterial resistance increases, and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can serve as an alternative source for antimicrobial agents. Their mode of action is commonly hypothesized to involve pore formation in the lipid membrane, thereby leading to cell death. However, bacterial cell walls are much more complex than just the lipid membrane. A large portion of the wall is comprised of peptidoglycan, yet we did not find any report of AMP-peptidoglycan interactions. Consequently, this work evaluated AMP-peptidoglycan and AMP-phospholipid (multilamellar vesicles) interactions through tryptophan fluorescence. Given that peptidoglycan is insoluble and vesicles are large particles, we took advantage of the unique properties of Trp-fluorescence to use one technique for two very different systems. Interestingly, melittin and cecropin A interacted with peptidoglycan to a degree similar to vancomycin, a positive control. Whether these AMP-peptidoglycan interactions relate to a killing mode of action requires further study.

  14. Identification and screening of potent antimicrobial peptides in arthropod genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duwadi, Deepesh; Shrestha, Anishma; Yilma, Binyam; Kozlovski, Itamar; Sa-Eed, Munaya; Dahal, Nikesh; Jukosky, James

    2018-05-01

    Using tBLASTn and BLASTp searches, we queried recently sequenced arthropod genomes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) using a database of known arthropod cecropins, defensins, and attacins. We identified and synthesized 6 potential AMPs and screened them for antimicrobial activity. Using radial diffusion assays and microtiter antimicrobial assays, we assessed the in vitro antimicrobial effects of these peptides against several human pathogens including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. We also conducted hemolysis assays to examine the cytotoxicity of these peptides to mammalian cells. Four of the six peptides identified showed antimicrobial effects in these assays. We also created truncated versions of these four peptides to assay their antimicrobial activity. Two cecropins derived from the monarch butterfly genome (Danaus plexippus), DAN1 and DAN2, showed minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in the range of 2-16 μg/ml when screened against Gram-negative bacteria. HOLO1 and LOUDEF1, two defensin-like peptides derived from red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) and human body louse (Pediculus humanus humanus), respectively, exhibited MICs in the range of 13-25 μg/ml against Gram-positive bacteria. Furthermore, HOLO1 showed an MIC less than 5 μg/ml against the fungal species Candida albicans. These peptides exhibited no hemolytic activity at concentrations up to 200 μg/ml. The truncated peptides derived from DAN2 and HOLO1 showed very little antimicrobial activity. Our experiments show that the peptides DAN1, DAN2, HOLO1, and LOUDEF1 showed potent antimicrobial activity in vitro against common human pathogens, did not lyse mammalian red blood cells, and indicates their potential as templates for novel therapeutic agents against microbial infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Recurrent Plasmodium falciparum malaria infections in Kenyan children diminish T-cell immunity to Epstein Barr virus lytic but not latent antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia J Snider

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum malaria (Pf-malaria and Epstein Barr Virus (EBV infections coexist in children at risk for endemic Burkitt's lymphoma (eBL; yet studies have only glimpsed the cumulative effect of Pf-malaria on EBV-specific immunity. Using pooled EBV lytic and latent CD8+ T-cell epitope-peptides, IFN-γ ELISPOT responses were surveyed three times among children (10 months to 15 years in Kenya from 2002-2004. Prevalence ratios (PR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were estimated in association with Pf-malaria exposure, defined at the district-level (Kisumu: holoendemic; Nandi: hypoendemic and the individual-level. We observed a 46% decrease in positive EBV lytic antigen IFN-γ responses among 5-9 year olds residing in Kisumu compared to Nandi (PR: 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30-0.99. Individual-level analysis in Kisumu revealed further impairment of EBV lytic antigen responses among 5-9 year olds consistently infected with Pf-malaria compared to those never infected. There were no observed district- or individual-level differences between Pf-malaria exposure and EBV latent antigen IFN-γ response. The gradual decrease of EBV lytic antigen but not latent antigen IFN-γ responses after primary infection suggests a specific loss in immunological control over the lytic cycle in children residing in malaria holoendemic areas, further refining our understanding of eBL etiology.

  16. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases from Myceliophthora thermophila C1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frommhagen, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Current developments aim at the effective enzymatic degradation of plant biomass polysaccharides into fermentable monosaccharides for biofuels and biochemicals. Recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxgygenases (LPMOs) boost the hydrolytic breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass, especially

  17. A novel chimeric cell-penetrating peptide with membrane-disruptive properties for efficient endosomal escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Fabrizio; Cardarelli, Francesco; Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Boccardi, Claudia; Nifosì, Riccardo; Bardi, Giuseppe; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Serresi, Michela; Beltram, Fabio

    2012-11-10

    Efficient endocytosis into a wide range of target cells and low toxicity make the arginine-rich Tat peptide (Tat(11): YGRKKRRQRRR, residues 47-57 of HIV-1 Tat protein) an excellent transporter for delivery purposes. Unfortunately, molecules taken up by endocytosis undergo endosomal entrapment and possible metabolic degradation. Escape from the endosome is therefore actively researched. In this context, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) provide viable templates for the design of new membrane-disruptive motifs. In particular the Cecropin-A and Melittin hybrids (CMs) are among the smallest and most effective peptides with membrane-perturbing abilities. Here we present a novel chimeric peptide in which the Tat(11) motif is fused to the CM(18) hybrid (KWKLFKKIGAVLKVLTTG, residues 1-7 of Cecropin-A and 2-12 of Melittin). When administered to cells, CM(18)-Tat(11) combines the two desired functionalities: efficient uptake and destabilization of endocytotic-vesicle membranes. We show that this chimeric peptide effectively increases cargo-molecule cytoplasm availability and allows the subsequent intracellular localization of diverse membrane-impermeable molecules (i.e. Tat(11)-EGFP fusion protein, calcein, dextrans, and plasmidic DNA) with no detectable cytotoxicity. The present results open the way to the rational engineering of "modular" cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) that combine (i) efficient translocation from the extracellular milieu into vesicles and (ii) efficient release of molecules from vesicles into the cytoplasm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The antimicrobial peptides lactoferricin B and magainin 2 cross over the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane and reside in the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haukland, H H; Ulvatne, H; Sandvik, K; Vorland, L H

    2001-11-23

    The localization of immunolabelled antimicrobial peptides was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were exposed to lactoferricin B (17-41), lactoferricin B (17-31) and D-lactoferricin B (17-31). E. coli was also exposed to cecropin P1 and magainin 2. The lactoferricins were found in the cytoplasm of both bacteria. In S. aureus the amount of cytoplasmic lactoferricin B (17-41) was time- and concentration-dependent, reaching a maximum within 30 min. Cecropin P1 was confined to the cell wall, while magainin 2 was found in the cytoplasm of E. coli. The finding of intracellularly localized magainin is not reported previously.

  19. Painful Lytic Lesions of the Foot : A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Vaishya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of lytic lesions in the bones of foot raises a number of diagnostic possibilities ranging from infection, inflammatory pathology to neoplastic conditions. Although the radiological picture is not pathognomonic of any pathology, clinical history and histopathological examination can help to clinch the diagnosis. We present a case of multiple lytic lesions of the foot and discuss possible differential diagnoses. The patient was diagnosed as a case of madura foot and the lesions responded to surgical debridement and anti-fungal treatment with a good functional outcome. Madura foot is an uncommon, chronic granulomatous fungal or bacterial infection with a predilection in people who walk barefoot. Although known for a specific geographical distribution, madura foot should be kept as a possible diagnosis in patients presenting with lytic lesions of the foot due to population emigration across the world.

  20. Metastatic Breast Cancer or Multiple Myeloma? Camouflage by Lytic Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Hough

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a female with stage I infiltrating ductal carcinoma who received adjuvant therapy including trastuzumab. One year later she developed lytic lesions and was retreated with trastuzumab that was held after she developed symptomatic heart failure. Lytic lesions were attributed to relapse of breast cancer, and cardiac failure attributed to prior trastuzumab therapy. After complications necessitated multiple hospitalizations, a further workup revealed that the lytic lesions were not metastatic breast cancer but multiple myeloma. Her advanced multiple myeloma was associated with systemic amyloidosis involving gut and heart, which ultimately led to her demise. This report addresses the pitfalls of overlapping symptoms and the question of which patients with suspected metastatic disease should undergo a biopsy.

  1. MUREIN-METABOLIZING ENZYMES FROM ESCHERICHIA-COLI - EXISTENCE OF A 2ND LYTIC TRANSGLYCOSYLASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ENGEL, H; SMINK, AJ; VANWIJNGAARDEN, L; KECK, W

    1992-01-01

    In addition to the soluble lytic transglycosylase, a murein-metabolizing enzyme with a molecular mass of 70 kDa (Slt70), Escherichia coli possesses a second lytic transglycosylase, which has been described as a membrane-bound lytic transglycosylase (Mlt; 35 kDa; EC 3.2.1.-). The mlt gene, which

  2. Emergence of CD4+ and CD8+ Polyfunctional T Cell Responses Against Immunodominant Lytic and Latent EBV Antigens in Children With Primary EBV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice K. P. Lam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Long term carriers were shown to generate robust polyfunctional T cell (PFC responses against lytic and latent antigens of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. However, the time of emergence of PFC responses against EBV antigens, pattern of immunodominance and difference between CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses during various stages of EBV infection are not clearly understood. A longitudinal study was performed to assess the development of antigen-specific PFC responses in children diagnosed to have primary symptomatic (infectious mononucleosis [IM] and asymptomatic (AS EBV infection. Evaluation of IFN-γ secreting CD8+ T cell responses upon stimulation by HLA class I-specific peptides of EBV lytic and latent proteins by ELISPOT assay followed by assessment of CD4+ and CD8+ PFC responses upon stimulation by a panel of overlapping EBV peptides for co-expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, perforin and CD107a by flow cytometry were performed. Cytotoxicity of T cells against autologous lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs as well as EBV loads in PBMC and plasma were also determined. Both IM and AS patients had elevated PBMC and plasma viral loads which declined steadily during a 12-month period from the time of diagnosis whilst decrease in the magnitude of CD8+ T cell responses toward EBV lytic peptides in contrast to increase toward latent peptides was shown with no significant difference between those of IM and AS patients. Both lytic and latent antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells demonstrated polyfunctionality (defined as greater or equal to three functions concurrent with enhanced cytotoxicity against autologous LCLs and steady decrease in plasma and PBMC viral loads over time. Immunodominant peptides derived from BZLF1, BRLF1, BMLF1 and EBNA3A-C proteins induced the highest proportion of CD8+ as well as CD4+ PFC responses. Diverse functional subtypes of both CD4+ and CD8+ PFCs were shown to emerge at 6–12 months. In conclusion, EBV antigen-specific CD4+ and CD

  3. Sequence diversity and evolution of antimicrobial peptides in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Amparyup, Piti

    2015-02-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are evolutionarily ancient molecules that act as the key components in the invertebrate innate immunity against invading pathogens. Several AMPs have been identified and characterized in invertebrates, and found to display considerable diversity in their amino acid sequence, structure and biological activity. AMP genes appear to have rapidly evolved, which might have arisen from the co-evolutionary arms race between host and pathogens, and enabled organisms to survive in different microbial environments. Here, the sequence diversity of invertebrate AMPs (defensins, cecropins, crustins and anti-lipopolysaccharide factors) are presented to provide a better understanding of the evolution pattern of these peptides that play a major role in host defense mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The PDB database is a rich source of alpha-helical anti-microbial peptides to combat disease causing pathogens [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic potential of α-helical anti-microbial peptides (AH-AMP to combat pathogens is fast gaining prominence. Based on recently published open access software for characterizing α-helical peptides (PAGAL, we elucidate a search methodology (SCALPEL that leverages the massive structural data pre-existing in the PDB database to obtain AH-AMPs belonging to the host proteome. We provide in vitro validation of SCALPEL on plant pathogens (Xylella fastidiosa, Xanthomonas arboricola and Liberibacter crescens by identifying AH-AMPs that mirror the function and properties of cecropin B, a well-studied AH-AMP. The identified peptides include a linear AH-AMP present within the existing structure of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC20, and an AH-AMP mimicing the properties of the two α-helices of cecropin B from chitinase (CHITI25. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these peptides are comparable to that of cecropin B, while anionic peptides used as control failed to show any inhibitory effect on these pathogens. Substitute therapies in place of conventional chemotherapies using membrane permeabilizing peptides like these might also prove effective to target cancer cells. The use of native structures from the same organism could possibly ensure that administration of such peptides will be better tolerated and not elicit an adverse immune response. We suggest a similar approach to target Ebola epitopes, enumerated using PAGAL recently, by selecting suitable peptides from the human proteome, especially in wake of recent reports of cationic amphiphiles inhibiting virus entry and infection.

  5. Antimicrobial peptides design by evolutionary multiobjective optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maccari

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are an abundant and wide class of molecules produced by many tissues and cell types in a variety of mammals, plant and animal species. Linear alpha-helical antimicrobial peptides are among the most widespread membrane-disruptive AMPs in nature, representing a particularly successful structural arrangement in innate defense. Recently, AMPs have received increasing attention as potential therapeutic agents, owing to their broad activity spectrum and their reduced tendency to induce resistance. The introduction of non-natural amino acids will be a key requisite in order to contrast host resistance and increase compound's life. In this work, the possibility to design novel AMP sequences with non-natural amino acids was achieved through a flexible computational approach, based on chemophysical profiles of peptide sequences. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR descriptors were employed to code each peptide and train two statistical models in order to account for structural and functional properties of alpha-helical amphipathic AMPs. These models were then used as fitness functions for a multi-objective evolutional algorithm, together with a set of constraints for the design of a series of candidate AMPs. Two ab-initio natural peptides were synthesized and experimentally validated for antimicrobial activity, together with a series of control peptides. Furthermore, a well-known Cecropin-Mellitin alpha helical antimicrobial hybrid (CM18 was optimized by shortening its amino acid sequence while maintaining its activity and a peptide with non-natural amino acids was designed and tested, demonstrating the higher activity achievable with artificial residues.

  6. Viral infection model with periodic lytic immune response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kaifa; Wang Wendi; Liu Xianning

    2006-01-01

    Dynamical behavior and bifurcation structure of a viral infection model are studied under the assumption that the lytic immune response is periodic in time. The infection-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable when the basic reproductive ratio of virus is less than or equal to one. There is a non-constant periodic solution if the basic reproductive ratio of the virus is greater than one. It is found that period doubling bifurcations occur as the amplitude of lytic component is increased. For intermediate birth rates, the period triplication occurs and then period doubling cascades proceed gradually toward chaotic cycles. For large birth rate, the period doubling cascade proceeds gradually toward chaotic cycles without the period triplication, and the inverse period doubling can be observed. These results can be used to explain the oscillation behaviors of virus population, which was observed in chronic HBV or HCV carriers

  7. Induction of a peptide with activity against a broad spectrum of pathogens in the Aedes aegypti salivary gland, following Infection with Dengue Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthanej Luplertlop

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate stage of the transmission of Dengue Virus (DENV to man is strongly dependent on crosstalk between the virus and the immune system of its vector Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti. Infection of the mosquito's salivary glands by DENV is the final step prior to viral transmission. Therefore, in the present study, we have determined the modulatory effects of DENV infection on the immune response in this organ by carrying out a functional genomic analysis of uninfected salivary glands and salivary glands of female Ae. aegypti mosquitoes infected with DENV. We have shown that DENV infection of salivary glands strongly up-regulates the expression of genes that encode proteins involved in the vector's innate immune response, including the immune deficiency (IMD and Toll signalling pathways, and that it induces the expression of the gene encoding a putative anti-bacterial, cecropin-like, peptide (AAEL000598. Both the chemically synthesized non-cleaved, signal peptide-containing gene product of AAEL000598, and the cleaved, mature form, were found to exert, in addition to antibacterial activity, anti-DENV and anti-Chikungunya viral activity. However, in contrast to the mature form, the immature cecropin peptide was far more effective against Chikungunya virus (CHIKV and, furthermore, had strong anti-parasite activity as shown by its ability to kill Leishmania spp. Results from circular dichroism analysis showed that the immature form more readily adopts a helical conformation which would help it to cause membrane permeabilization, thus permitting its transfer across hydrophobic cell surfaces, which may explain the difference in the anti-pathogenic activity between the two forms. The present study underscores not only the importance of DENV-induced cecropin in the innate immune response of Ae. aegypti, but also emphasizes the broad-spectrum anti-pathogenic activity of the immature, signal peptide-containing form of this peptide.

  8. Cloning and expression analysis of genes encoding lytic endopeptidases L1 and L5 from Lysobacter sp. strain XL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapteva, Y S; Zolova, O E; Shlyapnikov, M G; Tsfasman, I M; Muranova, T A; Stepnaya, O A; Kulaev, I S; Granovsky, I E

    2012-10-01

    Lytic enzymes are the group of hydrolases that break down structural polymers of the cell walls of various microorganisms. In this work, we determined the nucleotide sequences of the Lysobacter sp. strain XL1 alpA and alpB genes, which code for, respectively, secreted lytic endopeptidases L1 (AlpA) and L5 (AlpB). In silico analysis of their amino acid sequences showed these endopeptidases to be homologous proteins synthesized as precursors similar in structural organization: the mature enzyme sequence is preceded by an N-terminal signal peptide and a pro region. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, endopeptidases AlpA and AlpB were assigned to the S1E family [clan PA(S)] of serine peptidases. Expression of the alpA and alpB open reading frames (ORFs) in Escherichia coli confirmed that they code for functionally active lytic enzymes. Each ORF was predicted to have the Shine-Dalgarno sequence located at a canonical distance from the start codon and a potential Rho-independent transcription terminator immediately after the stop codon. The alpA and alpB mRNAs were experimentally found to be monocistronic; transcription start points were determined for both mRNAs. The synthesis of the alpA and alpB mRNAs was shown to occur predominantly in the late logarithmic growth phase. The amount of alpA mRNA in cells of Lysobacter sp. strain XL1 was much higher, which correlates with greater production of endopeptidase L1 than of L5.

  9. Bacteriophage lytic to Desulfovibrio aespoeensis isolated from deep groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eydal, Hallgerd S C; Jägevall, Sara; Hermansson, Malte; Pedersen, Karsten

    2009-10-01

    Viruses were earlier found to be 10-fold more abundant than prokaryotes in deep granitic groundwater at the Aspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). Using a most probable number (MPN) method, 8-30 000 cells of sulphate-reducing bacteria per ml were found in groundwater from seven boreholes at the Aspö HRL. The content of lytic phages infecting the indigenous bacterium Desulfovibrio aespoeensis in Aspö groundwater was analysed using the MPN technique for phages. In four of 10 boreholes, 0.2-80 phages per ml were found at depths of 342-450 m. Isolates of lytic phages were made from five cultures. Using transmission electron microscopy, these were characterized and found to be in the Podoviridae morphology group. The isolated phages were further analysed regarding host range and were found not to infect five other species of Desulfovibrio or 10 Desulfovibrio isolates with up to 99.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to D. aespoeensis. To further analyse phage-host interactions, using a direct count method, growth of the phages and their host was followed in batch cultures, and the viral burst size was calculated to be approximately 170 phages per lytic event, after a latent period of approximately 70 h. When surviving cells from infected D. aespoeensis batch cultures were inoculated into new cultures and reinfected, immunity to the phages was found. The parasite-prey system found implies that viruses are important for microbial ecosystem diversity and activity, and for microbial numbers in deep subsurface groundwater.

  10. Percutaneous aspiration biopsy in cervical spine lytic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tampieri, D.; Weill, A.; Melanson, D.; Ethier, R.

    1991-01-01

    We describe the technique and the results of the percutaneous aspiration biopsy (PAB) in a series of 9 patients presenting with neck pain and different degrees of myelopathy, in whom the cervical spine X-ray demonstrated lytic lesions of unknown origin. PAB is a useful, relatively safe technique, and leads to histological diagnosis between metastatic and inflammatory processes. Furthermore, in inflammatory lesions with negative hemoculture, PAB may help in detecting the micro-organism responsible and therefore allow a better antibiotic treatment. (orig.)

  11. The lytic transglycosylase MltB connects membrane homeostasis and in vivo fitness of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépin, Sébastien; Ottosen, Elizabeth N; Peters, Katharina; Smith, Sara N; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Vollmer, Waldemar; Mobley, Harry L T

    2018-06-08

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a leading nosocomial pathogen, infecting a wide range of anatomic sites including the respiratory tract and the bloodstream. In addition to being multi-drug resistant, little is known about the molecular basis of A. baumannii pathogenesis. To better understand A. baumannii virulence, a combination of a transposon-sequencing (TraDIS) screen and the neutropenic mouse model of bacteremia was used to identify the full set of fitness genes required during bloodstream infection. The lytic transglycosylase MltB was identified as a critical fitness factor. MltB cleaves the MurNAc-GlcNAc bond of peptidoglycan, which leads to cell wall remodeling. Here we show that MltB is part of a complex network connecting resistance to stresses, membrane homeostasis, biogenesis of pili and in vivo fitness. Indeed, inactivation of mltB not only impaired resistance to serum complement, cationic antimicrobial peptides and oxygen species, but also altered the cell envelope integrity, activated the envelope stress response, drastically reduced the number of pili at the cell surface and finally, significantly decreased colonization of both the bloodstream and the respiratory tract. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Secondary structure of cell-penetrating peptides during interaction with fungal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zifan; Ikonomova, Svetlana P; Karlsson, Amy J

    2018-03-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are peptides that cross cell membranes, either alone or while carrying molecular cargo. Although their interactions with mammalian cells have been widely studied, much less is known about their interactions with fungal cells, particularly at the biophysical level. We analyzed the interactions of seven CPPs (penetratin, Pep-1, MPG, pVEC, TP-10, MAP, and cecropin B) with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans using experiments and molecular simulations. Circular dichroism (CD) of the peptides revealed a structural transition from a random coil or weak helix to an α-helix occurs for all peptides when the solvent is changed from aqueous to hydrophobic. However, CD performed in the presence of C. albicans cells showed that proximity to the cell membrane is not necessarily sufficient to induce this structural transition, as penetratin, Pep-1, and MPG did not display a structural shift in the presence of cells. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to further probe the molecular-level interaction with the cell membrane, and these simulations suggested that pVEC, TP-10, MAP, and cecropin B strongly penetrate into the hydrophobic domain of the membrane lipid bilayer, inducing a transition to an α-helical conformation. In contrast, penetratin, Pep-1 and MPG remained in the hydrophilic region without a shift in conformation. The experimental data and MC simulations combine to explain how peptide structure affects their interaction with cells and their mechanism of translocation into cells (direct translocation vs. endocytosis). Our work also highlights the utility of combining biophysical experiments, biological experiments, and molecular modeling to understand biological phenomena. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  13. Immunology: Is Actin at the Lytic Synapse a Friend or a Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, John A

    2018-02-19

    Cytotoxic T cells and natural killer cells defend us against disease by secreting lytic granules. Whether actin facilitates or thwarts lytic granule secretion has been an open question. Recent results now indicate that the answer depends on the maturation stage of the immune cell-target cell contact. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Lytic effects of mixed micelles of fatty acids and bile acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lapré, J. A.; Termont, D. S.; Groen, A. K.; van der Meer, R.

    1992-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that bile acids and fatty acids promote colon cancer. A proposed mechanism is a lytic effect of these surfactants on colonic epithelium, resulting in a compensatory proliferation of colonic cells. To investigate the first step of this hypothesis, we studied the lytic

  15. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Merabishvili

    Full Text Available Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively, high burst size (125 and 145, respectively, stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  16. Niclosamide inhibits lytic replication of Epstein-Barr virus by disrupting mTOR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Yang, Mengtian; Yuan, Yan; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2017-02-01

    Infection with the oncogenic γ-herpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) cause several severe malignancies in humans. Inhibition of the lytic replication of EBV and KSHV eliminates the reservoir of persistent infection and transmission, consequently preventing the occurrence of diseases from the sources of infection. Antiviral drugs are limited in controlling these viral infectious diseases. Here, we demonstrate that niclosamide, an old anthelmintic drug, inhibits mTOR activation during EBV lytic replication. Consequently, niclosamide effectively suppresses EBV lytic gene expression, viral DNA lytic replication and virion production in EBV-infected lymphoma cells and epithelial cells. Niclosamide exhibits cytotoxicity toward lymphoma cells and induces irreversible cell cycle arrest in lytically EBV-infected cells. The ectopic overexpression of mTOR reverses the inhibition of niclosamide in EBV lytic replication. Similarly, niclosamide inhibits KSHV lytic replication. Thus, we conclude that niclosamide is a promising candidate for chemotherapy against the acute occurrence and transmission of infectious diseases of oncogenic γ-herpesviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Drug Modulators of B Cell Signaling Pathways and Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowicz, John G; Lee, Jaeyeun; Peiffer, Brandon; Guo, Zufeng; Chen, Jianmeng; Liao, Gangling; Hayward, S Diane; Liu, Jun O; Ambinder, Richard F

    2017-08-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous human gammaherpesvirus that establishes a latency reservoir in B cells. In this work, we show that ibrutinib, idelalisib, and dasatinib, drugs that block B cell receptor (BCR) signaling and are used in the treatment of hematologic malignancies, block BCR-mediated lytic induction at clinically relevant doses. We confirm that the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporine and tacrolimus also inhibit BCR-mediated lytic induction but find that rapamycin does not inhibit BCR-mediated lytic induction. Further investigation shows that mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) contributes to BCR-mediated lytic induction and that FK506-binding protein 12 (FKBP12) binding alone is not adequate to block activation. Finally, we show that BCR signaling can activate EBV lytic induction in freshly isolated B cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and that activation can be inhibited by ibrutinib or idelalisib. IMPORTANCE EBV establishes viral latency in B cells. Activation of the B cell receptor pathway activates lytic viral expression in cell lines. Here we show that drugs that inhibit important kinases in the BCR signaling pathway inhibit activation of lytic viral expression but do not inhibit several other lytic activation pathways. Immunosuppressant drugs such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus but not rapamycin also inhibit BCR-mediated EBV activation. Finally, we show that BCR activation of lytic infection occurs not only in tumor cell lines but also in freshly isolated B cells from patients and that this activation can be blocked by BCR inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. In vitro atrazine-exposure inhibits human natural killer cell lytic granule release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, Alexander M.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Barnett, John B.

    2007-01-01

    The herbicide atrazine is a known immunotoxicant and an inhibitor of human natural killer (NK) cell lytic function. The precise changes in NK cell lytic function following atrazine exposure have not been fully elucidated. The current study identifies the point at which atrazine exerts its affect on the stepwise process of human NK cell-mediated lyses of the K562 target cell line. Using intracellular staining of human peripheral blood lymphocytes, it was determined that a 24-h in vitro exposure to atrazine did not decrease the level of NK cell lytic proteins granzyme A, granzyme B or perforin. Thus, it was hypothesized that atrazine exposure was inhibiting the ability of the NK cells to bind to the target cell and subsequently inhibit the release of lytic protein from the NK cell. To test this hypothesis, flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy were employed to analyze NK cell-target cell co-cultures following atrazine exposure. These assays demonstrated no significant decrease in the level of target cell binding. However, the levels of NK intracellular lytic protein retained and the amount of lytic protein released were assessed following a 4-h incubation with K562 target cells. The relative level of intracellular lytic protein was 25-50% higher, and the amount of lytic protein released was 55-65% less in atrazine-treated cells than vehicle-treated cells following incubation with the target cells. These results indicate that ATR exposure inhibits the ability of NK cells to lyse target cells by blocking lytic granule release without affecting the ability of the NK cell to form stable conjugates with target cells

  19. Enhancement of anti-tumor activity of hybrid peptide in conjugation with carboxymethyl dextran via disulfide linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaowa, Arong; Horibe, Tomohisa; Kohno, Masayuki; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Harada, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2015-05-01

    To improve the anti-tumor activity of EGFR2R-lytic hybrid peptide, we prepared peptide-modified dextran conjugates with the disulfide bonds between thiolated carboxymethyl dextran (CMD-Cys) and cysteine-conjugated peptide (EGFR2R-lytic-Cys). In vitro release studies showed that the peptide was released from the CMD-s-s-peptide conjugate in a concentration-dependent manner in the presence of glutathione (GSH, 2μM-2mM). The CMD-s-s-peptide conjugate exhibited a similar cytotoxic activity with free peptide alone against human pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 cells in vitro. Furthermore, it was shown that the CMD-s-s-peptide conjugates were highly accumulated in tumor tissue in a mouse xenograft model using BxPC-3 cells, and the anti-tumor activity of the conjugate was more effective than that of the free peptide. In addition, the plasma concentrations of peptide were moderately increased and the elimination half-life of the peptide was prolonged after intravenous injection of CMD-s-s-peptide conjugates. These results demonstrated that the conjugate based on thiolated CMD polymer would be potentially useful carriers for the sustained release of the hybrid peptide in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Potential of a lytic bacteriophage to disrupt Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yannan; Mi, Zhiqiang; Niu, Wenkai; An, Xiaoping; Yuan, Xin; Liu, Huiying; Wang, Yong; Feng, Yuzhong; Huang, Yong; Zhang, Xianglilan; Zhang, Zhiyi; Fan, Hang; Peng, Fan; Li, Puyuan; Tong, Yigang; Bai, Changqing

    2016-10-01

    The ability of Acinetobacter baumannii to form biofilms and develop antibiotic resistance makes it difficult to control infections caused by this bacterium. In this study, we explored the potential of a lytic bacteriophage to disrupt A. baumannii biofilms. The potential of the lytic bacteriophage to disrupt A. baumannii biofilms was assessed by performing electron microscopy, live/dead bacterial staining, crystal violet staining and by determining adenosine triphosphate release. The bacteriophage inhibited the formation of and disrupted preformed A. baumannii biofilms. Results of disinfection assay showed that the lytic bacteriophage lysed A. baumannii cells suspended in blood or grown on metal surfaces. These results suggest the potential of the lytic bacteriophage to disrupt A. baumannii biofilms.

  1. Navigating barriers: the challenge of directed secretion at the natural killer cell lytic immunological synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanborn, Keri B; Orange, Jordan S

    2010-05-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have an inherent ability to recognize and destroy a wide array of cells rendered abnormal by stress or disease. NK cells can kill a targeted cell by forming a tight interface-the lytic immunological synapse. This represents a dynamic molecular arrangement that over time progresses through a series of steps to ultimately deliver the contents of specialized organelles known as lytic granules. In order to mediate cytotoxicity, the NK cell faces the challenge of mobilizing the lytic granules, polarizing them to the targeted cell, facilitating their approximation to the NK cell membrane, and releasing their contents. This review is focused upon the final steps in accessing function through the lytic immunological synapse.

  2. Differentiation-Dependent KLF4 Expression Promotes Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay M Nawandar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with B-cell and epithelial cell malignancies. EBV lytically infects normal differentiated oral epithelial cells, where it causes a tongue lesion known as oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL in immunosuppressed patients. However, the cellular mechanism(s that enable EBV to establish exclusively lytic infection in normal differentiated oral epithelial cells are not currently understood. Here we show that a cellular transcription factor known to promote epithelial cell differentiation, KLF4, induces differentiation-dependent lytic EBV infection by binding to and activating the two EBV immediate-early gene (BZLF1 and BRLF1 promoters. We demonstrate that latently EBV-infected, telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs cells undergo lytic viral reactivation confined to the more differentiated cell layers in organotypic raft culture. Furthermore, we show that endogenous KLF4 expression is required for efficient lytic viral reactivation in response to phorbol ester and sodium butyrate treatment in several different EBV-infected epithelial cell lines, and that the combination of KLF4 and another differentiation-dependent cellular transcription factor, BLIMP1, is highly synergistic for inducing lytic EBV infection. We confirm that both KLF4 and BLIMP1 are expressed in differentiated, but not undifferentiated, epithelial cells in normal tongue tissue, and show that KLF4 and BLIMP1 are both expressed in a patient-derived OHL lesion. In contrast, KLF4 protein is not detectably expressed in B cells, where EBV normally enters latent infection, although KLF4 over-expression is sufficient to induce lytic EBV reactivation in Burkitt lymphoma cells. Thus, KLF4, together with BLIMP1, plays a critical role in mediating lytic EBV reactivation in epithelial cells.

  3. Liposome Disruption Assay to Examine Lytic Properties of Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimah, John R; Schlesinger, Paul H; Tolia, Niraj H

    2017-08-05

    Proteins may have three dimensional structural or amino acid features that suggest a role in targeting and disrupting lipids within cell membranes. It is often necessary to experimentally investigate if these proteins and biomolecules are able to disrupt membranes in order to conclusively characterize the function of these biomolecules. Here, we describe an in vitro assay to evaluate the membrane lytic properties of proteins and biomolecules. Large unilamellar vesicles (liposomes) containing carboxyfluorescein at fluorescence-quenching concentrations are treated with the biomolecule of interest. A resulting increase in fluorescence due to leakage of the dye from liposomes and subsequent dilution in the buffer demonstrates that the biomolecule is sufficient for disrupting liposomes and membranes. Additionally, since liposome disruption may occur via pore-formation or via general solubilization of lipids similar to detergents, we provide a method to distinguish between these two mechanisms. Pore-formation can be identified and evaluated by examining the blockade of carboxyfluorescein release with dextran molecules that fit the pore. The methods described here were used to determine that the malaria vaccine candidate CelTOS and proapoptotic Bax disrupt liposomes by pore formation (Saito et al. , 2000; Jimah et al. , 2016). Since membrane lipid binding by a biomolecule precedes membrane disruption, we recommend the companion protocol: Jimah et al. , 2017.

  4. Identification of novel bacteriophage peptides using a combination of gene sequence LC-MS-MS analysis and BLASTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: In an effort to characterize novel bacteriophage with lytic activity against pathogenic E.coli associated with foodborne illness, gene sequencing and mass spectrometry have been used to identify expressed peptides which differentiate isolated bacteriophage from other known phage. Here,...

  5. Antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities of PR-39 derived peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin J A Veldhuizen

    Full Text Available The porcine cathelicidin PR-39 is a host defence peptide that plays a pivotal role in the innate immune defence of the pig against infections. Besides direct antimicrobial activity, it is involved in immunomodulation, wound healing and several other biological processes. In this study, the antimicrobial- and immunomodulatory activity of PR-39, and N- and C-terminal derivatives of PR-39 were tested. PR-39 exhibited an unexpected broad antimicrobial spectrum including several Gram positive strains such as Bacillus globigii and Enterococcus faecalis. Of organisms tested, only Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to PR-39. Truncation of PR-39 down to 15 (N-terminal amino acids did not lead to major loss of activity, while peptides corresponding to the C-terminal part of PR-39 were hampered in their antimicrobial activity. However, shorter peptides were all much more sensitive to inhibition by salt. Active peptides induced ATP leakage and loss of membrane potential in Bacillus globigii and Escherichia coli, indicating a lytic mechanism of action for these peptides. Finally, only the mature peptide was able to induce IL-8 production in porcine macrophages, but some shorter peptides also had an effect on TNF-α production showing differential regulation of cytokine induction by PR-39 derived peptides. None of the active peptides showed high cytotoxicity highlighting the potential of these peptides for use as an alternative to antibiotics.

  6. Antimicrobial and Immunomodulatory Activities of PR-39 Derived Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Schneider, Viktoria A. F.; Agustiandari, Herfita; van Dijk, Albert; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, Johanna L. M.; Bikker, Floris J.; Haagsman, Henk P.

    2014-01-01

    The porcine cathelicidin PR-39 is a host defence peptide that plays a pivotal role in the innate immune defence of the pig against infections. Besides direct antimicrobial activity, it is involved in immunomodulation, wound healing and several other biological processes. In this study, the antimicrobial- and immunomodulatory activity of PR-39, and N- and C-terminal derivatives of PR-39 were tested. PR-39 exhibited an unexpected broad antimicrobial spectrum including several Gram positive strains such as Bacillus globigii and Enterococcus faecalis. Of organisms tested, only Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to PR-39. Truncation of PR-39 down to 15 (N-terminal) amino acids did not lead to major loss of activity, while peptides corresponding to the C-terminal part of PR-39 were hampered in their antimicrobial activity. However, shorter peptides were all much more sensitive to inhibition by salt. Active peptides induced ATP leakage and loss of membrane potential in Bacillus globigii and Escherichia coli, indicating a lytic mechanism of action for these peptides. Finally, only the mature peptide was able to induce IL-8 production in porcine macrophages, but some shorter peptides also had an effect on TNF-α production showing differential regulation of cytokine induction by PR-39 derived peptides. None of the active peptides showed high cytotoxicity highlighting the potential of these peptides for use as an alternative to antibiotics. PMID:24755622

  7. Discovery and industrial applications of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Katja S

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) has opened up a vast area of research covering several fields of application. The biotech company Novozymes A/S holds patents on the use of these enzymes for the conversion of steam-pre-treated plant residues such as straw to free sugars. These patents predate the correct classification of LPMOs and the striking synergistic effect of fungal LPMOs when combined with canonical cellulases was discovered when fractions of fungal secretomes were evaluated in industrially relevant enzyme performance assays. Today, LPMOs are a central component in the Cellic CTec enzyme products which are used in several large-scale plants for the industrial production of lignocellulosic ethanol. LPMOs are characterized by an N-terminal histidine residue which, together with an internal histidine and a tyrosine residue, co-ordinates a single copper atom in a so-called histidine brace. The mechanism by which oxygen binds to the reduced copper atom has been reported and the general mechanism of copper-oxygen-mediated activation of carbon is being investigated in the light of these discoveries. LPMOs are widespread in both the fungal and the bacterial kingdoms, although the range of action of these enzymes remains to be elucidated. However, based on the high abundance of LPMOs expressed by microbes involved in the decomposition of organic matter, the importance of LPMOs in the natural carbon-cycle is predicted to be significant. In addition, it has been suggested that LPMOs play a role in the pathology of infectious diseases such as cholera and to thus be relevant in the field of medicine. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  8. Surface modification and properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin films by antimicrobial peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Liqiang; Zhu Liangjun; Min Sijia; Liu Lin; Cai Yurong; Yao Juming

    2008-01-01

    The Bombyx mori silk fibroin films (SFFs) were modified by a Cecropin B (CB) antimicrobial peptide, (NH 2 )-NGIVKAGPAIAVLGEAAL-CONH 2 , using the carbodiimide chemistry method. In order to avoid the dissolution of films during the modification procedure, the SFFs were first treated with 60% (v/v) ethanol aqueous solution, resulting a structural transition from unstable silk I to silk II. The investigation of modification conditions showed that the surface-modified SFFs had the satisfied antimicrobial activity and durability when they were activated by EDC.HCl/NHS solution followed by a treatment in CB peptide/PBS buffer (pH 6.5 or 8) solution at ambient temperature for 2 h. Moreover, the surface-modified SFFs showed the smaller contact angle due to the hydrophilic antimicrobial peptides coupled on the film surface, which is essential for the cell adhesion and proliferation. AFM results indicated that the surface roughness of SFFs was considerably increased after the modification by the peptides. The elemental composition analysis results also suggested that the peptides were tightly coupled to the surface of SFFs. This approach may provide a new option to engineer the surface-modified implanted materials preventing the biomaterial-centered infection (BCI)

  9. Surface modification and properties of Bombyx mori silk fibroin films by antimicrobial peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai Liqiang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Materials and Textile, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Xiasha Higher Education Park, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Zhu Liangjun; Min Sijia [College of Animal Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Liu Lin; Cai Yurong [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Materials and Textile, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Xiasha Higher Education Park, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Yao Juming [Key Laboratory of Advanced Textile Materials and Manufacturing Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Materials and Textile, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Xiasha Higher Education Park, Hangzhou 310018 (China)], E-mail: yaoj@zstu.edu.cn

    2008-03-15

    The Bombyx mori silk fibroin films (SFFs) were modified by a Cecropin B (CB) antimicrobial peptide, (NH{sub 2})-NGIVKAGPAIAVLGEAAL-CONH{sub 2}, using the carbodiimide chemistry method. In order to avoid the dissolution of films during the modification procedure, the SFFs were first treated with 60% (v/v) ethanol aqueous solution, resulting a structural transition from unstable silk I to silk II. The investigation of modification conditions showed that the surface-modified SFFs had the satisfied antimicrobial activity and durability when they were activated by EDC.HCl/NHS solution followed by a treatment in CB peptide/PBS buffer (pH 6.5 or 8) solution at ambient temperature for 2 h. Moreover, the surface-modified SFFs showed the smaller contact angle due to the hydrophilic antimicrobial peptides coupled on the film surface, which is essential for the cell adhesion and proliferation. AFM results indicated that the surface roughness of SFFs was considerably increased after the modification by the peptides. The elemental composition analysis results also suggested that the peptides were tightly coupled to the surface of SFFs. This approach may provide a new option to engineer the surface-modified implanted materials preventing the biomaterial-centered infection (BCI)

  10. Peptide dendrimers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niederhafner, Petr; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Ježek, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), 757-788 ISSN 1075-2617 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : multiple antigen peptides * peptide dendrimers * synthetic vaccine * multipleantigenic peptides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.803, year: 2005

  11. Coordination of KSHV Latent and Lytic Gene Control by CTCF-Cohesin Mediated Chromosome Conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyojeung; Wiedmer, Andreas; Yuan, Yan; Robertson, Erle; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Herpesvirus persistence requires a dynamic balance between latent and lytic cycle gene expression, but how this balance is maintained remains enigmatic. We have previously shown that the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) major latency transcripts encoding LANA, vCyclin, vFLIP, v-miRNAs, and Kaposin are regulated, in part, by a chromatin organizing element that binds CTCF and cohesins. Using viral genome-wide chromatin conformation capture (3C) methods, we now show that KSHV latency control region is physically linked to the promoter regulatory region for ORF50, which encodes the KSHV immediate early protein RTA. Other linkages were also observed, including an interaction between the 5′ and 3′ end of the latency transcription cluster. Mutation of the CTCF-cohesin binding site reduced or eliminated the chromatin conformation linkages, and deregulated viral transcription and genome copy number control. siRNA depletion of CTCF or cohesin subunits also disrupted chromosomal linkages and deregulated viral latent and lytic gene transcription. Furthermore, the linkage between the latent and lytic control region was subject to cell cycle fluctuation and disrupted during lytic cycle reactivation, suggesting that these interactions are dynamic and regulatory. Our findings indicate that KSHV genomes are organized into chromatin loops mediated by CTCF and cohesin interactions, and that these inter-chromosomal linkages coordinate latent and lytic gene control. PMID:21876668

  12. Different Interfacial Behaviors of N- and C-Terminus Cysteine-Modified Cecropin P1 Chemically Immobilized onto Polymer Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    Anderson, G. P.; Ligler, F. S.; Shaffer, K. M.; Taitt, C. R. Antimicrobial peptides: New recognition molecules for detecting botulinum toxins ...as a biosensor for rapid detection of pathogens and toxins . Lab. Invest. 2007, 88 (2), 196−206. (20) Jonkheijm, P.; Weinrich, D.; Schröder, H...optics; Wiley-Interscience: New York, 1984; Vol. 575, p 1. (43) Shen, Y. R. Surface properties probed by second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation

  13. Functional Elucidation of Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii Nematocyst Venoms' Lytic Activity Using Mass Spectrometry and Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yang; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Kecheng; Wang, Xueqin; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Pengcheng

    2017-01-26

    Medusozoans utilize explosively discharging penetrant nematocysts to inject venom into prey. These venoms are composed of highly complex proteins and peptides with extensive bioactivities, as observed in vitro. Diverse enzymatic toxins have been putatively identified in the venom of jellyfish, Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii , through examination of their proteomes and transcriptomes. However, functional examination of putative enzymatic components identified in proteomic approaches to elucidate potential bioactivities is critically needed. In this study, enzymatic toxins were functionally identified using a combined approach consisting of in gel zymography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The potential roles of metalloproteinases and lipases in hemolytic activity were explored using specific inhibitors. Zymography indicated that nematocyst venom possessed protease-, lipase- and hyaluronidase-class activities. Further, proteomic approaches using LC-MS/MS indicated sequence homology of proteolytic bands observed in zymography to extant zinc metalloproteinase-disintegrins and astacin metalloproteinases. Moreover, pre-incubation of the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat with N . nomurai nematocyst venom resulted in an approximate 62% reduction of hemolysis compared to venom exposed sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that metalloproteinases contribute to hemolytic activity. Additionally, species within the molecular mass range of 14-18 kDa exhibited both egg yolk and erythrocyte lytic activities in gel overlay assays. For the first time, our findings demonstrate the contribution of jellyfish venom metalloproteinase and suggest the involvement of lipase species to hemolytic activity. Investigations of this relationship will facilitate a better understanding of the constituents and toxicity of jellyfish venom.

  14. Temperate and lytic bacteriophages programmed to sensitize and kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosef, Ido; Manor, Miriam; Kiro, Ruth; Qimron, Udi

    2015-06-09

    The increasing threat of pathogen resistance to antibiotics requires the development of novel antimicrobial strategies. Here we present a proof of concept for a genetic strategy that aims to sensitize bacteria to antibiotics and selectively kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria. We use temperate phages to deliver a functional clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated (Cas) system into the genome of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The delivered CRISPR-Cas system destroys both antibiotic resistance-conferring plasmids and genetically modified lytic phages. This linkage between antibiotic sensitization and protection from lytic phages is a key feature of the strategy. It allows programming of lytic phages to kill only antibiotic-resistant bacteria while protecting antibiotic-sensitized bacteria. Phages designed according to this strategy may be used on hospital surfaces and hand sanitizers to facilitate replacement of antibiotic-resistant pathogens with sensitive ones.

  15. The Lytic SA Phage Demonstrate Bactericidal Activity against Mastitis Causing Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ameer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the major causative agent of mastitis among dairy animals as it causes intramammary gland infection. Due to antibiotic resistance and contamination of antibiotics in the milk of diseased animals; alternative therapeutic agents are required to cure mastitis. Lytic bacteriophages and their gene products can be potential therapeutic agents against bacteria as they are host specific and less harmful than antibiotics. In this study, Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from milk samples of the infected animals and identified biochemically. SA phage was isolated from sewage water showing lytic activity against Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The highest lytic activity of bacteriophages was observed at 37°C and pH 7, and the most suitable storage condition was at 4°C. SA phage efficiently reduced bacterial growth in the bacterial reduction assay. The characterization and bacterial growth reduction activity of the bacteriophages against Staphylococcus aureus signifies their underlying potential of phage therapy against mastitis.

  16. The importance of lytic and nonlytic immune responses in viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wodarz, Dominik; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2002-01-01

    Antiviral immune effector mechanisms can be divided broadly into lytic and nonlytic components. We use mathematical models to investigate the fundamental question of which type of response is required to combat different types of viral infection. According to our model, the relative roles...... of the two types of component depend on the cytopathicity of the virus relative to its rate of replication. If the viral cytopathicity is low relative to the rate of viral replication, the model predicts that a combination of lytic and nonlytic effector mechanisms is likely to be required to resolve...

  17. Phenoloxidase but not lytic activity reflects resistance against Pasteuria ramosa in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Kevin; De Meester, Luc; Decaestecker, Ellen; Stoks, Robby

    2011-02-23

    The field of ecological immunology strongly relies on indicators of immunocompetence. Two major indicators in invertebrates, the activity of phenoloxidase (PO) and lytic activity have recently been questioned in studies showing that, across a natural range of baseline levels, these indicators did not predict resistance against a manipulated challenge with natural parasites. We confirmed this finding by showing that baseline levels of PO and lytic activity in the host Daphnia magna were not related to spore load of the parasite Pasteuria ramosa. Yet, PO levels in infected hosts did predict spore load, indicating PO activity can be useful as an indicator of immunocompetence in this model parasite-host system.

  18. Antibacterial activity of a newly developed peptide-modified lysin against Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang eYang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The global emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR bacteria is a growing threat to public health worldwide. Natural bacteriophage lysins are promising alternatives in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens, but not Gram-negative ones, like Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, due to the barriers posed by their outer membranes. Recently, modifying a natural lysin with an antimicrobial peptide was found able to break the barriers, and to kill Gram-negative pathogens. Herein, a new peptide-modified lysin (PlyA was constructed by fusing the cecropin A peptide residues 1–8 (KWKLFKKI with the OBPgp279 lysin and its antibacterial activity was studied. PlyA showed good and broad antibacterial activities against logarithmic phase A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa, but much reduced activities against the cells in stationary phase. Addition of outer membrane permeabilizers (EDTA and citric acid could enhance the antibacterial activity of PlyA against stationary phase cells. Finally, no antibacterial activity of PlyA could be observed in some bio-matrices, such as culture media, milk, and sera. In conclusion, we reported here a novel peptide-modified lysin with significant antibacterial activity against both logarithmic (without OMPs and stationary phase (with OMPs A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa cells in buffer, but further optimization is needed to achieve broad activity in diverse bio-matrices.

  19. Effectiveness of lytic bacteriophages in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations introduced through cross-contamination on fresh cut lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous research has shown that lytic bacteriophages (phages) can kill E. coli O157:H7 on produce surfaces. The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield) at 10^8 PFU/m...

  20. Hemoglobin is a co-factor of human trypanosome lytic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Widener, Justin; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Shiflett, April

    2007-01-01

    Trypanosome lytic factor (TLF) is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subclass providing innate protection to humans against infection by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Two primate-specific plasma proteins, haptoglobin-related protein (Hpr) and apolipoprotein L-1 (ApoL-1), have be...

  1. Oncogenic Herpesvirus Utilizes Stress-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoints for Efficient Lytic Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Balistreri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV causes Kaposi's sarcoma and certain lymphoproliferative malignancies. Latent infection is established in the majority of tumor cells, whereas lytic replication is reactivated in a small fraction of cells, which is important for both virus spread and disease progression. A siRNA screen for novel regulators of KSHV reactivation identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 as a negative regulator of viral reactivation. Depletion of MDM2, a repressor of p53, favored efficient activation of the viral lytic transcription program and viral reactivation. During lytic replication cells activated a p53 response, accumulated DNA damage and arrested at G2-phase. Depletion of p21, a p53 target gene, restored cell cycle progression and thereby impaired the virus reactivation cascade delaying the onset of virus replication induced cytopathic effect. Herpesviruses are known to reactivate in response to different kinds of stress, and our study now highlights the molecular events in the stressed host cell that KSHV has evolved to utilize to ensure efficient viral lytic replication.

  2. Role of the adenovirus early region 1B tumor antigens in transformation and lytic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Leeuw, M.G.W. de; Houweling, A.; Eb, A.J. van der

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the contribution of each of the two adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) major early region lb (Elb) proteins in cell transformation and in lytic infection. An Ad5 El plasmid, in which the reading frame for the 19-kDa Elb protein was abolished by a stop codon close to the initiation codon,

  3. Crystal structure and mechanism of the lytic transglycosylase MltA from Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straaten, Karin

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the determination and analysis of the 3D-structure of the lytic transglycosylase MltA from Escherichia coli by X-ray crystallography. This work aims to further increase our knowledge of the molecular details of the cleaving mechanism and the typical 1,6- anhydromuropeptide

  4. Analyzing Activities of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases by Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjørge; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; Wittrup Agger, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases perform oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds in various polysaccharides. The majority of LMPOs studied so far possess activity on either cellulose or chitin and analysis of these activities is therefore the main focus of this review. Notably, however, the num...

  5. Comparative mode of action of novel hybrid peptide CS-1a and its rearranged amphipathic analogue CS-2a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Seema; Bisht, Gopal S; Rawat, Diwan S; Maiti, Souvik; Pasha, Santosh

    2012-10-01

    Cell selective, naturally occurring, host defence cationic peptides present a good template for the design of novel peptides with the aim of achieving a short length with improved antimicrobial potency and selectivity. A novel, short peptide CS-1a (14 residues) was derived using a sequence hybridization approach on sarcotoxin I (39 residues) and cecropin B (35 residues). The sequence of CS-1a was rearranged to enhance amphipathicity with the help of a Schiffer-Edmundson diagram to obtain CS-2a. Both peptides showed good antibacterial activity in the concentration range 4-16 μg·mL(-1) against susceptible as well as drug-resistant bacterial strains, including the clinically relevant pathogens Acenatobacter sp. and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The major thrust of these peptides is their nonhaemolytic activity against human red blood cells up to a high concentration of 512 μg·mL(-1). Compared to CS-1a, amphipathic peptide CS-2a showed a more pronounced α-helical conformation, along with a better membrane insertion depth in bacterial mimic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) small unilamellar vesicles. With equivalent lipid-binding affinity, the two peptides assumed different pathways of membrane disruption, as demonstrated by calcein leakage and the results of transmission electron microscopy on model bacterial mimic large unilamellar vesicles. Extending the work from model membranes to intact Escherichia coli cells, differences in membrane perturbation were visible in microscopic images of peptide-treated E. coli. The present study describes two novel short peptides with potent activity, cell selectivity and divergent modes of action that will aid in the future design of peptides with better therapeutic potential. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  6. Genetic characterization of ØVC8 lytic phage for Vibrio cholerae O1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Sánchez, Alejandro; Hernández-Chiñas, Ulises; Navarro-Ocaña, Armando; De la Mora, Javier; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Eslava-Campos, Carlos

    2016-03-22

    Epidemics and pandemics of cholera, a diarrheal disease, are attributed to Vibrio cholera serogroups O1 and O139. In recent years, specific lytic phages of V. cholera have been proposed to be important factors in the cyclic occurrence of cholera in endemic areas. However, the role and potential participation of lytic phages during long interepidemic periods of cholera in non-endemic regions have not yet been described. The purpose of this study was to isolate and characterize specific lytic phages of V. cholera O1 strains. Sixteen phages were isolated from wastewater samples collected at the Endhó Dam in Hidalgo State, Mexico, concentrated with PEG/NaCl, and purified by density gradient. The lytic activity of the purified phages was tested using different V. cholerae O1 and O139 strains. Phage morphology was visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and phage genome sequencing was performed using the Genome Analyzer IIx System. Genome assembly and bioinformatics analysis were performed using a set of high-throughput programs. Phage structural proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Sixteen phages with lytic and lysogenic activity were isolated; only phage ØVC8 showed specific lytic activity against V. cholerae O1 strains. TEM images of ØVC8 revealed a phage with a short tail and an isometric head. The ØVC8 genome comprises linear double-stranded DNA of 39,422 bp with 50.8 % G + C. Of the 48 annotated ORFs, 16 exhibit homology with sequences of known function and several conserved domains. Bioinformatics analysis showed multiple conserved domains, including an Ig domain, suggesting that ØVC8 might adhere to different mucus substrates such as the human intestinal epithelium. The results suggest that ØVC8 genome utilize the "single-stranded cohesive ends" packaging strategy of the lambda-like group. The two structural proteins sequenced and analyzed are proteins of known function. ØVC8 is a lytic phage with specific activity against V. cholerae

  7. Functional Elucidation of Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii Nematocyst Venoms’ Lytic Activity Using Mass Spectrometry and Zymography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yang; Yu, Huahua; Li, Rongfeng; Xing, Ronge; Liu, Song; Li, Kecheng; Wang, Xueqin; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Pengcheng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medusozoans utilize explosively discharging penetrant nematocysts to inject venom into prey. These venoms are composed of highly complex proteins and peptides with extensive bioactivities, as observed in vitro. Diverse enzymatic toxins have been putatively identified in the venom of jellyfish, Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii, through examination of their proteomes and transcriptomes. However, functional examination of putative enzymatic components identified in proteomic approaches to elucidate potential bioactivities is critically needed. Methods: In this study, enzymatic toxins were functionally identified using a combined approach consisting of in gel zymography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The potential roles of metalloproteinases and lipases in hemolytic activity were explored using specific inhibitors. Results: Zymography indicated that nematocyst venom possessed protease-, lipase- and hyaluronidase-class activities. Further, proteomic approaches using LC-MS/MS indicated sequence homology of proteolytic bands observed in zymography to extant zinc metalloproteinase-disintegrins and astacin metalloproteinases. Moreover, pre-incubation of the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat with N. nomurai nematocyst venom resulted in an approximate 62% reduction of hemolysis compared to venom exposed sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that metalloproteinases contribute to hemolytic activity. Additionally, species within the molecular mass range of 14–18 kDa exhibited both egg yolk and erythrocyte lytic activities in gel overlay assays. Conclusion: For the first time, our findings demonstrate the contribution of jellyfish venom metalloproteinase and suggest the involvement of lipase species to hemolytic activity. Investigations of this relationship will facilitate a better understanding of the constituents and toxicity of jellyfish venom. PMID:28134758

  8. Functional Elucidation of Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii Nematocyst Venoms’ Lytic Activity Using Mass Spectrometry and Zymography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medusozoans utilize explosively discharging penetrant nematocysts to inject venom into prey. These venoms are composed of highly complex proteins and peptides with extensive bioactivities, as observed in vitro. Diverse enzymatic toxins have been putatively identified in the venom of jellyfish, Nemopilema nomurai and Cyanea nozakii, through examination of their proteomes and transcriptomes. However, functional examination of putative enzymatic components identified in proteomic approaches to elucidate potential bioactivities is critically needed. Methods: In this study, enzymatic toxins were functionally identified using a combined approach consisting of in gel zymography and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS. The potential roles of metalloproteinases and lipases in hemolytic activity were explored using specific inhibitors. Results: Zymography indicated that nematocyst venom possessed protease-, lipase- and hyaluronidase-class activities. Further, proteomic approaches using LC-MS/MS indicated sequence homology of proteolytic bands observed in zymography to extant zinc metalloproteinase-disintegrins and astacin metalloproteinases. Moreover, pre-incubation of the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat with N. nomurai nematocyst venom resulted in an approximate 62% reduction of hemolysis compared to venom exposed sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that metalloproteinases contribute to hemolytic activity. Additionally, species within the molecular mass range of 14–18 kDa exhibited both egg yolk and erythrocyte lytic activities in gel overlay assays. Conclusion: For the first time, our findings demonstrate the contribution of jellyfish venom metalloproteinase and suggest the involvement of lipase species to hemolytic activity. Investigations of this relationship will facilitate a better understanding of the constituents and toxicity of jellyfish venom.

