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Sample records for lytic gene regions

  1. Genomic analysis of Bacillus subtilis lytic bacteriophage ϕNIT1 capable of obstructing natto fermentation carrying genes for the capsule-lytic soluble enzymes poly-γ-glutamate hydrolase and levanase.

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    Ozaki, Tatsuro; Abe, Naoki; Kimura, Keitarou; Suzuki, Atsuto; Kaneko, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis strains including the fermented soybean (natto) starter produce capsular polymers consisting of poly-γ-glutamate and levan. Capsular polymers may protect the cells from phage infection. However, bacteriophage ϕNIT1 carries a γ-PGA hydrolase gene (pghP) that help it to counteract the host cell's protection strategy. ϕNIT had a linear double stranded DNA genome of 155,631-bp with a terminal redundancy of 5,103-bp, containing a gene encoding an active levan hydrolase. These capsule-lytic enzyme genes were located in the possible foreign gene cluster regions between central core and terminal redundant regions, and were expressed at the late phase of the phage lytic cycle. All tested natto origin Spounavirinae phages carried both genes for capsule degrading enzymes similar to ϕNIT1. A comparative genomic analysis revealed the diversity among ϕNIT1 and Bacillus phages carrying pghP-like and levan-hydrolase genes, and provides novel understanding on the acquisition mechanism of these enzymatic genes.

  2. Induction of Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Replication by Recombinant Adenoviruses Expressing the Zebra Gene with EBV Specific Promoters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu CHEN; Juan YIN; Yi CHEN; Jiang ZHONG

    2005-01-01

    The latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is found in the cells of many tumors. For example, EBV is detectable in almost all cases, and in almost all tumor cells, of non-keratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma.Activating the latent virus, which will result in its lytic replication and the death of tumor cells, is a potential approach for the treatment of EBV-associated cancers. In this study, three recombinant adenoviruses were constructed to express the Zebra gene, an EBV gene responsible for switching from the latent state to lytic replication. EBV-specific promoters were used in order to limit Zebra expression in EBV-positive cells, and reduce the potential side effects. The EBV promoters used were Cp, Zp and a dual promoter combining both promoters, CpZp. The Zebra protein was detected in HEK293 cells as well as the EBV-positive D98-HR1 cells infected with recombinant viruses. An EBV lytic replication early antigen, EA-D, was also detected in infected D98-HR1, implying the initiation of lytic replication. In the cell viability assay, Zebra-expressing adenoviruses had little effect on EBV-negative HeLa cells, while significantly reducing the cell viability and proliferation of D98-HR1 cells. The results indicate that EBV virus promoters can be used in adenovirus vectors to express the Zebra gene and induce EBV lytic replication in D98-HR1 cells.

  3. Preparation and characterization of polyclonal antibody against Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic gene encoding RTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weifei; Tang, Qiao; Shen, Chenyou; Qin, Di; Lu, Chun; Yan, Qin

    2015-11-01

    Replication and transcription activator (RTA) is a critical lytic protein encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). To prepare rabbit polyclonal antibody against RTA, three antigenic polypeptides of KSHV RTA were initially synthesized. The fragment of RTA was cloned into p3FlagBsd to construct the recombinant plasmid, pRTA-Flag. 293 T and EA.hy926 cells were transfected with pRTA-Flag to obtain RTA-Flag fusion protein, which was detected using anti-Flag antibody. Next, New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with keyhole limpet hemocyanin-conjugated peptides to generate polyclonal antibodies against RTA. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to characterize the polyclonal antibodies, and the titers of the polyclonal antibodies against RTA were greater than 1:11,000. Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay revealed that the prepared antibody reacted specifically with the RTA-Flag fusion protein as well as the native viral protein in KSHV-infected primary effusion lymphoma cells. Collectively, our work successfully constructed the recombinant expression vector, pRTA-Flag, and prepared the polyclonal antibody against RTA, which was valuable for investigating the biochemical and biological functions of the critical KSHV lytic gene.

  4. Chromatin Modulation of Herpesvirus Lytic Gene Expression: Managing Nucleosome Density and Heterochromatic Histone Modifications

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    Thomas M. Kristie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Like their cellular hosts, herpesviruses are subject to the regulatory impacts of chromatin assembled on their genomes. Upon infection, these viruses are assembled into domains of chromatin with heterochromatic signatures that suppress viral gene expression or euchromatic characteristics that promote gene expression. The organization and modulation of these chromatin domains appear to be intimately linked to the coordinated expression of the different classes of viral genes and thus ultimately play an important role in the progression of productive infection or the establishment and maintenance of viral latency. A recent report from the Knipe laboratory (J. S. Lee, P. Raja, and D. M. Knipe, mBio 7:e02007-15, 2016 contributes to the understanding of the dynamic modulation of chromatin assembled on the herpes simplex virus genome by monitoring the levels of characteristic heterochromatic histone modifications (histone H3 lysine 9 and 27 methylation associated with a model viral early gene during the progression of lytic infection. Additionally, this study builds upon previous observations that the viral immediate-early protein ICP0 plays a role in reducing the levels of heterochromatin associated with the early genes.

  5. An antisense RNA in a lytic cyanophage links psbA to a gene encoding a homing endonuclease.

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    Millard, Andrew D; Gierga, Gregor; Clokie, Martha R J; Evans, David J; Hess, Wolfgang R; Scanlan, David J

    2010-09-01

    Cyanophage genomes frequently possess the psbA gene, encoding the D1 polypeptide of photosystem II. This protein is believed to maintain host photosynthetic capacity during infection and enhance phage fitness under high-light conditions. Although the first documented cyanophage-encoded psbA gene contained a group I intron, this feature has not been widely reported since, despite a plethora of new sequences becoming available. In this study, we show that in cyanophage S-PM2, this intron is spliced during the entire infection cycle. Furthermore, we report the widespread occurrence of psbA introns in marine metagenomic libraries, and with psbA often adjacent to a homing endonuclease (HE). Bioinformatic analysis of the intergenic region between psbA and the adjacent HE gene F-CphI in S-PM2 showed the presence of an antisense RNA (asRNA) connecting these two separate genetic elements. The asRNA is co-regulated with psbA and F-CphI, suggesting its involvement with their expression. Analysis of scaffolds from global ocean survey datasets shows this asRNA to be commonly associated with the 3' end of cyanophage psbA genes, implying that this potential mechanism of regulating marine 'viral' photosynthesis is evolutionarily conserved. Although antisense transcription is commonly found in eukaryotic and increasingly also in prokaryotic organisms, there has been no indication for asRNAs in lytic phages so far. We propose that this asRNA also provides a means of preventing the formation of mobile group I introns within cyanophage psbA genes.

  6. Regional Variation in Lytic and Lysogenic Viral Infection in the Southern Ocean and Its Contribution to Biogeochemical Cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, C.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2012-01-01

    Lytic and lysogenic viral infection was investigated throughout the Southern Ocean at sites spanning the sub-Antarctic zone, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, and an Antarctic continental sea. Higher lytic virus activity was recorded in the more productive sub-Antarctic zone than in the iron-limite

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α plays roles in Epstein-Barr virus's natural life cycle and tumorigenesis by inducing lytic infection through direct binding to the immediate-early BZLF1 gene promoter.

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    Kraus, Richard J; Yu, Xianming; Cordes, Blue-Leaf A; Sathiamoorthi, Saraniya; Iempridee, Tawin; Nawandar, Dhananjay M; Ma, Shidong; Romero-Masters, James C; McChesney, Kyle G; Lin, Zhen; Makielski, Kathleen R; Lee, Denis L; Lambert, Paul F; Johannsen, Eric C; Kenney, Shannon C; Mertz, Janet E

    2017-06-01

    When confronted with poor oxygenation, cells adapt by activating survival signaling pathways, including the oxygen-sensitive transcriptional regulators called hypoxia-inducible factor alphas (HIF-αs). We report here that HIF-1α also regulates the life cycle of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Incubation of EBV-positive gastric carcinoma AGS-Akata and SNU-719 and Burkitt lymphoma Sal and KemIII cell lines with a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, L-mimosine or deferoxamine, or the NEDDylation inhibitor MLN4924 promoted rapid and sustained accumulation of both HIF-1α and lytic EBV antigens. ShRNA knockdown of HIF-1α significantly reduced deferoxamine-mediated lytic reactivation. HIF-1α directly bound the promoter of the EBV primary latent-lytic switch BZLF1 gene, Zp, activating transcription via a consensus hypoxia-response element (HRE) located at nt -83 through -76 relative to the transcription initiation site. HIF-1α did not activate transcription from the other EBV immediate-early gene, BRLF1. Importantly, expression of HIF-1α induced EBV lytic-gene expression in cells harboring wild-type EBV, but not in cells infected with variants containing base-pair substitution mutations within this HRE. Human oral keratinocyte (NOK) and gingival epithelial (hGET) cells induced to differentiate by incubation with either methyl cellulose or growth in organotypic culture accumulated both HIF-1α and Blimp-1α, another cellular factor implicated in lytic reactivation. HIF-1α activity also accumulated along with Blimp-1α during B-cell differentiation into plasma cells. Furthermore, most BZLF1-expressing cells observed in lymphomas induced by EBV in NSG mice with a humanized immune system were located distal to blood vessels in hypoxic regions of the tumors. Thus, we conclude that HIF-1α plays central roles in both EBV's natural life cycle and EBV-associated tumorigenesis. We propose that drugs that induce HIF-1α protein accumulation are good candidates for development of a lytic

  8. CTCF and Rad21 act as host cell restriction factors for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV lytic replication by modulating viral gene transcription.

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    Da-Jiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is a human herpesvirus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma and is associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases. KSHV reactivation from latency and virion production is dependent on efficient transcription of over eighty lytic cycle genes and viral DNA replication. CTCF and cohesin, cellular proteins that cooperatively regulate gene expression and mediate long-range DNA interactions, have been shown to bind at specific sites in herpesvirus genomes. CTCF and cohesin regulate KSHV gene expression during latency and may also control lytic reactivation, although their role in lytic gene expression remains incompletely characterized. Here, we analyze the dynamic changes in CTCF and cohesin binding that occur during the process of KSHV viral reactivation and virion production by high resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq and show that both proteins dissociate from viral genomes in kinetically and spatially distinct patterns. By utilizing siRNAs to specifically deplete CTCF and Rad21, a cohesin component, we demonstrate that both proteins are potent restriction factors for KSHV replication, with cohesin knockdown leading to hundred-fold increases in viral yield. High-throughput RNA sequencing was used to characterize the transcriptional effects of CTCF and cohesin depletion, and demonstrated that both proteins have complex and global effects on KSHV lytic transcription. Specifically, both proteins act as positive factors for viral transcription initially but subsequently inhibit KSHV lytic transcription, such that their net effect is to limit KSHV RNA accumulation. Cohesin is a more potent inhibitor of KSHV transcription than CTCF but both proteins are also required for efficient transcription of a subset of KSHV genes. These data reveal novel effects of CTCF and cohesin on transcription from a relatively small genome that resemble their effects on the cellular

  9. An Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Protein Complex Requires an Origin of Lytic Replication In Cis to Mediate Late Gene Transcription.

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    Reza Djavadian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus lytic replication is accomplished by an intricate cascade of gene expression that integrates viral DNA replication and structural protein synthesis. Most genes encoding structural proteins exhibit "true" late kinetics-their expression is strictly dependent on lytic DNA replication. Recently, the EBV BcRF1 gene was reported to encode a TATA box binding protein homolog, which preferentially recognizes the TATT sequence found in true late gene promoters. BcRF1 is one of seven EBV genes with homologs found in other β- and γ-, but not in α-herpesviruses. Using EBV BACmids, we systematically disrupted each of these "βγ" genes. We found that six of them, including BcRF1, exhibited an identical phenotype: intact viral DNA replication with loss of late gene expression. The proteins encoded by these six genes have been found by other investigators to form a viral protein complex that is essential for activation of TATT-containing reporters in EBV-negative 293 cells. Unexpectedly, in EBV infected 293 cells, we found that TATT reporter activation was weak and non-specific unless an EBV origin of lytic replication (OriLyt was present in cis. Using two different replication-defective EBV genomes, we demonstrated that OriLyt-mediated DNA replication is required in cis for TATT reporter activation and for late gene expression from the EBV genome. We further demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the late BcLF1 mRNA localizes to EBV DNA replication factories. These findings support a model in which EBV true late genes are only transcribed from newly replicated viral genomes.

  10. The HSV-1 Latency-Associated Transcript Functions to Repress Latent Phase Lytic Gene Expression and Suppress Virus Reactivation from Latently Infected Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Michael P; Hann, William; Shivkumar, Maitreyi; Harman, Laura E R; Connor, Viv; Coleman, Heather M; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes life-long latent infection within sensory neurons, during which viral lytic gene expression is silenced. The only highly expressed viral gene product during latent infection is the latency-associated transcript (LAT), a non-protein coding RNA that has been strongly implicated in the epigenetic regulation of HSV-1 gene expression. We have investigated LAT-mediated control of latent gene expression using chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses and LAT-negative viruses engineered to express firefly luciferase or β-galactosidase from a heterologous lytic promoter. Whilst we were unable to determine a significant effect of LAT expression upon heterochromatin enrichment on latent HSV-1 genomes, we show that reporter gene expression from latent HSV-1 genomes occurs at a greater frequency in the absence of LAT. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter viruses we have observed that HSV-1 gene expression decreases during long-term latent infection, with a most marked effect during LAT-negative virus infection. Finally, using a fluorescent mouse model of infection to isolate and culture single latently infected neurons, we also show that reactivation occurs at a greater frequency from cultures harbouring LAT-negative HSV-1. Together, our data suggest that the HSV-1 LAT RNA represses HSV-1 gene expression in small populations of neurons within the mouse TG, a phenomenon that directly impacts upon the frequency of reactivation and the maintenance of the transcriptionally active latent reservoir.

  11. Kinetic expression analysis of the cluster mdv1-mir-M9-M4, genes meq and vIL-8 differs between the lytic and latent phases of Marek's disease virus infection.

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    Coupeau, D; Dambrine, G; Rasschaert, D

    2012-07-01

    Marek's disease virus (GaHV-2) is an alphaherpesvirus that induces T-cell lymphoma in chickens. The infection includes both lytic and latent stages. GaHV-2 encodes three clusters of microRNAs (miRNAs) located in the internal (I)/terminal (T) repeat (R) regions. We characterized transcripts encompassing the mdv1-mir-M9-M4 and mir-M11-M1 clusters located in the IR(L)/TR(L) region, upstream and downstream from the meq oncogene, respectively. By 5'- and 3'-RACE-PCR and targeted RT-PCR, we showed that mdv1-mir-M9-M4 could be transcribed from an unspliced transcript or from at least 15 alternatively spliced transcripts covering the IR(L)/TR(L) region, encompassing the meq and vIL-8 genes and localizing the mdv1-mir-M9-M4 cluster to the first intron at the 5'-end. However, all these transcripts, whether spliced or unspliced, seemed to start at the same transcriptional start site, their transcription being driven by a single promoter, prmiRM9M4. We demonstrated alternative promoter usage for the meq and vIL-8 genes, depending on the phase of GaHV-2 infection. During the latent phase, the prmiRM9M4 promoter drove transcription of the meq and vIL-8 genes and the mdv1-mir-M9-M4 cluster in the first intron of the corresponding transcripts. By contrast, during the lytic phase, this promoter drove the transcription only of the mdv1-mir-M9-M4 cluster to generate unspliced mRNA, the meq and vIL-8 genes being transcribed principally from their own promoters. Despite the expression of meq and the mdv1-mir-M9-M4 cluster under two different transcriptional processes during the latent and lytic phases, our data provide an explanation for meq expression and mdv1-mir-M4-5P overexpression in miRNA libraries from GaHV-2-infected cells, regardless of the phase of infection.

  12. KSHV miRNAs Decrease Expression of Lytic Genes in Latently Infected PEL and Endothelial Cells by Targeting Host Transcription Factors

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    Karlie Plaisance-Bonstaff

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV microRNAs are encoded in the latency-associated region. Knockdown of KSHV miR-K12-3 and miR-K12-11 increased expression of lytic genes in BC-3 cells, and increased virus production from latently infected BCBL-1 cells. Furthermore, iSLK cells infected with miR-K12-3 and miR-K12-11 deletion mutant viruses displayed increased spontaneous reactivation and were more sensitive to inducers of reactivation than cells infected with wild type KSHV. Predicted binding sites for miR-K12-3 and miR-K12-11 were found in the 3’UTRs of the cellular transcription factors MYB, Ets-1, and C/EBPα, which activate RTA, the KSHV replication and transcription activator. Targeting of MYB by miR-K12-11 was confirmed by cloning the MYB 3’UTR downstream from the luciferase reporter. Knockdown of miR‑K12-11 resulted in increased levels of MYB transcript, and knockdown of miR-K12-3 increased both C/EBPα and Ets-1 transcripts. Thus, miR-K12-11 and miR-K12-3 contribute to maintenance of latency by decreasing RTA expression indirectly, presumably via down‑regulation of MYB, C/EBPα and Ets-1, and possibly other host transcription factors.

  13. Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 ORF48 Is an RTA-Responsive Gene Product and Functions in both Viral Lytic Replication and Latency during In Vivo Infection.

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    Qi, Jing; Han, Chuanhui; Gong, Danyang; Liu, Ping; Zhou, Sheng; Deng, Hongyu

    2015-06-01

    Replication and transcription activator (RTA) of gammaherpesvirus is an immediate early gene product and regulates the expression of many downstream viral lytic genes. ORF48 is also conserved among gammaherpesviruses; however, its expression regulation and function remained largely unknown. In this study, we characterized the transcription unit of ORF48 from murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) and analyzed its transcriptional regulation. We showed that RTA activates the ORF48 promoter via an RTA-responsive element (48pRRE). RTA binds to 48pRRE directly in vitro and also associates with ORF48 promoter in vivo. Mutagenesis of 48pRRE in the context of the viral genome demonstrated that the expression of ORF48 is activated by RTA through 48pRRE during de novo infection. Through site-specific mutagenesis, we generated an ORF48-null virus and examined the function of ORF48 in vitro and in vivo. The ORF48-null mutation remarkably reduced the viral replication efficiency in cell culture. Moreover, through intranasal or intraperitoneal infection of laboratory mice, we showed that ORF48 is important for viral lytic replication in the lung and establishment of latency in the spleen, as well as viral reactivation from latency. Collectively, our study identified ORF48 as an RTA-responsive gene and showed that ORF48 is important for MHV-68 replication both in vitro and in vivo. The replication and transcription activator (RTA), conserved among gammaherpesviruses, serves as a molecular switch for the virus life cycle. It works as a transcriptional regulator to activate the expression of many viral lytic genes. However, only a limited number of such downstream genes have been uncovered for MHV-68. In this study, we identified ORF48 as an RTA-responsive gene of MHV-68 and mapped the cis element involved. By constructing a mutant virus that is deficient in ORF48 expression and through infection of laboratory mice, we showed that ORF48 plays important roles in different stages of

  14. The bacteriophage P1 hot gene, encoding a homolog of the E. coli DNA polymerase III theta subunit, is expressed during both lysogenic and lytic growth stages.

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    Chikova, Anna K; Schaaper, Roel M

    2007-11-01

    The bacteriophage P1 hot gene product is a homolog of the theta subunit of E. coli DNA polymerase III. Previous studies with hot cloned on a plasmid have shown that Hot protein can substitute for theta, as evidenced by its stabilizing effect on certain dnaQ mutator mutants carrying an unstable pol III proofreading subunit (epsilon subunit). These results are consistent with Hot, like theta, being a replication protein involved in stabilizing the intrinsically unstable epsilon proofreading function. However, the function of hot for the viral life cycle is less clear. In the present study, we show that the hot gene is not essential. Based on its promoter structure, hot has been previously classified as a "late" phage gene, a property that is not easily reconciled with a presumed replication function. Here, we clarify this issue by demonstrating that P1 hot is actively expressed both during the lysogenic state and in the early stages of a lytic induction, in addition to its expression in the late stage of phage development. The results indicate that P1 hot has a complex expression pattern, compatible with a model in which Hot may affect the host replication machinery to benefit overall phage replication.

  15. Lytic to temperate switching of viral communities

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    Knowles, B.; Silveira, C. B.; Bailey, B. A.; Barott, K.; Cantu, V. A.; Cobián-Güemes, A. G.; Coutinho, F. H.; Dinsdale, E. A.; Felts, B.; Furby, K. A.; George, E. E.; Green, K. T.; Gregoracci, G. B.; Haas, A. F.; Haggerty, J. M.; Hester, E. R.; Hisakawa, N.; Kelly, L. W.; Lim, Y. W.; Little, M.; Luque, A.; McDole-Somera, T.; McNair, K.; de Oliveira, L. S.; Quistad, S. D.; Robinett, N. L.; Sala, E.; Salamon, P.; Sanchez, S. E.; Sandin, S.; Silva, G. G. Z.; Smith, J.; Sullivan, C.; Thompson, C.; Vermeij, M. J. A.; Youle, M.; Young, C.; Zgliczynski, B.; Brainard, R.; Edwards, R. A.; Nulton, J.; Thompson, F.; Rohwer, F.

    2016-03-01

    Microbial viruses can control host abundances via density-dependent lytic predator-prey dynamics. Less clear is how temperate viruses, which coexist and replicate with their host, influence microbial communities. Here we show that virus-like particles are relatively less abundant at high host densities. This suggests suppressed lysis where established models predict lytic dynamics are favoured. Meta-analysis of published viral and microbial densities showed that this trend was widespread in diverse ecosystems ranging from soil to freshwater to human lungs. Experimental manipulations showed viral densities more consistent with temperate than lytic life cycles at increasing microbial abundance. An analysis of 24 coral reef viromes showed a relative increase in the abundance of hallmark genes encoded by temperate viruses with increased microbial abundance. Based on these four lines of evidence, we propose the Piggyback-the-Winner model wherein temperate dynamics become increasingly important in ecosystems with high microbial densities; thus ‘more microbes, fewer viruses’.

  16. Genomic sequence and evolution of marine cyanophage P60: a new insight on lytic and lysogenic phages.

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    Chen, Feng; Lu, Jingrang

    2002-05-01

    The genome of cyanophage P60, a lytic virus which infects marine Synechococcus WH7803, was completely sequenced. The P60 genome contained 47,872 bp with 80 potential open reading frames that were mostly similar to the genes found in lytic phages like T7, phi-YeO3-12, and SIO1. The DNA replication system, consisting of primase-helicase and DNA polymerase, appeared to be more conserved in podoviruses than in siphoviruses and myoviruses, suggesting that DNA replication genes could be the critical elements for lytic phages. Strikingly high sequence similarities in the regions coding for nucleotide metabolism were found between cyanophage P60 and marine unicellular cyanobacteria.

  17. Phage lytic enzymes: a history

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David; Trudil

    2015-01-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of ‘bacteria-eaters’ or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well(Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specifi c disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay(Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes–from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  18. Genes from the exo-xis region of λ and Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophages influence lysogenization and prophage induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Sylwia; Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Łoś, Joanna M; Barańska, Sylwia; Łepek, Krzysztof; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Łoś, Marcin; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2013-11-01

    The exo-xis region, present in genomes of lambdoid bacteriophages, contains highly conserved genes of largely unknown functions. In this report, using bacteriophage λ and Shiga toxin-converting bacteriophage ϕ24Β, we demonstrate that the presence of this region on a multicopy plasmid results in impaired lysogenization of Escherichia coli and delayed, while more effective, induction of prophages following stimulation by various agents (mitomycin C, hydrogen peroxide, UV irradiation). Spontaneous induction of λ and ϕ24Β prophages was also more efficient in bacteria carrying additional copies of the corresponding exo-xis region on plasmids. No significant effects of an increased copy number of genes located between exo and xis on both efficiency of adsorption on the host cells and lytic development inside the host cell of these bacteriophages were found. We conclude that genes from the exo-xis region of lambdoid bacteriophages participate in the regulation of lysogenization and prophage maintenance.

  19. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus K-bZIP Protein Is Necessary for Lytic Viral Gene Expression, DNA Replication, and Virion Production in Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cell Lines▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Lefort, Sylvain; Flamand, Louis

    2009-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of three human proliferative disorders, namely, Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphomas (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease. Lytic DNA replication of KSHV, which is essential for viral propagation, requires the binding of at least two KSHV proteins, replication and transactivation activator (RTA) and K-bZIP, on the lytic origin of replication. Moreover, K-bZIP physically interacts with RTA and represses its tra...

  20. Complete Genome Sequences of Lytic Bacteriophages of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamales, Julio; Vasquez, Ignacio; Santos, Leonardo; Segovia, Cristopher; Ayala, Manuel; Alvarado, Romina; Nuñez, Pablo; Santander, Javier

    2016-06-02

    Three bacteriophages, f20-Xaj, f29-Xaj, and f30-Xaj, with lytic activity against Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis were isolated from walnut trees (VIII Bío Bío Region, Chile). These lytic bacteriophages have double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes of 43,851 bp, 41,865 bp, and 44,262 bp, respectively. These are the first described bacteriophages with lytic activity against X. arboricola pv. juglandis that can be utilized as biocontrol agents.

  1. 5-hydroxymethylation of the EBV genome regulates the latent to lytic switch.

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    Wille, Coral K; Nawandar, Dhananjay M; Henning, Amanda N; Ma, Shidong; Oetting, Kayla M; Lee, Dennis; Lambert, Paul; Johannsen, Eric C; Kenney, Shannon C

    2015-12-29

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and cellular hypermethylation are hallmarks of undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, EBV infection of normal oral epithelial cells is confined to differentiated cells and is lytic. Here we demonstrate that the EBV genome can become 5-hydroxymethylated and that this DNA modification affects EBV lytic reactivation. We show that global 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC)-modified DNA accumulates during normal epithelial-cell differentiation, whereas EBV+ NPCs have little if any 5hmC-modified DNA. Furthermore, we find that increasing cellular ten-eleven translocation (TET) activity [which converts methylated cytosine (5mC) to 5hmC] decreases methylation, and increases 5hmC modification, of lytic EBV promoters in EBV-infected cell lines containing highly methylated viral genomes. Conversely, inhibition of endogenous TET activity increases lytic EBV promoter methylation in an EBV-infected telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs) cell line where lytic viral promoters are largely unmethylated. We demonstrate that these cytosine modifications differentially affect the ability of the two EBV immediate-early proteins, BZLF1 (Z) and BRLF1 (R), to induce the lytic form of viral infection. Although methylation of lytic EBV promoters increases Z-mediated and inhibits R-mediated lytic reactivation, 5hmC modification of lytic EBV promoters has the opposite effect. We also identify a specific CpG-containing Z-binding site on the BRLF1 promoter that must be methylated for Z-mediated viral reactivation and show that TET-mediated 5hmC modification of this site in NOKs prevents Z-mediated viral reactivation. Decreased 5-hydroxymethylation of cellular and viral genes may contribute to NPC formation.

  2. The ribosomal gene spacer region in archaebacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achenbach-Richter, L.; Woese, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Sequences for the spacer regions that separate the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA genes have been determined for four more (strategically placed) archaebacteria. These confirm the general rule that methanogens and extreme halophiles have spacers that contain a single tRNAala gene, while tRNA genes are not found in the spacer region of the true extreme thermophiles. The present study also shows that the spacer regions from the sulfate reducing Archaeglobus and the extreme thermophile Thermococcus (both of which cluster phylogenetically with the methanogens and extreme halophiles) contain each a tRNAala gene. Thus, not only all methanogens and extreme halophiles show this characteristic, but all organisms on the "methanogen branch" of the archaebacterial tree appear to do so. The finding of a tRNA gene in the spacer region of the extreme thermophile Thermococcus celer is the first known phenotypic property that links this organism with its phylogenetic counterparts, the methanogens, rather than with its phenotypic counterparts, the sulfur-dependent extreme thermophiles.

  3. A green-light inducible lytic system for cyanobacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Kotone; Abe, Koichi; Ferri, Stefano; Nakajima, Mitsuharu; Nakamura, Mayumi; Yoshida, Wataru; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Ikebukuro, Kazunori; Sode, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an attractive candidate for the production of biofuel because of their ability to capture carbon dioxide by photosynthesis and grow on non-arable land. However, because huge quantities of water are required for cultivation, strict water management is one of the greatest issues in algae- and cyanobacteria-based biofuel production. In this study, we aim to construct a lytic cyanobacterium that can be regulated by a physical signal (green-light illumination) for future use in the recovery of biofuel related compounds. We introduced T4 bacteriophage-derived lysis genes encoding holin and endolysin under the control of the green-light regulated cpcG2 promoter in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. When cells harboring the lysis genes were illuminated with both red and green light, we observed a considerable decrease in growth rate, a significant increase in cellular phycocyanin released in the medium, and a considerable fraction of dead cells. These effects were not observed when these cells were illuminated with only red light, or when cells not containing the lysis genes were grown under either red light or red and green light. These results indicate that our constructed green-light inducible lytic system was clearly induced by green-light illumination, resulting in lytic cells that released intracellular phycocyanin into the culture supernatant. This property suggests a future possibility to construct photosynthetic genetically modified organisms that are unable to survive under sunlight exposure. Expression of the self-lysis system with green-light illumination was also found to greatly increase the fragility of the cell membrane, as determined by subjecting the induced cells to detergent, osmotic-shock, and freeze-thaw treatments. A green-light inducible lytic system was constructed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The engineered lytic cyanobacterial cells should be beneficial for the recovery of biofuels and related compounds from cells with minimal effort

  4. Differentiation-Dependent KLF4 Expression Promotes Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Epithelial Cells.

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    Dhananjay M Nawandar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with B-cell and epithelial cell malignancies. EBV lytically infects normal differentiated oral epithelial cells, where it causes a tongue lesion known as oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL in immunosuppressed patients. However, the cellular mechanism(s that enable EBV to establish exclusively lytic infection in normal differentiated oral epithelial cells are not currently understood. Here we show that a cellular transcription factor known to promote epithelial cell differentiation, KLF4, induces differentiation-dependent lytic EBV infection by binding to and activating the two EBV immediate-early gene (BZLF1 and BRLF1 promoters. We demonstrate that latently EBV-infected, telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs cells undergo lytic viral reactivation confined to the more differentiated cell layers in organotypic raft culture. Furthermore, we show that endogenous KLF4 expression is required for efficient lytic viral reactivation in response to phorbol ester and sodium butyrate treatment in several different EBV-infected epithelial cell lines, and that the combination of KLF4 and another differentiation-dependent cellular transcription factor, BLIMP1, is highly synergistic for inducing lytic EBV infection. We confirm that both KLF4 and BLIMP1 are expressed in differentiated, but not undifferentiated, epithelial cells in normal tongue tissue, and show that KLF4 and BLIMP1 are both expressed in a patient-derived OHL lesion. In contrast, KLF4 protein is not detectably expressed in B cells, where EBV normally enters latent infection, although KLF4 over-expression is sufficient to induce lytic EBV reactivation in Burkitt lymphoma cells. Thus, KLF4, together with BLIMP1, plays a critical role in mediating lytic EBV reactivation in epithelial cells.

  5. Gene Regions Responding to Skeletal Muscle Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Frank W.

    1997-01-01

    Our stated specific aims for this project were: 1) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb myosin heavy chain (MHC) promoter necessary for in vivo expression in mouse fast-twitch muscle, and 2) Identify the region(s) of the mouse IIb MHC promoter responsive to immobilization in mouse slow-twitch muscle in vivo. We sought to address these specific aims by introducing various MHC IIb promoter/reporter gene constructs directly into the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles of living mice. Although the method of somatic gene transfer into skeletal muscle by direct injection has been successfully used in our laboratory to study the regulation of the skeletal alpha actin gene in chicken skeletal muscle, we had many difficulties utilizing this procedure in the mouse. Because of the small size of the mouse soleus and the difficulty in obtaining consistent results, we elected not to study this muscle as first proposed. Rather, our MHC IIb promoter deletion experiments were performed in the gastrocnemius. Further, we decided to use hindlimb unloading via tail suspension to induce an upregulation of the MHC IIb gene, rather than immobilization of the hindlimbs via plaster casts. This change was made because tail suspension more closely mimics spaceflight, and this procedure in our lab results in a smaller loss of overall body mass than the mouse hindlimb immobilization procedure. This suggests that the stress level during tail suspension is less than during immobilization. This research has provided an important beginning point towards understanding the molecular regulation of the MHC lIb gene in response to unweighting of skeletal muscle Future work will focus on the regulation of MHC IIb mRNA stability in response to altered loading of skeletal muscle

  6. A Herpesviral Lytic Protein Regulates the Structure of Latent Viral Chromatin

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    Priya Raja

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Latent infections by viruses usually involve minimizing viral protein expression so that the host immune system cannot recognize the infected cell through the viral peptides presented on its cell surface. Herpes simplex virus (HSV, for example, is thought to express noncoding RNAs such as latency-associated transcripts (LATs and microRNAs (miRNAs as the only abundant viral gene products during latent infection. Here we describe analysis of HSV-1 mutant viruses, providing strong genetic evidence that HSV-infected cell protein 0 (ICP0 is expressed during establishment and/or maintenance of latent infection in murine sensory neurons in vivo. Studies of an ICP0 nonsense mutant virus showed that ICP0 promotes heterochromatin and latent and lytic transcription, arguing that ICP0 is expressed and functional. We propose that ICP0 promotes transcription of LATs during establishment or maintenance of HSV latent infection, much as it promotes lytic gene transcription. This report introduces the new concept that a lytic viral protein can be expressed during latent infection and can serve dual roles to regulate viral chromatin to optimize latent infection in addition to its role in epigenetic regulation during lytic infection. An additional implication of the results is that ICP0 might serve as a target for an antiviral therapeutic acting on lytic and latent infections.

  7. Inhibition of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle by moronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fang-Rong; Hsieh, Yi-Chung; Chang, Yung-Fu; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2010-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) expresses two transcription factors, Rta and Zta, during the immediate-early stage of the lytic cycle to activate the transcription of viral lytic genes. Our immunoblotting and flow cytometry analyses find that moronic acid, found in galls of Rhus chinensis and Brazilian propolis, at 10microM inhibits the expression of Rta, Zta, and an EBV early protein, EA-D, after lytic induction with sodium butyrate. This study also finds that moronic acids inhibits the capacity of Rta to activate a promoter that contains an Rta-response element, indicating that moronic acid interferes with the function of Rta. On the other hand, moronic acid does not appear to influence with the transactivation function of Zta. Therefore, the lack of expression of Zta and EA-D after moronic acid treatment is attributable to the inhibition of the transactivation functions of Rta. Because the expression of Zta, EA-D and many EBV lytic genes depends on Rta, the treatment of P3HR1 cells with moronic acid substantially reduces the numbers of EBV particles produced by the cells after lytic induction. This study suggests that moronic acid is a new structural lead for anti-EBV drug development.

  8. Genome wide nucleosome mapping for HSV-1 shows nucleosomes are deposited at preferred positions during lytic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaewook; Sanders, Iryna F; Chen, Eric Z; Li, Hongzhe; Tobias, John W; Isett, R Benjamin; Penubarthi, Sindura; Sun, Hao; Baldwin, Don A; Fraser, Nigel W

    2015-01-01

    HSV is a large double stranded DNA virus, capable of causing a variety of diseases from the common cold sore to devastating encephalitis. Although DNA within the HSV virion does not contain any histone protein, within 1 h of infecting a cell and entering its nucleus the viral genome acquires some histone protein (nucleosomes). During lytic infection, partial micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion does not give the classic ladder band pattern, seen on digestion of cell DNA or latent viral DNA. However, complete digestion does give a mono-nucleosome band, strongly suggesting that there are some nucleosomes present on the viral genome during the lytic infection, but that they are not evenly positioned, with a 200 bp repeat pattern, like cell DNA. Where then are the nucleosomes positioned? Here we perform HSV-1 genome wide nucleosome mapping, at a time when viral replication is in full swing (6 hr PI), using a microarray consisting of 50mer oligonucleotides, covering the whole viral genome (152 kb). Arrays were probed with MNase-protected fragments of DNA from infected cells. Cells were not treated with crosslinking agents, thus we are only mapping tightly bound nucleosomes. The data show that nucleosome deposition is not random. The distribution of signal on the arrays suggest that nucleosomes are located at preferred positions on the genome, and that there are some positions that are not occupied (nucleosome free regions -NFR or Nucleosome depleted regions -NDR), or occupied at frequency below our limit of detection in the population of genomes. Occupancy of only a fraction of the possible sites may explain the lack of a typical MNase partial digestion band ladder pattern for HSV DNA during lytic infection. On average, DNA encoding Immediate Early (IE), Early (E) and Late (L) genes appear to have a similar density of nucleosomes.