  9. Human natural killer cells prevent infectious mononucleosis features by targeting lytic Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chijioke, Obinna; Müller, Anne; Feederle, Regina; Barros, Mario Henrique M; Krieg, Carsten; Emmel, Vanessa; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Leung, Carol S; Antsiferova, Olga; Landtwing, Vanessa; Bossart, Walter; Moretta, Alessandro; Hassan, Rocio; Boyman, Onur; Niedobitek, Gerald; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Capaul, Riccarda; Münz, Christian

    2013-12-26

    Primary infection with the human oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can result in infectious mononucleosis (IM), a self-limiting disease caused by massive lymphocyte expansion that predisposes for the development of distinct EBV-associated lymphomas. Why some individuals experience this symptomatic primary EBV infection, whereas the majority acquires the virus asymptomatically, remains unclear. Using a mouse model with reconstituted human immune system components, we show that depletion of human natural killer (NK) cells enhances IM symptoms and promotes EBV-associated tumorigenesis mainly because of a loss of immune control over lytic EBV infection. These data suggest that failure of innate immune control by human NK cells augments symptomatic lytic EBV infection, which drives lymphocyte expansion and predisposes for EBV-associated malignancies. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human Natural Killer Cells Prevent Infectious Mononucleosis Features by Targeting Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obinna Chijioke

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary infection with the human oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV can result in infectious mononucleosis (IM, a self-limiting disease caused by massive lymphocyte expansion that predisposes for the development of distinct EBV-associated lymphomas. Why some individuals experience this symptomatic primary EBV infection, whereas the majority acquires the virus asymptomatically, remains unclear. Using a mouse model with reconstituted human immune system components, we show that depletion of human natural killer (NK cells enhances IM symptoms and promotes EBV-associated tumorigenesis mainly because of a loss of immune control over lytic EBV infection. These data suggest that failure of innate immune control by human NK cells augments symptomatic lytic EBV infection, which drives lymphocyte expansion and predisposes for EBV-associated malignancies.

  11. Characteristics of a broad lytic spectrum endolysin from phage BtCS33 of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yihui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endolysins produced by bacteriophages lyse bacteria, and are thus considered a novel type of antimicrobial agent. Several endolysins from Bacillus phages or prophages have previously been characterized and used to target Bacillus strains that cause disease in animals and humans. B. thuringiensis phage BtCS33 is a Siphoviridae family phage and its genome has been sequenced and analyzed. In the BtCS33 genome, orf18 was found to encode an endolysin protein (PlyBt33. Results Bioinformatic analyses showed that endolysin PlyBt33 was composed of two functional domains, the N-terminal catalytic domain and the C-terminal cell wall binding domain. In this study, the entire endolysin PlyBt33, and both the N- and C-termini,were expressed in Escherichia coli and then purified. The lytic activities of PlyBt33 and its N-terminus were tested on bacteria. Both regions exhibited lytic activity, although PlyBt33 showed a higher lytic activity than the N-terminus. PlyBt33 exhibited activity against all Bacillus strains tested from five different species, but was not active against Gram-negative bacteria. Optimal conditions for PlyBt33 reactivity were pH 9.0 and 50°C. PlyBt33 showed high thermostability, with 40% of initial activity remaining following 1 h of treatment at 60°C. The C-terminus of PlyBt33 bound to B. thuringiensis strain HD-73 and Bacillus subtilis strain 168. This cell wall binding domain might be novel, as its amino acid sequence showed little similarity to previously reported endolysins. Conclusions PlyBt33 showed potential as a novel antimicrobial agent at a relatively high temperature and had a broad lytic spectrum within the Bacillus genus. The C-terminus of PlyBt33 might be a novel kind of cell wall binding domain.

  12. Oncogenic Herpesvirus Utilizes Stress-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoints for Efficient Lytic Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Balistreri, Giuseppe; Viiliainen, Johanna; Turunen, Mikko; Diaz, Raquel; Lyly, Lauri; Pekkonen, Pirita; Rantala, Juha; Ojala, Krista; Sarek, Grzegorz; Teesalu, Mari; Denisova, Oxana; Peltonen, Karita; Julkunen, Ilkka; Varjosalo, Markku; Kainov, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi?s sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) causes Kaposi?s sarcoma and certain lymphoproliferative malignancies. Latent infection is established in the majority of tumor cells, whereas lytic replication is reactivated in a small fraction of cells, which is important for both virus spread and disease progression. A siRNA screen for novel regulators of KSHV reactivation identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 as a negative regulator of viral reactivation. Depletion of MDM2, a repressor of p53, favored...

  13. Leflunomide/teriflunomide inhibit Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)- induced lymphoproliferative disease and lytic viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilger, Andrea; Plowshay, Julie; Ma, Shidong; Nawandar, Dhananjay; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Romero-Masters, James C; Bristol, Jillian A; Li, Zhe; Tsai, Ming-Han; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Kenney, Shannon C

    2017-07-04

    EBV infection causes mononucleosis and is associated with specific subsets of B cell lymphomas. Immunosuppressed patients such as organ transplant recipients are particularly susceptible to EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease (LPD), which can be fatal. Leflunomide (a drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis) and its active metabolite teriflunomide (used to treat multiple sclerosis) inhibit de novo pyrimidine synthesis by targeting the cellular dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, thereby decreasing T cell proliferation. Leflunomide also inhibits the replication of cytomegalovirus and BK virus via both "on target" and "off target" mechanisms and is increasingly used to treat these viruses in organ transplant recipients. However, whether leflunomide/teriflunomide block EBV replication or inhibit EBV-mediated B cell transformation is currently unknown. We show that teriflunomide inhibits cellular proliferation, and promotes apoptosis, in EBV-transformed B cells in vitro at a clinically relevant dose. In addition, teriflunomide prevents the development of EBV-induced lymphomas in both a humanized mouse model and a xenograft model. Furthermore, teriflunomide inhibits lytic EBV infection in vitro both by preventing the initial steps of lytic viral reactivation, and by blocking lytic viral DNA replication. Leflunomide/teriflunomide might therefore be clinically useful for preventing EBV-induced LPD in patients who have high EBV loads yet require continued immunosuppression.

  14. Diversity of phage infection types and associated terminology: the problem with 'Lytic or lysogenic'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Zack; Abedon, Stephen T

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses of members of domain Bacteria. These viruses play numerous roles in shaping the diversity of microbial communities, with impact differing depending on what infection strategies specific phages employ. From an applied perspective, these especially are communities containing undesired or pathogenic bacteria that can be modified through phage-mediated bacterial biocontrol, that is, through phage therapy. Here we seek to categorize phages in terms of their infection strategies as well as review or suggest more descriptive, accurate or distinguishing terminology. Categories can be differentiated in terms of (1) whether or not virion release occurs (productive infections versus lysogeny, pseudolysogeny and/or the phage carrier state), (2) the means of virion release (lytic versus chronic release) and (3) the degree to which phages are genetically equipped to display lysogenic cycles (temperate versus non-temperate phages). We address in particular the use or overuse of what can be a somewhat equivocal phrase, 'Lytic or lysogenic', especially when employed as a means of distinguishing among phages types. We suggest that the implied dichotomy is inconsistent with both modern as well as historical understanding of phage biology. We consider, therefore, less ambiguous terminology for distinguishing between 'Lytic' versus 'Lysogenic' phage types. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Transfection of mouse cytotoxic T lymphocyte with an antisense granzyme A vector reduces lytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talento, A; Nguyen, M; Law, S; Wu, J K; Poe, M; Blake, J T; Patel, M; Wu, T J; Manyak, C L; Silberklang, M

    1992-12-15

    Murine CTL have seven serine proteases, known as granzymes, in their lytic granules. Despite considerable effort, convincing evidence that these enzymes play an obligatory role in the lytic process has not been presented. To investigate the function of one of these proteases, granzyme A (GA), we utilized an antisense expression vector to lower the level of the enzyme in the cells. An expression vector containing antisense cDNA for GA and the gene for hygromycin B resistance was constructed and electroporated into the murine CTL line, AR1. Transfectants were selected based on resistance to hygromycin B, and a number of stable lines were developed. One of the antisense lines had greatly reduced levels of GA mRNA, when compared to the parental cells or to control lines transfected with the vector lacking the antisense DNA. The message levels for two other CTL granule proteins, granzyme B and perforin, were unaffected by the antisense vector. The amount of GA, as measured by enzymatic activity, was 3- to 10-fold lower in the transfectant. Most significantly, this line also consistently showed 50 to 70% lower ability to lyse nucleated target cells and to degrade their DNA. Furthermore, it exhibited 90 to 95% lower lytic activity to anti-CD3-coated SRBC. Conjugate formation with target cells, however, was normal. These data provide strong evidence that GA plays an important role in the cytolytic cycle, and that the quantity of enzyme is a limiting factor in these cytolytic cells.

  16. Are Phage Lytic Proteins the Secret Weapon To Kill Staphylococcus aureus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gutiérrez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the most threatening microorganisms for global human health. The current strategies to reduce the impact of S. aureus include a restrictive control of worldwide antibiotic use, prophylactic measures to hinder contamination, and the search for novel antimicrobials to treat human and animal infections caused by this bacterium. The last strategy is currently the focus of considerable research. In this regard, phage lytic proteins (endolysins and virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases [VAPGHs] have been proposed as suitable candidates. Indeed, these proteins display narrow-spectrum antimicrobial activity and a virtual lack of bacterial-resistance development. Additionally, the therapeutic use of phage lytic proteins in S. aureus animal infection models is yielding promising results, showing good efficacy without apparent side effects. Nonetheless, human clinical trials are still in progress, and data are not available yet. This minireview also analyzes the main obstacles for introducing phage lytic proteins as human therapeutics against S. aureus infections. Besides the common technological problems derived from large-scale production of therapeutic proteins, a major setback is the lack of a proper legal framework regulating their use. In that sense, the relevant health authorities should urgently have a timely discussion about these new antimicrobials. On the other hand, the research community should provide data to dispel any doubts regarding their efficacy and safety. Overall, the appropriate scientific data and regulatory framework will encourage pharmaceutical companies to invest in these promising antimicrobials.

  17. Cytosolic antibody delivery by lipid-sensitive endosomolytic peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishiba, Misao; Takeuchi, Toshihide; Kawaguchi, Yoshimasa; Sakamoto, Kentarou; Yu, Hao-Hsin; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Madani, Fatemeh; Gräslund, Astrid; Futaki, Shiroh

    2017-08-01

    One of the major obstacles in intracellular targeting using antibodies is their limited release from endosomes into the cytosol. Here we report an approach to deliver proteins, which include antibodies, into cells by using endosomolytic peptides derived from the cationic and membrane-lytic spider venom peptide M-lycotoxin. The delivery peptides were developed by introducing one or two glutamic acid residues into the hydrophobic face. One peptide with the substitution of leucine by glutamic acid (L17E) was shown to enable a marked cytosolic liberation of antibodies (immunoglobulins G (IgGs)) from endosomes. The predominant membrane-perturbation mechanism of this peptide is the preferential disruption of negatively charged membranes (endosomal membranes) over neutral membranes (plasma membranes), and the endosomolytic peptide promotes the uptake by inducing macropinocytosis. The fidelity of this approach was confirmed through the intracellular delivery of a ribosome-inactivation protein (saporin), Cre recombinase and IgG delivery, which resulted in a specific labelling of the cytosolic proteins and subsequent suppression of the glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription. We also demonstrate the L17E-mediated cytosolic delivery of exosome-encapsulated proteins.

  18. Anti-TNFα therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases is associated with Epstein-Barr virus lytic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapsia, Sameer; Koganti, Siva; Spadaro, Salvatore; Rajapakse, Ramona; Chawla, Anupama; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita

    2016-02-01

    Anti-TNFα therapy, known to suppress T-cell immunity, is increasingly gaining popularity for treatment of autoimmune diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). T-cell suppression increases the risk of B-cell EBV-lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas. Since EBV-lytic activation is essential for development of EBV-lymphomas and there have been reports of EBV-lymphomas in patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy, we investigated if patients treated with anti-TNFα antibodies demonstrate greater EBV-lytic activity in blood. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 10 IBD patients solely on anti-TNFα therapy compared to 3 control groups (10 IBD patients not on immunosuppressive therapy, 10 patients with abdominal pain but without IBD, and 10 healthy subjects) were examined for the percentage of T-cells, EBV load and EBV-lytic transcripts. Patients on anti-TNFα therapy had significantly fewer T-cells, greater EBV load, and increased levels of transcripts from EBV-lytic genes of all kinetic classes compared to controls. Furthermore, exposure of EBV-infected B-cell lines to anti-TNFα antibodies resulted in increased levels of BZLF1 mRNA; BZLF1 encodes for ZEBRA, the viral latency-to-lytic cycle switch. Thus, IBD patients treated with anti-TNFα antibodies have greater EBV loads likely due to enhanced EBV-lytic gene expression and anti-TNFα antibodies may be sufficient to activate the EBV lytic cycle. Findings from this pilot study lay the groundwork for additional scientific and clinical investigation into the effects of anti-TNFα therapy on the life cycle of EBV, a ubiquitous oncovirus that causes lymphomas in the setting of immunocompromise. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Strategies for the Activation and Release of the Membranolytic Peptide Melittin from Liposomes Using Endosomal pH as a Trigger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Blenke, E; Sleszynska, M; Evers, M J W; Storm, G; Martin, N I; Mastrobattista, E

    2017-02-15

    Endosomolytic peptides are often coupled to drug delivery systems to enhance endosomal escape, which is crucial for the delivery of macromolecular drugs that are vulnerable to degradation in the endolysosomal pathway. Melittin is a 26 amino acid peptide derived from bee venom that has a very high membranolytic activity. However, such lytic peptides also impose a significant safety risk when applied in vivo as they often have similar activity against red blood cells and other nontarget cell membranes. Our aim is to control the membrane-disrupting capacity of these peptides in time and space by physically constraining them to a nanocarrier surface in such a way that they only become activated when delivered inside acidic endosomes. To this end, a variety of chemical approaches for the coupling of lytic peptides to liposomes via functionalized PEG-lipids were explored, including maleimide-thiol chemistry, click-chemistry, and aldehyde-hydrazide chemistry. The latter enables reversible conjugation via a hydrazone bond, allowing for release of the peptide under endosomal conditions. By carefully choosing the conjugation site and by using a pH activated analog of the melittin peptide, lytic activity toward a model membrane is completely inhibited at physiological pH. At endosomal pH the activity is restored by hydrolysis of the acid-labile hydrazone bond, releasing the peptide in its most active, free form. Furthermore, using an analogue containing a nonhydrolyzable bond as a control, it was shown that the activity observed can be completely attributed to release of the peptide, validating dynamic covalent conjugation as a suitable strategy to maintain safety during circulation.

  20. Glycotriazole-peptides derived from the peptide HSP1: synergistic effect of triazole and saccharide rings on the antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junior, Eduardo F C; Guimarães, Carlos F R C; Franco, Lucas L; Alves, Ricardo J; Kato, Kelly C; Martins, Helen R; de Souza Filho, José D; Bemquerer, Marcelo P; Munhoz, Victor H O; Resende, Jarbas M; Verly, Rodrigo M

    2017-08-01

    This work proposes a strategy that uses solid-phase peptide synthesis associated with copper(I)-catalyzed azide alkyne cycloaddition reaction to promote the glycosylation of an antimicrobial peptide (HSP1) containing a carboxyamidated C-terminus (HSP1-NH 2 ). Two glycotriazole-peptides, namely [p-Glc-trz-G 1 ]HSP1-NH 2 and [p-GlcNAc-trz-G 1 ]HSP1-NH 2 , were prepared using per-O-acetylated azide derivatives of glucose and N-acetylglucosamine in the presence of copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO 4 ·5H 2 O) and sodium ascorbate as a reducing agent. In order to investigate the synergistic action of the carbohydrate motif linked to the triazole-peptide structure, a triazole derivative [trz-G 1 ]HSP1-NH 2 was also prepared. A set of biophysical approaches such as DLS, Zeta Potential, SPR and carboxyfluorescein leakage from phospholipid vesicles confirmed higher membrane disruption and lytic activities as well as stronger peptide-LUVs interactions for the glycotriazole-peptides when compared to HSP1-NH 2 and to its triazole derivative, which is in accordance with the performed biological assays: whereas HSP1-NH 2 presents relatively low and [trz-G 1 ]HSP1-NH 2 just moderate fungicidal activity, the glycotriazole-peptides are significantly more effective antifungal agents. In addition, the glycotriazole-peptides and the triazole derivative present strong inhibition effects on ergosterol biosynthesis in Candida albicans, when compared to HSP1-NH 2 alone. In conclusion, the increased fungicidal activity of the glycotriazole-peptides seems to be the result of (A) more pronounced membrane-disruptive properties, which is related to the presence of a saccharide ring, together with (B) the inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis, which seems to be related to the presence of both the monosaccharide and the triazole rings.

  1. Peptide chemistry toolbox - Transforming natural peptides into peptide therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erak, Miloš; Bellmann-Sickert, Kathrin; Els-Heindl, Sylvia; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2018-06-01

    The development of solid phase peptide synthesis has released tremendous opportunities for using synthetic peptides in medicinal applications. In the last decades, peptide therapeutics became an emerging market in pharmaceutical industry. The need for synthetic strategies in order to improve peptidic properties, such as longer half-life, higher bioavailability, increased potency and efficiency is accordingly rising. In this mini-review, we present a toolbox of modifications in peptide chemistry for overcoming the main drawbacks during the transition from natural peptides to peptide therapeutics. Modifications at the level of the peptide backbone, amino acid side chains and higher orders of structures are described. Furthermore, we are discussing the future of peptide therapeutics development and their impact on the pharmaceutical market. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pear transformed with a lytic peptide gene for disease control affects nontarget organism, pear psylla (Homoptera: Psyllidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puterka, Gary J; Bocchetti, Chris; Dang, Phat; Bell, R L; Scorza, Ralph

    2002-08-01

    The biology and behavior of pear psylla, Cacopsylla pyricola Foerster, on a transgenic clone of 'Bartlett' pear, Pyrus communis L., containing a synthetic antimicrobial gene, D5C1, was compared with that of a nontransgenic parental clone to determine whether there were any nontarget effects. The gene construct also contained the marker gene nptII (aminoglycoside 3'-phosphotransferase II) that encodes for antibiotic resistance to identify transformed plants. The purpose of the original transformation was to enhance pear resistance to the bacterial disease fireblight caused by Erwinia amylovora (Burr.) Winslow et al. The biology and behavior of pear psylla on a transgenic clone were compared with a nontransgenic parental pear clone in short- (crops.

  3. A Cell Culture Model of Latent and Lytic Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in Spiral Ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuehong; Li, Shufeng

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) is supposed to be one of the causes of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. This study aims to establish a cell culture model of latent and lytic HSV-1 infection in spiral ganglia. In the presence of acyclovir, primary cultures of SGNs were latently infected with HSV-1 expressing green fluorescent protein. Four days later, these cells were treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a known chemical reactivator of HSV-1. TCID50 was used to measure the titers of virus in cultures on Vero cells. RNA from cultures was detected for the presence of transcripts of ICP27 and latency-associated transcript (LAT) using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. There is no detectable infectious HSV-1 in latently infected cultures, whereas they could be observed in both lytically infected and latently infected/TSA-treated cultures. LAT was the only detectable transcript during latent infection, whereas lytic ICP27 transcript was detected in lytically infected and latently infected/TSA-treated cultures. Cultured SGNs can be both latently and lytically infected with HSV-1. Furthermore, latently infected SGNs can be reactivated using TSA, yielding infectious virus.

  4. Are Phage Lytic Proteins the Secret Weapon To Kill Staphylococcus aureus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Fernández, Lucía; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2018-01-23

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most threatening microorganisms for global human health. The current strategies to reduce the impact of S. aureus include a restrictive control of worldwide antibiotic use, prophylactic measures to hinder contamination, and the search for novel antimicrobials to treat human and animal infections caused by this bacterium. The last strategy is currently the focus of considerable research. In this regard, phage lytic proteins (endolysins and virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases [VAPGHs]) have been proposed as suitable candidates. Indeed, these proteins display narrow-spectrum antimicrobial activity and a virtual lack of bacterial-resistance development. Additionally, the therapeutic use of phage lytic proteins in S. aureus animal infection models is yielding promising results, showing good efficacy without apparent side effects. Nonetheless, human clinical trials are still in progress, and data are not available yet. This minireview also analyzes the main obstacles for introducing phage lytic proteins as human therapeutics against S. aureus infections. Besides the common technological problems derived from large-scale production of therapeutic proteins, a major setback is the lack of a proper legal framework regulating their use. In that sense, the relevant health authorities should urgently have a timely discussion about these new antimicrobials. On the other hand, the research community should provide data to dispel any doubts regarding their efficacy and safety. Overall, the appropriate scientific data and regulatory framework will encourage pharmaceutical companies to invest in these promising antimicrobials. Copyright © 2018 Gutiérrez et al.

  5. Noncanonical microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in lytic infection of murine gammaherpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xia

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA and endogenous small interfering RNA (endo-siRNA are two essential classes of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs in eukaryotes. The class of miRNA is diverse and there exist noncanonical miRNAs that bypass the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway. In order to identify noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs responding to virus infection and study their potential function, we sequenced small-RNA species from cells lytically infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68. In addition to three novel canonical miRNAs in mouse, two antisense miRNAs in virus and 25 novel noncanonical miRNAs, including miRNAs derived from transfer RNAs, small nucleolar RNAs and introns, in the host were identified. These noncanonical miRNAs exhibited features distinct from that of canonical miRNAs in lengths of hairpins, base pairings and first nucleotide preference. Many of the novel miRNAs are conserved in mammals. Besides several known murine endo-siRNAs detected by the sequencing profiling, a novel locus in the mouse genome was identified to produce endo-siRNAs. This novel endo-siRNA locus is comprised of two tandem inverted B4 short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs. Unexpectedly, the SINE-derived endo-siRNAs were found in a variety of sequencing data and virus-infected cells. Moreover, a murine miRNA was up-regulated more than 35 fold in infected than in mock-treated cells. The putative targets of the viral and the up-regulated murine miRNAs were potentially involved in processes of gene transcription and protein phosphorylation, and localized to membranes, suggesting their potential role in manipulating the host basal immune system during lytic infection. Our results extended the number of noncanonical miRNAs in mammals and shed new light on their potential functions of lytic infection of MHV68.

  6. Radiation-induced focal cortical necrosis of the femur presenting as a lytic lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Schils, Jean [Cleveland Clinic, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Joyce, Michael [Cleveland Clinic, Orthopedic Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shah, Chirag [Cleveland Clinic, Radiation Oncology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Zhang, Yaxia [Cleveland Clinic, Pathology, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Management of soft tissue sarcomas is often complicated, requiring radiation before and in some cases after limb-sparing surgery. Radiation necrosis is a severe complication after radiation treatment and is typically dose related and involves medullary bone. We report on two cases of hitherto unreported focal circumscribed intra-cortical lytic lesions within the radiation portal, which appeared 19 months and 31 months, respectively, after the conclusion of radiation treatment. Both patients had a history of soft tissue sarcoma treated with radiation (66 Gy) and surgical resection. Biopsy of these lesions showed necrotic bone attributed to radiation. (orig.)

  7. Percutaneous aspiration biopsy in cervical spine lytic lesions. Indications and technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tampieri, D; Weill, A; Melanson, D; Ethier, R [Montreal Neurological Inst. and Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    1991-02-01

    We describe the technique and the results of the percutaneous aspiration biopsy (PAB) in a series of 9 patients presenting with neck pain and different degrees of myelopathy, in whom the cervical spine X-ray demonstrated lytic lesions of unknown origin. PAB is a useful, relatively safe technique, and leads to histological diagnosis between metastatic and inflammatory processes. Furthermore, in inflammatory lesions with negative hemoculture, PAB may help in detecting the micro-organism responsible and therefore allow a better antibiotic treatment. (orig.).

  8. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1 an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2 a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  9. Effect of metals on the lytic cycle of the coccolithovirus, EhV86.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha eGledhill

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we show that metals, and in particular copper (Cu, can disrupt the lytic cycle in the Emiliania huxleyi - EhV86 host-virus system. Numbers of virus particles produced per E. huxleyi cell and E. huxleyi lysis rates were reduced by Cu at total metal concentrations over 500 nM in the presence of EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and 250 nM in the absence of EDTA in acute short term exposure experiments. Zinc (Zn, cadmium (Cd and cobalt (Co were not observed to affect the lysis rate of EhV86 in these experiments. The cellular glutathione (GSH content increased in virus infected cells, but not as a result of metal exposure. In contrast, the cellular content of phytochelatins (PCs increased only in response to metal exposure. The increase in gluthatione content is consistent with increases in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS on viral infection, while increases in PC content are likely linked to metal homeostasis and indicate that metal toxicity to the host was not affected by viral infection. We propose that Cu prevents lytic production of EhV86 by interfering with virus DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis through a transcriptional block, which ultimately suppresses the formation of ROS, a biochemical response required for successful virus infection.

  10. A Temporal Proteomic Map of Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Replication in B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Ersing

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV replication contributes to multiple human diseases, including infectious mononucleosis, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, B cell lymphomas, and oral hairy leukoplakia. We performed systematic quantitative analyses of temporal changes in host and EBV proteins during lytic replication to gain insights into virus-host interactions, using conditional Burkitt lymphoma models of type I and II EBV infection. We quantified profiles of >8,000 cellular and 69 EBV proteins, including >500 plasma membrane proteins, providing temporal views of the lytic B cell proteome and EBV virome. Our approach revealed EBV-induced remodeling of cell cycle, innate and adaptive immune pathways, including upregulation of the complement cascade and proteasomal degradation of the B cell receptor complex, conserved between EBV types I and II. Cross-comparison with proteomic analyses of human cytomegalovirus infection and of a Kaposi-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus immunoevasin identified host factors targeted by multiple herpesviruses. Our results provide an important resource for studies of EBV replication.

  11. Characterization and lytic activity of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA phages isolated from NICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnar Rahimzadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a well-known pathogen that causes serious diseases in humans. As part of the efforts to control this pathogen, an isolated bacteriophage, Siphoviridae, which specifically targets Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, was characterized. Aims The objective of this study was to characterize of a virulent bacteriophage (Siphoviridae isolated from a NICU bathroom sink. Methods The MRSA strain was isolated from patient blood. The isolated strain was confirmed as MRSA using conventional methods. Phages were isolated from a NICU bathroom sink and activity was lytic as determined by spot test. Titer phage lysate was measured by the Double Layer Agar (DLA technique. The morphology was found with electron microscopy. The single-step growth curve was plotted. Results Electron microscopy showed the phage as a member of the family Siphoviridae, serogroup A and F. The isolated phage was capable of lytic activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strain as shown by spot test. By DLA, the titre of the phages was determined to be 10×108PFU/ml. The single-step growth curve showed that the latent period of the isolated bacteriophage was 30 min and the total number of viable progeny per infected host, burst size, was 2600 PFU/infected host. Conclusion In this study, two phages were isolated and characterized from a NICU bathroom sink, from the Siphoviridae family, which specifically targetsmethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA.

  12. PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A LYTIC METHICILLIN RESISTANT-STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS BACTERIOPHAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Al-Yousef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A marked increase in the infection incidence caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains has been noted in medical practice in recent years. This study was conducted to study the biological and characterize of MRSA-phage. Methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus was detected and confirmed by determining of the MIC of oxacillin by the standard agar dilution method. Phage was biologically purified using single plaque technique, then phage characterization were studied using host range, adsorption time, particle morphology and its structural protein. MRSA phage showing lytic nature was purified by repeated plating after picking of single isolated plaques. This phage is active against all 11 isolates either of S. aureus or MRSA tested as hosts. Phage produced clear plaques indicating their lytic nature. This phage was concentrated employing polyethylene glycol (PEG-NaCl precipitation method. Morphologically, MRSA Phage has a hexagonal head having a long non-contractile tail, indicating his icosahedral nature. Adsorption studies showed 100% adsorption of MRSA-Phage after 35 minutes of exposure. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE experimentation indicated that the phage particles contain one major structural protein (about 30 Kda.

  13. Bronchogenic adenocarcinoma presenting as a synchronous solitary lytic skull lesion with ischaemic stroke--case report and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, David

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a rare case of metastatic bronchogenic adenocarcinoma in a 55-year-old man presenting with concomittant solitary lytic skull lesion and ischaemic stroke. Metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma is known to present as lytic skull lesions. Primary brain tumours are also known to cause ischaemic brain injury. An underlying stroke risk may be exagerated by cranial tumour surgery. Patients with brain tumours are well known to be predisposed to an increased risk of developing thromboembolic disease. It is unusual to see metastatic bronchogenic adenocarcinoma presenting as ischaemic stroke with a background of concomittant cerebral metastasis. The aetio-pathogenesis of this rare occurrence is discussed with a review of literature.

  14. The use of lytic bacteriophages to reduce E. coli O157:H7 on fresh cut lettuce introduced through cross-contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield) at 108 PFU/ml or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either 1) spraying on to lettuce piec...

  15. Augmentation of failed human vertebrae with critical un-contained lytic defect restores their structural competence under functional loading: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkalay, Ron N; von Stechow, Dietrich; Hackney, David B

    2015-07-01

    Lytic spinal lesions reduce vertebral strength and may result in their fracture. Vertebral augmentation is employed clinically to provide mechanical stability and pain relief for vertebrae with lytic lesions. However, little is known about its efficacy in strengthening fractured vertebrae containing lytic metastasis. Eighteen unembalmed human lumbar vertebrae, having simulated uncontained lytic defects and tested to failure in a prior study, were augmented using a transpedicular approach and re-tested to failure using a wedge fracture model. Axial and moment based strength and stiffness parameters were used to quantify the effect of augmentation on the structural response of the failed vertebrae. Effects of cement volume, bone mineral density and vertebral geometry on the change in structural response were investigated. Augmentation increased the failed lytic vertebral strength [compression: 85% (Paugmentation is effective in bolstering the failed lytic vertebrae compressive and axial structural competence, showing strength estimates up to 50-90% of historical values of osteoporotic vertebrae without lytic defects. This modest increase suggests that lytic vertebrae undergo a high degree of structural damage at failure, with strength only partially restored by vertebral augmentation. The positive effect of cement volume is self-limiting due to extravasation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Toward Understanding Phage:Host Interactions in the Rumen; Complete Genome Sequences of Lytic Phages Infecting Rumen Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind A. Gilbert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The rumen is known to harbor dense populations of bacteriophages (phages predicted to be capable of infecting a diverse range of rumen bacteria. While bacterial genome sequencing projects are revealing the presence of phages which can integrate their DNA into the genome of their host to form stable, lysogenic associations, little is known of the genetics of phages which utilize lytic replication. These phages infect and replicate within the host, culminating in host lysis, and the release of progeny phage particles. While lytic phages for rumen bacteria have been previously isolated, their genomes have remained largely uncharacterized. Here we report the first complete genome sequences of lytic phage isolates specifically infecting three genera of rumen bacteria: Bacteroides, Ruminococcus, and Streptococcus. All phages were classified within the viral order Caudovirales and include two phage morphotypes, representative of the Siphoviridae and Podoviridae families. The phage genomes displayed modular organization and conserved viral genes were identified which enabled further classification and determination of closest phage relatives. Co-examination of bacterial host genomes led to the identification of several genes responsible for modulating phage:host interactions, including CRISPR/Cas elements and restriction-modification phage defense systems. These findings provide new genetic information and insights into how lytic phages may interact with bacteria of the rumen microbiome.

  17. In vivo dynamics of EBNA1-oriP interaction during latent and lytic replication of Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daikoku, Tohru; Kudoh, Ayumi; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sugaya, Yutaka; Isomura, Hiroki; Tsurumi, Tatsuya

    2004-12-24

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is required for maintenance of the viral genome DNA during the latent phase of EBV replication but continues to be synthesized after the induction of viral productive replication. An EBV genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that EBNA1 constantly binds to oriP of the EBV genome during not only latent but also lytic infection. Although the total levels of EBNA1 proved constant throughout the latter, the levels of the oriP-bound form were increased as lytic infection proceeded. EBV productive DNA replication occurs at discrete sites in nuclei, called replication compartments, where viral replication proteins are clustered. Confocal laser microscopic analyses revealed that whereas EBNA1 was distributed broadly in nuclei as fine punctate dots during the latent phase of infection, the protein became redistributed to the viral replication compartments and localized as distinct spots within and/or nearby the compartments after the induction of lytic replication. Taking these findings into consideration, oriP regions of the EBV genome might be organized by EBNA1 into replication domains that may set up scaffolding for lytic replication and transcription.

  18. Probing the structure of glucan lyases – the lytic members of GH31 - by sequence analysis, circular dichroism and proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Heidi; Lo Leggio, Leila; Yu, Shukun

    2005-01-01

    Glucan lyase (GL) is a polysaccharide lyase with unique characteristics. It is involved in an alternative pathway for the degradation of alpha-glucans, the anhydrofructose pathway. Sequence similarity suggests that this lytic enzyme belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 31, for which until very r...

  19. Gene Expression of Lytic Endopeptidases AlpA and AlpB from Lysobacter sp. XL1 in Pseudomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsfasman, Irina M; Lapteva, Yulia S; Krasovskaya, Ludmila A; Kudryakova, Irina V; Vasilyeva, Natalia V; Granovsky, Igor E; Stepnaya, Olga A

    2015-01-01

    Development of an efficient expression system for (especially secreted) bacterial lytic enzymes is a complicated task due to the specificity of their action. The substrate for such enzymes is peptidoglycan, the main structural component of bacterial cell walls. For this reason, expression of recombinant lytic proteins is often accompanied with lysis of the producing bacterium. This paper presents data on the construction of an inducible system for expression of the lytic peptidases AlpA and AlpB from Lysobacter sp. XL1 in Pseudomonas fluorescens Q2-87, which provides for the successful secretion of these proteins into the culture liquid. In this system, the endopeptidase gene under control of the T7lac promoter was integrated into the bacterial chromosome, as well as the Escherichia coli lactose operon repressor protein gene. The T7 pol gene under lac promoter control, which encodes the phage T7 RNA polymerase, is maintained in Pseudomonas cells on the plasmids. Media and cultivation conditions for the recombinant strains were selected to enable the production of AlpA and AlpB by a simple purification protocol. Production of recombinant lytic enzymes should contribute to the development of new-generation antimicrobial drugs whose application will not be accompanied by selection of resistant microorganisms. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Epiphyseal involvement in Erdheim-Chester disease: radiographic and scintigraphic findings in a case with lytic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Hernandez, G.; Tajahuerce-Romera, G.M.; Latorre-Ibanez, M.D.; Lara-Pomares, A. [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Provincial de Castellon (Spain); Vila-Fayos, V. [Servicio de Reumatologia, Hospital Comarcal de Vinaroz (Spain)

    2000-08-01

    We reported a symmetric increase of activity in lower links secondary to Erdheim-Chester disease and demonstrated by bone scans and radiographs. An inusual scintigraphic and radiographic appearance with epiphyseal involvement and lytic lesions is described. Differential diagnosis of bone scan and radiographic findings is discussed. (orig.)

  1. Oxidative cleavage and hydrolytic boosting of cellulose in soybean spent flakes by Trichoderma reesei Cel61A lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Wichmann, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    The auxiliary activity family 9 (AA9) copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) from Trichoderma reesei (EG4; TrCel61A) was investigated for its ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides from soybean. The substrate specificity of the enzyme was assessed against a variety of ...

  2. Lytic Infection of Lactococcus lactis by Bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 Triggers Alternative Transcriptional Host Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainsworth, S.; Zomer, A.L.; Mahony, J.; Sinderen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed

  3. Needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of lytic bone lesions in histiocytosis X, Ewing's sarcoma and neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thommesen, P.; Frederiksen, P.; Loewhagen, T.; Willems, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Cytologic smears obtained by needle aspiration biopsy of lytic bone lesions in 15 patients with histiocytosis X, Ewing's sarcoma and neuroblastoma were reviewed. After conventional staining, histiocytosis X could be diagnosed and differentiated from small cell tumours such as Ewing's sarcoma and neuroblastoma. The need for sampling material for cytochemical and ultrastructural analysis of these small cell tumours by needle aspiration is emphasized. (Auth.)

  4. Chaetocin reactivates the lytic replication of Epstein-Barr virus from latency via reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shilun; Yin, Juan; Zhong, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress, regarded as a negative effect of free radicals in vivo, takes place when organisms suffer from harmful stimuli. Some viruses can induce the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in infected cells, which may be closely related with their pathogenicity. In this report, chaetocin, a fungal metabolite reported to have antimicrobial and cytostatic activity, was studied for its effect on the activation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in B95-8 cells. We found that chaetocin remarkably up-regulated EBV lytic transcription and DNA replication at a low concentration (50 nmol L -1 ). The activation of latent EBV was accompanied by an increased cellular ROS level. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), an ROS inhibitor, suppressed chaetocin-induced EBV activation. Chaetocin had little effect on histone H3K9 methylation, while NAC also significantly reduced H3K9 methylation. These results suggested that chaetocin reactivates latent EBV primarily via ROS pathways.

  5. Isolation and life cycle characterization of lytic viruses infecting heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middelboe, Mathias; Chan, Amy; Bertelsen, Sif Koldborg

    2010-01-01

    Basic knowledge on viruses infecting heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria is key to future progress in understanding the role of viruses in aquatic systems and the influence of virus–host interactions on microbial mortality, biogeochemical cycles, and genetic exchange. Such studies require......, and discusses the applications and limitations of different isolation procedures. Most work on phage isolation has been carried out with aerobic heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria, culturable both on agar plates and in enriched liquid cultures. The procedures presented here are limited to lytic viruses...... infecting such hosts. In addition to the isolation procedures, methods for life cycle characterization (one-step growth experiments) of bacteriophages and cyanophages are described. Finally, limitations and drawbacks of the proposed methods are assessed and discussed...

  6. Investigating the effect of a single glycine to alanine substitution on interactions of antimicrobial peptide latarcin 2a with a lipid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idiong, Grace; Won, Amy; Ruscito, Annamaria; Leung, Bonnie O; Hitchcock, Adam P; Ianoul, Anatoli

    2011-09-01

    Latarcins are linear, α-helical antimicrobial peptides purified from the venom of the Central Asian spider Lachesana tarabaevi, with lytic activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, erythrocytes, and yeast at micromolar concentrations. In this work, we investigated the role of the hinge in latarcin 2a (ltc2a, GLFGKLIKKFGRKAISYAVKKARGKH-COOH), which adopts a helix-hinge-helix conformation in membrane-mimicking environments, on peptide-membrane interactions and its potential effect on the selective toxicity of the peptide. A modified latarcin 2a, ltc2aG11A, obtained by replacing the glycine at position 11 with alanine (ltc2aG11A, GLFGKLIKKFARKAISYAVKKARGKH-COOH), adopts a more rigid structure due to the reduced conformational flexibility. Langmuir monolayer measurements combined with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) indicate that both peptides bind and insert preferentially into anionic compared with zwitterionic phospholipid monolayers. Modified ltc2aG11A was found to be more disruptive of supported phospholipid bilayer modeling mammalian cell membrane. However, no considerable difference in lytic activity of the two peptides toward bacterial membrane was found. Overall the data indicate that decrease in the flexibility of ltc2a induced by the modification in the hinge region is likely to increase the peptide's nonspecific interactions with zwitterionic cell membranes and potentially increase its toxicity against eukaryotic cells.

  7. Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC inhibits lytic replication of gamma oncogenic herpesviruses in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedman Herman

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major psychoactive cannabinoid compound of marijuana, delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, has been shown to modulate immune responses and lymphocyte function. After primary infection the viral DNA genome of gamma herpesviruses persists in lymphoid cell nuclei in a latent episomal circular form. In response to extracellular signals, the latent virus can be activated, which leads to production of infectious virus progeny. Therefore, we evaluated the potential effects of THC on gamma herpesvirus replication. Methods Tissue cultures infected with various gamma herpesviruses were cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of THC and the amount of viral DNA or infectious virus yield was compared to those of control cultures. The effect of THC on Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV replication was measured by the Gardella method and replication of herpesvirus saimiri (HVS of monkeys, murine gamma herpesvirus 68 (MHV 68, and herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1 was measured by yield reduction assays. Inhibition of the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter activity was measured by the dual luciferase method. Results Micromolar concentrations of THC inhibit KSHV and EBV reactivation in virus infected/immortalized B cells. THC also strongly inhibits lytic replication of MHV 68 and HVS in vitro. Importantly, concentrations of THC that inhibit virus replication of gamma herpesviruses have no effect on cell growth or HSV-1 replication, indicating selectivity. THC was shown to selectively inhibit the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter of KSHV and MHV 68. Conclusions THC specifically targets viral and/or cellular mechanisms required for replication and possibly shared by these gamma herpesviruses, and the endocannabinoid system is possibly involved in regulating gamma herpesvirus latency and lytic replication. The immediate early gene ORF 50 promoter activity was specifically inhibited by THC

  8. Trypanosome lytic factor, an antimicrobial high-density lipoprotein, ameliorates Leishmania infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Samanovic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Trypanosome Lytic Factor (TLF is a minor sub-fraction of human high-density lipoprotein that provides innate immunity by completely protecting humans from infection by most species of African trypanosomes, which belong to the Kinetoplastida order. Herein, we demonstrate the broader protective effects of human TLF, which inhibits intracellular infection by Leishmania, a kinetoplastid that replicates in phagolysosomes of macrophages. We show that TLF accumulates within the parasitophorous vacuole of macrophages in vitro and reduces the number of Leishmania metacyclic promastigotes, but not amastigotes. We do not detect any activation of the macrophages by TLF in the presence or absence of Leishmania, and therefore propose that TLF directly damages the parasite in the acidic parasitophorous vacuole. To investigate the physiological relevance of this observation, we have reconstituted lytic activity in vivo by generating mice that express the two main protein components of TLFs: human apolipoprotein L-I and haptoglobin-related protein. Both proteins are expressed in mice at levels equivalent to those found in humans and circulate within high-density lipoproteins. We find that TLF mice can ameliorate an infection with Leishmania by significantly reducing the pathogen burden. In contrast, TLF mice were not protected against infection by the kinetoplastid Trypanosoma cruzi, which infects many cell types and transiently passes through a phagolysosome. We conclude that TLF not only determines species specificity for African trypanosomes, but can also ameliorate an infection with Leishmania, while having no effect on T. cruzi. We propose that TLFs are a component of the innate immune system that can limit infections by their ability to selectively damage pathogens in phagolysosomes within the reticuloendothelial system.

  9. Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) inhibits lytic replication of gamma oncogenic herpesviruses in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medveczky, Maria M; Sherwood, Tracy A; Klein, Thomas W; Friedman, Herman; Medveczky, Peter G

    2004-09-15

    The major psychoactive cannabinoid compound of marijuana, delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), has been shown to modulate immune responses and lymphocyte function. After primary infection the viral DNA genome of gamma herpesviruses persists in lymphoid cell nuclei in a latent episomal circular form. In response to extracellular signals, the latent virus can be activated, which leads to production of infectious virus progeny. Therefore, we evaluated the potential effects of THC on gamma herpesvirus replication. Tissue cultures infected with various gamma herpesviruses were cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of THC and the amount of viral DNA or infectious virus yield was compared to those of control cultures. The effect of THC on Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replication was measured by the Gardella method and replication of herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) of monkeys, murine gamma herpesvirus 68 (MHV 68), and herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) was measured by yield reduction assays. Inhibition of the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter activity was measured by the dual luciferase method. Micromolar concentrations of THC inhibit KSHV and EBV reactivation in virus infected/immortalized B cells. THC also strongly inhibits lytic replication of MHV 68 and HVS in vitro. Importantly, concentrations of THC that inhibit virus replication of gamma herpesviruses have no effect on cell growth or HSV-1 replication, indicating selectivity. THC was shown to selectively inhibit the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter of KSHV and MHV 68. THC specifically targets viral and/or cellular mechanisms required for replication and possibly shared by these gamma herpesviruses, and the endocannabinoid system is possibly involved in regulating gamma herpesvirus latency and lytic replication. The immediate early gene ORF 50 promoter activity was specifically inhibited by THC. These studies may also provide the foundation for the development

  10. Implementation of antimicrobial peptides for sample preparation prior to nucleic acid amplification in point-of-care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krõlov, Katrin; Uusna, Julia; Grellier, Tiia; Andresen, Liis; Jevtuševskaja, Jekaterina; Tulp, Indrek; Langel, Ülo

    2017-12-01

    A variety of sample preparation techniques are used prior to nucleic acid amplification. However, their efficiency is not always sufficient and nucleic acid purification remains the preferred method for template preparation. Purification is difficult and costly to apply in point-of-care (POC) settings and there is a strong need for more robust, rapid, and efficient biological sample preparation techniques in molecular diagnostics. Here, the authors applied antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for urine sample preparation prior to isothermal loop-mediated amplification (LAMP). AMPs bind to many microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses causing disruption of their membrane integrity and facilitate nucleic acid release. The authors show that incubation of E. coli with antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 for 5 min had a significant effect on the availability of template DNA compared with untreated or even heat treated samples resulting in up to six times increase of the amplification efficiency. These results show that AMPs treatment is a very efficient sample preparation technique that is suitable for application prior to nucleic acid amplification directly within biological samples. Furthermore, the entire process of AMPs treatment was performed at room temperature for 5 min thereby making it a good candidate for use in POC applications.

  11. Transgenic Brassica juncea plants expressing MsrA1, a synthetic cationic antimicrobial peptide, exhibit resistance to fungal phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Anjana; Kumar, Deepak; Shekhar, Shashi; Yusuf, Mohd Aslam; Misra, Santosh; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2014-06-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) have shown potential against broad spectrum of phytopathogens. Synthetic versions with desirable properties have been modeled on these natural peptides. MsrA1 is a synthetic chimera of cecropin A and melittin CAPs with antimicrobial properties. We generated transgenic Brassica juncea plants expressing the msrA1 gene aimed at conferring fungal resistance. Five independent transgenic lines were evaluated for resistance to Alternaria brassicae and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, two of the most devastating pathogens of B. juncea crops. In vitro assays showed inhibition by MsrA1 of Alternaria hyphae growth by 44-62 %. As assessed by the number and size of lesions and time taken for complete leaf necrosis, the Alternaria infection was delayed and restricted in the transgenic plants with the protection varying from 69 to 85 % in different transgenic lines. In case of S. sclerotiorum infection, the lesions were more severe and spread profusely in untransformed control compared with transgenic plants. The sclerotia formed in the stem of untransformed control plants were significantly more in number and larger in size than those present in the transgenic plants where disease protection of 56-71.5 % was obtained. We discuss the potential of engineering broad spectrum biotic stress tolerance by transgenic expression of CAPs in crop plants.

  12. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2, wh...

  13. Coexistence of a two-states organization for a cell-penetrating peptide in lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plénat, Thomas; Boichot, Sylvie; Dosset, Patrice; Milhiet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Le Grimellec, Christian

    2005-12-01

    Primary amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides transport cargoes across cell membranes with high efficiency and low lytic activity. These primary amphipathic peptides were previously shown to form aggregates or supramolecular structures in mixed lipid-peptide monolayers, but their behavior in lipid bilayers remains to be characterized. Using atomic force microscopy, we have examined the interactions of P(alpha), a primary amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide which remains alpha-helical whatever the environment, with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayers. Addition of P(alpha) at concentrations up to 5 mol % markedly modified the supported bilayers topography. Long and thin filaments lying flat at the membrane surface coexisted with deeply embedded peptides which induced a local thinning of the bilayer. On the other hand, addition of P(alpha) only exerted very limited effects on the corresponding liposome's bilayer physical state, as estimated from differential scanning calorimetry and diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy experiments. The use of a gel-fluid phase separated supported bilayers made of a dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine mixture confirmed both the existence of long filaments, which at low peptide concentration were preferentially localized in the fluid phase domains and the membrane disorganizing effects of 5 mol % P(alpha). The simultaneous two-states organization of P(alpha), at the membrane surface and deeply embedded in the bilayer, may be involved in the transmembrane carrier function of this primary amphipathic peptide.

  14. Comparative antimicrobial activity and mechanism of action of bovine lactoferricin-derived synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifan; Han, Feifei; Xie, Yonggang; Wang, Yizhen

    2011-12-01

    Lactoferricin B (LfcinB), a 25 residue peptide derived from the N-terminal of bovine lactoferrin (bLF), causes depolarization of the cytoplasmic membrane in susceptible bacteria. Its mechanism of action, however, still needs to be elucidated. In the present study, synthetic LfcinB (without a disulfide bridge) and LfcinB (C-C; with a disulfide bridge) as well as three derivatives with 15-, 11- and 9-residue peptides were prepared to investigate their antimicrobial nature and mechanisms. The antimicrobial properties were measured via minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determinations, killing kinetics assays and synergy testing, and hemolytic activities were assessed by hemoglobin release. Finally, the morphology of peptide-treated bacteria was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We found that there was no difference in MICs between LfcinB and LfcinB (C-C). Among the derivatives, only LfcinB15 maintained nearly the same level as LfcinB, in the MIC range of 16-128 μg/ml, and the MICs of LfcinB11 (64-256 μg/ml) were 4 times more than LfcinB, while LfcinB9 exhibited the lowest antimicrobial activity. When treated at MIC for 1 h, many blebs were formed and holes of various sizes appeared on the cell surface, but the cell still maintained its integrity. This suggested that LfcinB had a major permeability effect on the cytoplasmic membrane of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, which also indicated it may be a possible intracellular target. Among the tested antibiotics, aureomycin increased the bactericidal activity of LfcinB against E. coli, S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, but neomycin did not have such an effect. We also found that the combination of cecropin A and LfcinB had synergistic effects against E. coli.

  15. Cooperation between Epstein-Barr Virus Immune Evasion Proteins Spreads Protection from CD8+ T Cell Recognition across All Three Phases of the Lytic Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Laura L.; Zuo, Jianmin; Abbott, Rachel J. M.; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Tierney, Rosemary J.; Hislop, Andrew D.; Rowe, Martin

    2014-01-01

    CD8+ T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle expressed antigens display a hierarchy of immunodominance, in which responses to epitopes of immediate-early (IE) and some early (E) antigens are more frequently observed than responses to epitopes of late (L) expressed antigens. It has been proposed that this hierarchy, which correlates with the phase-specific efficiency of antigen presentation, may be due to the influence of viral immune-evasion genes. At least three EBV-encoded genes, BNLF2a, BGLF5 and BILF1, have the potential to inhibit processing and presentation of CD8+ T cell epitopes. Here we examined the relative contribution of these genes to modulation of CD8+ T cell recognition of EBV lytic antigens expressed at different phases of the replication cycle in EBV-transformed B-cells (LCLs) which spontaneously reactivate lytic cycle. Selective shRNA-mediated knockdown of BNLF2a expression led to more efficient recognition of immediate-early (IE)- and early (E)-derived epitopes by CD8+ T cells, while knock down of BILF1 increased recognition of epitopes from E and late (L)-expressed antigens. Contrary to what might have been predicted from previous ectopic expression studies in EBV-negative model cell lines, the shRNA-mediated inhibition of BGLF5 expression in LCLs showed only modest, if any, increase in recognition of epitopes expressed in any phase of lytic cycle. These data indicate that whilst BNLF2a interferes with antigen presentation with diminishing efficiency as lytic cycle progresses (IE>E>>L), interference by BILF1 increases with progression through lytic cycle (IEevasion functions are actually relevant in the context of lytic virus replication, and secondly identify lytic-cycle phase-specific effects that provide mechanistic insight into the immunodominance pattern seen for CD8+ T cell responses to EBV lytic antigens. PMID:25144360

  16. Activation and Repression of Epstein-Barr Virus and Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Cycles by Short- and Medium-Chain Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorres, Kelly L.; Daigle, Derek; Mohanram, Sudharshan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The lytic cycles of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are induced in cell culture by sodium butyrate (NaB), a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Valproic acid (VPA), another SCFA and an HDAC inhibitor, induces the lytic cycle of KSHV but blocks EBV lytic reactivation. To explore the hypothesis that structural differences between NaB and VPA account for their functional effects on the two related viruses, we investigated the capacity of 16 structurally related short- and medium-chain fatty acids to promote or prevent lytic cycle reactivation. SCFAs differentially affected EBV and KSHV reactivation. KSHV was reactivated by all SCFAs that are HDAC inhibitors, including phenylbutyrate. However, several fatty acid HDAC inhibitors, such as isobutyrate and phenylbutyrate, did not reactivate EBV. Reactivation of KSHV lytic transcripts could not be blocked completely by any fatty acid tested. In contrast, several medium-chain fatty acids inhibited lytic activation of EBV. Fatty acids that blocked EBV reactivation were more lipophilic than those that activated EBV. VPA blocked activation of the BZLF1 promoter by NaB but did not block the transcriptional function of ZEBRA. VPA also blocked activation of the DNA damage response that accompanies EBV lytic cycle activation. Properties of SCFAs in addition to their effects on chromatin are likely to explain activation or repression of EBV. We concluded that fatty acids stimulate the two related human gammaherpesviruses to enter the lytic cycle through different pathways. IMPORTANCE Lytic reactivation of EBV and KSHV is needed for persistence of these viruses and plays a role in carcinogenesis. Our direct comparison highlights the mechanistic differences in lytic reactivation between related human oncogenic gammaherpesviruses. Our findings have therapeutic implications, as fatty acids are found in the diet and produced by the human microbiota

  17. DNA Damage Signaling Is Induced in the Absence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Lytic DNA Replication and in Response to Expression of ZEBRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang'ondu, Ruth; Teal, Stuart; Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Delecluse, Henri; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV), like other oncogenic viruses, modulates the activity of cellular DNA damage responses (DDR) during its life cycle. Our aim was to characterize the role of early lytic proteins and viral lytic DNA replication in activation of DNA damage signaling during the EBV lytic cycle. Our data challenge the prevalent hypothesis that activation of DDR pathways during the EBV lytic cycle occurs solely in response to large amounts of exogenous double stranded DNA products generated during lytic viral DNA replication. In immunofluorescence or immunoblot assays, DDR activation markers, specifically phosphorylated ATM (pATM), H2AX (γH2AX), or 53BP1 (p53BP1), were induced in the presence or absence of viral DNA amplification or replication compartments during the EBV lytic cycle. In assays with an ATM inhibitor and DNA damaging reagents in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, γH2AX induction was necessary for optimal expression of early EBV genes, but not sufficient for lytic reactivation. Studies in lytically reactivated EBV-positive cells in which early EBV proteins, BGLF4, BGLF5, or BALF2, were not expressed showed that these proteins were not necessary for DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle. Expression of ZEBRA, a viral protein that is necessary for EBV entry into the lytic phase, induced pATM foci and γH2AX independent of other EBV gene products. ZEBRA mutants deficient in DNA binding, Z(R183E) and Z(S186E), did not induce foci of pATM. ZEBRA co-localized with HP1β, a heterochromatin associated protein involved in DNA damage signaling. We propose a model of DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle in which ZEBRA induces ATM kinase phosphorylation, in a DNA binding dependent manner, to modulate gene expression. ATM and H2AX phosphorylation induced prior to EBV replication may be critical for creating a microenvironment of viral and cellular gene expression that enables lytic cycle progression.