  9. The FIKK kinase of Toxoplasma gondii is not essential for the parasite's lytic cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skariah, S; Walwyn, O; Engelberg, K; Gubbels, M-J; Gaylets, C; Kim, N; Lynch, B; Sultan, A; Mordue, D G

    2016-05-01

    FIKK kinases are a novel family of kinases unique to the Apicomplexa. While most apicomplexans encode a single FIKK kinase, Plasmodium falciparum expresses 21 and piroplasms do not encode a FIKK kinase. FIKK kinases share a conserved C-terminal catalytic domain, but the N-terminal region is highly variable and contains no known functional domains. To date, FIKK kinases have been primarily studied in P. falciparum and Plasmodium berghei. Those that have been studied are exported from the parasite and associate with diverse locations in the infected erythrocyte cytosol or membrane. Deletion of individual P. falciparum FIKK kinases indicates that they may play a role in modification of the infected erythrocyte. The current study characterises the single FIKK gene in Toxoplasma gondii to evaluate the importance of the FIKK kinase in an apicomplexan that has a single FIKK kinase. The TgFIKK gene encoded a protein of approximately 280kDa. Endogenous tagging of the FIKK protein with Yellow Fluorescent Protein showed that the FIKK protein exclusively localised to the posterior end of tachyzoites. A Yellow Fluorescent Protein-tagged FIKK and a Ty-tagged FIKK both co-localised with T. gondii membrane occupation and recognition nexus protein to the basal complex and were localised apical to inner membrane complex protein-5 and Centrin2. Deletion of TgFIKK, surprisingly, had no detectable effect on the parasite's lytic cycle in vitro in human fibroblast cells or in acute virulence in vivo. Thus, our results clearly show that while the FIKK kinase is expressed in tachyzoites, it is not essential for the lytic cycle of T. gondii. Copyright © 2016 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lytic clavicular lesions in fibromatosis colli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartoris, D.J.; Parker, B.R.; Mochizuki, R.M.

    1983-06-01

    Two patients with fibromatosis colli (congenital torticollis) presented with lytic lesions in the clavicle at the insertion of the fibrosed clavicular head of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Biopsy of one lesion showed intraosseous fibrosis. These lesions are probably not uncommon but radiographs are rarely performed in uncomplicated cases.

  11. TRIM5α Promotes Ubiquitination of Rta from Epstein–Barr Virus to Attenuate Lytic Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsiang-Hung; Chen, Chien-Sin; Wang, Wen-Hung; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Tsai, Hsiao-Han; Liu, Shih-Tung; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2017-01-01

    Replication and transcription activator (Rta), a key protein expressed by Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) during the immediate-early stage of the lytic cycle, is responsible for the activation of viral lytic genes. In this study, GST-pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that Rta interacts in vitro and in vivo with TRIM5α, a host factor known to be involved in the restriction of retroviral infections. Confocal microscopy results revealed that Rta colocalizes with TRIM5α in the nucleus during lytic progression. The interaction involves 190 amino acids in the N-terminal of Rta and the RING domain in TRIM5α, and it was further found that TRIM5α acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase to promote Rta ubiquitination. Overexpression of TRIM5α reduced the transactivating capabilities of Rta, while reducing TRIM5α expression enhanced EBV lytic protein expression and DNA replication. Taken together, these results point to a critical role for TRIM5α in attenuating EBV lytic progression through the targeting of Rta for ubiquitination, and suggest that the restrictive capabilities of TRIM5α may go beyond retroviral infections. PMID:28105027

  12. Marker2sequence, mine your QTL regions for candidate genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chibon, P.Y.F.R.P.; Schoof, H.; Visser, R.G.F.; Finkers, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Marker2sequence (M2S) aims at mining quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for candidate genes. For each gene, within the QTL region, M2S uses data integration technology to integrate putative gene function with associated gene ontology terms, proteins, pathways and literature. As a typical QTL region

  13. The Lytic SA Phage Demonstrate Bactericidal Activity against Mastitis Causing Staphylococcus aureus

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    Hamza Ameer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the major causative agent of mastitis among dairy animals as it causes intramammary gland infection. Due to antibiotic resistance and contamination of antibiotics in the milk of diseased animals; alternative therapeutic agents are required to cure mastitis. Lytic bacteriophages and their gene products can be potential therapeutic agents against bacteria as they are host specific and less harmful than antibiotics. In this study, Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from milk samples of the infected animals and identified biochemically. SA phage was isolated from sewage water showing lytic activity against Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The highest lytic activity of bacteriophages was observed at 37°C and pH 7, and the most suitable storage condition was at 4°C. SA phage efficiently reduced bacterial growth in the bacterial reduction assay. The characterization and bacterial growth reduction activity of the bacteriophages against Staphylococcus aureus signifies their underlying potential of phage therapy against mastitis.

  14. Characterization of the lytic-lysogenic switch of the lactococcal bacteriophage Tuc2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenny, JG; Leach, S; de la Hoz, AB; Venema, G; Kok, J; Fitzgerald, GF; Nauta, A; Alonso, JC; van Sinderen, D; Kenny, John G.; Hoz, Ana B. de la; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Alonso, Juan C.

    2006-01-01

    Tuc2009 is a temperate bacteriophage of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509 which encodes a CI- and Cro-type lysogenic-lytic switch region. A helix-swap of the 0 helices of the closely related Cl-type proteins from the lactococcal phages r1t and Tuc2009 revealed the crucial elements involved in

  15. RTA Occupancy of the Origin of Lytic Replication during Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from B Cell Latency

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    Alexis L. Santana

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available RTA, the viral Replication and Transcription Activator, is essential for rhadinovirus lytic gene expression upon de novo infection and reactivation from latency. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS/toll-like receptor (TLR4 engagement enhances rhadinovirus reactivation. We developed two new systems to examine the interaction of RTA with host NF-kappaB (NF-κB signaling during murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 infection: a latent B cell line (HE-RIT inducible for RTA-Flag expression and virus reactivation; and a recombinant virus (MHV68-RTA-Bio that enabled in vivo biotinylation of RTA in BirA transgenic mice. LPS acted as a second stimulus to drive virus reactivation from latency in the context of induced expression of RTA-Flag. ORF6, the gene encoding the single-stranded DNA binding protein, was one of many viral genes that were directly responsive to RTA induction; expression was further increased upon treatment with LPS. However, NF-κB sites in the promoter of ORF6 did not influence RTA transactivation in response to LPS in HE-RIT cells. We found no evidence for RTA occupancy of the minimal RTA-responsive region of the ORF6 promoter, yet RTA was found to complex with a portion of the right origin of lytic replication (oriLyt-R that contains predicted RTA recognition elements. RTA occupancy of select regions of the MHV-68 genome was also evaluated in our novel in vivo RTA biotinylation system. Streptavidin isolation of RTA-Bio confirmed complex formation with oriLyt-R in LPS-treated primary splenocytes from BirA mice infected with MHV68 RTA-Bio. We demonstrate the utility of reactivation-inducible B cells coupled with in vivo RTA biotinylation for mechanistic investigations of the interplay of host signaling with RTA.

  16. RTA Occupancy of the Origin of Lytic Replication during Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation from B Cell Latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Alexis L.; Oldenburg, Darby G.; Kirillov, Varvara; Malik, Laraib; Dong, Qiwen; Sinayev, Roman; Marcu, Kenneth B.; White, Douglas W.; Krug, Laurie T.

    2017-01-01

    RTA, the viral Replication and Transcription Activator, is essential for rhadinovirus lytic gene expression upon de novo infection and reactivation from latency. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/toll-like receptor (TLR)4 engagement enhances rhadinovirus reactivation. We developed two new systems to examine the interaction of RTA with host NF-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling during murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection: a latent B cell line (HE-RIT) inducible for RTA-Flag expression and virus reactivation; and a recombinant virus (MHV68-RTA-Bio) that enabled in vivo biotinylation of RTA in BirA transgenic mice. LPS acted as a second stimulus to drive virus reactivation from latency in the context of induced expression of RTA-Flag. ORF6, the gene encoding the single-stranded DNA binding protein, was one of many viral genes that were directly responsive to RTA induction; expression was further increased upon treatment with LPS. However, NF-κB sites in the promoter of ORF6 did not influence RTA transactivation in response to LPS in HE-RIT cells. We found no evidence for RTA occupancy of the minimal RTA-responsive region of the ORF6 promoter, yet RTA was found to complex with a portion of the right origin of lytic replication (oriLyt-R) that contains predicted RTA recognition elements. RTA occupancy of select regions of the MHV-68 genome was also evaluated in our novel in vivo RTA biotinylation system. Streptavidin isolation of RTA-Bio confirmed complex formation with oriLyt-R in LPS-treated primary splenocytes from BirA mice infected with MHV68 RTA-Bio. We demonstrate the utility of reactivation-inducible B cells coupled with in vivo RTA biotinylation for mechanistic investigations of the interplay of host signaling with RTA. PMID:28212352

  17. The Molecular Switch of Telomere Phages: High Binding Specificity of the PY54 Cro Lytic Repressor to a Single Operator Site

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    Jens Andre Hammerl

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperate bacteriophages possess a molecular switch, which regulates the lytic and lysogenic growth. The genomes of the temperate telomere phages N15, PY54 and ɸKO2 harbor a primary immunity region (immB comprising genes for the prophage repressor, the lytic repressor and a putative antiterminator. The roles of these products are thought to be similar to those of the lambda proteins CI, Cro and Q, respectively. Moreover, the gene order and the location of several operator sites in the prototype telomere phage N15 and in ɸKO2 are also reminiscent of lambda-like phages. By contrast, in silico analyses revealed the presence of only one operator (O\\(_{\\rm{R}}\\3 in PY54. The purified PY54 Cro protein was used for EMSA studies demonstrating that it exclusively binds to a 16-bp palindromic site (O\\(_{\\rm{R}}\\3 upstream of the prophage repressor gene. The O\\(_{\\rm{R}}\\3 operator sequences of PY54 and ɸKO2/N15 only differ by their peripheral base pairs, which are responsible for Cro specificity. PY54 cI and cro transcription is regulated by highly active promoters initiating the synthesis of a homogenious species of leaderless mRNA. The location of the PY54 Cro binding site and of the identified promoters suggests that the lytic repressor suppresses cI transcription but not its own synthesis. The results indicate an unexpected diversity of the growth regulation mechanisms in lambda-related phages.

  18. Lytic and lysogenic infection of diverse Escherichia coli and Shigella strains with a verocytotoxigenic bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, C E; Stanley, K N; Allison, H E; Flint, H J; Stewart, C S; Sharp, R J; Saunders, J R; McCarthy, A J

    2001-09-01

    A verocytotoxigenic bacteriophage isolated from a strain of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157, into which a kanamycin resistance gene (aph3) had been inserted to inactivate the verocytotoxin gene (vt2), was used to infect Enterobacteriaceae strains. A number of Shigella and E. coli strains were susceptible to lysogenic infection, and a smooth E. coli isolate (O107) was also susceptible to lytic infection. The lysogenized strains included different smooth E. coli serotypes of both human and animal origin, indicating that this bacteriophage has a substantial capacity to disseminate verocytotoxin genes. A novel indirect plaque assay utilizing an E. coli recA441 mutant in which phage-infected cells can enter only the lytic cycle, enabling detection of all infective phage, was developed.

  19. Oncogenic Herpesvirus Utilizes Stress-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoints for Efficient Lytic Replication.

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    Giuseppe Balistreri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV causes Kaposi's sarcoma and certain lymphoproliferative malignancies. Latent infection is established in the majority of tumor cells, whereas lytic replication is reactivated in a small fraction of cells, which is important for both virus spread and disease progression. A siRNA screen for novel regulators of KSHV reactivation identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 as a negative regulator of viral reactivation. Depletion of MDM2, a repressor of p53, favored efficient activation of the viral lytic transcription program and viral reactivation. During lytic replication cells activated a p53 response, accumulated DNA damage and arrested at G2-phase. Depletion of p21, a p53 target gene, restored cell cycle progression and thereby impaired the virus reactivation cascade delaying the onset of virus replication induced cytopathic effect. Herpesviruses are known to reactivate in response to different kinds of stress, and our study now highlights the molecular events in the stressed host cell that KSHV has evolved to utilize to ensure efficient viral lytic replication.

  20. The novel Shewanella putrefaciens-infecting bacteriophage Spp001: genome sequence and lytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Feng; Li, Meng; Lin, Hong; Wang, Jingxue; Cao, Limin; Khan, Muhammad Naseem

    2014-06-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens has been identified as a specific spoilage organism commonly found in chilled fresh fish, which contributes to the spoilage of fish products. Limiting S. putrefaciens growth can extend the shelf-life of chilled fish. Endolysins, which are lytic enzymes produced by bacteriophages, have been considered an alternative to control bacterial growth, and have been useful in various applications, including food preservation. We report here, for the first time, the complete genome sequence of a novel phage Spp001, which lyses S. putrefaciens Sp225. The Spp001 genome comprises a 54,789-bp DNA molecule with 67 open reading frames and an average total G + C content of 49.42 %. In silico analysis revealed that the Spp001 open reading frames encode various putative functional proteins, including an endolysin (ORF 62); however, no sequence for genes encoding the holin polypeptides, which work in concert with endolysins, was identified. To examine further the lytic activity of Spp001, we analyzed the lytic enzyme-containing fraction from phages released at the end of the phage lytic cycle in S. putrefaciens, using diffusion and turbidimetric assays. The results show that the partially purified extract contained endolysin, as indicated by a high hydrolytic activity towards bacterial peptidoglycan decrease in the OD590 value by 0.160 in 15 min. The results will allow further investigation of the purification of natural Spp001 endolysin, the extension of Spp001 host range, and the applications of the phage-encoded enzymes.

  1. Oncogenic Herpesvirus Utilizes Stress-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoints for Efficient Lytic Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistreri, Giuseppe; Viiliäinen, Johanna; Turunen, Mikko; Diaz, Raquel; Lyly, Lauri; Pekkonen, Pirita; Rantala, Juha; Ojala, Krista; Sarek, Grzegorz; Teesalu, Mari; Denisova, Oxana; Peltonen, Karita; Julkunen, Ilkka; Varjosalo, Markku; Kainov, Denis; Kallioniemi, Olli; Laiho, Marikki; Taipale, Jussi; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Ojala, Päivi M

    2016-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) causes Kaposi's sarcoma and certain lymphoproliferative malignancies. Latent infection is established in the majority of tumor cells, whereas lytic replication is reactivated in a small fraction of cells, which is important for both virus spread and disease progression. A siRNA screen for novel regulators of KSHV reactivation identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 as a negative regulator of viral reactivation. Depletion of MDM2, a repressor of p53, favored efficient activation of the viral lytic transcription program and viral reactivation. During lytic replication cells activated a p53 response, accumulated DNA damage and arrested at G2-phase. Depletion of p21, a p53 target gene, restored cell cycle progression and thereby impaired the virus reactivation cascade delaying the onset of virus replication induced cytopathic effect. Herpesviruses are known to reactivate in response to different kinds of stress, and our study now highlights the molecular events in the stressed host cell that KSHV has evolved to utilize to ensure efficient viral lytic replication.

  2. DNA Damage Signaling Is Induced in the Absence of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Lytic DNA Replication and in Response to Expression of ZEBRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang'ondu, Ruth; Teal, Stuart; Park, Richard; Heston, Lee; Delecluse, Henri; Miller, George

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV), like other oncogenic viruses, modulates the activity of cellular DNA damage responses (DDR) during its life cycle. Our aim was to characterize the role of early lytic proteins and viral lytic DNA replication in activation of DNA damage signaling during the EBV lytic cycle. Our data challenge the prevalent hypothesis that activation of DDR pathways during the EBV lytic cycle occurs solely in response to large amounts of exogenous double stranded DNA products generated during lytic viral DNA replication. In immunofluorescence or immunoblot assays, DDR activation markers, specifically phosphorylated ATM (pATM), H2AX (γH2AX), or 53BP1 (p53BP1), were induced in the presence or absence of viral DNA amplification or replication compartments during the EBV lytic cycle. In assays with an ATM inhibitor and DNA damaging reagents in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines, γH2AX induction was necessary for optimal expression of early EBV genes, but not sufficient for lytic reactivation. Studies in lytically reactivated EBV-positive cells in which early EBV proteins, BGLF4, BGLF5, or BALF2, were not expressed showed that these proteins were not necessary for DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle. Expression of ZEBRA, a viral protein that is necessary for EBV entry into the lytic phase, induced pATM foci and γH2AX independent of other EBV gene products. ZEBRA mutants deficient in DNA binding, Z(R183E) and Z(S186E), did not induce foci of pATM. ZEBRA co-localized with HP1β, a heterochromatin associated protein involved in DNA damage signaling. We propose a model of DDR activation during the EBV lytic cycle in which ZEBRA induces ATM kinase phosphorylation, in a DNA binding dependent manner, to modulate gene expression. ATM and H2AX phosphorylation induced prior to EBV replication may be critical for creating a microenvironment of viral and cellular gene expression that enables lytic cycle progression.

  3. Lytic infection of Lactococcus lactis by bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 triggers alternative transcriptional host responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Zomer, Aldert; Mahony, Jennifer; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-08-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed throughout lytic infection. Whole-genome microarrays performed at various time points postinfection demonstrated a rather modest impact on host transcription. The majority of changes in the host transcriptome occur during late infection stages; few changes in host gene transcription occur during the immediate and early infection stages. Alterations in the L. lactis UC509.9 transcriptome during lytic infection appear to be phage specific, with relatively few differentially transcribed genes shared between cells infected with Tuc2009 and those infected with c2. Despite the apparent lack of a coordinated general phage response, three themes common to both infections were noted: alternative transcription of genes involved in catabolic flux and energy production, differential transcription of genes involved in cell wall modification, and differential transcription of genes involved in the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. The transcriptional profiles of both bacteriophages during lytic infection generally correlated with the findings of previous studies and allowed the confirmation of previously predicted promoter sequences. In addition, the host transcriptional response to lysogenization with Tuc2009 was monitored along with tiling array analysis of Tuc2009 in the lysogenic state. Analysis identified 44 host genes with altered transcription during lysogeny, 36 of which displayed levels of transcription significantly reduced from those for uninfected cells.

  4. Inhibition of Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Cycle by an Ethyl Acetate Subfraction Separated from Polygonum cuspidatum Root and Its Major Component, Emodin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yi Yiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polygonum cuspidatum is widely used as a medicinal herb in Asia. In this study, we examined the ethyl acetate subfraction F3 obtained from P. cuspidatum root and its major component, emodin, for their capacity to inhibit the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV lytic cycle. The cell viability was determined by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] method. The expression of EBV lytic proteins was analyzed by immunoblot, indirect immunofluorescence and flow cytometric assays. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to assess the EBV DNA replication and the transcription of lytic genes, including BRLF1 and BZLF1. Results showed that the F3 and its major component emodin inhibit the transcription of EBV immediate early genes, the expression of EBV lytic proteins, including Rta, Zta, and EA-D and reduces EBV DNA replication, showing that F3 and emodin are potentially useful as an anti-EBV drug.

  5. Mechanosensitive promoter region in the human HB-GAM gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liedert, Astrid; Kassem, Moustapha; Claes, Lutz;

    2009-01-01

    expression through specific transcription factor binding sites in the promoter region of mechanosensitive genes. In the present study, we demonstrate that the expression of HB-GAM, which is known to have stimulating effects on osteogenic differentiation, is rapidly induced by mechanical loading in hMSC-TERT4...... cells. Analysis of the human HB-GAM gene upstream regulatory region with luciferase reporter gene assays revealed that the upregulation of HB-GAM expression occurred at the transcriptional level and was mainly dependent on the HB-GAM promoter region most upstream containing three potential AP-1 binding...

  6. MID2 can substitute for MID1 and control exocytosis of lytic granules in cytotoxic T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Hansen, Ann K; Meroni, Germana;

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that the E3 ubiquitin ligase midline 1 (MID1) is upregulated in murine cytotoxic lymphocytes (CTL), where it controls exocytosis of lytic granules and the killing capacity. Accordingly, CTL from MID1 knock-out (MID1(-/-)) mice have a 25-30% reduction in exocytosis of lytic...... granules and cytotoxicity compared to CTL from wild-type (WT) mice. We wondered why the MID1 gene knock-out did not affect exocytosis and cytotoxicity more severely and speculated whether MID2, a close homologue of MID1, might partially compensate for the loss of MID1 in MID1(-/-) CTL. Here, we showed...

  7. Hepatocyte growth factor pathway upregulation in the bone marrow microenvironment in multiple myeloma is associated with lytic bone disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ida B; Christensen, Jacob H; Lyng, Maria Bibi

    2013-01-01

    Lytic bone disease (LBD) in multiple myeloma (MM) is caused by osteoclast hyperactivation and osteoblast inhibition. Based on in vitro studies, the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) pathway is thought to be central in osteoblast inhibition. We evaluated the gene expression of the HGF pathway in vivo...

  8. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1 an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2 a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  9. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ju; Tsai, Wan-Hua; Chen, Yu-Lian; Ko, Ying-Chieh; Chou, Sheng-Ping; Chen, Jen-Yang; Lin, Su-Fang

    2011-03-10

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1) an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2) a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  10. Host transcript accumulation during lytic KSHV infection reveals several classes of host responses.

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    Sanjay Chandriani

    Full Text Available Lytic infection by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is associated with an extensive shutoff of host gene expression, mediated chiefly by accelerated mRNA turnover due to expression of the viral SOX protein. We have previously identified a small number of host mRNAs that can escape SOX-mediated degradation. Here we present a detailed, transcriptome-wide analysis of host shutoff, with careful microarray normalization to allow rigorous determination of the magnitude and extent of transcript loss. We find that the extent of transcript reduction represents a continuum of susceptibilities of transcripts to virus-mediated shutoff. Our results affirm that the levels of over 75% of host transcripts are substantially reduced during lytic infection, but also show that another approximately 20% of cellular mRNAs declines only slightly (less than 2-fold during the course of infection. Approximately 2% of examined cellular genes are strongly upregulated during lytic infection, most likely due to transcriptional induction of mRNAs that display intrinsic SOX-resistance.

  11. Superhelical destabilization in regulatory regions of stress response genes.

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    Huiquan Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced DNA duplex destabilization (SIDD analysis exploits the known structural and energetic properties of DNA to predict sites that are susceptible to strand separation under negative superhelical stress. When this approach was used to calculate the SIDD profile of the entire Escherichia coli K12 genome, it was found that strongly destabilized sites occur preferentially in intergenic regions that are either known or inferred to contain promoters, but rarely occur in coding regions. Here, we investigate whether the genes grouped in different functional categories have characteristic SIDD properties in their upstream flanks. We report that strong SIDD sites in the E. coli K12 genome are statistically significantly overrepresented in the upstream regions of genes encoding transcriptional regulators. In particular, the upstream regions of genes that directly respond to physiological and environmental stimuli are more destabilized than are those regions of genes that are not involved in these responses. Moreover, if a pathway is controlled by a transcriptional regulator whose gene has a destabilized 5' flank, then the genes (operons in that pathway also usually contain strongly destabilized SIDD sites in their 5' flanks. We observe this statistically significant association of SIDD sites with upstream regions of genes functioning in transcription in 38 of 43 genomes of free-living bacteria, but in only four of 18 genomes of endosymbionts or obligate parasitic bacteria. These results suggest that strong SIDD sites 5' to participating genes may be involved in transcriptional responses to environmental changes, which are known to transiently alter superhelicity. We propose that these SIDD sites are active and necessary participants in superhelically mediated regulatory mechanisms governing changes in the global pattern of gene expression in prokaryotes in response to physiological or environmental changes.

  12. A subset of replication proteins enhances origin recognition and lytic replication by the Epstein-Barr virus ZEBRA protein.

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    Ayman El-Guindy

    Full Text Available ZEBRA is a site-specific DNA binding protein that functions as a transcriptional activator and as an origin binding protein. Both activities require that ZEBRA recognizes DNA motifs that are scattered along the viral genome. The mechanism by which ZEBRA discriminates between the origin of lytic replication and promoters of EBV early genes is not well understood. We explored the hypothesis that activation of replication requires stronger association between ZEBRA and DNA than does transcription. A ZEBRA mutant, Z(S173A, at a phosphorylation site and three point mutants in the DNA recognition domain of ZEBRA, namely Z(Y180E, Z(R187K and Z(K188A, were similarly deficient at activating lytic DNA replication and expression of late gene expression but were competent to activate transcription of viral early lytic genes. These mutants all exhibited reduced capacity to interact with DNA as assessed by EMSA, ChIP and an in vivo biotinylated DNA pull-down assay. Over-expression of three virally encoded replication proteins, namely the primase (BSLF1, the single-stranded DNA-binding protein (BALF2 and the DNA polymerase processivity factor (BMRF1, partially rescued the replication defect in these mutants and enhanced ZEBRA's interaction with oriLyt. The findings demonstrate a functional role of replication proteins in stabilizing the association of ZEBRA with viral DNA. Enhanced binding of ZEBRA to oriLyt is crucial for lytic viral DNA replication.

  13. The distribution of SNPs in human gene regulatory regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yongjian

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a result of high-throughput genotyping methods, millions of human genetic variants have been reported in recent years. To efficiently identify those with significant biological functions, a practical strategy is to concentrate on variants located in important sequence regions such as gene regulatory regions. Results Analysis of the most common type of variant, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, shows that in gene promoter regions more SNPs occur in close proximity to transcriptional start sites than in regions further upstream, and a disproportionate number of those SNPs represent nucleotide transversions. Additionally, the number of SNPs found in the predicted transcription factor binding sites is higher than in non-binding site sequences. Conclusion Current information about transcription factor binding site sequence patterns may not be exhaustive, and SNPs may be actively involved in influencing gene expression by affecting the transcription factor binding sites.

  14. Evidence for gene conversion among immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, S H; Rudikoff, S

    1984-03-01

    We have previously reported that the VH region amino acid sequence of a phosphocholine (PC)-binding hybridoma antibody of CBA/J origin, HP101 6G6 (6G6), differs extensively from the VH regions of other PC-binding antibodies. The sequence of 6G6 VH appears to be derived from a gene homologous to the BALB/c V11 gene, a member of the PC VH (T15 VH) gene family not normally used to encode PC-binding antibodies. The 6G6 VH sequence differs from the translated sequence of V11 by six amino acids, four of which occur at the same position in other members of this gene family. This coincidence led to the proposal that the 6G6 VH gene was derived by gene conversion involving three genes of the PC VH gene family. We report here the nucleic acid sequence of the rearranged VH gene of hybridoma 6G6. This sequence supports our previous suggestion of gene conversion by confirming those differences, relative to the BALB/c V11 gene sequence, that are encoded by other members of this gene family, and extends this correlation to include three silent base pair substitutions as well. In addition, 5' noncoding region sequence and Southern blot analysis using probes derived from the coding and 5' noncoding regions confirm that the 6G6 VH gene is likely to be derived from the V11 homologue in CBA/J mice, and suggest that all three genes believed to be involved in the generation of the 6G6 VH gene are present in the CBA/J genome, a prerequisite for their involvement in gene conversion.

  15. Characterization of 3'-untranslated region of the mouse GDNF gene

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    Oh-hashi Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF is a potent survival factor for many cell types, and its expression is widespread both within and outside of the nervous system. The regulation of GDNF expression has been extensively investigated but is not fully understood. Results Using a luciferase reporter assay, we identified the role of the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR of the mouse GDNF gene in the regulation of gene expression. We focused on a well-conserved A- and T-rich region (approximately 200 bp in length, which is located approximately 1000 bp downstream of the stop codon in exon 4 of the gene and contains three typical AU-rich elements (AREs, AUUUA. Interestingly, these AREs are well conserved in several GDNF genes. By testing reporter constructs containing various regions and lengths of the 3'-UTR fused to the end of the luciferase gene, we demonstrated that the ARE-induced decrease in luciferase activity correlates with the attenuation of the mRNA stability. Furthermore, we found that several regions around the AREs in the 3'-UTR suppressed the luciferase activity. Moreover, the expression level of the GDNF protein was negligible in C6 glioma cells transfected with the ARE-containing GDNF expression vector. Conclusions Our study is the first characterization of the possible role of AREs and other suppressive regions in the 3'-UTR in regulating the amounts of GDNF mRNA in C6 cells.

  16. Viral reproductive strategies: How can lytic viruses be evolutionarily competitive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Natalia L

    2007-12-21

    Viral release strategies can be roughly classified as lytic (the ones that accumulate inside the host cell and exit in a burst, killing the cell), and budding (the ones that are produced and released from the host cell gradually). Here we study the evolutionary competition between the two strategies. If all the parameters, such as the rate of viral production, cell life-span and the neutralizing capacity of the antibodies, were the same for lytic and budding viruses, the budding life-strategy would have a large evolutionary advantage. The question arises what makes lytic viruses evolutionarily competitive. We propose that it is the different removal capacity of the antibodies against budding and lytic virions. The latter exit the cell in a large burst such that the antibodies are "flooded" and a larger proportion of virions can escape the immune system and spread to new cells. We create two spatial models of virus-antibody interaction and show that for realistic parameter values, the effect of antibody flooding can indeed take place. We also argue that the lytic life cycle, including a relatively large burst-size, has evolved to promote survival in the face of antibody attack. According to the calculations, in the absence of efficient antibodies, the optimal burst size of lytic viruses would be only a few virus particles, as opposed to the observed 10(2)-10(5) viral particles. Similarly, there is an evolutionary pressure to extend the life-span as a response to antibody action.

  17. Isolation and characterization of lytic phages TSE1-3 against Enterobacter cloacae

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    Khawaja Komal Ameer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens is becoming a major challenge for patient care. The utilization of alternative therapies for infectious diseases other than antibiotics is an urgent need of today medical practice. The utilization of lytic bacteriophages and their gene products as therapeutic agents against antibiotic resistant bacteria is one of the convincing alternative approaches. Here we present the isolation and characterization of three lytic bacteriophages TSE1-3 against Enterobacter cloacae from sewage effluent. The isolates maintained antibacterial activity for 10 hours of incubation followed by the development of phage resistance. Their stability at different temperatures and pH, established their possible application in phage therapy. The highest activity of the phages was observed at 37°C and pH 7.0, while they gave lytic activity up to 60°C. The latent period of all the TSE phages was 20 minutes, while the burst size was 360 for TSE1, 270 for TSE2 and 311 for TSE3. The phages were harboring double-stranded DNA larger than 12kb in size. Further research into the phages genome and proteins, animal experiments, delivery parameters and clinical trials may lead to their utilization in phage therapy.

  18. Identification of genes from the Treacher Collins candidate region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, M.; Dixon, J.; Edwards, S. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)]|[Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development. The TCOF1 locus has previously been mapped to chromosome 5q32-33. The candidate gene region has been defined as being between two flanking markers, ribosomal protein S14 (RPS14) and Annexin 6 (ANX6), by analyzing recombination events in affected individuals. It is estimated that the distance between these flanking markers is 500 kb by three separate analysis methods: (1) radiation hybrid mapping; (2) genetic linkage; and (3) YAC contig analysis. A cosmid contig which spans the candidate gene region for TCOF1 has been constructed by screening the Los Alamos National Laboratory flow-sorted chromosome 5 cosmid library. Cosmids were obtained by using a combination of probes generated from YAC end clones, Alu-PCR fragments from YACs, and asymmetric PCR fragments from both T7 and T3 cosmid ends. Exon amplifications, the selection of genomic coding sequences based upon the presence of functional splice acceptor and donor sites, was used to identify potential exon sequences. Sequences found to be conserved between species were then used to screen cDNA libraries in order to identify candidate genes. To date, four different cDNAs have been isolated from this region and are being analyzed as potential candidate genes for TCOF1. These include the genes encoding plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPX3), heparin sulfate sulfotransferase (HSST), a gene with homology to the ETS family of proteins and one which shows no homology to any known genes. Work is also in progress to identify and characterize additional cDNAs from the candidate gene region.

  19. Gene recovery microdissection (GRM) a process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, A T; Coleman, M A; Tucker, J D

    2001-02-08

    Gene Recovery Microdissection (GRM) is a unique and cost-effective process for producing chromosome region-specific libraries of expressed genes. It accelerates the pace, reduces the cost, and extends the capabilities of functional genomic research, the means by which scientists will put to life-saving, life-enhancing use their knowledge of any plant or animal genome.

  20. Characterization of the promoter region of the mouse Xist gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, N; Bonny, C; Schorderet, D F

    1995-01-01

    The mouse Xist gene is expressed exclusively from the inactive X chromosome and may be implicated in initiating X inactivation. To better understand the mechanisms underlying the control of Xist expression, we investigated the upstream regulatory region of the mouse Xist promoter. A 1.2-kb upstream region of the Xist gene was sequenced and promoter activity was studied by chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assays after transfection in murine XX and XY cell lines. The region analyzed (-1157 to +917 showed no in vitro sex-specific promoter activity. However, a minimal constitutional promoter was assigned to a region from -81 to +1, and a cis element from -41 to -15 regulates promoter activity. We showed that a nuclear factor binds to an element located at -30 to -25 (TTAAAG). A second sequence at -41 to -15 does not act as an enhancer and is unable to confer transcriptional activity to the Xist gene on its own. A third region from -82 to -41 is needed for correct expression. Deletion of the segment -441 to -231 is associated with an increase in CAT activity and may represent a silencer element. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8618932

  1. Gene expression profiles in rat brain disclose CNS signature genes and regional patterns of functional specialisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breilid Harald

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian brain is divided into distinct regions with structural and neurophysiological differences. As a result, gene expression is likely to vary between regions in relation to their cellular composition and neuronal function. In order to improve our knowledge and understanding of regional patterns of gene expression in the CNS, we have generated a global map of gene expression in selected regions of the adult rat brain (frontomedial-, temporal- and occipital cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum; both right and left sides as well as in three major non-neural tissues (spleen, liver and kidney using the Applied Biosystems Rat Genome Survey Microarray. Results By unsupervised hierarchical clustering, we found that the transcriptome within a region was highly conserved among individual rats and that there were no systematic differences between the two hemispheres (right versus left side. Further, we identified distinct sets of genes showing significant regional enrichment. Functional annotation of each of these gene sets clearly reflected several important physiological features of the region in question, including synaptic transmission within the cortex, neurogenesis in hippocampus and G-protein-mediated signalling in striatum. In addition, we were able to reveal potentially new regional features, such as mRNA transcription- and neurogenesis-annotated activities in cerebellum and differential use of glutamate signalling between regions. Finally, we determined a set of 'CNS-signature' genes that uncover characteristics of several common neuronal processes in the CNS, with marked over-representation of specific features of synaptic transmission, ion transport and cell communication, as well as numerous novel unclassified genes. Conclusion We have generated a global map of gene expression in the rat brain and used this to determine functional processes and pathways that have a regional preference or ubiquitous

  2. Lytic and non-lytic permeabilization of cardiolipin-containing lipid bilayers induced by cytochrome C.

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    Jian Xu

    Full Text Available The release of cytochrome c (cyt c from mitochondria is an important early step during cellular apoptosis, however the precise mechanism by which the outer mitochondrial membrane becomes permeable to these proteins is as yet unclear. Inspired by our previous observation of cyt c crossing the membrane barrier of giant unilamellar vesicle model systems, we investigate the interaction of cyt c with cardiolipin (CL-containing membranes using the innovative droplet bilayer system that permits electrochemical measurements with simultaneous microscopy observation. We find that cyt c can permeabilize CL-containing membranes by induction of lipid pores in a dose-dependent manner, with membrane lysis eventually observed at relatively high (µM cyt c concentrations due to widespread pore formation in the membrane destabilizing its bilayer structure. Surprisingly, as cyt c concentration is further increased, we find a regime with exceptionally high permeability where a stable membrane barrier is still maintained between droplet compartments. This unusual non-lytic state has a long lifetime (>20 h and can be reversibly formed by mechanically separating the droplets before reforming the contact area between them. The transitions between behavioural regimes are electrostatically driven, demonstrated by their suppression with increasing ionic concentrations and their dependence on CL composition. While membrane permeability could also be induced by cationic PAMAM dendrimers, the non-lytic, highly permeable membrane state could not be reproduced using these synthetic polymers, indicating that details in the structure of cyt c beyond simply possessing a cationic net charge are important for the emergence of this unconventional membrane state. These unexpected findings may hold significance for the mechanism by which cyt c escapes into the cytosol of cells during apoptosis.