  18. Increased CD8+ T cell response to Epstein-Barr virus lytic antigens in the active phase of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela F Angelini

    Full Text Available It has long been known that multiple sclerosis (MS is associated with an increased Epstein-Barr virus (EBV seroprevalence and high immune reactivity to EBV and that infectious mononucleosis increases MS risk. This evidence led to postulate that EBV infection plays a role in MS etiopathogenesis, although the mechanisms are debated. This study was designed to assess the prevalence and magnitude of CD8+ T-cell responses to EBV latent (EBNA-3A, LMP-2A and lytic (BZLF-1, BMLF-1 antigens in relapsing-remitting MS patients (n = 113 and healthy donors (HD (n = 43 and to investigate whether the EBV-specific CD8+ T cell response correlates with disease activity, as defined by clinical evaluation and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Using HLA class I pentamers, lytic antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses were detected in fewer untreated inactive MS patients than in active MS patients and HD while the frequency of CD8+ T cells specific for EBV lytic and latent antigens was higher in active and inactive MS patients, respectively. In contrast, the CD8+ T cell response to cytomegalovirus did not differ between HD and MS patients, irrespective of the disease phase. Marked differences in the prevalence of EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses were observed in patients treated with interferon-β and natalizumab, two licensed drugs for relapsing-remitting MS. Longitudinal studies revealed expansion of CD8+ T cells specific for EBV lytic antigens during active disease in untreated MS patients but not in relapse-free, natalizumab-treated patients. Analysis of post-mortem MS brain samples showed expression of the EBV lytic protein BZLF-1 and interactions between cytotoxic CD8+ T cells and EBV lytically infected plasma cells in inflammatory white matter lesions and meninges. We therefore propose that inability to control EBV infection during inactive MS could set the stage for intracerebral viral reactivation and disease relapse.

  19. A rapid quantitative activity assay shows that the Vibrio cholerae colonization factor GbpA is an active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loose, Jennifer S. M.; Forsberg, Zarah; Fraaije, Marco W.; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of the copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) has revealed new territory for chemical and biochemical analysis. These unique mononuclear copper enzymes are abundant, suggesting functional diversity beyond their established roles in the depolymerization of biomass

  20. Unliganded and substrate bound structures of the cellooligosaccharide active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase LsAA9A at low pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Kristian Erik Høpfner; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Tandrup, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) have been found to be key components in microbial (bacterial and fungal) degradation of biomass. They are copper metalloenzymes that degrade polysaccharides oxidatively and act in synergy with glycoside hydrolases. Recently crystallographic studies...

  1. Utility of lytic bacteriophage in the treatment of multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicemia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinodkumar C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance is the major cause of increase in morbidity and mortality in neonates. One thousand six hundred forty-seven suspected septicemic neonates were subjected for microbiological analysis over a period of 5 years. Forty-two P. aeruginosa were isolated and the antibiogram revealed that 28 P. aeruginosa were resistant to almost all the common drugs used (multidrug-resistant. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains is one of the most critical problems of modern medicine. As a result, a novel and most effective approaches for treating infection caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are urgently required. In this context, one intriguing approach is to use bacteriophages (viruses that kill bacteria in the treatment of infection caused by drug-resistant bacteria. In the present study, the utility of lytic bacteriophages to rescue septicemic mice with multidrug-resistant (MDR P. aeruginosa infection was evaluated. MDR P. aeruginosa was used to induce septicemia in mice by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of 10 7 CFU. The resulting bacteremia was fatal within 48 hrs. The phage strain used in this study had lytic activity against a wide range of clinical isolates of MDR P. aeruginosa. A single i.p. injection of 3 x 10 9 PFU of the phage strain, administered 45 min after the bacterial challenge, was sufficient to rescue 100% of the animals. Even when treatment was delayed to the point where all animals were moribund, approximately 50% of them were rescued by a single injection of this phage preparation. The ability of this phage to rescue septicemic mice was demonstrated to be due to the functional capabilities of the phage and not to a nonspecific immune effect. The rescue of septicemic mice could be affected only by phage strains able to grow in vitro on the bacterial host used to infect the animals and when such strains are heat-inactivated, they lose their ability to rescue the infected mice. Multidrug-resistant bacteria have

  2. Isolation and characterization of ZZ1, a novel lytic phage that infects Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates

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    Jin Jing

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acinetobacter baumannii, a significant nosocomial pathogen, has evolved resistance to almost all conventional antimicrobial drugs. Bacteriophage therapy is a potential alternative treatment for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. In this study, one lytic bacteriophage, ZZ1, which infects A. baumannii and has a broad host range, was selected for characterization. Results Phage ZZ1 and 3 of its natural hosts, A. baumanni clinical isolates AB09V, AB0902, and AB0901, are described in this study. The 3 strains have different sensitivities to ZZ1, but they have the same sensitivity to antibiotics. They are resistant to almost all of the antibiotics tested, except for polymyxin. Several aspects of the life cycle of ZZ1 were investigated using the sensitive strain AB09V under optimal growth conditions. ZZ1 is highly infectious with a short latent period (9 min and a large burst size (200 PFU/cell. It exhibited the most powerful antibacterial activity at temperatures ranging from 35°C to 39°C. Moreover, when ZZ1 alone was incubated at different pHs and different temperatures, the phage was stable over a wide pH range (4 to 9 and at extreme temperatures (between 50°C and 60°C. ZZ1 possesses a 100-nm icosahedral head containing double-stranded DNA with a total length of 166,682 bp and a 120-nm long contractile tail. Morphologically, it could be classified as a member of the Myoviridae family and the Caudovirales order. Bioinformatic analysis of the phage whole genome sequence further suggested that ZZ1 was more likely to be a new member of the Myoviridae phages. Most of the predicted ORFs of the phage were similar to the predicted ORFs from other Acinetobacter phages. Conclusion The phage ZZ1 has a relatively broad lytic spectrum, high pH stability, strong heat resistance, and efficient antibacterial potential at body temperature. These characteristics greatly increase the utility of this phage as an antibacterial agent

  3. Isolation and characterization of ZZ1, a novel lytic phage that infects Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Li, Zhen-Jiang; Wang, Shu-Wei; Wang, Shan-Mei; Huang, De-Hai; Li, Ya-Hui; Ma, Yun-Yun; Wang, Jin; Liu, Fang; Chen, Xiang-Dong; Li, Guang-Xing; Wang, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Zhong-Quan; Zhao, Guo-Qiang

    2012-07-28

    Acinetobacter baumannii, a significant nosocomial pathogen, has evolved resistance to almost all conventional antimicrobial drugs. Bacteriophage therapy is a potential alternative treatment for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. In this study, one lytic bacteriophage, ZZ1, which infects A. baumannii and has a broad host range, was selected for characterization. Phage ZZ1 and 3 of its natural hosts, A. baumanni clinical isolates AB09V, AB0902, and AB0901, are described in this study. The 3 strains have different sensitivities to ZZ1, but they have the same sensitivity to antibiotics. They are resistant to almost all of the antibiotics tested, except for polymyxin. Several aspects of the life cycle of ZZ1 were investigated using the sensitive strain AB09V under optimal growth conditions. ZZ1 is highly infectious with a short latent period (9 min) and a large burst size (200 PFU/cell). It exhibited the most powerful antibacterial activity at temperatures ranging from 35°C to 39°C. Moreover, when ZZ1 alone was incubated at different pHs and different temperatures, the phage was stable over a wide pH range (4 to 9) and at extreme temperatures (between 50°C and 60°C). ZZ1 possesses a 100-nm icosahedral head containing double-stranded DNA with a total length of 166,682 bp and a 120-nm long contractile tail. Morphologically, it could be classified as a member of the Myoviridae family and the Caudovirales order. Bioinformatic analysis of the phage whole genome sequence further suggested that ZZ1 was more likely to be a new member of the Myoviridae phages. Most of the predicted ORFs of the phage were similar to the predicted ORFs from other Acinetobacter phages. The phage ZZ1 has a relatively broad lytic spectrum, high pH stability, strong heat resistance, and efficient antibacterial potential at body temperature. These characteristics greatly increase the utility of this phage as an antibacterial agent; thus, it should be further investigated.

  4. A comparative study on the activity of fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for the depolymerization of cellulose in soybean spent flakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Zhang, Zhenghong

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-dependent enzymes capable of the oxidative breakdown of polysaccharides. They are of industrial interest due to their ability to enhance the enzymatic depolymerization of recalcitrant substrates by glycoside hydrolases. In this paper, twenty......-four lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) expressed in Trichoderma reesei were evaluated for their ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides in soybean spent flakes, an abundant and industrially relevant substrate. TrCel61A, a soy-polysaccharide-active AA9 LPMO from T. reesei, was used...... as a benchmark in this evaluation. In total, seven LPMOs demonstrated activity on pretreated soy spent flakes, with the products from enzymatic treatments evaluated using mass spectrometry and high performance anion exchange chromatography. The hydrolytic boosting effect of the top-performing enzymes...

  5. Interaction of antimicrobial peptide Plantaricin149a and four analogs with lipid bilayers and bacterial membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz de Souza Lopes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The amidated analog of Plantaricin149, an antimicrobial peptide from Lactobacillus plantarum NRIC 149, directly interacts with negatively charged liposomes and bacterial membranes, leading to their lysis. In this study, four Pln149-analogs were synthesized with different hydrophobic groups at their N-terminus with the goal of evaluating the effect of the modifications at this region in the peptide's antimicrobial properties. The interaction of these peptides with membrane models, surface activity, their hemolytic effect on red blood cells, and antibacterial activity against microorganisms were evaluated. The analogs presented similar action of Plantaricin149a; three of them with no hemolytic effect (< 5% until 0.5 mM, in addition to the induction of a helical element when binding to negative liposomes. The N-terminus difference between the analogs and Plantaricin149a retained the antibacterial effect on S. aureus and P. aeruginosa for all peptides (MIC50 of 19 µM and 155 µM to Plantaricin149a, respectively but resulted in a different mechanism of action against the microorganisms, that was bactericidal for Plantaricin149a and bacteriostatic for the analogs. This difference was confirmed by a reduction in leakage action for the analogs. The lytic activity of Plantaricin149a is suggested to be a result of the peptide-lipid interactions from the amphipathic helix and the hydrophobic residues at the N-terminus of the antimicrobial peptide.

  6. Lytic bacteriophages reduce Escherichia coli O157: H7 on fresh cut lettuce introduced through cross-contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sean; Roberts, Cheryl; Handy, Eric; Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield™) or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either; (1) immersion of lettuce in 500 ml of EcoShield™ 8.3 log PFU/ml or 9.8 log PFU/ml for up to 2 min before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7; (2) spray-application of EcoShield™ (9.3 log PFU/ml) to lettuce after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (4.10 CFU/cm 2 ) following exposure to 50 μg/ml chlorine for 30 sec. After immersion studies, lettuce was spot-inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (2.38 CFU/cm 2 ). Phage-treated, inoculated lettuce pieces were stored at 4°C for and analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 populations for up to 7 d. Immersion of lettuce in 9.8 log PFU/ml EcoShield™ for 2 min significantly (p PFU/ml) resulted in the deposition of high concentrations (7.8 log log PFU/cm 2 ) of bacteriophages on the surface of fresh cut lettuce, potentially contributing to the efficacy of the lytic phages on lettuce. Spraying phages on to inoculated fresh cut lettuce after being washed in hypochlorite solution was significantly more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations (2.22 log CFU/cm 2 ) on day 0 compared with control treatments (4.10 log CFU/cm 2 ). Both immersion and spray treatments provided protection from E. coli O157:H7 contamination on lettuce, but spray application of lytic bacteriophages to lettuce was more effective in immediately reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations fresh cut lettuce.

  7. AtlA Functions as a Peptidoglycan Lytic Transglycosylase in the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Type IV Secretion System▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kohler, Petra L.; Hamilton, Holly L.; Cloud-Hansen, Karen; Dillard, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    Type IV secretion systems require peptidoglycan lytic transglycosylases for efficient secretion, but the function of these enzymes is not clear. The type IV secretion system gene cluster of Neisseria gonorrhoeae encodes two peptidoglycan transglycosylase homologues. One, LtgX, is similar to peptidoglycan transglycosylases from other type IV secretion systems. The other, AtlA, is similar to endolysins from bacteriophages and is not similar to any described type IV secretion component. We chara...

  8. Metabolic Cooperation of Glucose and Glutamine Is Essential for the Lytic Cycle of Obligate Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii*

    OpenAIRE

    Nitzsche, Richard; Zagoriy, Vyacheslav; Lucius, Richard; Gupta, Nishith

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread protozoan parasite infecting nearly all warm-blooded organisms. Asexual reproduction of the parasite within its host cells is achieved by consecutive lytic cycles, which necessitates biogenesis of significant energy and biomass. Here we show that glucose and glutamine are the two major physiologically important nutrients used for the synthesis of macromolecules (ATP, nucleic acid, proteins, and lipids) in T. gondii, and either of them is sufficient to ensure ...

  9. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of KSHV-Infected Cells Reveals Roles of ORF45-Activated RSK during Lytic Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Avey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV is an oncogenic virus which has adapted unique mechanisms to modulate the cellular microenvironment of its human host. The pathogenesis of KSHV is intimately linked to its manipulation of cellular signaling pathways, including the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway. We have previously shown that KSHV ORF45 contributes to the sustained activation of both ERK and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK, a major functional mediator of ERK/MAPK signaling during KSHV lytic replication. ORF45-activated RSK is required for optimal KSHV lytic gene expression and progeny virion production, though the underlying mechanisms downstream of this activation are still unclear. We hypothesized that the activation of RSK by ORF45 causes differential phosphorylation of cellular and viral substrates, affecting biological processes essential for efficient KSHV lytic replication. Accordingly, we observed widespread and significant differences in protein phosphorylation upon induction of lytic replication. Mass-spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic screening identified putative substrates of ORF45-activated RSK in KSHV-infected cells. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that nuclear proteins, including several transcriptional regulators, were overrepresented among these candidates. We validated the ORF45/RSK-dependent phosphorylation of several putative substrates by employing KSHV BAC mutagenesis, kinase inhibitor treatments, and/or CRISPR-mediated knockout of RSK in KSHV-infected cells. Furthermore, we assessed the consequences of knocking out these substrates on ORF45/RSK-dependent regulation of gene expression and KSHV progeny virion production. Finally, we show data to support that ORF45 regulates the translational efficiency of a subset of viral/cellular genes with complex secondary structure in their 5' UTR. Altogether, these data shed light on the mechanisms by which KSHV ORF45

  10. Primary intraosseous atypical inflammatory meningioma presenting as a lytic skull lesion: Case report with review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohara, Sangita; Agarwal, Swapnil; Khurana, Nita; Pandey, P N

    2016-01-01

    Primary extradural meningiomas of the skull comprise 1% of all meningiomas, and lytic skull meningiomas are still rarer and are said to be more aggressive. We present a case of 38-year-old male with an extradural tumor which on histopathological examination showed features of inflammatory atypical meningioma (WHO Grade II). The intense inflammatory nature of osteolytic primary intraosseous meningioma has not been reported before. This entity deserves special mention because of the need for adjuvant therapy and proper follow-up.

  11. Sensibilidad in vitro de micobacterias a dos péptidos sintéticos híbridos con actividad antimicrobiana In-vitro activity of two hybrid synthetic peptides having antimicrobial activity against mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zerbini

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El aumento de aislamientos clínicos de Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistentes a las drogas esenciales y de casos de micobacteriosis diseminadas debidas al complejo Mycobacterium avium hacen necesario investigar nuevos agentes antimicobacterianos. Los péptidos antimicrobianos son un nuevo grupo de antibióticos que poseen un mecanismo de acción particular. Algunos de ellos, como la cecropina y la melitina, han sido aislados de insectos y han demostrado buena actividad in vitro contra bacterias gram positivas y gram negativas. Híbridos sintéticos de esos péptidos han presentado mayor actividad que los péptidos individuales. En este trabajo se evaluó la actividad in vitro de dos péptidos híbridos sintéticos de melitina y cecropina contra M. tuberculosis, complejo M. avium, Mycobacterium fortuitum y Mycobacterium smegmatis. Se determinó la concentración inhibitoria mínima empleando la técnica de macrodilución en caldo. Luego se estableció la concentración bactericida mínima en medio Lowenstein Jensen. Los péptidos evaluados mostraron ser activos in vitro contra M. smegmatis, mientras que no presentaron ninguna actividad contra las otras micobacterias estudiadas.The increase in both Mycobacterium tuberculosis human clinical isolates resistant to the essential drugs and cases of disseminated micobacteriosis due to Mycobacterium avium Complex, underlines the need to investigate new antimicobacterial agents. The antimicrobial peptides are a new group of active antibiotics with a particular mechanism of action. Some of them, like cecropin and melittin, isolated from insects, have demonstrated good in vitro activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Synthetic hybrids of those peptides have been more active than individual peptides. In this study, the in vitro activity of two hybrid synthetic peptides from melittin and cecropin against M. tuberculosis, M. avium Complex, Mycobacterium fortuitum and Mycobacterium smegmatis

  12. Human Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Form Dysfunctional Immune Synapses with B Cells Characterized by Non-Polarized Lytic Granule Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kabanova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of the cytotoxic T cell (CTL immune response has been proposed as one mechanism for immune evasion in cancer. In this study, we have explored the underlying basis for CTL suppression in the context of B cell malignancies. We document that human B cells have an intrinsic ability to resist killing by freshly isolated cytotoxic T cells (CTLs, but are susceptible to lysis by IL-2 activated CTL blasts and CTLs isolated from immunotherapy-treated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Impaired killing was associated with the formation of dysfunctional non-lytic immune synapses characterized by the presence of defective linker for activation of T cells (LAT signaling and non-polarized release of the lytic granules transported by ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 8 (Arl8. We propose that non-lytic degranulation of CTLs are a key regulatory mechanism of evasion through which B cells may interfere with the formation of functional immune synapses by CTLs.

  13. Cordycepin enhances Epstein-Barr virus lytic infection and Epstein-Barr virus-positive tumor treatment efficacy by doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yinping; Yu, Jieshi; Du, Li; Tang, Jun; Feng, Wen-Hai

    2016-07-01

    The consistent latent presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in tumor cells offers potential for virus-targeted therapies. The switch from the latent form of EBV to the lytic form in tumor cells can lead to tumor cell lysis. In this study, we report that a natural small molecule compound, cordycepin, can induce lytic EBV infection in tumor cells. Subsequently, we demonstrate that cordycepin can enhance EBV reactivating capacity and EBV-positive tumor cell killing ability of low dose doxorubicin. The combination of cordycepin and doxorubicin phosphorylates CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) through protein kinase C (PKC)-p38 mitogen activated protein kinases (p38 MAPK) signaling pathway, and C/EBPβ is required for the activation of lytic EBV infection. Most importantly, an in vivo experiment demonstrates that the combination of cordycepin and doxorubicin is more effective in inhibiting tumor growth in SCID mice than is doxorubicin alone. Our findings establish that cordycepin can enhance the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy for treatment of EBV-positive tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  15. Biophysical and biological properties of small linear peptides derived from crotamine, a cationic antimicrobial/antitumoral toxin with cell penetrating and cargo delivery abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Mas, C; Pinheiro, D A; Campeiro, J D; Mattei, B; Oliveira, V; Oliveira, E B; Miranda, A; Perez, K R; Hayashi, M A F

    2017-12-01

    Crotamine is a natural polypeptide from snake venom which delivers nucleic acid molecules into cells, besides having pronounced affinity for negatively charged membranes and antifungal activity. We previously demonstrated that crotamine derived short linear peptides were not very effective as antifungal, although the non-structured recombinant crotamine was overridingly more potent compared to the native structured crotamine. Aiming to identify the features necessary for the antifungal activity of crotamine, two linear short peptides, each comprising half of the total positively charged amino acid residues of the full-length crotamine were evaluated here to show that these linear peptides keep the ability to interact with lipid membrane model systems with different phospholipid compositions, even after forming complexes with DNA. Interestingly, the presence of cysteine residues in the structure of these linear peptides highly influenced the antifungal activity, which was not associated to the lipid membrane lytic activity. In addition to the importance of the positive charges, the crucial role of cysteine residues was noticed for these linear analogs of crotamine, although the tridimensional structure and lipid membrane lytic activity observed only for native crotamine was not essential for the antifungal activity. As these peptides still keep the ability to form complexes with DNA molecules with no prejudice to their ability to bind to lipid membranes, they may be potentially advantageous as membrane translocation vector, as they do not show lipid membrane lytic activity and may harbor or not antifungal activity, by keeping or not the semi-essential amino acid cysteine in their sequence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Crystal Structures of the SpoIID Lytic Transglycosylases Essential for Bacterial Sporulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocadello, Salvatore; Minasov, George; Shuvalova, Ludmilla S; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Sabini, Elisabetta; Anderson, Wayne F

    2016-07-15

    Bacterial spores are the most resistant form of life known on Earth and represent a serious problem for (i) bioterrorism attack, (ii) horizontal transmission of microbial pathogens in the community, and (iii) persistence in patients and in a nosocomial environment. Stage II sporulation protein D (SpoIID) is a lytic transglycosylase (LT) essential for sporulation. The LT superfamily is a potential drug target because it is active in essential bacterial processes involving the peptidoglycan, which is unique to bacteria. However, the absence of structural information for the sporulation-specific LT enzymes has hindered mechanistic understanding of SpoIID. Here, we report the first crystal structures with and without ligands of the SpoIID family from two community relevant spore-forming pathogens, Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium difficile. The structures allow us to visualize the overall architecture, characterize the substrate recognition model, identify critical residues, and provide the structural basis for catalysis by this new family of enzymes. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Determination of lytic enzyme activities of indigenous Trichoderma isolates from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, Saeed Ahmad; Tabassum, Ayesha; Hameed, Abdul; Hassan, Fayyaz Ul; Afzal, Aftab; Khan, Sabaz Ali; Ahmed, Rafiq; Shahzad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated lytic enzyme activities in three indigenous Trichoderma strains namely, Trichoderma asperellum, Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma sp. Native Trichoderma strains and a virulent strain of Rhizoctonia solani isolated from infected bean plants were also included in the study. Enzyme activities were determined by measuring sugar reduction by dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method using suitable substrates. The antagonists were cultured in minimal salt medium with the following modifications: medium A (1 g of glucose), medium B (0.5 g of glucose + 0.5 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia), medium C (1.0 g of deactivated respective antagonist mycelium) and medium D (1 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia). T asperellum showed presence of higher amounts of chitinases, β-1, 3-glucanases and xylanases in extracellular protein extracts from medium D as compared to medium A. While, the higher activities of glucosidases and endoglucanses were shown in medium D extracts by T. harzianum. β-glucosidase activities were lower compared with other enzymes; however, activities of the extracts of medium D were significantly different. T. asperellum exhibited maximum inhibition (97.7%). On the other hand, Trichoderma sp. did not show any effect on mycelia growth of R. solani on crude extract.

  18. Lytic phages obscure the cost of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazzyman, Samuel J; Hall, Alex R

    2015-03-17

    The long-term persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria depends on their fitness relative to other genotypes in the absence of drugs. Outside the laboratory, viruses that parasitize bacteria (phages) are ubiquitous, but costs of antibiotic resistance are typically studied in phage-free experimental conditions. We used a mathematical model and experiments with Escherichia coli to show that lytic phages strongly affect the incidence of antibiotic resistance in drug-free conditions. Under phage parasitism, the likelihood that antibiotic-resistant genetic backgrounds spread depends on their initial frequency, mutation rate and intrinsic growth rate relative to drug-susceptible genotypes, because these parameters determine relative rates of phage-resistance evolution on different genetic backgrounds. Moreover, the average cost of antibiotic resistance in terms of intrinsic growth in the antibiotic-free experimental environment was small relative to the benefits of an increased mutation rate in the presence of phages. This is consistent with our theoretical work indicating that, under phage selection, typical costs of antibiotic resistance can be outweighed by realistic increases in mutability if drug resistance and hypermutability are genetically linked, as is frequently observed in clinical isolates. This suggests the long-term distribution of antibiotic resistance depends on the relative rates at which different lineages adapt to other types of selection, which in the case of phage parasitism is probably extremely common, as well as costs of resistance inferred by classical in vitro methods.

  19. Innate Lymphoid Cells (ILCs) as Mediators of Inflammation, Release of Cytokines and Lytic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elemam, Noha Mousaad; Hannawi, Suad; Maghazachi, Azzam A

    2017-12-10

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are an emerging group of immune cells that provide the first line of defense against various pathogens as well as contributing to tissue repair and inflammation. ILCs have been classically divided into three subgroups based on their cytokine secretion and transcription factor profiles. ILC nomenclature is analogous to that of T helper cells. Group 1 ILCs composed of natural killer (NK) cells as well as IFN-γ secreting ILC1s. ILC2s have the capability to produce T H 2 cytokines while ILC3s and lymphoid tissue inducer (LTis) are subsets of cells that are able to secrete IL-17 and/or IL-22. A recent subset of ILC known as ILC4 was discovered, and the cells of this subset were designated as NK17/NK1 due to their release of IL-17 and IFN-γ. In this review, we sought to explain the subclasses of ILCs and their roles as mediators of lytic enzymes and inflammation.

  20. Innate Lymphoid Cells (ILCs as Mediators of Inflammation, Release of Cytokines and Lytic Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Mousaad Elemam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are an emerging group of immune cells that provide the first line of defense against various pathogens as well as contributing to tissue repair and inflammation. ILCs have been classically divided into three subgroups based on their cytokine secretion and transcription factor profiles. ILC nomenclature is analogous to that of T helper cells. Group 1 ILCs composed of natural killer (NK cells as well as IFN-γ secreting ILC1s. ILC2s have the capability to produce TH2 cytokines while ILC3s and lymphoid tissue inducer (LTis are subsets of cells that are able to secrete IL-17 and/or IL-22. A recent subset of ILC known as ILC4 was discovered, and the cells of this subset were designated as NK17/NK1 due to their release of IL-17 and IFN-γ. In this review, we sought to explain the subclasses of ILCs and their roles as mediators of lytic enzymes and inflammation.

  1. Determination of lytic enzyme activities of indigenous Trichoderma isolates from Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, Saeed Ahmad; Tabassum, Ayesha; Hameed, Abdul; Hassan, Fayyaz ul; Afzal, Aftab; Khan, Sabaz Ali; Ahmed, Rafiq; Shahzad, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated lytic enzyme activities in three indigenous Trichoderma strains namely, Trichoderma asperellum, Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma sp. Native Trichoderma strains and a virulent strain of Rhizoctonia solani isolated from infected bean plants were also included in the study. Enzyme activities were determined by measuring sugar reduction by dinitrosalicylic acid (DNS) method using suitable substrates. The antagonists were cultured in minimal salt medium with the following modifications: medium A (1 g of glucose), medium B (0.5 g of glucose + 0.5 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia), medium C (1.0 g of deactivated respective antagonist mycelium) and medium D (1 g of deactivated R. solani mycelia). T asperellum showed presence of higher amounts of chitinases, β-1, 3-glucanases and xylanases in extracellular protein extracts from medium D as compared to medium A. While, the higher activities of glucosidases and endoglucanses were shown in medium D extracts by T. harzianum. β-glucosidase activities were lower compared with other enzymes; however, activities of the extracts of medium D were significantly different. T. asperellum exhibited maximum inhibition (97.7%). On the other hand, Trichoderma sp. did not show any effect on mycelia growth of R. solani on crude extract. PMID:26691463

  2. Differential impact of lytic viruses on prokaryotic morphopopulations in a tropical estuarine system (Cochin estuary, India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasna, Vijayan; Pradeep Ram, Angia Sriram; Parvathi, Ammini; Sime-Ngando, Telesphore

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding on the importance of viral lysis in the functioning of tropical estuarine ecosystem is limited. This study examines viral infection of prokaryotes and subsequent lysis of cells belonging to different morphotypes across a salinity gradient in monsoon driven estuarine ecosystem (Cochin estuary, India). High standing stock of viruses and prokaryotes accompanied by lytic infection rates in the euryhaline/mesohaline region of the estuary suggests salinity to have an influential role in driving interactions between prokaryotes and viruses. High prokaryotic mortality rates, up to 42% of prokaryote population in the pre-monsoon season is further substantiated by a high virus to prokaryote ratio (VPR), suggesting that maintenance of a high number of viruses is dependent on the most active fraction of bacterioplankton. Although myoviruses were the dominant viral morphotype (mean = 43%) throughout the study period, there was significant variation among prokaryotic morphotypes susceptible to viral infection. Among them, the viral infected short rod prokaryote morphotype with lower burst estimates (mean = 18 viruses prokaryote-1) was dominant (35%) in the dry seasons whereas a substantial increase in cocci forms (30%) infected by viruses with high burst size (mean = 31 viruses prokaryote-1) was evident during the monsoon season. Such preferential infections of prokaryotic morphopopulations with respect to seasons can have a strong and variable impact on the carbon and energy flow in this tropical ecosystem.

  3. Characterisation and genome sequence of the lytic Acinetobacter baumannii bacteriophage vB_AbaS_Loki.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dann Turner

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen in healthcare and community settings. While over 100 of Acinetobacter phages have been described in the literature, relatively few have been sequenced. This work describes the characterisation and genome annotation of a new lytic Acinetobacter siphovirus, vB_AbaS_Loki, isolated from activated sewage sludge. Sequencing revealed that Loki encapsulates a 41,308 bp genome, encoding 51 predicted open reading frames. Loki is most closely related to Acinetobacter phage IME_AB3 and more distantly related to Burkholderia phage KL1, Paracoccus phage vB_PmaS_IMEP1 and Pseudomonas phages vB_Pae_Kakheti25, vB_PaeS_SCH_Ab26 and PA73. Loki is characterised by a narrow host range, among the 40 Acinetobacter isolates tested, productive infection was only observed for the propagating host, A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Plaque formation was found to be dependent upon the presence of Ca2+ ions and adsorption to host cells was abolished upon incubation with a mutant of ATCC 17978 encoding a premature stop codon in lpxA. The complete genome sequence of vB_AbaS_Loki was deposited in the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA under the accession number LN890663.

  4. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  5. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  6. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  7. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  8. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  9. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  11. Natural antimicrobial peptide complexes in the fighting of antibiotic resistant biofilms: Calliphora vicina medicinal maggots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gordya

    Full Text Available Biofilms, sedimented microbial communities embedded in a biopolymer matrix cause vast majority of human bacterial infections and many severe complications such as chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Biofilms' resistance to the host immunity and antibiotics makes this kind of infection particularly intractable. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are a ubiquitous facet of innate immunity in animals. However, AMPs activity was studied mainly on planktonic bacteria and little is known about their effects on biofilms. We studied structure and anti-biofilm activity of AMP complex produced by the maggots of blowfly Calliphora vicina living in environments extremely contaminated by biofilm-forming germs. The complex exhibits strong cell killing and matrix destroying activity against human pathogenic antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms as well as non-toxicity to human immune cells. The complex was found to contain AMPs from defensin, cecropin, diptericin and proline-rich peptide families simultaneously expressed in response to bacterial infection and encoded by hundreds mRNA isoforms. All the families combine cell killing and matrix destruction mechanisms, but the ratio of these effects and antibacterial activity spectrum are specific to each family. These molecules dramatically extend the list of known anti-biofilm AMPs. However, pharmacological development of the complex as a whole can provide significant advantages compared with a conventional one-component approach. In particular, a similar level of activity against biofilm and planktonic bacteria (MBEC/MIC ratio provides the complex advantage over conventional antibiotics. Available methods of the complex in situ and in vitro biosynthesis make this idea practicable.

  12. Natural antimicrobial peptide complexes in the fighting of antibiotic resistant biofilms: Calliphora vicina medicinal maggots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordya, Natalia; Yakovlev, Andrey; Kruglikova, Anastasia; Tulin, Dmitry; Potolitsina, Evdokia; Suborova, Tatyana; Bordo, Domenico; Rosano, Camillo; Chernysh, Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Biofilms, sedimented microbial communities embedded in a biopolymer matrix cause vast majority of human bacterial infections and many severe complications such as chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Biofilms' resistance to the host immunity and antibiotics makes this kind of infection particularly intractable. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a ubiquitous facet of innate immunity in animals. However, AMPs activity was studied mainly on planktonic bacteria and little is known about their effects on biofilms. We studied structure and anti-biofilm activity of AMP complex produced by the maggots of blowfly Calliphora vicina living in environments extremely contaminated by biofilm-forming germs. The complex exhibits strong cell killing and matrix destroying activity against human pathogenic antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii biofilms as well as non-toxicity to human immune cells. The complex was found to contain AMPs from defensin, cecropin, diptericin and proline-rich peptide families simultaneously expressed in response to bacterial infection and encoded by hundreds mRNA isoforms. All the families combine cell killing and matrix destruction mechanisms, but the ratio of these effects and antibacterial activity spectrum are specific to each family. These molecules dramatically extend the list of known anti-biofilm AMPs. However, pharmacological development of the complex as a whole can provide significant advantages compared with a conventional one-component approach. In particular, a similar level of activity against biofilm and planktonic bacteria (MBEC/MIC ratio) provides the complex advantage over conventional antibiotics. Available methods of the complex in situ and in vitro biosynthesis make this idea practicable.

  13. High-yield nontoxic gene transfer through conjugation of the CM₁₈-Tat₁₁ chimeric peptide with nanosecond electric pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Fabrizio; Breton, Marie; Leray, Isabelle; Cardarelli, Francesco; Boccardi, Claudia; Bonhenry, Daniel; Tarek, Mounir; Mir, Lluis M; Beltram, Fabio

    2014-07-07

    We report a novel nontoxic, high-yield, gene delivery system based on the synergistic use of nanosecond electric pulses (NPs) and nanomolar doses of the recently introduced CM18-Tat11 chimeric peptide (sequence of KWKLFKKIGAVLKVLTTGYGRKKRRQRRR, residues 1-7 of cecropin-A, 2-12 of melittin, and 47-57 of HIV-1 Tat protein). This combined use makes it possible to drastically reduce the required CM18-Tat11 concentration and confines stable nanopore formation to vesicle membranes followed by DNA release, while no detectable perturbation of the plasma membrane is observed. Two different experimental assays are exploited to quantitatively evaluate the details of NPs and CM18-Tat11 cooperation: (i) cytofluorimetric analysis of the integrity of synthetic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine giant unilamellar vesicles exposed to CM18-Tat11 and NPs and (ii) the in vitro transfection efficiency of a green fluorescent protein-encoding plasmid conjugated to CM18-Tat11 in the presence of NPs. Data support a model in which NPs induce membrane perturbation in the form of transient pores on all cellular membranes, while the peptide stabilizes membrane defects selectively within endosomes. Interestingly, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations show that the latter activity can be specifically attributed to the CM18 module, while Tat11 remains essential for cargo binding and vector subcellular localization. We argue that this result represents a paradigmatic example that can open the way to other targeted delivery protocols.

  14. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation.

  15. Viral FGARAT ORF75A promotes early events in lytic infection and gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Chad H.; Oldenburg, Darby G.; Kara, Mehmet

    2018-01-01

    Gammaherpesviruses encode proteins with homology to the cellular purine metabolic enzyme formyl-glycinamide-phosphoribosyl-amidotransferase (FGARAT), but the role of these viral FGARATs (vFGARATs) in the pathogenesis of a natural host has not been investigated. We report a novel role for the ORF75A vFGARAT of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) in infectious virion production and colonization of mice. MHV68 mutants with premature stop codons in orf75A exhibited a log reduction in acute replication in the lungs after intranasal infection, which preceded a defect in colonization of multiple host reservoirs including the mediastinal lymph nodes, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the spleen. Intraperitoneal infection rescued splenic latency, but not reactivation. The 75A.stop virus also exhibited defective replication in primary fibroblast and macrophage cells. Viruses produced in the absence of ORF75A were characterized by an increase in the ratio of particles to PFU. In the next round of infection this led to the alteration of early events in lytic replication including the deposition of the ORF75C tegument protein, the accelerated kinetics of viral gene expression, and induction of TNFα release and cell death. Infecting cells to deliver equivalent genomes revealed that ORF75A was required for initiating early events in infection. In contrast with the numerous phenotypes observed in the absence of ORF75A, ORF75B was dispensable for replication and pathogenesis. These studies reveal that murine rhadinovirus vFGARAT family members ORF75A and ORF75C have evolved to perform divergent functions that promote replication and colonization of the host. PMID:29390024

  16. CD8 T cells protect adult naive mice from JEV-induced morbidity via lytic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nidhi; Oswal, Neelam; Chawla, Amanpreet Singh; Agrawal, Tanvi; Biswas, Moanaro; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Rath, Satyajit; George, Anna; Bal, Vineeta; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R

    2017-02-01

    Following Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection neutralizing antibodies are shown to provide protection in a significant proportion of cases, but not all, suggesting additional components of immune system might also contribute to elicit protective immune response. Here we have characterized the role of T cells in offering protection in adult mice infected with JEV. Mice lacking α/β-T cells (TCRβ-null) are highly susceptible and die over 10-18 day period as compared to the wild-type (WT) mice which are resistant. This is associated with high viral load, higher mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines and breach in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Infected WT mice do not show a breach in BBB; however, in contrast to TCRβ-null, they show the presence of T cells in the brain. Using adoptive transfer of cells with specific genetic deficiencies we see that neither the presence of CD4 T cells nor cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10 or interferon-gamma have any significant role in offering protection from primary infection. In contrast, we show that CD8 T cell deficiency is more critical as absence of CD8 T cells alone increases mortality in mice infected with JEV. Further, transfer of T cells from beige mice with defects in granular lytic function into TCRβ-null mice shows poor protection implicating granule-mediated target cell lysis as an essential component for survival. In addition, for the first time we report that γ/δ-T cells also make significant contribution to confer protection from JEV infection. Our data show that effector CD8 T cells play a protective role during primary infection possibly by preventing the breach in BBB and neuronal damage.

  17. CD8 T cells protect adult naive mice from JEV-induced morbidity via lytic function.

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    Nidhi Jain

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Following Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV infection neutralizing antibodies are shown to provide protection in a significant proportion of cases, but not all, suggesting additional components of immune system might also contribute to elicit protective immune response. Here we have characterized the role of T cells in offering protection in adult mice infected with JEV. Mice lacking α/β-T cells (TCRβ-null are highly susceptible and die over 10-18 day period as compared to the wild-type (WT mice which are resistant. This is associated with high viral load, higher mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines and breach in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB. Infected WT mice do not show a breach in BBB; however, in contrast to TCRβ-null, they show the presence of T cells in the brain. Using adoptive transfer of cells with specific genetic deficiencies we see that neither the presence of CD4 T cells nor cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10 or interferon-gamma have any significant role in offering protection from primary infection. In contrast, we show that CD8 T cell deficiency is more critical as absence of CD8 T cells alone increases mortality in mice infected with JEV. Further, transfer of T cells from beige mice with defects in granular lytic function into TCRβ-null mice shows poor protection implicating granule-mediated target cell lysis as an essential component for survival. In addition, for the first time we report that γ/δ-T cells also make significant contribution to confer protection from JEV infection. Our data show that effector CD8 T cells play a protective role during primary infection possibly by preventing the breach in BBB and neuronal damage.

  18. Using lytic bacteriophages to eliminate or significantly reduce contamination of food by foodborne bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulakvelidze, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Bacteriophages (also called 'phages') are viruses that kill bacteria. They are arguably the oldest (3 billion years old, by some estimates) and most ubiquitous (total number estimated to be 10(30) -10(32) ) known organisms on Earth. Phages play a key role in maintaining microbial balance in every ecosystem where bacteria exist, and they are part of the normal microflora of all fresh, unprocessed foods. Interest in various practical applications of bacteriophages has been gaining momentum recently, with perhaps the most attention focused on using them to improve food safety. That approach, called 'phage biocontrol', typically includes three main types of applications: (i) using phages to treat domesticated livestock in order to reduce their intestinal colonization with, and shedding of, specific bacterial pathogens; (ii) treatments for decontaminating inanimate surfaces in food-processing facilities and other food establishments, so that foods processed on those surfaces are not cross-contaminated with the targeted pathogens; and (iii) post-harvest treatments involving direct applications of phages onto the harvested foods. This mini-review primarily focuses on the last type of intervention, which has been gaining the most momentum recently. Indeed, the results of recent studies dealing with improving food safety, and several recent regulatory approvals of various commercial phage preparations developed for post-harvest food safety applications, strongly support the idea that lytic phages may provide a safe, environmentally-friendly, and effective approach for significantly reducing contamination of various foods with foodborne bacterial pathogens. However, some important technical and nontechnical problems may need to be addressed before phage biocontrol protocols can become an integral part of routine food safety intervention strategies implemented by food industries in the USA. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Antibacterial Efficacy of Lytic Bacteriophages against Antibiotic-Resistant Klebsiella Species

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    M. Khajeh Karamoddini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a leading and highly prevalent problem in the treatment of infectious diseases. Bacteriophages (phages appear to be effective and safe alternatives for the treatment of resistant infections because of their specificity for bacterial species and lack of infectivity in eukaryotic cells. The present study aimed to isolate bacteriophages against Klebsiella spp. and evaluate their efficacy against antibiotic-resistant species. Seventy-two antibiotic-resistant Klebsiella spp. were isolated from samples of patients who referred to the Ghaem Hospital (Mashhad, Iran. Lytic bacteriophages against Klebsiella spp. were isolated from wastewater of the septic tank of the same hospital. Bactericidal activity of phages against resistant Klebsiella spp. was tested in both liquid (tube method; after 1 and 24 h of incubation and solid (double-layer agar plate method; after 24 h of incubation phases. In each method, three different concentrations of bacteriophages (low: 107 PFU/mL were used. Bacteriophages showed promising bactericidal activity at all assessed concentrations, regardless of the test method and duration of incubation. Overall, bactericidal effects were augmented at higher concentrations. In the tube method, higher activity was observed after 24 h of incubation compared to the 1-h incubation. The bactericidal effects were also higher in the tube method compared to the double-layer agar plate method after 24 h of incubation. The findings of the present study suggest that bacteriophages possess effective bactericidal activity against resistant Klebsiella spp. These bactericidal activities are influenced by phage concentration, duration of incubation, and test method.

  20. Single-cell, real-time detection of oxidative stress induced in Escherichia coli by the antimicrobial peptide CM15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Heejun; Yang, Zhilin; Weisshaar, James C

    2015-01-20

    Antibiotics target specific biochemical mechanisms in bacteria. In response to new drugs, pathogenic bacteria rapidly develop resistance. In contrast, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have retained broad spectrum antibacterial potency over millions of years. We present single-cell fluorescence assays that detect reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm in real time. Within 30 s of permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane by the cationic AMP CM15 [combining residues 1-7 of cecropin A (from moth) with residues 2-9 of melittin (bee venom)], three fluorescence signals report oxidative stress in the cytoplasm, apparently involving O2 (-), H2O2, and •OH. Mechanistic studies indicate that active respiration is a prerequisite to the CM15-induced oxidative damage. In anaerobic conditions, signals from ROS are greatly diminished and the minimum inhibitory concentration increases 20-fold. Evidently the natural human AMP LL-37 also induces a burst of ROS. Oxidative stress may prove a significant bacteriostatic mechanism for a variety of cationic AMPs. If so, host organisms may use the local oxygen level to modulate AMP potency.

  1. In vitro pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial cationic peptides alone and in combination with antibiotics against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosler, Sibel; Mataraci, Emel

    2013-11-01

    Antibiotic therapy for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections is becoming more difficult in hospitals and communities because of strong biofilm-forming properties and multidrug resistance. Biofilm-associated MRSA is not affected by therapeutically achievable concentrations of antibiotics. Therefore, we investigated the in vitro pharmacokinetic activities of antimicrobial cationic peptides (AMPs; indolicidin, cecropin [1-7]-melittin A [2-9] amide [CAMA], and nisin), either alone or in combination with antibiotics (daptomycin, linezolid, teicoplanin, ciprofloxacin, and azithromycin), against standard and 2 clinically obtained MRSA biofilms. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum biofilm-eradication concentrations (MBEC) were determined by microbroth dilution technique. The time-kill curve (TKC) method was used to determine the bactericidal activities of the AMPs alone and in combination with the antibiotics against standard and clinically obtained MRSA biofilms. The MIC values of the AMPs and antibiotics ranged between 2 to 16 and 0.25 to 512 mg/L, and their MBEC values were 640 and 512 to 5120 mg/L, respectively. The TKC studies demonstrated that synergistic interactions occurred most frequently when using nisin+daptomycin/ciprofloxacin, indolicidin+teicoplanin, and CAMA+ciprofloxacin combinations. No antagonism was observed with any combination. AMPs appear to be good candidates for the treatment of MRSA biofilms, as they act as both enhancers of anti-biofilm activities and help to prevent or delay the emergence of resistance when used either alone or in combination with antibiotics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential scanning calorimetry of whole Escherichia coli treated with the antimicrobial peptide MSI-78 indicate a multi-hit mechanism with ribosomes as a novel target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Brannan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC of intact Escherichia coli (E. coli was used to identify non-lipidic targets of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP MSI-78. The DSC thermograms revealed that, in addition to its known lytic properties, MSI-78 also has a striking effect on ribosomes. MSI-78’s effect on DSC scans of bacteria was similar to that of kanamycin, an antibiotic drug known to target the 30S small ribosomal subunit. An in vitro transcription/translation assay helped confirm MSI-78’s targeting of ribosomes. The scrambled version of MSI-78 also affected the ribosome peak of the DSC scans, but required greater amounts of peptide to cause a similar effect to the unscrambled peptide. Furthermore, the effect of the scrambled peptide was not specific to the ribosomes; other regions of the DSC thermogram were also affected. These results suggest that MSI-78’s effects on E. coli are at least somewhat dependent on its particular structural features, rather than a sole function of its overall charge and hydrophobicity. When considered along with earlier work detailing MSI-78’s membrane lytic properties, it appears that MSI-78 operates via a multi-hit mechanism with multiple targets.

  3. Cooperation between Epstein-Barr virus immune evasion proteins spreads protection from CD8+ T cell recognition across all three phases of the lytic cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura L Quinn

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cell responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV lytic cycle expressed antigens display a hierarchy of immunodominance, in which responses to epitopes of immediate-early (IE and some early (E antigens are more frequently observed than responses to epitopes of late (L expressed antigens. It has been proposed that this hierarchy, which correlates with the phase-specific efficiency of antigen presentation, may be due to the influence of viral immune-evasion genes. At least three EBV-encoded genes, BNLF2a, BGLF5 and BILF1, have the potential to inhibit processing and presentation of CD8+ T cell epitopes. Here we examined the relative contribution of these genes to modulation of CD8+ T cell recognition of EBV lytic antigens expressed at different phases of the replication cycle in EBV-transformed B-cells (LCLs which spontaneously reactivate lytic cycle. Selective shRNA-mediated knockdown of BNLF2a expression led to more efficient recognition of immediate-early (IE- and early (E-derived epitopes by CD8+ T cells, while knock down of BILF1 increased recognition of epitopes from E and late (L-expressed antigens. Contrary to what might have been predicted from previous ectopic expression studies in EBV-negative model cell lines, the shRNA-mediated inhibition of BGLF5 expression in LCLs showed only modest, if any, increase in recognition of epitopes expressed in any phase of lytic cycle. These data indicate that whilst BNLF2a interferes with antigen presentation with diminishing efficiency as lytic cycle progresses (IE>E>>L, interference by BILF1 increases with progression through lytic cycle (IElytic virus replication, and secondly identify lytic-cycle phase-specific effects that provide mechanistic

  4. Unprecedented evidence for high viral abundance and lytic activity in coral reef waters of the South Pacific Ocean

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    Jérôme P. Payet

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite nutrient-depleted conditions, coral reef waters harbor abundant and diverse microbes; as major agents of microbial mortality, viruses are likely to influence microbial processes in these ecosystems. However, little is known about marine viruses in these rapidly changing ecosystems. Here we examined spatial and short-term temporal variability in marine viral abundance and viral lytic activity across various reef habitats surrounding Moorea Island (French Polynesia in the South Pacific. Water samples were collected along 4 regional cross-reef transects and during a time-series in Opunohu Bay. Results revealed high viral abundance (range: 5.6 x 106 – 3.6 x 107 viruses ml-1 and lytic viral production (range: 1.5 x 109 – 9.2 x 1010 viruses l-1 d-1. Flow cytometry revealed that viral assemblages were composed of three subsets that each displayed distinct spatiotemporal relationships with nutrient concentrations and autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial abundances. The results highlight dynamic shifts in viral community structure and imply that each of these three subsets is ecologically important and likely to infect distinct microbial hosts in reef waters. Based on viral-reduction approach, we estimate that lytic viruses were responsible for the removal of ca. 24% to 367% of bacterial standing stock d-1 and the release of ca. 1.1 to 62 µg of organic carbon l-1 d-1 in reef waters. Overall, this work demonstrates the highly dynamic distribution of viruses and their critical roles in controlling microbial mortality and nutrient cycling in coral reef water ecosystems.

  5. AtlA functions as a peptidoglycan lytic transglycosylase in the Neisseria gonorrhoeae type IV secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Petra L; Hamilton, Holly L; Cloud-Hansen, Karen; Dillard, Joseph P

    2007-08-01

    Type IV secretion systems require peptidoglycan lytic transglycosylases for efficient secretion, but the function of these enzymes is not clear. The type IV secretion system gene cluster of Neisseria gonorrhoeae encodes two peptidoglycan transglycosylase homologues. One, LtgX, is similar to peptidoglycan transglycosylases from other type IV secretion systems. The other, AtlA, is similar to endolysins from bacteriophages and is not similar to any described type IV secretion component. We characterized the enzymatic function of AtlA in order to examine its role in the type IV secretion system. Purified AtlA was found to degrade macromolecular peptidoglycan and to produce 1,6-anhydro peptidoglycan monomers, characteristic of lytic transglycosylase activity. We found that AtlA can functionally replace the lambda endolysin to lyse Escherichia coli. In contrast, a sensitive measure of lysis demonstrated that AtlA does not lyse gonococci expressing it or gonococci cocultured with an AtlA-expressing strain. The gonococcal type IV secretion system secretes DNA during growth. A deletion of ltgX or a substitution in the putative active site of AtlA severely decreased DNA secretion. These results indicate that AtlA and LtgX are actively involved in type IV secretion and that AtlA is not involved in lysis of gonococci to release DNA. This is the first demonstration that a type IV secretion peptidoglycanase has lytic transglycosylase activity. These data show that AtlA plays a role in type IV secretion of DNA that requires peptidoglycan breakdown without cell lysis.

  6. Metabolic Cooperation of Glucose and Glutamine Is Essential for the Lytic Cycle of Obligate Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Richard; Zagoriy, Vyacheslav; Lucius, Richard; Gupta, Nishith

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread protozoan parasite infecting nearly all warm-blooded organisms. Asexual reproduction of the parasite within its host cells is achieved by consecutive lytic cycles, which necessitates biogenesis of significant energy and biomass. Here we show that glucose and glutamine are the two major physiologically important nutrients used for the synthesis of macromolecules (ATP, nucleic acid, proteins, and lipids) in T. gondii, and either of them is sufficient to ensure the parasite survival. The parasite can counteract genetic ablation of its glucose transporter by increasing the flux of glutamine-derived carbon through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and by concurrently activating gluconeogenesis, which guarantee a continued biogenesis of ATP and biomass for host-cell invasion and parasite replication, respectively. In accord, a pharmacological inhibition of glutaminolysis or oxidative phosphorylation arrests the lytic cycle of the glycolysis-deficient mutant, which is primarily a consequence of impaired invasion due to depletion of ATP. Unexpectedly, however, intracellular parasites continue to proliferate, albeit slower, notwithstanding a simultaneous deprivation of glucose and glutamine. A growth defect in the glycolysis-impaired mutant is caused by a compromised synthesis of lipids, which cannot be counterbalanced by glutamine but can be restored by acetate. Consistently, supplementation of parasite cultures with exogenous acetate can amend the lytic cycle of the glucose transport mutant. Such plasticity in the parasite's carbon flux enables a growth-and-survival trade-off in assorted nutrient milieus, which may underlie the promiscuous survival of T. gondii tachyzoites in diverse host cells. Our results also indicate a convergence of parasite metabolism with cancer cells. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Metabolic Cooperation of Glucose and Glutamine Is Essential for the Lytic Cycle of Obligate Intracellular Parasite Toxoplasma gondii*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Richard; Zagoriy, Vyacheslav; Lucius, Richard; Gupta, Nishith

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread protozoan parasite infecting nearly all warm-blooded organisms. Asexual reproduction of the parasite within its host cells is achieved by consecutive lytic cycles, which necessitates biogenesis of significant energy and biomass. Here we show that glucose and glutamine are the two major physiologically important nutrients used for the synthesis of macromolecules (ATP, nucleic acid, proteins, and lipids) in T. gondii, and either of them is sufficient to ensure the parasite survival. The parasite can counteract genetic ablation of its glucose transporter by increasing the flux of glutamine-derived carbon through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and by concurrently activating gluconeogenesis, which guarantee a continued biogenesis of ATP and biomass for host-cell invasion and parasite replication, respectively. In accord, a pharmacological inhibition of glutaminolysis or oxidative phosphorylation arrests the lytic cycle of the glycolysis-deficient mutant, which is primarily a consequence of impaired invasion due to depletion of ATP. Unexpectedly, however, intracellular parasites continue to proliferate, albeit slower, notwithstanding a simultaneous deprivation of glucose and glutamine. A growth defect in the glycolysis-impaired mutant is caused by a compromised synthesis of lipids, which cannot be counterbalanced by glutamine but can be restored by acetate. Consistently, supplementation of parasite cultures with exogenous acetate can amend the lytic cycle of the glucose transport mutant. Such plasticity in the parasite's carbon flux enables a growth-and-survival trade-off in assorted nutrient milieus, which may underlie the promiscuous survival of T. gondii tachyzoites in diverse host cells. Our results also indicate a convergence of parasite metabolism with cancer cells. PMID:26518878

  8. Peptides in melanoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Peptides derived from tumor associated antigens can be utilized to elicit a therapeutically effective immune response against melanoma in experimental models. However, patient vaccination with peptides - although it is often followed by the induction of melanoma- specific T lymphocytes - is rarely associated with tumor response of clinical relevance. In this review I summarize the principles of peptide design as well as the results so far obtained in the clinical setting while treating cutaneous melanoma by means of this active immunotherapy strategy. I also discuss some immunological and methodological issues that might be helpful for the successful development of peptide-based vaccines.