  3. Regulation of latency to lytic life cycle:multiple tricks by KSHV RTA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiemin Wong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Higher Education Press and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010The herpesviruses are large enveloped DNA viruses that infect a wide spectrum hosts including human being. A key characteristic of all herpesviruses is their ability to establish life-time latency within the infected host and to periodically reactivate and enter the iytic replication to produce infectious virus progeny. During latency the 120-300 kb double-stranded DNA genomes of these viruses are maintained as multiple copies of circular episomes within the nuclei of the host cells. Lytic replication is marked by an increase in viral gene expression and the production of infectious virus progeny.

  4. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase pathway induces apoptosis and prevents Epstein Barr virus reactivation in Raji cells exposed to lytic cycle inducing compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Renzo Livia

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EBV lytic cycle activators, such as phorbol esters, anti-immunoglobulin, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ, sodium butyrate, induce apoptosis in EBV-negative but not in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma (BL cells. To investigate the molecular mechanisms allowing EBV-infected cells to be protected, we examined the expression of viral and cellular antiapoptotic proteins as well as the activation of signal transduction pathways in BL-derived Raji cells exposed to lytic cycle inducing agents. Results Our data show that, following EBV activation, the latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1 and the cellular anti-apoptotic proteins MCL-1 and BCL-2 were quickly up-regulated and that Raji cells remained viable even when exposed simultaneously to P(BU2, sodium butyrate and TGFβ. We report here that inhibition of p38 pathway, during EBV activation, led to a three fold increment of apoptosis and largely prevented lytic gene expression. Conclusion These findings indicate that, during the switch from the latent to the lytic phase of EBV infection, p38 MAPK phosphorylation plays a key role both for protecting the host cells from apoptosis as well as for inducing viral reactivation. Because Raji cells are defective for late antigens expression, we hypothesize that the increment of LMP1 gene expression in the early phases of EBV lytic cycle might contribute to the survival of the EBV-positive cells.

  5. Painful Lytic Lesions of the Foot : A Case Report

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    R Vaishya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of lytic lesions in the bones of foot raises a number of diagnostic possibilities ranging from infection, inflammatory pathology to neoplastic conditions. Although the radiological picture is not pathognomonic of any pathology, clinical history and histopathological examination can help to clinch the diagnosis. We present a case of multiple lytic lesions of the foot and discuss possible differential diagnoses. The patient was diagnosed as a case of madura foot and the lesions responded to surgical debridement and anti-fungal treatment with a good functional outcome. Madura foot is an uncommon, chronic granulomatous fungal or bacterial infection with a predilection in people who walk barefoot. Although known for a specific geographical distribution, madura foot should be kept as a possible diagnosis in patients presenting with lytic lesions of the foot due to population emigration across the world.

  6. In vivo dynamics of EBNA1-oriP interaction during latent and lytic replication of Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daikoku, Tohru; Kudoh, Ayumi; Fujita, Masatoshi; Sugaya, Yutaka; Isomura, Hiroki; Tsurumi, Tatsuya

    2004-12-24

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is required for maintenance of the viral genome DNA during the latent phase of EBV replication but continues to be synthesized after the induction of viral productive replication. An EBV genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that EBNA1 constantly binds to oriP of the EBV genome during not only latent but also lytic infection. Although the total levels of EBNA1 proved constant throughout the latter, the levels of the oriP-bound form were increased as lytic infection proceeded. EBV productive DNA replication occurs at discrete sites in nuclei, called replication compartments, where viral replication proteins are clustered. Confocal laser microscopic analyses revealed that whereas EBNA1 was distributed broadly in nuclei as fine punctate dots during the latent phase of infection, the protein became redistributed to the viral replication compartments and localized as distinct spots within and/or nearby the compartments after the induction of lytic replication. Taking these findings into consideration, oriP regions of the EBV genome might be organized by EBNA1 into replication domains that may set up scaffolding for lytic replication and transcription.

  7. Remodelling of cortical actin where lytic granules dock at natural killer cell immune synapses revealed by super-resolution microscopy.

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    Alice C N Brown

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are innate immune cells that secrete lytic granules to directly kill virus-infected or transformed cells across an immune synapse. However, a major gap in understanding this process is in establishing how lytic granules pass through the mesh of cortical actin known to underlie the NK cell membrane. Research has been hampered by the resolution of conventional light microscopy, which is too low to resolve cortical actin during lytic granule secretion. Here we use two high-resolution imaging techniques to probe the synaptic organisation of NK cell receptors and filamentous (F-actin. A combination of optical tweezers and live cell confocal microscopy reveals that microclusters of NKG2D assemble into a ring-shaped structure at the centre of intercellular synapses, where Vav1 and Grb2 also accumulate. Within this ring-shaped organisation of NK cell proteins, lytic granules accumulate for secretion. Using 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM to gain super-resolution of ~100 nm, cortical actin was detected in a central region of the NK cell synapse irrespective of whether activating or inhibitory signals dominate. Strikingly, the periodicity of the cortical actin mesh increased in specific domains at the synapse when the NK cell was activated. Two-colour super-resolution imaging revealed that lytic granules docked precisely in these domains which were also proximal to where the microtubule-organising centre (MTOC polarised. Together, these data demonstrate that remodelling of the cortical actin mesh occurs at the central region of the cytolytic NK cell immune synapse. This is likely to occur for other types of cell secretion and also emphasises the importance of emerging super-resolution imaging technology for revealing new biology.

  8. Remodelling of cortical actin where lytic granules dock at natural killer cell immune synapses revealed by super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alice C N; Oddos, Stephane; Dobbie, Ian M; Alakoskela, Juha-Matti; Parton, Richard M; Eissmann, Philipp; Neil, Mark A A; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M W; Davis, Ilan; Davis, Daniel M

    2011-09-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate immune cells that secrete lytic granules to directly kill virus-infected or transformed cells across an immune synapse. However, a major gap in understanding this process is in establishing how lytic granules pass through the mesh of cortical actin known to underlie the NK cell membrane. Research has been hampered by the resolution of conventional light microscopy, which is too low to resolve cortical actin during lytic granule secretion. Here we use two high-resolution imaging techniques to probe the synaptic organisation of NK cell receptors and filamentous (F)-actin. A combination of optical tweezers and live cell confocal microscopy reveals that microclusters of NKG2D assemble into a ring-shaped structure at the centre of intercellular synapses, where Vav1 and Grb2 also accumulate. Within this ring-shaped organisation of NK cell proteins, lytic granules accumulate for secretion. Using 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) to gain super-resolution of ~100 nm, cortical actin was detected in a central region of the NK cell synapse irrespective of whether activating or inhibitory signals dominate. Strikingly, the periodicity of the cortical actin mesh increased in specific domains at the synapse when the NK cell was activated. Two-colour super-resolution imaging revealed that lytic granules docked precisely in these domains which were also proximal to where the microtubule-organising centre (MTOC) polarised. Together, these data demonstrate that remodelling of the cortical actin mesh occurs at the central region of the cytolytic NK cell immune synapse. This is likely to occur for other types of cell secretion and also emphasises the importance of emerging super-resolution imaging technology for revealing new biology.

  9. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 functions as a viral splicing factor and promotes expression of intron-containing viral lytic genes in spliceosome-mediated RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Yamanegi, Koji; Allemand, Eric; Kruhlak, Michael; Krainer, Adrian R; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2008-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 facilitates the expression of both intronless viral ORF59 genes and intron-containing viral K8 and K8.1 genes (V. Majerciak, N. Pripuzova, J. P. McCoy, S. J. Gao, and Z. M. Zheng, J. Virol. 81:1062-1071, 2007). In this study, we showed that disruption of ORF57 in a KSHV genome led to increased accumulation of ORF50 and K8 pre-mRNAs and reduced expression of ORF50 and K-bZIP proteins but had no effect on latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA). Cotransfection of ORF57 and K8beta cDNA, which retains a suboptimal intron of K8 pre-mRNA due to alternative splicing, promoted RNA splicing of K8beta and production of K8alpha (K-bZIP). Although Epstein-Barr virus EB2, a closely related homolog of ORF57, had a similar activity in the cotransfection assays, herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP27 was inactive. This enhancement of RNA splicing by ORF57 correlates with the intact N-terminal nuclear localization signal motifs of ORF57 and takes place in the absence of other viral proteins. In activated KSHV-infected B cells, KSHV ORF57 partially colocalizes with splicing factors in nuclear speckles and assembles into spliceosomal complexes in association with low-abundance viral ORF50 and K8 pre-mRNAs and essential splicing components. The association of ORF57 with snRNAs occurs by ORF57-Sm protein interaction. We also found that ORF57 binds K8beta pre-mRNAs in vitro in the presence of nuclear extracts. Collectively our data indicate that KSHV ORF57 functions as a novel splicing factor in the spliceosome-mediated splicing of viral RNA transcripts.

  10. Urban land use limits regional bumble bee gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shalene; Kremen, C

    2013-05-01

    Potential declines in native pollinator communities and increased reliance on pollinator-dependent crops have raised concerns about native pollinator conservation and dispersal across human-altered landscapes. Bumble bees are one of the most effective native pollinators and are often the first to be extirpated in human-altered habitats, yet little is known about how bumble bees move across fine spatial scales and what landscapes promote or limit their gene flow. In this study, we examine regional genetic differentiation and fine-scale relatedness patterns of the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, to investigate how current and historic habitat composition impact gene flow. We conducted our study across a landscape mosaic of natural, agricultural and urban/suburban habitats, and we show that B. vosnesenskii exhibits low but significant levels of differentiation across the study system (F(ST) = 0.019, D(est) = 0.049). Most importantly, we reveal significant relationships between pairwise F(ST) and resistance models created from contemporary land use maps. Specifically, B. vosnesenskii gene flow is most limited by commercial, industrial and transportation-related impervious cover. Finally, our fine-scale analysis reveals significant but declining relatedness between individuals at the 1-9 km spatial scale, most likely due to local queen dispersal. Overall, our results indicate that B. vosnesenskii exhibits considerable local dispersal and that regional gene flow is significantly limited by impervious cover associated with urbanization.

  11. Morphological diversity of cultured cold-active lytic bacteriophages isolated from the Napahai plateau wetland in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuling Ji; Chunjing Zhang; Anxiu Kuang; Jiankai Li; Yinshan Cui; Kunhao Qin; Lianbing Lin; Benxu Cheng; Qi Zhang; Yunlin Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dear Editor,Viruses are the most abundant,diverse,and ubiquitous entities(approximately 1031)on Earth.They play major roles in horizontal gene transfer,the regulation of bacterial community structures,as well as nutrient and energy cycles of marine ecosystems(Danovaro et al.,2008).In particular,lytic bacteriophages(phages)can infect and kill bacteria without harming human or animal

  12. CTCF interacts with the lytic HSV-1 genome to promote viral transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Fengchao; Li, Xin; Vladimirova, Olga; Hu, Benxia; Chen, Guijun; Xiao, Yu; Singh, Vikrant; Lu, Danfeng; Li, Lihong; Han, Hongbo; Wickramasinghe, J. M. A. S. P.; Smith, Sheryl T.; Zheng, Chunfu; Li, Qihan; Lieberman, Paul M.; Fraser, Nigel W.; Zhou, Jumin

    2017-01-01

    CTCF is an essential chromatin regulator implicated in important nuclear processes including in nuclear organization and transcription. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen, which enters productive infection in human epithelial and many other cell types. CTCF is known to bind several sites in the HSV-1 genome during latency and reactivation, but its function has not been defined. Here, we report that CTCF interacts extensively with the HSV-1 DNA during lytic infection by ChIP-seq, and its knockdown results in the reduction of viral transcription, viral genome copy number and virus yield. CTCF knockdown led to increased H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, and a reduction of RNA pol II occupancy on viral genes. Importantly, ChIP-seq analysis revealed that there is a higher level of CTD Ser2P modified RNA Pol II near CTCF peaks relative to the Ser5P form in the viral genome. Consistent with this, CTCF knockdown reduced the Ser2P but increased Ser5P modified forms of RNA Pol II on viral genes. These results suggest that CTCF promotes HSV-1 lytic transcription by facilitating the elongation of RNA Pol II and preventing silenced chromatin on the viral genome. PMID:28045091

  13. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of KSHV-Infected Cells Reveals Roles of ORF45-Activated RSK during Lytic Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Avey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV is an oncogenic virus which has adapted unique mechanisms to modulate the cellular microenvironment of its human host. The pathogenesis of KSHV is intimately linked to its manipulation of cellular signaling pathways, including the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway. We have previously shown that KSHV ORF45 contributes to the sustained activation of both ERK and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK, a major functional mediator of ERK/MAPK signaling during KSHV lytic replication. ORF45-activated RSK is required for optimal KSHV lytic gene expression and progeny virion production, though the underlying mechanisms downstream of this activation are still unclear. We hypothesized that the activation of RSK by ORF45 causes differential phosphorylation of cellular and viral substrates, affecting biological processes essential for efficient KSHV lytic replication. Accordingly, we observed widespread and significant differences in protein phosphorylation upon induction of lytic replication. Mass-spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic screening identified putative substrates of ORF45-activated RSK in KSHV-infected cells. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that nuclear proteins, including several transcriptional regulators, were overrepresented among these candidates. We validated the ORF45/RSK-dependent phosphorylation of several putative substrates by employing KSHV BAC mutagenesis, kinase inhibitor treatments, and/or CRISPR-mediated knockout of RSK in KSHV-infected cells. Furthermore, we assessed the consequences of knocking out these substrates on ORF45/RSK-dependent regulation of gene expression and KSHV progeny virion production. Finally, we show data to support that ORF45 regulates the translational efficiency of a subset of viral/cellular genes with complex secondary structure in their 5' UTR. Altogether, these data shed light on the mechanisms by which KSHV ORF45

  14. Noncanonical microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in lytic infection of murine gammaherpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xia

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA and endogenous small interfering RNA (endo-siRNA are two essential classes of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs in eukaryotes. The class of miRNA is diverse and there exist noncanonical miRNAs that bypass the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway. In order to identify noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs responding to virus infection and study their potential function, we sequenced small-RNA species from cells lytically infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68. In addition to three novel canonical miRNAs in mouse, two antisense miRNAs in virus and 25 novel noncanonical miRNAs, including miRNAs derived from transfer RNAs, small nucleolar RNAs and introns, in the host were identified. These noncanonical miRNAs exhibited features distinct from that of canonical miRNAs in lengths of hairpins, base pairings and first nucleotide preference. Many of the novel miRNAs are conserved in mammals. Besides several known murine endo-siRNAs detected by the sequencing profiling, a novel locus in the mouse genome was identified to produce endo-siRNAs. This novel endo-siRNA locus is comprised of two tandem inverted B4 short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs. Unexpectedly, the SINE-derived endo-siRNAs were found in a variety of sequencing data and virus-infected cells. Moreover, a murine miRNA was up-regulated more than 35 fold in infected than in mock-treated cells. The putative targets of the viral and the up-regulated murine miRNAs were potentially involved in processes of gene transcription and protein phosphorylation, and localized to membranes, suggesting their potential role in manipulating the host basal immune system during lytic infection. Our results extended the number of noncanonical miRNAs in mammals and shed new light on their potential functions of lytic infection of MHV68.

  15. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus spontaneous lytic infection involves ERK1/2 and PI3-K/Akt signaling in EBV-positive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sufang; Li, Hongde; Chen, Lin; Yang, Lifang; Li, Lili; Tao, Yongguan; Li, Wei; Li, Zijian; Liu, Haidan; Tang, Min; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Cao, Ya

    2013-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation into the lytic cycle plays certain roles in the development of EBV-associated diseases, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma and lymphoma. In this study, we investigated the effects of the tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on EBV spontaneous lytic infection and the mechanism(s) involved in EBV-positive cells. We found that EGCG could effectively inhibit the constitutive lytic infection of EBV at the DNA, gene transcription and protein levels by decreasing the phosphorylation and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt. By using cellular signaling pathway-specific inhibitors, we also explored the signaling mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of EGCG on EBV spontaneous lytic infection in cell models. Results show that specific inhibitors of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase (MEK) (PD98059) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase [PI3-K (LY294002)] markedly downregulated gene transcription and expression of BZLF1 and BMRF1 indicating that the MEK/ERK1/2 and PI3-K/Akt pathways are involved in the EBV spontaneous lytic cycle cascade. Therefore, one of the mechanisms by which EGCG inhibits EBV spontaneous lytic infection appears to involve the suppression of the activation of MEK/ERK1/2 and PI3-K/Akt signaling.

  16. Parallel evolution of genes and languages in the Caucasus region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanovsky, Oleg; Dibirova, Khadizhat; Dybo, Anna; Mudrak, Oleg; Frolova, Svetlana; Pocheshkhova, Elvira; Haber, Marc; Platt, Daniel; Schurr, Theodore; Haak, Wolfgang; Kuznetsova, Marina; Radzhabov, Magomed; Balaganskaya, Olga; Romanov, Alexey; Zakharova, Tatiana; Soria Hernanz, David F; Zalloua, Pierre; Koshel, Sergey; Ruhlen, Merritt; Renfrew, Colin; Wells, R Spencer; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Balanovska, Elena

    2011-10-01

    We analyzed 40 single nucleotide polymorphism and 19 short tandem repeat Y-chromosomal markers in a large sample of 1,525 indigenous individuals from 14 populations in the Caucasus and 254 additional individuals representing potential source populations. We also employed a lexicostatistical approach to reconstruct the history of the languages of the North Caucasian family spoken by the Caucasus populations. We found a different major haplogroup to be prevalent in each of four sets of populations that occupy distinct geographic regions and belong to different linguistic branches. The haplogroup frequencies correlated with geography and, even more strongly, with language. Within haplogroups, a number of haplotype clusters were shown to be specific to individual populations and languages. The data suggested a direct origin of Caucasus male lineages from the Near East, followed by high levels of isolation, differentiation, and genetic drift in situ. Comparison of genetic and linguistic reconstructions covering the last few millennia showed striking correspondences between the topology and dates of the respective gene and language trees and with documented historical events. Overall, in the Caucasus region, unmatched levels of gene-language coevolution occurred within geographically isolated populations, probably due to its mountainous terrain.

  17. Regional genomic instability predisposes to complex dystrophin gene rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Junko; Magner, Daniel B; Lee, Jennifer A; Breman, Amy M; Schmitt, Eric S; White, Lisa D; Crowe, Carol A; Merrill, Michelle; Jayakar, Parul; Rajadhyaksha, Aparna; Eng, Christine M; del Gaudio, Daniela

    2009-09-01

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) cause Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies and the majority of cases are due to DMD gene rearrangements. Despite the high incidence of these aberrations, little is known about their causative molecular mechanism(s). We examined 792 DMD/BMD clinical samples by oligonucleotide array-CGH and report on the junction sequence analysis of 15 unique deletion cases and three complex intragenic rearrangements to elucidate potential underlying mechanism(s). Furthermore, we present three cases with intergenic rearrangements involving DMD and neighboring loci. The cases with intragenic rearrangements include an inversion with flanking deleted sequences; a duplicated segment inserted in direct orientation into a deleted region; and a splicing mutation adjacent to a deletion. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that 7 of 12 breakpoints combined among 3 complex cases aligned with repetitive sequences, as compared to 4 of 30 breakpoints for the 15 deletion cases. Moreover, the inversion/deletion case may involve a stem-loop structure that has contributed to the initiation of this rearrangement. For the duplication/deletion and splicing mutation/deletion cases, the presence of the first mutation, either a duplication or point mutation, may have elicited the deletion events in an attempt to correct preexisting mutations. While NHEJ is one potential mechanism for these complex rearrangements, the highly complex junction sequence of the inversion/deletion case suggests the involvement of a replication-based mechanism. Our results support the notion that regional genomic instability, aided by the presence of repetitive elements, a stem-loop structure, and possibly preexisting mutations, may elicit complex rearrangements of the DMD gene.

  18. Anthropogenic antibiotic resistance genes mobilization to the polar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Jorge; González-Acuña, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic influences in the southern polar region have been rare, but lately microorganisms associated with humans have reached Antarctica, possibly from military bases, fishing boats, scientific expeditions, and/or ship-borne tourism. Studies of seawater in areas of human intervention and proximal to fresh penguin feces revealed the presence of Escherichia coli strains least resistant to antibiotics in penguins, whereas E. coli from seawater elsewhere showed resistance to one or more of the following antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, and trim-sulfa. In seawater samples, bacteria were found carrying extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-type CTX-M genes in which multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) showed different sequence types (STs), previously reported in humans. In the Arctic, on the contrary, people have been present for a long time, and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) appears to be much more wide-spread than was previously reported. Studies of E coli from Arctic birds (Bering Strait) revealed reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, but one globally spreading clone of E. coli genotype O25b-ST131, carrying genes of ESBL-type CTX-M, was identified. In the few years between sample collections in the same area, differences in resistance pattern were observed, with E. coli from birds showing resistance to a maximum of five different antibiotics. Presence of resistance-type ESBLs (TEM, SHV, and CTX-M) in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae was also confirmed by specified PCR methods. MLST revealed that those bacteria carried STs that connect them to previously described strains in humans. In conclusion, bacteria previously related to humans could be found in relatively pristine environments, and presently human-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria have reached a high global level of distribution that they are now found even in the polar regions. PMID:27938628

  19. Overexpression of antimicrobial lytic peptides protects grapevine from Pierce's disease under greenhouse but not field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijian T; Hopkins, Donald L; Gray, Dennis J

    2015-10-01

    Pierce's disease (PD) caused by Xylella fastidiosa prevents cultivation of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) and susceptible hybrids in the southeastern United States and poses a major threat to the grape industry of California and Texas. Genetic resistance is the only proven control of X. fastidiosa. Genetic engineering offers an alternative to heretofore ineffective conventional breeding in order to transfer only PD resistance traits into elite cultivars. A synthetic gene encoding lytic peptide LIMA-A was introduced into V. vinifera and a Vitis hybrid to assess in planta inhibition of X. fastidiosa. Over 1050 independent transgenic plant lines were evaluated in the greenhouse, among which nine lines were selected and tested under naturally-inoculated field conditions. These selected plant lines in the greenhouse remain disease-free for 10 years, to date, even with multiple manual pathogen inoculations. However, all these lines in the field, including a grafted transgenic rootstock, succumbed to PD within 7 years. We conclude that in planta production of antimicrobial lytic peptides does not provide durable PD resistance to grapevine under field conditions.

  20. Global mRNA degradation during lytic gammaherpesvirus infection contributes to establishment of viral latency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin M Richner

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available During a lytic gammaherpesvirus infection, host gene expression is severely restricted by the global degradation and altered 3' end processing of mRNA. This host shutoff phenotype is orchestrated by the viral SOX protein, yet its functional significance to the viral lifecycle has not been elucidated, in part due to the multifunctional nature of SOX. Using an unbiased mutagenesis screen of the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 SOX homolog, we isolated a single amino acid point mutant that is selectively defective in host shutoff activity. Incorporation of this mutation into MHV68 yielded a virus with significantly reduced capacity for mRNA turnover. Unexpectedly, the MHV68 mutant showed little defect during the acute replication phase in the mouse lung. Instead, the virus exhibited attenuation at later stages of in vivo infections suggestive of defects in both trafficking and latency establishment. Specifically, mice intranasally infected with the host shutoff mutant accumulated to lower levels at 10 days post infection in the lymph nodes, failed to develop splenomegaly, and exhibited reduced viral DNA levels and a lower frequency of latently infected splenocytes. Decreased latency establishment was also observed upon infection via the intraperitoneal route. These results highlight for the first time the importance of global mRNA degradation during a gammaherpesvirus infection and link an exclusively lytic phenomenon with downstream latency establishment.

  1. Screening of the Human Kinome Identifies MSK1/2-CREB1 as an Essential Pathway Mediating Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Replication during Primary Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fan; Sawant, Tanvee Vinod; Lan, Ke; Lu, Chun; Jung, Jae U.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses often hijack cellular pathways to facilitate infection and replication. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic gammaherpesvirus etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, a vascular tumor of endothelial cells. Despite intensive studies, cellular pathways mediating KSHV infection and replication are still not well defined. Using an antibody array approach, we examined cellular proteins phosphorylated during primary KSHV infection of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Enrichment analysis identified integrin/mitogen-activated protein kinase (integrin/MAPK), insulin/epidermal growth factor receptor (insulin/EGFR), and JAK/STAT as the activated networks during primary KSHV infection. The transcriptional factor CREB1 (cyclic AMP [cAMP]-responsive element-binding protein 1) had the strongest increase in phosphorylation. While knockdown of CREB1 had no effect on KSHV entry and trafficking, it drastically reduced the expression of lytic transcripts and proteins and the production of infectious virions. Chemical activation of CREB1 significantly enhanced viral lytic replication. In contrast, CREB1 neither influenced the expression of the latent gene LANA nor affected KSHV infectivity. Mechanistically, CREB1 was not activated through the classic cAMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway or via the AKT, MK2, and RSK pathways. Rather, CREB1 was activated by the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases 1 and 2 (MSK1/2). Consequently, chemical inhibition or knockdown of MSKs significantly inhibited the KSHV lytic replication program; however, it had a minimal effect on LANA expression and KSHV infectivity. Together, these results identify the MSK1/2-CREB1 proteins as novel essential effectors of KSHV lytic replication during primary infection. The differential effect of the MSK1/2-CREB1 pathway on the expression of viral latent and lytic genes might control the robustness of viral lytic replication, and therefore the

  2. An Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) mutant with enhanced BZLF1 expression causes lymphomas with abortive lytic EBV infection in a humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shi-Dong; Yu, Xianming; Mertz, Janet E; Gumperz, Jenny E; Reinheim, Erik; Zhou, Ying; Tang, Weihua; Burlingham, William J; Gulley, Margaret L; Kenney, Shannon C

    2012-08-01

    Immunosuppressed patients are at risk for developing Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-positive lymphomas that express the major EBV oncoprotein, LMP1. Although increasing evidence suggests that a small number of lytically infected cells may promote EBV-positive lymphomas, the impact of enhanced lytic gene expression on the ability of EBV to induce lymphomas is unclear. Here we have used immune-deficient mice, engrafted with human fetal hematopoietic stem cells and thymus and liver tissue, to compare lymphoma formation following infection with wild-type (WT) EBV versus infection with a "superlytic" (SL) mutant with enhanced BZLF1 (Z) expression. The same proportions (2/6) of the WT and SL virus-infected animals developed B-cell lymphomas by day 60 postinfection; the remainder of the animals had persistent tumor-free viral latency. In contrast, all WT and SL virus-infected animals treated with the OKT3 anti-CD3 antibody (which inhibits T-cell function) developed lymphomas by day 29. Lymphomas in OKT3-treated animals (in contrast to lymphomas in the untreated animals) contained many LMP1-expressing cells. The SL virus-infected lymphomas in both OKT3-treated and untreated animals contained many more Z-expressing cells (up to 30%) than the WT virus-infected lymphomas, but did not express late viral proteins and thus had an abortive lytic form of EBV infection. LMP1 and BMRF1 (an early lytic viral protein) were never coexpressed in the same cell, suggesting that LMP1 expression is incompatible with lytic viral reactivation. These results show that the SL mutant induces an "abortive" lytic infection in humanized mice that is compatible with continued cell growth and at least partially resistant to T-cell killing.

  3. Cortex Peptidoglycan Lytic Activity in Germinating Bacillus anthracis Spores▿

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial endospore dormancy and resistance properties depend on the relative dehydration of the spore core, which is maintained by the spore membrane and its surrounding cortex peptidoglycan wall. During spore germination, the cortex peptidoglycan is rapidly hydrolyzed by lytic enzymes packaged into the dormant spore. The peptidoglycan structures in both dormant and germinating Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores were analyzed. The B. anthracis dormant spore peptidoglycan was similar to that fo...

  4. Current status and future prospect of FSHD region gene 1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ARMAN KUNWAR HANSDA; ANKIT TIWARI; MANJUSHA DIXIT

    2017-06-01

    FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1), as the name suggests, is the primary candidate gene for fascioscapulohumeral musculardystrophy disease. It seemingly affects muscle physiology in normal individuals but in FSHD, where it is found to behighly upregulated, might be involved in disruption of face, scapula and humeral skeletal muscle. Literature on FRG1,reviewed from 1996 to 2016, reveals that it is primarily associated with muscle development and maintenance.Approximately 75% of FSHD patients also show vascular abnormalities indicating that FRG1 might have some part toplay in these abnormalities. Research involving vasculature in X. laevis larvae shows that FRG1 positively affectsnormal vasculature. Few of the well-established angiogenic regulators seem to get affected by abnormal expressionlevel of FRG1. Its primary localization in sub nuclear structures like Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles indicatesregulation of the above-mentioned factors by transcriptional and post-transcriptional machineries, but in-depth studiesneed to be done to conclude a clear statement. In this review, we have attempted to present all the work done onFRG1, all the lacunas which need to be unraveled, and hypothesized a model for our readers to get an insight into itsmolecular mechanism.

  5. The bovine Mx1 gene: characterization of the gene structure, alternative splicing, and promoter region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takatoshi; Oshima, Kazunaga; Watanabe, Hiroko; Komatsu, Masanori

    2003-12-01

    The Mx gene encodes an antiviral protein and is induced by type 1 interferons (IFNs). In this study, a new bovine Mx gene (designated Mx1B) was isolated from the endometrial cDNA library of the early pregnant cow. Although the Mx1B cDNA contained a single open reading frame (ORF) the same as the known Mx1, the 5' untranslated region (UTR) and 5' coding region of Mx1B were rather different from the corresponding regions of Mx1. Genomic structure analysis revealed that bovine Mx1B was an alternative splicing variant of Mx1 and had transcription regulatory sequences in the upstream region. RT-PCR and its sequencing identified another Mx1 splicing variant and demonstrated that these bovine Mx1 splicing variants were ubiquitously expressed in various tissues. Furthermore, it was found that all the bovine breeds investigated had identical splice sites of Mx1 and Mx1B. It is speculated that cattle have at least two functional Mx isoforms that might provide strong natural resistance to specific viruses.

  6. Revisiting the Cellulosimicrobium cellulans yeast-lytic β-1,3-glucanases toolbox: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrer Pau

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cellulosimicrobium cellulans (also known with the synonyms Cellulomonas cellulans, Oerskovia xanthineolytica, and Arthrobacter luteus is an actinomycete that excretes yeast cell wall lytic enzyme complexes containing endo-β-1,3-glucanases [EC 3.2.1.39 and 3.2.1.6] as key constituents. Three genes encoding endo-β-1,3-glucanases from two C. cellulans strains have been cloned and characterised over the past years. The βglII and βglIIA genes from strain DSM 10297 (also known as O. xanthineolytica LL G109 encoded proteins of 40.8 and 28.6 kDa, respectively, whereas the β-1,3-glucanase gene from strain ATCC 21606 (also known as A. luteus 73–14 encoded a 54.5 kDa protein. Alignment of their deduced amino acid sequences reveal that βglII and βglIIA have catalytic domains assigned to family 16 of glycosyl hydrolases, whereas the catalytic domain from the 54.5 kDa glucanase belongs to family 64. Notably, both βglII and the 54.5 kDa β-1,3-glucanase are multidomain proteins, having a lectin-like C-terminal domain that has been assigned to family 13 of carbohydrate binding modules, and that confers to β-1,3-glucanases the ability to lyse viable yeast cells. Furthermore, βglII may also undergo posttranslational proteolytic processing of its C-terminal domain, resulting in a truncated enzyme retaining its glucanase activity but with very low yeast-lytic activity. In this review, the diversity in terms of structural and functional characteristics of the C. cellulans β-1,3-glucanases has been compiled and compared.

  7. Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC inhibits lytic replication of gamma oncogenic herpesviruses in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedman Herman

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major psychoactive cannabinoid compound of marijuana, delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, has been shown to modulate immune responses and lymphocyte function. After primary infection the viral DNA genome of gamma herpesviruses persists in lymphoid cell nuclei in a latent episomal circular form. In response to extracellular signals, the latent virus can be activated, which leads to production of infectious virus progeny. Therefore, we evaluated the potential effects of THC on gamma herpesvirus replication. Methods Tissue cultures infected with various gamma herpesviruses were cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of THC and the amount of viral DNA or infectious virus yield was compared to those of control cultures. The effect of THC on Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV replication was measured by the Gardella method and replication of herpesvirus saimiri (HVS of monkeys, murine gamma herpesvirus 68 (MHV 68, and herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1 was measured by yield reduction assays. Inhibition of the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter activity was measured by the dual luciferase method. Results Micromolar concentrations of THC inhibit KSHV and EBV reactivation in virus infected/immortalized B cells. THC also strongly inhibits lytic replication of MHV 68 and HVS in vitro. Importantly, concentrations of THC that inhibit virus replication of gamma herpesviruses have no effect on cell growth or HSV-1 replication, indicating selectivity. THC was shown to selectively inhibit the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter of KSHV and MHV 68. Conclusions THC specifically targets viral and/or cellular mechanisms required for replication and possibly shared by these gamma herpesviruses, and the endocannabinoid system is possibly involved in regulating gamma herpesvirus latency and lytic replication. The immediate early gene ORF 50 promoter activity was specifically inhibited by THC

  8. Sequencing analysis reveals a unique gene organization in the gyrB region of Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Søren; Christiansen, Gunna

    1994-01-01

    of which showed similarity to that which encodes the LicA protein of Haemophilus influenzae. The organization of the genes in the region showed no resemblance to that in the corresponding regions of other bacteria sequenced so far. The gyrA gene was mapped 35 kb downstream from the gyrB gene....

  9. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility genes in the HLA region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Judith

    2006-01-01

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) region on the short arm of chromosome 6 includes the classical HLA genes and in addition HLA-related and non-HLA related genes. The majority of the genes located in this region are directly or indirectly involved in the immune response. The polymorphic HLA molecules

  10. Comparative analysis of chromatin landscape in regulatory regions of human housekeeping and tissue specific genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasgupta Dipayan

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global regulatory mechanisms involving chromatin assembly and remodelling in the promoter regions of genes is implicated in eukaryotic transcription control especially for genes subjected to spatial and temporal regulation. The potential to utilise global regulatory mechanisms for controlling gene expression might depend upon the architecture of the chromatin in and around the gene. In-silico analysis can yield important insights into this aspect, facilitating comparison of two or more classes of genes comprising of a large number of genes within each group. Results In the present study, we carried out a comparative analysis of chromatin characteristics in terms of the scaffold/matrix attachment regions, nucleosome formation potential and the occurrence of repetitive sequences, in the upstream regulatory regions of housekeeping and tissue specific genes. Our data show that putative scaffold/matrix attachment regions are more abundant and nucleosome formation potential is higher in the 5' regions of tissue specific genes as compared to the housekeeping genes. Conclusion The differences in the chromatin features between the two groups of genes indicate the involvement of chromatin organisation in the control of gene expression. The presence of global regulatory mechanisms mediated through chromatin organisation can decrease the burden of invoking gene specific regulators for maintenance of the active/silenced state of gene expression. This could partially explain the lower number of genes estimated in the human genome.

  11. Structural characterization of Lytic Polysaccharide MonoOxygenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Kristian Erik Høpfner

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a new class of copper-containingmetalloenzymes that have been found to oxidatively degrade polysaccharides (and recently alsooligosaccharides). They dependent on redox partners to provide them with electrons and they utilizemolecular oxygen to cleave......) and their interaction with substratehave been structurally characterized. A number of structures of LsAA9A have been obtained in complexwith a range of cellulosic- and hemicellulosic substrates and with the active site Cu in different redox state.Two of the LsAA9A structures with the active site Cu in essentially a Cu...

  12. Different Expression Patterns of Genes from the Exo-Xis Region of Bacteriophage λ and Shiga Toxin-Converting Bacteriophage Ф24B following Infection or Prophage Induction in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Sylwia; Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Łoś, Joanna M.; Felczykowska, Agnieszka; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Lambdoid bacteriophages serve as useful models in microbiological and molecular studies on basic biological process. Moreover, this family of viruses plays an important role in pathogenesis of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains, as they are carriers of genes coding for Shiga toxins. Efficient expression of these genes requires lambdoid prophage induction and multiplication of the phage genome. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms regulating these processes appears essential for both basic knowledge and potential anti-EHEC applications. The exo-xis region, present in genomes of lambdoid bacteriophages, contains highly conserved genes of largely unknown functions. Recent report indicated that the Ea8.5 protein, encoded in this region, contains a newly discovered fused homeodomain/zinc-finger fold, suggesting its plausible regulatory role. Moreover, subsequent studies demonstrated that overexpression of the exo-xis region from a multicopy plasmid resulted in impaired lysogenization of E. coli and more effective induction of λ and Ф24B prophages. In this report, we demonstrate that after prophage induction, the increase in phage DNA content in the host cells is more efficient in E. coli bearing additional copies of the exo-xis region, while survival rate of such bacteria is lower, which corroborated previous observations. Importantly, by using quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR, we have determined patterns of expressions of particular genes from this region. Unexpectedly, in both phages λ and Ф24B, these patterns were significantly different not only between conditions of the host cells infection by bacteriophages and prophage induction, but also between induction of prophages with various agents (mitomycin C and hydrogen peroxide). This may shed a new light on our understanding of regulation of lambdoid phage development, depending on the mode of lytic cycle initiation. PMID:25310402

  13. Genome-wide analysis of regions similar to promoters of histone genes

    KAUST Repository

    Chowdhary, Rajesh

    2010-05-28

    Background: The purpose of this study is to: i) develop a computational model of promoters of human histone-encoding genes (shortly histone genes), an important class of genes that participate in various critical cellular processes, ii) use the model so developed to identify regions across the human genome that have similar structure as promoters of histone genes; such regions could represent potential genomic regulatory regions, e.g. promoters, of genes that may be coregulated with histone genes, and iii/ identify in this way genes that have high likelihood of being coregulated with the histone genes.Results: We successfully developed a histone promoter model using a comprehensive collection of histone genes. Based on leave-one-out cross-validation test, the model produced good prediction accuracy (94.1% sensitivity, 92.6% specificity, and 92.8% positive predictive value). We used this model to predict across the genome a number of genes that shared similar promoter structures with the histone gene promoters. We thus hypothesize that these predicted genes could be coregulated with histone genes. This hypothesis matches well with the available gene expression, gene ontology, and pathways data. Jointly with promoters of the above-mentioned genes, we found a large number of intergenic regions with similar structure as histone promoters.Conclusions: This study represents one of the most comprehensive computational analyses conducted thus far on a genome-wide scale of promoters of human histone genes. Our analysis suggests a number of other human genes that share a high similarity of promoter structure with the histone genes and thus are highly likely to be coregulated, and consequently coexpressed, with the histone genes. We also found that there are a large number of intergenic regions across the genome with their structures similar to promoters of histone genes. These regions may be promoters of yet unidentified genes, or may represent remote control regions that

  14. Cello-Oligosaccharide Oxidation Reveals Differences between Two Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases (Family GH61) from Podospora anserina

    OpenAIRE

    Bey, Mathieu; Zhou, Simeng; Poidevin, Laetitia; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Sigoillot, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    The genome of the coprophilic ascomycete Podospora anserina encodes 33 different genes encoding copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) from glycoside hydrolase family 61 (GH61). In this study, two of these enzymes (P. anserina GH61A [PaGH61A] and PaGH61B), which both harbored a family 1 carbohydrate binding module, were successfully produced in Pichia pastoris. Synergistic cooperation between PaGH61A or PaGH61B with the cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) of Pycnoporus cinnab...

  15. Cyclin-dependent kinase activity controls the onset of the HCMV lytic cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Zydek

    Full Text Available The onset of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV lytic infection is strictly synchronized with the host cell cycle. Infected G0/G1 cells support viral immediate early (IE gene expression and proceed to the G1/S boundary where they finally arrest. In contrast, S/G2 cells can be infected but effectively block IE gene expression and this inhibition is not relieved until host cells have divided and reentered G1. During latent infection IE gene expression is also inhibited, and for reactivation to occur this block to IE gene expression must be overcome. It is only poorly understood which viral and/or cellular activities maintain the block to cell cycle or latency-associated viral IE gene repression and whether the two mechanisms may be linked. Here, we show that the block to IE gene expression during S and G2 phase can be overcome by both genotoxic stress and chemical inhibitors of cellular DNA replication, pointing to the involvement of checkpoint-dependent signaling pathways in controlling IE gene repression. Checkpoint-dependent rescue of IE expression strictly requires p53 and in the absence of checkpoint activation is mimicked by proteasomal inhibition in a p53 dependent manner. Requirement for the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK inhibitor p21 downstream of p53 suggests a pivotal role for CDKs in controlling IE gene repression in S/G2 and treatment of S/G2 cells with the CDK inhibitor roscovitine alleviates IE repression independently of p53. Importantly, CDK inhibiton also overcomes the block to IE expression during quiescent infection of NTera2 (NT2 cells. Thus, a timely block to CDK activity not only secures phase specificity of the cell cycle dependent HCMV IE gene expression program, but in addition plays a hitherto unrecognized role in preventing the establishment of a latent-like state.

  16. Broad-range lytic bacteriophages that kill Staphylococcus aureus local field strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abatángelo, Virginia; Peressutti Bacci, Natalia; Boncompain, Carina A; Amadio, Ariel A; Carrasco, Soledad; Suárez, Cristian A; Morbidoni, Héctor R

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a very successful opportunistic pathogen capable of causing a variety of diseases ranging from mild skin infections to life-threatening sepsis, meningitis and pneumonia. Its ability to display numerous virulence mechanisms matches its skill to display resistance to several antibiotics, including β-lactams, underscoring the fact that new anti-S. aureus drugs are urgently required. In this scenario, the utilization of lytic bacteriophages that kill bacteria in a genus -or even species- specific way, has become an attractive field of study. In this report, we describe the isolation, characterization and sequencing of phages capable of killing S. aureus including methicillin resistant (MRSA) and multi-drug resistant S. aureus local strains from environmental, animal and human origin. Genome sequencing and bio-informatics analysis showed the absence of genes encoding virulence factors, toxins or antibiotic resistance determinants. Of note, there was a high similarity between our set of phages to others described in the literature such as phage K. Considering that reported phages were obtained in different continents, it seems plausible that there is a commonality of genetic features that are needed for optimum, broad host range anti-staphylococcal activity of these related phages. Importantly, the high activity and broad host range of one of our phages underscores its promising value to control the presence of S. aureus in fomites, industry and hospital environments and eventually on animal and human skin. The development of a cocktail of the reported lytic phages active against S. aureus-currently under way- is thus, a sensible strategy against this pathogen.

  17. Lytic Characteristics and Identification of Two Alga-lysing Bacterial Strains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Haiyan; HU Wenrong

    2006-01-01

    All previously reported bacterial species which are capable of lysing harmful algae have been isolated from coastal environments in which harmful algae blooms have occurred. Due to the low concentration of alga-lysing bacteria in an algal bloom, it is difficult to isolate the alga-lysing bacteria by existing methods. In this paper, two algae-lysing bacterial strains,P01 and P03, have been isolated from a biosystem immobilized on a sponge that was highly effective in removing algae and microcystins. Their lysing modes and effects on Microcystis aeruginosa have been studied. The results show that the degradation processes of these two strains for M. aeruginosa accorded with a first-order reaction model when the chlorophylla concentration was in the range from 0 to 1000 μg L-1. The degradation rate constants were 0.106 7, 0.127 4 and 0.279 2 for P01and0.0683, 0.0744 and 0.02897 for P03, when the bacterial densities were 8.6 × 105, 8.6 × 106 and 8.6 × 107cells mL 1, respectively. Moreover, the two bacterial strains had favourable lytic effects not only on M. aeruginosa, but also on Chlorella and Scene-desmus. Their lytic effect on M. aeruginosa did not require physical cell to cell contact, but proceeded by the production of an extracellular product. The bacterial strains were identified as Bacillus species by PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene, BLAST analysis, and comparison with sequences in the GenBank nucleotide database.

  18. A differentially methylated region of the DAZ1 gene in spermatic and somatic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zuo-Xiang Li; Xu Ma; Zhao-Hui Wang

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the methylation status of the deleted in azoospermia 1 (DAZ1) gene promoter region in different cell types. Methods: Using CpG island Searcher software, a CpG island was found in the promoter region of the DAZ1 gene. The methylation status of this region was analyzed in sperm and leukocytes by bisulfited sequencing.Results: The methylation status of the CpG island in the DAZ1 gene promoter region differed in leukocytes and sperm: it was methylated in leukocytes, but unmethylated in sperm. Conclusion: A differentially methylated region of the DAZ1 gene exists in spermatic and somatic cells, suggesting that methylation of this region may regulate DAZ1 gene expression in different tissues.

  19. Gene-Based Analysis of Regionally Enriched Cortical Genes in GWAS Data Sets of Cognitive Traits and Psychiatric Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersland, Kari M; Christoforou, Andrea; Stansberg, Christine;

    2012-01-01

    the regionally enriched cortical genes to mine a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the Norwegian Cognitive NeuroGenetics (NCNG) sample of healthy adults for association to nine psychometric tests measures. In addition, we explored GWAS data sets for the serious psychiatric disorders schizophrenia (SCZ) (n......Despite its estimated high heritability, the genetic architecture leading to differences in cognitive performance remains poorly understood. Different cortical regions play important roles in normal cognitive functioning and impairment. Recently, we reported on sets of regionally enriched genes...... in three different cortical areas (frontomedial, temporal and occipital cortices) of the adult rat brain. It has been suggested that genes preferentially, or specifically, expressed in one region or organ reflect functional specialisation. Employing a gene-based approach to the analysis, we used...

  20. Gene-based analysis of regionally enriched cortical genes in GWAS data sets of cognitive traits and psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari M Ersland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite its estimated high heritability, the genetic architecture leading to differences in cognitive performance remains poorly understood. Different cortical regions play important roles in normal cognitive functioning and impairment. Recently, we reported on sets of regionally enriched genes in three different cortical areas (frontomedial, temporal and occipital cortices of the adult rat brain. It has been suggested that genes preferentially, or specifically, expressed in one region or organ reflect functional specialisation. Employing a gene-based approach to the analysis, we used the regionally enriched cortical genes to mine a genome-wide association study (GWAS of the Norwegian Cognitive NeuroGenetics (NCNG sample of healthy adults for association to nine psychometric tests measures. In addition, we explored GWAS data sets for the serious psychiatric disorders schizophrenia (SCZ (n = 3 samples and bipolar affective disorder (BP (n = 3 samples, to which cognitive impairment is linked. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At the single gene level, the temporal cortex enriched gene RAR-related orphan receptor B (RORB showed the strongest overall association, namely to a test of verbal intelligence (Vocabulary, P = 7.7E-04. We also applied gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA to test the candidate genes, as gene sets, for enrichment of association signal in the NCNG GWAS and in GWASs of BP and of SCZ. We found that genes differentially expressed in the temporal cortex showed a significant enrichment of association signal in a test measure of non-verbal intelligence (Reasoning in the NCNG sample. CONCLUSION: Our gene-based approach suggests that RORB could be involved in verbal intelligence differences, while the genes enriched in the temporal cortex might be important to intellectual functions as measured by a test of reasoning in the healthy population. These findings warrant further replication in independent samples on cognitive traits.

  1. Determination of variants in the 3'-region of the Tyrosinase gene requires locus specific amplification.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaki, M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Ray, K.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the Tyrosinase gene (TYR, 11q14-q21) cause oculocutaneous albinism type 1 (OCA1). The 3'-region of the TYR shows 98.55% sequence identity with a pseudogene, known as Tyrosinase-Like Gene (TYRL, 11p11.2-cen). A large number of publicly available nucleotide variants of TYR in this region

  2. Polymorphism in transmembrane region of MICA gene and cholelithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Shou-Chuan; Lee, Yann-Jinn; Liu, Hsin-Fu; Dang, Ching-Wen; Chang, Shih-Chuan; Lin, Shee-Chan; Kao, Chin-Roa

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the significance of polymorphism of MHC class I chain-related gene A (MICA) gene in patients with cholelithiasis. METHODS: Subjects included 170 unrelated adults (83 males) with cholelithiasis and 245 randomly selected unrelated adults (130 males) as controls. DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes and analyzed for polymorphism of 5 alleles (A4, A5, A5.1, A6 and A9) of the MICA gene. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in phenotype, allele, and genotype frequencies of any of the 5 alleles between cholelithiasis patients and controls. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that MICA alleles studied bear no relation to cholelithiasis. PMID:12854159

  3. Polymorphism in transmembrane region of MTCA gene and cholelithiasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Chuan Shih; Yann-Jinn Lee; Hsin-Fu Liu; Ching-Wen Dang; Shih-Chuan Chang; Shee-Chan Lin; Chin-Roa Kao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the significance of polymorphism of MHC class I chain-related gene A (MICA) gene in patients with cholelithiasis.METHODS: Subjects included 170 unrelated adults (83males) with cholelithiasis and 245 randomly selected unrelated adults (130 males) as controls. DNA was extracted from peripheral leukocytes and analyzed for polymorphism of 5 alleles (A4, A5, A5.1, A6 and A9) of the MICA gene.RESULTS: There was no significant difference in phenotype,allele, and genotype frequencies of any of the 5 alleles between cholelithiasis patients and controls.CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that MICA allelesstudied bear no relation to cholelithiasis.

  4. Burkitt's lymphoma is a malignancy of mature B cells expressing somatically mutated V region genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, U.; Klein, G.; Ehlin-Henriksson, B.; Rajewsky, K.; Küppers, R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The developmental stage from which stems the malignant B cell population in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is unclear. An approach to answering this question is provided by the sequence analysis of rear-ranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes from BL for evidence of somatic mutations, together with a phenotypic characterization. As somatic hypermutation of Ig V region genes occurs in germinal center B cells, somatically mutated Ig genes are found in germinal center B cells a...

  5. Production of four Neurospora crassa lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in Pichia pastoris monitored by a fluorimetric assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittl, Roman; Kracher, Daniel; Burgstaller, Daniel; Haltrich, Dietmar; Ludwig, Roland

    2012-10-26

    Recent studies demonstrate that enzymes from the glycosyl hydrolase family 61 (GH61) show lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (PMO) activity. Together with cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) an enzymatic system capable of oxidative cellulose cleavage is formed, which increases the efficiency of cellulases and put PMOs at focus of biofuel research. Large amounts of purified PMOs, which are difficult to obtain from the native fungal producers, are needed to study their reaction kinetics, structure and industrial application. In addition, a fast and robust enzymatic assay is necessary to monitor enzyme production and purification. Four pmo genes from Neurospora crassa were expressed in P. pastoris under control of the AOX1 promoter. High yields were obtained for the glycosylated gene products PMO-01867, PMO-02916 and PMO-08760 (>300 mg L-1), whereas the yield of non-glycosylated PMO-03328 was moderate (~45 mg L-1). The production and purification of all four enzymes was specifically followed by a newly developed, fast assay based on a side reaction of PMO: the production of H2O2 in the presence of reductants. While ascorbate is a suitable reductant for homogeneous PMO preparations, fermentation samples require the specific electron donor CDH. P. pastoris is a high performing expression host for N. crassa PMOs. The pmo genes under control of the native signal sequence are correctly processed and active. The novel CDH-based enzyme assay allows fast determination of PMO activity in fermentation samples and is robust against interfering matrix components.

  6. DNA immunization with fusion genes containing HCV core region and HBV core region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨莉; 刘晶; 孔玉英; 汪垣; 李光地

    1999-01-01

    The eucaryotic expression plasmids were constructed to express the complete (HCc191) or the truncated (HCc69 and HCc40) HCV core genes, solely or fused with the HBV core gene (HBc144). These constructions were transiently expressed in COS cells under the control of the CMV promoter. The antigenicity of HBc and HCc could be detected in the expression products by ELISA and Western blot. The mice immunized with these expression plasmids efficiently produced the anti-HCc antibodies, and also anti-HBc antibodies when the plasmids contained the fusion genes. In addition, the antibodies induced by the fusion genes were more persistent than those induced by the non-fusion HCV core genes. These indicate that the fusion of HCc genes to HBc gene is in favor of the immunogenicity of HCc, while the immunogenicity of HBc is not affected.

  7. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabishvili, Maia; Vandenheuvel, Dieter; Kropinski, Andrew M; Mast, Jan; De Vos, Daniel; Verbeken, Gilbert; Noben, Jean-Paul; Lavigne, Rob; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively), high burst size (125 and 145, respectively), stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  8. Characterization of newly isolated lytic bacteriophages active against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Merabishvili

    Full Text Available Based on genotyping and host range, two newly isolated lytic bacteriophages, myovirus vB_AbaM_Acibel004 and podovirus vB_AbaP_Acibel007, active against Acinetobacter baumannii clinical strains, were selected from a new phage library for further characterization. The complete genomes of the two phages were analyzed. Both phages are characterized by broad host range and essential features of potential therapeutic phages, such as short latent period (27 and 21 min, respectively, high burst size (125 and 145, respectively, stability of activity in liquid culture and low frequency of occurrence of phage-resistant mutant bacterial cells. Genomic analysis showed that while Acibel004 represents a novel bacteriophage with resemblance to some unclassified Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages, Acibel007 belongs to the well-characterized genus of the Phikmvlikevirus. The newly isolated phages can serve as potential candidates for phage cocktails to control A. baumannii infections.

  9. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases disrupt the cellulose fibers structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Garajova, Sona; Foucat, Loïc; Falourd, Xavier; Saake, Bodo; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Cathala, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a class of powerful oxidative enzymes that breakdown recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose. Here we investigate the action of LPMOs on cellulose fibers. After enzymatic treatment and dispersion, LPMO-treated fibers show intense fibrillation. Cellulose structure modifications visualized at different scales indicate that LPMO creates nicking points that trigger the disintegration of the cellulose fibrillar structure with rupture of chains and release of elementary nanofibrils. Investigation of LPMO action using solid-state NMR provides direct evidence of modification of accessible and inaccessible surfaces surrounding the crystalline core of the fibrils. The chains breakage likely induces modifications of the cellulose network and weakens fibers cohesion promoting their disruption. Besides the formation of new initiation sites for conventional cellulases, this work provides the first evidence of the direct oxidative action of LPMOs with the mechanical weakening of the cellulose ultrastructure. LPMOs can be viewed as promising biocatalysts for enzymatic modification or degradation of cellulose fibers. PMID:28071716

  10. Increased Lytic Efficiency of Bovine Macrophages Trained with Killed Mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste, Ramon A.; Alonso-Hearn, Marta; Garrido, Joseba M.; Abendaño, Naiara; Sevilla, Iker A.; Gortazar, Christian; de la Fuente, José; Dominguez, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity is evolutionarily conserved in multicellular organisms and was considered to lack memory until very recently. One of its more characteristic mechanisms is phagocytosis, the ability of cells to engulf, process and eventually destroy any injuring agent. We report the results of an ex vivo experiment in bovine macrophages in which improved clearance of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) was induced by pre-exposure to a heat killed M. bovis preparation. The effects were independent of humoral and cellular adaptive immune responses and lasted up to six months. Specifically, our results demonstrate the existence of a training effect in the lytic phase of phagocytosis that can be activated by killed mycobacteria, thus suggesting a new mechanism of vaccine protection. These findings are compatible with the recently proposed concept of trained immunity, which was developed to explain the observation that innate immune responses provide unspecific protection against pathogens including other than those that originally triggered the immune response. PMID:27820836

  11. Structural characterization of Lytic Polysaccharide MonoOxygenases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Kristian Erik Høpfner

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a new class of copper-containingmetalloenzymes that have been found to oxidatively degrade polysaccharides (and recently alsooligosaccharides). They dependent on redox partners to provide them with electrons and they utilizemolecular oxygen to cleave......) and their interaction with substratehave been structurally characterized. A number of structures of LsAA9A have been obtained in complexwith a range of cellulosic- and hemicellulosic substrates and with the active site Cu in different redox state.Two of the LsAA9A structures with the active site Cu in essentially a Cu......(II) state show differences in thenature of the Cu-ligand with and without cellulosic substrate bound and provide structural insight into themechanistic action of LPMOs. Interestingly, for an LsAA9A complex structure with a hemicellulosicsubstrate (xylooligosaccharide) a corresponding difference...

  12. An improved method for detecting and delineating genomic regions with altered gene expression in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Genomic regions with altered gene expression are a characteristic feature of cancer cells. We present a novel method for identifying such regions in gene expression maps. This method is based on total variation minimization, a classical signal restoration technique. In systematic evaluations, we show that our method combines top-notch detection performance with an ability to delineate relevant regions without excessive over-segmentation, making it a significant advance over existing methods. ...

  13. Abortive lytic Epstein–Barr virus replication in tonsil-B lymphocytes in infectious mononucleosis and a subset of the chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerner AM

    2012-11-01

    . Abortive lytic replication may be a pathogenic mechanism for EBV disease. EBV (HHV4 is a gamma herpesvirus composed of dsDNA about 170 Kb in length. For this discussion, there are early genes (including expressions of encoded proteins EBV dUTPase, DNA polymerase, and nuclear proteins and late genes (including expressions of capsid and membrane proteins. Abortive infection infers incomplete virion expressions of either early or late proteins, but the virion is incomplete. The lytic virus infers a complete virion. The pathologic consequences of EBV abortive replication are currently being investigated by authors.Keywords: Epstein–Barr virus, chronic fatigue syndrome, subset chronic fatigue syndrome, abortive lytic replication

  14. The involucrin genes of the white-fronted capuchin and cottontop tamarin: the platyrrhine middle region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M; Rice, R H; Djian, P; Green, H

    1991-09-01

    In all anthropoid species, the coding region of the involucrin gene contains a segment of short tandem repeats that were added sequentially, beginning in a common anthropoid ancestor. The involucrin coding region of each of two platyrrhine species, the white-fronted capuchin (Cebus albifrons) and the cottontop tamarin (Saguinus oedipus), has now been cloned and sequenced. These genes share with the genes of the catarrhines the repeats added in the common anthropoid lineage (the early region). After their divergence, the platyrrhines, like the catarrhines, continued to add repeats vectorially 5' of the early region, to form a middle region. The mechanism that was established in the common anthropoid lineage for the addition of repeats at a definite site in the coding region was transmitted to both platyrrhines and catarrhines, enabling each to generate its middle region independently. The process of vectorial repeat addition continued in two platyrrhine sublineages after their divergence from each other.

  15. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies chromosomal regions involved in ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Jochumsen, Kirsten M; Mogensen, Ole;

    2009-01-01

    the relation of gene expression and chromosomal position to identify chromosomal regions of importance for early recurrence of ovarian cancer. By use of *Gene Set Enrichment Analysis*, we have ranked chromosomal regions according to their association to survival. Over-representation analysis including 1......Ovarian cancer cells exhibit complex karyotypic alterations causing deregulation of numerous genes. Some of these genes are probably causal for cancer formation and local growth, whereas others are causal for metastasis and recurrence. By using publicly available data sets, we have investigated......-4 consecutive cytogenetic bands identified regions with increased expression for chromosome 5q12-14, and a very large region of chromosome 7 with the strongest signal at 7p15-13 among tumors from short-living patients. Reduced gene expression was identified at 4q26-32, 6p12-q15, 9p21-q32, and 11p14-11. We...

  16. Chronic ethanol exposure produces time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Osterndorff-Kahanek

    Full Text Available Repeated ethanol exposure and withdrawal in mice increases voluntary drinking and represents an animal model of physical dependence. We examined time- and brain region-dependent changes in gene coexpression networks in amygdala (AMY, nucleus accumbens (NAC, prefrontal cortex (PFC, and liver after four weekly cycles of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE vapor exposure in C57BL/6J mice. Microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles at 0-, 8-, and 120-hours following the last ethanol exposure. Each brain region exhibited a large number of differentially expressed genes (2,000-3,000 at the 0- and 8-hour time points, but fewer changes were detected at the 120-hour time point (400-600. Within each region, there was little gene overlap across time (~20%. All brain regions were significantly enriched with differentially expressed immune-related genes at the 8-hour time point. Weighted gene correlation network analysis identified modules that were highly enriched with differentially expressed genes at the 0- and 8-hour time points with virtually no enrichment at 120 hours. Modules enriched for both ethanol-responsive and cell-specific genes were identified in each brain region. These results indicate that chronic alcohol exposure causes global 'rewiring' of coexpression systems involving glial and immune signaling as well as neuronal genes.

  17. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-12-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions.

  18. Differential regulation of the period genes in striatal regions following cocaine exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Falcon

    Full Text Available Several studies have suggested that disruptions in circadian rhythms contribute to the pathophysiology of multiple psychiatric diseases, including drug addiction. In fact, a number of the genes involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms are also involved in modulating the reward value for drugs of abuse, like cocaine. Thus, we wanted to determine the effects of chronic cocaine on the expression of several circadian genes in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc and Caudate Putamen (CP, regions of the brain known to be involved in the behavioral responses to drugs of abuse. Moreover, we wanted to explore the mechanism by which these genes are regulated following cocaine exposure. Here we find that after repeated cocaine exposure, expression of the Period (Per genes and Neuronal PAS Domain Protein 2 (Npas2 are elevated, in a somewhat regionally selective fashion. Moreover, NPAS2 (but not CLOCK (Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput protein binding at Per gene promoters was enhanced following cocaine treatment. Mice lacking a functional Npas2 gene failed to exhibit any induction of Per gene expression after cocaine, suggesting that NPAS2 is necessary for this cocaine-induced regulation. Examination of Per gene and Npas2 expression over twenty-four hours identified changes in diurnal rhythmicity of these genes following chronic cocaine, which were regionally specific. Taken together, these studies point to selective disruptions in Per gene rhythmicity in striatial regions following chronic cocaine treatment, which are mediated primarily by NPAS2.

  19. Hox genes and regional patterning of the vertebrate body plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mallo, M.; Wellik, D.M.; Deschamps, J.

    2010-01-01

    Several decades have passed since the discovery of Hox genes in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Their unique ability to regulate morphologies along the anteroposterior (AP) axis (Lewis, 1978) earned them well-deserved attention as important regulators of embryonic development. Phenotypes due

  20. Temporal transcription of the lactococcal temperate phage TP901-1 and DNA sequence of the early promoter region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Hans Peter Lynge; Hammer, Karin

    1998-01-01

    , of which at least two (the integrase gene and putative repressor) are needed for lysogeny, and the divergent and longer transcriptional unit from PL, presumably encoding functions required for the lytic life cycle. ORFs with homology to proteins involved in DNA replication were identified on the latter...... to a phage repressor, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein, a topoisomerase, a Cro-like protein and two other phage proteins of unknown function were detected. The gene arrangement in the early transcribed region of TP901-1 thus consists of two transcriptional units: one from PR containing four genes...

  1. Short 5'-flanking regions of the Amy gene of Drosophila kikkawai affect amylase gene expression and respond to food environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Nobuyuki; Nakashima, Shuichi

    2008-04-15

    Evolution of the duplicated genes and regulation in gene expression is of great interest, especially in terms of adaptation. Molecular population genetic and evolutionary studies on the duplicated amylase genes of Drosophila species have suggested that their 5'-flanking (cis-regulatory) regions play an important role in evolution of these genes. For better understanding of evolution of the duplicated amylase genes and gene expression, we studied functional significance of the Amy1 gene of Drosophila kikkawai using in vitro deletion mutagenesis followed by P-element-mediated germline transformation. We found that a 1.6-kb of the 5'-flanking region can produce strikingly higher level of larval amylase activity on starch food compared with that on glucose food. We found two cis-regulatory elements, which increase larval amylase activity on starch food. We also found a larval cis-regulatory element, which responds to the food difference. This food-response element is necessary for the function of the element increasing larval activity on starch food. A 5-bp deletion in a putative GRE caused high amylase activity, indicating a cis-regulatory element decreasing amylase activity. These cis-regulatory elements identified in the 5'-flanking region could be the targets of natural selection.

  2. PCR primers for 30 novel gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlberg, Niklas; Peña, Carlos; Ahola, Milla; Wheat, Christopher W.; Rota, Jadranka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report primer pairs for 30 new gene regions in the nuclear genomes of Lepidoptera that can be amplified using a standard PCR protocol. The new primers were tested across diverse Lepidoptera , including nonditrysians and a wide selection of ditrysians. These new gene regions give a total of 11,043 bp of DNA sequence data and they show similar variability to traditionally used nuclear gene regions in studies of Lepidoptera . We feel that a PCR-based approach still has its place in m...

  3. Analysis of the sexual development-promoting region of Schizophyllum commune TRP1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Kikuo; Kinoshita, Hideki; Tazuke, Kazuyuki; Maki, Yoshinori; Yoshiura, Yumi; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Shibai, Hiroshiro; Kurosawa, Shin-Ichi

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to elucidate the mechanism of sexual development of basidiomycetous mushrooms from mating to fruit body formation. Sequencing analysis showed the TRP1 gene of basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune encoded an enzyme with three catalytic regions of GAT (glutamine amidotransferase), IGPS (indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthase), and PRAI (5-phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase); among these three regions, the trp1 mutant (Trp(-)) had a missense mutation (L→F) of a 338th amino acid residue of the TRP1 protein within the IGPS region. To investigate the function of IGPS region related to sexual development, dikaryons with high, usual, and no expression of the IGPS region of TRP1 gene were made. The dikaryotic mycelia with high expression of the IGPS formed mature fruit bodies earlier than those with usual and no expression of the IGPS. These results showed that the IGPS region in TRP1 gene promoted sexual development of S. commune.

  4. Mutations in the gene region of hepatitis B virus genotype in Turkish patients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mehmet Özaslan; Ersan Özaslan; Arzu Barsgan; Mehmet Koruk

    2007-12-01

    The gene region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is responsible for the expression of surface antigens and includes the ‘a’-determinant region. Thus, mutation(s) in this region would afford HBV variants a distinct survival advantage, permitting the mutant virus to escape from the immune system. The aim of this study was to search for mutations of the gene region in different patient groups infected with genotype variants of HBV, and to analyse the biological significance of these mutations. Moreover, we investigated gene mutation inductance among family members. Forty HBV-DNA-positive patients were determined among 132 hepatitis B surface antigen (HbsAg) carriers by the first stage of seminested PCR. Genotypes and subtypes were established by sequencing of the amplified S gene regions. Variants were compared with original sequences of these serotypes, and mutations were identified. All variants were designated as genotype and subtype ayw3. Ten kinds of point mutations were identified within the region. The highest rates of mutation were found in chronic hepatitis patients and their family members. The amino acid mutations 125 (M → T) and 127 (T → P) were found on the first loop of ‘a’-determinant. The other consequence was mutation inductance in a family member. We found some mutations in the S gene region known to be stable and observed that some of these mutations affected gene expression.

  5. Increase of Expression Levels of Reporter Gene in Transgenic Tobaccos by Matrix Attachment Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The matrix attachment region (MAR) located downstream of Plastocyanin gene was isolated from the genome of pea. To study the effect of MARs on foreign gene expression in transgenic plants, T-DNA vector was constructed in which MARs flanked bothβ-glucuronidase(GUS) gene and selectable marker neomycin phosphotransferase (NPT-II) gene. The plant expression vectors were transferred into leaf discs via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation procedure. The result of GUS measurement showed that pea MAR could increase transgene expression level. The mean expression levels of GUS gene expression in population containing MARs could be increased twofold when compared with that of population without MARs.

  6. Four out of eight genes in a mouse chromosome 7 congenic donor region are candidate obesity genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarahan, Kari A.; Fisler, Janis S.

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified a region of mouse chromosome 7 that influences body fat mass in F2 littermates of congenic × background intercrosses. Current analyses revealed that alleles in the donor region of the subcongenic B6.C-D7Mit318 (318) promoted a twofold increase in adiposity in homozygous lines of 318 compared with background C57BL/6ByJ (B6By) mice. Parent-of-origin effects were discounted through cross-fostering studies and an F1 reciprocal cross. Mapping of the donor region revealed that it has a maximal size of 2.8 Mb (minimum 1.8 Mb) and contains a maximum of eight protein coding genes. Quantitative PCR in whole brain, liver, and gonadal white adipose tissue (GWAT) revealed differential expression between genotypes for three genes in females and two genes in males. Alpha-2,8-sialyltransferase 8B (St8sia2) showed reduced 318 mRNA levels in brain for females and males and in GWAT for females only. Both sexes of 318 mice had reduced Repulsive guidance molecule-a (Rgma) expression in GWAT. In brain, Family with sequence similarity 174 member b (Fam174b) had increased expression in 318 females, whereas Chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 2 (Chd2-2) had reduced expression in 318 males. No donor region genes were differentially expressed in liver. Sequence analysis of coding exons for all genes in the 318 donor region revealed only one single nucleotide polymorphism that produced a nonsynonymous missense mutation, Gln7Pro, in Fam174b. Our findings highlight the difficulty of using expression and sequence to identify quantitative trait genes underlying obesity even in small genomic regions. PMID:21730028

  7. Four out of eight genes in a mouse chromosome 7 congenic donor region are candidate obesity genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarahan, Kari A; Fisler, Janis S; Warden, Craig H

    2011-09-22

    We previously identified a region of mouse chromosome 7 that influences body fat mass in F2 littermates of congenic × background intercrosses. Current analyses revealed that alleles in the donor region of the subcongenic B6.C-D7Mit318 (318) promoted a twofold increase in adiposity in homozygous lines of 318 compared with background C57BL/6ByJ (B6By) mice. Parent-of-origin effects were discounted through cross-fostering studies and an F1 reciprocal cross. Mapping of the donor region revealed that it has a maximal size of 2.8 Mb (minimum 1.8 Mb) and contains a maximum of eight protein coding genes. Quantitative PCR in whole brain, liver, and gonadal white adipose tissue (GWAT) revealed differential expression between genotypes for three genes in females and two genes in males. Alpha-2,8-sialyltransferase 8B (St8sia2) showed reduced 318 mRNA levels in brain for females and males and in GWAT for females only. Both sexes of 318 mice had reduced Repulsive guidance molecule-a (Rgma) expression in GWAT. In brain, Family with sequence similarity 174 member b (Fam174b) had increased expression in 318 females, whereas Chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 2 (Chd2-2) had reduced expression in 318 males. No donor region genes were differentially expressed in liver. Sequence analysis of coding exons for all genes in the 318 donor region revealed only one single nucleotide polymorphism that produced a nonsynonymous missense mutation, Gln7Pro, in Fam174b. Our findings highlight the difficulty of using expression and sequence to identify quantitative trait genes underlying obesity even in small genomic regions.

  8. A Novel Phytophthora sojae Resistance Rps12 Gene Mapped to a Genomic Region That Contains Several Rps Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Dipak K.; Abeysekara, Nilwala S.; Cianzio, Silvia R.; Robertson, Alison E.