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  10. Genomic analysis of Bacillus subtilis lytic bacteriophage ϕNIT1 capable of obstructing natto fermentation carrying genes for the capsule-lytic soluble enzymes poly-γ-glutamate hydrolase and levanase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Tatsuro; Abe, Naoki; Kimura, Keitarou; Suzuki, Atsuto; Kaneko, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis strains including the fermented soybean (natto) starter produce capsular polymers consisting of poly-γ-glutamate and levan. Capsular polymers may protect the cells from phage infection. However, bacteriophage ϕNIT1 carries a γ-PGA hydrolase gene (pghP) that help it to counteract the host cell's protection strategy. ϕNIT had a linear double stranded DNA genome of 155,631-bp with a terminal redundancy of 5,103-bp, containing a gene encoding an active levan hydrolase. These capsule-lytic enzyme genes were located in the possible foreign gene cluster regions between central core and terminal redundant regions, and were expressed at the late phase of the phage lytic cycle. All tested natto origin Spounavirinae phages carried both genes for capsule degrading enzymes similar to ϕNIT1. A comparative genomic analysis revealed the diversity among ϕNIT1 and Bacillus phages carrying pghP-like and levan-hydrolase genes, and provides novel understanding on the acquisition mechanism of these enzymatic genes.

  11. Deletion of Lytic Transglycosylases Increases Beta-Lactam Resistance in Shewanella oneidensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jianhua; Sun, Yiyang; Sun, Yijuan; Yu, Zhiliang; Qiu, Juanping; Gao, Haichun

    2018-01-01

    Production of chromosome-encoded β-lactamases confers resistance to β-lactams in many Gram-negative bacteria. Some inducible β-lactamases, especially the class C β-lactamase AmpC in Enterobacteriaceae, share a common regulatory mechanism, the ampR-ampC paradigm. Induction of ampC is intimately linked to peptidoglycan recycling, and the LysR-type transcriptional regulator AmpR plays a central role in the process. However, our previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of class D β-lactamase gene blaA in Shewanella oneidensis is distinct from the established paradigm since an AmpR homolog is absent and major peptidoglycan recycling enzymes play opposite roles in β-lactamase expression. Given that lytic transglycosylases (LTs), a class of peptidoglycan hydrolases cleaving the β-1,4 glycosidic linkage in glycan strands of peptidoglycan, can disturb peptidoglycan recycling, and thus may affect induction of blaA. In this study, we investigated impacts of such enzymes on susceptibility to β-lactams. Deletion of three LTs (SltY, MltB and MltB2) increased β-lactam resistance, while four other LTs (MltD, MltD2, MltF, and Slt2) seemed dispensable to β-lactam resistance. The double LT mutants ΔmltBΔmltB2 and ΔsltYΔmltB2 had β-lactam resistance stronger than any of the single mutants. Deletion of ampG (encoding permease AmpG) and mrcA (encoding penicillin binding protein 1a, PBP1a) from both double LT mutants further increased the resistance to β-lactams. Notably, all increased β-lactam resistance phenotypes were in accordance with enhanced blaA expression. Although significant, the increase in β-lactamase activity after inactivating LTs is much lower than that produced by PBP1a inactivation. Our data implicate that LTs play important roles in blaA expression in S. oneidensis. PMID:29403465

  12. Bacteriophage and lytic enzymes - can they help us in the war with antibiotic resistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trudil, D.; Rainina, E.

    2009-01-01

    Drug-resistant pathogens are a growing menace to all people, regardless of age, or socioeconomic background. They endanger people industrial societies like the United States, as well as in less developed nations and are even causing problems in military field hospitals. From Streptococcus pneumoniae to Staphylococcus, C. difficile, and multidrug-resistant TB, the list is growing. The threat of engineered microorganisms further complicates the interaction between man and Mother Nature. Additionally, although antibiotics were specifically designed for treating human health emergencies, their use for raising livestock animals has expanded. In the US, large amounts of antibiotics are routinely mixed into feed in order to promote growth rather than combat disease and as prophylactic treatment to offset unnatural diets and unhealthy living conditions. U.S.-raised animals in the 1950s received 2 million pounds per year of antibiotics in their feed compared to 50 million pounds today-a 2,500-percent increase. A large percentage of these drugs pass into the environment. In fact, prior to 1995, when fluoroquinolones were first approved to treat poultry, very few fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter were found in people with foodborne diseases in the United States. After the approval, however, many more fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria were found in humans and in poultry from slaughter plants and retail stores. The threat to our food supply becomes a threat to security. What can be done? One approach is to treat bacterial diseases by the use of bacteriophages. Phages are very small viruses that destroy by lysing select bacteria. The idea of using phage as a therapy for infectious bacterial diseases was first proposed by d'Herelle around World War I and over 80 years bacteriophage has been a key tool of healthcare professionals within Eastern Europe. More recently professionals in the USA and Western Europe have isolated and developed specific lytic components which have

  13. Structure, synthesis, and activity of dermaseptin b, a novel vertebrate defensive peptide from frog skin: relationship with adenoregulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, A; Amiche, M; Nicolas, P

    1994-05-31

    A novel antimicrobial peptide, designated dermaseptin b, was isolated from the skin of the arboreal frog Phyllomedusa bicolor. This 27-residue peptide amide is basic, containing 3 lysine residues that punctuate an alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic sequence. In helix-inducing solvent, dermaseptin b adopts an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation that most closely resembles class L amphipathic helixes, with all lysine residues on the polar face of the helix. The peptide exhibits growth inhibition activity in vitro against a broad spectrum of pathogenic microorganisms including yeast and bacteria as well as various filamentous fungi that are responsible for severe opportunistic infections accompanying acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the use of immunosuppressive agents. Maximized pairwise sequence alignment of dermaseptin b and dermaseptin s, a 34-residue antimicrobial peptide previously isolated from Phyllomedusa sauvagii, reveals 81% amino acid identity. No other significant similarity was found between dermaseptin b and any prokaryotic or eukaryotic protein, but similarity was found with adenoregulin (38% amino acid postional identity), a 33-residue peptide that enhances binding of agonists to the A1 adenosine receptor. The synthetic replicates of dermaseptin b and adenoregulin displayed similar but nonidentical spectra of antimicrobial activity, and both peptides were devoid of lytic effect on mammalian cells. Accordingly, the observation that adenoregulin enhances binding of agonists to the adenosine receptor may in fact be a consequence of its ability to alter the structure of biological membranes and to produce signal transduction via interactions with the lipid bilayer, bypassing cell surface receptor interactions.

  14. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  15. De Novo Herpes Simplex Virus VP16 Expression Gates a Dynamic Programmatic Transition and Sets the Latent/Lytic Balance during Acute Infection in Trigeminal Ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawtell, Nancy M; Thompson, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    The life long relationship between herpes simplex virus and its host hinges on the ability of the virus to aggressively replicate in epithelial cells at the site of infection and transport into the nervous system through axons innervating the infection site. Interaction between the virus and the sensory neuron represents a pivot point where largely unknown mechanisms lead to a latent or a lytic infection in the neuron. Regulation at this pivot point is critical for balancing two objectives, efficient widespread seeding of the nervous system and host survival. By combining genetic and in vivo in approaches, our studies reveal that the balance between latent and lytic programs is a process occurring early in the trigeminal ganglion. Unexpectedly, activation of the latent program precedes entry into the lytic program by 12 -14hrs. Importantly, at the individual neuronal level, the lytic program begins as a transition out of this acute stage latent program and this escape from the default latent program is regulated by de novo VP16 expression. Our findings support a model in which regulated de novo VP16 expression in the neuron mediates entry into the lytic cycle during the earliest stages of virus infection in vivo. These findings support the hypothesis that the loose association of VP16 with the viral tegument combined with sensory axon length and transport mechanisms serve to limit arrival of virion associated VP16 into neuronal nuclei favoring latency. Further, our findings point to specialized features of the VP16 promoter that control the de novo expression of VP16 in neurons and this regulation is a key component in setting the balance between lytic and latent infections in the nervous system.

  16. Volume of Lytic Vertebral Body Metastatic Disease Quantified Using Computed Tomography–Based Image Segmentation Predicts Fracture Risk After Spine Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thibault, Isabelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de L' Universite de Québec–Université Laval, Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Whyne, Cari M. [Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zhou, Stephanie; Campbell, Mikki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Atenafu, Eshetu G. [Department of Biostatistics, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Myrehaug, Sten; Soliman, Hany; Lee, Young K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ebrahimi, Hamid [Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Yee, Albert J.M. [Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: arjun.sahgal@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine a threshold of vertebral body (VB) osteolytic or osteoblastic tumor involvement that would predict vertebral compression fracture (VCF) risk after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), using volumetric image-segmentation software. Methods and Materials: A computational semiautomated skeletal metastasis segmentation process refined in our laboratory was applied to the pretreatment planning CT scan of 100 vertebral segments in 55 patients treated with spine SBRT. Each VB was segmented and the percentage of lytic and/or blastic disease by volume determined. Results: The cumulative incidence of VCF at 3 and 12 months was 14.1% and 17.3%, respectively. The median follow-up was 7.3 months (range, 0.6-67.6 months). In all, 56% of segments were determined lytic, 23% blastic, and 21% mixed, according to clinical radiologic determination. Within these 3 clinical cohorts, the segmentation-determined mean percentages of lytic and blastic tumor were 8.9% and 6.0%, 0.2% and 26.9%, and 3.4% and 15.8% by volume, respectively. On the basis of the entire cohort (n=100), a significant association was observed for the osteolytic percentage measures and the occurrence of VCF (P<.001) but not for the osteoblastic measures. The most significant lytic disease threshold was observed at ≥11.6% (odds ratio 37.4, 95% confidence interval 9.4-148.9). On multivariable analysis, ≥11.6% lytic disease (P<.001), baseline VCF (P<.001), and SBRT with ≥20 Gy per fraction (P=.014) were predictive. Conclusions: Pretreatment lytic VB disease volumetric measures, independent of the blastic component, predict for SBRT-induced VCF. Larger-scale trials evaluating our software are planned to validate the results.

  17. Peptide Vaccines for Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory C. F. De Brito

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to an increase in the incidence of leishmaniases worldwide, the development of new strategies such as prophylactic vaccines to prevent infection and decrease the disease have become a high priority. Classic vaccines against leishmaniases were based on live or attenuated parasites or their subunits. Nevertheless, the use of whole parasite or their subunits for vaccine production has numerous disadvantages. Therefore, the use of Leishmania peptides to design more specific vaccines against leishmaniases seems promising. Moreover, peptides have several benefits in comparison with other kinds of antigens, for instance, good stability, absence of potentially damaging materials, antigen low complexity, and low-cost to scale up. By contrast, peptides are poor immunogenic alone, and they need to be delivered correctly. In this context, several approaches described in this review are useful to solve these drawbacks. Approaches, such as, peptides in combination with potent adjuvants, cellular vaccinations, adenovirus, polyepitopes, or DNA vaccines have been used to develop peptide-based vaccines. Recent advancements in peptide vaccine design, chimeric, or polypeptide vaccines and nanovaccines based on particles attached or formulated with antigenic components or peptides have been increasingly employed to drive a specific immune response. In this review, we briefly summarize the old, current, and future stands on peptide-based vaccines, describing the disadvantages and benefits associated with them. We also propose possible approaches to overcome the related weaknesses of synthetic vaccines and suggest future guidelines for their development.

  18. Peptide Vaccines for Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brito, Rory C F; Cardoso, Jamille M De O; Reis, Levi E S; Vieira, Joao F; Mathias, Fernando A S; Roatt, Bruno M; Aguiar-Soares, Rodrigo Dian D O; Ruiz, Jeronimo C; Resende, Daniela de M; Reis, Alexandre B

    2018-01-01

    Due to an increase in the incidence of leishmaniases worldwide, the development of new strategies such as prophylactic vaccines to prevent infection and decrease the disease have become a high priority. Classic vaccines against leishmaniases were based on live or attenuated parasites or their subunits. Nevertheless, the use of whole parasite or their subunits for vaccine production has numerous disadvantages. Therefore, the use of Leishmania peptides to design more specific vaccines against leishmaniases seems promising. Moreover, peptides have several benefits in comparison with other kinds of antigens, for instance, good stability, absence of potentially damaging materials, antigen low complexity, and low-cost to scale up. By contrast, peptides are poor immunogenic alone, and they need to be delivered correctly. In this context, several approaches described in this review are useful to solve these drawbacks. Approaches, such as, peptides in combination with potent adjuvants, cellular vaccinations, adenovirus, polyepitopes, or DNA vaccines have been used to develop peptide-based vaccines. Recent advancements in peptide vaccine design, chimeric, or polypeptide vaccines and nanovaccines based on particles attached or formulated with antigenic components or peptides have been increasingly employed to drive a specific immune response. In this review, we briefly summarize the old, current, and future stands on peptide-based vaccines, describing the disadvantages and benefits associated with them. We also propose possible approaches to overcome the related weaknesses of synthetic vaccines and suggest future guidelines for their development.

  19. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from...

  20. A comparative study on the activity of fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for the depolymerization of cellulose in soybean spent flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brian C; Agger, Jane Wittrup; Zhang, Zhenghong; Wichmann, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S

    2017-09-08

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-dependent enzymes capable of the oxidative breakdown of polysaccharides. They are of industrial interest due to their ability to enhance the enzymatic depolymerization of recalcitrant substrates by glycoside hydrolases. In this paper, twenty-four lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) expressed in Trichoderma reesei were evaluated for their ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides in soybean spent flakes, an abundant and industrially relevant substrate. TrCel61A, a soy-polysaccharide-active AA9 LPMO from T. reesei, was used as a benchmark in this evaluation. In total, seven LPMOs demonstrated activity on pretreated soy spent flakes, with the products from enzymatic treatments evaluated using mass spectrometry and high performance anion exchange chromatography. The hydrolytic boosting effect of the top-performing enzymes was evaluated in combination with endoglucanase and beta-glucosidase. Two enzymes (TrCel61A and Aspte6) showed the ability to release more than 36% of the pretreated soy spent flake glucose - a greater than 75% increase over the same treatment without LPMO addition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the lytic transglycosylase MltE from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artola-Recolons, Cecilia; Llarrull, Leticia I.; Lastochkin, Elena; Mobashery, Shahriar; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2010-01-01

    Crystals of the lytic transglycosylase MltE from E. coli were grown using the microbatch method and diffracted to a resolution of 2.1 Å. MltE from Escherichia coli (193 amino acids, 21 380 Da) is a lytic transglycosylase that initiates the first step of cell-wall recycling. This enzyme is responsible for the cleavage of the cell-wall peptidoglycan at the β-1,4-glycosidic bond between the N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylmuramic acid units. At the end this reaction generates a disaccharide that is internalized and initiates the recycling process. To obtain insights into the biological functions of MltE, crystallization trials were performed and crystals of MltE protein that were suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis were obtained. The MltE protein of E. coli was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Crystals grew from a mixture consisting of 28% polyethylene glycol 4000, 0.1 M Tris pH 8.4 and 0.2 M magnesium chloride. Further optimization was performed using the microbatch technique. Single crystals were obtained that belonged to the orthorhombic space group C222 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 123.32, b = 183.93, c = 35.29 Å, and diffracted to a resolution of 2.1 Å

  2. Listeria monocytogenes has a functional chitinolytic system and an active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paspaliari, Dafni Katerina; Loose, Jennifer S. M.; Larsen, Marianne Halberg

    2015-01-01

    Chitinases and chitin-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are most commonly associated with chitin metabolism, but are also reported as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. Listeria monocytogenes, a well-known virulent bacterium, possesses two chitinases (ChiA and ChiB) and a ......Chitinases and chitin-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are most commonly associated with chitin metabolism, but are also reported as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. Listeria monocytogenes, a well-known virulent bacterium, possesses two chitinases (ChiA and Chi...... but different product profiles depending on the substrate. In LPMO-chitinase synergy experiments, CBP21 is able to boost the activity of both ChiA and ChiB more than LmLPMO10. Product analysis of the synergy assays revealed that the chitinases were unable to efficiently hydrolyse the LPMO products...... (chitooligosaccharide aldonic acids) with a degree of polymerization below four (ChiA and SmChiC) or three (ChiB). Gene transcription and protein expression analysis showed that LmLPMO10 is neither highly transcribed, nor abundantly secreted during the growth of L. monocytogenes in a chitin-containing medium...

  3. The role of oxidative stress in EBV lytic reactivation, radioresistance and the potential preventive and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianmin; Li, Hongde; Luo, Xiangjian; Li, Yueshuo; Bode, Ann; Cao, Ya

    2017-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an important cancer causing virus. Cancer associated with EBV account for approximately 1.5% of all cancers, and represent 1.8% of all cancer deaths worldwide. EBV reactivation plays an important role in the development of EBV-related diseases and is closely related with patients' survival and clinical stages of EBV-related cancers. The therapy regarding to EBV-related cancers is very urgent, especially in endemic areas. Generating oxidative stress is a critical mechanism by which host cells defend against infection by virus. In addition, ROS-mediated oxidative stress plays a significant but paradoxical role acting as a "double-edged sword" to regulate cellular response to radiation, which is the main therapy strategy for EBV-related cancers, especially nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Therefore, in this review we primarily discuss the possible interplay among the oxidative stress, EBV lytic reactivation and radioresistance. Understanding the role of oxidative stress in EBV lytic reactivation and radioresistance will assist in the development of effective strategies for prevention and treatment of EBV-related cancers. © 2017 UICC.

  4. Effective inhibition of lytic development of bacteriophages λ, P1 and T4 by starvation of their host, Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn Alicja

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriophage infections of bacterial cultures cause serious problems in genetic engineering and biotechnology. They are dangerous not only because of direct effects on the currently infected cultures, i.e. their devastation, but also due to a high probability of spreading the phage progeny throughout a whole laboratory or plant, which causes a real danger for further cultivations. Therefore, a simple method for quick inhibition of phage development after detection of bacterial culture infection should be very useful. Results Here, we demonstrate that depletion of a carbon source from the culture medium, which provokes starvation of bacterial cells, results in rapid inhibition of lytic development of three Escherichia coli phages, λ, P1 and T4. Since the effect was similar for three different phages, it seems that it may be a general phenomenon. Moreover, similar effects were observed in flask cultures and in chemostats. Conclusion Bacteriophage lytic development can be inhibited efficiently by carbon source limitation in bacterial cultures. Thus, if bacteriophage contamination is detected, starvation procedures may be recommended to alleviate deleterious effects of phage infection on the culture. We believe that this strategy, in combination with the use of automated and sensitive bacteriophage biosensors, may be employed in the fermentation laboratory practice to control phage outbreaks in bioprocesses more effectively.

  5. Efficient Translation of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) DNA Polymerase Contributes to the Enhanced Lytic Replication Phenotype of M81 EBV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Trenton Mel; Verma, Dinesh; Thompson, Jacob; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2018-03-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is linked to the development of both lymphoid and epithelial malignancies worldwide. The M81 strain of EBV, isolated from a Chinese patient with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), demonstrates spontaneous lytic replication and high-titer virus production in comparison to the prototype B95-8 EBV strain. Genetic comparisons of M81 and B95-8 EBVs were previously been performed in order to determine if the hyperlytic property of M81 is associated with sequence differences in essential lytic genes. EBV SM is an RNA-binding protein expressed during early lytic replication that is essential for virus production. We compared the functions of M81 SM and B95-8 SM and demonstrate that polymorphisms in SM do not contribute to the lytic phenotype of M81 EBV. However, the expression level of the EBV DNA polymerase protein was much higher in M81- than in B95-8-infected cells. The relative deficiency in the expression of B95-8 DNA polymerase was related to the B95-8 genome deletion, which truncates the BALF5 3' untranslated region (UTR). Similarly, the insertion of bacmid DNA into the widely used recombinant B95-8 bacmid creates an inefficient BALF5 3' UTR. We further showed that the while SM is required for and facilitates the efficient expression of both M81 and B95-8 mRNAs regardless of the 3' UTR, the BALF5 3' UTR sequence is important for BALF5 protein translation. These data indicate that the enhanced lytic replication and virus production of M81 compared to those of B95-8 are partly due to the robust translation of EBV DNA polymerase required for viral DNA replication due to a more efficient BALF5 3' UTR in M81. IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects more than 90% of the human population, but the incidence of EBV-associated tumors varies greatly in different parts of the world. Thus, understanding the connection between genetic polymorphisms from patient isolates of EBV, gene expression phenotypes, and disease is important and may help in

  6. Comparison of MGIT and Myco/F lytic liquid-based blood culture systems for recovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from pleural fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harausz, Elizabeth; Lusiba, John Kafuluma; Nsereko, Mary; Johnson, John L; Toossi, Zahra; Ogwang, Sam; Boom, W Henry; Joloba, Moses L

    2015-04-01

    The specificities and sensitivities of the Bactec mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) system for the recovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from pleural fluid are not statistically different than those of the Myco/F lytic liquid culture system. The time to positivity is shorter in the MGIT system (12.7 versus 20.7 days, respectively; P=0.007). The Myco/F lytic culture system may be an alternative to the MGIT system for diagnosing pleural tuberculosis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Nucleation in mesoscopic systems under transient conditions: Peptide-induced pore formation in vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.; Höök, Fredrik

    2013-04-01

    Attachment of lytic peptides to the lipid membrane of virions or bacteria is often accompanied by their aggregation and pore formation, resulting eventually in membrane rupture and pathogen neutralization. The membrane rupture may occur gradually via formation of many pores or abruptly after the formation of the first pore. In academic studies, this process is observed during interaction of peptides with lipid vesicles. We present an analytical model and the corresponding Monte Carlo simulations focused on the pore formation in such situations. Specifically, we calculate the time of the first nucleation-limited pore-formation event and show the distribution of this time in the regime when the fluctuations of the number of peptides attached to a vesicle are appreciable. The results obtained are used to clarify the mechanism of the pore formation and membrane destabilization observed recently during interaction of highly active α-helical peptide with sub-100-nm lipid vesicles that mimic enveloped viruses with nanoscale membrane curvature. The model proposed and the analysis presented are generic and may be applicable to other meso- and nanosystems.

  8. Biofilm infections between Scylla and Charybdis: interplay of host antimicrobial peptides and antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernysh S

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Sergey Chernysh,* Natalia Gordya,* Dmitry Tulin, Andrey Yakovlev Laboratory of Insect Biopharmacology and Immunology, Faculty of Biology, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The aim of this study is to improve the anti-biofilm activity of antibiotics. We hypothesized that the antimicrobial peptide (AMP complex of the host’s immune system can be used for this purpose and examined the assumption on model biofilms. Methods: FLIP7, the AMP complex of the blowfly Calliphora vicina containing a combination of defensins, cecropins, diptericins and proline-rich peptides was isolated from the hemolymph of bacteria-challenged maggots. The complex interaction with antibiotics of various classes was studied in biofilm and planktonic cultures of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii by the checkerboard method using trimethyl tetrazolium chloride cell viability and crystal violet biofilm eradication assays supplemented with microscopic analysis. Results: We found that FLIP7 demonstrated: high synergy (fractional inhibitory concentration index <0.25 with meropenem, amikacin, kanamycin, ampicillin, vancomycin and cefotaxime; synergy with clindamycin, erythromycin and chloramphenicol; additive interaction with oxacillin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and gentamicin; and no interaction with polymyxin B. The interaction in planktonic cell models was significantly weaker than in biofilms of the same strains. The analysis of the dose–effect curves pointed to persister cells as a likely target of FLIP7 synergistic effect. The biofilm eradication assay showed that the effect also caused total destruction of S. aureus and E. coli biofilm materials. The effect allowed reducing the effective anti-biofilm concentration of the antibiotic to a level well below the one clinically achievable (2–3 orders of magnitude in

  9. Decalcified allograft in repair of lytic lesions of bone: A study to evolve bone bank in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The quest for ideal bone graft substitutes still haunts orthopedic researchers. The impetus for this search of newer bone substitutes is provided by mismatch between the demand and supply of autogenous bone grafts. Bone banking facilities such as deep frozen and freeze-dried allografts are not so widely available in most of the developing countries. To overcome the problem, we have used partially decalcified, ethanol preserved, and domestic refrigerator stored allografts which are economical and needs simple technology for procurement, preparation, and preservation. The aim of the study was to assess the radiological and functional outcome of the partially decalcified allograft (by weak hydrochloric acid in patients of benign lytic lesions of bone. Through this study, we have also tried to evolve, establish, and disseminate the concept of the bone bank. Materials and Methods: 42 cases of lytic lesions of bone who were treated by decalcified (by weak hydrochloric acid, ethanol preserved, allografts were included in this prospective study. The allograft was obtained from freshly amputated limbs or excised femoral heads during hip arthroplasties under strict aseptic conditions. The causes of lytic lesions were unicameral bone cyst ( n = 3, aneurysmal bone cyst ( n = 3, giant cell tumor ( n = 9, fibrous dysplasia ( n = 12, chondromyxoid fibroma, chondroma, nonossifying fibroma ( n = 1 each, tubercular osteomyelitis ( n = 7, and chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis ( n = 5. The cavity of the lesion was thoroughly curetted and compactly filled with matchstick sized allografts. Results: Quantitative assessment based on the criteria of Sethi et al. (1993 was done. There was complete assimilation in 27 cases, partial healing in 12 cases, and failure in 3 cases. Functional assessment was also done according to which there were 29 excellent results, 6 good, and 7 cases of failure (infection, recurrence, and nonunion of pathological fracture. We

  10. Comparative activity and mechanism of action of three types of bovine antimicrobial peptides against pathogenic Prototheca spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasinsig, Linda; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Scarsini, Michele; Guida, Filomena; Piccinini, Renata; Tossi, Alessandro; Zanetti, Margherita

    2012-02-01

    The yeast-like algae of the genus Prototheca are ubiquitous saprophytes causing infections in immunocompromised patients and granulomatous mastitis in cattle. Few available therapies and the rapid spread of resistant strains worldwide support the need for novel drugs against protothecosis. Host defence antimicrobial peptides inactivate a wide array of pathogens and are a rich source of leads, with the advantage of being largely unaffected by microbial resistance mechanisms. Three structurally diverse bovine peptides [BMAP-28, Bac5 and lingual antimicrobial peptide (LAP)] have thus been tested for their capacity to inactivate Prototheca spp. In minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays, they were all effective in the micromolar range against clinical mastitis isolates as well as a Prototheca wickerhamii reference strain. BMAP-28 sterilized Prototheca cultures within 30-60 min at its MIC, induced cell permeabilization with near 100% release of cellular adenosine triphosphate and resulted in extensive surface blebbing and release of intracellular material as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Bac5 and LAP inactivated Prototheca following 3-6 h incubation at fourfold their MIC and did not result in detectable surface damage despite 70-90% killing, suggesting they act via non-lytic mechanisms. In circular dichroism studies, the conformation of BMAP-28, but not that of Bac5 or LAP, was affected by interaction with liposomes mimicking algal membranes. Our results indicate that BMAP-28, Bac5 and LAP kill Prototheca with distinct potencies, killing kinetics, and modes of action and may be appropriate for protothecal mastitis treatment. In addition, the ability of Bac5 and LAP to act via non-lytic mechanisms may be exploited for the development of target-selective drugs. Copyright © 2011 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Diversity-oriented peptide stapling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thu Phuong; Larsen, Christian Ørnbøl; Røndbjerg, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    as a powerful method for peptide stapling. However, to date CuAAC stapling has not provided a simple method for obtaining peptides that are easily diversified further. In the present study, we report a new diversity-oriented peptide stapling (DOPS) methodology based on CuAAC chemistry. Stapling of peptides...

  12. MUREIN-METABOLIZING ENZYMES FROM ESCHERICHIA-COLI - SEQUENCE-ANALYSIS AND CONTROLLED OVEREXPRESSION OF THE SLT GENE, WHICH ENCODES THE SOLUBLE LYTIC TRANSGLYCOSYLASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ENGEL, H; KAZEMIER, B; KECK, W

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the slt gene encoding the soluble lytic transglycosylase (Slt; EC 3.2.1.-) from Escherichia coli has been determined. The largest open reading frame identified on a 2.5-kb PvuII-SalI fragment indicates that the enzyme is translated as a preprotein of either 654 or

  13. Latent and lytic HHV-8 mRNA expression in PBMCs and Kaposi's sarcoma skin biopsies of AIDS Kaposi's sarcoma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polstra, Abeltje M.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Cornelissen, Marion

    2003-01-01

    Human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with all clinical forms of Kaposi's sarcoma. HHV-8 DNA is present in Kaposi's sarcoma biopsies and is observed regularly in saliva and less consistently in blood of Kaposi's sarcoma patients. The expression pattern of latent (ORF 73) and lytic (vGCR,

  14. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  15. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  16. Oxidative cleavage and hydrolytic boosting of cellulose in soybean spent flakes by Trichoderma reesei Cel61A lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brian C; Agger, Jane Wittrup; Wichmann, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S

    2017-03-01

    The auxiliary activity family 9 (AA9) copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) from Trichoderma reesei (EG4; TrCel61A) was investigated for its ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides from soybean. The substrate specificity of the enzyme was assessed against a variety of substrates, including both soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry, and soy spent flake pretreated with sodium hydroxide. Products from enzymatic treatments were analyzed using mass spectrometry and high performance anion exchange chromatography. We demonstrate that TrCel61A is capable of oxidizing cellulose from both pretreated soy spent flake and phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, oxidizing at both the C1 and C4 positions. In addition, we show that the oxidative activity of TrCel61A displays a synergistic effect capable of boosting endoglucanase activity, and thereby substrate depolymerization of soy cellulose, by 27%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Peptide aldehyde inhibitors of bacterial peptide deformylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, D J; Gordon Green, B; O'Connell, J F; Grant, S K

    1999-07-15

    Bacterial peptide deformylases (PDF, EC 3.5.1.27) are metalloenzymes that cleave the N-formyl groups from N-blocked methionine polypeptides. Peptide aldehydes containing a methional or norleucinal inhibited recombinant peptide deformylase from gram-negative Escherichia coli and gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. The most potent inhibitor was calpeptin, N-CBZ-Leu-norleucinal, which was a competitive inhibitor of the zinc-containing metalloenzymes, E. coli and B. subtilis PDF with Ki values of 26.0 and 55.6 microM, respectively. Cobalt-substituted E. coli and B. subtilis deformylases were also inhibited by these aldehydes with Ki values for calpeptin of 9.5 and 12.4 microM, respectively. Distinct spectral changes were observed upon binding of calpeptin to the Co(II)-deformylases, consistent with the noncovalent binding of the inhibitor rather than the formation of a covalent complex. In contrast, the chelator 1,10-phenanthroline caused the time-dependent inhibition of B. subtilis Co(II)-PDF activity with the loss of the active site metal. The fact that calpeptin was nearly equipotent against deformylases from both gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial sources lends further support to the idea that a single deformylase inhibitor might have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  18. Role of protein kinase C in TBT-induced inhibition of lytic function and MAPK activation in human natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraha, Abraham B; Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret M

    2010-11-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that destroy tumor and virally infected cells. Previous studies have shown that exposure of NK cells to tributyltin (TBT) greatly diminishes their ability to destroy tumor cells (lytic function) while activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (p44/42, p38, and JNK) in NK cells. The signaling pathway that regulates NK lytic function appears to include activation of protein kinase C(PKC) as well as MAPK activity. TBT-induced activation of MAPKs would trigger a portion of the NK lytic signaling pathway, which would then leave the NK cell unable to trigger this pathway in response to a subsequent encounter with a target cell. In the present study we evaluated the involvement of PKC in inhibition of NK lysis of tumor cells and activation of MAPKs caused by TBT exposure. TBT caused a 2–3-fold activation of PKC at concentrations ranging from 50 to 300 nM (16–98 ng/ml),indicating that activation of PKC occurs in response to TBT exposure. This would then leave the NK cell unable to respond to targets. Treatment with the PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, caused an 85% decrease in the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells, validating the involvement of PKC in the lytic signaling pathway. The role of PKC in the activation of MAPKs by TBT was also investigated using bisindolylmaleimide I. The results indicated that, in NK cells where PKC activation was blocked, there was no activation of the MAPK, p44/42 in response to TBT.However, TBT-induced activation of the MAPKs, p38 and JNK did not require PKC activation. These results indicate the pivotal role of PKC in the TBT-induced loss of NK lytic function including activation of p44/42 by TBT in NK cells.

  19. Role of protein kinase C in the TBT-induced inhibition of lytic function and MAPK activation in human natural killer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraha, Abraham B.; Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2010-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that destroy tumor and virally infected cells. Previous studies have shown that exposures of NK cells to tributyltin (TBT) greatly diminish their ability to destroy tumor cells (lytic function) while activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (p44/42, p38, and JNK) in the NK cells. The signaling pathway that regulates NK lytic function appears to include activation of protein kinase C (PKC) as well as MAPK activity. The TBT-induced activation of MAPKs would trigger a portion of the NK lytic signaling pathway, which would then leave the NK cell unable to trigger this pathway in response to a subsequent encounter with a target cell. In the present study we evaluated the involvement of PKC in the inhibition of NK lysis of tumor cells and activation of MAPKs caused by TBT exposures. TBT caused a 2–3 fold activation of PKC at concentrations ranging from 50–300 nM (16–98 ng/mL), indicating that activation of PKC occurs in response to TBT exposures. This would then leave the NK cell unable to respond to targets. Treatment with the PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, caused an 85% decrease in the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells validating the involvement of PKC in the lytic signaling pathway. The role of PKC in the activation of MAPKs by TBT was also investigated using bisindolylmaleimide I. The results indicated that in NK cells where PKC activation was blocked there was no activation of the MAPK, p44/42 in response to TBT. However, TBT-induced activation of the MAPKs, p38 and JNK did not require PKC activation. These results indicate the pivotal role of PKC in the TBT-induced loss of NK lytic function including the activation of p44/42 by TBT in NK cells. PMID:20390410

  20. Combined Inhibition of the BMP pathway and the RANK-RANKL axis in a Mixed Lytic/blastic Prostate Cancer Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Mandeep S.; Alaee, Farhang; Petrigliano, Frank A.; Sugiyama, Osamu; Chatziioannou, Arion F.; Stout, David; Dougall, William C.; Lieberman, Jay R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of combined inhibition of RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) activity in a mixed lytic/blastic prostate cancer lesion in bone. Human prostate cancer cells (C4 2b) were injected into immunocompromised mice using an intratibial injection model to create mixed lytic/blastic lesions. RANK-Fc, a recombinant RANKL antagonist, was injected subcutaneously three times a week (10mg/kg) to inhibit RANKL and subsequent formation, function and survival of osteoclasts. Inhibition of BMP activity was achieved by transducing prostate cancer cells ex vivo with a retroviral vector expressing noggin (retronoggin; RN). There were three treatment groups (RANK-Fc treatment, RN treatment and combined RN and RANK-Fc treatment) and two control groups (untreated control and empty vector control for the RN treatment group). The progression of bone lesion and tumor growth was evaluated using plain radiographs, hind limb tumor size, 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose and 18F-fluoride micro PET-CT, histology and histomorphometry. Treatment with RANK-Fc alone inhibited osteolysis and transformed a mixed lytic/blastic lesion into an osteoblastic phenotype. Treatment with RN alone inhibited the osteoblastic component in a mixed lytic/blastic lesion and resulted in formation of smaller osteolytic bone lesion with smaller soft tissue size. The animals treated with both RN and RANK-Fc demonstrated delayed development of bone lesions, inhibition of osteolysis, small soft tissue tumors and preservation of bone architecture with less tumor induced new bone formation. This study suggests that combined inhibition of the RANKL and the BMP pathway may be an effective biologic therapy to inhibit the progression of established mixed lytic/blastic prostate cancer lesions in bone. PMID:21073986

  1. High-resolution mass spectrometry driven discovery of peptidic danger signals in insect immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arton Berisha

    Full Text Available The 'danger model' is an alternative concept for immune response postulating that the immune system reacts to entities that do damage (danger associated molecular patterns, DAMP and not only to entities that are foreign (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMP as proposed by classical immunology concepts. In this study we used Galleria mellonella to validate the danger model in insects. Hemolymph of G. mellonella was digested with thermolysin (as a representative for virulence-associated metalloproteinases produced by humanpathogens followed by chromatographic fractionation. Immune-stimulatory activity was tested by measuring lysozyme activity with the lytic zone assays against Micrococcus luteus cell wall components. Peptides were analyzed by nano-scale liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometers. Addressing the lack of a genome sequence we complemented the rudimentary NCBI protein database with a recently established transcriptome and de novo sequencing methods for peptide identification. This approach led to identification of 127 peptides, 9 of which were identified in bioactive fractions. Detailed MS/MS experiments in comparison with synthetic analogues confirmed the amino acid sequence of all 9 peptides. To test the potential of these putative danger signals to induce immune responses we injected the synthetic analogues into G. mellonella and monitored the anti-bacterial activity against living Micrococcus luteus. Six out of 9 peptides identified in the bioactive fractions exhibited immune-stimulatory activity when injected. Hence, we provide evidence that small peptides resulting from thermolysin-mediated digestion of hemolymph proteins function as endogenous danger signals which can set the immune system into alarm. Consequently, our study indicates that the danger model also plays a role in insect immunity.

  2. Human polyomavirus JCV late leader peptide region contains important regulatory elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akan, Ilhan; Sariyer, Ilker Kudret; Biffi, Renato; Palermo, Victoria; Woolridge, Stefanie; White, Martyn K.; Amini, Shohreh; Khalili, Kamel; Safak, Mahmut

    2006-01-01

    Transcription is a complex process that relies on the cooperative interaction between sequence-specific factors and the basal transcription machinery. The strength of a promoter depends on upstream or downstream cis-acting DNA elements, which bind transcription factors. In this study, we investigated whether DNA elements located downstream of the JCV late promoter, encompassing the late leader peptide region, which encodes agnoprotein, play regulatory roles in the JCV lytic cycle. For this purpose, the entire coding region of the leader peptide was deleted and the functional consequences of this deletion were analyzed. We found that viral gene expression and replication were drastically reduced. Gene expression also decreased from a leader peptide point mutant but to a lesser extent. This suggested that the leader peptide region of JCV might contain critical cis-acting DNA elements to which transcription factors bind and regulate viral gene expression and replication. We analyzed the entire coding region of the late leader peptide by a footprinting assay and identified three major regions (region I, II and III) that were protected by nuclear proteins. Further investigation of the first two protected regions by band shift assays revealed a new band that appeared in new infection cycles, suggesting that viral infection induces new factors that interact with the late leader peptide region of JCV. Analysis of the effect of the leader peptide region on the promoter activity of JCV by transfection assays demonstrated that this region has a positive and negative effect on the large T antigen (LT-Ag)-mediated activation of the viral early and late promoters, respectively. Furthermore, a partial deletion analysis of the leader peptide region encompassing the protected regions I and II demonstrated a significant down-regulation of viral gene expression and replication. More importantly, these results were similar to that obtained from a complete deletion of the late leader

  3. Abortive lytic Epstein–Barr virus replication in tonsil-B lymphocytes in infectious mononucleosis and a subset of the chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerner AM

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A Martin Lerner,1 Safedin Beqaj21Department of Medicine, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Rochester, MI, USA; 2Pathology Inc, Torrance, CA, USAAbstract: A systematic 2001–2007 review of 142 chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS patients identified 106 CFS patients with elevated serum IgG antibodies to the herpesviruses Epstein–Barr virus (EBV, cytomegalovirus, or human herpesvirus (HHV 6 in single or multiple infections, with no other co-infections detected. We named these 106 patients group-A CFS. Eighty-six of these 106 group-A CFS patients (81% had elevated EBV early antibody, early antigen (diffuse, serum titers. A small group of six patients in the group-A EBV subset of CFS, additionally, had repetitive elevated-serum titers of antibody to the early lytic replication-encoded proteins, EBV dUTPase, and EBV DNA polymerase. The presence of these serum antibodies to EBV dUTPase and EBV DNA polymerase indicated EBV abortive lytic replication in these 6 CFS patients. None of 20 random control people (age- and sex-matched, with blood drawn at a commercial laboratory had elevated serum titers of antibody to EBV dUTPase or EBV DNA polymerase (P < 0.01. This finding needs verification in a larger group of EBV CFS subset patients, but if corroborated, it may represent a molecular marker for diagnosing the EBV subset of CFS. We review evidence that EBV abortive lytic replication with unassembled viral proteins in the blood may be the same in infectious mononucleosis (IM and a subset of CFS. EBV-abortive lytic replication in tonsil plasma cells is dominant in IM. No complete lytic virion is in the blood of IM or CFS patients. Complications of CFS and IM include cardiomyopathy and encephalopathy. Circulating abortive lytic-encoded EBV proteins (eg, EBV dUTPase, EBV DNA polymerase, and others may be common to IM and CFS. The intensity and duration of the circulating EBV-encoded proteins might differentiate the IM and EBV subsets of CFS

  4. Peptide Integrated Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Lapshina, Nadezda; Apter, Boris; Rosenman, Gil

    2018-02-01

    Bio-nanophotonics is a wide field in which advanced optical materials, biomedicine, fundamental optics, and nanotechnology are combined and result in the development of biomedical optical chips. Silk fibers or synthetic bioabsorbable polymers are the main light-guiding components. In this work, an advanced concept of integrated bio-optics is proposed, which is based on bioinspired peptide optical materials exhibiting wide optical transparency, nonlinear and electrooptical properties, and effective passive and active waveguiding. Developed new technology combining bottom-up controlled deposition of peptide planar wafers of a large area and top-down focus ion beam lithography provides direct fabrication of peptide optical integrated circuits. Finding a deep modification of peptide optical properties by reconformation of biological secondary structure from native phase to β-sheet architecture is followed by the appearance of visible fluorescence and unexpected transition from a native passive optical waveguiding to an active one. Original biocompatibility, switchable regimes of waveguiding, and multifunctional nonlinear optical properties make these new peptide planar optical materials attractive for application in emerging technology of lab-on-biochips, combining biomedical photonic and electronic circuits toward medical diagnosis, light-activated therapy, and health monitoring. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Tam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic, lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms.

  6. Acylation of Therapeutic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Jensen, Simon Bjerregaard

    ) , which promotes intestinal growth and is used to treat bowel disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases and short bowel syndrome, and the 32 amino acid salmon calcitonin (sCT), which lowers blood calcium and is employed in the treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis and hypercalcemia. The two...... peptides are similar in size and structure, but oppositely charged at physiological pH. Both peptides were acylated with linear acyl chains of systematically increasing length, where sCT was furthermore acylated at two different positions on the peptide backbone. For GLP-2, we found that increasing acyl...... remained optimal overall. The results indicate that rational acylation of GLP-2 can increase its in vitro intestinal absorption, alone or in combination with permeation enhancers, and are consistent with the initial project hypothesis. For sCT, an unpredicted effect of acylation largely superseded...

  7. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  8. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    of these are currently being used in quantitative structure--activity relationship (QSAR) studies for AMP optimization. Additionally, some key commercial computational tools are discussed, and both successful and less successful studies are referenced, illustrating some of the challenges facing AMP scientists. Through...... examples of different peptide QSAR studies, this review highlights some of the missing links and illuminates some of the questions that would be interesting to challenge in a more systematic fashion. Expert opinion: Computer-aided peptide QSAR using molecular descriptors may provide the necessary edge...

  9. Integrative transcriptome and proteome analyses define marked differences between Neospora caninum isolates throughout the tachyzoite lytic cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horcajo, P; Xia, D; Randle, N; Collantes-Fernández, E; Wastling, J; Ortega-Mora, L M; Regidor-Cerrillo, J

    2017-11-14

    Neospora caninum is one of the main causes of transmissible abortion in cattle. Intraspecific variations in virulence have been widely shown among N. caninum isolates. However, the molecular basis governing such variability have not been elucidated to date. In this study label free LC-MS/MS was used to investigate proteome differences between the high virulence isolate Nc-Spain7 and the low virulence isolate Nc-Spain1H throughout the tachyzoite lytic cycle. The results showed greater differences in the abundance of proteins at invasion and egress with 77 and 62 proteins, respectively. During parasite replication, only 19 proteins were differentially abundant between isolates. The microneme protein repertoire involved in parasite invasion and egress was more abundant in the Nc-Spain1H isolate, which displays a lower invasion rate. Rhoptry and dense granule proteins, proteins related to metabolism and stress responses also showed differential abundances between isolates. Comparative RNA-Seq analyses during tachyzoite egress were also performed, revealing an expression profile of genes associated with the bradyzoite stage in the low virulence Nc-Spain1H isolate. The differences in proteome and RNA expression profiles between these two isolates reveal interesting insights into likely mechanisms involved in specific phenotypic traits and virulence in N. caninum. The molecular basis that governs biological variability in N. caninum and the pathogenesis of neosporosis has not been well-established yet. This is the first study in which high throughput technology of LC-MS/MS and RNA-Seq is used to investigate differences in the proteome and transcriptome between two well-characterized isolates. Both isolates displayed different proteomes throughout the lytic cycle and the transcriptomes also showed marked variations but were inconsistent with the proteome results. However, both datasets identified a pre-bradyzoite status of the low virulence isolate Nc-Spain1H. This study

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides: An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Evan F; Mansour, Sarah C; Hancock, Robert E W

    2017-01-01

    The "golden era" of antibiotic discovery has long passed, but the need for new antibiotics has never been greater due to the emerging threat of antibiotic resistance. This urgency to develop new antibiotics has motivated researchers to find new methods to combat pathogenic microorganisms resulting in a surge of research focused around antimicrobial peptides (AMPs; also termed host defense peptides) and their potential as therapeutics. During the past few decades, more than 2000 AMPs have been identified from a diverse range of organisms (animals, fungi, plants, and bacteria). While these AMPs share a number of common features and a limited number of structural motifs; their sequences, activities, and targets differ considerably. In addition to their antimicrobial effects, AMPs can also exhibit immunomodulatory, anti-biofilm, and anticancer activities. These diverse functions have spurred tremendous interest in research aimed at understanding the activity of AMPs, and various protocols have been described to assess different aspects of AMP function including screening and evaluating the activities of natural and synthetic AMPs, measuring interactions with membranes, optimizing peptide function, and scaling up peptide production. Here, we provide a general overview of AMPs and introduce some of the methodologies that have been used to advance AMP research.

  11. Comparative genome analysis of novel Podoviruses lytic for hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae of K1, K2, and K57 capsular types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovieva, Ekaterina V; Myakinina, Vera P; Kislichkina, Angelina A; Krasilnikova, Valentina M; Verevkin, Vladimir V; Mochalov, Vladimir V; Lev, Anastasia I; Fursova, Nadezhda K; Volozhantsev, Nikolay V

    2018-01-02

    Hypermucoviscous (HV) strains of capsular types K1, K2 and K57 are the most virulent representatives of the Klebsiella pneumoniae species. Eight novel bacteriophages lytic for HV K. pneumoniae were isolated and characterized. Three bacteriophages, KpV41, KpV475, and KpV71 were found to have a lytic activity against mainly K. pneumoniae of capsular type K1. Two phages, KpV74, and KpV763 were lytic for K2 capsular type K. pneumoniae, and the phage KpV767 was specific to K57-type K. pneumoniae only. Two more phages, KpV766, and KpV48 had no capsular specificity. The phage genomes consist of a linear double-stranded DNA of 40,395-44,623bp including direct terminal repeats of 180-246 bp. The G + C contents are 52.3-54.2 % that is slightly lower than that of genomes of K. pneumoniae strains being used for phage propagation. According to the genome structures, sequence similarity and phylogenetic data, the phages are classified within the genus Kp32virus and Kp34virus of subfamily Autographivirinae, family Podoviridae. In the phage genomes, genes encoding proteins with putative motifs of polysaccharide depolymerase were identified. Depolymerase genes of phages KpV71 and KpV74 lytic for hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae of K1 and K2 capsular type, respectively, were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant gene products were purified. The specificity and polysaccharide-degrading activity of the recombinant depolymerases were demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A study by nitrogen-15 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the state of histidine in the catalytic triad of α-lytic protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Roberts, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    The ionization behaviour of the histidine of the catalytic triad of α-lytic protease using N-15 NMR spectroscopy is studied. This technique is especially informative about the protonation, hydrogen-bond formation, and tautomeric equilibrium of imidazole rings. The efficient and specific incorporation of N-15 labelled histidine into α-lytic protease was achieved by inducing and isolating an auxotroph of myxobacter 495 for which histidine is an essential amino acid. The results show that histidine of the catalytic triad of α-lytic protease appears to have a base strength which is essentially normal for an imidazole derivative but, in the pH range where the enzymatic activity is high, the histidine tautomer is favoured with the hydrogen located on N3 (π), as the result of hydrogen bonding to the asparate anion and possible the serine hydroxyl. Thus, the N-15 NMR shifts support the general geometry postulated for the ''charge-relay'' mechanism but not the idea of an unusually weakly basic histidine or an unusually strongly basic asparate carboxylate anion. (A.G.)

  13. [Distiller Yeasts Producing Antibacterial Peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyachko, E V; Morozkina, E V; Zaitchik, B Ts; Benevolensky, S V

    2015-01-01

    A new method of controlling lactic acid bacteria contamination was developed with the use of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides. Genes encoding the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin with codons preferable for S. cerevisiae were synthesized, and a system was constructed for their secretory expression. Recombinant S. cerevisiae strains producing antibacterial peptides effectively inhibit the growth of Lactobacillus sakei, Pediacoccus pentasaceus, Pediacoccus acidilactici, etc. The application of distiller yeasts producing antibacterial peptides enhances the ethanol yield in cases of bacterial contamination. Recombinant yeasts producing the antibacterial peptides pediocin and plantaricin can successfully substitute the available industrial yeast strains upon ethanol production.

  14. Expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transposable phages in Pseudomonas putida cells. I. Establishment of lysogeny and lytic growth efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbunova, S.A.; Yanenko, A.S.; Akhverdyan, V.Z.; Reulets, M.A.; Krylov, V.N.

    1986-03-01

    Expression of the genomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transposable phages (TP) in the cells of a heterologous host, P. putida PpGl, was studied. A high efficiency of TP lytic growth in PpGl cells was obtained both after zygotic induction following RP4::TP plasmid transfer and after thermoinduction of PpGl cells lysogenic for thermoinducible prophage D3112cts15. Characteristic for PpGl cells was a high TP yield (20-25 phage D3112cts15 particles per cell), which was evidence of a high level of TP transposition in cells of this species. The frequency of RP4::TP transfer into PpGl and PA01 cells was equal, but the lysogeny detection rat was somewhat lower in PpGl. Pseudomonas aeruginosa TP can integrate into the PpGl chromosome, producing inducible lysogens. The presence of RP4 is not necessary for the expression of the TP genome in PpGl cells. The D3112cts15 TP may be used for interspecific transduction of plasmids and chromosomal markers.

  15. Expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transposable phages in Pseudomonas putida cells. I. Establishment of lysogeny and lytic growth efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunova, S.A.; Yanenko, A.S.; Akhverdyan, V.Z.; Reulets, M.A.; Krylov, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    Expression of the genomes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transposable phages (TP) in the cells of a heterologous host, P. putida PpGl, was studied. A high efficiency of TP lytic growth in PpGl cells was obtained both after zygotic induction following RP4::TP plasmid transfer and after thermoinduction of PpGl cells lysogenic for thermoinducible prophage D3112cts15. Characteristic for PpGl cells was a high TP yield (20-25 phage D3112cts15 particles per cell), which was evidence of a high level of TP transposition in cells of this species. The frequency of RP4::TP transfer into PpGl and PA01 cells was equal, but the lysogeny detection rat was somewhat lower in PpGl. Pseudomonas aeruginosa TP can integrate into the PpGl chromosome, producing inducible lysogens. The presence of RP4 is not necessary for the expression of the TP genome in PpGl cells. The D3112cts15 TP may be used for interspecific transduction of plasmids and chromosomal markers

  16. pUL34 binding near the human cytomegalovirus origin of lytic replication enhances DNA replication and viral growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayton, Mark; Hossain, Tanvir; Biegalke, Bonita J

    2018-05-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL34 gene encodes sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins (pUL34) which are required for viral replication. Interactions of pUL34 with DNA binding sites represses transcription of two viral immune evasion genes, US3 and US9. 12 additional predicted pUL34-binding sites are present in the HCMV genome (strain AD169) with three binding sites concentrated near the HCMV origin of lytic replication (oriLyt). We used ChIP-seq analysis of pUL34-DNA interactions to confirm that pUL34 binds to the oriLyt region during infection. Mutagenesis of the UL34-binding sites in an oriLyt-containing plasmid significantly reduced viral-mediated oriLyt-dependent DNA replication. Mutagenesis of these sites in the HCMV genome reduced the replication efficiencies of the resulting viruses. Protein-protein interaction analyses demonstrated that pUL34 interacts with the viral proteins IE2, UL44, and UL84, that are essential for viral DNA replication, suggesting that pUL34-DNA interactions in the oriLyt region are involved in the DNA replication cascade. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro characterization and in vivo properties of Salmonellae lytic bacteriophages isolated from free-range layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Fiorentin

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of food poisoning related to Salmonella-contaminated eggs and chicken meat has been frequent in humans. Salmonella Enteritidis (SE and Salmonella Typhimurium (ST are included among the most important paratyphoid salmonellae associated with chicken meat and eggs. Elimination of Salmonella at the pre-harvest stage can play a significant role in preventing the introduction of this pathogen into the food chain and consequently in the reduction of food poisoning in humans. Bactericidal bacteriophages may provide a natural, nontoxic, feasible and non-expensive component of the multi-factorial approach for a pre-harvest control of Salmonella in poultry. Five bacteriophages lytic for SE PT4 and ST were obtained from 107 samples of feces of free-range layers in Brazil. All bacteriophages were characterized in vitro and in vivo, showing head and tail morphology and dsDNA as nucleic acids. Results of "in vivo" studies suggested that bacteriophages do not remain in Salmonella-free birds longer than one day, whereas they multiply in Salmonella-infected birds for longer periods. Besides, selection for phage-resistant SE PT4 did not seem to occur in the short term. Isolated bacteriophages will be investigated for their potential for pre-harvest biocontrol of SE PT4 in poultry.

  18. The role of staphylococci in subclinical mastitis of cows and lytic phage isolation against to Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Gulmez Saglam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to determine the role of Staphylococcus in the formation of subclinical mastitis in cows and to isolate the phage against isolated Staphylococcus aureus strains. Materials and Methods: In this study, 400 milk cows were screened by California Mastitis Test (CMT for subclinical mastitis and 235 udders of 96 cows, which were determined to be positive, were evaluated for Staphylococcus. Milk samples were evaluated using conventional and molecular methods. In addition, phage isolation studies were performed against S. aureus strains causing mastitis. Results: At the result of cultural examination, of 235 milk samples that were found as positive for mastitis by CMT, a total of 117 (49.7% Staphylococcus spp. were isolated as a distribution of 74 (63.24% coagulase-positive staphylococci and 43 (36.75% coagulase-negative staphylococci. Of these isolates, 76 (64.95% were characterized as S. aureus both conventional and molecular techniques. Lytic bacteriophages against two S. aureus strains which were isolated from mastitic milk samples were obtained from wastewater samples. Conclusion: The results of this study show that a significant portion of subclinical mastitis was formed by staphylococci. In addition, phage isolation against S. aureus strains isolated can be considered as one of the steps to be applied in the prophylaxis and treatment of such infections.

  19. Ligand-regulated peptide aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Russell A

    2009-01-01

    The peptide aptamer approach employs high-throughput selection to identify members of a randomized peptide library displayed from a scaffold protein by virtue of their interaction with a target molecule. Extending this approach, we have developed a peptide aptamer scaffold protein that can impart small-molecule control over the aptamer-target interaction. This ligand-regulated peptide (LiRP) scaffold, consisting of the protein domains FKBP12, FRB, and GST, binds to the cell-permeable small-molecule rapamycin and the binding of this molecule can prevent the interaction of the randomizable linker region connecting FKBP12 with FRB. Here we present a detailed protocol for the creation of a peptide aptamer plasmid library, selection of peptide aptamers using the LiRP scaffold in a yeast two-hybrid system, and the screening of those peptide aptamers for a ligand-regulated interaction.

  20. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac...... peptides has only been elucidated during the last decade. The cellular synthesis including amino acid modifications and proteolytic cleavages has proven considerably more complex than initially perceived. Consequently, the elimination phase of the peptide products in circulation is not yet well....... An inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...

  1. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Boerman, Otto C.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of research in nuclear medicine. The {sup 111}In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (OctreoScan trademark) is the most successful radiopeptide for tumour imaging, and was the first to be approved for diagnostic use. Based on the success of these studies, other receptor-targeting peptides such as cholecystokinin/gastrin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1, bombesin (BN), chemokine receptor CXCR4 targeting peptides, and RGD peptides are currently under development or undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of these peptides and their analogues, with regard to their potential for radionuclide imaging of tumours. (orig.)

  2. Epstein-Barr Virus MicroRNA miR-BART20-5p Suppresses Lytic Induction by Inhibiting BAD-Mediated caspase-3-Dependent Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoji; Choi, Hoyun; Lee, Suk Kyeong

    2016-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human gammaherpesvirus associated with a variety of tumor types. EBV can establish latency or undergo lytic replication in host cells. In general, EBV remains latent in tumors and expresses a limited repertoire of latent proteins to avoid host immune surveillance. When the lytic cycle is triggered by some as-yet-unknown form of stimulation, lytic gene expression and progeny virus production commence. Thus far, the exact mechanism of EBV latency maintenance and the in vivo triggering signal for lytic induction have yet to be elucidated. Previously, we have shown that the EBV microRNA miR-BART20-5p directly targets the immediate early genes BRLF1 and BZLF1 as well as Bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD) in EBV-associated gastric carcinoma. In this study, we found that both mRNA and protein levels of BRLF1 and BZLF1 were suppressed in cells following BAD knockdown and increased after BAD overexpression. Progeny virus production was also downregulated by specific knockdown of BAD. Our results demonstrated that caspase-3-dependent apoptosis is a prerequisite for BAD-mediated EBV lytic cycle induction. Therefore, our data suggest that miR-BART20-5p plays an important role in latency maintenance and tumor persistence of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma by inhibiting BAD-mediated caspase-3-dependent apoptosis, which would trigger immediate early gene expression. EBV has an ability to remain latent in host cells, including EBV-associated tumor cells hiding from immune surveillance. However, the exact molecular mechanisms of EBV latency maintenance remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that miR-BART20-5p inhibited the expression of EBV immediate early genes indirectly, by suppressing BAD-induced caspase-3-dependent apoptosis, in addition to directly, as we previously reported. Our study suggests that EBV-associated tumor cells might endure apoptotic stress to some extent and remain latent with the aid of miR-BART20-5p. Blocking the

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  4. Bombyx mori E26 transformation-specific 2 (BmEts2), an Ets family protein, represses Bombyx mori Rels (BmRels)-mediated promoter activation of antimicrobial peptide genes in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Sagisaka, A; Suzuki, N; Yamakawa, M

    2016-10-01

    E26 transformation-specific (Ets) family transcription factors are known to play roles in various biological phenomena, including immunity, in vertebrates. However, the mechanisms by which Ets proteins contribute to immunity in invertebrates remain poorly understood. In this study, we identified a cDNA encoding BmEts2, which is a putative orthologue of Drosophila Yan and human translocation-ets-leukemia/Ets-variant gene 6, from the silkworm Bombyx mori. Expression of the BmEts2 gene was significantly increased in the fat bodies of silkworm larvae in response to injection with Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. BmEts2 overexpression dramatically repressed B. mori Rels (BmRels)-mediated promoter activation of antimicrobial peptide genes in silkworm cells. Conversely, gene knockdown of BmEts2 significantly enhanced BmRels activity. In addition, two κB sites located on the 5' upstream region of cecropin B1 were found to be involved in the repression of BmRels-mediated promoter activation. Protein-competition analysis further demonstrated that BmEts2 competitively inhibited binding of BmRels to κB sites. Overall, BmEts2 acts as a repressor of BmRels-mediated transactivation of antimicrobial protein genes by inhibiting the binding of BmRels to κB sites. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  5. Therapeutic peptides for cancer therapy. Part II - cell cycle inhibitory peptides and apoptosis-inducing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raucher, Drazen; Moktan, Shama; Massodi, Iqbal; Bidwell, Gene L

    2009-10-01

    Therapeutic peptides have great potential as anticancer agents owing to their ease of rational design and target specificity. However, their utility in vivo is limited by low stability and poor tumor penetration. The authors review the development of peptide inhibitors with potential for cancer therapy. Peptides that arrest the cell cycle by mimicking CDK inhibitors or induce apoptosis directly are discussed. The authors searched Medline for articles concerning the development of therapeutic peptides and their delivery. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation directly using peptides that arrest the cell cycle or induce apoptosis is a promising strategy. Peptides can be designed that interact very specifically with cyclins and/or cyclin-dependent kinases and with members of apoptotic cascades. Use of these peptides is not limited by their design, as a rational approach to peptide design is much less challenging than the design of small molecule inhibitors of specific protein-protein interactions. However, the limitations of peptide therapy lie in the poor pharmacokinetic properties of these large, often charged molecules. Therefore, overcoming the drug delivery hurdles could open the door for effective peptide therapy, thus making an entirely new class of molecules useful as anticancer drugs.

  6. Reduction of Salmonella on chicken meat and chicken skin by combined or sequential application of lytic bacteriophage with chemical antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Anuraj T; Nannapaneni, Rama; Kiess, Aaron; Sharma, Chander Shekhar

    2015-08-17

    The effectiveness of recently approved Salmonella lytic bacteriophage preparation (SalmoFresh™) in reducing Salmonella in vitro and on chicken breast fillets was examined in combination with lauric arginate (LAE) or cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC). In another experiment, a sequential spray application of this bacteriophage (phage) solution on Salmonella inoculated chicken skin after a 20s dip in chemical antimicrobials (LAE, CPC, peracetic acid, or chlorine) was also examined in reducing Salmonella counts on chicken skin. The application of phage in combination with CPC or LAE reduced S. Typhimurium, S. Heidelberg, and S. Enteritidis up to 5 log units in vitro at 4 °C. On chicken breast fillets, phage in combination with CPC or LAE resulted in significant (p<0.05) reductions of Salmonella ranging from 0.5 to 1.3 log CFU/g as compared to control up to 7 days of refrigerated storage. When phage was applied sequentially with chemical antimicrobials, all the treatments resulted in significant reductions of Salmonella. The application of chlorine (30 ppm) and PAA (400 ppm) followed by phage spray (10(9)PFU/ml) resulted in highest Salmonella reductions of 1.6-1.7 and 2.2-2.5l og CFU/cm(2), respectively. In conclusion, the surface applications of phage in combination with LAE or CPC significantly reduced Salmonella counts on chicken breast fillets. However, higher reductions in Salmonella counts were achieved on chicken skin by the sequential application of chemical antimicrobials followed by phage spray. The sequential application of chlorine, PAA, and phage can provide additional hurdles to reduce Salmonella on fresh poultry carcasses or cut up parts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Herpesviral ICP0 Protein Promotes Two Waves of Heterochromatin Removal on an Early Viral Promoter during Lytic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses must contend with host cell epigenetic silencing responses acting on their genomes upon entry into the host cell nucleus. In this study, we confirmed that unchromatinized herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 genomes enter primary human foreskin fibroblasts and are rapidly subjected to assembly of nucleosomes and association with repressive heterochromatin modifications such as histone 3 (H3 lysine 9-trimethylation (H3K9me3 and lysine 27-trimethylation (H3K27me3 during the first 1 to 2 h postinfection. Kinetic analysis of the modulation of nucleosomes and heterochromatin modifications over the course of lytic infection demonstrates a progressive removal that coincided with initiation of viral gene expression. We obtained evidence for three phases of heterochromatin removal from an early gene promoter: an initial removal of histones and heterochromatin not dependent on ICP0, a second ICP0-dependent round of removal of H3K9me3 that is independent of viral DNA synthesis, and a third phase of H3K27me3 removal that is dependent on ICP0 and viral DNA synthesis. The presence of ICP0 in transfected cells is also sufficient to promote removal of histones and H3K9me3 modifications of cotransfected genes. Overall, these results show that ICP0 promotes histone removal, a reduction of H3K9me3 modifications, and a later indirect reduction of H3K27me3 modifications following viral early gene expression and DNA synthesis. Therefore, HSV ICP0 promotes the reversal of host epigenetic silencing mechanisms by several mechanisms.

  8. Solid-phase peptide synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective.......This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective....

  9. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  10. Anticancer peptides from bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz M. Karpiński

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death in the world. The rapid development of medicine and pharmacology allows to create new and effective anticancer drugs. Among modern anticancer drugs are bacterial proteins. Until now has been shown anticancer activity among others azurin and exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pep27anal2 from Streptococcus pneumoniae, diphtheria toxin from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, and recently discovered Entap from Enterococcus sp. The study presents the current data regarding the properties, action and anticancer activity of listed peptides.

  11. Bone marrow edema pattern identification in patients with lytic bone lesions using digital subtraction angiography-like bone subtraction on large-area detector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim Teixeira, Pedro Augusto; Hossu, Gabriela; Lecocq, Sophie; Razeto, Marco; Louis, Matthias; Blum, Alain

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of digital subtraction angiography (DSA)-like bone subtraction with 2 different registration methods for the identification of bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) in patients with lytic bone lesions, using magnetic resonance imaging as the criterion standard. Fifty-five patients with a lytic bone lesion were included in this prospective study with approval from the ethics committee. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging and low-dose computed tomographic (CT) perfusion after signing an informed consent. Two CT volumes were used for bone subtraction, which was performed with 2 different algorithms (rigid and nonrigid). Enhancement at the nonlytic bone marrow was considered as a sign of BMEP. Two readers evaluated the images blindly. The presence of BMEP on bone-subtracted CT images was evaluated subjectively and quantitatively. Image quality was assessed. Magnetic resonance imaging was used as the criterion standard. Using a rigid registration method, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of CT with DSA-like bone subtraction BMEP was 77%, 100%, 100%, 68%, and 85%, respectively. The interobserver agreement was good (κ, 0.782). Image quality was better using a nonrigid registration. With this algorithm, artifacts interfered with image interpretation in only 5% of cases. However, there was a noticeable drop in sensitivity and negative predictive value when a nonrigid algorithm was used: 56% and 52%, respectively. The interobserver agreement was average with a nonrigid subtraction algorithm. Computed tomography with DSA-like bone subtraction is sensitive and highly specific for the identification of BMEP associated with lytic bone lesions. Rigid registering should be preferred, but nonrigid algorithms can be used as a second option when artifacts interfere with image interpretation.

  12. Cellular corepressor TLE2 inhibits replication-and-transcription- activator-mediated transactivation and lytic reactivation of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiheng; Liu, Yunhua; Liang, Deguang; Wang, Zhuo; Robertson, Erle S; Lan, Ke

    2010-02-01

    Replication and transcription activator (RTA) encoded by open reading frame 50 (ORF50) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is essential and sufficient to initiate lytic reactivation. RTA activates its target genes through direct binding with high affinity to its responsive elements or by interaction with cellular factors, such as RBP-Jkappa, Ap-1, C/EBP-alpha, and Oct-1. In this study, we identified transducin-like enhancer of split 2 (TLE2) as a novel RTA binding protein by using yeast two-hybrid screening of a human spleen cDNA library. The interaction between TLE2 and RTA was confirmed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) binding and coimmunoprecipitation assays. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that TLE2 and RTA were colocalized in the same nuclear compartment in KSHV-infected cells. This interaction recruited TLE2 to RTA bound to its recognition sites on DNA and repressed RTA auto-activation and transactivation activity. Moreover, TLE2 also inhibited the induction of lytic replication and virion production driven by RTA. We further showed that the Q (Gln-rich), SP (Ser-Pro-rich), and WDR (Trp-Asp repeat) domains of TLE2 and the Pro-rich domain of RTA were essential for this interaction. RBP-Jkappa has been shown previously to bind to the same Pro-rich domain of RTA, and this binding can be subject to competition by TLE2. In addition, TLE2 can form a complex with RTA to access the cognate DNA sequence of the RTA-responsive element at different promoters. Intriguingly, the transcription level of TLE2 could be upregulated by RTA during the lytic reactivation process. In conclusion, we identified a new RTA binding protein, TLE2, and demonstrated that TLE2 inhibited replication and transactivation mediated by RTA. This provides another potentially important mechanism for maintenance of KSHV viral latency through interaction with a host protein.

  13. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the

  14. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Zegers (Netty)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps

  15. Peptide radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, D.; Vermeij, P.; Feitsma, R.I.J.; Pauwels, E.J.K.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews the labelling of peptides that are recognised to be of interest for nuclear medicine or are the subject of ongoing nuclear medicine research. Applications and approaches to the labelling of peptide radiopharmaceuticals are discussed, and drawbacks in their development considered. (orig.)

  16. Lytic cell death induced by melittin bypasses pyroptosis but induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Sánchez, Fátima; Martínez-García, Juan José; Muñoz-García, María; Martínez-Villanueva, Miriam; Noguera-Velasco, José A; Andreu, David; Rivas, Luís; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2017-08-10

    The nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat-containing receptor with a pyrin domain 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a sensor for different types of infections and alterations of homeostatic parameters, including abnormally high levels of the extracellular nucleotide ATP or crystallization of different metabolites. All NLRP3 activators trigger a similar intracellular pathway, where a decrease in intracellular K + concentration and permeabilization of plasma membrane are key steps. Cationic amphipathic antimicrobial peptides and peptide toxins permeabilize the plasma membrane. In fact, some of them have been described to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome. Among them, the bee venom antimicrobial toxin peptide melittin is known to elicit an inflammatory reaction via the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to bee venom. Our study found that melittin induces canonical NLRP3 inflammasome activation by plasma membrane permeabilization and a reduction in the intracellular K + concentration. Following melittin treatment, the apoptosis-associated speck-like protein, an adaptor protein with a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), was necessary to activate caspase-1 and induce IL-1β release. However, cell death induced by melittin prevented the formation of large ASC aggregates, amplification of caspase-1 activation, IL-18 release and execution of pyroptosis. Therefore, melittin-induced activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome results in an attenuated inflammasome response that does not result in caspase-1 dependent cell death.

  17. The Equine PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Louise; Jacobsen, Stine; Sørensen, Mette Aamand

    2014-01-01

    Progress in MS-based methods for veterinary research and diagnostics is lagging behind compared to the human research, and proteome data of domestic animals is still not well represented in open source data repositories. This is particularly true for the equine species. Here we present a first...... Equine PeptideAtlas encompassing high-resolution tandem MS analyses of 51 samples representing a selection of equine tissues and body fluids from healthy and diseased animals. The raw data were processed through the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline to yield high quality identification of proteins and peptides....... The current release comprises 24 131 distinct peptides representing 2636 canonical proteins observed at false discovery rates of 0.2% at the peptide level and 1.4% at the protein level. Data from the Equine PeptideAtlas are available for experimental planning, validation of new datasets, and as a proteomic...

  18. Vascular targeting with peptide libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqualini, R. [La Jolla Cancer Research Center The Burnham Inst., La Jolla CA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    The authors have developed an 'in vivo' selection system in which phage capable of selective homing to different tissues are recovered from a phage display peptide library following intravenous administration. Using this strategy, they have isolate several organ and tumor-homing peptides. They have shown that each of those peptides binds of different receptors that are selectively expressed on the vasculature of the target tissue. The tumor-homing peptides bind to receptors that are up regulated in tumor angiogenic vasculature. Targeted delivery of doxorubicin to angiogenic vasculature using these peptides in animals models decrease toxicity and increased the therapeutic efficacy of the drug. Vascular targeting may facilitate the development of other treatment strategies that rely on inhibition of angio genesis and lead to advances to extend the potential for targeting of drugs, genes and radionuclides in the context of many diseases.

  19. Natriuretic peptides and cerebral hemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Barringer, Filippa; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides have emerged as important diagnostic and prognostic tools for cardiovascular disease. Plasma measurement of the bioactive peptides as well as precursor-derived fragments is a sensitive tool in assessing heart failure. In heart failure, the peptides are used as treatment...... in decompensated disease. In contrast, their biological effects on the cerebral hemodynamics are poorly understood. In this mini-review, we summarize the hemodynamic effects of the natriuretic peptides with a focus on the cerebral hemodynamics. In addition, we will discuss its potential implications in diseases...... where alteration of the cerebral hemodynamics plays a role such as migraine and acute brain injury including stroke. We conclude that a possible role of the peptides is feasible as evaluated from animal and in vitro studies, but more research is needed in humans to determine the precise response...

  20. Maize Bioactive Peptides against Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Gómez, Jorge L.; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; Preciado-Ortiz, Ricardo E.; García-Lara, Silverio

    2017-06-01

    Cancer is one of the main chronic degenerative diseases worldwide. In recent years, consumption of whole-grain cereals and their derived food products has been associated with reduction risks of various types of cancer. Cereals main biomolecules includes proteins, peptides, and amino acids present in different quantities within the grain. The nutraceutical properties associated with peptides exerts biological functions that promote health and prevent this disease. In this review, we report the current status and advances on maize peptides regarding bioactive properties that have been reported such as antioxidant, antihypertensive, hepatoprotective, and anti-tumour activities. We also highlighted its biological potential through which maize bioactive peptides exert anti-cancer activity. Finally, we analyse and emphasize the possible areas of application for maize peptides.

  1. Clinical Manifestations of Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Lytic Activation: Multicentric Castleman Disease (KSHV-MCD) and the KSHV Inflammatory Cytokine Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzotto, Mark N; Uldrick, Thomas S; Hu, Duosha; Yarchoan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Soon after the discovery of Kaposi sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), it was appreciated that this virus was associated with most cases of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) arising in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. It has subsequently been recognized that KSHV-MCD is a distinct entity from other forms of MCD. Like MCD that is unrelated to KSHV, the clinical presentation of KSHV-MCD is dominated by systemic inflammatory symptoms including fevers, cachexia, and laboratory abnormalities including cytopenias, hypoalbuminemia, hyponatremia, and elevated C-reactive protein. Pathologically KSHV-MCD is characterized by polyclonal, IgM-lambda restricted plasmacytoid cells in the intrafollicular areas of affected lymph nodes. A portion of these cells are infected with KSHV and a sizable subset of these cells express KSHV lytic genes including a viral homolog of interleukin-6 (vIL-6). Patients with KSHV-MCD generally have elevated KSHV viral loads in their peripheral blood. Production of vIL-6 and induction of human (h) IL-6 both contribute to symptoms, perhaps in combination with overproduction of IL-10 and other cytokines. Until recently, the prognosis of patients with KSHV-MCD was poor. Recent therapeutic advances targeting KSHV-infected B cells with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and utilizing KSHV enzymes to target KSHV-infected cells have substantially improved patient outcomes. Recently another KSHV-associated condition, the KSHV inflammatory cytokine syndrome (KICS) has been described. Its clinical manifestations resemble those of KSHV-MCD but lymphadenopathy is not prominent and the pathologic nodal changes of KSHV-MCD are absent. Patients with KICS exhibit elevated KSHV viral loads and elevation of vIL-6, homolog of human interleukin-6 and IL-10 comparable to those seen in KSHV-MCD; the cellular origin of these is a matter of investigation. KICS may contribute to the inflammatory symptoms seen in some patients with

  2. Clinical Manifestations of Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Lytic Activation: Multicentric Castleman Disease (KSHV–MCD) and the KSHV Inflammatory Cytokine Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzotto, Mark N.; Uldrick, Thomas S.; Hu, Duosha; Yarchoan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Soon after the discovery of Kaposi sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), it was appreciated that this virus was associated with most cases of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) arising in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. It has subsequently been recognized that KSHV–MCD is a distinct entity from other forms of MCD. Like MCD that is unrelated to KSHV, the clinical presentation of KSHV–MCD is dominated by systemic inflammatory symptoms including fevers, cachexia, and laboratory abnormalities including cytopenias, hypoalbuminemia, hyponatremia, and elevated C-reactive protein. Pathologically KSHV–MCD is characterized by polyclonal, IgM-lambda restricted plasmacytoid cells in the intrafollicular areas of affected lymph nodes. A portion of these cells are infected with KSHV and a sizable subset of these cells express KSHV lytic genes including a viral homolog of interleukin-6 (vIL-6). Patients with KSHV–MCD generally have elevated KSHV viral loads in their peripheral blood. Production of vIL-6 and induction of human (h) IL-6 both contribute to symptoms, perhaps in combination with overproduction of IL-10 and other cytokines. Until recently, the prognosis of patients with KSHV–MCD was poor. Recent therapeutic advances targeting KSHV-infected B cells with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and utilizing KSHV enzymes to target KSHV-infected cells have substantially improved patient outcomes. Recently another KSHV-associated condition, the KSHV inflammatory cytokine syndrome (KICS) has been described. Its clinical manifestations resemble those of KSHV–MCD but lymphadenopathy is not prominent and the pathologic nodal changes of KSHV–MCD are absent. Patients with KICS exhibit elevated KSHV viral loads and elevation of vIL-6, homolog of human interleukin-6 and IL-10 comparable to those seen in KSHV–MCD; the cellular origin of these is a matter of investigation. KICS may contribute to the inflammatory symptoms seen in some

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of amphiphilic peptides as nanostructures and drug delivery tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeh, Naser Ali

    the well-known, highly cationic CPPs, such as TAT and Arg9, which do not translocate across phospholipid bilayers, and enter cells mostly by active endocytosis. Alternatively, researchers have found that an effective cellular delivery vector can be improved developed by conjugating a CPP with a fatty acid chain. Amphiphilic peptides have also become a subject of major interest as potent antibacterial agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are produced naturally by bacteria and are considered as the first line of host defense protecting living organisms from microorganisms. Various types of AMPs has been discovered, such as defensins, cecropins, magainins and cathelicidins, with significant different structures and bioactivity profiles. The mechanism of actions for these peptides were reported as effectors and regulators of the innate immune system by increasing production and release of chemokine, and enhancing wound healing and angiogenesis. They were able to suppress biofilm formation and induce the dissolution of existing biofilms. Thus, design of new AMPs and more cost effective sequences with highly activity are urgently needed. Although a number of cyclic peptides were discovered and reported as efficient cellular delivery agents or antimicrobial agent, a more systematic investigation is required to identify design rules for optimal entrapment, drug loading, and stability. The balance of many small forces determines the overall morphology, size, and functionality of the structures. A deeper understanding of these factors is required for guiding future research, and for customizing cyclic peptides for drug loading and cellular delivery applications. Thus, additional amphiphilic cyclic and linear peptides were designed with variable electrostatic and hydrophobic residues to optimize drug encapsulation. The diversity in ring size, amino acid number, position and sequences, number of rings, net charge, and hydrophobicity of side chains in cyclic peptides will allow

  4. Produção, purificação, clonagem e aplicação de enzimas líticas Production, purification, cloning and application of lytic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Francisco Fleuri

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Lytic enzymes such as beta-1,3 glucanases, proteases and chitinases are able to hydrolyse, respectively, beta-1,3 glucans, mannoproteins and chitin, as well as the cell walls of many yeast species. Lytic enzymes are useful in a great variety of applications including the preparation of protoplasts; the extraction of proteins, enzymes, pigments and functional carbohydrates; pre-treatment for the mechanical rupture of cells; degradation of residual yeast cell mass for the preparation of animal feed; analysis of the yeast cell wall structure and composition; study of the yeast cell wall synthesis and the control of pathogenic fungi. This review presents the most important aspects with respect to lytic enzymes, especially their production, purification, cloning and application.

  5. Purification and use of E. coli peptide deformylase for peptide deprotection in chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Toma, Claudia; Sonke, Theo; Quaedflieg, Peter J.; Janssen, Dick B.

    Peptide deformylases (PDFs) catalyze the removal of the formyl group from the N-terminal methionine residue in nascent polypeptide chains in prokaryotes. Its deformylation activity makes PDF an attractive candidate for the biocatalytic deprotection of formylated peptides that are used in

  6. Cathepsin-Mediated Cleavage of Peptides from Peptide Amphiphiles Leads to Enhanced Intracellular Peptide Accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, Handan [Institute; Department; Samaeekia, Ravand [Institute; Department; Schnorenberg, Mathew R. [Institute; Department; Medical; Sasmal, Dibyendu K. [Institute; Huang, Jun [Institute; Tirrell, Matthew V. [Institute; Institute; LaBelle, James L. [Department

    2017-08-24

    Peptides synthesized in the likeness of their native interaction domain(s) are natural choices to target protein protein interactions (PPIs) due to their fidelity of orthostatic contact points between binding partners. Despite therapeutic promise, intracellular delivery of biofunctional peptides at concentrations necessary for efficacy remains a formidable challenge. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) provide a facile method of intracellular delivery and stabilization of bioactive peptides. PAs consisting of biofunctional peptide headgroups linked to hydrophobic alkyl lipid-like tails prevent peptide hydrolysis and proteolysis in circulation, and PA monomers are internalized via endocytosis. However, endocytotic sequestration and steric hindrance from the lipid tail are two major mechanisms that limit PA efficacy to target intracellular PPIs. To address these problems, we have constructed a PA platform consisting of cathepsin-B cleavable PAs in which a selective p53-based inhibitory peptide is cleaved from its lipid tail within endosomes, allowing for intracellular peptide accumulation and extracellular recycling of the lipid moiety. We monitor for cleavage and follow individual PA components in real time using a resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tracking system. Using this platform, components in real time using a Forster we provide a better understanding and quantification of cellular internalization, trafficking, and endosomal cleavage of PAs and of the ultimate fates of each component.

  7. Lab-on-fiber optofluidic platform for in-situ study of therapeutic peptides and bacterial response (Rising Researcher Presentation) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fei; Yang, Fan; Liang, Junfeng

    2017-05-01

    Hospital acquired infections in indwelling device have become a life-threatening issue accompanied by the wide use of medical devices and implants. The infection process typically involves the attachment, growth and eventual assemblage of microbial cells into biofilms, with the latter exhibiting extremely higher antibiotic tolerance than planktonic bacteria. Surface constructed antimicrobial coatings offer a viable solution for bacteria responsive antibiotic strategy in medical devices such as catheter and stents. Therapeutic peptide has pioneered the field for their attractive pharmacological profile with broad antibacterial spectrum, great efficacy and long life-span. It has been a common practice to separately assess bacteria responses through commercially available activity assay kits after their exposure to antibiotic coatings, limiting the assessment of their activity in vitro with a discontinuous fashion. We developed and demonstrated an innovative all-optical lab-on-fiber optofluidic platform (LOFOP) to fill in this technical gap by allowing in situ measurement of the bacteria attachment in a continuous manner. This LOFOP allows for evaluation of drug release and resultant bacterial response by integrating glass capillary with lytic peptide-containing LbL-coated long period graing (LPG) as its core. S. aureus suspension is introduced through the assembled optofluidic platform with the capillary and the peptide-coated LPG. The efficacy of the peptide-containing coating is evaluated in situ by monitoring the attachment of bacteria and the ensuing development of biofilms using the LPG. LPG without antimicrobial coatings will be explored and compared as control.

  8. Immune response induced by Epstein-Barr virus and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis peptides in current and past infectious mononucleosis: a risk for multiple sclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, G; Madeddu, G; Cossu, D; Galleri, G; Manetti, R; Babudieri, S; Mura, M Stella; Sechi, L A

    2016-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis (IM) caused by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the mechanism linking these pathologies is unclear. Different reports indicate the association of EBV, and recently Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), with MS. For a better understanding of the role of these pathogens, the host response induced by selected antigenic peptides in subjects with a history of IM that significantly increases the risk of MS was investigated. Both humoral and cell-mediated response against peptides able to induce a specific immune activation in MS patients deriving from lytic and latent EBV antigens BOLF1(305-320), EBNA1(400-413), from MAP MAP_4027(18-32), MAP_0106c(121-132) and from human proteins IRF5(424-434) and MBP(85-98) in subjects with current and past IM were examined. EBNA1 and MAP_0106c peptides were able to induce a humoral immune response in subjects with a history of clinical IM in an independent manner. Moreover, these peptides were capable of inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon γ by CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and interleukin 6 and tumour necrosis factor α by CD14+ monocyte cells. Our results highlight that EBV and MAP may be involved independently in the same causal process leading to MS in subjects with a history of IM. © 2015 EAN.

  9. A functional MSBBA cyltransferaseof photorhabdus luminescens, required for secondary lipid aacylation in gram-negative bacteria,confers resistance to anti-microbial peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abi Khattar, Z.; Gaudriault, S.; Givaudan, A.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid A is a potent endotoxin, and its fatty acids (lauric, myristic, and sometimes palmitic acid) anchors lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into the outer leaflet of the outer membrane of most Gram-negative bacteria. The highly anionic charge of the glucosamine lipid A moiety makes the LPS a powerful attractant for cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). AMPs are major component of innate immunity that kill bacteria by permeabilization of lipid bilayers. Secondary lipid A acylation of Klebsiella pneumoniae, involving the acyltransferase LpxM (formally, msbBor WaaN) that acylates (KDO)2-(lauroyl)-lipid IV-A with myristate during lipid A biosynthesis, has been associated with bacterial resistanceto AMPs contributing to virulence in animal models. We investigated here the role of the msbB gene of the entomopathogenic bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens in AMP resistance, by functional complementation of the AMP susceptible K. pneumoniae lpxM mutant with the P. luminescens msbB gene. We showed that msbB (lpxM) gene of P. luminescensis able to enhance polymyxin B, colistin and cecropin A resistance of K. pneumoniae lpxM mutant, compared to the non-complemented mutant. However, we could not obtain any msbB mutant of Photorhabdus by performing allelic exchange experiments based on positive selection of sucrose highly resistant mutants.We thus suggest that msbB-mediated Photorhabdus lipid A acylation is essential for outer membrane low-permeability and thatmodification of lipid A composition, fluidity and osmosis-resistance have an important role in the ability of Photorhabdus to grow in sucrose at high concentrations. (author)

  10. A novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage, Ab31, a chimera formed from temperate phage PAJU2 and P. putida lytic phage AF: characteristics and mechanism of bacterial resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libera Latino

    Full Text Available A novel temperate bacteriophage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, phage vB_PaeP_Tr60_Ab31 (alias Ab31 is described. Its genome is composed of structural genes related to those of lytic P. putida phage AF, and regulatory genes similar to those of temperate phage PAJU2. The virion structure resembles that of phage AF and other lytic Podoviridae (S. enterica Epsilon 15 and E. coli phiv10 with similar tail spikes. Ab31 was able to infect P. aeruginosa strain PA14 and two genetically related strains called Tr60 and Tr162, out of 35 diverse strains from cystic fibrosis patients. Analysis of resistant host variants revealed different phenotypes, including induction of pigment and alginate overproduction. Whole genome sequencing of resistant variants highlighted the existence of a large deletion of 234 kbp in two strains, encompassing a cluster of genes required for the production of CupA fimbriae. Stable lysogens formed by Ab31 in strain Tr60, permitted the identification of the insertion site. During colonization of the lung in cystic fibrosis patients, P. aeruginosa adapts by modifying its genome. We suggest that bacteriophages such as Ab31 may play an important role in this adaptation by selecting for bacterial characteristics that favor persistence of bacteria in the lung.

  11. Role of defective Oct-2 and OCA-B expression in immunoglobulin production and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivation in primary effusion lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bartolo, Daniel L; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Keller, Shannon; Guasparri, Ilaria; Deng, Hongyu; Sun, Ren; Chadburn, Amy; Knowles, Daniel M; Cesarman, Ethel

    2009-05-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a distinct type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma characterized by the presence of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/human herpesvirus 8). Despite having a genotype and gene expression signature of highly differentiated B cells, PEL does not usually express surface or cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (Ig). We show the lack of Oct-2 and OCA-B transcription factors to be responsible, at least in part, for this defect in Ig production. Like Ig genes, ORF50, the key regulator of the switch from latency to lytic reactivation, contains an octamer motif within its promoter. We therefore examined the impact of Oct-2 and OCA-B on ORF50 activation. The binding of Oct-1 to the ORF50 promoter has been shown to significantly enhance ORF50 transactivation. We found that Oct-2, on the other hand, inhibited ORF50 expression and consequently lytic reactivation by competing with Oct-1 for the octamer motif in the ORF50 promoter. Our data suggest that Oct-2 downregulation in infected cells would be favorable to KSHV in allowing for efficient viral reactivation.

  12. Rapid Assessment of Resistance to Antibiotic Inhibitors of Protein Synthesis in the Gram-Positive Pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, Based on Evaluation of the Lytic Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Fátima; Tamayo, María; Santiso, Rebeca; Gosálvez, Jaime; Bou, Germán; Fernández, José Luis

    2017-04-01

    A novel assay for rapid determination of resistance to antibiotic inhibitors of protein synthesis was developed for the gram-positive pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. To this purpose, a lytic response was obtained by a brief incubation with lysozyme or a mixture of lysozyme, Triton X-100, and EDTA for E. faecalis (n = 82) and S. pneumoniae (n = 51), respectively. Lysis was quantified by visualizing the released nucleoids. Antibiotic-susceptible bacteria treated with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoint doses of erythromycin, azithromycin, or doxycycline that inhibited protein synthesis demonstrated a large reduction of lysed cells with respect to the control, that is, without antibiotics. However, cell lysis prevention was much lower in nonsusceptible strains, with unsuccessful inhibition of protein synthesis. ROC analysis showed that a reduction value of ≥35.6% and ≥40.4% discriminates susceptible and nonsusceptible strains for erythromycin and for doxycycline, respectively, in E. faecalis, whereas ≥20.0% is adequate for both macrolides and doxycycline in S. pneumoniae. Resistant stains were identified in 90-120 min with sensitivity and specificity between 91.7% and 100%. This is a proof of concept that evaluation of the lytic response may be a rapid and efficient test for determination of resistance to antibiotic inhibitors of protein synthesis.

  13. Radiopharmaceutical development of radiolabelled peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Receptor targeting with radiolabelled peptides has become very important in nuclear medicine and oncology in the past few years. The overexpression of many peptide receptors in numerous cancers, compared to their relatively low density in physiological organs, represents the molecular basis for in vivo imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy with radiolabelled peptide-based probes. The prototypes are analogs of somatostatin which are routinely used in the clinic. More recent developments include somatostatin analogs with a broader receptor subtype profile or with antagonistic properties. Many other peptide families such as bombesin, cholecystokinin/gastrin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/exendin, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) etc. have been explored during the last few years and quite a number of potential radiolabelled probes have been derived from them. On the other hand, a variety of strategies and optimized protocols for efficient labelling of peptides with clinically relevant radionuclides such as {sup 99m}Tc, M{sup 3+} radiometals ({sup 111}In, {sup 86/90}Y, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 67/68}Ga), {sup 64/67}Cu, {sup 18}F or radioisotopes of iodine have been developed. The labelling approaches include direct labelling, the use of bifunctional chelators or prosthetic groups. The choice of the labelling approach is driven by the nature and the chemical properties of the radionuclide. Additionally, chemical strategies, including modification of the amino acid sequence and introduction of linkers/spacers with different characteristics, have been explored for the improvement of the overall performance of the radiopeptides, e.g. metabolic stability and pharmacokinetics. Herein, we discuss the development of peptides as radiopharmaceuticals starting from the choice of the labelling method and the conditions to the design and optimization of the peptide probe, as well as some recent developments, focusing on a selected list of peptide families, including somatostatin

  14. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte

    2013-01-01

    properties, peptides were introduced into oligonucleotides via a 2'-alkyne-2'-amino-LNA scaffold. Derivatives of methionine- and leucine-enkephalins were chosen as model peptides of mixed amino acid content, which were singly and doubly incorporated into LNA/DNA strands using highly efficient copper......(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry. DNA/RNA target binding affinity and selectivity of the resulting POCs were improved in comparison to LNA/DNA mixmers and unmodified DNA controls. This clearly demonstrates that internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides can significantly...

  15. New vasoactive peptides in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Goetze, Jens Peter; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with cirrhosis have substantial circulatory imbalance between vasoconstrictive and vasodilating forces. The study of circulatory vasoactive peptides may provide important pathophysiological information. This study aimed to assess concentrations, organ extraction and relations...... to haemodynamic changes in the pro-peptides copeptin, proadrenomedullin and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (proANP) in patients with cirrhosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-four cirrhotic patients and 15 controls were characterized haemodynamically during a liver vein catheterization. Copeptin, proadrenomedullin...... pressure (R=0·32, P0·31, Ppeptide is elevated in cirrhosis. Copeptin, proadrenomedullin and proANP are related to portal pressure and seem associated with systemic haemodynamics. These propeptides may...

  16. Characterization of synthetic peptides by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala Krishna; Mirza, Osman Asghar; Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI......-TOF-MS and LC-MS of synthetic peptides....

  17. Marine Peptides: Bioactivities and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Chi Fai Cheung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are important bioactive natural products which are present in many marine species. These marine peptides have high potential nutraceutical and medicinal values because of their broad spectra of bioactivities. Their antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidative, cardioprotective (antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and anticoagulant, immunomodulatory, analgesic, anxiolytic anti-diabetic, appetite suppressing and neuroprotective activities have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which attempts to design them for use in the treatment or prevention of various diseases. Some marine peptides or their derivatives have high commercial values and had reached the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical markets. A large number of them are already in different phases of the clinical and preclinical pipeline. This review highlights the recent research in marine peptides and the trends and prospects for the future, with special emphasis on nutraceutical and pharmaceutical development into marketed products.

  18. Cardioprotective peptides from marine sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnedy, Padraigín A; FitzGerald, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Elevated blood pressure or hypertension is one of the fastest growing health problems worldwide. Although the etiology of essential hypertension has a genetic component, dietary factors play an important role. With the high costs and adverse side-effects associated with synthetic antihypertensive drugs and the awareness of the link between diet and health there has been increased focus on identification of food components that may contribute to cardiovascular health. In recent years special interest has been paid to the cardioprotective activity of peptides derived from food proteins including marine proteins. These peptides are latent within the sequence of the parent protein and only become active when released by proteolytic digestion during gastrointestinal digestion or through food processing. Current data on antihypertensive activity of marine-derived protein hydrolysates/peptides in animal and human studies is reviewed herein. Furthermore, products containing protein hydrolysates/peptides from marine origin with antihypertensive effects are discussed.

  19. Antimicrobial peptides from Capsicum sp.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-30

    Dec 30, 2011 ... Key words: Antimicrobial peptides, Capsicum sp, Capsicum chinense, chili pepper, agronomical options, ..... of this human activity is resumed by the simple phrase: produce .... It will be interesting to scale the AMPs extraction.

  20. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies...... are powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors......, including solid-phase peptide-carrier conjugation and peptide-carrier conjugation in solution. Upon immunization, adjuvants such as Al(OH)(3) are added together with the immunogenic peptide-carrier conjugate, which usually leads to high-titred antisera. Following immunization and peptide antibody...

  1. Effects of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase Oxidation on Cellulose Structure and Binding of Oxidized Cellulose Oligomers to Cellulases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Crowley, Michael F.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Payne, Christina M.

    2015-05-21

    In nature, polysaccharide glycosidic bonds are cleaved by hydrolytic enzymes for a vast array of biological functions. Recently, a new class of enzymes that utilize an oxidative mechanism to cleave glycosidic linkages was discovered; these enzymes are called lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMO). These oxidative enzymes are synergistic with cocktails of hydrolytic enzymes and are thought to act primarily on crystalline regions, in turn providing new sites of productive attachment and detachment for processive hydrolytic enzymes. In the case of cellulose, the homopolymer of ..beta..-1,4-d-glucose, enzymatic oxidation occurs at either the reducing end or the nonreducing end of glucose, depending on enzymatic specificity, and results in the generation of oxidized chemical substituents at polymer chain ends. LPMO oxidation of cellulose is thought to produce either a lactone at the reducing end of glucose that can spontaneously or enzymatically convert to aldonic acid or 4-keto-aldose at the nonreducing end that may further oxidize to a geminal diol. Here, we use molecular simulation to examine the effect of oxidation on the structure of crystalline cellulose. The simulations highlight variations in behaviors depending on the chemical identity of the oxidized species and its location within the cellulose fibril, as different oxidized species introduce steric effects that disrupt local crystallinity and in some cases reduce the work needed for polymer decrystallization. Reducing-end oxidations are easiest to decrystallize when located at the end of the fibril, whereas nonreducing end oxidations readily decrystallize from internal cleavage sites despite their lower solvent accessibility. The differential in decrystallization free energy suggests a molecular mechanism consistent with experimentally observed LPMO/cellobiohydrolase synergy. Additionally, the soluble oxidized cellobiose products released by hydrolytic cellulases may bind to the active sites of cellulases

  2. Peptides and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopy make it possible to derive detailed structural information about biomolecular structures in solution. These techniques are critically dependent on the availability of labeled compounds. For example, NMR techniques used today to derive peptide and protein structures require uniformity {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled samples that are derived biosynthetically from (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. These experiments are possible now because, during the 1970s, the National Stable Isotope Resource developed algal methods for producing (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. If NMR techniques are to be used to study larger proteins, we will need sophisticated labelling patterns in amino acids that employ a combination of {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N labeling. The availability of these specifically labeled amino acids requires a renewed investment in new methods for chemical synthesis of labeled amino acids. The development of new magnetic resonance or vibrational techniques to elucidate biomolecular structure will be seriously impeded if we do not see rapid progress in labeling technology. Investment in labeling chemistry is as important as investment in the development of advanced spectroscopic tools.

  3. Matrix-assisted peptide synthesis on nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandadash, Raz; Machtey, Victoria; Weiss, Aryeh; Byk, Gerardo

    2014-09-01

    We report a new method for multistep peptide synthesis on polymeric nanoparticles of differing sizes. Polymeric nanoparticles were functionalized via their temporary embedment into a magnetic inorganic matrix that allows multistep peptide synthesis. The matrix is removed at the end of the process for obtaining nanoparticles functionalized with peptides. The matrix-assisted synthesis on nanoparticles was proved by generating various biologically relevant peptides. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  5. Flanking signal and mature peptide residues influence signal peptide cleavage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganathan Shoba

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal peptides (SPs mediate the targeting of secretory precursor proteins to the correct subcellular compartments in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Identifying these transient peptides is crucial to the medical, food and beverage and biotechnology industries yet our understanding of these peptides remains limited. This paper examines the most common type of signal peptides cleavable by the endoprotease signal peptidase I (SPase I, and the residues flanking the cleavage sites of three groups of signal peptide sequences, namely (i eukaryotes (Euk (ii Gram-positive (Gram+ bacteria, and (iii Gram-negative (Gram- bacteria. Results In this study, 2352 secretory peptide sequences from a variety of organisms with amino-terminal SPs are extracted from the manually curated SPdb database for analysis based on physicochemical properties such as pI, aliphatic index, GRAVY score, hydrophobicity, net charge and position-specific residue preferences. Our findings show that the three groups share several similarities in general, but they display distinctive features upon examination in terms of their amino acid compositions and frequencies, and various physico-chemical properties. Thus, analysis or prediction of their sequences should be separated and treated as distinct groups. Conclusion We conclude that the peptide segment recognized by SPase I extends to the start of the mature protein to a limited extent, upon our survey of the amino acid residues surrounding the cleavage processing site. These flanking residues possibly influence the cleavage processing and contribute to non-canonical cleavage sites. Our findings are applicable in defining more accurate prediction tools for recognition and identification of cleavage site of SPs.

  6. The CD8 and CD4 T-cell response against Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is skewed towards early and late lytic antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C Robey

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is causally related to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, the most common malignancy in untreated individuals with HIV/AIDS. The adaptive T-cell immune response against KSHV has not been fully characterized. To achieve a better understanding of the antigenic repertoire of the CD8 and CD4 T-cell responses against KSHV, we constructed a library of lentiviral expression vectors each coding for one of 31 individual KSHV open reading frames (ORFs. We used these to transduce monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs isolated from 14 KSHV-seropositive (12 HIV-positive and 7 KSHV-seronegative (4 HIV-positive individuals. moDCs were transduced with up to 3 KSHV ORFs simultaneously (ORFs grouped according to their expression during the viral life cycle. Transduced moDCs naturally process the KSHV genes and present the resulting antigens in the context of MHC class I and II. Transduced moDCs were cultured with purified autologous T cells and the CD8 and CD4 T-cell proliferative responses to each KSHV ORF (or group was assessed using a CFSE dye-based assay. Two pools of early lytic KSHV genes ([ORF8/ORF49/ORF61] and [ORF59/ORF65/K4.1] were frequently-recognized targets of both CD8 and CD4 T cells from KSHV seropositive individuals. One pool of late lytic KSHV genes ([ORF28/ORF36/ORF37] was a frequently-recognized CD8 target and another pool of late genes ([ORF33/K1/K8.1] was a frequently-recognized CD4 target. We report that both the CD8 and CD4 T-cell responses against KSHV are skewed towards genes expressed in the early and late phases of the viral lytic cycle, and identify some previously unknown targets of these responses. This knowledge will be important to future immunological investigations into KSHV and may eventually lead to the development of better immunotherapies for KSHV-related diseases.

  7. Peptides and Anti-peptide Antibodies for Small and Medium Scale Peptide and Anti-peptide Affinity Microarrays: Antigenic Peptide Selection, Immobilization, and Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Briones, Andrea; Soloviev, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of selection of antigenic peptides for the development of anti-peptide antibodies for use in microarray-based multiplex affinity assays and also with mass-spectrometry detection. The methods described here are mostly applicable to small to medium scale arrays. Although the same principles of peptide selection would be suitable for larger scale arrays (with 100+ features) the actual informatics software and printing methods may well be different. Because of the sheer number of proteins/peptides to be processed and analyzed dedicated software capable of processing all the proteins and an enterprise level array robotics may be necessary for larger scale efforts. This report aims to provide practical advice to those who develop or use arrays with up to ~100 different peptide or protein features.

  8. Release of Periplasmic Nucleotidase Induced by Human Antimicrobial Peptide in E. coli Causes Accumulation of the Immunomodulator Adenosine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Bergamo Estrela

    Full Text Available Previous work by our group described that human β-defensin-2 induces accumulation of extracellular adenosine (Ado in E. coli cultures through a non-lytic mechanism causing severe plasmolysis. Here, we investigate the presence of AMP as a direct precursor and the involvement of a bacterial enzyme in the generation of extracellular Ado by treated bacteria. Following hBD-2 treatment, metabolites were quantified in the supernatants using targeted HPLC-MS/MS analysis. Microbial growth was monitored by optical density and cell viability was determined by colony forming units counts. Phosphatase activity was measured using chromogenic substrate pNPP. The results demonstrate that defensin-treated E. coli strain W releases AMP in the extracellular space, where it is converted to Ado by a bacterial soluble factor. An increase in phosphatase activity in the supernatant was observed after peptide treatment, similar to the effect of sucrose-induced osmotic stress, suggesting that the periplasmic 5'nucleotidase (5'-NT is released following the plasmolysis event triggered by the peptide. Ado accumulation was enhanced in the presence of Co2+ ion and inhibited by EDTA, further supporting the involvement of a metallo-phosphatase such as 5'-NT in extracellular AMP conversion into Ado. The comparative analysis of hBD-induced Ado accumulation in different E. coli strains and in Pseudomonas aeruginosa revealed that the response is not correlated to the peptide's effect on cell viability, but indicates it might be dependent on the subcellular distribution of the nucleotidase. Taken together, these data shed light on a yet undescribed mechanism of host-microbial interaction: a human antimicrobial peptide inducing selective release of a bacterial enzyme (E. coli 5'-NT, leading to the formation of a potent immunomodulator metabolite (Ado.

  9. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis to obtain therapeutic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Mäde

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The great versatility and the inherent high affinities of peptides for their respective targets have led to tremendous progress for therapeutic applications in the last years. In order to increase the drugability of these frequently unstable and rapidly cleared molecules, chemical modifications are of great interest. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS offers a suitable technology to produce chemically engineered peptides. This review concentrates on the application of SPPS by Fmoc/t-Bu protecting-group strategy, which is most commonly used. Critical issues and suggestions for the synthesis are covered. The development of automated methods from conventional to essentially improved microwave-assisted instruments is discussed. In order to improve pharmacokinetic properties of peptides, lipidation and PEGylation are described as covalent conjugation methods, which can be applied by a combination of automated and manual synthesis approaches. The synthesis and application of SPPS is described for neuropeptide Y receptor analogs as an example for bioactive hormones. The applied strategies represent innovative and potent methods for the development of novel peptide drug candidates that can be manufactured with optimized automated synthesis technologies.

  10. What peptides these deltorphins be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, L H; Bryant, S D; Cooper, P S; Salvadori, S

    1999-02-01

    The deltorphins are a class of highly selective delta-opioid heptapeptides from the skin of the Amazonian frogs Phyllomedusa sauvagei and P. bicolor. The first of these fascinating peptides came to light in 1987 by cloning of the cDNA of from frog skins, while the other members of this family were identified either by cDNA or isolation of the peptides. The distinctive feature of deltorphins is the presence of a naturally occurring D-enantiomer at the second position in their common N-terminal sequence, Tyr-D-Xaa-Phe, comparable to dermorphin, which is the prototype of a group of mu-selective opioids from the same source. The D-amino acid and the anionic residues, either Glu or Asp, as well as their unique amino acid compositions are responsible for the remarkable biostability, high delta-receptor affinity, bioactivity and peptide conformation. This review summarizes a decade of research from many laboratories that defined which residues and substituents in the deltorphins interact with the delta-receptor and characterized pharmacological and physiological activities in vitro and in vivo. It begins with a historical description of the topic and presents general schema for the synthesis of peptide analogues of deltorphins A, B and C as a means to document the methods employed in producing a myriad of analogues. Structure activity studies of the peptides and their pharmacological activities in vitro are detailed in abundantly tabulated data. A brief compendium of the current level of knowledge of the delta-receptor assists the reader to appreciate the rationale for the design of these analogues. Discussion of the conformation of these peptides addresses how structure leads to further hypotheses regarding ligand receptor interaction. The review ends with a broad discussion of the potential applications of these peptides in clinical and therapeutic settings.

  11. Sequencing Cyclic Peptides by Multistage Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohimani, Hosein; Yang, Yu-Liang; Liu, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most effective antibiotics (e.g., Vancomycin and Daptomycin) are cyclic peptides produced by non-ribosomal biosynthetic pathways. While hundreds of biomedically important cyclic peptides have been sequenced, the computational techniques for sequencing cyclic peptides are still in their infancy. Previous methods for sequencing peptide antibiotics and other cyclic peptides are based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, and require large amount (miligrams) of purified materials that, for most compounds, are not possible to obtain. Recently, development of mass spectrometry based methods has provided some hope for accurate sequencing of cyclic peptides using picograms of materials. In this paper we develop a method for sequencing of cyclic peptides by multistage mass spectrometry, and show its advantages over single stage mass spectrometry. The method is tested on known and new cyclic peptides from Bacillus brevis, Dianthus superbus and Streptomyces griseus, as well as a new family of cyclic peptides produced by marine bacteria. PMID:21751357

  12. Cyclic peptide therapeutics: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Cyclic peptides combine several favorable properties such as good binding affinity, target selectivity and low toxicity that make them an attractive modality for the development of therapeutics. Over 40 cyclic peptide drugs are currently in clinical use and around one new cyclic peptide drug enters the market every year on average. The vast majority of clinically approved cyclic peptides are derived from natural products, such as antimicrobials or human peptide hormones. New powerful techniques based on rational design and in vitro evolution have enabled the de novo development of cyclic peptide ligands to targets for which nature does not offer solutions. A look at the cyclic peptides currently under clinical evaluation shows that several have been developed using such techniques. This new source for cyclic peptide ligands introduces a freshness to the field, and it is likely that de novo developed cyclic peptides will be in clinical use in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lysis to Kill: Evaluation of the Lytic Abilities, and Genomics of Nine Bacteriophages Infective for Gordonia spp. and Their Potential Use in Activated Sludge Foam Biocontrol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe A Dyson

    Full Text Available Nine bacteriophages (phages infective for members of the genus Gordonia were isolated from wastewater and other natural water environments using standard enrichment techniques. The majority were broad host range phages targeting more than one Gordonia species. When their genomes were sequenced, they all emerged as double stranded DNA Siphoviridae phages, ranging from 17,562 to 103,424 bp in size, and containing between 27 and 127 genes, many of which were detailed for the first time. Many of these phage genomes diverged from the expected modular genome architecture of other characterized Siphoviridae phages and contained unusual lysis gene arrangements. Whole genome sequencing also revealed that infection with lytic phages does not appear to prevent spontaneous prophage induction in Gordonia malaquae lysogen strain BEN700. TEM sample preparation techniques were developed to view both attachment and replication stages of phage infection.

  14. The Performance of the Four Anaerobic Blood Culture Bottles BacT/ALERT-FN, -FN Plus, BACTEC-Plus and -Lytic in Detection of Anaerobic Bacteria and Identification by Direct MALDI-TOF MS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Almuhayawi

    Full Text Available Detection and identification of anaerobic bacteria in blood cultures (BC is a well-recognized challenge in clinical microbiology. We studied 100 clinical anaerobic BC isolates to evaluate the performance of BacT/ALERT-FN, -FN Plus (BioMérieux, BACTEC-Plus and -Lytic (Becton Dickinson BioSciences BC bottles in detection and time to detection (TTD of anaerobic bacteria. BACTEC Lytic had higher detection rate (94/100, 94% than BacT/ALERT FN Plus (80/100, 80% (p<0.01 in the studied material. There was no significant difference in detection of anaerobic bacteria among the remaining bottle types. The 67 anaerobic bacteria that signalled positive in all four bottle types were analyzed to compare the time to detection (TTD and isolates were directly identified by MALDI-TOF MS. There was a significant difference in TTD among the four bottle types (p<0.0001. The shortest median TTD was 18 h in BACTEC Lytic followed by BacT/ALERT FN (23.5 h, BACTEC Plus (27 h and finally BacT/ALERT FN Plus (38 h bottles. In contrast, MALDI-TOF MS performed similarly in all bottle types with accurate identification in 51/67 (76% BacT/ALERT FN, 51/67 (76% BacT/ALERT FN Plus, 53/67 (79% BACTEC Plus and 50/67 (75% BACTEC Lytic bottles. In conclusion, BACTEC Lytic bottles have significantly better detection rates and shorter TTD compared to the three other bottle types. The anaerobic BC bottles are equally suitable for direct MALDI-TOF MS for rapid and reliable identification of common anaerobic bacteria. Further clinical studies are warranted to investigate the performance of anaerobic BC bottles in detection of anaerobic bacteria and identification by direct MALDI-TOF MS.