    2017-01-01

    Phytophthora sojae Kaufmann and Gerdemann, which causes Phytophthora root rot, is a widespread pathogen that limits soybean production worldwide. Development of Phytophthora resistant cultivars carrying Phytophthora resistance Rps genes is a cost-effective approach in controlling this disease. For this mapping study of a novel Rps gene, 290 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) (F7 families) were developed by crossing the P. sojae resistant cultivar PI399036 with the P. sojae susceptible AR2 line, and were phenotyped for responses to a mixture of three P. sojae isolates that overcome most of the known Rps genes. Of these 290 RILs, 130 were homozygous resistant, 12 heterzygous and segregating for Phytophthora resistance, and 148 were recessive homozygous and susceptible. From this population, 59 RILs homozygous for Phytophthora sojae resistance and 61 susceptible to a mixture of P. sojae isolates R17 and Val12-11 or P7074 that overcome resistance encoded by known Rps genes mapped to Chromosome 18 were selected for mapping novel Rps gene. A single gene accounted for the 1:1 segregation of resistance and susceptibility among the RILs. The gene encoding the Phytophthora resistance mapped to a 5.8 cM interval between the SSR markers BARCSOYSSR_18_1840 and Sat_064 located in the lower arm of Chromosome 18. The gene is mapped 2.2 cM proximal to the NBSRps4/6-like sequence that was reported to co-segregate with the Phytophthora resistance genes Rps4 and Rps6. The gene is mapped to a highly recombinogenic, gene-rich genomic region carrying several nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-like genes. We named this novel gene as Rps12, which is expected to be an invaluable resource in breeding soybeans for Phytophthora resistance. PMID:28081566

  9. Isolation, Characterization, and Bioinformatic Analyses of Lytic Salmonella Enteritidis Phages and Tests of Their Antibacterial Activity in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Wei, Xiaoting; Wei, Yi; Zhang, Xiufeng; Li, Xuemin; Jiang, Jinzhong; Wang, Ran

    2017-02-01

    Salmonella Enteritidis remains a major threat for food safety. To take efforts to develop phage-based biocontrol for S. Enteritidis contamination in food, in this study, the phages against S. Enteritidis were isolated from sewage samples, characterized by host range assays, DNA restriction enzyme pattern analyses, and transmission electron microscope observations, and tested for antibacterial activity in food; some potent phages were further characterized by bioinformatic analyses. Results showed that based on the plaque quality and host range, seven lytic phages targeting S. Enteritidis were selected, considered as seven distinct phages through DNA physical maps, and classified as Myoviridae or Siphoviridae family by morphologic observations; the combined use of such seven strain phages as a "food additive" could succeed in controlling the artificial S. Enteritidis contamination in the different physical forms of food at a range of temperatures; by bioinformatic analyses, both selected phage BPS11Q3 and BPS15Q2 seemed to be newfound obligate lytic phage strains with no indications for any potentially harmful genes in their genomes. In conclusion, our results showed a potential of isolated phages as food additives for controlling S. Enteritidis contamination in some salmonellosis outbreak-associated food vehicles, and there could be minimized potential risk associated with using BPS11Q3 and BPS15Q2 in food.

  10. Gene expression in the rodent brain is associated with its regional connectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior Wolf

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The putative link between gene expression of brain regions and their neural connectivity patterns is a fundamental question in neuroscience. Here this question is addressed in the first large scale study of a prototypical mammalian rodent brain, using a combination of rat brain regional connectivity data with gene expression of the mouse brain. Remarkably, even though this study uses data from two different rodent species (due to the data limitations, we still find that the connectivity of the majority of brain regions is highly predictable from their gene expression levels-the outgoing (incoming connectivity is successfully predicted for 73% (56% of brain regions, with an overall fairly marked accuracy level of 0.79 (0.83. Many genes are found to play a part in predicting both the incoming and outgoing connectivity (241 out of the 500 top selected genes, p-value<1e-5. Reassuringly, the genes previously known from the literature to be involved in axon guidance do carry significant information about regional brain connectivity. Surveying the genes known to be associated with the pathogenesis of several brain disorders, we find that those associated with schizophrenia, autism and attention deficit disorder are the most highly enriched in the connectivity-related genes identified here. Finally, we find that the profile of functional annotation groups that are associated with regional connectivity in the rodent is significantly correlated with the annotation profile of genes previously found to determine neural connectivity in C. elegans (Pearson correlation of 0.24, p<1e-6 for the outgoing connections and 0.27, p<1e-5 for the incoming. Overall, the association between connectivity and gene expression in a specific extant rodent species' brain is likely to be even stronger than found here, given the limitations of current data.

  11. Fine mapping of the human pentraxin gene region on chromosome 1q23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, M.T.; Whitehead, A.S. [Univ. of Dublin (Ireland); Divane, A. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    The 1q21 to 25 region of human chromosome 1 contains genes which encode proteins with immune- and inflammation-associated functions. These include the pentraxin genes, for C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid P(SAP) protein (APCS), and a CRP pseudogene (CRPP1). The region of chromosome 1 containing this cluster is syntenic with distal mouse chromosome 1. We constructed an approximately 1.4 megabase yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig with the pentraxin genes at its core. This four-YAC contig includes other genes with immune functions including the FCER1A gene, which encodes the {alpha}-subunit of the IgE high-affinity Fc receptor and the 1F1-16 gene, an interferon-{gamma}-induced gene. In addition, it contains the histone H3F2 and H4F2 genes and the gene for erythroid {alpha}-spectrin (SPTA1). The gene order is cen.-SPTA1-H4F2-H3F2-1F1-16-CRP-CRPP1-APCS-FCERIA-tel. The contig thus consists of a cluster of genes whose products either have immunological importance, bind DNA, or both. 68 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Properties of Brucella-phages lytic for non-smooth Brucella strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbel, M J

    1984-01-01

    A series of host-range mutants has been selected for brucella-phage R. Two of these mutants designated R/O and R/C have been used for typing purposes. Phage R/O is lytic for non-smooth strains of Brucella abortus and for B. ovis. It is genetically unstable however and produces mutants lytic for smooth B. obortus and B. suis. Phage R/C is lytic for non-smooth B. abortus and for B. ovis and B. canis. It is much more stable than phages R or R/O and shows little or no lytic activity on smooth Brucella strains. It has been effective in differentiating B. canis from B. suis in tests on a limited number of strains. In their properties, all of the brucella-phages of the R series resemble their parent phage.

  13. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Light Variable Region Gene of Anti-human Retinoblastoma Monoclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufeng Zhong; Yongping Li; Shuqi Huang; Bo Ning; Chunyan Zhang; Jianliang Zheng; Guanguang Feng

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To clone the variable region gene of light chain of monoclonal antibody against human retinoblastoma and to analyze the characterization of its nucleotide sequence as well as amino acid sequence.Methods: Total RNA was extracted from 3C6 hybridoma cells secreting specific monoclonal antibody(McAb)against human retinoblastoma(RB), then transcripted reversely into cDNA with olig-dT primers.The variable region of the light chain (VL) gene fragments was amplified using polymeerase chain reaction(PCR) and further cloned into pGEM(R) -T Easy vector. Then, 3C6 VL cDNA was sequenced by Sanger's method.Homologous analysis was done by NCBI BLAST.Results: The complete nucleotide sequence of 3C6 VL cDNA consisted of 321 bp encoding 107 amino acid residues, containing four workframe regions(FRs)and three complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) as well as the typical structure of two cys residues. The sequence is most homological to a member of the Vk9 gene family, and its chain utilizes the Jkl gene segment.Conclusion: The light chain variable region gene of the McAb against human RB was amplified successfully , which belongs to the Vk9 gene family and utilizes Vk-Jk1 gene rearrangement. This study lays a good basis for constructing a recombinant antibody and for making a new targeted therapeutic agents against retinoblastoma.

  14. Identification of the transcriptional promoters in the proximal regions of human microRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yue-Sheng; Deng, Guang-Fei; Sun, Xun-Sha; Yi, Yong-Hong; Su, Tao; Zhao, Qi-Hua; Liao, Wei-Ping

    2011-08-01

    To identify the transcriptional promoters in the proximal regions of human microRNA (miRNA) genes, we analyzed the 5' flanking regions of intergenic miRNAs and intronic miRNAs. With the TSSG program prediction, we found that the ratio of intronic-s miRNA genes with a least one promoter was significantly lower than those of intergenic miRNA genes and intronic-a miRNA genes. More than half of the miRNA genes have only one promoter and less than 20% of the miRNA genes have more than three promoters in the 5-kb upstream regions. All potential promoters are randomly distributed within these regions. Approximately 60% of the miRNA promoters have a TATA-like box, being significantly higher than that of all human promoters. Luciferase reporter assays showed that 22 of the 30 promoters drove gene expression in HEK-293 cells, indicating a high accuracy of the promoter prediction. This study lays a foundation for future investigation into the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of human miRNA genes.

  15. Regional differences in gene expression and promoter usage in aged human brains

    KAUST Repository

    Pardo, Luba M.

    2013-02-19

    To characterize the promoterome of caudate and putamen regions (striatum), frontal and temporal cortices, and hippocampi from aged human brains, we used high-throughput cap analysis of gene expression to profile the transcription start sites and to quantify the differences in gene expression across the 5 brain regions. We also analyzed the extent to which methylation influenced the observed expression profiles. We sequenced more than 71 million cap analysis of gene expression tags corresponding to 70,202 promoter regions and 16,888 genes. More than 7000 transcripts were differentially expressed, mainly because of differential alternative promoter usage. Unexpectedly, 7% of differentially expressed genes were neurodevelopmental transcription factors. Functional pathway analysis on the differentially expressed genes revealed an overrepresentation of several signaling pathways (e.g., fibroblast growth factor and wnt signaling) in hippocampus and striatum. We also found that although 73% of methylation signals mapped within genes, the influence of methylation on the expression profile was small. Our study underscores alternative promoter usage as an important mechanism for determining the regional differences in gene expression at old age.

  16. Sequence breakpoints in the aflatoxin biosynthesis gene cluster and flanking regions in nonaflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Horn, Bruce W; Dorner, Joe W

    2005-11-01

    Aspergillus flavus populations are genetically diverse. Isolates that produce either, neither, or both aflatoxins and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) are present in the field. We investigated defects in the aflatoxin gene cluster in 38 nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus isolates collected from southern United States. PCR assays using aflatoxin-gene-specific primers grouped these isolates into eight (A-H) deletion patterns. Patterns C, E, G, and H, which contain 40 kb deletions, were examined for their sequence breakpoints. Pattern C has one breakpoint in the cypA 3' untranslated region (UTR) and another in the verA coding region. Pattern E has a breakpoint in the amdA coding region and another in the ver1 5'UTR. Pattern G contains a deletion identical to the one found in pattern C and has another deletion that extends from the cypA coding region to one end of the chromosome as suggested by the presence of telomeric sequence repeats, CCCTAATGTTGA. Pattern H has a deletion of the entire aflatoxin gene cluster from the hexA coding region in the sugar utilization gene cluster to the telomeric region. Thus, deletions in the aflatoxin gene cluster among A. flavus isolates are not rare, and the patterns appear to be diverse. Genetic drift may be a driving force that is responsible for the loss of the entire aflatoxin gene cluster in nonaflatoxigenic A. flavus isolates when aflatoxins have lost their adaptive value in nature.

  17. Cloning and Analysis of the Promoter Region of Rat uPA Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan LIU; Jin-wen XIONG; Li-gang CHEN; Yong-hong TIAN; Cheng-liang XIONG

    2007-01-01

    Objective To clone and analyze the promoter sequence of rat urokinase plasminogen activator protein gene.Methods The genomic DNA was extracted from rat testicular tissue. According to urokinase plasminogen activator, the gene sense primer and antisense primer of uPA gene were designed and synthesized, then Touch-Down PCR were performed. After proper purification, the PCR product was sequenced, analyzed with the promoter prediction software and compared with the DNA sequence of rattuas urokinase plasminogen activator.Results The cloned uPA gene was about 1 572 bp in length, which contained a full open-reading frame with 21 bp in length exons, and the upper region of transcriptional start was 1 551 bp in length which was eucaryon transcriptional control area.The 5' UTR had a promoter region including a non-responsive TATA-box. Not only the GC-box binding region was found in this gene, but also active protein 1 (AP1) and SP1 were seen in other regions.Conclusion A 1 572 bp uPA gene fragment (GenBank accession No. X65651) was obtained from rat genomic DNA library, containing eucaryon transcriptional control area with a promoter region, non-conspicuous TATA-box, GC-box and an extron. A non-responsive TATA-box is located at the upper -30 region.

  18. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortoluzzi Stefania

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers.

  19. Enhancement of Lytic Activity by Leptin Is Independent From Lipid Rafts in Murine Primary Splenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Aurore; Noacco, Audrey; Talvas, Jérémie; Caldefie-Chézet, Florence; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Farges, Marie-Chantal

    2017-01-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic adipokine, is known as a regulator of food intake, but it is also involved in inflammation, immunity, cell proliferation, and survival. Leptin receptor is integrated inside cholesterol-rich microdomains called lipid rafts, which, if disrupted or destroyed, could lead to a perturbation of lytic mechanism. Previous studies also reported that leptin could induce membrane remodeling. In this context, we studied the effect of membrane remodeling in lytic activity modulation induced by leptin. Thus, primary mouse splenocytes were incubated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (β-MCD), a lipid rafts disrupting agent, cholesterol, a major component of cell membranes, or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a membrane stabilizer agent for 1 h. These treatments were followed by splenocyte incubation with leptin (absence, 10 and 100 ng/ml). Unlike β-MCD or cholesterol, UDCA was able to block leptin lytic induction. This result suggests that leptin increased the lytic activity of primary spleen cells against syngenic EO771 mammary cancer cells independently from lipid rafts but may involve membrane fluidity. Furthermore, natural killer cells were shown to be involved in the splenocyte lytic activity. To our knowledge it is the first publication in primary culture that provides the link between leptin lytic modulation and membrane remodeling. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 101-109, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Interactions of a lytic peptide with supported lipid bilayers investigated by time-resolved evanescent wave-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapson, Andrew C.; Gee, Michelle L.; Clayton, Andrew H. A.; Smith, Trevor A.

    2016-12-01

    We report investigations, using time-resolved and polarised evanescent wave-induced fluorescence methods, into the location, orientation and mobility of a fluorescently labelled form of the antimicrobial peptide, melittin, when it interacts with vesicles and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). This melittin analogue, termed MK14-A430, was found to penetrate the lipid headgroup structure in pure, ordered-phase DPPC membranes but was located near the headgroup-water region when cholesterol was included. MK14-A430 formed lytic pores in SLBs, and an increase in pore formation with incubation time was observed through an increase in polarity and mobility of the probe. When associated with the Cholesterol-containing SLB, the probe displayed polarity and mobility that indicated a population distributed near the lipid headgroup-water interface with MK14-A430 arranged predominantly in a surface-aligned state. This study indicates that the lytic activity of MK14-A430 occurred through a pore-forming mechanism. The lipid headgroup environment experienced by the fluorescent label, where MK14-A430 displayed pore information, indicated that pore formation was best described by the toroidal pore model.

  1. Cloning and analysing of 5‘ flanking region of Xenopus organizer gene noggin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAOQINHUA; JINGYANG; 等

    1999-01-01

    Xenopus organizer specific gene noggin possesses nearly all the characterestic properties of the action of organizer to specify the embryonic body acis.To analyze how the maternal inherited factors control its expression pattern,we cloned the 5' regulatory region of noggin gene.The 1.5 kb upstream sequense could direct reporter gene to express in vivo and data from deletion analysis indicated that a 229 base pair fragmet is essential for activating noggin expression.We further demonstrated that the response elements within this regulatory region were indeed under the control of growth factor activin and Wnt signaling pathway components.

  2. ATRX promotes gene expression by facilitating transcriptional elongation through guanine-rich coding regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael A; Kernohan, Kristin D; Jiang, Yan; Bérubé, Nathalie G

    2015-04-01

    ATRX is a chromatin remodeling protein involved in deposition of the histone variant H3.3 at telomeres and pericentromeric heterochromatin. It also influences the expression level of specific genes; however, deposition of H3.3 at transcribed genes is currently thought to occur independently of ATRX. We focused on a set of genes, including the autism susceptibility gene Neuroligin 4 (Nlgn4), that exhibit decreased expression in ATRX-null cells to investigate the mechanisms used by ATRX to promote gene transcription. Overall TERRA levels, as well as DNA methylation and histone modifications at ATRX target genes are not altered and thus cannot explain transcriptional dysregulation. We found that ATRX does not associate with the promoter of these genes, but rather binds within regions of the gene body corresponding to high H3.3 occupancy. These intragenic regions consist of guanine-rich DNA sequences predicted to form non-B DNA structures called G-quadruplexes during transcriptional elongation. We demonstrate that ATRX deficiency corresponds to reduced H3.3 incorporation and stalling of RNA polymerase II at these G-rich intragenic sites. These findings suggest that ATRX promotes the incorporation of histone H3.3 at particular transcribed genes and facilitates transcriptional elongation through G-rich sequences. The inability to transcribe genes such as Nlgn4 could cause deficits in neuronal connectivity and cognition associated with ATRX mutations in humans.

  3. GeneRegionScan: a Bioconductor package for probe-level analysis of specific, small regions of the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkersen, Lasse; Diez, Diego; Wheelock, Craig E; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Goto, Susumu; Eriksson, Per; Gabrielsen, Anders

    2009-08-01

    Whole-genome microarrays allow us to interrogate the entire transcriptome of a cell. Affymetrix microarrays are constructed using several probes that match to different regions of a gene and a summarization step reduces this complexity into a single value, representing the expression level of the gene or the expression level of an exon in the case of exon arrays. However, this simplification eliminates information that might be useful when focusing on specific genes of interest. To address these limitations, we present a software package for the R platform that allows detailed analysis of expression at the probe level. The package matches the probe sequences against a target gene sequence (either mRNA or DNA) and shows the expression levels of each probe along the gene. It also features functions to fit a linear regression based on several genetic models that enables study of the relationship between gene expression and genotype. The software is implemented as a platform-independent R package available through the Bioconductor repository at http://www.bioconductor.org/. It is licensed as GPL 2.0. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  4. Molecular methods for bacterial genotyping and analyzed gene regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Halil Yıldırım1, Seval Cing Yıldırım2, Nadir Koçak3

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial strain typing is an important process for diagnosis, treatment and epidemiological investigations. Current bacterial strain typing methods may be classified into two main categories: phenotyping and genotyping. Phenotypic characters are the reflection of genetic contents. Genotyping, which refers discrimination of bacterial strains based on their genetic content, has recently become widely used for bacterial strain typing. The methods already used in genotypingof bacteria are quite different from each other. In this review we tried to summarize the basic principles of DNA-based methods used in genotyping of bacteria and describe some important DNA regions that are used in genotyping of bacteria. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2011;1(1:42-46.

  5. Gene expression in the rodent brain is associated with its regional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Lior; Goldberg, Chen; Manor, Nathan; Sharan, Roded; Ruppin, Eytan

    2011-05-01

    The putative link between gene expression of brain regions and their neural connectivity patterns is a fundamental question in neuroscience. Here this question is addressed in the first large scale study of a prototypical mammalian rodent brain, using a combination of rat brain regional connectivity data with gene expression of the mouse brain. Remarkably, even though this study uses data from two different rodent species (due to the data limitations), we still find that the connectivity of the majority of brain regions is highly predictable from their gene expression levels-the outgoing (incoming) connectivity is successfully predicted for 73% (56%) of brain regions, with an overall fairly marked accuracy level of 0.79 (0.83). Many genes are found to play a part in predicting both the incoming and outgoing connectivity (241 out of the 500 top selected genes, p-valueregional connectivity in the rodent is significantly correlated with the annotation profile of genes previously found to determine neural connectivity in C. elegans (Pearson correlation of 0.24, p<1e-6 for the outgoing connections and 0.27, p<1e-5 for the incoming). Overall, the association between connectivity and gene expression in a specific extant rodent species' brain is likely to be even stronger than found here, given the limitations of current data.

  6. Growth and gene expression are predominantly controlled by distinct regions of the human IL-4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J J; McReynolds, L J; Keegan, A; Wang, L H; Garfein, E; Rothman, P; Nelms, K; Paul, W E

    1996-02-01

    IL-4 causes hematopoietic cells to proliferate and express a series of genes, including CD23. We examined whether IL-4-mediated growth, as measured by 4PS phosphorylation, and gene induction were similarly controlled. Studies of M12.4.1 cells expressing human IL-4R truncation mutants indicated that the region between amino acids 557-657 is necessary for full gene expression, which correlated with Stat6 DNA binding activity. This region was not required for 4PS phosphorylation. Tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutations in the interval between amino acids 557-657 revealed that as long as one tyrosine remained unmutated, CD23 was fully induced. When all three tyrosines were mutated, the receptor was unable to induce CD23. The results indicate that growth regulation and gene expression are principally controlled by distinct regions of IL-4R.

  7. Analysis of transcription regulatory regions of embryonic chicken pepsinogen (ECPg) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanuki, Kumiko; Yasugi, Sadao

    2003-09-01

    Genes encoding pepsinogens, zymogens of digestive enzyme pepsins, are expressed specifically in the gland epithelial cells of the vertebrate stomach, and their expression is also developmentally regulated, therefore providing a good model for the analysis of transcriptional regulation of genes. In the development of chicken embryonic stomach, the epithelium invaginates into the mesenchyme and forms glands and gland epithelial cells then begin to express embryonic chicken pepsinogen (ECPg) gene. It has been shown that cGATA5 binds directly GATA binding sites located within 1.1-kbp upstream of ECPg gene and activates its transcription. To find more precisely the sequences necessary for ECPg gene transcription, we carried out deletion and mutation analysis with 1.1-kbp upstream region. The results suggest that binding of GATA factor to three GATA binding sites within the upstream region -656 to -419 synergistically regulates ECPg expression in the gland epithelial cells.

  8. CAGE-defined promoter regions of the genes implicated in Rett Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitezic, Morana; Bertin, Nicolas; Andersson, Robin;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in three functionally diverse genes cause Rett Syndrome. Although the functions of Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1), Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2) and Cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) have been studied individually, not much is known about their relation to each other...... for each gene and the common transcription factors likely to regulate the three genes. Our data imply Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) mediated silencing of Foxg1 in cerebellum CONCLUSIONS: Our analyses provide a comprehensive picture of the regulatory regions of the three genes involved in Rett...... Syndrome....

  9. Identifying relationships among genomic disease regions: predicting genes at pathogenic SNP associations and rare deletions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Raychaudhuri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Translating a set of disease regions into insight about pathogenic mechanisms requires not only the ability to identify the key disease genes within them, but also the biological relationships among those key genes. Here we describe a statistical method, Gene Relationships Among Implicated Loci (GRAIL, that takes a list of disease regions and automatically assesses the degree of relatedness of implicated genes using 250,000 PubMed abstracts. We first evaluated GRAIL by assessing its ability to identify subsets of highly related genes in common pathways from validated lipid and height SNP associations from recent genome-wide studies. We then tested GRAIL, by assessing its ability to separate true disease regions from many false positive disease regions in two separate practical applications in human genetics. First, we took 74 nominally associated Crohn's disease SNPs and applied GRAIL to identify a subset of 13 SNPs with highly related genes. Of these, ten convincingly validated in follow-up genotyping; genotyping results for the remaining three were inconclusive. Next, we applied GRAIL to 165 rare deletion events seen in schizophrenia cases (less than one-third of which are contributing to disease risk. We demonstrate that GRAIL is able to identify a subset of 16 deletions containing highly related genes; many of these genes are expressed in the central nervous system and play a role in neuronal synapses. GRAIL offers a statistically robust approach to identifying functionally related genes from across multiple disease regions--that likely represent key disease pathways. An online version of this method is available for public use (http://www.broad.mit.edu/mpg/grail/.

  10. Burkitt's lymphoma is a malignancy of mature B cells expressing somatically mutated V region genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, U.; Klein, G.; Ehlin-Henriksson, B.; Rajewsky, K.; Küppers, R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The developmental stage from which stems the malignant B cell population in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is unclear. An approach to answering this question is provided by the sequence analysis of rear-ranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes from BL for evidence of somatic mutations, together with a phenotypic characterization. As somatic hypermutation of Ig V region genes occurs in germinal center B cells, somatically mutated Ig genes are found in germinal center B cells and their descendents. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rearranged V kappa region genes from 10 kappa-expressing sporadic and endemic BL-derived cell lines (9 IgM and 1 IgG positive) and three kappa-expressing endemic BL biopsy specimens were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. In addition, VH region gene sequences from these cell lines were determined. RESULTS: All BL cell lines and the three biopsy specimens carried somatically mutated V region genes. The average mutation frequency of rearranged V kappa genes from eight BL cell lines established from sporadic BL was 1.8%. A higher frequency (6%) was found in five endemic cases (three biopsy specimens and two BL cell lines). CONCLUSIONS: The detection of somatic mutations in the rearranged V region genes suggests that both sporadic and endemic BL represent a B-cell malignancy originating from germinal center B cells or their descendants. Interestingly, the mutation frequency detected in sporadic BL is in a range similar to that characteristic for IgM-expressing B cells in the human peripheral blood and for mu chain-expressing germinal center B cells, whereas the mutation frequency found in endemic BL is significantly higher. PMID:8529116

  11. A 4.5-megabase YAC contig and physical map over the hemochromatosis gene region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, M.J.; Smit, D.J.; Pyper, W.R.; Powell, L.W.; Jazwinska, E.C. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

    1996-04-15

    We have constructed a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig over the candidate hemochromatosis gene region. This contig comprises hemochromatosis gene region. This contig comprises 16 YACs from the CEPH, Washington University, and ICI YAC libraries and covers 4.5 Mb at 6p21.3-6p22. The complete contig has been restriction mapped, enabling the precise relationship between the YACs to be determined and the mapping of a total of 12 STSs. Nine of these are highly polymorphic STSs that are closely linked to hemochromatosis; this series includes D6S265 and D6S1260, which comprise the most proximal and distal markers linked to HC. This is the first YAC contig that spans the hemochromatosis candidate region, and it provides valuable resource material for the cloning of this and other genes in the region distal to the MHC class I complex. 33 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. The human SOX18 gene: Expression analysis and characterization of its 5’ flanking region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Isidora

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish an adequate in vitro model system for studying transcriptional regulation of the human SOX18 gene. The paper presents an analysis of expression of this gene in cultured cell lines and characterization of its 5' flanking region. Using RT-PCR, Northern and Western blot analysis, we demonstrated SOX18 expression in HeLa cells, indicating that this cell line provides a suitable model system for studying transcriptional regulation of the given gene. We also cloned, sequenced and for the first time characterized the human SOX18 5’ flanking region. It is shown that the region 892 bp in size immediately upstream from the start codone harbors regulatory elements sufficient for transcription and represents an SOX18 promoter region.

  13. A brain region-specific predictive gene map for autism derived by profiling a reference gene set.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    Full Text Available Molecular underpinnings of complex psychiatric disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD remain largely unresolved. Increasingly, structural variations in discrete chromosomal loci are implicated in ASD, expanding the search space for its disease etiology. We exploited the high genetic heterogeneity of ASD to derive a predictive map of candidate genes by an integrated bioinformatics approach. Using a reference set of 84 Rare and Syndromic candidate ASD genes (AutRef84, we built a composite reference profile based on both functional and expression analyses. First, we created a functional profile of AutRef84 by performing Gene Ontology (GO enrichment analysis which encompassed three main areas: 1 neurogenesis/projection, 2 cell adhesion, and 3 ion channel activity. Second, we constructed an expression profile of AutRef84 by conducting DAVID analysis which found enrichment in brain regions critical for sensory information processing (olfactory bulb, occipital lobe, executive function (prefrontal cortex, and hormone secretion (pituitary. Disease specificity of this dual AutRef84 profile was demonstrated by comparative analysis with control, diabetes, and non-specific gene sets. We then screened the human genome with the dual AutRef84 profile to derive a set of 460 potential ASD candidate genes. Importantly, the power of our predictive gene map was demonstrated by capturing 18 existing ASD-associated genes which were not part of the AutRef84 input dataset. The remaining 442 genes are entirely novel putative ASD risk genes. Together, we used a composite ASD reference profile to generate a predictive map of novel ASD candidate genes which should be prioritized for future research.

  14. Genetic Architecture of MAPT Gene Region in Parkinson Disease Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Esterina; Di Battista, Maria Elena; Rubino, Alfonso; Purcaro, Carlo; Valente, Marcella; Fattapposta, Francesco; Ferraguti, Giampiero; Meco, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) region has been conceptualized as a model of the interaction between genetics and functional disease outcomes in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson disease (PD). Indeed, haplotype-specific differences in expression and alternative splicing of MAPT transcripts affect cellular functions at different levels, increasing susceptibility to a range of neurodegenerative processes. In order to evaluate a possible link between MAPT variants, PD risk and PD motor phenotype, we analyzed the genetic architecture of MAPT in a cohort of PD patients. We observed a statistically significant association between the H1 haplotype and PD risk (79.5 vs 69.5%; χ(2) = 9.9; OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4; p = 0.002). The effect was more evident in non tremor dominant (TD) PD subjects (NTD-PD) (82 vs 69.5%; χ(2) = 13.6; OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.4-3; p = 0.0003), while no difference emerged between PD subgroup of tremor dominant patients (TD-PD) and control subjects. Examination of specific intra-H1 variations showed that the H1h subhaplotype was overrepresented in NTD-PD patients compared with controls (p = 0.007; OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3-6.3). Although we cannot exclude that MAPT variation may be associated with ethnicity, our results may support the hypothesis that MAPT H1 clade and a specific H1 subhaplotype influence the risk of PD and modulate the clinical expression of the disease, including motor phenotype.

  15. Identification of a membrane-bound prepore species clarifies the lytic mechanism of actinoporins

    CERN Document Server

    Morante, Koldo; Gil-Cartón, David; Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Sot, Jesús; Scheuring, Simon; Valle, Mikel; González-Mañas, Juan Manuel; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M

    2016-01-01

    Pore-forming toxins (PFT) are cytolytic proteins belonging to the molecular warfare apparatus of living organisms. The assembly of the functional transmembrane pore requires several intermediate steps ranging from a water-soluble monomeric species to the multimeric ensemble inserted in the cell membrane. The non-lytic oligomeric intermediate known as prepore plays an essential role in the mechanism of insertion of the class of $\\beta$-PFT. However, in the class of $\\alpha$-PFT like the actinoporins produced by sea anemones, evidence of membrane-bound prepores is still lacking. We have employed single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to identify, for the first time, a prepore species of the actinoporin fragaceatoxin C (FraC) bound to lipid vesicles. The size of the prepore coincides that of the functional pore, except for the transmembrane region, which is absent in the prepore. Biochemical assays indicated that, in the prepore species, the N-terminus is not inserte...

  16. Assessing the Value of DNA Barcodes and Other Priority Gene Regions for Molecular Phylogenetics of Lepidoptera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John James

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite apparently abundant amounts of observable variation and species diversity, the order Lepidoptera exhibits a morphological homogeneity that has provided only a limited number of taxonomic characters and led to widespread use of nucleotides for inferring relationships. This study aims to characterize and develop methods to quantify the value of priority gene regions designated for Lepidoptera molecular systematics. In particular, I assess how the DNA barcode segment of the mitochondrial COI gene performs across a broad temporal range given its number one position of priority, most sequenced status, and the conflicting opinions on its phylogenetic performance. Methodology/Principal Findings Gene regions commonly sequenced for Lepidoptera phylogenetics were scored using multiple measures across three categories: practicality, which includes universality of primers and sequence quality; phylogenetic utility; and phylogenetic signal. I found that alternative measures within a category often appeared correlated, but high scores in one category did not necessarily translate into high scores in another. The DNA barcode was easier to sequence than other genes, and had high scores for utility but low signal above the genus level. Conclusions/Significance Given limited financial resources and time constraints, careful selection of gene regions for molecular phylogenetics is crucial to avoid wasted effort producing partially informative data. This study introduces an approach to assessing the value of gene regions prior to the initiation of new studies and presents empirical results to help guide future selections. PMID:20479871

  17. Assessing the value of DNA barcodes and other priority gene regions for molecular phylogenetics of Lepidoptera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John James Wilson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite apparently abundant amounts of observable variation and species diversity, the order Lepidoptera exhibits a morphological homogeneity that has provided only a limited number of taxonomic characters and led to widespread use of nucleotides for inferring relationships. This study aims to characterize and develop methods to quantify the value of priority gene regions designated for Lepidoptera molecular systematics. In particular, I assess how the DNA barcode segment of the mitochondrial COI gene performs across a broad temporal range given its number one position of priority, most sequenced status, and the conflicting opinions on its phylogenetic performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene regions commonly sequenced for lepidoptera phylogenetics were scored using multiple measures across three categories: practicality, which includes universality of primers and sequence quality; phylogenetic utility; and phylogenetic signal. I found that alternative measures within a category often appeared correlated, but high scores in one category did not necessarily translate into high scores in another. The DNA barcode was easier to sequence than other genes, and had high scores for utility but low signal above the genus level. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Given limited financial resources and time constraints, careful selection of gene regions for molecular phylogenetics is crucial to avoid wasted effort producing partially informative data. This study introduces an approach to assessing the value of gene regions prior to the initiation of new studies and presents empirical results to help guide future selections.

  18. Identification of a set of genes showing regionally enriched expression in the mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marra Marco A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Pleiades Promoter Project aims to improve gene therapy by designing human mini-promoters ( Results We have utilized LongSAGE to identify regionally enriched transcripts in the adult mouse brain. As supplemental strategies, we also performed a meta-analysis of published literature and inspected the Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. From a set of approximately 30,000 mouse genes, 237 were identified as showing specific or enriched expression in 30 target regions of the mouse brain. GO term over-representation among these genes revealed co-involvement in various aspects of central nervous system development and physiology. Conclusion Using a multi-faceted expression validation approach, we have identified mouse genes whose human orthologs are good candidates for design of mini-promoters. These mouse genes represent molecular markers in several discrete brain regions/cell-types, which could potentially provide a mechanistic explanation of unique functions performed by each region. This set of markers may also serve as a resource for further studies of gene regulatory elements influencing brain expression.

  19. Discovery and industrial applications of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Katja S

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) has opened up a vast area of research covering several fields of application. The biotech company Novozymes A/S holds patents on the use of these enzymes for the conversion of steam-pre-treated plant residues such as straw to free sugars. These patents predate the correct classification of LPMOs and the striking synergistic effect of fungal LPMOs when combined with canonical cellulases was discovered when fractions of fungal secretomes were evaluated in industrially relevant enzyme performance assays. Today, LPMOs are a central component in the Cellic CTec enzyme products which are used in several large-scale plants for the industrial production of lignocellulosic ethanol. LPMOs are characterized by an N-terminal histidine residue which, together with an internal histidine and a tyrosine residue, co-ordinates a single copper atom in a so-called histidine brace. The mechanism by which oxygen binds to the reduced copper atom has been reported and the general mechanism of copper-oxygen-mediated activation of carbon is being investigated in the light of these discoveries. LPMOs are widespread in both the fungal and the bacterial kingdoms, although the range of action of these enzymes remains to be elucidated. However, based on the high abundance of LPMOs expressed by microbes involved in the decomposition of organic matter, the importance of LPMOs in the natural carbon-cycle is predicted to be significant. In addition, it has been suggested that LPMOs play a role in the pathology of infectious diseases such as cholera and to thus be relevant in the field of medicine. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  20. Cloning,sequencing and analyzing of the heavy chain V region genes of human polyreactive antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGJINSONG; MINGYEH

    1994-01-01

    The heavy chain variable region genes of 5 human polyreactive mAbs generated in our laboratory have been cloned and sequenced using polymerase chain reaction(PCR) technique.We found that 2 and 3 mAbs utilized genes of the VHIV and VHⅢ families,respectively.The former 2 VH segments were in germline configuration.A common VH segment,with the best similarity of 90.1% to the published VHⅢ germline genes,was utilized by 2 different rearranged genes encoding the V regions of other 3 mAbs.This strongly suggests that the common VH segment is a unmutated copy of an unidentified germline VHⅢ gene.All these polyreactive mAbs displayed a large NDN region(VH-D-JH junction).The entire H chain V regions of these polyreactive mAbs are unusually basic.The analysis of the charge properties of these mAbs as well as those of other poly-and mono-reactive mAbs from literatures prompts us to propose that the charged amino acids with a particular distribution along the H chain V region,especially the binding sites(CDRs),may be an important structural feature involved in antibody polyreactivity.