  15. PD-1 blocks lytic granule polarization with concomitant impairment of integrin outside-in signaling in the natural killer cell immunological synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Chen, Zhiying; Jang, Joon Hee; Baig, Mirza S; Bertolet, Grant; Schroeder, Casey; Huang, Shengjian; Hu, Qian; Zhao, Yong; Lewis, Dorothy E; Qin, Lidong; Zhu, Michael Xi; Liu, Dongfang

    2018-04-18

    The inhibitory receptor programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) is upregulated on a variety of immune cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, during chronic viral infection and tumorigenesis. Blockade of PD-1 or its ligands produces durable clinical responses with tolerable side effects in patients with a broad spectrum of cancers. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how PD-1 regulates NK cell function remain poorly characterized. We sought to determine the effect of PD-1 signaling on NK cells. PD-1 was overexpressed in CD16-KHYG-1 (a human NK cell line with both antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity through CD16 and natural cytotoxicity through NKG2D) cells and stimulated by exposing the cells to NK-sensitive target cells expressing programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1). PD-1 engagement by PD-L1 specifically blocked NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity without interfering with the conjugation between NK cells and target cells. Further examination showed that PD-1 signaling blocked lytic granule polarization in NK cells, which was accompanied by failure of integrin-linked kinase, a key molecule in the integrin outside-in signaling pathway, to accumulate in the immunological synapse after NK-target cell conjugation. Our results suggest that NK cell cytotoxicity is inhibited by PD-1 engagement, which blocks lytic granule polarization to the NK cell immunological synapse with concomitant impairment of integrin outside-in signaling. This study provides novel mechanistic insights into how PD-1 inhibition disrupts NK cell function. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Co-therapy using lytic bacteriophage and linezolid: effective treatment in eliminating methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA from diabetic foot infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Chhibber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus remains the predominant pathogen in diabetic foot infections and prevalence of methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA strains further complicates the situation. The incidence of MRSA in infected foot ulcers is 15-30% and there is an alarming trend for its increase in many countries. Diabetes acts as an immunosuppressive state decreasing the overall immune functioning of body and to worsen the situation, wounds inflicted with drug resistant strains represent a morbid combination in diabetic patients. Foot infections caused by MRSA are associated with an increased risk of amputations, increased hospital stay, increased expenses and higher infection-related mortality. Hence, newer, safer and effective treatment strategies are required for treating MRSA mediated diabetic foot infections. The present study focuses on the use of lytic bacteriophage in combination with linezolid as an effective treatment strategy against foot infection in diabetic population. METHODOLOGY: Acute hindpaw infection with S.aureus ATCC 43300 was established in alloxan induced diabetic BALB/c mice. Therapeutic efficacy of a well characterized broad host range lytic bacteriophage, MR-10 was evaluated alone as well as in combination with linezolid in resolving the course of hindpaw foot infection in diabetic mice. The process of wound healing was also investigated. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A single administration of phage exhibited efficacy similar to linezolid in resolving the course of hindpaw infection in diabetic animals. However, combination therapy using both the agents was much more effective in arresting the entire infection process (bacterial load, lesion score, foot myeloperoxidase activity and histopathological analysis. The entire process of tissue healing was also hastened. Use of combined agents has been known to decrease the frequency of emergence of resistant mutants, hence this approach can serve as an effective strategy in

  17. Analysis of nanomechanical properties of Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes under the influence of lytic factors in an in vitro model using atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Tokarska-Rodak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atomic force microscopy (AFM is an experimental technique which recently has been used in biology, microbiology, and medicine to investigate the topography of surfaces and in the evaluation of mechanical properties of cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the complement system and specific anti-Borrelia antibodies in in vitro conditions on the modification of nanomechanical features of B. burgdorferi B31 cells. Material and methods: In order to assess the influence of the complement system and anti-Borrelia antibodies on B. burgdorferi s.s. B31 spirochetes, the bacteria were incubated together with plasma of identified status. The samples were applied on the surface of mica disks. Young’s modulus and adhesive forces were analyzed with a NanoScope V, MultiMode 8 AFM microscope (Bruker by the PeakForce QNM technique in air using NanoScope Analysis 1.40 software (Bruker.Results/Conclusion: The average value of flexibility of spirochetes’ surface expressed by Young’s modulus was 10185.32 MPa, whereas the adhesion force was 3.68 nN. AFM is a modern tool with a broad spectrum of observational and measurement abilities. Young’s modulus and the adhesion force can be treated as parameters in the evaluation of intensity and changes which take place in pathogenic microorganisms under the influence of various lytic factors. The visualization of the changes in association with nanomechanical features provides a realistic portrayal of the lytic abilities of the elements of the innate and adaptive human immune system.

  18. Peptide Vaccine: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidang Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional vaccine strategies have been highly efficacious for several decades in reducing mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases. The bane of conventional vaccines, such as those that include whole organisms or large proteins, appear to be the inclusion of unnecessary antigenic load that, not only contributes little to the protective immune response, but complicates the situation by inducing allergenic and/or reactogenic responses. Peptide vaccines are an attractive alternative strategy that relies on usage of short peptide fragments to engineer the induction of highly targeted immune responses, consequently avoiding allergenic and/or reactogenic sequences. Conversely, peptide vaccines used in isolation are often weakly immunogenic and require particulate carriers for delivery and adjuvanting. In this article, we discuss the specific advantages and considerations in targeted induction of immune responses by peptide vaccines and progresses in the development of such vaccines against various diseases. Additionally, we also discuss the development of particulate carrier strategies and the inherent challenges with regard to safety when combining such technologies with peptide vaccines.

  19. Double-Stranded Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker.......A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  20. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery....... To better understand the underlying mechanisms of antibody-antigen interaction here we present a pipeline developed by us to structurally classify immunoglobulin antigen binding sites and to infer key sequence residues and other variables that have a prominent role in each structural class....

  1. Self-assembling peptide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Kai; Makam, Pandeeswar; Aizen, Ruth; Gazit, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductors are central to the modern electronics and optics industries. Conventional semiconductive materials bear inherent limitations, especially in emerging fields such as interfacing with biological systems and bottom-up fabrication. A promising candidate for bioinspired and durable nanoscale semiconductors is the family of self-assembled nanostructures comprising short peptides. The highly ordered and directional intermolecular π-π interactions and hydrogen-bonding network allow the formation of quantum confined structures within the peptide self-assemblies, thus decreasing the band gaps of the superstructures into semiconductor regions. As a result of the diverse architectures and ease of modification of peptide self-assemblies, their semiconductivity can be readily tuned, doped, and functionalized. Therefore, this family of electroactive supramolecular materials may bridge the gap between the inorganic semiconductor world and biological systems. PMID:29146781

  2. Antimicrobial Peptide Production and Purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Srinivas; Field, Des; Barron, Niall

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are natural defense compounds which are synthesized as ribosomal gene-encoded pre-peptides and produced by all living organisms. AMPs are small peptides, usually cationic and typically have hydrophobic residues which interact with cell membranes and have either a narrow or broad spectrum of biological activity. AMPs are isolated from the natural host or heterologously expressed in other hosts such as Escherichia coli. The proto-typical lantibiotic Nisin is a widely used AMP that is produced by the food-grade organism Lactococcus lactis. Although AMP production and purification procedures require optimization for individual AMPs, the Nisin production and purification protocol outlined in this chapter can be easily applied with minor modifications for the production and purification of other lantibiotics or AMPs. While Nisin is produced and secreted into the supernatant, steps to recover Nisin from both cell-free supernatant and cell pellet are outlined in detail.

  3. Delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Randi; Malmsten, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Due to rapidly increasing resistance development against conventional antibiotics, finding novel approaches for the treatment of infections has emerged as a key health issue. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have attracted interest in this context, and there is by now a considerable literature...... on the identification such peptides, as well as on their optimization to reach potent antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects at simultaneously low toxicity against human cells. In comparison, delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides have attracted considerably less interest. However, such delivery systems...... are likely to play a key role in the development of potent and safe AMP-based therapeutics, e.g., through reducing chemical or biological degradation of AMPs either in the formulation or after administration, by reducing adverse side-effects, by controlling AMP release rate, by promoting biofilm penetration...

  4. Radioactive labelling of peptidic hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fromageot, P.; Pradelles, P.; Morgat, J.L.; Levine, H.

    1976-01-01

    The labelling of peptidic hormones requires stability, specificity and sensitivity of the label. Introduction of a radioactive atome is one way to satisfy these criteria. Several processes have been described to prepare radioactive TRF: synthesis of the peptide with labelled aminoacids or introduction of the label into the hormone. In that approach, tritium can be substituted in the imidazole ring, via precursors activating the proper carbon. Monoiodo TRF leads essentially to tritium labelling of the 5 positions whereas monoazo TRF allows the preparation of 3 H TRF labelled in the 2 positions. Di-substituted TRF leads to labelling into the 2 and 5 carbons. Labelled analogs of TRF can be prepared with labelled iodine; further developments of peptide labelling, will be presented. In particular, the homolytic scission of the C-iodine, bond by photochemical activation. The nascent carbon radical can be stabilized by a tritiated scavenger. This approach eliminates the use of heavy metal catalysts

  5. The Pig PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne Overgaard; Codrea, Marius; Sun, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Biological research of Sus scrofa, the domestic pig, is of immediate relevance for food production sciences, and for developing pig as a model organism for human biomedical research. Publicly available data repositories play a fundamental role for all biological sciences, and protein data...... repositories are in particular essential for the successful development of new proteomic methods. Cumulative proteome data repositories, including the PeptideAtlas, provide the means for targeted proteomics, system-wide observations, and cross-species observational studies, but pigs have so far been...... underrepresented in existing repositories. We here present a significantly improved build of the Pig PeptideAtlas, which includes pig proteome data from 25 tissues and three body fluid types mapped to 7139 canonical proteins. The content of the Pig PeptideAtlas reflects actively ongoing research within...

  6. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  7. Peptides and the new endocrinology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwyzer, Robert

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory peptides common to the nervous and the endocrine systems (brain, gut, and skin) has brought about a revolution in our concepts of endocrinology and neurology. We are beginning to understand some of the complex interrelationships between soma and psyche that might, someday, be important for an integrated treatment of diseases. Examples of the actions of certain peptides in the periphery and in the central nervous system are given, and their biosynthesis and molecular anatomy as carriers for information are discussed.

  8. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Carrasco, Letícia Dias de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:25302615

  9. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, Douglas G.; Ao, Zhaohui; Heidrich, Bradley J.; Hunsberger, Gerald E.; Graham, Taylor; Payne, Lisa; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Lu, Quinn; Aiyar, Nambi; Douglas, Stephen A.

    2007-01-01

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) is a newly-described natriuretic peptide which lowers blood pressure via vasodilation. The natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C) removes natriuretic peptides from the circulation, but whether DNP interacts with human NPR-C directly is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that DNP binds to NPR-C. ANP, BNP, CNP, and the NPR-C ligands AP-811 and cANP(4-23) displaced [ 125 I]-ANP from NPR-C with pM-to-nM K i values. DNP displaced [ 125 I]-ANP from NPR-C with nM potency, which represents the first direct demonstration of binding of DNP to human NPR-C. DNP showed high pM affinity for the GC-A receptor and no affinity for GC-B (K i > 1000 nM). DNP was nearly 10-fold more potent than ANP at stimulating cGMP production in GC-A expressing cells. Blockade of NPR-C might represent a novel therapeutic approach in augmenting the known beneficial actions of DNP in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure

  10. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of resistant pathogens.

  11. Histidine-Containing Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics.......Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics....

  12. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  13. Biomedical Applications of Self-Assembling Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radmalekshahi, Mazda; Lempsink, Ludwijn; Amidi, Maryam; Hennink, Wim E.; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembling peptides have gained increasing attention as versatile molecules to generate diverse supramolecular structures with tunable functionality. Because of the possibility to integrate a wide range of functional domains into self-assembling peptides including cell attachment sequences,

  14. Computer-Aided Design of Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjell, Christopher D.; Hancock, Robert E.W.; Jenssen, Håvard

    2010-01-01

    in antimicrobial activity. Consequently, the majority of peptides put into clinical trials have failed at some point, underlining the importance of a thorough peptide optimization. An important tool in peptide design and optimization is quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis, correlating...... chemical parameters with biological activities of the peptide, using statistical methods. In this review we will discuss two different in silico strategies of computer-aided antibacterial peptide design, a linear correlation model build as an extension of traditional principal component analysis (PCA......) and a non-linear artificial neural network model. Studies on structurally diverse peptides, have concluded that the PCA derived model are able to guide the antibacterial peptide design in a meaningful way, however requiring rather a high homology between the peptides in the test-set and the in silico...

  15. Characterization of cyclic peptides containing disulfide bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Mindy; Liu, Mingtao; Struble, Elaine; Hettiarachchi, Kanthi

    2015-01-01

    Unlike linear peptides, analysis of cyclic peptides containing disulfide bonds is not straightforward and demands indirect methods to achieve a rigorous proof of structure. Three peptides that belong to this category, p-Cl-Phe-DPDPE, DPDPE, and CTOP, were analyzed and the results are presented in this paper. The great potential of two dimensional NMR and ESI tandem mass spectrometry was harnessed during the course of peptide characterizations. A new RP-HPLC method for the analysis of trifluor...

  16. Peptides, polypeptides and peptide-polymer hybrids as nucleic acid carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Marya

    2017-10-24

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), and protein transduction domains (PTDs) of viruses and other natural proteins serve as a template for the development of efficient peptide based gene delivery vectors. PTDs are sequences of acidic or basic amphipathic amino acids, with superior membrane trespassing efficacies. Gene delivery vectors derived from these natural, cationic and cationic amphipathic peptides, however, offer little flexibility in tailoring the physicochemical properties of single chain peptide based systems. Owing to significant advances in the field of peptide chemistry, synthetic mimics of natural peptides are often prepared and have been evaluated for their gene expression, as a function of amino acid functionalities, architecture and net cationic content of peptide chains. Moreover, chimeric single polypeptide chains are prepared by a combination of multiple small natural or synthetic peptides, which imparts distinct physiological properties to peptide based gene delivery therapeutics. In order to obtain multivalency and improve the gene delivery efficacies of low molecular weight cationic peptides, bioactive peptides are often incorporated into a polymeric architecture to obtain novel 'polymer-peptide hybrids' with improved gene delivery efficacies. Peptide modified polymers prepared by physical or chemical modifications exhibit enhanced endosomal escape, stimuli responsive degradation and targeting efficacies, as a function of physicochemical and biological activities of peptides attached onto a polymeric scaffold. The focus of this review is to provide comprehensive and step-wise progress in major natural and synthetic peptides, chimeric polypeptides, and peptide-polymer hybrids for nucleic acid delivery applications.

  17. Development and use of engineered peptide deformylase in chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Toma, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Deze thesis beschrijft het onderzoek naar potentieel van het gebruik van het peptide deformylase (PDF) in chemo enzymatische peptide synthese. PDF is geschikt voor selective N terminale deformylatie van bepaalde N-formyl-peptides zonder gelijktijdige hydrolyse van de peptide binding. Door de

  18. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α plays roles in Epstein-Barr virus's natural life cycle and tumorigenesis by inducing lytic infection through direct binding to the immediate-early BZLF1 gene promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Kraus

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available When confronted with poor oxygenation, cells adapt by activating survival signaling pathways, including the oxygen-sensitive transcriptional regulators called hypoxia-inducible factor alphas (HIF-αs. We report here that HIF-1α also regulates the life cycle of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Incubation of EBV-positive gastric carcinoma AGS-Akata and SNU-719 and Burkitt lymphoma Sal and KemIII cell lines with a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, L-mimosine or deferoxamine, or the NEDDylation inhibitor MLN4924 promoted rapid and sustained accumulation of both HIF-1α and lytic EBV antigens. ShRNA knockdown of HIF-1α significantly reduced deferoxamine-mediated lytic reactivation. HIF-1α directly bound the promoter of the EBV primary latent-lytic switch BZLF1 gene, Zp, activating transcription via a consensus hypoxia-response element (HRE located at nt -83 through -76 relative to the transcription initiation site. HIF-1α did not activate transcription from the other EBV immediate-early gene, BRLF1. Importantly, expression of HIF-1α induced EBV lytic-gene expression in cells harboring wild-type EBV, but not in cells infected with variants containing base-pair substitution mutations within this HRE. Human oral keratinocyte (NOK and gingival epithelial (hGET cells induced to differentiate by incubation with either methyl cellulose or growth in organotypic culture accumulated both HIF-1α and Blimp-1α, another cellular factor implicated in lytic reactivation. HIF-1α activity also accumulated along with Blimp-1α during B-cell differentiation into plasma cells. Furthermore, most BZLF1-expressing cells observed in lymphomas induced by EBV in NSG mice with a humanized immune system were located distal to blood vessels in hypoxic regions of the tumors. Thus, we conclude that HIF-1α plays central roles in both EBV's natural life cycle and EBV-associated tumorigenesis. We propose that drugs that induce HIF-1α protein accumulation are good candidates for

  19. Oxidative Modification of Tryptophan-Containing Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jonas; Christensen, Pia Katrine; Nielsen, Mathias T

    2018-01-01

    We herein present a broadly useful method for the chemoselective modification of a wide range of tryptophan-containing peptides. Exposing a tryptophan-containing peptide to 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ) resulted in a selective cyclodehydration between the peptide backbone...

  20. Synthetic Procedures for Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  1. Insect Peptides - Perspectives in Human Diseases Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowanski, Szymon; Adamski, Zbigniew; Lubawy, Jan; Marciniak, Pawel; Pacholska-Bogalska, Joanna; Slocinska, Malgorzata; Spochacz, Marta; Szymczak, Monika; Urbanski, Arkadiusz; Walkowiak-Nowicka, Karolina; Rosinski, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Insects are the largest and the most widely distributed group of animals in the world. Their diversity is a source of incredible variety of different mechanisms of life processes regulation. There are many agents that regulate immunology, reproduction, growth and development or metabolism. Hence, it seems that insects may be a source of numerous substances useful in human diseases treatment. Especially important in the regulation of insect physiology are peptides, like neuropeptides, peptide hormones or antimicrobial peptides. There are two main aspects where they can be helpful, 1) Peptides isolated from insects may become potential drugs in therapy of different diseases, 2) A lot of insect peptide hormones show structural or functional homology to mammalian peptide hormones and the comparative studies may give a new look on human disorders. In our review we focused on three group of insect derived peptides: 1) immune-active peptides, 2) peptide hormones and 3) peptides present in venoms. In our review we try to show the considerable potential of insect peptides in searching for new solutions for mammalian diseases treatment. We summarise the knowledge about properties of insect peptides against different virulent agents, anti-inflammatory or anti-nociceptive properties as well as compare insect and mammalian/vertebrate peptide endocrine system to indicate usefulness of knowledge about insect peptide hormones in drug design. The field of possible using of insect delivered peptide to therapy of various human diseases is still not sufficiently explored. Undoubtedly, more attention should be paid to insects due to searching new drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Peptides: Production, bioactivity, functionality, and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajfathalian, Mona; Ghelichi, Sakhi; García Moreno, Pedro Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Production of peptides with various effects from proteins of different sources continues to receive academic attention. Researchers of different disciplines are putting increasing efforts to produce bioactive and functional peptides from different sources such as plants, animals, and food industry...... by-products. The aim of this review is to introduce production methods of hydrolysates and peptides and provide a comprehensive overview of their bioactivity in terms of their effects on immune, cardiovascular, nervous, and gastrointestinal systems. Moreover, functional and antioxidant properties...... of hydrolysates and isolated peptides are reviewed. Finally, industrial and commercial applications of bioactive peptides including their use in nutrition and production of pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals are discussed....

  3. Natriuretic peptides in cardiometabolic regulation and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zois, Nora E; Bartels, Emil D; Hunter, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    decade. Dysregulation of the natriuretic peptide system has been associated with obesity, glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and essential hypertension. Moreover, the natriuretic peptides have been implicated in the protection against atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and myocardial ischaemia. All...... these conditions can coexist and potentially lead to heart failure, a syndrome associated with a functional natriuretic peptide deficiency despite high circulating concentrations of immunoreactive peptides. Therefore, dysregulation of the natriuretic peptide system, a 'natriuretic handicap', might be an important...... factor in the initiation and progression of metabolic dysfunction and its accompanying cardiovascular complications. This Review provides a summary of the natriuretic peptide system and its involvement in these cardiometabolic conditions. We propose that these peptides might have an integrating role...

  4. Exo-exo synergy between Cel6A and Cel7A from Hypocrea jecorina: Role of carbohydrate binding module and the endo-lytic character of the enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badino, Silke F; Christensen, Stefan J; Kari, Jeppe; Windahl, Michael S; Hvidt, Søren; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Synergy between cellulolytic enzymes is essential in both natural and industrial breakdown of biomass. In addition to synergy between endo- and exo-lytic enzymes, a lesser known but equally conspicuous synergy occurs among exo-acting, processive cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) such as Cel7A and Cel6A from Hypocrea jecorina. We studied this system using microcrystalline cellulose as substrate and found a degree of synergy between 1.3 and 2.2 depending on the experimental conditions. Synergy between enzyme variants without the carbohydrate binding module (CBM) and its linker was strongly reduced compared to the wild types. One plausible interpretation of this is that exo-exo synergy depends on the targeting role of the CBM. Many earlier works have proposed that exo-exo synergy was caused by an auxiliary endo-lytic activity of Cel6A. However, biochemical data from different assays suggested that the endo-lytic activity of both Cel6A and Cel7A were 10 3 -10 4 times lower than the common endoglucanase, Cel7B, from the same organism. Moreover, the endo-lytic activity of Cel7A was 2-3-fold higher than for Cel6A, and we suggest that endo-like activity of Cel6A cannot be the main cause for the observed synergy. Rather, we suggest the exo-exo synergy found here depends on different specificities of the enzymes possibly governed by their CBMs. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1639-1647. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Analysis of peptide uptake and location of root hair-promoting peptide accumulation in plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Yoshiki; Taniguchi, Rikiya; Kubo, Motoki

    2012-03-01

    Peptide uptake by plant roots from degraded soybean-meal products was analyzed in Brassica rapa and Solanum lycopersicum. B. rapa absorbed about 40% of the initial water volume, whereas peptide concentration was decreased by 75% after 24 h. Analysis by reversed-phase HPLC showed that number of peptides was absorbed by the roots during soaking in degraded soybean-meal products for 24 h. Carboxyfluorescein-labeled root hair-promoting peptide was synthesized, and its localization, movement, and accumulation in roots were investigated. The peptide appeared to be absorbed by root hairs and then moved to trichoblasts. Furthermore, the peptide was moved from trichoblasts to atrichoblasts after 24 h. The peptide was accumulated in epidermal cells, suggesting that the peptide may have a function in both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts. Copyright © 2012 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Technological application of an extracellular cell lytic enzyme in xanthan gum clarification Aplicação tecnológica de uma enzima celulolítica para clarificação de goma xantana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Shastry

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available An extracellular cell lytic enzyme from Pseudomonas sp. was active on heat killed cells of Xanthomonas campestris. The lytic activity caused enzymatic digestion of X.campestris xanthan gum. Digestion was effective for highly viscous native xanthan 2.0% (w/v and 2.5% (w/v commercial Sigma xanthan. Scanning electron microscopy and SDS-PAGE observations confirmed the cell lytic action on X.campestris cells.Uma enzima extracelular celulolítica produzida por Pseudomonas sp. foi ativa sobre células de Xanthomonas campestris mortas pelo calor. A atividade lítica causou a digestão enzimática de goma xantana de X. campestris. A digestão foi eficiente tanto para xantana nativa altamante viscosa (2,0% w/v como para xantana comercial Sigma (2,5% w/v. Observações por microscopia eletrônica de varredura demonstraram a ação celulolítica sobre células de X. campestris.

  8. Radio peptide imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscombe, Jonh

    1997-01-01

    Full text. The concept of the magic bullet retains its attraction to us. If only we could take a drug or radioisotope and inject this intravenously and then will attach to the target cancer. This may allow imaging if labelled with a radio pharmaceutical or possibly even effective therapy. Initially work was started using antibodies of mouse origin. These have shown some utility in targeting tumors but there are problems in that these are essentially non-human proteins, often derived from mice. This leads to the formation of antibodies against that antibody so that repeat administrations lead to reduced efficacy and possibly may carry a risk anaphylaxis for the patient. Two different methods have evolved to deal with this situation. Either make antibodies more human or use smaller fragments, so that they are less likely to cause allergic reactions. The second method is to try and use a synthetic peptide. This will contain a series of amino acids which recognize a certain cell receptor. For example the somatostatin analogue Octreotide is an 8 amino acid peptide which has the same biological actions as natural somatostatin but an increased plasma half life. To this is added a linker a good example being DTPA and then radioisotope for example In-111. There we can have the complex In-111-DTPA-Octreotide which can be used to image somatostatin receptors in vivo. The main advantage over antibodies is that the cost production is less and many different variation of peptides for a particular receptor can be manufactured and assessed to find which is the optimal agent tumour imaging at a fraction of the cost of antibody production. There are two main approaches. Firstly to take a natural peptide hormone such as insulin or VIP and label by a simple method such as iodination with I-123. A group in Vienna have done it and shown good uptake of I-123 Insulin in primary hepatomas and of I-123 VIP in pancreatic cancers. Many natural peptide hormones however have a short plasma half

  9. Peptide-targeted polymer cancerostatics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Böhmová, Eliška; Pola, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, Suppl. 2 (2016), S153-S164 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : HPMA copolymers * tumor targeting * peptides Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/65%20Suppl%202/65_S153.pdf

  10. Photosystem Inspired Peptide Hybrid Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-07

    materials defined at the molecular level. We propose a novel way to make hybrid catalyst composed of inorganic nanomaterials and peptides. The...Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of Scientific Research (AFOSR)/ IOA Arlington, Virginia 22203 Air Force Research Laboratory Air...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) SEOUL NATIONAL UNIVERSITY SNUR&DB FOUNDATION RESEARCH PARK CENTER SEOUL, 151742 KR 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  11. Peptide stabilized amphotericin B nanodisks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufteland, Megan; Pesavento, Joseph B.; Bermingham, Rachelle L.; Hoeprich, Paul D.; Ryan, Robert O.

    2007-01-01

    Nanometer scale apolipoprotein A-I stabilized phospholipid disk complexes (nanodisks; ND) have been formulated with the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B (AMB). The present studies were designed to evaluate if a peptide can substitute for the function of the apolipoprotein component of ND with respect to particle formation and stability. An 18-residue synthetic amphipathic α-helical peptide, termed 4F (Ac-D-W-F-K-A-F-Y-D-K-V-A-E-K-F-K-E-A-F-NH2), solubilized vesicles comprised of egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), dipentadecanoyl PC or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) at rates greater than or equal to solubilization rates observed with human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I; 243 amino acids). Characterization studies revealed that interaction with DMPC induced a near doubling of 4F tryptophan fluorescence emission quantum yield (excitation 280 nm) and a ~7 nm blue shift in emission wavelength maximum. Inclusion of AMB in the vesicle substrate resulted in formation of 4F AMB-ND. Spectra of AMB containing particles revealed the antibiotic is a highly effective quencher of 4F tryptophan fluorescence emission, giving rise to a Ksv = 7.7 × 104. Negative stain electron microscopy revealed that AMB-ND prepared with 4F possessed a disk shaped morphology similar to ND prepared without AMB or prepared with apoA-I. In yeast and pathogenic fungi growth inhibition assays, 4F AMB-ND was as effective as apoA-I AMB-ND. The data indicate that AMB-ND generated using an amphipathic peptide in lieu of apoA-I form a discrete population of particles that possess potent biological activity. Given their intrinsic versatility, peptides may be preferred for scale up and clinical application of AMB-ND. PMID:17293004

  12. Biopharmaceuticals: From peptide to drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannappel, Margarete

    2017-08-01

    Biologics are therapeutic proteins or peptides that are produced by means of biological processes within living organisms and cells. They are highly specific molecules and play a crucial role as therapeutics for the treatment of severe and chronic diseases (e.g. cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, autoimmune disorders). The development of new biologics and biologics-based drugs gains more and more importance in the fight against various diseases. A short overview on biotherapeutical drug development is given. Cone snails are a large group of poisonous, predatory sea snails with more than 700 species. They use a very powerful venom which rapidly inactivates and paralyzes their prey. Most bioactive venom components are small peptides (conotoxins, conopeptides) which are precisely directed towards a specific target (e.g. ion channel, receptors). Due to their small size, their precision and speed of action, naturally occurring cone snail venom peptides represent an attractive source for the identification and design of novel biological drug entities. The Jagna cone snail project is an encouraging initiative to map the ecological variety of cone snails around the island of Bohol (Philippines) and to conserve the biological information for potential future application.

  13. Coffee, hunger, and peptide YY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, James A; Geliebter, Allan

    2012-06-01

    There is evidence from several empirical studies suggesting that coffee may help people control body weight. Our objective was to assess the effects of caffeine, caffeinated coffee, and decaffeinated coffee, both alone and in combination with 75 g of glucose, on perceived hunger and satiety and related peptides. We conducted a placebo-controlled single-blinded randomized 4-way crossover trial. Eleven healthy male volunteers (mean age, 23.5 ± 5.7 years; mean BMI, 23.6 ± 4.2 kg/m(2)) ingested 1 of 3 test beverages (caffeine in water, caffeinated coffee, or decaffeinated coffee) or placebo (water), and 60 minutes later they ingested the glucose. Eight times during each laboratory visit, hunger and satiety were assessed by visual analog scales, and blood samples were drawn to measure 3 endogenous peptides associated with hunger and satiety: ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and leptin. Compared to placebo, decaffeinated coffee yielded significantly lower hunger during the whole 180-minute study period and higher plasma PYY for the first 90 minutes (p hunger or PYY. Caffeinated coffee showed a pattern between that of decaffeinated coffee and caffeine in water. These findings suggest that one or more noncaffeine ingredients in coffee may have the potential to decrease body weight. Glucose ingestion did not change the effects of the beverages. Our randomized human trial showed that decaffeinated coffee can acutely decrease hunger and increase the satiety hormone PYY.

  14. Lytic process studies on anaerobic digestion of organic wastes. Etude des activites lytiques intervenant au cours de la digestion anaerobie des dechets organiques; Rapport final

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durecu, S.; Thauront, J. (PEC Engineering, 95 - Cergy Pontoise (France). Service de Recherche et Developpement); Festino, C.; Aubart, C.; Reisinger, O. (Nancy-1 Univ., 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France). Lab. d' Ecologie Microbienne)

    1990-01-01

    To improve anaerobic digestion of pig manure, solubilization of the solid fraction was studied as the rate limiting step in the biomethanation process in an experimental completely mixed digester. The performance of conventional digesters should anaerobic microflora were inefficient in degrading complex biopolymers such as plant fibers. For pectin or cellulose, the use of digestible co-substrates accelerated methanation by increasing the yield of methane and a doubling of the apparent first order solubilization rate constant (Kp = 0.090/d). Lignin should methanation by decreasing methane yield and reducing the rate constant (Kp = 0.035/d). This inhibition was unrelated to volatile fatty acid accumulation. Nine strains of pectinolytic and/or cellulolytic bacteria were isolated. Chitin, a structural constituent of many final species, was effectively solubilized dining anaerobic digestion of pig manure. Seven strains of chitinolytic bacteria were isolated by high chitnese activity. The mycolytic power of fermenting manure processes acting through lytic microflora has been shown to be an effective antagonist of soil borne phytopathogenic fungi, as well as a fertilizer. In greenhouse trails, this compiled fraction demonstrated its ability to control flux unit. Keratin enhanced methane production, and increased H{sub 2}S nearly six-fold. Bacterial strains able to solubilize keratin were also used in autoclawed feather meal to extract the amino acids. (KJD)

  15. The complete genomic sequence of lytic bacteriophage gh-1 infecting Pseudomonas putida--evidence for close relationship to the T7 group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalyova, Irina V.; Kropinski, Andrew M.

    2003-01-01

    The genome of the lytic Pseudomonas putida bacteriophage gh-1 is linear double-stranded DNA containing 37,359 bp with 216-bp direct terminal repeats. Like other members of the T7 group, the gh-1 genome contains regions of high homology to T7 interspersed with nonhomologous regions that contain small open reading frames of unknown function. The genome shares 31 genes in common with other members of the T7 group, including RNA polymerase, and an additional 12 unique putative genes. A major difference between gh-1 and other members of this group is the absence of any open reading frames between the left direct terminal repeat and gene 1. Sequence analysis of the gh-1 genome also revealed the presence of 10 putative phage promoters with a consensus sequence similar to the promoters of T3 and phiYeO3-12 (consensus: TAAAAACCCTCACTRTGGCHSCM). P. putida mutants resistant to gh-1 were demonstrated to have an altered lipopolysaccharide structure, indicating that members of this group use lipopolysaccharide as their cellular receptor

  16. Crystallization of a fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase expressed from glycoengineered Pichia pastoris for X-ray and neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O; Dell, William B.; Swartz, Paul D.; Weiss, Kevin L.; Meilleur, Flora (ORNL); (NCSU)

    2017-01-19

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are carbohydrate-disrupting enzymes secreted by bacteria and fungi that break glycosidic bondsviaan oxidative mechanism. Fungal LPMOs typically act on cellulose and can enhance the efficiency of cellulose-hydrolyzing enzymes that release soluble sugars for bioethanol production or other industrial uses. The enzyme PMO-2 fromNeurospora crassa(NcPMO-2) was heterologously expressed inPichia pastoristo facilitate crystallographic studies of the fungal LPMO mechanism. Diffraction resolution and crystal morphology were improved by expressingNcPMO-2 from a glycoengineered strain ofP. pastorisand by the use of crystal seeding methods, respectively. These improvements resulted in high-resolution (1.20 Å) X-ray diffraction data collection at 100 K and the production of a largeNcPMO-2 crystal suitable for room-temperature neutron diffraction data collection to 2.12 Å resolution.

  17. Isolation and characterization of φkm18p, a novel lytic phage with therapeutic potential against extensively drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwan-Han Shen

    Full Text Available AIMS: To isolate phages against extensively drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB and characterize the highest lytic capability phage as a model to evaluate the potential on phage therapy. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eight phages were isolated from hospital sewage and showed narrow host spectrum. Phage φkm18p was able to effectively lyse the most XDRAB. It has a dsDNA genome of 45 kb in size and hexagonal head of about 59 nm in diameter and no tail. Bacterial population decreased quickly from 10(8 CFU ml(-1 to 10(3 CFU ml(-1 in 30 min by φkm18p. The 185 kDa lysis protein encoded by φkm18p genome was detected when the extracted protein did not boil before SDS-PAGE; it showed that the lysis protein is a complex rather than a monomer. Phage φkm18p improved human lung epithelial cells survival rates when they were incubated with A. baumannii. Combination of phages (φkm18p, φTZ1 and φ314 as a cocktail could lyse all genotype-varying XDRAB isolates. CONCLUSION: Infections with XDRAB are extremely difficult to treat and development of a phage cocktails therapy could be a therapeutic alternative in the future. Phage φkm18p is a good candidate for inclusion in phage cocktails.

  18. Biocontrol ability of Lysobacter antibioticus HS124 against Phytophthora blight is mediated by the production of 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and several lytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyun-Sun; Jin, Rong-De; Krishnan, Hari B; Lee, Sang-Bog; Kim, Kil-Yong

    2009-12-01

    Several rhizobacteria play a vital role in plant protection, plant growth promotion and the improvement of soil health. In this study, we have isolated a strain of Lysobacter antibioticus HS124 from rhizosphere and demonstrate its antifungal activity against various pathogens including Phytophthora capsici, a destructive pathogen of pepper plants. L. antibioticus HS124 produced lytic enzymes such as chitinase, beta-1,3-glucanase, lipase, protease, and an antibiotic compound. This antibiotic compound was purified by diaion HP-20, silica gel, sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. The purified compound was identified as 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid by gas chromatography-electron ionization (GC-EI) and gas chromatography-chemical ionization (GC-CI) mass spectrometry. This antibiotic exhibited destructive activity toward P. capsici hyphae. In vivo experiments utilizing green house grown pepper plants demonstrated the protective effect of L. antibioticus HS124 against P. capsici. The growth of pepper plants treated with L. antibioticus culture was enhanced, resulting in greater protection from fungal disease. Optimum growth and protection was found when cultures were grown in presence of Fe(III). Additionally, the activities of pathogenesis-related proteins such as chitinase and beta-1,3-glucanase decreased in roots, but increased in leaves with time after treatment compared to controls. Our results demonstrate L. antibioticus HS124 as a promising candidate for biocontrol of P. capsici in pepper plants.

  19. Synthetic peptide vaccines: palmitoylation of peptide antigens by a thioester bond increases immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekman, N.J.C.M.; Schaaper, W.M.M.; Tesser, G.I.

    1997-01-01

    Synthetic peptides have frequently been used to immunize animals. However, peptides less than about 20 to 30 amino acids long are poor immunogens. In general, to increase its immunogenicity, the presentation of the peptide should be improved, and molecular weight needs to be increased. Many...... or an amide bond. It was found that these S-palmitoylated peptides were much more immunogenic than N-palmitoylated peptides and at least similar to KLH-conjugated peptides with respect to appearance and magnitude of induced antibodies (canine parvovirus) or immunocastration effect (gonadotropin...

  20. Chemical Methods for Peptide and Protein Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Toth

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the invention of solid phase synthetic methods by Merrifield in 1963, the number of research groups focusing on peptide synthesis has grown exponentially. However, the original step-by-step synthesis had limitations: the purity of the final product decreased with the number of coupling steps. After the development of Boc and Fmoc protecting groups, novel amino acid protecting groups and new techniques were introduced to provide high quality and quantity peptide products. Fragment condensation was a popular method for peptide production in the 1980s, but unfortunately the rate of racemization and reaction difficulties proved less than ideal. Kent and co-workers revolutionized peptide coupling by introducing the chemoselective reaction of unprotected peptides, called native chemical ligation. Subsequently, research has focused on the development of novel ligating techniques including the famous click reaction, ligation of peptide hydrazides, and the recently reported a-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligations with 5-oxaproline. Several companies have been formed all over the world to prepare high quality Good Manufacturing Practice peptide products on a multi-kilogram scale. This review describes the advances in peptide chemistry including the variety of synthetic peptide methods currently available and the broad application of peptides in medicinal chemistry.

  1. Chemical methods for peptide and protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrudu, Saranya; Simerska, Pavla; Toth, Istvan

    2013-04-12

    Since the invention of solid phase synthetic methods by Merrifield in 1963, the number of research groups focusing on peptide synthesis has grown exponentially. However, the original step-by-step synthesis had limitations: the purity of the final product decreased with the number of coupling steps. After the development of Boc and Fmoc protecting groups, novel amino acid protecting groups and new techniques were introduced to provide high quality and quantity peptide products. Fragment condensation was a popular method for peptide production in the 1980s, but unfortunately the rate of racemization and reaction difficulties proved less than ideal. Kent and co-workers revolutionized peptide coupling by introducing the chemoselective reaction of unprotected peptides, called native chemical ligation. Subsequently, research has focused on the development of novel ligating techniques including the famous click reaction, ligation of peptide hydrazides, and the recently reported α-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligations with 5-oxaproline. Several companies have been formed all over the world to prepare high quality Good Manufacturing Practice peptide products on a multi-kilogram scale. This review describes the advances in peptide chemistry including the variety of synthetic peptide methods currently available and the broad application of peptides in medicinal chemistry.

  2. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  3. Structural and antimicrobial properties of human pre-elafin/trappin-2 and derived peptides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagné Stéphane M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pre-elafin/trappin-2 is a human innate defense molecule initially described as a potent inhibitor of neutrophil elastase. The full-length protein as well as the N-terminal "cementoin" and C-terminal "elafin" domains were also shown to possess broad antimicrobial activity, namely against the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. The mode of action of these peptides has, however, yet to be fully elucidated. Both domains of pre-elafin/trappin-2 are polycationic, but only the structure of the elafin domain is currently known. The aim of the present study was to determine the secondary structures of the cementoin domain and to characterize the antibacterial properties of these peptides against P. aeruginosa. Results We show here that the cementoin domain adopts an α-helical conformation both by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses in the presence of membrane mimetics, a characteristic shared with a large number of linear polycationic antimicrobial peptides. However, pre-elafin/trappin-2 and its domains display only weak lytic properties, as assessed by scanning electron micrography, outer and inner membrane depolarization studies with P. aeruginosa and leakage of liposome-entrapped calcein. Confocal microscopy of fluorescein-labeled pre-elafin/trappin-2 suggests that this protein possesses the ability to translocate across membranes. This correlates with the finding that pre-elafin/trappin-2 and elafin bind to DNA in vitro and attenuate the expression of some P. aeruginosa virulence factors, namely the biofilm formation and the secretion of pyoverdine. Conclusions The N-terminal cementoin domain adopts α-helical secondary structures in a membrane mimetic environment, which is common in antimicrobial peptides. However, unlike numerous linear polycationic antimicrobial peptides, membrane disruption does not appear to be the main function of either cementoin, elafin or full-length pre-elafin/trappin-2 against

  4. Synthesis of peptide .alpha.-thioesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero, Julio A [Livermore, CA; Mitchell, Alexander R [Livermore, CA; De Yoreo, James J [Clayton, CA

    2008-08-19

    Disclosed herein is a new method for the solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of C-terminal peptide .alpha. thioesters using Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry. This method is based on the use of an aryl hydrazine linker, which is totally stable to conditions required for Fmoc-SPPS. When the peptide synthesis has been completed, activation of the linker is achieved by mild oxidation. The oxidation step converts the acyl-hydrazine group into a highly reactive acyl-diazene intermediate which reacts with an .alpha.-amino acid alkylthioester (H-AA-SR) to yield the corresponding peptide .alpha.-thioester in good yield. A variety of peptide thioesters, cyclic peptides and a fully functional Src homology 3 (SH3) protein domain have been successfully prepared.

  5. Peptide YY receptors in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, A.; Oya, M.; Okita, M.

    1988-01-01

    Radiolabelled ligand binding studies demonstrated that specific receptors for peptide YY are present in the porcine as well as the canine brains. Peptide YY was bound to brain tissue membranes via high-affinity (dissociation constant, 1.39 X 10(-10)M) and low-affinity (dissociation constant, 3.72 X 10(-8)M) components. The binding sites showed a high specificity for peptide YY and neuropeptide Y, but not for pancreatic polypeptide or structurally unrelated peptides. The specific activity of peptide YY binding was highest in the hippocampus, followed by the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus, and the amygdala of the porcine brain, this pattern being similarly observed in the canine brain. The results suggest that peptide YY and neuropeptide Y may regulate the function of these regions of the brain through interaction with a common receptor site

  6. The human endolymphatic sac expresses natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Kirkeby, Svend; Vikeså, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    : Several natriuretic peptides were found expressed significantly in the ES, including uroguanylin and brain natriuretic peptide, but also peptides regulating vascular tone, including adrenomedullin 2. In addition, both neurophysin and oxytocin (OXT) were found significantly expressed. All peptides were...... verified by immunohistochemistry. CONCLUSION: The present data support the hypothesis that the human ES may have an endocrine/paracrine capacity through expression of several peptides with potent natriuretic activity. Furthermore, the ES may influence the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and may regulate...... vasopressin receptors and aquaporin-2 channels in the inner ear via OXT expression. We hypothesize that the ES is likely to regulate inner ear endolymphatic homeostasis, possibly through secretion of several peptides, but it may also influence systemic and/or intracranial blood pressure through direct...

  7. Potent peptidic fusion inhibitors of influenza virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Juraszek, Jarek; Brandenburg, Boerries; Buyck, Christophe; Schepens, Wim B. G.; Kesteleyn, Bart; Stoops, Bart; Vreeken, Rob J.; Vermond, Jan; Goutier, Wouter; Tang, Chan; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H. E.; Goudsmit, Jaap; van Dongen, Maria J. P.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2017-09-28

    Influenza therapeutics with new targets and mechanisms of action are urgently needed to combat potential pandemics, emerging viruses, and constantly mutating strains in circulation. We report here on the design and structural characterization of potent peptidic inhibitors of influenza hemagglutinin. The peptide design was based on complementarity-determining region loops of human broadly neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (FI6v3 and CR9114). The optimized peptides exhibit nanomolar affinity and neutralization against influenza A group 1 viruses, including the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and avian H5N1 strains. The peptide inhibitors bind to the highly conserved stem epitope and block the low pH–induced conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion. These peptidic compounds and their advantageous biological properties should accelerate the development of new small molecule– and peptide-based therapeutics against influenza virus.

  8. Designing anticancer peptides by constructive machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisoni, Francesca; Neuhaus, Claudia; Gabernet, Gisela; Müller, Alex; Hiss, Jan; Schneider, Gisbert

    2018-04-21

    Constructive machine learning enables the automated generation of novel chemical structures without the need for explicit molecular design rules. This study presents the experimental application of such a generative model to design membranolytic anticancer peptides (ACPs) de novo. A recurrent neural network with long short-term memory cells was trained on alpha-helical cationic amphipathic peptide sequences and then fine-tuned with 26 known ACPs. This optimized model was used to generate unique and novel amino acid sequences. Twelve of the peptides were synthesized and tested for their activity on MCF7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells and selectivity against human erythrocytes. Ten of these peptides were active against cancer cells. Six of the active peptides killed MCF7 cancer cells without affecting human erythrocytes with at least threefold selectivity. These results advocate constructive machine learning for the automated design of peptides with desired biological activities. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Use of galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2018-04-03

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  10. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2017-03-21

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  11. Highly selective enrichment of phosphorylated peptides from peptide mixtures using titanium dioxide microcolumns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Røssel; Thingholm, Tine E; Jensen, Ole N

    2005-01-01

    based on TiO2microcolumns and peptide loading in 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB). The effect of DHB was a very efficient reduction in the binding of nonphosphorylated peptides to TiO2 while retaining its high binding affinity for phosphorylated peptides. Thus, inclusion of DHB dramatically increased...... the selectivity of the enrichment of phosphorylated peptides by TiO2. We demonstrated that this new procedure was more selective for binding phosphorylated peptides than IMAC using MALDI mass spectrometry. In addition, we showed that LC-ESI-MSMS was biased toward monophosphorylated peptides, whereas MALDI MS...... was not. Other substituted aromatic carboxylic acids were also capable of specifically reducing binding of nonphosphorylated peptides, whereas phosphoric acid reduced binding of both phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated peptides. A putative mechanism for this intriguing effect is presented....

  12. Production of peptide antisera specific for mouse and rat proinsulin C-peptide 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, N; Madsen, O D; Kofod, Hans

    1990-01-01

    for antibody binding to the immunizing antigen. Antisera to C-peptide 2, stained islet beta-cells on mouse and rat, but not monkey pancreas sections in immunocytochemical analysis. Preabsorption to the synthetic C-peptide 2, but not the synthetic mouse and rat C-peptide 1 abolished staining. In conclusion we......Mice and rats have two functional non-allelic insulin genes. By using a synthetic peptide representing a common sequence in mouse and rat C-peptide 2 as antigen, we have produced rabbit antisera specific for an epitope which is not present in mouse or rat C-peptide 1. Long-term immunization did...... not seem to increase the end point titre as tested in direct ELISA. The specificity of the antiserum was determined by competitive ELISA and histochemistry on pancreas sections. Only the synthetic C-peptide 2, but not the homologous synthetic C-peptide 1 from mouse and rat competed efficiently in ELISA...

  13. Therapeutic peptides for cancer therapy. Part I - peptide inhibitors of signal transduction cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, Gene L; Raucher, Drazen

    2009-10-01

    Therapeutic peptides have great potential as anticancer agents owing to their ease of rational design and target specificity. However, their utility in vivo is limited by low stability and poor tumor penetration. The authors review the development of peptide inhibitors with potential for cancer therapy. Peptides that inhibit signal transduction cascades are discussed. The authors searched Medline for articles concerning the development of therapeutic peptides and their delivery. Given our current knowledge of protein sequences, structures and interaction interfaces, therapeutic peptides that inhibit interactions of interest are easily designed. These peptides are advantageous because they are highly specific for the interaction of interest, and they are much more easily developed than small molecule inhibitors of the same interactions. The main hurdle to application of peptides for cancer therapy is their poor pharmacokinetic and biodistribution parameters. Therefore, successful development of peptide delivery vectors could potentially make possible the use of this new and very promising class of anticancer agents.

  14. A novel chimeric peptide with antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaybeyoglu, Begum; Akbulut, Berna Sariyar; Ozkirimli, Elif

    2015-04-01

    Beta-lactamase-mediated bacterial drug resistance exacerbates the prognosis of infectious diseases, which are sometimes treated with co-administration of beta-lactam type antibiotics and beta-lactamase inhibitors. Antimicrobial peptides are promising broad-spectrum alternatives to conventional antibiotics in this era of evolving bacterial resistance. Peptides based on the Ala46-Tyr51 beta-hairpin loop of beta-lactamase inhibitory protein (BLIP) have been previously shown to inhibit beta-lactamase. Here, our goal was to modify this peptide for improved beta-lactamase inhibition and cellular uptake. Motivated by the cell-penetrating pVEC sequence, which includes a hydrophobic stretch at its N-terminus, our approach involved the addition of LLIIL residues to the inhibitory peptide N-terminus to facilitate uptake. Activity measurements of the peptide based on the 45-53 loop of BLIP for enhanced inhibition verified that the peptide was a competitive beta-lactamase inhibitor with a K(i) value of 58 μM. Incubation of beta-lactam-resistant cells with peptide decreased the number of viable cells, while it had no effect on beta-lactamase-free cells, indicating that this peptide had antimicrobial activity via beta-lactamase inhibition. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which this peptide moves across the membrane, steered molecular dynamics simulations were carried out. We propose that addition of hydrophobic residues to the N-terminus of the peptide affords a promising strategy in the design of novel antimicrobial peptides not only against beta-lactamase but also for other intracellular targets. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides, Infections and the Skin Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Maja Lisa; Agner, Tove

    2016-01-01

    The skin serves as a strong barrier protecting us from invading pathogens and harmful organisms. An important part of this barrier comes from antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are small peptides expressed abundantly in the skin. AMPs are produced in the deeper layers of the epidermis and trans......The skin serves as a strong barrier protecting us from invading pathogens and harmful organisms. An important part of this barrier comes from antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which are small peptides expressed abundantly in the skin. AMPs are produced in the deeper layers of the epidermis...

  16. Antioxidant activity of yoghurt peptides: Part 2 – Characterisationof peptide fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Baron, Caroline; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2010-01-01

    the peptides identified contained at least one proline residue. Some of the identified peptides included the hydrophobic amino acid residues Val or Leu at the N-terminus and Pro, His or Tyr in the amino acid sequence, which is characteristic of antioxidant peptides. In addition, the yoghurt contained...

  17. Connecting peptide (c-peptide) and the duration of diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: C-peptide is derived from proinsulin and it is secreted in equimolar concentration with insulin. Plasma C-peptide is more stable than insulin and it provides an indirect measure of insulin secretory reserve and beta cell function. To determine relationship between C-peptide and duration of diabetes mellitus, age, ...

  18. Radiometallating antibodies and autoantigenic peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer-Smith, J.A.; Lewis, D.; Cole, D.A.; Newmyer, S.L.; Schulte, L.D.; Mixon, P.L.; Schreyer, S.A.; Burns, T.P.; Roberts, J.C.; Figard, S.D.; McCormick, D.J.; Lennon, V.A.; Hayashi, M.; Lavallee, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed methods to radiolabel large molecules, using porphyrins as bifunctional chelating agents for radiometals. The porphyrins are substituted with an N- benzyl group to activate them for radiometallation under mild reaction conditions. Porphyrins that have one functional group for covalent attachment to other molecules cannot cause crosslinking. We have examined the labeling chemistry for antibodies and have developed methods to label smaller biologically active molecules, such as autoantigenic peptides (fragments of the acetylcholine receptor), which are pertinent to myasthenia gravis research. The methods of covalent attachment of these bifunctional chelating agents to large molecules, the radiometallation chemistry, and biological characterization of the radiolabeled compounds will be discussed

  19. Atrial natriuretic peptides in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Hansen, Lasse H; Terzic, Dijana

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of cardiac natriuretic peptides in plasma has gained a diagnostic role in the assessment of heart failure. Plasma measurement is though hampered by the marked instability of the hormones, which has led to the development of analyses that target N-terminal fragments from the prohormone....... These fragments are stable in plasma and represent surrogate markers of the actual natriuretic hormone. Post-translational processing of the precursors, however, is revealing itself to be a complex event with new information still being reported on proteolysis, covalent modifications, and amino acid...

  20. Atrial natriuretic peptides in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens P; Holst Hansen, Lasse; Terzic, Dijana

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of cardiac natriuretic peptides in plasma has gained a diagnostic role in the assessment of heart failure. Plasma measurement is though hampered by the marked instability of the hormones, which has led to the development of analyses that target N-terminal fragments from the prohormone....... These fragments are stable in plasma and represent surrogate markers of the actual natriuretic hormone. Post-translational processing of the precursors, however, is revealing itself to be a complex event with new information still being reported on proteolysis, covalent modifications, and amino acid...

  1. Synthesis of radioiodinated labeled peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matloobi, M.; Rafii, H.; Beigi, D.; Khalaj, A.; Kamali-Dehghan, M.

    2003-01-01

    Optimization of radioiodination of peptides is covered by both a direct method in which a constituent tyrosine residue is labeled and indirect method by using an iodinated derivative (SIB) of N succinimidyl 3-(tri-n-butylstannyl) benzoate (ATE) as the intermediate. Radioiodination of IgG and FMLF were performed by direct method using Chloramine-T as an oxidant but since Formyl-Methyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine, FMLF, does not lend itself for direct radioiodination we performed labeling of FMLF by indirect method via radioiodined SIB at different pH. (author)

  2. Effect of a Fusion Peptide by Covalent Conjugation of a Mitochondrial Cell-Penetrating Peptide and a Glutathione Analog Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmine Pasquale Cerrato

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we designed and synthesized a library of mitochondrial antioxidative cell-penetrating peptides (mtCPPs superior to the parent peptide, SS31, to protect mitochondria from oxidative damage. A library of antioxidative glutathione analogs called glutathione peptides (UPFs, exceptional in hydroxyl radical elimination compared with glutathione, were also designed and synthesized. Here, a follow-up study is described, investigating the effects of the most promising members from both libraries on reactive oxidative species scavenging ability. None of the peptides influenced cell viability at the concentrations used. Fluorescence microscopy studies showed that the fluorescein-mtCPP1-UPF25 (mtgCPP internalized into cells, and spectrofluorometric analysis determined the presence and extent of peptide into different cell compartments. mtgCPP has superior antioxidative activity compared with mtCPP1 and UPF25 against H2O2 insult, preventing ROS formation by 2- and 3-fold, respectively. Moreover, we neither observed effects on mitochondrial membrane potential nor production of ATP. These data indicate that mtgCPP is targeting mitochondria, protecting them from oxidative damage, while also being present in the cytosol. Our hypothesis is based on a synergistic effect resulting from the fused peptide. The mitochondrial peptide segment is targeting mitochondria, whereas the glutathione analog peptide segment is active in the cytosol, resulting in increased scavenging ability.

  3. peptide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    effects can be observed under certain conditions but these are not always .... of proteins with amyloid characteristics in muscle (Jayaraman et al. 2008) ... not enhance the growth of dangerous fibrils generated at pH. 7.4. ..... The lower chart shows Aβ(25-35) aggregation kinetics during the first 4 min of monitoring. Results are ...