  1. Identification of true EST alignments and exon regions of gene sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yanhong; JING Hui; LI Yanen; LIU Huailan

    2004-01-01

    Expressed sequence tags (ESTs), which have piled up considerably so far, provide a valuable resource for finding new genes, disease-relevant genes, and for recognizing alternative splicing variants, SNP sites, etc. The prerequisite for carrying out these researches is to correctly ascertain the gene-sequence-related ESTs. Based on analysis of the alignment results between some known gene sequences and ESTs in public database, several measures including Identity Check, Gap Check, Inclusion Check and Length Check have been introduced to judge whether an EST alignment is related to a gene sequence or not. A computational program EDSAc1.0 has been developed to identify true EST alignments and exon regions of query gene sequences. When tested with human gene sequences in the standard dataset HMR195 and evaluated with the standard measures of gene prediction performance, EDSAc1.0 can identify protein- coding regions with specificity of 0.997 and sensitivity of 0.88 at the nucleotide level, which outperform that of the counterpart TAP. A web server of EDSAc1.0 is available at http://infosci.hust.edu.cn.

  2. Characterization of a gene from the EDM1-PSACH region of human chromosome 19p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lennon, G.G.; Giorgi, D.; Martin, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Genetic linkage mapping has indicated that both multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1), a dominantly inherited chondrodysplasia, and pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH), a skeletal disorder associated with dwarfism, map to a 2-3 Mb region of human chromosome 19p. We have isolated a partial cDNA from this region using hybrid selection, and report on progress towards the characterization of the genomic structure and transcription of the corresponding gene. Sequence analysis of the cDNA to date indicates that this gene is likely to be expressed within extracellular matrix tissues. Defects in this gene or neighboring gene family members may therefore lead to EDM1, PSACH, or other connective tissue and skeletal disorders.

  3. Expression of. Arabidopsis tryptophan biosynthetic pathway genes: effect of the 5’ coding region of phosphoribosylanthranilate isomerase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何奕昆; 刘新仿; 李家洋

    1999-01-01

    There are three non-allelic isogenes encoding phosphoribosylanthranilate isomerase (PAI) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression plasmids were constructed by fusion of the GUS reporter gene to the three PAI promoters with or without the 5’ region encoding PAI N-terminal polypeptides and transferred into Arabidopsis plants by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Analysis of GUS activity revealed that the PAI 5’ coding region was necessary for high expression of GUS activity. GUS activity in transgenic plants transformed with the expression plasmids containing the 5’ coding region of PAI1 or PAI3 was 60—100-fold higher than that without the corresponding 5’ region. However, the effect of 5’ coding region of PAI2 gene on the GUS activity was very small (only about 1 time difference). The GUS histochemical staining showed a similar result as revealed by GUS activity assay. It was expressed in the mesophyll cells and guard cells, but not in the epidermic cells, indicating that the N-terminal polypeptides encoded by t

  4. Core and region-enriched networks of behaviorally regulated genes and the singing genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Osceola; Pfenning, Andreas R.; Howard, Jason T.; Blatti, Charles A; Liu, Fang; Ward, James M.; Wang, Rui; Audet, Jean-Nicolas; Kellis, Manolis; Mukherjee, Sayan; Sinha, Saurabh; Hartemink, Alexander J.; West, Anne E.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2015-01-01

    Songbirds represent an important model organism for elucidating molecular mechanisms that link genes with complex behaviors, in part because they have discrete vocal learning circuits that have parallels with those that mediate human speech. We found that ~10% of the genes in the avian genome were regulated by singing, and we found a striking regional diversity of both basal and singing-induced programs in the four key song nuclei of the zebra finch, a vocal learning songbird. The region-enriched patterns were a result of distinct combinations of region-enriched transcription factors (TFs), their binding motifs, and presinging acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 27 (H3K27ac) enhancer activity in the regulatory regions of the associated genes. RNA interference manipulations validated the role of the calcium-response transcription factor (CaRF) in regulating genes preferentially expressed in specific song nuclei in response to singing. Thus, differential combinatorial binding of a small group of activity-regulated TFs and predefined epigenetic enhancer activity influences the anatomical diversity of behaviorally regulated gene networks. PMID:25504732

  5. Hypermethylation of Syk gene in promoter region associated with oncogenesis and metastasis of gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui Wang; Yong-Bin Ding; Guo-Yu Chen; Jian-Guo Xia; Zhen-Yan Wu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the rrelationship between methylation of Syk (spleen tyrosine kinase) gene in promoter region and oncogenesis, metastasis of gastric carcinoma. The relation between silencing of the Syk gene and methylation of Syk promoter region was also studied.METHODS: By using methylation-specific PCR (MSP)technique, the methylation of Syk promoter region in specimens from 61 gastric cancer patients (tumor tissues and adjacent normal tissues) was detected. Meanwhile, RTPCR was used to analyse syk expression exclusively.RESULTS: The expression of the Syk gene was detected in all normal gastric tissues. Syk expression in gastric carcinoma was lower in 14 out of 61 gastric cancer samples than in adjacent normal tissues (x2=72.3, P<0.05). No methylation of Syk promoter was found in adjacent normal tissues, hypermethylation of Syk gene in promoter was detected 21 cases in 61 gastric carcinoma patients. The rate of methylation of Syk promoter in gastric carcinoma was higher than that in adjacent normal tissues (x2=25.1,P<0.05). In 31 patients with lymph node metastasis, 17 were found with Syk promoter methylation. A significant difference was noted between two groups (x2=11.4, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Hypermethylation leads to silencing of the Syk gene in human gastric carcinoma. Methylation of Syk promoter is correlated to oncogenesis and metastasis of gastric carcinoma. Syk is considered to be a potential tumor suppressor and anti-metastasis gene in human gastric cancer.

  6. Efficacy of lytic Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduor, Joseph Michael Ochieng'; Onkoba, Nyamongo; Maloba, Fredrick; Arodi, Washingtone Ouma; Nyachieo, Atunga

    2016-11-24

    The use of bacteriophages as an alternative treatment method against multidrug-resistant bacteria has not been explored in Kenya. This study sought to determine the efficacy of environmentally obtained lytic bacteriophage against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MDRSA) bacterium in mice. Staphylococcus aureus bacterium and S. aureus-specific lytic phage were isolated from sewage and wastewater collected within Nairobi County, Kenya. Thirty mice were randomly assigned into three groups: MDRSA infection group (n = 20), phage-infection group (n = 5), and non-infection group (n = 5). The MDRSA infection group was further subdivided into three groups: clindamycin treatment (8 mg/kg; n = 5), lytic phage treatment (108 PFU/mL (n = 5), and a combination treatment of clindamycin and lytic phage (n = 5). Treatments were done at either 24 or 72 hours post-infection (p.i), and data on efficacy, bacterial load, and animal physical health were collected. Treatment with phage was more effective (100%) than with clindamycin (62.25% at 24 hours p.i and 87.5% at 72 hours p.i.) or combination treatment (75% at 24 hours p.i. and 90% at 72 hours p.i.) (p aureus lytic bacteriophage has therapeutic potential against MDRSA bacterium in mice.

  7. Conserved gene arrangement in the origin region of the Streptomyces coelicolor chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    A 23-kb fragment of the Streptomyces coelicolor chromosome spanning the dnaA region has been isolated as a cosmid clone. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 5-kb portion shows that the genes for the RNase P protein (rnpA), ribosomal protein L34 (rpmH), the replication initiator protein (dnaA), and the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III (dnaN) are present in the highly conserved gene arrangement found in all eubacterial genomes studied so far. The dnaA-dnaN intergenic region is approximately 1 k...

  8. Sequencing of 15 622 gene-bearing BACs clarifies the gene-dense regions of the barley genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Amatriaín, María; Lonardi, Stefano; Luo, MingCheng; Madishetty, Kavitha; Svensson, Jan T; Moscou, Matthew J; Wanamaker, Steve; Jiang, Tao; Kleinhofs, Andris; Muehlbauer, Gary J; Wise, Roger P; Stein, Nils; Ma, Yaqin; Rodriguez, Edmundo; Kudrna, Dave; Bhat, Prasanna R; Chao, Shiaoman; Condamine, Pascal; Heinen, Shane; Resnik, Josh; Wing, Rod; Witt, Heather N; Alpert, Matthew; Beccuti, Marco; Bozdag, Serdar; Cordero, Francesca; Mirebrahim, Hamid; Ounit, Rachid; Wu, Yonghui; You, Frank; Zheng, Jie; Simková, Hana; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Duma, Denisa; Altschmied, Lothar; Blake, Tom; Bregitzer, Phil; Cooper, Laurel; Dilbirligi, Muharrem; Falk, Anders; Feiz, Leila; Graner, Andreas; Gustafson, Perry; Hayes, Patrick M; Lemaux, Peggy; Mammadov, Jafar; Close, Timothy J

    2015-10-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) possesses a large and highly repetitive genome of 5.1 Gb that has hindered the development of a complete sequence. In 2012, the International Barley Sequencing Consortium released a resource integrating whole-genome shotgun sequences with a physical and genetic framework. However, because only 6278 bacterial artificial chromosome (BACs) in the physical map were sequenced, fine structure was limited. To gain access to the gene-containing portion of the barley genome at high resolution, we identified and sequenced 15 622 BACs representing the minimal tiling path of 72 052 physical-mapped gene-bearing BACs. This generated ~1.7 Gb of genomic sequence containing an estimated 2/3 of all Morex barley genes. Exploration of these sequenced BACs revealed that although distal ends of chromosomes contain most of the gene-enriched BACs and are characterized by high recombination rates, there are also gene-dense regions with suppressed recombination. We made use of published map-anchored sequence data from Aegilops tauschii to develop a synteny viewer between barley and the ancestor of the wheat D-genome. Except for some notable inversions, there is a high level of collinearity between the two species. The software HarvEST:Barley provides facile access to BAC sequences and their annotations, along with the barley-Ae. tauschii synteny viewer. These BAC sequences constitute a resource to improve the efficiency of marker development, map-based cloning, and comparative genomics in barley and related crops. Additional knowledge about regions of the barley genome that are gene-dense but low recombination is particularly relevant.

  9. A new PKLR gene mutation in the R-type promoter region affects the gene transcription causing pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manco, L; Ribeiro, M L; Máximo, V; Almeida, H; Costa, A; Freitas, O; Barbot, J; Abade, A; Tamagnini, G

    2000-09-01

    Mutations in the PKLR gene responsible for pyruvate kinase (PK)-deficient anaemia are mainly located in the coding regions: 11 are in the splicing sites and, recently, three mutations have been described in the promoter region. We now report a novel point mutation A-->G on nucleotide 72, upstream from the initiation codon of the PKLR gene, in four Portuguese PK-deficient patients. This new regulatory mutation occurs within the most proximal of the four GATA motifs (GATA-A element) in the R-type promoter region. In two patients who were homozygous for this mutation, a semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedure was used to evaluate the amount of R-PK mRNA transcript in the reticulocytes. The mRNA level was about five times lower than in normal controls, demonstrating that the PKLR gene transcription is severely affected, most probably because the -72A-->G point mutation disables the binding of the erythroid transcription factor GATA-1 to the GATA-A element. Supporting these data, the two patients homozygous for the -72A-->G mutation had severe haemolytic anaemia and were transfusion dependent until splenectomy. Two other patients who were compound heterozygous for this mutation and the previously described missense mutation 1456C-->T had a mild condition.

  10. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  11. Linkage disequilibrium in the region of the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snarey, A. (Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (United Kingdom)); Thomas, S.; Harris, P.C. (Institute of Molecular Medicine, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Schneider, M.C. (Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)); Pound, S.E.; Wright, A.F. (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)); Barton, N.; Somlo, S.; Germino, G.G.; Reeders, S.T. (and others)

    1994-08-01

    The gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD1) is located on chromosome 16p, between the flanking markers D16S84 and D16S125 (26.6 prox). This region is 750 kb long and has been cloned. The authors have looked at the association of 10 polymorphic markers from the region, with the disease and with each other. This was done in a set of Scottish families that had previously shown association with D16S94, a marker proximal to the PKD1 region. They report significant association between two CA repeat markers and the disease but have not found evidence for a single founder haplotype in these families, indicating the presence of several mutations in this population. Their results favor a location of the PKD1 gene in the proximal part of the candidate region. 25 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibition modulates histone acetylation at gene promoter regions and affects genome-wide gene transcription in Schistosoma mansoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Letícia; Gomes, Monete Rajão; daSilva, Lucas Ferreira; Pereira, Adriana da Silva Andrade; Mourão, Marina M.; Romier, Christophe; Pierce, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Treatment depends on a single drug, praziquantel, which kills the Schistosoma spp. parasite only at the adult stage. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) such as Trichostatin A (TSA) induce parasite mortality in vitro (schistosomula and adult worms), however the downstream effects of histone hyperacetylation on the parasite are not known. Methodology/Principal findings TSA treatment of adult worms in vitro increased histone acetylation at H3K9ac and H3K14ac, which are transcription activation marks, not affecting the unrelated transcription repression mark H3K27me3. We investigated the effect of TSA HDACi on schistosomula gene expression at three different time points, finding a marked genome-wide change in the transcriptome profile. Gene transcription activity was correlated with changes on the chromatin acetylation mark at gene promoter regions. Moreover, combining expression data with ChIP-Seq public data for schistosomula, we found that differentially expressed genes having the H3K4me3 mark at their promoter region in general showed transcription activation upon HDACi treatment, compared with those without the mark, which showed transcription down-regulation. Affected genes are enriched for DNA replication processes, most of them being up-regulated. Twenty out of 22 genes encoding proteins involved in reducing reactive oxygen species accumulation were down-regulated. Dozens of genes encoding proteins with histone reader motifs were changed, including SmEED from the PRC2 complex. We targeted SmEZH2 methyltransferase PRC2 component with a new EZH2 inhibitor (GSK343) and showed a synergistic effect with TSA, significantly increasing schistosomula mortality. Conclusions/Significance Genome-wide gene expression analyses have identified important pathways and cellular functions that were affected and may explain the schistosomicidal effect of TSA HDACi. The change in expression

  13. Potential transcriptional regulatory regions exist upstream of the human ezrin gene promoter in esophageal carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuying Gao; Yanpeng Dai; Meijun Yin; Jing Ye; Gang Li; Jie Yu

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the region -87/+ 134 of the human ezrin gene (VIL2) exhibited promoter activity in human esophageal carcinoma EC109 cells, and a further upstream region -1324/-890 positively regulated transcription.In this study, to identify the transcriptional regulatory regions upstream of the VIL2 promoter, we cloned VIL2 - 1541/- 706 segment containing the -1324/-890, and investigated its transcriptional regulatory properties via luciferase assays in transiently transfected cells.In EC109 cells, it was found that VIL2 -1541/-706 possessed promoter and enhancer activities.We also localized transcriptional regulatory regions by fusing 5′- or 3′-deletion segments of VIL2 -1541/-706 to a luciferase reporter.We found that there were three positive and one negative transcriptional regulatory regions ithin VIL2 -1541/-706 in EC109 cells.When these regions were separately located upstream of the luciferase gene without promoter, or located upstream of the VIL2 promoter or SV40 promoter directing the luciferase gene, only VIL2 -1297/-1186 exhibited considerable promoter and enhancer activities, which were lower than those of -1541/-706.In addition, transient expression of Sp1 increased ezrin expression and the transcriptional activation of VIL2 -1297/-1186.Other three regions,although exhibiting significantly positive or negative transcriptional regulation in deletion experiments, showed a weaker or absent regulation.These data suggested that more than one region upstream of the VIL2 promoter participated in VIL2 transcription, and the VIL2 -1297/-1186, probably as a key transcriptional regulatory region, regulated VIL2 transcription in company with other potential regulatory regions.

  14. Functional characterization of genetic polymorphisms identified in the promoter region of the bovine PEPS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Zhihua; Zheng, Xue; Huang, Jinming; Qi, Chao; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jianbin; Zhong, Jifeng; Wang, Changfa

    2012-06-01

    Peptidase S (PEPS) is a metallopeptidase that cleaves N-terminal residues from proteins and peptides. PEPS is used as a cell maintenance enzyme with critical roles in peptide turnover. The promoter region located upstream of the initiation site plays an important role in regulating gene expression. Polymorphism in the promoter region can alter gene expression and lead to biological changes. In the current study, polymorphisms in the promoter region of the PEPS gene were investigated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA sequencing methods were used to screen sequence variations in the promoter region of DNA samples from 743 Chinese Holstein cattle. Two polymorphisms (g. -534 T>C and g. -2545 G>A) were identified and eight haplotypes were classified by haplotype analysis. The two genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes were associated with fat percentage and somatic cell score in Chinese Holstein cattle. The results of real-time PCR showed that cow kidneys exhibit the highest PEPS expression level. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis predicted that the single-nucleotide polymorphism g. -534 T>C is located in the core promoter region and in the transcription factor binding sites. The promoter activities of the polymorphism of -543 T>C were measured by luciferase assay in the human kidney epithelial cell line 293T. Transcriptional activity is significantly lower in cell lines transfected with the reporter construct containing 2.5 kb upstream fragments with -543 C than in those with wild-type -543 T. The results indicated that genetic variation at locus -543 influences PEPS promoter activity. The genetic variation in the promoter region of PEPS gene may regulate PEPS gene transcription and might have consequences at a regulatory level.

  15. In vitro cytocidal effect of lytic peptides on several transformed mammalian cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, J M; Julian, G R; Jeffers, G W; White, K L; Enright, F M

    1989-01-01

    Several types of transformed mammalian cells, derived from established cell lines, were found to be lysed in vitro by three novel lytic peptides (SB-37, SB-37*, and Shiva-1). This is in contrast with the behavior of normal cells, where the observed lytic activity of the peptides is greatly reduced. Based on experiments utilizing compounds which disrupt the cytoskeleton (colchicine and cytochalasin-D), it is surmised that alterations in the cytoskeleton of transformed cells increase their sensitivity to the cytolytic activity exerted by the peptides, primarily by causing a loss of osmotic integrity. Thus, a stable and regenerative cytoskeletal system, as that possessed by normal cells, would seem requisite to withstanding the lytic effects of the peptides.

  16. Genetic organisation of the capsule transport gene region from Haemophilus paragallinarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. De Smidt

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The region involved in export of the capsule polysaccharides to the cell surface of Haemophilus paragallinarum was cloned and the genetic organisation determined. Degenerate primers designed from sequence alignment of the capsule transport genes of Haemophilus influenzae, Pasteurella multocida and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae were used to amplify a 2.6 kb fragment containing a segment of the H. paragallinarum capsule transport gene locus. This fragment was used as a digoxigenin labelled probe to isolate the complete H. paragallinarum capsule transport gene locus from genomic DNA. The sequence of the cloned DNA was determined and analysis revealed the presence of four genes, each showing high homology with known capsule transport genes. The four genes were designated hctA, B, C and D (for H. paragallinarum capsule transport genes and the predicted products of these genes likely encode an ATP-dependent export system responsible for transport of the capsule polysaccharides to the cell surface, possibly a member of a super family designated ABC (ATP-binding cassette transporters.

  17. Characterization of the Helicoverpa assulta nucleopolyhedrovirus genome and sequence analysis of the polyhedrin gene region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Soo-Dong Woo; Jae Young Choi; Yeon Ho Je; Byung Rae Jin

    2006-09-01

    A local strain of Helicoverpa assulta nucleopolyhedrovirus (HasNPV) was isolated from infected H. assulta larvae in Korea. Restriction endonuclease fragment analysis, using 4 restriction enzymes, estimated that the total genome size of HasNPV is about 138 kb. A degenerate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer set for the polyhedrin gene successfully amplified the partial polyhedrin gene of HasNPV. The sequencing results showed that the about 430 bp PCR product was a fragment of the corresponding polyhedrin gene. Using HasNPV partial predicted polyhedrin to probe the Southern blots, we identified the location of the polyhedrin gene within the 6 kb EcoRI, 15 kb NcoI, 20 kb XhoI, 17 kb BglII and 3 kb ClaI fragments, respectively. The 3 kb ClaI fragment was cloned and the nucleotide sequences of the polyhedrin coding region and its flaking regions were determined. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicated the presence of an open reading frame of 735 nucleotides which could encode 245 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 29 kDa. The nucleotide sequences within the coding region of HasNPV polyhedrin shared 73.7% identity with the polyhedrin gene from Autographa californica NPV but were most closely related to Helicoverpa and Heliothis species NPVs with over 99% sequence identity.

  18. A common deletion at D6S265 in the hemochromatosis gene region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyper, W.R.; Burt, M.J.; Powell, L.W. [Queensland Institute of Medical Research and Department of Medicine, Brisbane (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Positional cloning of the hemochromatosis (HC) gene on chromosome 6p has utilized a number of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers. While the putative HC gene has been localized within 1 cM of HLA-A, definition of the genetic limits of the HC locus has been controversial. Isolation and characterization of additional markers within this region will enable construction of a physical map upon which the HC gene can located. D6S265 is one such microsatellite, physically mapped within 120 kb centromeric of HLA-A. Recombinant and linkage analysis of this dinucleotide repeat in 24 Australian families segregating for HC positioned D6S265 within 1 cM of the HC gene, while allele association analysis showed allele 1 to be significantly increased in HC patients ({chi}{sup 2}=41.4, p<0.001, RR=5.75). In 6 of the 24 HC families, a D6265 locus deletion was found to segregate with HLA-A25 and HLA-A26 alleles. The D6S265 locus deletion was not associated with expression of HC. This study enables us to exclude candidate HC genes from the deleted region involving D6S265, and gives further support for an area of instability in the HLA class I region.

  19. Sequence analysis of 21 genes located in the Kartagener syndrome linkage region on chromosome 15q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geremek, Maciej; Schoenmaker, Frederieke; Zietkiewicz, Ewa; Pogorzelski, Andrzej; Diehl, Scott; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witt, Michal

    2008-06-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare genetic disorder, which shows extensive genetic heterogeneity and is mostly inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. There are four genes with a proven pathogenetic role in PCD. DNAH5 and DNAI1 are involved in 28 and 10% of PCD cases, respectively, while two other genes, DNAH11 and TXNDC3, have been identified as causal in one PCD family each. We have previously identified a 3.5 cM (2.82 Mb) region on chromosome 15q linked to Kartagener syndrome (KS), a subtype of PCD characterized by the randomization of body organ positioning. We have now refined the KS candidate region to a 1.8 Mb segment containing 18 known genes. The coding regions of these genes and three neighboring genes were subjected to sequence analysis in seven KS probands, and we were able to identify 60 single nucleotide sequence variants, 35 of which resided in mRNA coding sequences. However, none of the variations alone could explain the occurrence of the disease in these patients.

  20. A Region-Based GeneSIS Segmentation Algorithm for the Classification of Remotely Sensed Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelios K. Mylonas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an object-based segmentation/classification scheme for remotely sensed images, based on a novel variant of the recently proposed Genetic Sequential Image Segmentation (GeneSIS algorithm. GeneSIS segments the image in an iterative manner, whereby at each iteration a single object is extracted via a genetic-based object extraction algorithm. Contrary to the previous pixel-based GeneSIS where the candidate objects to be extracted were evaluated through the fuzzy content of their included pixels, in the newly developed region-based GeneSIS algorithm, a watershed-driven fine segmentation map is initially obtained from the original image, which serves as the basis for the forthcoming GeneSIS segmentation. Furthermore, in order to enhance the spatial search capabilities, we introduce a more descriptive encoding scheme in the object extraction algorithm, where the structural search modules are represented by polygonal shapes. Our objectives in the new framework are posed as follows: enhance the flexibility of the algorithm in extracting more flexible object shapes, assure high level classification accuracies, and reduce the execution time of the segmentation, while at the same time preserving all the inherent attributes of the GeneSIS approach. Finally, exploiting the inherent attribute of GeneSIS to produce multiple segmentations, we also propose two segmentation fusion schemes that operate on the ensemble of segmentations generated by GeneSIS. Our approaches are tested on an urban and two agricultural images. The results show that region-based GeneSIS has considerably lower computational demands compared to the pixel-based one. Furthermore, the suggested methods achieve higher classification accuracies and good segmentation maps compared to a series of existing algorithms.

  1. Identification of 2 novel genes developmentally regulated in the mouse aorta-gonad-mesonephros region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio; E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe first adult-repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge in the mouse aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region at embryonic day 10.5 prior to their appearance in the yolk sac and fetal liver. Although several genes are implicated in the regulation of HSCs, there

  2. The Rhodomonas salina mitochondrial genome: bacteria-like operons, compact gene arrangement and complex repeat region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauth, Amy M; Maier, Uwe G; Lang, B Franz; Burger, Gertraud

    2005-01-01

    To gain insight into the mitochondrial genome structure and gene content of a putatively ancestral group of eukaryotes, the cryptophytes, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNA of Rhodomonas salina. The 48 063 bp circular-mapping molecule codes for 2 rRNAs, 27 tRNAs and 40 proteins including 23 components of oxidative phosphorylation, 15 ribosomal proteins and two subunits of tat translocase. One potential protein (ORF161) is without assigned function. Only two introns occur in the genome; both are present within cox1 belong to group II and contain RT open reading frames. Primitive genome features include bacteria-like rRNAs and tRNAs, ribosomal protein genes organized in large clusters resembling bacterial operons and the presence of the otherwise rare genes such as rps1 and tatA. The highly compact gene organization contrasts with the presence of a 4.7 kb long, repeat-containing intergenic region. Repeat motifs approximately 40-700 bp long occur up to 31 times, forming a complex repeat structure. Tandem repeats are the major arrangement but the region also includes a large, approximately 3 kb, inverted repeat and several potentially stable approximately 40-80 bp long hairpin structures. We provide evidence that the large repeat region is involved in replication and transcription initiation, predict a promoter motif that occurs in three locations and discuss two likely scenarios of how this highly structured repeat region might have evolved.

  3. The evolution of vertebrate somatostatin receptors and their gene regions involves extensive chromosomal rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocampo Daza Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatostatin and its related neuroendocrine peptides have a wide variety of physiological functions that are mediated by five somatostatin receptors with gene names SSTR1-5 in mammals. To resolve their evolution in vertebrates we have investigated the SSTR genes and a large number of adjacent gene families by phylogeny and conserved synteny analyses in a broad range of vertebrate species. Results We find that the SSTRs form two families that belong to distinct paralogons. We observe not only chromosomal similarities reflecting the paralogy relationships between the SSTR-bearing chromosome regions, but also extensive rearrangements between these regions in teleost fish genomes, including fusions and translocations followed by reshuffling through intrachromosomal rearrangements. These events obscure the paralogy relationships but are still tractable thanks to the many genomes now available. We have identified a previously unrecognized SSTR subtype, SSTR6, previously misidentified as either SSTR1 or SSTR4. Conclusions Two ancestral SSTR-bearing chromosome regions were duplicated in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidizations (2R. One of these ancestral SSTR genes generated SSTR2, -3 and -5, the other gave rise to SSTR1, -4 and -6. Subsequently SSTR6 was lost in tetrapods and SSTR4 in teleosts. Our study shows that extensive chromosomal rearrangements have taken place between related chromosome regions in teleosts, but that these events can be resolved by investigating several distantly related species.

  4. Abortive lytic reactivation of KSHV in CBF1/CSL deficient human B cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Scholz

    Full Text Available Since Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV establishes a persistent infection in human B cells, B cells are a critical compartment for viral pathogenesis. RTA, the replication and transcription activator of KSHV, can either directly bind to DNA or use cellular DNA binding factors including CBF1/CSL as DNA adaptors. In addition, the viral factors LANA1 and vIRF4 are known to bind to CBF1/CSL and modulate RTA activity. To analyze the contribution of CBF1/CSL to reactivation in human B cells, we have successfully infected DG75 and DG75 CBF1/CSL knock-out cell lines with recombinant KSHV.219 and selected for viral maintenance by selective medium. Both lines maintained the virus irrespective of their CBF1/CSL status. Viral reactivation could be initiated in both B cell lines but viral genome replication was attenuated in CBF1/CSL deficient lines, which also failed to produce detectable levels of infectious virus. Induction of immediate early, early and late viral genes was impaired in CBF1/CSL deficient cells at multiple stages of the reactivation process but could be restored to wild-type levels by reintroduction of CBF1/CSL. To identify additional viral RTA target genes, which are directly controlled by CBF1/CSL, we analyzed promoters of a selected subset of viral genes. We show that the induction of the late viral genes ORF29a and ORF65 by RTA is strongly enhanced by CBF1/CSL. Orthologs of ORF29a in other herpesviruses are part of the terminase complex required for viral packaging. ORF65 encodes the small capsid protein essential for capsid shell assembly. Our study demonstrates for the first time that in human B cells viral replication can be initiated in the absence of CBF1/CSL but the reactivation process is severely attenuated at all stages and does not lead to virion production. Thus, CBF1/CSL acts as a global hub which is used by the virus to coordinate the lytic cascade.

  5. The spinal muscular atrophy gene region at 5q13.1 has a paralogous chromosomal region at 6p21.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyer, J L; Goldwurm, S; Cullen, L; van der Griend, B; Zournazi, A; Smit, D J; Powell, L W; Jazwinska, E C

    1998-03-01

    Paralogous regions are duplicated segments of chromosomal DNA that have been acquired during the evolution of the genome. Subsequent divergent evolution of the genes within paralogous regions can lead to the formation of gene families. Here, we report the identification of a region on Chromosome (Chr) 6 at 6p21.3 that is paralogous with the Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) gene region on Chr 5 at 5q13.1. Partial characterization of this region identified nine sequences all of which are highly homologous to DNA sequences of the SMA gene region at 5q13.1. These sequences include four beta-glucuronidase sequences, two retrotransposon sequences, a novel cDNA, a Sequence Tagged Site (STS), and one that is homologous to exon 9 of the Neuronal Apoptosis Inhibitor Protein (NAIP) gene. The 6p21.3 paralogous SMA region may contain genes that are related to those in the SMA region at 5q13.1; however, a direct association of this region with SMA is unlikely given that no linkage of SMA with Chr 6 has been reported.

  6. Cloning and Sequence Analysis on 3' Coding Region of Wild Boar and Cross Bred Pig Myostatin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Di; YANG Xiu-qin; YANG Jia-fang

    2004-01-01

    Myostatin, with a highly conservative gene among breeds is a negative regulator of muscle. The 3' coding regions of wild boar and crossbred pig myostatin were cloned by RT-PCR and sequenced respectively. The homology of the nucleotide sequence between wild boar and crossbred pig was 100% and there was no difference in this region compared with pig myostatin gene of Genbank. This indicated that there was not change of gene sequence in this region during the evolution processes.

  7. Refinement in localization and identification of gene regions associated with Crohn disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elding, Heather; Lau, Winston; Swallow, Dallas M; Maniatis, Nikolas

    2013-01-10

    The risk of Crohn disease (CD) has a large genetic component. A recent meta-analysis of 6 genome-wide association studies reported 71 chromosomal intervals but does not account for all of the known genetic contribution. Here, we refine localization of the previously reported intervals and also identify additional CD susceptibility genes using a mapping approach that localizes causal variants based on genetic maps in linkage disequilibrium units (LDU maps). Using 2 of the 6 cohorts, 66 of the 71 previously reported loci are confirmed and more precise location estimates for these intervals are given. We identify 78 additional gene regions that pass genome-wide significance, providing strong evidence for 144 genes. Additionally, 56 nominally significant signals, but with more stringent and precise colocalization, are identified. In total, we provide evidence for 200 gene regions confirming that CD is truly multifactorial and complex in nature. Many identified genes have functions that are compatible with involvement in immune/inflammatory processes and seem to have a large effect in individuals with extra ileal as well as ileal inflammation. The precise locations and the evidence that some genes reflect phenotypic subgroups will help identify functional variants and will lead to greater insight of CD etiology. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Immediate-early Inducible Function in Upstream Region of junB Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HONG WAN; HIROSHI ISHIHARA; IZUMI TANAKA

    2006-01-01

    Objective To analyze the upstream region of radiation-induced junB gene. Methods Four plasmids containing 250 bp, 590 bp, 900 bp and 1650 bp, and CAT reporter gene were constructed separately and introduced to L8704 cells. The cells were irradiated with 2 Gy X-rays and incubated at different intervals. Total RNA was extracted from the cells and fluctuation of the CAT mRNA level was assessed by the RNA ratio of CAT/β-actin measured by quantitative Northern blot hybridization. Results CAT mRNA expression containing 900 bp and 1560 bpjunB promoter remarkably and rapidly increased, and reached its peak 30 min after 2 Gy X-ray irradiation. Conclusions 590~900 bp fragments located in the upstream region ofjunB gene play an important role in the early process of cells against radiation.

  9. Intact coding region of the serotonin transporter gene in obsessive-compulsive disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altemus, M.; Murphy, D.L.; Greenberg, B. [NIMH, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lesch, K.P. [Univ. of Wuerzburg (Germany)

    1996-07-26

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that obsessive-compulsive disorder is genetically transmitted in some families, although no genetic abnormalities have been identified in individuals with this disorder. The selective response of obsessive-compulsive disorder to treatment with agents which block serotonin reuptake suggests the gene coding for the serotonin transporter as a candidate gene. The primary structure of the serotonin-transporter coding region was sequenced in 22 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, using direct PCR sequencing of cDNA synthesized from platelet serotonin-transporter mRNA. No variations in amino acid sequence were found among the obsessive-compulsive disorder patients or healthy controls. These results do not support a role for alteration in the primary structure of the coding region of the serotonin-transporter gene in the pathogenesis of obsessive-compulsive disorder. 27 refs.

  10. Frequent gene conversion events between the X and Y homologous chromosomal regions in primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai Hirohisa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian sex-chromosomes originated from a pair of autosomes. A step-wise cessation of recombination is necessary for the proper maintenance of sex-determination and, consequently, generates a four strata structure on the X chromosome. Each stratum shows a specific per-site nucleotide sequence difference (p-distance between the X and Y chromosomes, depending on the time of recombination arrest. Stratum 4 covers the distal half of the human X chromosome short arm and the p-distance of the stratum is ~10%, on average. However, a 100-kb region, which includes KALX and VCX, in the middle of stratum 4 shows a significantly lower p-distance (1-5%, suggesting frequent sequence exchanges or gene conversions between the X and Y chromosomes in humans. To examine the evolutionary mechanism for this low p-distance region, sequences of a corresponding region including KALX/Y from seven species of non-human primates were analyzed. Results Phylogenetic analysis of this low p-distance region in humans and non-human primate species revealed that gene conversion like events have taken place at least ten times after the divergence of New World monkeys and Catarrhini (i.e., Old World monkeys and hominoids. A KALY-converted KALX allele in white-handed gibbons also suggests a possible recent gene conversion between the X and Y chromosomes. In these primate sequences, the proximal boundary of this low p-distance region is located in a LINE element shared between the X and Y chromosomes, suggesting the involvement of this element in frequent gene conversions. Together with a palindrome on the Y chromosome, a segmental palindrome structure on the X chromosome at the distal boundary near VCX, in humans and chimpanzees, may mediate frequent sequence exchanges between X and Y chromosomes. Conclusion Gene conversion events between the X and Y homologous regions have been suggested, mainly in humans. Here, we found frequent gene conversions in the

  11. Characterization of four lytic transducing bacteriophages of luminescent Vibrio harveyi isolated from shrimp (Penaeus monodon) hatcheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiyagarajan, Sanjeevi; Chrisolite, Bagthasingh; Alavandi, Shankar V; Poornima, Modem; Kalaimani, Natarajan; Santiago, T Chinnappan

    2011-12-01

    Four lytic bacteriophages designated as φVh1, φVh2, φVh3, and φVh4 were isolated from commercial shrimp hatcheries, possessing broad spectrum of infectivity against luminescent Vibrio harveyi isolates, considering their potential as biocontrol agent of luminescent bacterial disease in shrimp hatcheries, and were characterized by electron microscopy, genomic analysis, restriction enzyme analysis (REA), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Three phages φVh1, φVh2, and φVh4 had an icosahedral head of 60-115 nm size with a long, noncontractile tail of 130-329 × 1-17 nm, belonged to the family Siphoviridae. φVh3 had an icosahedral head (72 ± 5 nm) with a short tail (27 × 12 nm) and belonged to Podoviridae. REA with DraI and PFGE of genomic DNA digested with ScaI and XbaI and cluster analysis of their banding patterns indicated that φVh3 was distinct from the other three siphophages. PFGE-based genome mean size of the four bacteriophages φVh1, φVh2, φVh3, and φVh4 was estimated to be about 85, 58, 64, and 107 kb, respectively. These phages had the property of generalized transduction as demonstrated by transduction with plasmid pHSG 396 with frequencies ranging from 4.1 × 10(-7) to 2 × 10(-9) per plaque-forming unit, suggesting a potential ecological role in gene transfer among aquatic vibrios.