  4. Suppression of injuries caused by a lytic RNA virus (mengovirus) and their uncoupling from viral reproduction by mutual cell/virus disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikitas, Olga V; Ivin, Yuri Y; Golyshev, Sergey A; Povarova, Natalia V; Galkina, Svetlana I; Pletjushkina, Olga Y; Nadezhdina, Elena S; Gmyl, Anatoly P; Agol, Vadim I

    2012-05-01

    Viruses often elicit cell injury (cytopathic effect [CPE]), a major cause of viral diseases. CPE is usually considered to be a prerequisite for and/or consequence of efficient viral growth. Recently, we proposed that viral CPE may largely be due to host defensive and viral antidefensive activities. This study aimed to check the validity of this proposal by using as a model HeLa cells infected with mengovirus (MV). As we showed previously, infection of these cells with wild-type MV resulted in necrosis, whereas a mutant with incapacitated antidefensive ("security") viral leader (L) protein induced apoptosis. Here, we showed that several major morphological and biochemical signs of CPE (e.g., alterations in cellular and nuclear shape, plasma membrane, cytoskeleton, chromatin, and metabolic activity) in cells infected with L(-) mutants in the presence of an apoptosis inhibitor were strongly suppressed or delayed for long after completion of viral reproduction. These facts demonstrate that the efficient reproduction of a lytic virus may not directly require development of at least some pathological alterations normally accompanying infection. They also imply that L protein is involved in the control of many apparently unrelated functions. The results also suggest that the virus-activated program with competing necrotic and apoptotic branches is host encoded, with the choice between apoptosis and necrosis depending on a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic conditions. Implementation of this defensive suicidal program could be uncoupled from the viral reproduction. The possibility of such uncoupling has significant implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of viral diseases.

  5. UV irradiation of Shigella Dysenteriae induced the transformation and excision of a presumed integrated lysogenic prophage Shd-4L10 into a lytic phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, F. K.; Addy, B.; Armah, G.; Fobil, J.; Steiner-Asiedu, M.; Efavi, J.

    2012-01-01

    Repeated exposures of Shigella dysenteriae strain A to ultra-violet radiation (253.7 nm) with intervening outgrowth of survivors gave rise to clear bacteriophage plaques. Isolation, propagation and partial purification of the new Shd-4LI0 phages showed that they are similar in morphology to the Myxobacteriaphage Mx-4 described earlier. The new phages retained the general characteristics of S. dystenteriae phageShd-4L3, including serological properties and phage typing. It is suggested that ultra-violet irradiation may have played a role in the transformation and excision of the presumed lysogen of S. dysenteriaestrain A into a lytic phase. PhageShd-4LI0 was subsequently partially characterized. It has a density of 1.61, a DNA: protein ratio of 0.42 and thus a cryptogram of D/2:54.3/32.5:X/X: B/O. The phage was further characterised by fractionation of its protein using SDS-polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis. DNA extracted from phages was hydrolysed with restriction endonuclease R., EcoR1. The restriction fragments were catalogued and their apparent molecular weights calculated from electrophoresis gels calibrated with fragments from DNA of coliphageλ λ. From the total fragments obtained with nuclease R., EcoR1, the apparent minimum molecular weight of phage Shd-4LI0DNA was found to be 54.3 x 10 6 Daltons. The molecular weight of the phage DNA was also calculated from measurements of contour length of purified DNA samples, using the formula MW = 1.97 x 10 10 1/(magnification), where 1 is the measured length of DNA in centimetres). The very close relatedness with phage Shd-4L3 was confirmed by these techniques. (au)

  6. Structural and molecular dynamics studies of a C1-oxidizing lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase from Heterobasidion irregulare reveal amino acids important for substrate recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bing [Department of Molecular Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala Sweden; Kognole, Abhishek A. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY USA; Wu, Miao [Department of Molecular Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala Sweden; Westereng, Bjørge [Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology, and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås Norway; Crowley, Michael F. [Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Kim, Seonah [Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Dimarogona, Maria [Department of Molecular Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala Sweden; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, Greece; Payne, Christina M. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY USA; Directorate of Engineering, Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental, and Transport Systems, National Science Foundation, Alexandria VA USA; Sandgren, Mats [Department of Molecular Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala Sweden

    2018-04-24

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a group of recently discovered enzymes that play important roles in the decomposition of recalcitrant polysaccharides. Here, we report the biochemical, structural, and computational characterization of an LPMO from the white-rot fungus Heterobasidion irregulare (HiLPMO9B). This enzyme oxidizes cellulose at the C1 carbon of glycosidic linkages. The crystal structure of HiLPMO9B was determined at 2.1 A resolution using X-ray crystallography. Unlike the majority of the currently available C1-specific LPMO structures, the HiLPMO9B structure contains an extended L2 loop, connecting ..beta..-strands ..beta..2 and ..beta..3 of the ..beta..-sandwich structure. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest roles for both aromatic and acidic residues in the substrate binding of HiLPMO9B, with the main contribution from the residues located on the extended region of the L2 loop (Tyr20) and the LC loop (Asp205, Tyr207, and Glu210). Asp205 and Glu210 were found to be involved in the hydrogen bonding with the hydroxyl group of the C6 carbon of glucose moieties directly or via a water molecule. Two different binding orientations were observed over the course of the MD simulations. In each orientation, the active-site copper of this LPMO preferentially skewed toward the pyranose C1 of the glycosidic linkage over the targeted glycosidic bond. This study provides additional insight into cellulose binding by C1-specific LPMOs, giving a molecular-level picture of active site substrate interactions.

  7. Dual Targeting of Intracellular Pathogenic Bacteria with a Cleavable Conjugate of Kanamycin and an Antibacterial Cell-Penetrating Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezden, Anna; Mohamed, Mohamed F; Nepal, Manish; Harwood, John S; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Seleem, Mohamed N; Chmielewski, Jean

    2016-08-31

    Bacterial infection caused by intracellular pathogens, such as Mycobacterium, Salmonella, and Brucella, is a burgeoning global health epidemic that necessitates urgent action. However, the therapeutic value of a number of antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, against intracellular pathogenic bacteria is compromised due to their inability to traverse eukaryotic membranes. For this significant problem to be addressed, a cleavable conjugate of the antibiotic kanamycin and a nonmembrane lytic, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide with efficient mammalian cell penetration, P14LRR, was prepared. This approach allows kanamycin to enter mammalian cells as a conjugate linked via a tether that breaks down in the reducing environment within cells. Potent antimicrobial activity of the P14KanS conjugate was demonstrated in vitro, and this reducible conjugate effectively cleared intracellular pathogenic bacteria within macrophages more potently than that of a conjugate lacking the disulfide moiety. Notably, successful clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within macrophages was observed with the dual antibiotic conjugate, and Salmonella levels were significantly reduced in an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans model.

  8. Peptide hormones and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, T W

    2006-03-01

    Several peptide hormones have been identified which alter the proliferation of lung cancer. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), which is a neuroendocrine cancer, produces and secretes gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), neurotensin (NT) and adrenomedullin (AM) as autocrine growth factors. GRP, NT and AM bind to G-protein coupled receptors causing phosphatidylinositol turnover or elevated cAMP in SCLC cells. Addition of GRP, NT or AM to SCLC cells causes altered expression of nuclear oncogenes, such as c-fos, and stimulation of growth. Antagonists have been developed for GRP, NT and AM receptors which function as cytostatic agents and inhibit SCLC growth. Growth factor antagonists, such as the NT1 receptor antagonist SR48692, facilitate the ability of chemotherapeutic drugs to kill lung cancer cells. It remains to be determined if GRP, NT and AM receptors will served as molecular targets, for development of new therapies for the treatment of SCLC patients. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells also have a high density of GRP, NT, AM and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors. Several NSCLC patients with EGF receptor mutations respond to gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Gefitinib relieves NSCLC symptoms, maintaining stable disease in patients who are not eligible for systemic chemotherapy. It is important to develop new therapeutic approaches using translational research techniques for the treatment of lung cancer patients.

  9. Synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Abhigyan; Vemparala, Satyavani; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Tew, Gregory N

    2008-01-01

    Infectious diseases and antibiotic resistance are now considered the most imperative global healthcare problem. In the search for new treatments, host defense, or antimicrobial, peptides have attracted considerable attention due to their various unique properties; however, attempts to develop in vivo therapies have been severely limited. Efforts to develop synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides (SMAMPs) have increased significantly in the last decade, and this review will focus primarily on the structural evolution of SMAMPs and their membrane activity. This review will attempt to make a bridge between the design of SMAMPs and the fundamentals of SMAMP-membrane interactions. In discussions regarding the membrane interaction of SMAMPs, close attention will be paid to the lipid composition of the bilayer. Despite many years of study, the exact conformational aspects responsible for the high selectivity of these AMPs and SMAMPs toward bacterial cells over mammalian cells are still not fully understood. The ability to design SMAMPs that are potently antimicrobial, yet nontoxic to mammalian cells has been demonstrated with a variety of molecular scaffolds. Initial animal studies show very good tissue distribution along with more than a 4-log reduction in bacterial counts. The results on SMAMPs are not only extremely promising for novel antibiotics, but also provide an optimistic picture for the greater challenge of general proteomimetics.

  10. Driving engineering of novel antimicrobial peptides from simulations of peptide-micelle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Langham, Allison A; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    Simulations of antimicrobial peptides in membrane mimics can provide the high resolution, atomistic picture that is necessary to decipher which sequence and structure components are responsible for activity and toxicity. With such detailed insight, engineering new sequences that are active but non...... peptides and their interaction with membrane mimics. In this article, we discuss the promise and the challenges of widely used models and detail our recent work on peptide-micelle simulations as an attractive alternative to peptide-bilayer simulations. We detail our results with two large structural...... classes of peptides, helical and beta-sheet and demonstrate how simulations can assist in engineering of novel antimicrobials with therapeutic potential....

  11. Peptide-tagged proteins in aqueous two-phase systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Anna

    2002-01-01

    This thesis deals with proteins containing peptide tags for improved partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems. Qualitatively the peptide-tagged protein partitioning could be predicted from peptide data, i.e. partitioning trends found for peptides were also found for the peptide-tagged proteins. However, full effect of the tag as expected from peptide partitioning was not found in the tagged protein. When alkyl-ethylene oxide surfactant was included in a two-polymer system, almost full effect...

  12. Topical Peptide Treatments with Effective Anti-Aging Results

    OpenAIRE

    Silke Karin Schagen

    2017-01-01

    In the last two decades, many new peptides have been developed, and new knowledge on how peptides improve the skin has been uncovered. The spectrum of peptides in the field of cosmetics is continuously growing. This review summarizes some of the effective data on cosmeceutical peptides that work against intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Some peptides have been proven in their efficacy through clinical skin trials. Well-known and documented peptides like copper tripeptide are still under research...

  13. Prediction of twin-arginine signal peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Nielsen, Henrik; Widdick, D.

    2005-01-01

    expressions, whereas hydrophobicity discrimination of Tat- and Sec- signal peptides is carried out by an artificial neural network. A potential cleavage site of the predicted Tat signal peptide is also reported. The TatP prediction server is available as a public web server at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/TatP/....

  14. Double quick, double click reversible peptide "stapling".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison, Claire M; Burslem, George M; Miles, Jennifer A; Pilsl, Ludwig K A; Yeo, David J; Imani, Zeynab; Warriner, Stuart L; Webb, Michael E; Wilson, Andrew J

    2017-07-01

    The development of constrained peptides for inhibition of protein-protein interactions is an emerging strategy in chemical biology and drug discovery. This manuscript introduces a versatile, rapid and reversible approach to constrain peptides in a bioactive helical conformation using BID and RNase S peptides as models. Dibromomaleimide is used to constrain BID and RNase S peptide sequence variants bearing cysteine (Cys) or homocysteine ( h Cys) amino acids spaced at i and i + 4 positions by double substitution. The constraint can be readily removed by displacement of the maleimide using excess thiol. This new constraining methodology results in enhanced α-helical conformation (BID and RNase S peptide) as demonstrated by circular dichroism and molecular dynamics simulations, resistance to proteolysis (BID) as demonstrated by trypsin proteolysis experiments and retained or enhanced potency of inhibition for Bcl-2 family protein-protein interactions (BID), or greater capability to restore the hydrolytic activity of the RNAse S protein (RNase S peptide). Finally, use of a dibromomaleimide functionalized with an alkyne permits further divergent functionalization through alkyne-azide cycloaddition chemistry on the constrained peptide with fluorescein, oligoethylene glycol or biotin groups to facilitate biophysical and cellular analyses. Hence this methodology may extend the scope and accessibility of peptide stapling.

  15. Protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjernø, Karin

    2007-01-01

      Peptide mass fingerprinting is an effective way of identifying, e.g., gel-separated proteins, by matching experimentally obtained peptide mass data against large databases. However, several factors are known to influence the quality of the resulting matches, such as proteins contaminating the s...

  16. Peptide Mass Fingerprinting of Egg White Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alty, Lisa T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    Use of advanced mass spectrometry techniques in the undergraduate setting has burgeoned in the past decade. However, relatively few undergraduate experiments examine the proteomics tools of protein digestion, peptide accurate mass determination, and database searching, also known as peptide mass fingerprinting. In this experiment, biochemistry…

  17. Practical use of natriuretic peptide measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husby, Simon; Lind, Bent; Goetze, Jens P

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the knowledge regarding B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)/N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP) measurement among doctors using this biomarker.......To elucidate the knowledge regarding B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP)/N-terminal proBNP (NT-proBNP) measurement among doctors using this biomarker....

  18. Novel peptide-based protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée

    of novel peptide-based protease inhibitors, efforts were made towards improved methods for peptide synthesis. The coupling of Fmoc-amino acids onto N-methylated peptidyl resins was investigated. These couplings can be low yielding and the effect of the use of microwave heating combined with the coupling...

  19. Superior Antifouling Performance of a Zwitterionic Peptide Compared to an Amphiphilic, Non-Ionic Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Huijun; Wang, Libing; Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; Liu, Boshi; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2015-10-14

    The aim of this study was to explore the influence of amphiphilic and zwitterionic structures on the resistance of protein adsorption to peptide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and gain insight into the associated antifouling mechanism. Two kinds of cysteine-terminated heptapeptides were studied. One peptide had alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues with an amphiphilic sequence of CYSYSYS. The other peptide (CRERERE) was zwitterionic. Both peptides were covalently attached onto gold substrates via gold-thiol bond formation. Surface plasmon resonance analysis results showed that both peptide SAMs had ultralow or low protein adsorption amounts of 1.97-11.78 ng/cm2 in the presence of single proteins. The zwitterionic peptide showed relatively higher antifouling ability with single proteins and natural complex protein media. We performed molecular dynamics simulations to understand their respective antifouling behaviors. The results indicated that strong surface hydration of peptide SAMs contributes to fouling resistance by impeding interactions with proteins. Compared to the CYSYSYS peptide, more water molecules were predicted to form hydrogen-bonding interactions with the zwitterionic CRERERE peptide, which is in agreement with the antifouling test results. These findings reveal a clear relation between peptide structures and resistance to protein adsorption, facilitating the development of novel peptide-containing antifouling materials.

  20. Peptide ligands for targeting the extracellular domain of EGFR: Comparison between linear and cyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tyrslai M; Sable, Rushikesh; Singh, Sitanshu; Vicente, Maria Graca H; Jois, Seetharama D

    2018-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common solid internal malignancy among cancers. Early detection of cancer is key to increasing the survival rate of colorectal cancer patients. Overexpression of the EGFR protein is associated with CRC. We have designed a series of peptides that are highly specific for the extracellular domain of EGFR, based on our earlier studies on linear peptides. The previously reported linear peptide LARLLT, known to bind to EGFR, was modified with the goals of increasing its stability and its specificity toward EGFR. Peptide modifications, including D-amino acid substitution, cyclization, and chain reversal, were investigated. In addition, to facilitate labeling of the peptide with a fluorescent dye, an additional lysine residue was introduced onto the linear (KLARLLT) and cyclic peptides cyclo(KLARLLT) (Cyclo.L1). The lysine residue was also converted into an azide group in both a linear and reversed cyclic peptide sequences cyclo(K(N3)larllt) (Cyclo.L1.1) to allow for subsequent "click" conjugation. The cyclic peptides showed enhanced binding to EGFR by SPR. NMR and molecular modeling studies suggest that the peptides acquire a β-turn structure in solution. In vitro stability studies in human serum show that the cyclic peptide is more stable than the linear peptide. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. New dendrimer - Peptide host - Guest complexes: Towards dendrimers as peptide carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Sontjens, S.H.M.; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    Adamantyl urea and adamantyl thiourea modified poly(propylene imine) dendrimers act as hosts for N-terminal tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc)-protected peptides and form chloroform-soluble complexes. investigations with NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide is bound to the dendrimer by ionic interactions...... between the dendrimer outer shell tertiary amines and the C-terminal carboxylic acid of the peptide, and also through host-urea to peptide-amide hydrogen bonding. The hydrogen-bonding nature of the peptide dendrimer interactions was further confirmed by using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, for which...... the NH- and CO-stretch signals of the peptide amide moieties shift towards lower wave-numbers upon complexation with the dendrimer. Spatial analysis of the complexes with NOESY spectroscopy generally shows close proximity of the N-terminal Boc group of the peptide to the peripheral adamantyl groups...

  2. Tumor-targeting peptides from combinatorial libraries*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruiwu; Li, Xiaocen; Xiao, Wenwu; Lam, Kit S.

    2018-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major and leading causes of death worldwide. Two of the greatest challenges infighting cancer are early detection and effective treatments with no or minimum side effects. Widespread use of targeted therapies and molecular imaging in clinics requires high affinity, tumor-specific agents as effective targeting vehicles to deliver therapeutics and imaging probes to the primary or metastatic tumor sites. Combinatorial libraries such as phage-display and one-bead one-compound (OBOC) peptide libraries are powerful approaches in discovering tumor-targeting peptides. This review gives an overview of different combinatorial library technologies that have been used for the discovery of tumor-targeting peptides. Examples of tumor-targeting peptides identified from each combinatorial library method will be discussed. Published tumor-targeting peptide ligands and their applications will also be summarized by the combinatorial library methods and their corresponding binding receptors. PMID:27210583

  3. Development of novel ligands for peptide GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Brian M; McKillop, Aine M; O'Harte, Finbarr Pm

    2016-12-01

    Incretin based glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists which target a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) are currently used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This review focuses on GPCRs from pancreatic β-cells, including GLP-1, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY (PYY), oxyntomodulin (OXM) and ghrelin receptors. In addition, fatty acids GPCRs are thought to have an increasing role in regulating peptide secretions namely short fatty acids GPCR (GPR41, GPR43), medium chain fatty acid GPCR (GPR84), long chain fatty acid GPCR (GPR40, GPR120) and cannabinoid-like GPCR (GPR55, GPR119). Several pre-clinical and clinical trials are currently ongoing in peptide GPCR based therapies, including dual and triple agonist peptides which activate two or more GPCRs simultaneously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Circulating elastin peptides, role in vascular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, L; Labat-Robert, J

    2014-12-01

    The atherosclerotic process starts with the degradation of elastic fibers. Their presence was demonstrated in the circulation as well as several of their biological properties elucidated. We described years ago a procedure to obtain large elastin peptides by organo-alkaline hydrolysis, κ-elastin. This method enabled also the preparation of specific antibodies used to determine elastin peptides, as well as anti-elastin antibodies in body fluids and tissue extracts. Elastin peptides were determined in a large number of human blood samples. Studies were carried out to explore their pharmacological properties. Similar recent studies by other laboratories confirmed our findings and arose new interest in circulating elastin peptides for their biological activities. This recent trend justified the publication of a review of the biological and pathological activities of elastin peptides demonstrated during our previous studies, subject of this article. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Interpreting peptide mass spectra by VEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Rune; Lundsgaard, M.; Welinder, Karen G.

    2003-01-01

    the calculated and the experimental mass spectrum of the called peptide. The program package includes four accessory programs. VEMStrans creates protein databases in FASTA format from EST or cDNA sequence files. VEMSdata creates a virtual peptide database from FASTA files. VEMSdist displays the distribution......Most existing Mass Spectra (MS) analysis programs are automatic and provide limited opportunity for editing during the interpretation. Furthermore, they rely entirely on publicly available databases for interpretation. VEMS (Virtual Expert Mass Spectrometrist) is a program for interactive analysis...... of peptide MS/MS spectra imported in text file format. Peaks are annotated, the monoisotopic peaks retained, and the b-and y-ion series identified in an interactive manner. The called peptide sequence is searched against a local protein database for sequence identity and peptide mass. The report compares...

  6. Intracellular Signalling by C-Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Hills

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available C-peptide, a cleavage product of the proinsulin molecule, has long been regarded as biologically inert, serving merely as a surrogate marker for insulin release. Recent findings demonstrate both a physiological and protective role of C-peptide when administered to individuals with type I diabetes. Data indicate that C-peptide appears to bind in nanomolar concentrations to a cell surface receptor which is most likely to be G-protein coupled. Binding of C-peptide initiates multiple cellular effects, evoking a rise in intracellular calcium, increased PI-3-kinase activity, stimulation of the Na+/K+ ATPase, increased eNOS transcription, and activation of the MAPK signalling pathway. These cell signalling effects have been studied in multiple cell types from multiple tissues. Overall these observations raise the possibility that C-peptide may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of long-term complications associated with diabetes.

  7. Radiolabeled peptides: experimental and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, M.L.; Pallela, V.R.

    1998-01-01

    Radiolabeled receptor specific biomolecules hold unlimited potential in nuclear medicine. During the past few years much attention has been drawn to the development radiolabeled peptides for a variety of diagnostic applications, as well as for therapy of malignant tumors. Although only one peptide, In-111-DTPA-(D)-Phe 1 -octreotide, is available commercially for oncologic imaging, many more have been examined in humans with hematological disorders, and the early results appear to be promising. Impetus generated by these results have prompted investigators to label peptides with such radionuclides as Tc-99m, I-123, F-18, Cu-64, and Y-90. This review is intended to highlight the qualities of peptides, summarize the clinical results, and address some important issues associated with radiolabeling of highly potent peptides. While doing so, various methods of radiolabeling have been described, and their strengths and weaknesses have also been discussed. (author)

  8. Chemical reactions directed Peptide self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasale, Dnyaneshwar B; Das, Apurba K

    2015-05-13

    Fabrication of self-assembled nanostructures is one of the important aspects in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The study of self-assembled soft materials remains an area of interest due to their potential applications in biomedicine. The versatile properties of soft materials can be tuned using a bottom up approach of small molecules. Peptide based self-assembly has significant impact in biology because of its unique features such as biocompatibility, straight peptide chain and the presence of different side chain functionality. These unique features explore peptides in various self-assembly process. In this review, we briefly introduce chemical reaction-mediated peptide self-assembly. Herein, we have emphasised enzymes, native chemical ligation and photochemical reactions in the exploration of peptide self-assembly.

  9. Harnessing supramolecular peptide nanotechnology in biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Lee, Wei Hao; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The harnessing of peptides in biomedical applications is a recent hot topic. This arises mainly from the general biocompatibility of peptides, as well as from the ease of tunability of peptide structure to engineer desired properties. The ease of progression from laboratory testing to clinical trials is evident from the plethora of examples available. In this review, we compare and contrast how three distinct self-assembled peptide nanostructures possess different functions. We have 1) nanofibrils in biomaterials that can interact with cells, 2) nanoparticles that can traverse the bloodstream to deliver its payload and also be bioimaged, and 3) nanotubes that can serve as cross-membrane conduits and as a template for nanowire formation. Through this review, we aim to illustrate how various peptides, in their various self-assembled nanostructures, possess great promise in a wide range of biomedical applications and what more can be expected.

  10. Activation of PI3K/AKT and ERK MAPK signal pathways is required for the induction of lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus by herpes simplex virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Zhigang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is causally linked to several acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL and a subset of multicentric Castleman's disease. Regulation of viral lytic replication is critical to the initiation and progression of KS. Recently, we reported that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 was an important cofactor that activated lytic cycle replication of KSHV. Here, we further investigated the possible signal pathways involved in HSV-1-induced reactivation of KSHV. Results By transfecting a series of dominant negative mutants and protein expressing constructs and using pharmacologic inhibitors, we found that either Janus kinase 1 (JAK1/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 or JAK1/STAT6 signaling failed to regulate HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. However, HSV-1 infection of BCBL-1 cells activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (PKB, also called AKT pathway and inactivated phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β. PTEN/PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathway was found to be involved in HSV-1-induced KSHV reactivation. Additionally, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway also partially contributed to HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. Conclusions HSV-1 infection stimulated PI3K/AKT and ERK MAPK signaling pathways that in turn contributed to KSHV reactivation, which provided further insights into the molecular mechanism controlling KSHV lytic replication, particularly in the context of HSV-1 and KSHV co-infection.

  11. Peptide Antibiotics for ESKAPE Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thomas Thyge

    is considered poor compared to medicines for lifestyle diseases. According to the WHO we could be moving towards a post-antibiotic era in which previously treatable infections become fatal. Of special importance are multidrug resistant bacteria from the ESKAPE group (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus......Multi-drug resistance to antibiotics represents a global health challenge that results in increased morbidity and mortality rates. The annual death-toll is >700.000 people world-wide, rising to ~10 million by 2050. New antibiotics are lacking, and few are under development as return on investment......, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter). As a consequence of widespread multi-drug resistance, researchers have sought for alternative sources of antimicrobials. Antimicrobial peptides are produced by almost all living organisms as part of their defense or innate immune...

  12. Interactions of Bio-Inspired Membranes with Peptides and Peptide-Mimetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sebastiano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Via Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD and implicit solvent coarse-grained (CG Molecular Dynamics (MD we examine the interaction of an amphiphilic cell-penetrating peptide PMLKE and its synthetic counterpart with a bio-inspired membrane. We use the DPD technique to investigate the interaction of peptide-mimetic nanoparticles, or nanopins, with a three-component membrane. The CG MD approach is used to investigate the interaction of a cell-penetrating peptide PMLKE with single-component membrane. We observe the spontaneous binding and subsequent insertion of peptide and nanopin in the membrane by using CG MD and DPD approaches, respectively. In addition, we find that the insertion of peptide and nanopins is mainly driven by the favorable enthalpic interactions between the hydrophobic components of the peptide, or nanopin, and the membrane. Our study provides insights into the mechanism underlying the interactions of amphiphilic peptide and peptide-mimetic nanoparticles with a membrane. The result of this study can be used to guide the functional integration of peptide and peptide-mimetic nanoparticles with a cell membrane.

  13. Albumin-derived peptides efficiently reduce renal uptake of radiolabelled peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vegt, Erik; Eek, Annemarie; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Gotthardt, Martin; Boerman, Otto C.; Jong, Marion de

    2010-01-01

    In peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), the maximum activity dose that can safely be administered is limited by high renal uptake and retention of radiolabelled peptides. The kidney radiation dose can be reduced by coinfusion of agents that competitively inhibit the reabsorption of radiolabelled peptides, such as positively charged amino acids, Gelofusine, or trypsinised albumin. The aim of this study was to identify more specific and potent inhibitors of the kidney reabsorption of radiolabelled peptides, based on albumin. Albumin was fragmented using cyanogen bromide and six albumin-derived peptides with different numbers of electric charges were selected and synthesised. The effect of albumin fragments (FRALB-C) and selected albumin-derived peptides on the internalisation of 111 In-albumin, 111 In-minigastrin, 111 In-exendin and 111 In-octreotide by megalin-expressing cells was assessed. In rats, the effect of Gelofusine and albumin-derived peptides on the renal uptake and biodistribution of 111 In-minigastrin, 111 In-exendin and 111 In-octreotide was determined. FRALB-C significantly reduced the uptake of all radiolabelled peptides in vitro. The albumin-derived peptides showed different potencies in reducing the uptake of 111 In-albumin, 111 In-exendin and 111 In-minigastrin in vitro. The most efficient albumin-derived peptide (peptide 6), was selected for in vivo testing. In rats, 5 mg of peptide 6 very efficiently inhibited the renal uptake of 111 In-minigastrin, by 88%. Uptake of 111 In-exendin and 111 In-octreotide was reduced by 26 and 33%, respectively. The albumin-derived peptide 6 efficiently inhibited the renal reabsorption of 111 In-minigastrin, 111 In-exendin and 111 In-octreotide and is a promising candidate for kidney protection in PRRT. (orig.)

  14. Peptide array-based interaction assay of solid-bound peptides and anchorage-dependant cells and its effectiveness in cell-adhesive peptide design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ryuji; Kaga, Chiaki; Kunimatsu, Mitoshi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2006-06-01

    Peptide array, the designable peptide library covalently synthesized on cellulose support, was applied to assay peptide-cell interaction, between solid-bound peptides and anchorage-dependant cells, to study objective peptide design. As a model case, cell-adhesive peptides that could enhance cell growth as tissue engineering scaffold material, was studied. On the peptide array, the relative cell-adhesion ratio of NIH/3T3 cells was 2.5-fold higher on the RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) peptide spot as compared to the spot with no peptide, thus indicating integrin-mediated peptide-cell interaction. Such strong cell adhesion mediated by the RGDS peptide was easily disrupted by single residue substitution on the peptide array, thus indicating that the sequence recognition accuracy of cells was strictly conserved in our optimized scheme. The observed cellular morphological extension with active actin stress-fiber on the RGD motif-containing peptide supported our strategy that peptide array-based interaction assay of solid-bound peptide and anchorage-dependant cells (PIASPAC) could provide quantitative data on biological peptide-cell interaction. The analysis of 180 peptides obtained from fibronectin type III domain (no. 1447-1629) yielded 18 novel cell-adhesive peptides without the RGD motif. Taken together with the novel candidates, representative rules of ineffective amino acid usage were obtained from non-effective candidate sequences for the effective designing of cell-adhesive peptides. On comparing the amino acid usage of the top 20 and last 20 peptides from the 180 peptides, the following four brief design rules were indicated: (i) Arg or Lys of positively charged amino acids (except His) could enhance cell adhesion, (ii) small hydrophilic amino acids are favored in cell-adhesion peptides, (iii) negatively charged amino acids and small amino acids (except Gly) could reduce cell adhesion, and (iv) Cys and Met could be excluded from the sequence combination since they have

  15. Designing Antibacterial Peptides with Enhanced Killing Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza H. Waghu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are gaining attention as substitutes for antibiotics in order to combat the risk posed by multi-drug resistant pathogens. Several research groups are engaged in design of potent anti-infective agents using natural AMPs as templates. In this study, a library of peptides with high sequence similarity to Myeloid Antimicrobial Peptide (MAP family were screened using popular online prediction algorithms. These peptide variants were designed in a manner to retain the conserved residues within the MAP family. The prediction algorithms were found to effectively classify peptides based on their antimicrobial nature. In order to improve the activity of the identified peptides, molecular dynamics (MD simulations, using bilayer and micellar systems could be used to design and predict effect of residue substitution on membranes of microbial and mammalian cells. The inference from MD simulation studies well corroborated with the wet-lab observations indicating that MD-guided rational design could lead to discovery of potent AMPs. The effect of the residue substitution on membrane activity was studied in greater detail using killing kinetic analysis. Killing kinetics studies on Gram-positive, negative and human erythrocytes indicated that a single residue change has a drastic effect on the potency of AMPs. An interesting outcome was a switch from monophasic to biphasic death rate constant of Staphylococcus aureus due to a single residue mutation in the peptide.

  16. The lytic origin of herpesvirus papio is highly homologous to Epstein-Barr virus ori-Lyt: evolutionary conservation of transcriptional activation and replication signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryon, J J; Fixman, E D; Houchens, C; Zong, J; Lieberman, P M; Chang, Y N; Hayward, G S; Hayward, S D

    1993-01-01

    Herpesvirus papio (HVP) is a B-lymphotropic baboon virus with an estimated 40% homology to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We have cloned and sequenced ori-Lyt of herpesvirus papio and found a striking degree of nucleotide homology (89%) with ori-Lyt of EBV. Transcriptional elements form an integral part of EBV ori-Lyt. The promoter and enhancer domains of EBV ori-Lyt are conserved in herpesvirus papio. The EBV ori-Lyt promoter contains four binding sites for the EBV lytic cycle transactivator Zta, and the enhancer includes one Zta and two Rta response elements. All five of the Zta response elements and one of the Rta motifs are conserved in HVP ori-Lyt, and the HVP DS-L leftward promoter and the enhancer were activated in transient transfection assays by the EBV Zta and Rta transactivators. The EBV ori-Lyt enhancer contains a palindromic sequence, GGTCAGCTGACC, centered on a PvuII restriction site. This sequence, with a single base change, is also present in the HVP ori-Lyt enhancer. DNase I footprinting demonstrated that the PvuII sequence was bound by a protein present in a Raji nuclear extract. Mobility shift and competition assays using oligonucleotide probes identified this sequence as a binding site for the cellular transcription factor MLTF. Mutagenesis of the binding site indicated that MLTF contributes significantly to the constitutive activity of the ori-Lyt enhancer. The high degree of conservation of cis-acting signal sequences in HVP ori-Lyt was further emphasized by the finding that an HVP ori-Lyt-containing plasmid was replicated in Vero cells by a set of cotransfected EBV replication genes. The central domain of EBV ori-Lyt contains two related AT-rich palindromes, one of which is partially duplicated in the HVP sequence. The AT-rich palindromes are functionally important cis-acting motifs. Deletion of these palindromes severely diminished replication of an ori-Lyt target plasmid. Images PMID:8389916

  17. Peptides in fermented Finnish milk products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Kahala

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the rate of proteolysis and peptide profiles of different Finnish fermented milk products. The highest rate of proteolysis was observed in Biokefir, while the greatest change in the rate of proteolysis was observed in Gefilus®. Differences in starters and manufacturing processes reflected on the peptide profiles of the products. Most of the identified peptides originated from either the N- or C-terminal region of β-casein or from the N-terminal region of αs1-casein.

  18. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Kunal; Liyanage, Mangala R; Volkin, David B; Middaugh, C Russell

    2014-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy provides data that are widely used for secondary structure characterization of peptides. A wide array of available sampling methods permits structural analysis of peptides in diverse environments such as aqueous solution (including optically turbid media), powders, detergent micelles, and lipid bilayers. In some cases, side chain vibrations can also be resolved and used for tertiary structure and chemical analysis. Data from several low-resolution spectroscopic techniques, including FTIR, can be combined to generate an empirical phase diagram, an overall picture of peptide structure as a function of environmental conditions that can aid in the global interpretation of large amounts of spectroscopic data.

  19. Neoglycolipids for Prolonging the Effects of Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Witteloostuijn, Søren Blok; Mannerstedt, Karin Margareta Sophia; Wismann, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    Novel principles for optimizing the properties of peptide-based drugs are needed in order to leverage their full pharmacological potential. We present the design, synthesis, and evaluation of a library of neoglycolipidated glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogues, which are valuable drug...... was maintained or even improved compared to native GLP-1. This translated into pronounced in vivo efficacy in terms of both decreased acute food intake and improved glucose homeostasis in mice. Thus, we propose neoglycolipidation as a novel, general method for modulating the properties of therapeutic peptides...

  20. How Nature Morphs Peptide Scaffolds into Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional notion that peptides are poor candidates for orally available drugs because of protease-sensitive peptide bonds, intrinsic hydrophilicity, and ionic charges contrasts with the diversity of antibiotic natural products with peptide-based frameworks that are synthesized and utilized by Nature. Several of these antibiotics, including penicillin and vancomycin, are employed to treat bacterial infections in humans and have been best-selling therapeutics for decades. Others might provide new platforms for the design of novel therapeutics to combat emerging antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:19058272

  1. Brain natriuretic peptide: Diagnostic potential in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasojević-Kosić Ljubica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocrine role of the heart is evident in the secretion of noradrenaline and natriuretic peptides. The secretion of natriuretic peptides presents a useful mechanism for different conditions of cardiac dysfunction. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP has been accepted in human cardiology as a biomarker for cardiac insufficiency and coronary arterial disease. The specificity of the BNP structure is specie-specific, so that the testing of diagnostic and prognostic potential in dogs requires the existence of a test that is a homologue for that animal specie. The existence of an adequate method for measuring BNP concentration makes possible its implementation as a screening test in everyday clinical practice. .

  2. Recent updates of marine antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semreen, Mohammad H; El-Gamal, Mohammed I; Abdin, Shifaa; Alkhazraji, Hajar; Kamal, Leena; Hammad, Saba; El-Awady, Faten; Waleed, Dima; Kourbaj, Layal

    2018-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are group of proteins showing broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that have been known to be powerful agents against a variety of pathogens. This class of compounds contributed to solving the microbial resistance dilemma that limited the use of many potent antimicrobial agents. The marine environment is known to be one of the richest sources for antimicrobial peptides, yet this environment is not fully explored. Hence, the scientific research attention should be directed toward the marine ecosystem as enormous amount of useful discoveries could be brought to the forefront. In the current article, the marine antimicrobial peptides reported from mid 2012 to 2017 have been reviewed.

  3. Recent updates of marine antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H. Semreen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are group of proteins showing broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity that have been known to be powerful agents against a variety of pathogens. This class of compounds contributed to solving the microbial resistance dilemma that limited the use of many potent antimicrobial agents. The marine environment is known to be one of the richest sources for antimicrobial peptides, yet this environment is not fully explored. Hence, the scientific research attention should be directed toward the marine ecosystem as enormous amount of useful discoveries could be brought to the forefront. In the current article, the marine antimicrobial peptides reported from mid 2012 to 2017 have been reviewed.

  4. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, John K [Castro Valley, CA

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  5. Ligand-regulated peptides: a general approach for modulating protein-peptide interactions with small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkowski, Brock F; Miller, Russell A; Belshaw, Peter J

    2005-07-01

    We engineered a novel ligand-regulated peptide (LiRP) system where the binding activity of intracellular peptides is controlled by a cell-permeable small molecule. In the absence of ligand, peptides expressed as fusions in an FKBP-peptide-FRB-GST LiRP scaffold protein are free to interact with target proteins. In the presence of the ligand rapamycin, or the nonimmunosuppressive rapamycin derivative AP23102, the scaffold protein undergoes a conformational change that prevents the interaction of the peptide with the target protein. The modular design of the scaffold enables the creation of LiRPs through rational design or selection from combinatorial peptide libraries. Using these methods, we identified LiRPs that interact with three independent targets: retinoblastoma protein, c-Src, and the AMP-activated protein kinase. The LiRP system should provide a general method to temporally and spatially regulate protein function in cells and organisms.

  6. Amide I SFG Spectral Line Width Probes the Lipid-Peptide and Peptide-Peptide Interactions at Cell Membrane In Situ and in Real Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baixiong; Tan, Junjun; Li, Chuanzhao; Zhang, Jiahui; Ye, Shuji

    2018-06-13

    The balance of lipid-peptide and peptide-peptide interactions at cell membrane is essential to a large variety of cellular processes. In this study, we have experimentally demonstrated for the first time that sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy can be used to probe the peptide-peptide and lipid-peptide interactions in cell membrane in situ and in real time by determination of the line width of amide I band of protein backbone. Using a "benchmark" model of α-helical WALP23, it is found that the dominated lipid-peptide interaction causes a narrow line width of the amide I band, whereas the peptide-peptide interaction can markedly broaden the line width. When WALP23 molecules insert into the lipid bilayer, a quite narrow line width of the amide I band is observed because of the lipid-peptide interaction. In contrast, when the peptide lies down on the bilayer surface, the line width of amide I band becomes very broad owing to the peptide-peptide interaction. In terms of the real-time change in the line width, the transition from peptide-peptide interaction to lipid-peptide interaction is monitored during the insertion of WALP23 into 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'- rac-glycerol) (DPPG) lipid bilayer. The dephasing time of a pure α-helical WALP23 in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl- sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'- rac-glycerol) and DPPG bilayer is determined to be 2.2 and 0.64 ps, respectively. The peptide-peptide interaction can largely accelerate the dephasing time.

  7. The Performance of the Four Anaerobic Blood Culture Bottles BacT/ALERT-FN, -FN Plus, BACTEC-Plus and -Lytic in Detection of Anaerobic Bacteria and Identification by Direct MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuhayawi, Mohammed; Altun, Osman; Abdulmajeed, Adam Dilshad; Ullberg, Måns; Özenci, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Detection and identification of anaerobic bacteria in blood cultures (BC) is a well-recognized challenge in clinical microbiology. We studied 100 clinical anaerobic BC isolates to evaluate the performance of BacT/ALERT-FN, -FN Plus (BioMérieux), BACTEC-Plus and -Lytic (Becton Dickinson BioSciences) BC bottles in detection and time to detection (TTD) of anaerobic bacteria. BACTEC Lytic had higher detection rate (94/100, 94%) than BacT/ALERT FN Plus (80/100, 80%) (panaerobic bacteria among the remaining bottle types. The 67 anaerobic bacteria that signalled positive in all four bottle types were analyzed to compare the time to detection (TTD) and isolates were directly identified by MALDI-TOF MS. There was a significant difference in TTD among the four bottle types (panaerobic BC bottles are equally suitable for direct MALDI-TOF MS for rapid and reliable identification of common anaerobic bacteria. Further clinical studies are warranted to investigate the performance of anaerobic BC bottles in detection of anaerobic bacteria and identification by direct MALDI-TOF MS.

  8. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...... pocket, its carbonyl group aligning improperly relative to Ser195 and the oxyanion hole, explaining why the peptide is an inhibitor rather than a substrate. Substitution of the P1 Arg with novel unnatural Arg analogues with aliphatic or aromatic ring structures led to an increased affinity, depending......, in spite of a less favorable binding entropy and loss of a polar interaction. We conclude that increased flexibility of the peptide allows more favorable exosite interactions, which, in combination with the use of novel Arg analogues as P1 residues, can be used to manipulate the affinity and specificity...

  9. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Carlos E.; Badillo-Corona, Jesus A.; Ramírez-Sotelo, Guadalupe; Oliver-Salvador, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application. PMID:25815307

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides for Therapeutic Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsogbadrakh Mishig-Ochir

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have been considered as potential therapeutic sources of future antibiotics because of their broad-spectrum activities and different mechanisms of action compared to conventional antibiotics. Although AMPs possess considerable benefits as new generation antibiotics, their clinical and commercial development still have some limitations, such as potential toxicity, susceptibility to proteases, and high cost of peptide production. In order to overcome those obstacles, extensive efforts have been carried out. For instance, unusual amino acids or peptido-mimetics are introduced to avoid the proteolytic degradation and the design of short peptides retaining antimicrobial activities is proposed as a solution for the cost issue. In this review, we focus on small peptides, especially those with less than twelve amino acids, and provide an overview of the relationships between their three-dimensional structures and antimicrobial activities. The efforts to develop highly active AMPs with shorter sequences are also described.

  11. Charge Transport Phenomena in Peptide Molecular Junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchini, A.; Petricoin, E.F.; Geho, D.H.; Liotta, L.A.; Long, D.P.; Vaisman, I.I.

    2008-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) is a valuable in situ spectroscopic analysis technique that provides a direct portrait of the electron transport properties of a molecular species. In the past, IETS has been applied to small molecules. Using self-assembled nano electronic junctions, IETS was performed for the first time on a large polypeptide protein peptide in the phosphorylated and native form, yielding interpretable spectra. A reproducible 10-fold shift of the I/V characteristics of the peptide was observed upon phosphorylation. Phosphorylation can be utilized as a site-specific modification to alter peptide structure and thereby influence electron transport in peptide molecular junctions. It is envisioned that kinases and phosphatases may be used to create tunable systems for molecular electronics applications, such as biosensors and memory devices.

  12. Diagnostic value of C-peptide determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kober, G.; Rainer, O.H.

    1983-01-01

    C-peptide and insulin serum determinations were performed in 94 glucagon-stimulated diabetics and in 15 healthy persons. A minimal increase of 1.5 ng C-peptide/ml serum after glucagon injection (1 mg i.v.) was found to be a useful parameter for the differentiation of insulin dependent and non-insulin dependent diabetics. The maximal response to glucagon occurred during the first 10-minutes after the injection (blood was drawn at 2-minutes intervals). Serum insulin levels and basal C-peptide concentrations were of no value in predicting insulin-dependency. Basal C-peptide levels were significantly different from control in juvenile insulin dependent diabetics (decrease) only. (Author)

  13. Biologically Active and Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos E. Salas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application.

  14. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-granules: ultrastructure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2006-12-29

    Dec 29, 2006 ... morphometry and function. Eliane Florencio ... granules is greatest in the right atrium followed by the left atrium and left auricle and right auricle, in this order. ... family: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), Urodilatin, Brain natriuretic ...

  15. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco

    2016-01-01

    solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative......Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins...

  16. Expression of the cationic antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin fused with the anionic peptide in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha-Kun; Chun, Dae-Sik; Kim, Joon-Sik; Yun, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Hong, Soon-Kwang; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2006-09-01

    Direct expression of lactoferricin, an antimicrobial peptide, is lethal to Escherichia coli. For the efficient production of lactoferricin in E. coli, we developed an expression system in which the gene for the lysine- and arginine-rich cationic lactoferricin was fused to an anionic peptide gene to neutralize the basic property of lactoferricin, and successfully overexpressed the concatemeric fusion gene in E. coli. The lactoferricin gene was linked to a modified magainin intervening sequence gene by a recombinational polymerase chain reaction, thus producing an acidic peptide-lactoferricin fusion gene. The monomeric acidic peptide-lactoferricin fusion gene was multimerized and expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) upon induction with isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside. The expression levels of the fusion peptide reached the maximum at the tetramer, while further increases in the copy number of the fusion gene substantially reduced the peptide expression level. The fusion peptides were isolated and cleaved to generate the separate lactoferricin and acidic peptide. About 60 mg of pure recombinant lactoferricin was obtained from 1 L of E. coli culture. The purified recombinant lactoferricin was found to have a molecular weight similar to that of chemically synthesized lactoferricin. The recombinant lactoferricin showed antimicrobial activity and disrupted bacterial membrane permeability, as the native lactoferricin peptide does.

  17. Aggregation and toxicity of amyloid-beta peptide in relation to peptide sequence variation

    OpenAIRE

    Vandersteen, A.

    2012-01-01

    Generally, aggregation of the amyloid-ß peptide is considered the cause of neuronal death in Alzheimer disease. The heterogenous Aß peptide occurs in various lengths in vivo: Aß40 and Aß42 are the predominant forms while both shorter and longer peptides exist. Aß40 and shorter isoforms are less aggregation-prone and hence considered less dangerous than Aß42 and longer isoforms, which are more aggregation-prone. Up to now research mainly focussed on the predominant Aß peptides and their indivi...

  18. A distributive peptide cyclase processes multiple microviridin core peptides within a single polypeptide substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Kunhua; Yang, Guang; McBride, Joshua L; Bruner, Steven D; Ding, Yousong

    2018-05-03

    Ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are an important family of natural products. Their biosynthesis follows a common scheme in which the leader peptide of a precursor peptide guides the modifications of a single core peptide. Here we describe biochemical studies of the processing of multiple core peptides within a precursor peptide, rare in RiPP biosynthesis. In a cyanobacterial microviridin pathway, an ATP-grasp ligase, AMdnC, installs up to two macrolactones on each of the three core peptides within AMdnA. The enzyme catalysis occurs in a distributive fashion and follows an unstrict N-to-C overall directionality, but a strict order in macrolactonizing each core peptide. Furthermore, AMdnC is catalytically versatile to process unnatural substrates carrying one to four core peptides, and kinetic studies provide insights into its catalytic properties. Collectively, our results reveal a distinct biosynthetic logic of RiPPs, opening up the possibility of modular production via synthetic biology approaches.

  19. The preparation and characterization of peptide's lung cancer imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianfeng; Chu Liping; Wang Yan; Wang Yueying; Liu Jinjian; Wu Hongying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To screen in vivo lung cancer specific binding seven peptides by T7 phage display peptide library, so as to prepare peptide's lung cancer early diagnostic agent. Methods: Use phage display in vivo technology, the 7-peptide phage that binding the lung cancer specifically was obtained, then the DNA sequence was measured and the seven peptide was synthesized. After labeled by 125 I, the seven peptide was injected into mice via vein and the distribution was observed. Results: One peptide was obtained by four rounds screening, and the peptide can bind lung cancer tissue specifically. Two hours after injection get the best imaging of lung cancer, metabolism of peptide in mice is fast, the distribution in vivo is decrease six hours and almost disappear 20 hours after injection. Conclusion: The peptide can image and diagnose lung cancer better. (authors)

  20. Discovery of peptidic anti-­myotoxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjärtun, Johanna; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Munk, Andreas

    More than 2.5 millions envenomations and 125.000 death occur each year due to snakebite. Current antivenoms consist of immunoglobulinesderived from animals, and they are therefore associated with a high risk of adverse reactions in humans. The use of synthetic peptidic antitoxinsmay lead to safer...... and more effective antivenoms. This research reports the discovery of peptidic antitoxins against myotoxin II from B. asper....

  1. Preparation of peptide thioesters through fmoc-based solid-phase peptide synthesis by using amino thioesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuhr-Hansen, N.; Wilbek, T.S.; Strømgaard, K.

    2013-01-01

    protected peptide thioester, which was globally deprotected to afford the desired unprotected peptide thioester. The method is compatible with labile groups such as phosphoryl and glycosyl moieties. The synthesis of peptide alkyl thioesters by 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) solid-phase peptide synthesis...

  2. Membrane manufacture for peptide separations

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dooli; Salazar Moya, Octavio Ruben; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured polymeric membranes are key tools in biomedical applications such as hemodialysis, protein separations, in the food industry, and drinking water supply from seawater. Despite of the success in different separation processes, membrane manufacture itself is at risk, since the most used solvents are about to be banned in many countries due to environmental and health issues. We propose for the first time the preparation of polyethersulfone membranes based on dissolution in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([EMIM]DEP). We obtained a series of membranes tailored for separation of solutes with molecular weight of 30, 5, 1.3, and 1.25 kg mol-1 with respective water permeances of 140, 65, 30 and 20 Lm-2h-1bar-1. We demonstrate their superior efficiency in the separation of complex mixtures of peptides with molecular weights in the range of 800 to 3500 gmol-1. Furthermore, the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase separation leading to the pore formation in the membranes were investigated. The rheology of the solutions and the morphology of the prepared membranes were examed and compared to those of polyethersulfone in organic solvents currently used for membrane manufacture.

  3. Membrane manufacture for peptide separations

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dooli

    2016-06-07

    Nanostructured polymeric membranes are key tools in biomedical applications such as hemodialysis, protein separations, in the food industry, and drinking water supply from seawater. Despite of the success in different separation processes, membrane manufacture itself is at risk, since the most used solvents are about to be banned in many countries due to environmental and health issues. We propose for the first time the preparation of polyethersulfone membranes based on dissolution in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([EMIM]DEP). We obtained a series of membranes tailored for separation of solutes with molecular weight of 30, 5, 1.3, and 1.25 kg mol-1 with respective water permeances of 140, 65, 30 and 20 Lm-2h-1bar-1. We demonstrate their superior efficiency in the separation of complex mixtures of peptides with molecular weights in the range of 800 to 3500 gmol-1. Furthermore, the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase separation leading to the pore formation in the membranes were investigated. The rheology of the solutions and the morphology of the prepared membranes were examed and compared to those of polyethersulfone in organic solvents currently used for membrane manufacture.

  4. Chimeric opioid peptides: tools for identifying opioid receptor types.

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, G X; Miyajima, A; Yokota, T; Arai, K; Goldstein, A

    1990-01-01

    We synthesized several chimeric peptides in which the N-terminal nine residues of dynorphin-32, a peptide selective for the kappa opioid receptor, were replaced by opioid peptides selective for other opioid receptor types. Each chimeric peptide retained the high affinity and type selectivity characteristic of its N-terminal sequence. The common C-terminal two-thirds of the chimeric peptides served as an epitope recognized by the same monoclonal antibody. When bound to receptors on a cell surf...

  5. Constraining cyclic peptides to mimic protein structure motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Timothy A.; Shepherd, Nicholas E.; Diness, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    peptides can have protein-like biological activities and potencies, enabling their uses as biological probes and leads to therapeutics, diagnostics and vaccines. This Review highlights examples of cyclic peptides that mimic three-dimensional structures of strand, turn or helical segments of peptides...... and proteins, and identifies some additional restraints incorporated into natural product cyclic peptides and synthetic macrocyclic pepti-domimetics that refine peptide structure and confer biological properties....

  6. Confinement-Dependent Friction in Peptide Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbaş, Aykut; Netz, Roland R.

    2013-01-01

    Friction within globular proteins or between adhering macromolecules crucially determines the kinetics of protein folding, the formation, and the relaxation of self-assembled molecular systems. One fundamental question is how these friction effects depend on the local environment and in particular on the presence of water. In this model study, we use fully atomistic MD simulations with explicit water to obtain friction forces as a single polyglycine peptide chain is pulled out of a bundle of k adhering parallel polyglycine peptide chains. The whole system is periodically replicated along the peptide axes, so a stationary state at prescribed mean sliding velocity V is achieved. The aggregation number is varied between k = 2 (two peptide chains adhering to each other with plenty of water present at the adhesion sites) and k = 7 (one peptide chain pulled out from a close-packed cylindrical array of six neighboring peptide chains with no water inside the bundle). The friction coefficient per hydrogen bond, extrapolated to the viscous limit of vanishing pulling velocity V → 0, exhibits an increase by five orders of magnitude when going from k = 2 to k = 7. This dramatic confinement-induced friction enhancement we argue to be due to a combination of water depletion and increased hydrogen-bond cooperativity. PMID:23528088

  7. Biomathematical Description of Synthetic Peptide Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Libraries of randomised peptides displayed on phages or viral particles are essential tools in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is only limited understanding of a library's fundamental dynamics and the influences of encoding schemes and sizes on their quality. Numeric properties of libraries, such as the expected number of different peptides and the library's coverage, have long been in use as measures of a library's quality. Here, we present a graphical framework of these measures together with a library's relative efficiency to help to describe libraries in enough detail for researchers to plan new experiments in a more informed manner. In particular, these values allow us to answer-in a probabilistic fashion-the question of whether a specific library does indeed contain one of the "best" possible peptides. The framework is implemented in a web-interface based on two packages, discreteRV and peptider, to the statistical software environment R. We further provide a user-friendly web-interface called PeLiCa (Peptide Library Calculator, http://www.pelica.org), allowing scientists to plan and analyse their peptide libraries. PMID:26042419

  8. Peptides as Therapeutic Agents for Dengue Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Miaw-Fang; Poh, Keat-Seong; Poh, Chit-Laa

    2017-01-01

    Dengue is an important global threat caused by dengue virus (DENV) that records an estimated 390 million infections annually. Despite the availability of CYD-TDV as a commercial vaccine, its long-term efficacy against all four dengue virus serotypes remains unsatisfactory. There is therefore an urgent need for the development of antiviral drugs for the treatment of dengue. Peptide was once a neglected choice of medical treatment but it has lately regained interest from the pharmaceutical industry following pioneering advancements in technology. In this review, the design of peptide drugs, antiviral activities and mechanisms of peptides and peptidomimetics (modified peptides) action against dengue virus are discussed. The development of peptides as inhibitors for viral entry, replication and translation is also described, with a focus on the three main targets, namely, the host cell receptors, viral structural proteins and viral non-structural proteins. The antiviral peptides designed based on these approaches may lead to the discovery of novel anti-DENV therapeutics that can treat dengue patients.

  9. Peptide pheromone signaling in Streptococcus and Enterococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laura C.; Federle, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular chemical signaling in bacteria, commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS), relies on the production and detection of compounds known as pheromones to elicit coordinated responses among members of a community. Pheromones produced by Gram-positive bacteria are comprised of small peptides. Based on both peptide structure and sensory system architectures, Gram-positive bacterial signaling pathways may be classified into one of four groups with a defining hallmark: cyclical peptides of the Agr type, peptides that contain Gly-Gly processing motifs, sensory systems of the RNPP family, or the recently characterized Rgg-like regulatory family. The recent discovery that Rgg family members respond to peptide pheromones increases substantially the number of species in which QS is likely a key regulatory component. These pathways control a variety of fundamental behaviors including conjugation, natural competence for transformation, biofilm development, and virulence factor regulation. Overlapping QS pathways found in multiple species and pathways that utilize conserved peptide pheromones provide opportunities for interspecies communication. Here we review pheromone signaling identified in the genera Enterococcus and Streptococcus, providing examples of all four types of pathways. PMID:24118108

  10. Human C-peptide. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beischer, W.; Keller, L.; Maas, M.; Schiefer, E.; Pfeiffer, E.F.