  12. In vitro cytocidal effect of novel lytic peptides on Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, J M; Burton, C A; Barr, S B; Jeffers, G W; Julian, G R; White, K L; Enright, F M; Klei, T R; Laine, R A

    1988-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma cruzi were killed by two novel lytic peptides (SB-37 and Shiva-1) in vitro. Human erythrocytes infected with P. falciparum, and Vero cells infected with T. cruzi, were exposed to these peptides. The result, in both cases, was a significant decrease in the level of parasite infection. Furthermore, the peptides had a marked cytocidal effect on trypomastigote stages of T. cruzi in media, whereas host eukaryotic cells were unaffected by the treatments. In view of the worldwide prevalence of these protozoan diseases and the lack of completely suitable treatments, lytic peptides may provide new and unique chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of these infections.

  13. Listeria monocytogenes has a functional chitinolytic system and an active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paspaliari, Dafni Katerina; Loose, Jennifer S. M.; Larsen, Marianne Halberg

    2015-01-01

    B) and a multi-modular lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LmLPMO10). These enzymes have been related to virulence and their role in chitin metabolism is poorly understood. It is thus of interest to functionally characterize the individual enzymes in order to shed light on their roles in vivo. Our results......Chitinases and chitin-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are most commonly associated with chitin metabolism, but are also reported as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. Listeria monocytogenes, a well-known virulent bacterium, possesses two chitinases (ChiA and Chi...

  14. Aberrant DNA methylation in 5'regions of DNA methyltransferase genes in aborted bovine clones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    High rate of abortion and developmental abnormalities is thought to be closely associated with inefficient epigenetic reprogramming of the transplanted nuclei during bovine cloning.It is known that one of the important mechanisms for epigenetic reprogramming is DNA methylation.DNA methylation is established and maintained by DNA methyltransferases(DNMTs),therefore,it is postulated that the inefficient epigenetic reprogramming of transplanted nuclei may be due to abnormal expression of DNMTs.Since DNA methylation can strongly inhibit gene expression,aberrant DNA methylation of DNMT genes may disturb gene expression.But presently,it is not clear whether the methylation abnormality of DNMT genes is related to developmental failure of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.In our study,we analyzed methylation patterns of the 5' regions of four DNMT genes including Dnmt3a,Dnmt3b,Dnmtl and Dnmt2 in four aborted bovine clones.Using bisulfite sequencing method,we found that 3 out of 4 aborted bovine clones(AF1,AF2 and AF3)showed either hypermethylation or hypomethylation in the 5' regions of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b.indicating that Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b genes are not properly reprogrammed.However,the individual AF4 exhibited similar methylation level and pattern to age-matched in vitro fertilized (IVF)fetuses.Besides,we found that tle 5'regions of Dnmtl and Dnmt2 were nearly completely unmethylated in all normal adults.IVF fetuses,sperm and aborted clones.Together,our results suggest that the aberrant methylation of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b 5' regions is probably associated with the high abortion of bovine clones.

  15. Characterization of the bovine pregnancy-associated glycoprotein gene family – analysis of gene sequences, regulatory regions within the promoter and expression of selected genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Angela M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAGs belong to a large family of aspartic peptidases expressed exclusively in the placenta of species in the Artiodactyla order. In cattle, the PAG gene family is comprised of at least 22 transcribed genes, as well as some variants. Phylogenetic analyses have shown that the PAG family segregates into 'ancient' and 'modern' groupings. Along with sequence differences between family members, there are clear distinctions in their spatio-temporal distribution and in their relative level of expression. In this report, 1 we performed an in silico analysis of the bovine genome to further characterize the PAG gene family, 2 we scrutinized proximal promoter sequences of the PAG genes to evaluate the evolution pressures operating on them and to identify putative regulatory regions, 3 we determined relative transcript abundance of selected PAGs during pregnancy and, 4 we performed preliminary characterization of the putative regulatory elements for one of the candidate PAGs, bovine (bo PAG-2. Results From our analysis of the bovine genome, we identified 18 distinct PAG genes and 14 pseudogenes. We observed that the first 500 base pairs upstream of the translational start site contained multiple regions that are conserved among all boPAGs. However, a preponderance of conserved regions, that harbor recognition sites for putative transcriptional factors (TFs, were found to be unique to the modern boPAG grouping, but not the ancient boPAGs. We gathered evidence by means of Q-PCR and screening of EST databases to show that boPAG-2 is the most abundant of all boPAG transcripts. Finally, we provided preliminary evidence for the role of ETS- and DDVL-related TFs in the regulation of the boPAG-2 gene. Conclusion PAGs represent a relatively large gene family in the bovine genome. The proximal promoter regions of these genes display differences in putative TF binding sites, likely contributing to observed

  16. A novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage, Ab31, a chimera formed from temperate phage PAJU2 and P. putida lytic phage AF: characteristics and mechanism of bacterial resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libera Latino

    Full Text Available A novel temperate bacteriophage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, phage vB_PaeP_Tr60_Ab31 (alias Ab31 is described. Its genome is composed of structural genes related to those of lytic P. putida phage AF, and regulatory genes similar to those of temperate phage PAJU2. The virion structure resembles that of phage AF and other lytic Podoviridae (S. enterica Epsilon 15 and E. coli phiv10 with similar tail spikes. Ab31 was able to infect P. aeruginosa strain PA14 and two genetically related strains called Tr60 and Tr162, out of 35 diverse strains from cystic fibrosis patients. Analysis of resistant host variants revealed different phenotypes, including induction of pigment and alginate overproduction. Whole genome sequencing of resistant variants highlighted the existence of a large deletion of 234 kbp in two strains, encompassing a cluster of genes required for the production of CupA fimbriae. Stable lysogens formed by Ab31 in strain Tr60, permitted the identification of the insertion site. During colonization of the lung in cystic fibrosis patients, P. aeruginosa adapts by modifying its genome. We suggest that bacteriophages such as Ab31 may play an important role in this adaptation by selecting for bacterial characteristics that favor persistence of bacteria in the lung.

  17. Binding of cellular export factor REF/Aly by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 protein is not required for efficient KSHV lytic replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Jiang; Verma, Dinesh; Swaminathan, Sankar

    2012-09-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 protein is expressed early during lytic KSHV replication, enhances expression of many KSHV genes, and is essential for virus production. ORF57 is a member of a family of proteins conserved among all human and many animal herpesviruses that are multifunctional regulators of gene expression and act posttranscriptionally to increase accumulation of their target mRNAs. The mechanism of ORF57 action is complex and may involve effects on mRNA transcription, stability, and export. ORF57 directly binds to REF/Aly, a cellular RNA-binding protein component of the TREX complex that mediates RNA transcription and export. We analyzed the effects of an ORF57 mutation known to abrogate REF/Aly binding and demonstrate that the REF-binding mutant is impaired in activation of viral mRNAs and noncoding RNAs confined to the nucleus. Although the inability to bind REF leads to decreased ORF57 activity in enhancing gene expression, there is no demonstrable effect on nuclear export of viral mRNA or the ability of ORF57 to support KSHV replication and virus production. These data indicate that REF/Aly-ORF57 interaction is not essential for KSHV lytic replication but may contribute to target RNA stability independent of effects on RNA export, suggesting a novel role for REF/Aly in viral RNA metabolism.

  18. Undetectable bacterial resistance to phage lytic proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of three phage lytic proteins constructs. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes w...

  19. Influence of heavy metals on biosynthesis, activity of lytic enzymes and growthstimulating factor of Streptomyces recifensis var. lyticus P-29

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. P. Kilochok

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Influence of heavy metals on growth, biosynthesis, lytic action and growthstimulating activity enzymes complex of Streptomyces recifensis var. lyticus was studied. It was showed that salt of plumbum' has positive influence as on biosynthesis hydrolases (lytic endopeptidases, proteinases, amylases as well increase growthstimulating activity of preparation relatively the yeast

  20. Comparison of gene expression in segregating families identifies genes and genomic regions involved in a novel adaptation, zinc hyperaccumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Victor; Dowdle, John; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ford-Lloyd, Brian; Newbury, H John; Macnair, Mark R

    2006-09-01

    One of the challenges of comparative genomics is to identify specific genetic changes associated with the evolution of a novel adaptation or trait. We need to be able to disassociate the genes involved with a particular character from all the other genetic changes that take place as lineages diverge. Here we show that by comparing the transcriptional profile of segregating families with that of parent species differing in a novel trait, it is possible to narrow down substantially the list of potential target genes. In addition, by assuming synteny with a related model organism for which the complete genome sequence is available, it is possible to use the cosegregation of markers differing in transcription level to identify regions of the genome which probably contain quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the character. This novel combination of genomics and classical genetics provides a very powerful tool to identify candidate genes. We use this methodology to investigate zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri, the sister species to the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We compare the transcriptional profile of A. halleri with that of its sister nonaccumulator species, Arabidopsis petraea, and between accumulator and nonaccumulator F(3)s derived from the cross between the two species. We identify eight genes which consistently show greater expression in accumulator phenotypes in both roots and shoots, including two metal transporter genes (NRAMP3 and ZIP6), and cytoplasmic aconitase, a gene involved in iron homeostasis in mammals. We also show that there appear to be two QTLs for zinc accumulation, on chromosomes 3 and 7.

  1. Genic regions of a large salamander genome contain long introns and novel genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryant Susan V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The basis of genome size variation remains an outstanding question because DNA sequence data are lacking for organisms with large genomes. Sixteen BAC clones from the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum: c-value = 32 × 109 bp were isolated and sequenced to characterize the structure of genic regions. Results Annotation of genes within BACs showed that axolotl introns are on average 10× longer than orthologous vertebrate introns and they are predicted to contain more functional elements, including miRNAs and snoRNAs. Loci were discovered within BACs for two novel EST transcripts that are differentially expressed during spinal cord regeneration and skin metamorphosis. Unexpectedly, a third novel gene was also discovered while manually annotating BACs. Analysis of human-axolotl protein-coding sequences suggests there are 2% more lineage specific genes in the axolotl genome than the human genome, but the great majority (86% of genes between axolotl and human are predicted to be 1:1 orthologs. Considering that axolotl genes are on average 5× larger than human genes, the genic component of the salamander genome is estimated to be incredibly large, approximately 2.8 gigabases! Conclusion This study shows that a large salamander genome has a correspondingly large genic component, primarily because genes have incredibly long introns. These intronic sequences may harbor novel coding and non-coding sequences that regulate biological processes that are unique to salamanders.

  2. Clone and Bioinformatics Analysis of Pig SRPK1 Gene 5' UTR Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E Guangxin; LIU Di; YANG Xiuqin; ZHANG Dongjie; YU Cui

    2011-01-01

    Part 5' UTR region of pig SRPK1 gene was cloned by inverse PCR (I-PCR), then a 425 bp gene sequence was acquired. A promoter region in -1--309 bp was predicted by online tool (TFSEARCH) and 32 binding sites of transcription with scores higher than 85 were getten, of which scores of Spl, MyoD, and HSF2 were over 90. Some of these binding sites of transcription factors were connected with promoters, but TATA-box, which was important to gene expression, hadn't been found in this region. By using PCR-SSCP method to search SNPs this part (5' UTR of SRPK1 in pig), total of 40 Large White pigs were obtained as the research objects, but no polymorphism were found. Thus, 5' UTR of SRPK1 was speculated with a characteristic of high conservation, while it might have been directly or indirectly selected in commercial breeding. The paper provided a further feature of SRPK1 gene in molecular genetics.

  3. Chemical modification of methionines in a cobra venom cytotoxin differentiates between lytic and binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens-Truss, R; Hinman, C L

    1996-08-01

    Cytotoxin-III from Naja naja atra (CTX) was chemically modified at either or both of its two methionine residues: Over 50% oxidation of methionine-26 occurred with a 1:1 molar ratio of chloramine-T:methionine; at a 5:1 molar ratio, methionine-26 was almost completely oxidized, while methionine-24 was modified only 26%; at a 10:1 molar ratio, both methionines were completely oxidized. Each oxidized derivative demonstrated a lower toxicity toward T-cells than toward heart cells. Conversely, binding to heart cells was affected more than binding to T-cells. Cyanogen bromide cleaved native CTX at both methionines, excising phenyl-alanine-25 and methionine-26 and converting methionine-24 to homoserine lactone. This treatment of CTX eliminated cytotoxicity toward both heart and T-cells, but had only a modest effect upon T-cell binding, as had 50% oxidation of methionine-26, suggesting that CTX lytic and binding regions may be distinct. A selective loss in heart cell binding following oxidation of methionine-24 further suggests that different parts of CTX may interact with the two types of target cells. Perturbation of the relatively flat hydrophobic surface of the CTX' triple-stranded beta-sheet could result from the introduction of negative charge due to methionine-24 oxidation. Alternatively, amino acid side chain participation in a CTX binding domain may be altered by the potential formation of a new hydrogen bond between tyrosine-51 and methionine-24 sulfoxide, as revealed by computer modeling of the completely oxidized CTX derivative.

  4. Conservation-based prediction of the transcription regulatory region of the SCN1A gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Sheng Long; Yi-Wu Shi; Wei-Ping Liao

    2009-01-01

    A challenge in identifying the transcription regulatory region is that the locations of eukaryotic transcriptional elements are often diverse among different genes.SCN1A,a disease-related sodium channel gene,has a complex 5'-untranslated region and diverse mRNA transcripts,which might be driven by different promoters.By cross-species sequence comparison and bioinformatics analysis,human 5'-untranslated exons were found to be conserved within the region of 200 kb upstream of the 5' flanking regions of SCN1A in higher mammals,but not in lower mammals and non-mammals.The core promoter elements (INR,DPE,and TATA) were found in the regions flanking different 5'-untranslated exons,suggesting that these sequences (from-45 to+35) might be targeted as core promoters.The nucleotide identity rate of these core promoter sequences are different,and the conservation level of the upstream region of each core promoter varies distinctly,implicating different regulatory mechanisms of the four promoters which exist in the nervous system.

  5. Association analysis of PRNP gene region with chronic wasting disease in Rocky Mountain elk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spraker Terry R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic wasting disease (CWD is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE of cervids including white-tailed (Odocoileus virginianus and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus, Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni, and moose (Alces alces. A leucine variant at position 132 (132L in prion protein of Rocky Mountain elk confers a long incubation time with CWD, but not complete resistance. However, variants in regulatory regions outside the open reading frame of PRNP have been associated with varying degrees of susceptibility to prion disease in other species, and some variants have been observed in similar regions of Rocky Mountain elk PRNP. Thus, additional genetic variants might provide increased protection, either alone or in combination with 132L. Findings This study provided genomic sequence of all exons for PRNP of Rocky Mountain elk. Many functional sites in and around the PRNP gene region were sequenced, and this report approximately doubled (to 75 the number of known variants in this region. A haplotype-tagging approach was used to reduce the number of genetic variants required to survey this variation in the PRNP gene region of 559 Rocky Mountain elk. Eight haplotypes were observed with frequencies over 1.0%, and one haplotype was present at 71.2% frequency, reflecting limited genetic diversity in the PRNP gene region. Conclusions The presence of 132L cut odds of CWD by more than half (Odds Ratio = 0.43; P = 0.0031, which was similar to a previous report. However after accounting for 132L, no association with CWD was found for any additional variants in the PRNP region (P > 0.05.

  6. Molecular cloning of rhamnose-binding lectin gene and its promoter region from snakehead Channa argus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, W Z; Shang, N; Guo, Q L

    2010-09-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that mediate pathogen recognition and cell-cell interactions. A rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) gene and its promoter region have been cloned and characterized from snakehead Channa argus. From the transcription initiation site, snakehead rhamnose-binding lectin (SHL) gene extends 2,382 bp to the end of the 3' untranslated region (UTR), and contains nine exons and eight introns. The open reading frame (ORF) of the SHL transcript has 675 bp which encodes 224 amino acids. The molecular structure of SHL is composed of two tandem repeat carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD) with 35% internal identity. Analysis of the gene organization of SHL indicates that the ancestral gene of RBL may diverge and evolve by exon shuffling and gene duplication, producing new forms to play their own roles in various organisms. The characteristics of SHL gene 5' flanking region are the presence of consensus nuclear factor of interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) and IFN-gamma activation (GAS) sites. The results provide indirect evidence that up-regulation of SHL expression may be induced in response to inflammatory stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). The transcript of SHL mRNA was expressed in the head kidney, posterior kidney, spleen, liver, intestine, heart, muscle, and ovary. No tissue-specific expressive pattern is different from reported STLs, WCLs, and PFLs, suggesting that different types of RBLs exist in species-specific fish that have evolved and adapted to their surroundings.

  7. Gene divergence of homeologous regions associated with a major seed protein content QTL in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puji eLestari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding several modes of duplication contributing on the present genome structure is getting an attention because it could be related to numerous agronomically important traits. Since soybean serves as a rich protein source for animal feeds and human consumption, breeding efforts in soybean have been directed toward enhancing seed protein content. The publicly available soybean sequences and its genomically featured elements facilitate comprehending of quantitative trait loci (QTL for seed protein content in concordance with homeologous regions in soybean genome. Although parts of chromosome (Chr 20 and Chr 10 showed synteny, QTLs for seed protein content present only on Chr 20. Using comparative analysis of gene contents in recently duplicated genomic regions harboring QTL for protein/oil content on Chrs 20 and 10, a total of 27 genes are present in duplicated regions of both chromosomes. Notably, 4 tandem duplicates of the putative homeobox protein 22 (HB22 are present only on Chr 20 and this Medicago truncatula homolog expressed in endosperm at seed filling stage. These tandem duplicates could contribute on the protein/oil QTL of Chr 20. Our study suggests that non-shared gene contents within the duplicated genomic regions might lead to absence/presence of QTL related to protein/oil content.

  8. Study on the Polymorphisms of Porcine Myostatin Gene in Promoter Region by PCR-RFLPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiu-qin; LIU Di

    2005-01-01

    In order to further study functions of the porcine myostatin gene, we analyzed the polymorphisms of porcine myostatin gene in promoter region among different breeds including Yorkshire, Landrace, Duroc, Junmu, Min pig and Sanjiang white pig by PCR-RFLPs. The allele T dominated in the imported lean-type pig breeds such as Yorkshire, Landrace and Duroc. No allele A was detected in Junmu and Sanjiang white pig, and the frequencies of three genotypes were about equal in Min pig. The result using X2 analysis showed that the distribution of three genotypes was related to pig breeds.

  9. Interferon gamma response region in the promoter of the human DPA gene.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) response region of the human class II major histocompatibility complex gene, DPA, has been localized to a 52-base-pair (bp) DNA fragment in the proximal promotor at -107 to -55 bp after transfection into HeLa cells of a series of 5', 3', and gap deletion mutants linked to a reporter gene, human growth hormone, as well as of synthetic oligonucleotides fused to the heterologous promoter thymidine kinase. The 52-mer sequence contains the X and Y box elements cons...

  10. Effectiveness of lytic bacteriophages in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations introduced through cross-contamination on fresh cut lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous research has shown that lytic bacteriophages (phages) can kill E. coli O157:H7 on produce surfaces. The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield) at 10^8 PFU/m...

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a Lytic Siphoviridae Bacteriophage Infecting Several Serovars of Salmonella enterica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Rubina; Lombardi, Serena; Iodice, Maria Grazia; Riccardi, Marita Georgia; Orsini, Massimiliano; Bolletti Censi, Sergio; Galiero, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The bacteriophage 100268_sal2 was isolated from water buffalo feces in southern Italy, exhibiting lytic activity against several subspecies of Salmonella enterica. This bacteriophage belongs to the Siphoviridae family and has a 125,114-bp double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) genome containing 188 coding sequences (CDSs). PMID:27688334

  12. Crystal structure and mechanism of the lytic transglycosylase MltA from Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straaten, Karin

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the determination and analysis of the 3D-structure of the lytic transglycosylase MltA from Escherichia coli by X-ray crystallography. This work aims to further increase our knowledge of the molecular details of the cleaving mechanism and the typical 1,6- anhydromuropeptide prod

  13. Structure and boosting activity of a starch-degrading lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lo Leggio, Leila; Simmons, Thomas J.; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro

    2015-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered enzymes that oxidatively deconstruct polysaccharides. LPMOs are fundamental in the effective utilization of these substrates by bacteria and fungi; moreover, the enzymes have significant industrial importance. We report here...... substrate to maltose by β-amylase. The detailed structure of the enzyme's active site yields insights into the mechanism of action of this important class of enzymes....

  14. Pain relief with percutaneous trochanteroplasty in a patient with bilateral trochanteric myelomatous lytic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahezi, Sayed E; Silva, Kyle; Najafi, Shervin

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematologic malignancy associated with destructive bone loss. Lytic lesions, a hallmark of this cancer, can result in significant morbidity because of associated pain and structural osseous compromise. Osteoplasty has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of myelomatous pain within the axial skeleton; however, there is limited evidence supporting the utility of osteoplasty to treat extra-spinal lesions. We describe a 67 year-old woman with stable IgA lambda multiple myeloma with sentinel bilateral greater trochanteric lytic lesions that was referred to our interventional pain management clinic for evaluation of bilateral lateral hip pain. Conservative treatment options including physical therapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral opiates, and local corticosteroid injections to bilateral trochanteric bursae failed to offer pain relief. The patient underwent minimally invasive percutaneous trochanteroplasty with concomitant core biopsy of her bilateral trochanteric lytic lesions. The intended goals of this novel procedure were to determine the cause of the suspected lytic lesions, provide pain relief, and offer structural stability by safely implanting bone cement as part of a fracture prevention strategy. At 12 month follow-up, the patient's pain improved by 70% and she no longer required the use of pain medication. The patient also displayed a significant improvement in her day-to-day functioning and quality of life.

  15. The importance of lytic and nonlytic immune responses in viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wodarz, Dominik; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2002-01-01

    Antiviral immune effector mechanisms can be divided broadly into lytic and nonlytic components. We use mathematical models to investigate the fundamental question of which type of response is required to combat different types of viral infection. According to our model, the relative roles...

  16. Crystal structure and mechanism of the lytic transglycosylase MltA from Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straaten, Karin

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the determination and analysis of the 3D-structure of the lytic transglycosylase MltA from Escherichia coli by X-ray crystallography. This work aims to further increase our knowledge of the molecular details of the cleaving mechanism and the typical 1,6- anhydromuropeptide prod

  17. STUDIES ON THE BACTERIOPHAGE OF D'HERELLE : I. IS THE LYTIC PRINCIPLE VOLATILE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfenbrenner, J J; Korb, C

    1925-01-01

    The lytic principle concerned in the phenomenon of transmissible lysis is not volatile. The results which have been taken to indicate volatility are, in our opinion, to be attributed to the transfer to the distillate of minute droplets of the original active filtrate.

  18. Comparison of regional gene expression differences in the brains of the domestic dog and human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennerly Erin

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Comparison of the expression profiles of 2,721 genes in the cerebellum, cortex and pituitary gland of three American Staffordshire terriers, one beagle and one fox hound revealed regional expression differences in the brain but failed to reveal marked differences among breeds, or even individual dogs. Approximately 85 per cent (42 of 49 orthologue comparisons of the regional differences in the dog are similar to those that differentiate the analogous human brain regions. A smaller percentage of human differences were replicated in the dog, particularly in the cortex, which may generally be evolving more rapidly than other brain regions in mammals. This study lays the foundation for detailed analysis of the population structure of transcriptional variation as it relates to cognitive and neurological phenotypes in the domestic dog.

  19. Whole transcriptome sequencing reveals gene expression and splicing differences in brain regions affected by Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie A Twine

    Full Text Available Recent studies strongly indicate that aberrations in the control of gene expression might contribute to the initiation and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD. In particular, alternative splicing has been suggested to play a role in spontaneous cases of AD. Previous transcriptome profiling of AD models and patient samples using microarrays delivered conflicting results. This study provides, for the first time, transcriptomic analysis for distinct regions of the AD brain using RNA-Seq next-generation sequencing technology. Illumina RNA-Seq analysis was used to survey transcriptome profiles from total brain, frontal and temporal lobe of healthy and AD post-mortem tissue. We quantified gene expression levels, splicing isoforms and alternative transcript start sites. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis revealed an overrepresentation of genes associated with a neuron's cytological structure and synapse function in AD brain samples. Analysis of the temporal lobe with the Cufflinks tool revealed that transcriptional isoforms of the apolipoprotein E gene, APOE-001, -002 and -005, are under the control of different promoters in normal and AD brain tissue. We also observed differing expression levels of APOE-001 and -002 splice variants in the AD temporal lobe. Our results indicate that alternative splicing and promoter usage of the APOE gene in AD brain tissue might reflect the progression of neurodegeneration.

  20. Possible deletion of a developmentally regulated heavy-chain variable region gene in autoimmune diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Pei-Ming; Olee, Tsaiwei; Kozin, F.; Carson, D.A.; Chen, P.P. (Research Institute of Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA (USA)); Olsen, N.J. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (USA)); Siminovitch, K.A. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    1990-10-01

    Several autoantibody-associated variable region (V) genes are preferentially expressed during early ontogenic development, suggesting strongly that they are of developmental and physiological importance. As such, it is possible that polymorphisms in one or more of these genes may alter susceptibility to autoimmune disease. The authors have searched extensively for a probe related to a developmentally regulated V gene that has the power to differentiate among highly homologous V genes in human populations. Using such a probe (i.e., Humhv3005/P1) related to both anti-DNA and anti-IgG autoantibodies, they studied restriction fragment length polymorphisms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus and found an apparent heavy-chain V (V{sub H}) gene deletion that was nearly restricted to the autoimmune patients. These data suggest that deletions of physiologically important V{sub H} genes may increase the risk of autoimmunity through indirect effects on the development and homeostasis of the B-cell repertoire.

  1. The highly recombinogenic bz locus lies in an unusually gene-rich region of the maize genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, H; Park, W; Yan, X; Zheng, Z; Shen, B; Dooner, H K

    2001-07-17

    The bronze (bz) locus exhibits the highest rate of recombination of any gene in higher plants. To investigate the possible basis of this high rate of recombination, we have analyzed the physical organization of the region around the bz locus. Two adjacent bacterial artificial chromosome clones, comprising a 240-kb contig centered around the Bz-McC allele, were isolated, and 60 kb of contiguous DNA spanning the two bacterial artificial chromosome clones was sequenced. We find that the bz locus lies in an unusually gene-rich region of the maize genome. Ten genes, at least eight of which are shown to be transcribed, are contained in a 32-kb stretch of DNA that is uninterrupted by retrotransposons. We have isolated nearly full length cDNAs corresponding to the five proximal genes in the cluster. The average intertranscript distance between them is just 1 kb, revealing a surprisingly compact packaging of adjacent genes in this part of the genome. At least 11 small insertions, including several previously described miniature inverted repeat transposable elements, were detected in the introns and 3' untranslated regions of genes and between genes. The gene-rich region is flanked at the proximal and distal ends by retrotransposon blocks. Thus, the maize genome appears to have scattered regions of high gene density similar to those found in other plants. The unusually high rate of intragenic recombination seen in bz may be related to the very high gene density of the region.

  2. A GENE FROM HUMAN-CHROMOSOME REGION-3P21 WITH REDUCED EXPRESSION IN SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CARRITT, B; KOK, K; van den Berg, Anke; OSINGA, J; PILZ, A; HOFSTRA, RMW; DAVIS, MB; VANDERVEEN, AY; RABBITTS, PH; GULATI, K; BUYS, CHCM

    1992-01-01

    A combination of cytogenetic and molecular studies has implicated the p21 region of human chromosome 3 as the probable site of a gene the loss of which contributes to the development of small cell lung cancer. We report here the isolation of a gene from this region which is expressed in normal lung

  3. Association of HLA-C and HCP5 gene regions with the clinical course of HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van Manen; N.A. Kootstra; B. Boeser-Nunnink; M.A. Handulle; A.B. van 't Wout; H. Schuitemaker

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recently, a genome-wide association analysis revealed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the gene regions of HLA-C and HCP5 to be associated with viral load at set point and SNPs in the RNF39/ZNRD1 gene region to be associated with HIV-1 disease course. Methods: We Studied whether

  4. Fractionation of Synteny in a Genomic Region Containing Tandemly Duplicated Genes Across Glycine max, Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extended comparison of gene sequences found on homeologous soybean BACs to Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana genomic sequences demonstrated a network of synteny within conserved regions interrupted by gene addition and/or deletions. Consolidation of gene order among all three species prov...

  5. Variation in the sequence and modification state of the human insulin gene flanking regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, A; Dull, T J; Gray, A; Philips, J A; Peter, S

    1982-04-10

    The nucleotide sequence of a highly repetitive sequence region upstream from the human insulin gene is reported. The length of this region varies between alleles in the population, and appears to be stably transmitted to the next generation in a Mendelian fashion. There is no significant correlation between the length of this sequence and two types of diabetes mellitus. We observe variation in the cleavability of a BglI recognition site downstream from the human insulin gene, which is probably due to variable nucleotide modification. This presumed modification state appears not to be inherited, and varies between tissues within an individual and between individuals for a given tissue. Both alleles in a given tissue DNA sample are modified to the same extent.

  6. [Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms of 5'-untranslated region of GPx4 gene and male infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-yuan; Zhang, Chang-jun; Si, Xiao-min; Yao, Yu-feng; Shi, Lei; Ke, Jin-kun; Yu, Liang; Shi, Li; Yang, Zhao-qin; Huang, Xiao-qin; Sun, Hao; Chu, Jia-you

    2011-06-01

    To study the association between the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (GPx4 or PHGPx) gene and oligo- or asthenozoospermic male infertility. The 5'-UTR region of the GPx4 gene was amplified from infertile men and controls using the polymerase chain reaction and was analyzed for polymorphisms by direct sequencing. A total of 9 SNPs were present in the cohort, however there were no significant differences in these 9 SNPs between the case and control groups. According to the results of linkage disequilibrium analysis and haplotype construction, one haplotype (rs757229-rs757230-rs4588110-rs3746165-rs3746166: C-G-G-T-A) was present only in the control men, and significant difference was detected(Pinfertility. However, the haplotype (rs757229-rs757230-rs4588110- rs3746165-rs3746166: C-G-G-T-A) might be a protective haplotype.

  7. Genes involved in complex adaptive processes tend to have highly conserved upstream regions in mammalian genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohane Isaac

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in genome sequencing suggest a remarkable conservation in gene content of mammalian organisms. The similarity in gene repertoire present in different organisms has increased interest in studying regulatory mechanisms of gene expression aimed at elucidating the differences in phenotypes. In particular, a proximal promoter region contains a large number of regulatory elements that control the expression of its downstream gene. Although many studies have focused on identification of these elements, a broader picture on the complexity of transcriptional regulation of different biological processes has not been addressed in mammals. The regulatory complexity may strongly correlate with gene function, as different evolutionary forces must act on the regulatory systems under different biological conditions. We investigate this hypothesis by comparing the conservation of promoters upstream of genes classified in different functional categories. Results By conducting a rank correlation analysis between functional annotation and upstream sequence alignment scores obtained by human-mouse and human-dog comparison, we found a significantly greater conservation of the upstream sequence of genes involved in development, cell communication, neural functions and signaling processes than those involved in more basic processes shared with unicellular organisms such as metabolism and ribosomal function. This observation persists after controlling for G+C content. Considering conservation as a functional signature, we hypothesize a higher density of cis-regulatory elements upstream of genes participating in complex and adaptive processes. Conclusion We identified a class of functions that are associated with either high or low promoter conservation in mammals. We detected a significant tendency that points to complex and adaptive processes were associated with higher promoter conservation, despite the fact that they have emerged

  8. Localization of candidate regions for a novel gene for Kartagener syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Roelens, Ilse; Sluysmans, Thierry; Jorissen, Mark; Amyere, Mustapha; Vikkula, Miikka

    2006-07-01

    Asymmetric positioning of internal organs is a characteristics of vertebrates. The normal left-right anatomic positioning, situs solitus, sometimes does not occur normaly, leading to laterality defects. Studies in animal models have shown that laterality decisions are mediated by a cascade of genes that lead to the asymmetric expression of Nodal, LEFTA, LEFTB and PITX2 in the lateral plate mesoderm. A search for mutations in genes implicated in left-right patterning in animal models allowed genes associated with heterotaxia defects in humans to be identified. However, these genes explain only a small percentage of human situs defects, suggesting that other genes must play a role. In this study, we report a consanguineous family of Turkish origin, composed of two unaffected parents and three children, two of whom presented Kartagener syndrome. On the basis of their family history, we hypothesize autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. A genotype analysis with polymorphic markers did not show linkage with any known genes or loci causing laterality disorders. Array CGH did not detect a duplication or microdeletion greater than 1 Mb as a possible cause. Genome wide screening using 10 K Affymetrix SNP chips was performed, allowing the identification of two regions of autozygosity, one in chromosome 1 and the other on chromosome 7. In the chromosome 1 locus, a strong candidate gene, encoding the kinesin-associated protein 3 (KIF3AP) was not mutated, based on SSCP/heteroduplex analysis and direct sequencing. These data provide a basis for the identification of a novel gene implicated in Kartagener syndrome.

  9. Recombination events near the immunoglobulin Cmu gene join variable and constant region genes, switch heavy-chain expression, or inactivate the locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, S; Webb, E; Gough, J; Adams, J M

    1981-04-28

    Immunoglobulin heavy-chain expression is initiated by recombination between a variable region (VH) gene and one of several joining region (JH) genes located near the mu constant region (Cmu) gene, and the active VH gene can subsequently switch to another CH gene. That the general mechanism for CH switching involves recombination between sites within the JH-Cmu intervening sequence and the 5' flanking region of another CH gene is supported here by Southern blot hybridization analysis of eight IgG- and IgA-secreting plasmacytomas. An alternative model requiring successive VH linkage to similar JH clusters near each CH gene is shown to be very unlikely since the mouse genome appears to contain only one complement of the JH locus and no JH gene was detectable within large cloned sequences flanking germline C gamma 3 and C gamma 1 genes. Thus, VH-JH joining and CH switching are mediated by separate regions of "the joining-switch" or J-S element. In each plasmacytoma examined, the J-S element had undergone recombination within both the JH locus and the switch region and was shown to be linked to the functional CH gene in an IgG3, and IgG1, and three IgA secretors. Both JH joining and CH switching occurred by deletion of DNA. Switch recombination occurred at more than one site within the J-S element in different lines, even for recombination with the same CH gene. Significantly, although heavy-chain expression is restricted to one allele ("allelic exclusion"), all rearranged in each plasmacytoma. Some rearrangements were aberrant, involving, for example, deletion of all JH genes from the allele. Hence, an error-prone recombination machinery may account for allelic exclusion in many plasmacytomas.

  10. Organization and evolution of a gene-rich region of the mouse genome: a 12.7-Mb region deleted in the Del(13)Svea36H mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Ann-Marie; Wilming, Laurens; Weekes, Joseph; Gilbert, James G R; Ashurst, Jennifer; Peyrefitte, Sandrine; Matthews, Lucy; Cadman, Matthew; McKeone, Richard; Sellick, Chris A; Arkell, Ruth; Botcherby, Marc R M; Strivens, Mark A; Campbell, R Duncan; Gregory, Simon; Denny, Paul; Hancock, John M; Rogers, Jane; Brown, Steve D M

    2004-10-01

    Del(13)Svea36H (Del36H) is a deletion of approximately 20% of mouse chromosome 13 showing conserved synteny with human chromosome 6p22.1-6p22.3/6p25. The human region is lost in some deletion syndromes and is the site of several disease loci. Heterozygous Del36H mice show numerous phenotypes and may model aspects of human genetic disease. We describe 12.7 Mb of finished, annotated sequence from Del36H. Del36H has a higher gene density than the draft mouse genome, reflecting high local densities of three gene families (vomeronasal receptors, serpins, and prolactins) which are greatly expanded relative to human. Transposable elements are concentrated near these gene families. We therefore suggest that their neighborhoods are gene factories, regions of frequent recombination in which gene duplication is more frequent. The gene families show different proportions of pseudogenes, likely reflecting different strengths of purifying selection and/or gene conversion. They are also associated with relatively low simple sequence concentrations, which vary across the region with a periodicity of approximately 5 Mb. Del36H contains numerous evolutionarily conserved regions (ECRs). Many lie in noncoding regions, are detectable in species as distant as Ciona intestinalis, and therefore are candidate regulatory sequences. This analysis will facilitate functional genomic analysis of Del36H and provides insights into mouse genome evolution.