    1976-01-01

    Synthetic human C-peptide bearing a tyrosine group at its amino end is labelled with 125 iodine using chloramin T or hydrogen peroxide and lactoperoxidase. The results of the two methods are compared. Antiserum to synthetic human C-peptide (without tyrosine), which was partially coupled to rabbit albumin, is raised in guinea pigs and goats. Goats show to be superior to guinea pips concerning antibody production. The so-called 'hook effect' phenomenon is observed when setting up the standard curves for the radioimmunoassay. Monotonically decreasing standard curves are obtained on dilution of antiserum with a high antibody titer which was produced by repeated immunization in goats. Free C-peptide and C-peptide bound to antiserum are separated using the anion exchange resin amberlite. Using this separation technique we excluded unspecific binding of labelled C-peptide to protein fractions in serum of diabetics. The sensitivity of our radioimmunoassay is approx. 0.3 ng C-peptide/ml serum. Intra- and interassay variability are below 10%. Human proinsulin is the only substance found to crossreact with the antiserum. (orig.) [de

  11. Harnessing supramolecular peptide nanotechnology in biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan KH

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Kiat Hwa Chan,1 Wei Hao Lee,2 Shuangmu Zhuo,3 Ming Ni3 1Division of Science, Yale-NUS College, Singapore; 2Department of Chemistry, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine of Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The harnessing of peptides in biomedical applications is a recent hot topic. This arises mainly from the general biocompatibility of peptides, as well as from the ease of tunability of peptide structure to engineer desired properties. The ease of progression from laboratory testing to clinical trials is evident from the plethora of examples available. In this review, we compare and contrast how three distinct self-assembled peptide nanostructures possess different functions. We have 1 nanofibrils in biomaterials that can interact with cells, 2 nanoparticles that can traverse the bloodstream to deliver its payload and also be bioimaged, and 3 nanotubes that can serve as cross-membrane conduits and as a template for nanowire formation. Through this review, we aim to illustrate how various peptides, in their various self-assembled nanostructures, possess great promise in a wide range of biomedical applications and what more can be expected. Keywords: peptides, self-assembly, nanotechnology

  12. [Peptide phage display in biotechnology and biomedicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmicheva, G A; Belyavskaya, V A

    2016-07-01

    To date peptide phage display is one of the most common combinatorial methods used for identifying specific peptide ligands. Phage display peptide libraries containing billions different clones successfully used for selection of ligands with high affinity and selectivity toward wide range of targets including individual proteins, bacteria, viruses, spores, different kind of cancer cells and variety of nonorganic targets (metals, alloys, semiconductors etc.) Success of using filamentous phage in phage display technologies relays on the robustness of phage particles and a possibility to genetically modify its DNA to construct new phage variants with novel properties. In this review we are discussing characteristics of the most known non-commercial peptide phage display libraries of different formats (landscape libraries in particular) and their successful applications in several fields of biotechnology and biomedicine: discovery of peptides with diagnostic values against different pathogens, discovery and using of peptides recognizing cancer cells, trends in using of phage display technologies in human interactome studies, application of phage display technologies in construction of novel nano materials.

  13. Peptides with Dual Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felício, Mário R.; Silva, Osmar N.; Gonçalves, Sônia; Santos, Nuno C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the number of people suffering from cancer and multi-resistant infections has increased, such that both diseases are already seen as current and future major causes of death. Moreover, chronic infections are one of the main causes of cancer, due to the instability in the immune system that allows cancer cells to proliferate. Likewise, the physical debility associated with cancer or with anticancer therapy itself often paves the way for opportunistic infections. It is urgent to develop new therapeutic methods, with higher efficiency and lower side effects. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found in the innate immune system of a wide range of organisms. Identified as the most promising alternative to conventional molecules used nowadays against infections, some of them have been shown to have dual activity, both as antimicrobial and anticancer peptides (ACPs). Highly cationic and amphipathic, they have demonstrated efficacy against both conditions, with the number of nature-driven or synthetically designed peptides increasing year by year. With similar properties, AMPs that can also act as ACPs are viewed as future chemotherapeutic drugs, with the advantage of low propensity to resistance, which started this paradigm in the pharmaceutical market. These peptides have already been described as molecules presenting killing mechanisms at the membrane level, but also acting towards intracellular targets, which increases their success comparatively to specific one-target drugs. This review will approach the desirable characteristics of small peptides that demonstrated dual activity against microbial infections and cancer, as well as the peptides engaged in clinical trials.

  14. Comprehensive computational design of ordered peptide macrocycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinzadeh, Parisa; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Mulligan, Vikram K.; Shortridge, Matthew D.; Craven, Timothy W.; Pardo-Avila, Fatima; Rettie, Stephan A.; Kim, David E.; Silva, Daniel A.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Varani, Gabriele; Baker, David

    2017-12-14

    Mixed chirality peptide macrocycles such as cyclosporine are among the most potent therapeutics identified to-date, but there is currently no way to systematically search through the structural space spanned by such compounds for new drug candidates. Natural proteins do not provide a useful guide: peptide macrocycles lack regular secondary structures and hydrophobic cores and have different backbone torsional constraints. Hence the development of new peptide macrocycles has been approached by modifying natural products or using library selection methods; the former is limited by the small number of known structures, and the latter by the limited size and diversity accessible through library-based methods. To overcome these limitations, here we enumerate the stable structures that can be adopted by macrocyclic peptides composed of L and D amino acids. We identify more than 200 designs predicted to fold into single stable structures, many times more than the number of currently available unbound peptide macrocycle structures. We synthesize and characterize by NMR twelve 7-10 residue macrocycles, 9 of which have structures very close to the design models in solution. NMR structures of three 11-14 residue bicyclic designs are also very close to the computational models. Our results provide a nearly complete coverage of the rich space of structures possible for short peptide based macrocycles unparalleled for other molecular systems, and vastly increase the available starting scaffolds for both rational drug design and library selection methods.

  15. Human C-peptide. Pt. 1. Radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beischer, W; Keller, L; Maas, M; Schiefer, E; Pfeiffer, E F [Ulm Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Innere Medizin, Endokrinologie und Stoffwechsel

    1976-08-01

    Synthetic human C-peptide bearing a tyrosine group at its amino end is labelled with /sup 125/iodine using chloramin T or hydrogen peroxide and lactoperoxidase. The results of the two methods are compared. Antiserum to synthetic human C-peptide (without tyrosine), which was partially coupled to rabbit albumin, is raised in guinea pigs and goats. Goats show to be superior to guinea pips concerning antibody production. The so-called 'hook effect' phenomenon is observed when setting up the standard curves for the radioimmunoassay. Monotonically decreasing standard curves are obtained on dilution of antiserum with a high antibody titer which was produced by repeated immunization in goats. Free C-peptide and C-peptide bound to antiserum are separated using the anion exchange resin amberlite. Using this separation technique we excluded unspecific binding of labelled C-peptide to protein fractions in serum of diabetics. The sensitivity of our radioimmunoassay is approx. 0.3 ng C-peptide/ml serum. Intra- and interassay variability are below 10%. Human proinsulin is the only substance found to crossreact with the antiserum.

  16. A cocoa peptide protects Caenorhabditis elegans from oxidative stress and β-amyloid peptide toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Martorell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cocoa and cocoa-based products contain different compounds with beneficial properties for human health. Polyphenols are the most frequently studied, and display antioxidant properties. Moreover, protein content is a very interesting source of antioxidant bioactive peptides, which can be used therapeutically for the prevention of age-related diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A bioactive peptide, 13L (DNYDNSAGKWWVT, was obtained from a hydrolyzed cocoa by-product by chromatography. The in vitro inhibition of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP was used as screening method to select the suitable fraction for peptide identification. Functional analysis of 13L peptide was achieved using the transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strain CL4176 expressing the human Aβ₁₋₄₂ peptide as a pre-clinical in vivo model for Alzheimer's disease. Among the peptides isolated, peptide 13L (1 µg/mL showed the highest antioxidant activity (P≤0.001 in the wild-type strain (N2. Furthermore, 13L produced a significant delay in body paralysis in strain CL4176, especially in the 24-47 h period after Aβ₁₋₄₂ peptide induction (P≤0.0001. This observation is in accordance with the reduction of Aβ deposits in CL4176 by western blot. Finally, transcriptomic analysis in wild-type nematodes treated with 13L revealed modulation of the proteosomal and synaptic functions as the main metabolic targets of the peptide. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that the cocoa 13L peptide has antioxidant activity and may reduce Aβ deposition in a C. elegans model of Alzheimer's disease; and therefore has a putative therapeutic potential for prevention of age-related diseases. Further studies in murine models and humans will be essential to analyze the effectiveness of the 13L peptide in higher animals.

  17. Virtual screening using combinatorial cyclic peptide libraries reveals protein interfaces readily targetable by cyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Fergal J; O'Donovan, Darragh; Devocelle, Marc; Moran, Niamh; O'Connell, David J; Shields, Denis C

    2015-03-23

    Protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions are responsible for the vast majority of biological functions in vivo, but targeting these interactions with small molecules has historically been difficult. What is required are efficient combined computational and experimental screening methods to choose among a number of potential protein interfaces worthy of targeting lead macrocyclic compounds for further investigation. To achieve this, we have generated combinatorial 3D virtual libraries of short disulfide-bonded peptides and compared them to pharmacophore models of important protein-protein and protein-peptide structures, including short linear motifs (SLiMs), protein-binding peptides, and turn structures at protein-protein interfaces, built from 3D models available in the Protein Data Bank. We prepared a total of 372 reference pharmacophores, which were matched against 108,659 multiconformer cyclic peptides. After normalization to exclude nonspecific cyclic peptides, the top hits notably are enriched for mimetics of turn structures, including a turn at the interaction surface of human α thrombin, and also feature several protein-binding peptides. The top cyclic peptide hits also cover the critical "hot spot" interaction sites predicted from the interaction crystal structure. We have validated our method by testing cyclic peptides predicted to inhibit thrombin, a key protein in the blood coagulation pathway of important therapeutic interest, identifying a cyclic peptide inhibitor with lead-like activity. We conclude that protein interfaces most readily targetable by cyclic peptides and related macrocyclic drugs may be identified computationally among a set of candidate interfaces, accelerating the choice of interfaces against which lead compounds may be screened.

  18. Protein interaction networks by proteome peptide scanning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Landgraf

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A substantial proportion of protein interactions relies on small domains binding to short peptides in the partner proteins. Many of these interactions are relatively low affinity and transient, and they impact on signal transduction. However, neither the number of potential interactions mediated by each domain nor the degree of promiscuity at a whole proteome level has been investigated. We have used a combination of phage display and SPOT synthesis to discover all the peptides in the yeast proteome that have the potential to bind to eight SH3 domains. We first identified the peptides that match a relaxed consensus, as deduced from peptides selected by phage display experiments. Next, we synthesized all the matching peptides at high density on a cellulose membrane, and we probed them directly with the SH3 domains. The domains that we have studied were grouped by this approach into five classes with partially overlapping specificity. Within the classes, however, the domains display a high promiscuity and bind to a large number of common targets with comparable affinity. We estimate that the yeast proteome contains as few as six peptides that bind to the Abp1 SH3 domain with a dissociation constant lower than 100 microM, while it contains as many as 50-80 peptides with corresponding affinity for the SH3 domain of Yfr024c. All the targets of the Abp1 SH3 domain, identified by this approach, bind to the native protein in vivo, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Finally, we demonstrate that this strategy can be extended to the analysis of the entire human proteome. We have developed an approach, named WISE (whole interactome scanning experiment, that permits rapid and reliable identification of the partners of any peptide recognition module by peptide scanning of a proteome. Since the SPOT synthesis approach is semiquantitative and provides an approximation of the dissociation constants of the several thousands of interactions that are

  19. Interaction of antimicrobial peptides with lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanulova, Maria

    2008-12-15

    This study aims to investigate the difference in the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with two classes of zwitterionic peptides, phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) and phosphatidylcholines (PC). Further experiments were performed on model membranes prepared from specific bacterial lipids, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) isolated from Salmonella minnesota. The structure of the lipid-peptide aqueous dispersions was studied by small-and wide-angle X-ray diffraction during heating and cooling from 5 to 85 C. The lipids and peptides were mixed at lipid-to-peptide ratios 10-10000 (POPE and POPC) or 2-50 (LPS). All experiments were performed at synchrotron soft condensed matter beamline A2 in Hasylab at Desy in Hamburg, Germany. The phases were identified and the lattice parameters were calculated. Alamethicin and melittin interact in similar ways with the lipids. Pure POPC forms only lamellar phases. POPE forms lamellar phases at low temperatures that upon heating transform into a highly curved inverse hexagonal phase. Insertion of the peptide induced inverse bicontinuous cubic phases which are an ideal compromise between the curvature stress and the packing frustration. Melittin usually induced a mixture of two cubic phases, Im3m and Pn3m, with a ratio of lattice parameters close to 1.279, related to the underlying minimal surfaces. They formed during the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition and persisted during cooling till the onset of the gel phase. The phases formed at different lipid-to-peptide ratios had very similar lattice parameters. Epitaxial relationships existed between coexisting cubic phases and hexagonal or lamellar phases due to confinement of all phases to an onion vesicle, a vesicle with several layers consisting of different lipid phases. Alamethicin induced the same cubic phases, although their formation and lattice parameters were dependent on the peptide concentration. The cubic phases formed during heating from the lamellar phase and their onset

  20. Interaction of antimicrobial peptides with lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanulova, Maria

    2008-12-01

    This study aims to investigate the difference in the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with two classes of zwitterionic peptides, phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) and phosphatidylcholines (PC). Further experiments were performed on model membranes prepared from specific bacterial lipids, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) isolated from Salmonella minnesota. The structure of the lipid-peptide aqueous dispersions was studied by small-and wide-angle X-ray diffraction during heating and cooling from 5 to 85 C. The lipids and peptides were mixed at lipid-to-peptide ratios 10-10000 (POPE and POPC) or 2-50 (LPS). All experiments were performed at synchrotron soft condensed matter beamline A2 in Hasylab at Desy in Hamburg, Germany. The phases were identified and the lattice parameters were calculated. Alamethicin and melittin interact in similar ways with the lipids. Pure POPC forms only lamellar phases. POPE forms lamellar phases at low temperatures that upon heating transform into a highly curved inverse hexagonal phase. Insertion of the peptide induced inverse bicontinuous cubic phases which are an ideal compromise between the curvature stress and the packing frustration. Melittin usually induced a mixture of two cubic phases, Im3m and Pn3m, with a ratio of lattice parameters close to 1.279, related to the underlying minimal surfaces. They formed during the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition and persisted during cooling till the onset of the gel phase. The phases formed at different lipid-to-peptide ratios had very similar lattice parameters. Epitaxial relationships existed between coexisting cubic phases and hexagonal or lamellar phases due to confinement of all phases to an onion vesicle, a vesicle with several layers consisting of different lipid phases. Alamethicin induced the same cubic phases, although their formation and lattice parameters were dependent on the peptide concentration. The cubic phases formed during heating from the lamellar phase and their onset

  1. Antimicrobial activity and self-assembly behavior of antimicrobial peptide chensinin-1b with lipophilic alkyl tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Weibing; Liu, Ziang; Sun, Liying; Wang, Cui; Guan, Yue; Mao, Xiaoman; Shang, Dejing

    2018-04-25

    The threshold hydrophobicity and amphipathic structure of the peptidic chain are important for the biological function of antimicrobial peptides. Chensinin-1b exhibits broad-spectrum bactericidal activity with no hemolytic activity but has almost no anticancer ability against the selected cancer cell lines. In this study, the conjugation of aliphatic acid was designed with different lengths of N-terminal of chensinin-1b, the antimicrobial activity of the resulting lipo-chensinin-1b was examined, in which OA-C1b showed much stronger activity than those of cheninin-1b and the other two lipopeptides. The membrane interaction between the lipo-chensinin-1b and real/mimetic bacterial cell membrane was investigated. Electrostatic interactions between the lipo-chensinin-1b and lipopolysaccharides were detected by isothermal titration calorimetry and the binding affinities were 10.83 μM, 8.77 μM and 7.35 μM for OA-C1b, LA-C1b and PA-C1b, respectively. The antimicrobial activity and membrane interaction ability of the lipo-chensinin-1b followed this order: OA-C1b > chensinin-1b > LA-C1b > PA-C1b. In addition, the lipo-chensinin-1b also exhibited lytic activity against various cancer cells and demonstrated the ability to inhibit LPS-stimulated cytokine release from human U937 cells. The CD spectra indicated that the helical or β-strands contents were existed as the main components in TFE or LPS solution, respectively. The self-assembly behavior was trigged by the solution pH and affected by the length of carbon chain, in which chensinin-1b, OA-C1b, LA-C1b and PA-C1b formed micelles at neutral pH and the micelle size increased for chensinin-1b, OA-C1b and LA-C1b. PA-C1b formed nanofibers in an acidic environment indicated by TEM experiments, and the peptides formed aggregates in an acidic environment and re-dissociated when the pH was adjusted to neutral. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Growth hormone-releasing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghigo, E; Arvat, E; Muccioli, G; Camanni, F

    1997-05-01

    Growth hormone-releasing peptides (GHRPs) are synthetic, non-natural peptides endowed with potent stimulatory effects on somatotrope secretion in animals and humans. They have no structural homology with GHRH and act via specific receptors present either at the pituitary or the hypothalamic level both in animals and in humans. The GHRP receptor has recently been cloned and, interestingly, it does not show sequence homology with other G-protein-coupled receptors known so far. This evidence strongly suggests the existence of a natural GHRP-like ligand which, however, has not yet been found. The mechanisms underlying the GHRP effect are still unclear. At present, several data favor the hypothesis that GHRPs could act by counteracting somatostatinergic activity both at the pituitary and the hypothalamic level and/or, at least partially, via a GHRH-mediated mechanism. However, the possibility that GHRPs act via an unknown hypothalamic factor (U factor) is still open. GHRP-6 was the first hexapeptide to be extensively studied in humans. More recently, a heptapeptide, GHRP-1, and two other hexapeptides, GHRP-2 and Hexarelin, have been synthesized and are now available for human studies. Moreover, non-peptidyl GHRP mimetics have been developed which act via GHRP receptors and their effects have been clearly demonstrated in animals and in humans in vivo. Among non-peptidyl GHRPs, MK-0677 seems the most interesting molecule. The GH-releasing activity of GHRPs is marked and dose-related after intravenous, subcutaneous, intranasal and even oral administration. The effect of GHRPs is reproducible and undergoes partial desensitization, more during continuous infusion, less during intermittent administration: in fact, prolonged administration of GHRPs increases IGF-1 levels both in animals and in humans. The GH-releasing effect of GHRPs does not depend on sex but undergoes age-related variations. It increases from birth to puberty, persists at a similar level in adulthood and

  3. Peptide-membrane interactions of arginine-tryptophan peptides probed using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A

    2014-04-18

    Membrane-active peptides include peptides that can cross cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo as well as peptides that inhibit bacterial growth. Some of these peptides can act as both transporters and antibacterial agents. It is desirable to combine the knowledge from these two different fields of membrane-active peptides into design of new peptides with tailored actions, as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances, targeting specific membranes. We have previously shown that the position of the amino acid tryptophan in the peptide sequence of three arginine-tryptophan peptides affects their uptake and intracellular localization in live mammalian cells, as well as their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. Here, we use quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring to assess the induced changes caused by binding of the three peptides to supported model membranes composed of POPC, POPC/POPG, POPC/POPG/cholesterol or POPC/lactosyl PE. Our results indicate that the tryptophan position in the peptide sequence affects the way these peptides interact with the different model membranes and that the presence of cholesterol in particular seems to affect the membrane interaction of the peptide with an even distribution of tryptophans in the peptide sequence. These results give mechanistic insight into the function of these peptides and may aid in the design of membrane-active peptides with specified cellular targets and actions.

  4. Peptide-membrane interactions of arginine-tryptophan peptides probed using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A; Kunze, Angelika; Carlsson, Nils; Altgä rde, Noomi; Svedhem, Sofia; Nordé n, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-active peptides include peptides that can cross cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo as well as peptides that inhibit bacterial growth. Some of these peptides can act as both transporters and antibacterial agents. It is desirable to combine the knowledge from these two different fields of membrane-active peptides into design of new peptides with tailored actions, as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances, targeting specific membranes. We have previously shown that the position of the amino acid tryptophan in the peptide sequence of three arginine-tryptophan peptides affects their uptake and intracellular localization in live mammalian cells, as well as their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. Here, we use quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring to assess the induced changes caused by binding of the three peptides to supported model membranes composed of POPC, POPC/POPG, POPC/POPG/cholesterol or POPC/lactosyl PE. Our results indicate that the tryptophan position in the peptide sequence affects the way these peptides interact with the different model membranes and that the presence of cholesterol in particular seems to affect the membrane interaction of the peptide with an even distribution of tryptophans in the peptide sequence. These results give mechanistic insight into the function of these peptides and may aid in the design of membrane-active peptides with specified cellular targets and actions.

  5. Urodilatin. A renal natriuretic peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carstens, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Development and validation of a radioimmunoassay for endogenous URO in urine and synthetic URO in plasma is described. The first obstacle to overcome was to produce an antibody specific for URO. A polyclonal URO antibody with a cross-reactivity with the structural highly homologous atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was developed by immunization of rabbits with the whole URO(95-126). Purification of the polyclonal URO antiserum with CNBr-activated Sepharose affinity chromatography was a simple way of producing a URO-specific antibody without cross-reactivity with ANP analogues. A reliable 125 I-labelled URO tracer was made with the Iodo-Gen method. Prior to the assay, the urine samples were prepared by ethanol with a recovery of unlabelled URO between 80 - 100% and the plasma samples were Sep-Pak C 18 extracted with a recovery of about 50%. The radioimmunoassay is performed in 3 days, using polyethylene glycol for separation. The sensitivity of the assay was improved by sample preparation and concentration, reducing the amount of tracer and late addition, reducing the amount of antibody and increasing the incubation time and lowering the temperature of incubation. The infusion rate of 20 ng URO kg -1 min -1 was most potential and well tolerated in healthy subjects. The short-term natriuretic and diuretic effects were closely associated with a significant diminished sodium reabsorption in the distal nephron. Further studies are needed to exploit the therapeutical potential of URO, for example in patients with sodium-water retaining disorders. The therapeutical dose range will probably be narrow due to the blood pressure lowering effect of URO with infusion rates higher than 20-30 ng kg -1 min -1 . (EHS)

  6. Human antimicrobial peptides and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ge; Weinberg, Aaron

    2018-05-30

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have long been a topic of interest for entomologists, biologists, immunologists and clinicians because of these agents' intriguing origins in insects, their ubiquitous expression in many life forms, their capacity to kill a wide range of bacteria, fungi and viruses, their role in innate immunity as microbicidal and immunoregulatory agents that orchestrate cross-talk with the adaptive immune system, and, most recently, their association with cancer. We and others have theorized that surveillance through epithelial cell-derived AMPs functions to keep the natural flora of microorganisms in a steady state in different niches such as the skin, the intestines, and the mouth. More recently, findings related to specific activation pathways of some of these AMPs have led investigators to associate them with pro-tumoral activity; i.e., contributing to a tumorigenic microenvironment. This area is still in its infancy as there are intriguing yet contradictory findings demonstrating that while some AMPs have anti-tumoral activity and are under-expressed in solid tumors, others are overexpressed and pro-tumorigenic. This review will introduce a new paradigm in cancer biology as it relates to AMP activity in neoplasia to address the following questions: Is there evidence that AMPs contribute to tumor promoting microenvironments? Can an anti-AMP strategy be of use in cancer therapy? Do AMPs, expressed in and released from tumors, contribute to compositional shifting of bacteria in cancerous lesions? Can specific AMP expression characteristics be used one day as early warning signs for solid tumors? Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptides in Intracellular Delivery of Peptide Nucleic Acids Targeting Hepadnaviral Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ndeboko, Benedicte; Ramamurthy, Narayan; Lemamy, Guy Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are potentially attractive antisense agents against hepatitis B virus (HBV), although poor cellular uptake limits their therapeutic application. In the duck HBV (DHBV) model, we evaluated different cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) for delivery to hepatocytes of a PNA...

  8. THE USE OF DEDICATED PEPTIDE LIBRARIES PERMITS THE DISCOVERY OF HIGH-AFFINITY BINDING PEPTIDES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEKOSTER, HS; AMONS, R; BENCKHUIJSEN, WE; FEIJLBRIEF, M; SCHELLEKENS, GA; DRIJFHOUT, JW

    1995-01-01

    The motif for peptide binding to monoclonal antibody mAb A16, which is known to be directed against glycoprotein D of Herpes simplex virus type 1, was determined using two dedicated peptide libraries. As a starting point for this study we used an A-16 binding lead sequence, which had previously been

  9. Toward Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) Directed Peptide Translation Using Ester Based Aminoacyl Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singhal, Abhishek; Bagnacani, Valentina; Corradini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Peptide synthesis is a fundamental feature of life. However, it still remains unclear how the contemporary translation apparatus evolved from primitive prebiotic systems and at which stage of the evolution peptide synthesis emerged. Using simple molecular architectures, in which aminoacyl transfe...

  10. Peptide-MHC class I stability is a stronger predictor of CTL immunogenicity than peptide affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel Nors; Rasmussen, Michael; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-MHC class I stability is a stronger predictor of CTL immunogenicity than peptide affinity Mikkel Harndahla, Michael Rasmussena, Morten Nielsenb, Soren Buusa,∗ a Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark b Center for Biological Seq...... al., 2007. J. Immunol. 178, 7890–7901. doi:10.1016/j.molimm.2012.02.025...

  11. New dendrimer - peptide host - guest complexes : towards dendrimers as peptide carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boas, U.; Sontjens, S.H.M.; Jensen, K.J.; Christensen, J.B.; Meijer, E.W.

    2002-01-01

    Adamantyl urea and adamantyl thiourea modified poly(propylene imine) dendrimers act as hosts for N-terminal tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc)-protected peptides and form chloroform-soluble complexes. investigations with NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide is bound to the dendrimer by ionic interactions

  12. The non-peptidic part determines the internalization mechanism and intracellular trafficking of peptide amphiphiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Missirlis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peptide amphiphiles (PAs are a class of amphiphilic molecules able to self-assemble into nanomaterials that have shown efficient in vivo targeted delivery. Understanding the interactions of PAs with cells and the mechanisms of their internalization and intracellular trafficking is critical in their further development for therapeutic delivery applications. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PAs of a novel, cell- and tissue-penetrating peptide were synthesized possessing two different lipophilic tail architectures and their interactions with prostate cancer cells were studied in vitro. Cell uptake of peptides was greatly enhanced post-modification. Internalization occurred via lipid-raft mediated endocytosis and was common for the two analogs studied. On the contrary, we identified the non-peptidic part as the determining factor of differences between intracellular trafficking and retention of PAs. PAs composed of di-stearyl lipid tails linked through poly(ethylene glycol to the peptide exhibited higher exocytosis rates and employed different recycling pathways compared to ones consisting of di-palmitic-coupled peptides. As a result, cell association of the former PAs decreased with time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Control over peptide intracellular localization and retention is possible by appropriate modification with synthetic hydrophobic tails. We propose this as a strategy to design improved peptide-based delivery systems.

  13. Escherichia coli Peptide Binding Protein OppA Has a Preference for Positively Charged Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klepsch, M. M.; Kovermann, M.; Löw, C.; Balbach, J.; Permentier, H. P.; Fusetti, F.; de Gier, J. W.; Gier, Jan-Willem de; Slotboom, D. J.; Berntsson, R. P. -A.

    2011-01-01

    The Escherichia coli peptide binding protein OppA is an essential component of the oligopeptide transporter Opp. Based on studies on its orthologue from Salmonella typhimurium, it has been proposed that OppA binds peptides between two and five amino acids long, with no apparent sequence selectivity.

  14. A microbially derived tyrosine-sulfated peptide mimics a plant peptide hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Rory N; Joe, Anna; Zhang, Weiguo; Feng, Wei; Stewart, Valley; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Dinneny, José R; Ronald, Pamela C

    2017-07-01

    The biotrophic pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) produces a sulfated peptide named RaxX, which shares similarity to peptides in the PSY (plant peptide containing sulfated tyrosine) family. We hypothesize that RaxX mimics the growth-stimulating activity of PSY peptides. Root length was measured in Arabidopsis and rice treated with synthetic RaxX peptides. We also used comparative genomic analyses and reactive oxygen species burst assays to evaluate the activity of RaxX and PSY peptides. Here we found that a synthetic sulfated RaxX derivative comprising 13 residues (RaxX13-sY), highly conserved between RaxX and PSY, induces root growth in Arabidopsis and rice in a manner similar to that triggered by PSY. We identified residues that are required for activation of immunity mediated by the rice XA21 receptor but that are not essential for root growth induced by PSY. Finally, we showed that a Xanthomonas strain lacking raxX is impaired in virulence. These findings suggest that RaxX serves as a molecular mimic of PSY peptides to facilitate Xoo infection and that XA21 has evolved the ability to recognize and respond specifically to the microbial form of the peptide. © 2017 UT-Battelle LLC. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Peptide and Peptide-Dependent Motions in MHC Proteins: Immunological Implications and Biophysical Underpinnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory M. Ayres

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Structural biology of peptides presented by class I and class II MHC proteins has transformed immunology, impacting our understanding of fundamental immune mechanisms and allowing researchers to rationalize immunogenicity and design novel vaccines. However, proteins are not static structures as often inferred from crystallographic structures. Their components move and breathe individually and collectively over a range of timescales. Peptides bound within MHC peptide-binding grooves are no exception and their motions have been shown to impact recognition by T cell and other receptors in ways that influence function. Furthermore, peptides tune the motions of MHC proteins themselves, which impacts recognition of peptide/MHC complexes by other proteins. Here, we review the motional properties of peptides in MHC binding grooves and discuss how peptide properties can influence MHC motions. We briefly review theoretical concepts about protein motion and highlight key data that illustrate immunological consequences. We focus primarily on class I systems due to greater availability of data, but segue into class II systems as the concepts and consequences overlap. We suggest that characterization of the dynamic “energy landscapes” of peptide/MHC complexes and the resulting functional consequences is one of the next frontiers in structural immunology.

  16. Primary structure and conformational analysis of peptide methionine-tyrosine, a peptide related to neuropeptide Y and peptide YY isolated from lamprey intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conlon, J M; Bjørnholm, B; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    1991-01-01

    A peptide belonging to the pancreatic-polypeptide-fold family of regulatory peptides has been isolated from the intestine of an Agnathan, the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). The primary structure of the peptide (termed peptide methionine-tyrosine) was established as Met-Pro-Pro-Lys-Pro-Asp-Asn-...... in a preferred structure in which the conformation of the beta-turn between the two helical domains (residues 9-14) is appreciably different....

  17. Application of synthetic peptides for detection of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Holm, Bettina Eide; Slot, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs) are a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and represent an important tool for the serological diagnosis of RA. In this study, we describe ACPA reactivity to overlapping citrullinated Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1)-derived peptides...... (n=40), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=20), Sjögren's syndrome (n=40)) were screened for antibody reactivity. Antibodies to a panel of five citrullinated EBNA-1 peptides were found in 67% of RA sera, exclusively of the IgG isotype, while 53% of the patient sera reacted with a single peptide......, ARGGSRERARGRGRG-Cit-GEKR, accounting for more than half of the ACPA reactivity alone. Moreover, these antibodies were detected in 10% of CCP2-negative RA sera. In addition, 47% of the RA sera reacted with two or three citrullinated EBNA-1 peptides from the selected peptide panel. Furthermore, a negative...

  18. Acetone-Linked Peptides: A Convergent Approach for Peptide Macrocyclization and Labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assem, Naila; Ferreira, David J; Wolan, Dennis W; Dawson, Philip E

    2015-07-20

    Macrocyclization is a broadly applied approach for overcoming the intrinsically disordered nature of linear peptides. Herein, it is shown that dichloroacetone (DCA) enhances helical secondary structures when introduced between peptide nucleophiles, such as thiols, to yield an acetone-linked bridge (ACE). Aside from stabilizing helical structures, the ketone moiety embedded in the linker can be modified with diverse molecular tags by oxime ligation. Insights into the structure of the tether were obtained through co-crystallization of a constrained S-peptide in complex with RNAse S. The scope of the acetone-linked peptides was further explored through the generation of N-terminus to side chain macrocycles and a new approach for generating fused macrocycles (bicycles). Together, these studies suggest that acetone linking is generally applicable to peptide macrocycles with a specific utility in the synthesis of stabilized helices that incorporate functional tags. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Chimeric opioid peptides: Tools for identifying opioid receptor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, G.; Miyajima, A.; Yokota, T.; Arai, K.; Goldstein, A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors synthesized several chimeric [125J-labelled] peptides in which the N-terminal nine residues of dynorphin-32, a peptide selective for the κ opioid receptor, were replaced by opioid peptides selective for other opioid receptor types. Each chimeric peptide retained the high affinity and type selectivity characteristic of its N-terminal sequence. The common C-terminal two-thirds of the chimeric peptides served as an epitope recognized by the same monoclonal antibody. When bound to receptors on a cell surface or membrane preparation, these peptides could still bind specifically to the monoclonal antibody. These chimeric peptides should be useful for isolating μ, δ, and κ opioid receptors and for identifying opioid receptors on transfected cells in expression cloning procedures. The general approach using chimeric peptides should be applicable to other peptide receptors

  20. Urinary Peptide Levels in Patients with Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mungli Prakash

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peptide levels in urine are found to be decreased in renal failure. In the current study urinary peptide levels were determined in chronic renal failure (CRF patients. Method: 86 CRF patients and 80 healthy controls were selected for the study. Urinary proteins and peptide levels were determined by spectrophotometer based Lowry and Bradford methods. Urinary creatinine levels were determined by clinical chemistry analyzer. Results: There was significant decrease in urinary peptide levels in CRF patients and Urinary % peptides were significantly decreased in CRF patients as compared to healthy controls. Urinary % peptides correlated negatively with proteinuria. Conclusion: we have found decrease in urinary peptides and % urinary peptides in CRF patients and possibly measurement of % urinary peptides may possibly serve as better indicator in early detection of impairment in renal function.

  1. Evaluation of MAP-specific peptides following vaccination of goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lybeck, Kari; Sjurseth, Siri K.; Melvang, Heidi Mikkelsen

    species or 2) selected based on “experience”. Peptides predicted to bind bovine MHC II by in silico analysis were included in further studies, resulting in two panels 1) genome-based and 2) selected. Initially, two groups of 15 healthy goats were vaccinated with one of the two panels (50 µg/peptide in CAF......01 adjuvant/CAF04 for boosting). Four MAP-infected goats were also vaccinated. In a second vaccination trail, groups of 8 healthy goat kids were vaccinated with genome-based peptides, selected peptides or selected peptides linked together in a recombinant protein (20 µg/peptide or 50 µg protein...... peptides. IFN-γ responses in healthy goats after the first vaccination were low, but testing of T cell lines from MAP-infected goats identified peptides inducing strong proliferative responses. Peptides for a second vaccination were selected by combining results from this study with a parallel cattle study...

  2. Peptide pool immunization and CD8+ T cell reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne B; Harndahl, Mikkel N; Buus, Anette Stryhn

    2013-01-01

    Mice were immunized twice with a pool of five peptides selected among twenty 8-9-mer peptides for their ability to form stable complexes at 37°C with recombinant H-2K(b) (half-lives 10-15h). Vaccine-induced immunity of splenic CD8(+) T cells was studied in a 24h IFNγ Elispot assay. Surprisingly...... peptides induced normal peptide immunity i.e. the specific T cell reactivity in the Elispot culture was strictly dependent on exposure to the immunizing peptide ex vivo. However, immunization with two of the peptides, a VSV- and a Mycobacterium-derived peptide, resulted in IFNγ spot formation without...... peptide in the Elispot culture. Immunization with a mixture of the VSV-peptide and a "normal" peptide also resulted in IFNγ spot formation without addition of peptide to the assay culture. Peptide-tetramer staining of CD8(+) T cells from mice immunized with a mixture of VSV-peptide and "normal" peptide...

  3. Mycobacteria attenuate nociceptive responses by formyl peptide receptor triggered opioid peptide release from neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike L Rittner

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In inflammation, pain is regulated by a balance of pro- and analgesic mediators. Analgesic mediators include opioid peptides which are secreted by neutrophils at the site of inflammation, leading to activation of opioid receptors on peripheral sensory neurons. In humans, local opioids and opioid peptides significantly downregulate postoperative as well as arthritic pain. In rats, inflammatory pain is induced by intraplantar injection of heat inactivated Mycobacterium butyricum, a component of complete Freund's adjuvant. We hypothesized that mycobacterially derived formyl peptide receptor (FPR and/or toll like receptor (TLR agonists could activate neutrophils, leading to opioid peptide release and inhibition of inflammatory pain. In complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation, thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds of the paw were quantified (Hargreaves and Randall-Selitto methods, respectively. Withdrawal time to heat was decreased following systemic neutrophil depletion as well as local injection of opioid receptor antagonists or anti-opioid peptide (i.e. Met-enkephalin, beta-endorphin antibodies indicating an increase in pain. In vitro, opioid peptide release from human and rat neutrophils was measured by radioimmunoassay. Met-enkephalin release was triggered by Mycobacterium butyricum and formyl peptides but not by TLR-2 or TLR-4 agonists. Mycobacterium butyricum induced a rise in intracellular calcium as determined by FURA loading and calcium imaging. Opioid peptide release was blocked by intracellular calcium chelation as well as phosphoinositol-3-kinase inhibition. The FPR antagonists Boc-FLFLF and cyclosporine H reduced opioid peptide release in vitro and increased inflammatory pain in vivo while TLR 2/4 did not appear to be involved. In summary, mycobacteria activate FPR on neutrophils, resulting in tonic secretion of opioid peptides from neutrophils and in a decrease in inflammatory pain. Future therapeutic strategies may aim

  4. Peptide inhibition of human cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Cindy A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is the most prevalent congenital viral infection in the United States and Europe causing significant morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. HCMV is also an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV- infected patients with AIDS, and solid organ and allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. Current treatments for HCMV-associated diseases are insufficient due to the emergence of drug-induced resistance and cytotoxicity, necessitating novel approaches to limit HCMV infection. The aim of this study was to develop therapeutic peptides targeting glycoprotein B (gB, a major glycoprotein of HCMV that is highly conserved across the Herpesviridae family, that specifically inhibit fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane preventing HCMV entry and infection. Results Using the Wimley-White Interfacial Hydrophobicity Scale (WWIHS, several regions within gB were identified that display a high potential to interact with lipid bilayers of cell membranes and hydrophobic surfaces within proteins. The ability of synthetic peptides analogous to WWIHS-positive sequences of HCMV gB to inhibit viral infectivity was evaluated. Human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF were infected with the Towne-GFP strain of HCMV (0.5 MOI, preincubated with peptides at a range of concentrations (78 nm to 100 μM, and GFP-positive cells were visualized 48 hours post-infection by fluorescence microscopy and analyzed quantitatively by flow cytometry. Peptides that inhibited HCMV infection demonstrated different inhibitory concentration curves indicating that each peptide possesses distinct biophysical properties. Peptide 174-200 showed 80% inhibition of viral infection at a concentration of 100 μM, and 51% and 62% inhibition at concentrations of 5 μM and 2.5 μM, respectively. Peptide 233-263 inhibited infection by 97% and 92% at concentrations of 100

  5. Comprehensive computational design of ordered peptide macrocycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Parisa; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Mulligan, Vikram Khipple; Shortridge, Matthew D.; Craven, Timothy W.; Pardo-Avila, Fátima; Rettie, Stephen A.; Kim, David E.; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Varani, Gabriele; Baker, David

    2018-01-01

    Mixed-chirality peptide macrocycles such as cyclosporine are among the most potent therapeutics identified to date, but there is currently no way to systematically search the structural space spanned by such compounds. Natural proteins do not provide a useful guide: Peptide macrocycles lack regular secondary structures and hydrophobic cores, and can contain local structures not accessible with L-amino acids. Here, we enumerate the stable structures that can be adopted by macrocyclic peptides composed of L- and D-amino acids by near-exhaustive backbone sampling followed by sequence design and energy landscape calculations. We identify more than 200 designs predicted to fold into single stable structures, many times more than the number of currently available unbound peptide macrocycle structures. Nuclear magnetic resonance structures of 9 of 12 designed 7- to 10-residue macrocycles, and three 11- to 14-residue bicyclic designs, are close to the computational models. Our results provide a nearly complete coverage of the rich space of structures possible for short peptide macrocycles and vastly increase the available starting scaffolds for both rational drug design and library selection methods. PMID:29242347

  6. Folding very short peptides using molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosco K Ho

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Peptides often have conformational preferences. We simulated 133 peptide 8-mer fragments from six different proteins, sampled by replica-exchange molecular dynamics using Amber7 with a GB/SA (generalized-Born/solvent-accessible electrostatic approximation to water implicit solvent. We found that 85 of the peptides have no preferred structure, while 48 of them converge to a preferred structure. In 85% of the converged cases (41 peptides, the structures found by the simulations bear some resemblance to their native structures, based on a coarse-grained backbone description. In particular, all seven of the beta hairpins in the native structures contain a fragment in the turn that is highly structured. In the eight cases where the bioinformatics-based I-sites library picks out native-like structures, the present simulations are largely in agreement. Such physics-based modeling may be useful for identifying early nuclei in folding kinetics and for assisting in protein-structure prediction methods that utilize the assembly of peptide fragments.

  7. New peptides players in metabolic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Mierzwicka

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Among new peptides responsible for the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders and carbohydrate metabolism, adipokines are of great importance. Adipokines are substances of hormonal character, secreted by adipose tissue. Apart from the well-known adipokines, adropin and preptin are relatively newly discovered, hence their function is not fully understood. They are peptides not secreted by adipose tissue but their role in the metabolic regulations seems to be significant. Preptin is a 34-amino acid peptide, a derivative of proinsulin growth factor II (pro-IGF-II, secreted by pancreatic β cells, considered to be a physiological enhancer of insulin secretion. Additionally, preptin has a stimulating effect on osteoblasts, inducing their proliferation, differentiation and survival. Adropin is a 76-amino acid peptide, encoded by the energy homeostasis associated gene (Enho, mainly in liver and brain, and its expression is dependent on a diet. Adropin is believed to play an important role in metabolic homeostasis, fatty acids metabolism control, insulin resistance prevention, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. The results of studies conducted so far show that the diseases resulting from metabolic syndrome, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, or cardiovascular disease are accompanied by significant changes in the concentration of these peptides. It is also important to note that preptin has an anabolic effect on bone tissue, which might be preventive in osteoporosis.

  8. Encoded libraries of chemically modified peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinis, Christian; Winter, Greg

    2015-06-01

    The use of powerful technologies for generating and screening DNA-encoded protein libraries has helped drive the development of proteins as pharmaceutical ligands. However the development of peptides as pharmaceutical ligands has been more limited. Although encoded peptide libraries are typically several orders of magnitude larger than classical chemical libraries, can be more readily screened, and can give rise to higher affinity ligands, their use as pharmaceutical ligands is limited by their intrinsic properties. Two of the intrinsic limitations include the rotational flexibility of the peptide backbone and the limited number (20) of natural amino acids. However these limitations can be overcome by use of chemical modification. For example, the libraries can be modified to introduce topological constraints such as cyclization linkers, or to introduce new chemical entities such as small molecule ligands, fluorophores and photo-switchable compounds. This article reviews the chemistry involved, the properties of the peptide ligands, and the new opportunities offered by chemical modification of DNA-encoded peptide libraries. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Dinosaur peptides suggest mechanisms of protein survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Antonio, James D; Schweitzer, Mary H; Jensen, Shane T; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P R O

    2011-01-01

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  10. Guanylin peptides: cyclic GMP signaling mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forte L.R.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Guanylate cyclases (GC serve in two different signaling pathways involving cytosolic and membrane enzymes. Membrane GCs are receptors for guanylin and atriopeptin peptides, two families of cGMP-regulating peptides. Three subclasses of guanylin peptides contain one intramolecular disulfide (lymphoguanylin, two disulfides (guanylin and uroguanylin and three disulfides (E. coli stable toxin, ST. The peptides activate membrane receptor-GCs and regulate intestinal Cl- and HCO3- secretion via cGMP in target enterocytes. Uroguanylin and ST also elicit diuretic and natriuretic responses in the kidney. GC-C is an intestinal receptor-GC for guanylin and uroguanylin, but GC-C may not be involved in renal cGMP pathways. A novel receptor-GC expressed in the opossum kidney (OK-GC has been identified by molecular cloning. OK-GC cDNAs encode receptor-GCs in renal tubules that are activated by guanylins. Lymphoguanylin is highly expressed in the kidney and heart where it may influence cGMP pathways. Guanylin and uroguanylin are highly expressed in intestinal mucosa to regulate intestinal salt and water transport via paracrine actions on GC-C. Uroguanylin and guanylin are also secreted from intestinal mucosa into plasma where uroguanylin serves as an intestinal natriuretic hormone to influence body Na+ homeostasis by endocrine mechanisms. Thus, guanylin peptides control salt and water transport in the kidney and intestine mediated by cGMP via membrane receptors with intrinsic guanylate cyclase activity.

  11. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O. (Harvard-Med); (IIT); (NCSU); (UPENN); (Manchester); (Orthovita)

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  12. Synthetic peptide inhibitors of DNA replication in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Kjelstrup, Susanne

    F counterselection was developed to directly select for compounds able to disrupt selected interactions. We have subsequently constructed a cyclic peptide library for intracellular synthesis of cyclic peptides using known technology. Several cyclic peptides were able to interfere with oligomerization of Dna......N (), DnaB and DnaX (). Three peptides identified as inhibitors of DnaN have been purified. Two of these peptides inhibited growth as well as DNA replication in S. aureus. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the peptides was approximately 50 g/ml. Overexpression of DnaN reduced the inhibitory...

  13. Insulin and C-peptide in human brain neurons (insulin/C-peptide/brain peptides/immunohistochemistry/radioimmunoassay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, A.; Bernstein, H.G.; Rinne, A.; Hahn, H.J.; Ziegler, M.

    1983-01-01

    The regional distribution and cellular localization of insulin and C-peptide immunoreactivities were studied in human cadaver brains using the indirect immunofluorescence method, the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique, and radioimmunoassay. Products of the immune reactions to both polypeptides were observed in most nerve cells in all areas of the brain examined. Immunostaining was mainly restricted to the cell soma and proximal dendrites. Radioimmunoassay revealed that human brain contains insulin and C-peptide in concentrations much higher than the blood, the highest being in the hypothalamus. These findings support the hypothesis that the 'brain insulin' is - at least in part - produced in the CNS. (author)

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides: Multifunctional Drugs for Different Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea-Jessica Albrecht

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (APs are an important part of the innate immune system in epithelial and non-epithelial surfaces. So far, many different antimicrobial peptides from various families have been discovered in non-vertebrates and vertebrates. They are characterized by antibiotic, antifungal and antiviral activities against a variety of microorganisms. In addition to their role as endogenous antimicrobials, APs participate in multiple aspects of immunity. They are involved in septic and non-septic inflammation, wound repair, angiogenesis, regulation of the adaptive immune system and in maintaining homeostasis. Due to those characteristics AP could play an important role in many practical applications. Limited therapeutic efficiency of current antimicrobial agents and the emerging resistance of pathogens require alternate antimicrobial drugs. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent literature on functions and mechanisms of APs. It also shows their current practical applications as peptide therapeutics and bioactive polymers and discusses the possibilities of future clinical developments.

  15. Metal Ion Controlled Polymorphism of a Peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Lars Bo Stegeager; Jancso, Attila; Szunyogh, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    ions on fully or partially unstructured proteins, or the effect of metal ions on protein aggregation. Metal ions may be employed to fold (or misfold) individual peptides in a controlled manner depending on the potential metal ion coordinating amino acid side chains (Cys, His, Asp, Glu......In this work a metal ion binding model dodecapeptide was investigated in terms of its capacity to adopt different structures depending on the metal ion to peptide stoichiometry. The dodecapeptide is much simpler than real proteins, yet displays sufficient complexity to model the effect of metal......, …) in the peptide, and the ligand and structural preferences of the metal ion (in our studies Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Cu+/2+). Simultaneously, new species such as metal ion bridged ternary complexes or even oligomers may be formed. In recent previous studies we have observed similar polymorphism of zinc finger model...

  16. Radiolabelled RGD peptides for imaging and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaertner, F.C.; Schwaiger, M.; Beer, A.J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Kessler, H. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Advanced Study and Center of Integrated Protein Science, Department of Chemistry, Garching (Germany); King Abdulaziz University, Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Wester, H.-J. [Institute for Pharmaceutical Radiochemistry, Garching (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Imaging of angiogenesis has become increasingly important with the rising use of targeted antiangiogenic therapies like bevacizumab (Avastin). Non-invasive assessment of angiogenic activity is in this respect interesting, e.g. for response assessment of such targeted antiangiogenic therapies. One promising approach of angiogenesis imaging is imaging of specific molecular markers of the angiogenic cascade like the integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}. For molecular imaging of integrin expression, the use of radiolabelled peptides is still the only approach that has been successfully translated into the clinic. In this review we will summarize the current data on imaging of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} expression using radiolabelled RGD peptides with a focus on tracers already in clinical use. A perspective will be presented on the future clinical use of radiolabelled RGD peptides including an outlook on potential applications for radionuclide therapy. (orig.)

  17. Peptide Based Radiopharmaceuticals: Specific Construct Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Som, P; Rhodes, B A; Sharma, S S

    1997-10-21

    The objective of this project was to develop receptor based peptides for diagnostic imaging and therapy. A series of peptides related to cell adhesion molecules (CAM) and immune regulation were designed for radiolabeling with 99mTc and evaluated in animal models as potential diagnostic imaging agents for various disease conditions such as thrombus (clot), acute kidney failure, and inflection/inflammation imaging. The peptides for this project were designed by the industrial partner, Palatin Technologies, (formerly Rhomed, Inc.) using various peptide design approaches including a newly developed rational computer assisted drug design (CADD) approach termed MIDAS (Metal ion Induced Distinctive Array of Structures). In this approach, the biological function domain and the 99mTc complexing domain are fused together so that structurally these domains are indistinguishable. This approach allows construction of conformationally rigid metallo-peptide molecules (similar to cyclic peptides) that are metabolically stable in-vivo. All the newly designed peptides were screened in various in vitro receptor binding and functional assays to identify a lead compound. The lead compounds were formulated in a one-step 99mTc labeling kit form which were studied by BNL for detailed in-vivo imaging using various animals models of human disease. Two main peptides usingMIDAS approach evolved and were investigated: RGD peptide for acute renal failure and an immunomodulatory peptide derived from tuftsin (RMT-1) for infection/inflammation imaging. Various RGD based metallopeptides were designed, synthesized and assayed for their efficacy in inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation. Most of these peptides displayed biological activity in the 1-100 µM range. Based on previous work by others, RGD-I and RGD-II were evaluated in animal models of acute renal failure. These earlier studies showed that after acute ischemic injury the renal cortex displays

  18. Investigating the role of GXXXG motifs in helical folding and self-association of plasticins, Gly/Leu-rich antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Ludovic; Joanne, Pierre; Khemtémourian, Lucie; Lacombe, Claire; Nicolas, Pierre; El Amri, Chahrazade; Lequin, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Plasticins (PTC) are dermaseptin-related antimicrobial peptides characterized by a large number of leucine and glycine residues arranged in GXXXG motifs that are often described to promote helix association within biological membranes. We report the structure and interaction properties of two plasticins, PTC-B1 from Phyllomedusa bicolor and a cationic analog of PTC-DA1 from Pachymedusa dacnicolor, which exhibit membrane-lytic activities on a broad range of microorganisms. Despite a high number of glycine, CD and NMR spectroscopy show that the two plasticins adopt mainly alpha-helical conformations in a wide variety of environments such as trifluoroethanol, detergent micelles and lipid vesicles. In DPC and SDS, plasticins adopt well-defined helices that lie parallel to the micelle surface, all glycine residues being located on the solvent-exposed face. Spectroscopic data and cross-linking experiments indicate that the GXXXG repeats in these amphipathic helices do not provide a strong oligomerization interface, suggesting a different role from GXXXG motifs found in transmembrane helices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sacubitril/valsartan: beyond natriuretic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jagdeep S S; Burrell, Louise M; Cherif, Myriam; Squire, Iain B; Clark, Andrew L; Lang, Chim C

    2017-10-01

    Natriuretic peptides, especially B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), have primarily been regarded as biomarkers in heart failure (HF). However, they are also possible therapeutic agents due to their potentially beneficial physiological effects. The angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor, sacubitril/valsartan, simultaneously augments the natriuretic peptide system (NPS) by inhibiting the enzyme neprilysin (NEP) and inhibits the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) by blocking the angiotensin II receptor. It has been shown to improve mortality and hospitalisation outcomes in patients with HF due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The key advantage of sacubitril/valsartan has been perceived to be its ability to augment BNP, while its other effects have largely been overlooked. This review highlights the important effects of sacubitril/valsartan, beyond just the augmentation of BNP. First we discuss how NPS physiology differs between healthy individuals and those with HF by looking at mechanisms like the overwhelming effects of RAAS on the NPS, natriuretic peptide receptor desensitisation and absolute natriuretic deficiency. Second, this review explores other hormones that are augmented by sacubitril/valsartan such as bradykinin, substance P and adrenomedullin that may contribute to the efficacy of sacubitril/valsartan in HF. We also discuss concerns that sacubitril/valsartan may interfere with amyloid-β homeostasis with potential implications on Alzheimer's disease and macular degeneration. Finally, we explore the concept of 'autoinhibition' which is a recently described observation that humans have innate NEP inhibitory capability when natriuretic peptide levels rise above a threshold. There is speculation that autoinhibition may provide a surge of natriuretic and other vasoactive peptides to rapidly reverse decompensation. We contend that by pre-emptively inhibiting NEP, sacubitril/valsartan is inducing this surge earlier during decompensation

  20. Development of peptide and protein based radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Bracke, Nathalie; Stalmans, Sofie; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelled peptides and proteins have recently gained great interest as theranostics, due to their numerous and considerable advantages over small (organic) molecules. Developmental procedures of these radiolabelled biomolecules start with the radiolabelling process, greatly defined by the amino acid composition of the molecule and the radionuclide used. Depending on the radionuclide selection, radiolabelling starting materials are whether or not essential for efficient radiolabelling, resulting in direct or indirect radioiodination, radiometal-chelate coupling, indirect radiofluorination or (3)H/(14)C-labelling. Before preclinical investigations are performed, quality control analyses of the synthesized radiopharmaceutical are recommended to eliminate false positive or negative functionality results, e.g. changed receptor binding properties due to (radiolabelled) impurities. Therefore, radionuclidic, radiochemical and chemical purity are investigated, next to the general peptide attributes as described in the European and the United States Pharmacopeia. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo stability characteristics of the peptides and proteins also need to be explored, seen their strong sensitivity to proteinases and peptidases, together with radiolysis and trans-chelation phenomena of the radiopharmaceuticals. In vitro biomedical characterization of the radiolabelled peptides and proteins is performed by saturation, kinetic and competition binding assays, analyzing KD, Bmax, kon, koff and internalization properties, taking into account the chemical and metabolic stability and adsorption events inherent to peptides and proteins. In vivo biodistribution can be adapted by linker, chelate or radionuclide modifications, minimizing normal tissue (e.g. kidney and liver) radiation, and resulting in favorable dosimetry analyses. Finally, clinical trials are initiated, eventually leading to the marketing of radiolabelled peptides and proteins for PET/SPECT-imaging and therapy