  11. Candidate genes within a 143 kb region of the flower sex locus in Vitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter, Iris; Hausmann, Ludger; Daum, Margrit; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Viehöver, Prisca; Weisshaar, Bernd; Töpfer, Reinhard

    2012-03-01

    Wild Vitis species are dioecious plants, while the cultivated counterpart, Vitis vinifera subspec. vinifera, generally shows hermaphroditic flowers. In Vitis the genetic determinants of flower sex have previously been mapped to a region on chromosome 2. In a combined strategy of map-based cloning and the use of the publicly available grapevine reference genome sequence, the structure of the grapevine flower sex locus has been elucidated with the subsequent identification of candidate genes which might be involved in the development of the different flower sex types. In a fine mapping approach, the sex locus in grapevine was narrowed down using a population derived from a cross of a genotype with a Vitis vinifera background ('Schiava Grossa' × 'Riesling') with the male rootstock cv. 'Börner' (V. riparia × V. cinerea). A physical map of 143 kb was established from BAC clones spanning the 0.5 cM region defined by the closest flanking recombination break points. Sequencing and gene annotation of the entire region revealed several candidate genes with a potential impact on flower sex formation. One of the presumed candidate genes, an adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, was analysed in more detail. The results led to the development of a marker for the presence or absence of the female alleles, while the male and hermaphroditic alleles are still to be differentiated. The impact of other candidate genes is discussed, especially with regard to plant hormone actions. The markers developed will permit the selection of female breeding lines which do not require laborious emasculation thus considerably simplifying grapevine breeding. The genetic finger prints displayed that our cultivated grapevines frequently carry a female allele while homozygous hermaphrodites are rare.

  12. Complete structure and organization of immunoglobulin heavy chain constant region genes in a phylogenetically primitive vertebrate.

    OpenAIRE

    Kokubu, F; Hinds, K.; Litman, R.; Shamblott, M J; Litman, G. W.

    1988-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) gene organization in Heterodontus francisci (horned shark), a phylogenetically primitive vertebrate, is unique. Homologous Ig heavy chain variable (VH) and constant region (CH) specific probes were used to screen a spleen cDNA library constructed in lambda gt11. Both secretory (SEC) and transmembrane (TM) cDNA clones were recovered; the latter were identified by a negative selection strategy. The complete sequence of the CH portion of a Heterodontus genomic DNA-lambda clon...

  13. Mutations in the Translated Region of the Lactase Gene (LCT) Underlie Congenital Lactase Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kuokkanen, Mikko; Kokkonen, Jorma; Enattah, Nabil Sabri; Ylisaukko-oja, Tero; Komu, Hanna; Varilo, Teppo; Peltonen, Leena; Savilahti, Erkki; Järvelä, Irma

    2005-01-01

    Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) is a severe gastrointestinal disorder characterized by watery diarrhea in infants fed with breast milk or other lactose-containing formulas. We initially assigned the CLD locus by linkage and linkage disequilibrium on 2q21 in 19 Finnish families. Here we report the molecular background of CLD via characterization of five distinct mutations in the coding region of the lactase (LCT) gene. Twenty-seven patients out of 32 (84%) were homozygous for a nonsense mu...

  14. Seasonal and regional differences in gene expression in the brain of a hibernating mammal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Schwartz

    Full Text Available Mammalian hibernation presents a unique opportunity to study naturally occurring neuroprotection. Hibernating ground squirrels undergo rapid and extreme physiological changes in body temperature, oxygen consumption, and heart rate without suffering neurological damage from ischemia and reperfusion injury. Different brain regions show markedly different activity during the torpor/arousal cycle: the cerebral cortex shows activity only during the periodic returns to normothermia, while the hypothalamus is active over the entire temperature range. Therefore, region-specific neuroprotective strategies must exist to permit this compartmentalized spectrum of activity. In this study, we use the Illumina HiSeq platform to compare the transcriptomes of these two brain regions at four collection points across the hibernation season: April Active, October Active, Torpor, and IBA. In the cerebral cortex, 1,085 genes were found to be differentially expressed across collection points, while 1,063 genes were differentially expressed in the hypothalamus. Comparison of these transcripts indicates that the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus implement very different strategies during hibernation, showing less than 20% of these differentially expressed genes in common. The cerebral cortex transcriptome shows evidence of remodeling and plasticity during hibernation, including transcripts for the presynaptic cytomatrix proteins bassoon and piccolo, and extracellular matrix components, including laminins and collagens. Conversely, the hypothalamic transcriptome displays upregulation of transcripts involved in damage response signaling and protein turnover during hibernation, including the DNA damage repair gene RAD50 and ubiquitin E3 ligases UBR1 and UBR5. Additionally, the hypothalamus transcriptome also provides evidence of potential mechanisms underlying the hibernation phenotype, including feeding and satiety signaling, seasonal timing mechanisms, and fuel

  15. Phenotype of mutations in the promoter region of the β-globin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropero, Paloma; Erquiaga, Sara; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Pérez, Germán; de la Iglesia, Silvia; Torrejón, María José; Gil, Celia; Elena, Cela; Tenorio, María; Nieto, Jorge M; de la Fuente-Gonzalo, Félix; Villegas, Ana; González Fernández, Fernando-Ataúlfo; Martínez, Rafael

    2017-10-01

    β(+)-Thalassaemia is characterised by reduced production of β chains, which decrease can be caused by mutations in the promoter region (CACCC or TATA box), and is classified as mild or silent depending on the extent of β-globin chain reduction. In both cases, homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for these mutations usually have thalassaemia intermedia. Frequently the diagnosis is made in adulthood or even in old age. A total of 37 alterations in the promoter region have been described so far. In this report we describe the mutations found in the promoter region of the β-globin gene in a single hospital in Madrid. Between 1998 and 2015, more than 9000 blood samples were analysed for full blood count and underwent haemoglobin electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography. Genetic analysis of the β and Gγ-globin genes was carried out by automatic sequencing and, in the case of α genes, by multiplex PCR. 35 samples showed mutation in the promoter region of the β-globin gene, with a total of six different mutations identified: one in the distal CACCC box, two in the proximal CACCC box, three in the ATA box. Any alterations in the proximal CACCC and TATA boxes lead to a moderate decrease in synthesis of the β-globin chain, which has been demonstrated in cases of thalassaemia intermedia that have presented in the second decade of life with a moderate clinical course. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Transmission test for linkage disequilibrium: The insulin gene region and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielman, R.S.; McGinnis, R.E. (Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (United States)); Ewens, W.J. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States))

    1993-03-01

    A population association has consistently been observed between insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and the class 1 alleles of the region of tandem-repeat DNA (5[prime] flanking polymorphism [5[prime]FP])adjacent to the insulin gene on chromosome 11p. This finding suggests that the insulin gene region contains a gene or genes contributing to IDDM susceptibility. However, several studies that have sought to show linkage with IDDM by testing for cosegregation in affected sib pairs have failed to find evidence for linkage. As means for identifying genes for complex diseases, both the association and the affected-sib-pairs approaches have limitations. It is well known that population association between a disease and a genetic marker can arise as an artifact of population structure, even in the absence of linkage. On the other hand, linkage studies with modest numbers of affected sib pairs may fail to detect linkage, especially if there is linkage heterogeneity. The authors consider an alternative method to test for linkage with a genetic marker when population association has been found. Using data from families with at least one affected child, they evaluate the transmission of the associated marker allele from a heterozygous parent to an affected offspring. This approach has been used by several investigators, but the statistical properties of the method as a test for linkage have not been investigated. In the present paper they describe the statistical basis for this transmission test for linkage disequilibrium (transmission/disequilibrium test [TDT]). They then show the relationship of this test to tests of cosegregation that are based on the proportion of haplotypes or genes identical by descent in affected sibs. The TDT provides strong evidence for linkage between the 5[prime]FP and susceptibility to IDDM. 27 refs., 6 tabs.

  17. Localisation of the gene for achondroplasia to the telomeric region of chromosome 4p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoilov, I.; Velinov, M.; Kilpatrick, M.W. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common type of genetic dwarfism, is characterized by a variety of skeletal anomalies including disproportionate short stature and rhizomelic shortening of the extremities. The disorder is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, with a prevalence of 1-15 per 100,000 live births. The etiology of ACH remains unknown, although evidence points to a defect in the maturation of the chondrocytes in the growth plate of the cartilage. To determine the location of the gene responsible for ACH, a panel of 14 families with a total of 43 meioses was genotyped for 40 polymorphic markers for loci randomly distributed throughout the genome. The first significant positive Lod score was obtained for the locus D4S127 (Zmax=3.65 at {theta}=0.03). A series of 20 markers for chromosome 4p16.3 loci were then used to determine the most likely position of the ACH gene. Two additional loci, D4S412 and IDUA, showed strong linkage to the disease (Zmax=3.34 at {theta}=0.03 and Zmax=3.35 at {theta}=0.0, respectively). Multipoint analysis and direct counting of recombinants places the ACH gene in a 2.5 cM region between the marker D4S43 and the chromosome 4p telomere. No evidence was found for genetic heterogeneity. The ACH region contains a number of genes, including that for the fibroblast growth factor receptor FGFR3, which are being evaluated as candidates for the ACH gene. This identification of tightly linked polymorphic markers, as well as being the first step in the characterization of the ACH gene, offers the possibility of DNA based prenatal diagnosis of this disorder.

  18. Molecular characterization of genes encoding the quinolone resistance determining regions of Malaysian Streptococcus pneumoniae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes encoding the quinolones resistance determining regions (QRDRs in Streptococcus pneumoniae were detected by PCR and the sequence analysis was carried out to identify point mutations within these regions. The study was carried out to observe mutation patterns among S. pneumoniae strains in Malaysia. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 100 isolates was determined against various antibiotics, out of which 56 strains were categorised to have reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (≥2 μg/mL. These strains were subjected to PCR amplification for presence of the gyrA, parC , gyrB and parE genes. Eight representative strains with various susceptibilities to fluoroquinolones were sequenced. Two out of the eight isolates that were sequenced were shown to have a point mutation in the gyrA gene at position Ser81. The detection of mutation at codon Ser81 of the gyrA gene suggested the potential of developing fluoroquinolone resistance among S. pneumoniae isolates in Malaysia. However, further experimental work is required to confirm the involvement of this mutation in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Malaysia.

  19. Disruption of Imprinted Genes at Chromosome Region 11p15.5 in Paediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Anderson

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcomas are characterized by loss of heterozygosity (LOH at chromosome region 11pl5.5, a region known to contain several imprinted genes including insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2, H19, p57KIP2. We analyzed 48 primary tumour samples and found distinct genetic changes at 11p15.5 in alveolar and embryonal histological subtypes. LOH was a feature of embryonal tumours, but at a lower frequency than previous studies. Loss of imprinting (LOI of the IGF2 gene was detected in 6 of 13 informative cases, all harbouring PAX3—FKHR or PAX7—FKHR fusion genes characteristic of alveolar histology. In contrast, H19 imprinting was maintained in 14 of 15 informative cases and the case with H19 LOI had maintenance of the IGF2 imprint indicating separate mechanisms controlling imprinting of IGF2 and H19. The adult promoter of IGF2, P1, was used in 5 of 14 tumours and its expression was unrelated to IGF2 imprinting status implying a further mechanism of altered IGF2 regulation. The putative tumour suppressor gene p57KIP2 was expressed in 15 of 29 tumours and expression was unrelated to allele status. Moreover, in tumours with p57KIP2 expression, there was no evidence for inactivating mutations, suggesting that p57KIP2 is not a tumour suppressor in rhabdomyosarcoma.

  20. Genetic Diversity and Balancing Selection within the Human Phenylalanine Hydroxylase (PAH Gene Region in Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mowla

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background:Genetic diversity of three polymorphic markers in the phenylalanine hydroxylase(PAH gene region including PvuII(a, PAHSTR and MspI were investigated.Methods:Unrelated individuals (n=139 from the Iranian populations were genotyped using primers specific to PAH gene markers including PvuII(a,MspI and PAHSTR. The amplified products for PvuII(a,MspI were digested using the appropriate restriction enzymes and separated on 1.5% agarose. The PAHSTR alleles were identified using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by silver staining. The exact size of the STR alleles was determined by sequencing. The allele frequency and population status of the alleles were estimated using PHASE, FBAT and GENEPOP software.Results: The estimated degree of heterozygosity for PAHSTR, MspI and PvuII (a was 66%, 56% and 58%, respectively. The haplotype estimation analysis of the markers resulted in nine informative haplotypes with frequencies ≥5%.Moreover,the results obtained from Ewens-Watterson test for neutrality suggested that the markers were under balancing selection in the Iranian population.Conclusion:These findings suggested the presence of genetic diversity at these three markers in the PAH gene region. Therefore, the markers could be considered as functional markers for linkage analysis of the PAH gene mutations in the Iranian families with the PKU disease.

  1. [Regional features of obesity-associated gene polymorphism (rs9939609 FTO gene and gene Trp64Arg ADRB3) in Russian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baturin, A K; Sorokina, E Iu; Pogozheva, A V; Peskova, E V; Makurina, O N; Tutel'ian, V A

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown a significant association with obesity polymorphisms: rs9939609 gene due to fat mass and obesity FTO in European and some Asian and African American populations Trp64Arg ADRB3 gene in several European populations. Association of variants rs9939609 and Trp64Arg obesity was studied in 1244 the inhabitants of Moscow and Sverdlovsk regions. Genotyping was performed using allele-specific amplification, detection results in real time using TaqMan-probes complementary DNA polymorphic sites. The frequency of the mutant allele of the FTO gene in the population of Moscow and Sverdlovsk region was 45.1%, with the TT genotype was detected in 30.2% of cases, AT--49.5%, AA--20.3%. Women had the presence of the mutant allele more likely than men (48.4 vs. 42.5%). People with obesity were more genotypes AA (26.3%) and AT (52.8%) compared to the surveyed with a BMI of less than 30 kg/m2 (respectively 18.1 and 50.7%). A significantly higher incidence of risk allele A was found in individuals with obesity (52.6 and 43.4%). The presence of the mutant allele of the gene ADRB3 among the population of Moscow and Sverdlovsk regions was noted in 7.4% of cases. While 15.5% of patients had a heterozygous genotype Trp64Arg ADRB3, that is consistent with international research. The frequency of the risk allele and genotype Arg64 Trp64Arg in women (9.3 and 18.5%) was significantly higher than men (6.2 and 12.2%). The presence of the mutant allele and genotype Trp64Arg ADRB3 (respectively, 9.1 and 18.1%) were significantly more marked in the examined obese compared with those with a body mass index less than 30 kg/m2 (7.4 and 14.9%), but these differences were not statistically significant. The results of these studies suggest that genetic variants of the FTO gene rs9939609 genotype and Trp64Arg ADRB3 contribute to the development of obesity among residents of Moscow and Sverdlovsk Region of Russia. The risk of obesity increases in the case of combined polymorphisms in

  2. Radiation hybrid mapping of a cytokine gene cluster located in the proximal region of 5q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segal, A.L.; McPherson, J.D.; Wasmuth, J.J. [Univ. of California, Irvine (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The long (q) arm of chromosome 5 has been shown to contain a large number of genes encoding growth factors, growth factor receptors, hormone receptors and neurotransmitter receptors. IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-13, GM-CSF and IRF-1 are located in the 5q22-31.1 interval, while three GABA receptors map to 5q33-34. A number of receptors, including the prolactin and growth hormone receptors, the IL-7 receptor and the leukemia inhibitory factor receptor, map to proximal 5p. Genes encoding three of the complement components, C6, C7 and C9, are also located in the same region. YAC data indicates that C6 and C7 lie within 170 kb of each other. We have used a panel of 180 Chinese hamster-human radiation hybrids possessing fragments of human chromosome 5 to construct a physical map of this region of 5q. Two-point and multi-point analyses were done on the data and significant LOD scores (from 3 to 30) were observed. LIFR, PRLR, GHR, IL-7R, C6, C7, C9, TARS, and a number of CEPH-Genethon dinucleotide repeat markers were ordered and mapped. Yeast artificial chromosomes and cosmids have been isolated and inter-Alu PCR products from them are being used to construct a contig and to improve the physical map. The long term goal of this work is to identify and characterize new genes in the region.

  3. Point mutation of 5' noncoding region of BCL-6 gene in primary gastric lymphomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Liu Min; Xiao-Yan Zhou; Wen-Tao Yang; Hong-Fen Lu; Tai-Ming Zhang; Ai-Hua Zhen; Pei-Zheng Cao; Da-Ren Shi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mutations of the 5' noncoding region of BCL-6 gene in Chinese patients with primary gastric lymphomas.METHODS: PCR and direct DNA sequencing were used to identify BCL-6 gene mutations in the 5' noncoding region in 29 cases of gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)and 18 cases of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma as well as 10 cases of reactive hyperplasia of lymph node (LRH).RESULTS: Six of 29 gastric DLBCLs (20.7%), 4 of 18 gastric MALT lymphomas (22.2%) and 1 of 10 LRHs(10%) were found to have mutations. All mutations were single-base substitutions and the frequency of single-base changes was 0.20x10-2-1.02x10-2 per bp.CONCLUSION: Point mutations in the 5' noncoding region of BCL-6gene are found in Chinese patients with primary gastric DLBCLs and MALT lymphomas, suggesting that they may, in some extent, participate in the pathogenesis of primary gastric DLBCLs and MALT lymphomas.

  4. Cloning and characterizing of the murine IRF-3 gene promoter region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua-Guo; Liu, Lifei; Gao, Shan; Jin, Rui; Ren, Wei; Zhou, Guo-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) plays essential roles in inflammation and immune response. Here, we cloned the nucleotide sequence of the 5'-flanking region of the murine IRF-3 gene (mIRF-3) and characterized the molecular mechanisms controlling the mIRF-3 transcriptional activity in NIH3T3 cells. Analyses of a series of 5' deletion constructs demonstrated that a 301 bp region (-255/+46) of the mIRF-3 gene is sufficient for full promoter activity. This region contains IK1, Egr2, Cmyb, E2F1 and YY1 putative transcription factor binding sites. Mutation of Egr2 or YY1 site led to 52-68 % decrease of the mIRF-3 promoter activity, and double Egr2 and YY1 mutation reduced the promoter activity to 20 % of the wild-type promoter activity. Furthermore, knockingdown of endogenous Egr2 or YY1 by a siRNA strategy markedly inhibited the mIRF-3 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that Egr2 and YY1 interact with the mIRF-3 promoter in vivo. These results suggested that the basal promoter activity of the mIRF-3 gene is regulated by transcription factors Egr2 and YY1 in NIH3T3 cells.

  5. SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISM IN THE CODING REGION OF MYF5 GENE OF THE CAMEL (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS

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    M. G. SHAH, A. S. QURESHI1, M. REISSMANN2 AND H. J. SCHWARTZ3

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The myogenic factors (MYF 5 and 6 are integral to the initiation and development of skeletal muscles and to the maintenance of their phenotypes. Thus, they are candidate genes for growth and meat quality-related traits. The MYF5 gene is expressed during proliferation of myoblasts and comprises 3 exons: 500, 76 and 191 bp long. Genomic DNA was isolated from the camel hair using NucleoSpin Tissue kit. Two animals of each of the six breeds namely, Marecha, Dhatti, Larri, Kohi, Sakrai and Cambelpuri were used for sequencing. For PCR amplification of the gene, a primer pair was designed from homolog regions of already published sequences of farm animals from GenBank. Results showed that exon 1 comprising of 422 bp of the dromedary MYF5 gene was more homologous (94% to the cattle than the dog and human. However, phylogram showed that a small number of mutations had been experienced by dromedary camels at their MYF5 gene and was more near to human than other farm animals.

  6. Regulation of noncoding region for expression of Sendai virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡建红; 齐义鹏

    1999-01-01

    Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein was expressed in COS-7 cells, indicating that the expression of HN protein driven by SRα promoter is higher than that driven by chicken β-actin promoter. Moreover, with 5’ noncoding region (NCR) of HN gene, the expression was enhanced. Northern blotting demonstrated that this phenomenon was caused by the difference of HN mRNA transcription. To know the regulatory function of 5’ NCR, HN gene 5’ NCR was replaced by 5’ NCR of keratin gene or cytochrome P-450 gene and the 3’ NCR was deleted by site-directed mutagenesis. By using CAT gene as a reporter, S1 nuclease assay was done to quantitate the HN mRNA transcript in the COS-7 cells co-transfected with the reporter and mutated plasmids, indicating that 5’ NCR is non-specific to the enhancement of HN protein expression, and the 3’ NCR also has a special regulatory function.

  7. Complete structure and organization of immunoglobulin heavy chain constant region genes in a phylogenetically primitive vertebrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubu, F; Hinds, K; Litman, R; Shamblott, M J; Litman, G W

    1988-07-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) gene organization in Heterodontus francisci (horned shark), a phylogenetically primitive vertebrate, is unique. Homologous Ig heavy chain variable (VH) and constant region (CH) specific probes were used to screen a spleen cDNA library constructed in lambda gt11. Both secretory (SEC) and transmembrane (TM) cDNA clones were recovered; the latter were identified by a negative selection strategy. The complete sequence of the CH portion of a Heterodontus genomic DNA-lambda clone also was determined. The sequences of the individual CH genes differ from each other in all exons. When compared to mammalian prototypes, similarities in exon and intron organization as well as conservation of sequences involved with differential splicing of SEC and TM mRNA indicate that Heterodontus heavy chain genes are of the mu type, although intron lengths are uniformly longer in Heterodontus. Heterodontus genes are not associated, however, with the family of DNA sequences that have been implicated in heavy chain class switching in mammals. Spleen cDNA library screening and RNA blot analyses indicate that mRNAs encoding TM Ig are exceedingly rare. The relationship between this quantitative difference and the distribution of polyadenylation signal sequences suggests that regulation of Ig gene expression in Heterodontus may be highly dependent on position effects.

  8. Synaptic genes are extensively downregulated across multiple brain regions in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, Nicole C; Coleman, Paul D; Cribbs, David H; Rogers, Joseph; Gillen, Daniel L; Cotman, Carl W

    2013-06-01

    Synapses are essential for transmitting, processing, and storing information, all of which decline in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because synapse loss only partially accounts for the cognitive declines seen in aging and AD, we hypothesized that existing synapses might undergo molecular changes that reduce their functional capacity. Microarrays were used to evaluate expression profiles of 340 synaptic genes in aging (20-99 years) and AD across 4 brain regions from 81 cases. The analysis revealed an unexpectedly large number of significant expression changes in synapse-related genes in aging, with many undergoing progressive downregulation across aging and AD. Functional classification of the genes showing altered expression revealed that multiple aspects of synaptic function are affected, notably synaptic vesicle trafficking and release, neurotransmitter receptors and receptor trafficking, postsynaptic density scaffolding, cell adhesion regulating synaptic stability, and neuromodulatory systems. The widespread declines in synaptic gene expression in normal aging suggests that function of existing synapses might be impaired, and that a common set of synaptic genes are vulnerable to change in aging and AD.

  9. Intervene: a tool for intersection and visualization of multiple gene or genomic region sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aziz; Mathelier, Anthony

    2017-05-31

    A common task for scientists relies on comparing lists of genes or genomic regions derived from high-throughput sequencing experiments. While several tools exist to intersect and visualize sets of genes, similar tools dedicated to the visualization of genomic region sets are currently limited. To address this gap, we have developed the Intervene tool, which provides an easy and automated interface for the effective intersection and visualization of genomic region or list sets, thus facilitating their analysis and interpretation. Intervene contains three modules: venn to generate Venn diagrams of up to six sets, upset to generate UpSet plots of multiple sets, and pairwise to compute and visualize intersections of multiple sets as clustered heat maps. Intervene, and its interactive web ShinyApp companion, generate publication-quality figures for the interpretation of genomic region and list sets. Intervene and its web application companion provide an easy command line and an interactive web interface to compute intersections of multiple genomic and list sets. They have the capacity to plot intersections using easy-to-interpret visual approaches. Intervene is developed and designed to meet the needs of both computer scientists and biologists. The source code is freely available at https://bitbucket.org/CBGR/intervene , with the web application available at https://asntech.shinyapps.io/intervene .

  10. Rarity of DNA sequence alterations in the promoter region of the human androgen receptor gene

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    D.F. Cabral

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The human androgen receptor (AR gene promoter lies in a GC-rich region containing two principal sites of transcription initiation and a putative Sp1 protein-binding site, without typical "TATA" and "CAAT" boxes. It has been suggested that mutations within the 5'untranslated region (5'UTR may contribute to the development of prostate cancer by changing the rates of gene transcription and/or translation. In order to investigate this question, the aim of the present study was to search for the presence of mutations or polymorphisms at the AR-5'UTR in 92 prostate cancer patients, where histological diagnosis of adenocarcinoma was established in specimens obtained from transurethral resection or after prostatectomy. The AR-5'UTR was amplified by PCR from genomic DNA samples of the patients and of 100 healthy male blood donors, included as controls. Conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis was used for DNA sequence alteration screening. Only one band shift was detected in one individual from the blood donor group. Sequencing revealed a new single nucleotide deletion (T in the most conserved portion of the promoter region at position +36 downstream from the transcription initiation site I. Although the effect of this specific mutation remains unknown, its rarity reveals the high degree of sequence conservation of the human androgen promoter region. Moreover, the absence of detectable variation within the critical 5'UTR in prostate cancer patients indicates a low probability of its involvement in prostate cancer etiology.

  11. Specific amplification by PCR of rearranged genomic variable regions of immunoglobulin genes from mouse hybridoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdoz, J; Monath, T P; Kraehenbuhl, J P

    1995-04-01

    We have designed a novel strategy for the isolation of the rearranged genomic fragments encoding the L-VH-D-JH and L-V kappa/lambda-J kappa/lambda regions of mouse immunoglobulin genes. This strategy is based on the PCR amplification of genomic DNA from mouse hybridomas using multiple specific primers chosen in the 5'-untranslated region and in the intron downstream of the rearranged JH/J kappa/lambda sequences. Variable regions with intact coding sequences, including full-length leader peptides (L) can be obtained without previous DNA sequencing. Our strategy is based on a genomic template that produces fragments that do not need to be adapted for recombinant antibody expression, thus facilitating the generation of chimeric and isotype-switched immunoglobulins.

  12. Selection of reference genes in different myocardial regions of an in vivo ischemia/reperfusion rat model for normalization of antioxidant gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesentini, Nicoletta; Barsanti, Cristina; Martino, Alessandro; Kusmic, Claudia; Ripoli, Andrea; Rossi, AnnaMaria; L'Abbate, Antonio

    2012-02-29

    Changes in cardiac gene expression due to myocardial injury are usually assessed in whole heart tissue. However, as the heart is a heterogeneous system, spatial and temporal heterogeneity is expected in gene expression. In an ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) rat model we evaluated gene expression of mitochondrial and cytoplasmatic superoxide dismutase (MnSod, Cu-ZnSod) and thioredoxin reductase (trxr1) upon short (4 h) and long (72 h) reperfusion times in the right ventricle (RV), and in the ischemic/reperfused (IRR) and the remote region (RR) of the left ventricle. Gene expression was assessed by Real-time reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). In order to select most stable reference genes suitable for normalization purposes, in each myocardial region we tested nine putative reference genes by geNorm analysis. The genes investigated were: Actin beta (actb), Glyceraldehyde-3-P-dehydrogenase (gapdh), Ribosomal protein L13A (rpl13a), Tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (ywhaz), Beta-glucuronidase (gusb), Hypoxanthine guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (hprt), TATA binding box protein (tbp), Hydroxymethylbilane synthase (hmbs), Polyadenylate-binding protein 1 (papbn1). According to our findings, most stable reference genes in the RV and RR were hmbs/hprt and hmbs/tbp/hprt respectively. In the IRR, six reference genes were recommended for normalization purposes; however, in view of experimental feasibility limitations, target gene expression could be normalized against the three most stable reference genes (ywhaz/pabp/hmbs) without loss of sensitivity. In all cases MnSod and Cu-ZnSod expression decreased upon long reperfusion, the former in all myocardial regions and the latter in IRR alone. trxr1 expression did not vary. This study provides a validation of reference genes in the RV and in the anterior and posterior wall of the LV of cardiac ischemia/reperfusion model and shows that gene expression should be assessed separately in each region.

  13. Selection of reference genes in different myocardial regions of an in vivo ischemia/reperfusion rat model for normalization of antioxidant gene expression

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    Vesentini Nicoletta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in cardiac gene expression due to myocardial injury are usually assessed in whole heart tissue. However, as the heart is a heterogeneous system, spatial and temporal heterogeneity is expected in gene expression. Results In an ischemia/reperfusion (I/R rat model we evaluated gene expression of mitochondrial and cytoplasmatic superoxide dismutase (MnSod, Cu-ZnSod and thioredoxin reductase (trxr1 upon short (4 h and long (72 h reperfusion times in the right ventricle (RV, and in the ischemic/reperfused (IRR and the remote region (RR of the left ventricle. Gene expression was assessed by Real-time reverse-transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR. In order to select most stable reference genes suitable for normalization purposes, in each myocardial region we tested nine putative reference genes by geNorm analysis. The genes investigated were: Actin beta (actb, Glyceraldehyde-3-P-dehydrogenase (gapdh, Ribosomal protein L13A (rpl13a, Tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (ywhaz, Beta-glucuronidase (gusb, Hypoxanthine guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (hprt, TATA binding box protein (tbp, Hydroxymethylbilane synthase (hmbs, Polyadenylate-binding protein 1 (papbn1. According to our findings, most stable reference genes in the RV and RR were hmbs/hprt and hmbs/tbp/hprt respectively. In the IRR, six reference genes were recommended for normalization purposes; however, in view of experimental feasibility limitations, target gene expression could be normalized against the three most stable reference genes (ywhaz/pabp/hmbs without loss of sensitivity. In all cases MnSod and Cu-ZnSod expression decreased upon long reperfusion, the former in all myocardial regions and the latter in IRR alone. trxr1 expression did not vary. Conclusions This study provides a validation of reference genes in the RV and in the anterior and posterior wall of the LV of cardiac ischemia/reperfusion model and shows that gene expression should be assessed separately in

  14. Early vertebrate chromosome duplications and the evolution of the neuropeptide Y receptor gene regions

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    Brenner Sydney

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the many gene families that expanded in early vertebrate evolution is the neuropeptide (NPY receptor family of G-protein coupled receptors. Earlier work by our lab suggested that several of the NPY receptor genes found in extant vertebrates resulted from two genome duplications before the origin of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes and one additional genome duplication in the actinopterygian lineage, based on their location on chromosomes sharing several gene families. In this study we have investigated, in five vertebrate genomes, 45 gene families with members close to the NPY receptor genes in the compact genomes of the teleost fishes Tetraodon nigroviridis and Takifugu rubripes. These correspond to Homo sapiens chromosomes 4, 5, 8 and 10. Results Chromosome regions with conserved synteny were identified and confirmed by phylogenetic analyses in H. sapiens, M. musculus, D. rerio, T. rubripes and T. nigroviridis. 26 gene families, including the NPY receptor genes, (plus 3 described recently by other labs showed a tree topology consistent with duplications in early vertebrate evolution and in the actinopterygian lineage, thereby supporting expansion through block duplications. Eight gene families had complications that precluded analysis (such as short sequence length or variable number of repeated domains and another eight families did not support block duplications (because the paralogs in these families seem to have originated in another time window than the proposed genome duplication events. RT-PCR carried out with several tissues in T. rubripes revealed that all five NPY receptors were expressed in the brain and subtypes Y2, Y4 and Y8 were also expressed in peripheral organs. Conclusion We conclude that the phylogenetic analyses and chromosomal locations of these gene families support duplications of large blocks of genes or even entire chromosomes. Thus, these results are consistent with two early vertebrate

  15. Molecular structural and functional characterization of STAT1 gene regulatory region in teleost Channa argus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Weizhang; Zhou, Xiuxia

    2010-05-15

    The transcription factor STAT1 is involved in signal transduction of type I and II interferons (IFNs). However, the molecular characteristics of the STAT1 regulatory region still remain to be elucidated in teleosts. In the present study, the complete cDNA and the regulatory region of the STAT1 gene were isolated from snakehead (Channa argus). More than 2.4kb 5'-flanking region of STAT1 shares the regulatory elements of IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) and IFN-gamma activation site (GAS). Consensus ISRE and GAS were located from -373 to -361 and -716 to -724 in the promoter region, respectively. Moreover, it is noticeable that the crucial elements of ISRE (+698 to +710) and GAS (+294 and +301) are present in the first intron of snakehead STAT1. Comparisons of six vertebrate STAT1 5'-flanking regions all present the common sequence characteristics of IFN-induced gene promoter, which include ISRE, GAS and Sp1 sites. In order to further characterize the snakehead STAT1 regulatory region, six reporter constructs of snakehead STAT1 promoter and first intron were generated to examine the specificity to human interferon-gamma (hIFN-gamma). Only those constructs containing the ISRE element showed notable reporter activity after stimulation of Hela cells with hIFN-gamma. However, sequential deletions of putative transcription factor binding sites indicated that GAS elements have little effect on the promoter and intronic activity in response to hIFN-gamma. Taken together, these results suggest that the regulatory mechanisms of IFN-signalling appear to be mediated in a similar manner in fish and mammals.

  16. Reciprocal and nonreciprocal recombination at the glucocerebrosidase gene region: implications for complexity in Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebi, Nahid; Stubblefield, Barbara K; Park, Joseph K; Orvisky, Eduard; Walker, Jamie M; LaMarca, Mary E; Sidransky, Ellen

    2003-03-01

    Gaucher disease results from an autosomal recessive deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase. The glucocerebrosidase gene is located in a gene-rich region of 1q21 that contains six genes and two pseudogenes within 75 kb. The presence of contiguous, highly homologous pseudogenes for both glucocerebrosidase and metaxin at the locus increases the likelihood of DNA rearrangements in this region. These recombinations can complicate genotyping in patients with Gaucher disease and contribute to the difficulty in interpreting genotype-phenotype correlations in this disorder. In the present study, DNA samples from 240 patients with Gaucher disease were examined using several complementary approaches to identify and characterize recombinant alleles, including direct sequencing, long-template polymerase chain reaction, polymorphic microsatellite repeats, and Southern blots. Among the 480 alleles studied, 59 recombinant alleles were identified, including 34 gene conversions, 18 fusions, and 7 downstream duplications. Twenty-two percent of the patients evaluated had at least one recombinant allele. Twenty-six recombinant alleles were found among 310 alleles from patients with type 1 disease, 18 among 74 alleles from patients with type 2 disease, and 15 among 96 alleles from patients with type 3 disease. Several patients carried two recombinations or mutations on the same allele. Generally, alleles resulting from nonreciprocal recombination (gene conversion) could be distinguished from those arising by reciprocal recombination (crossover and exchange), and the length of the converted sequence was determined. Homozygosity for a recombinant allele was associated with early lethality. Ten different sites of crossover and a shared pentamer motif sequence (CACCA) that could be a hotspot for recombination were identified. These findings contribute to a better understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships in Gaucher disease and may provide insights into the mechanisms

  17. Characterization of the promoter region of biosynthetic enzyme genes involved in berberine biosynthesis in Coptis japonica

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    Yasuyuki Yamada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs, a plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4’OMT and CYP719A1 were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4’OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed.

  18. Yeast artificial chromosome contigs reveal that distal variable-region genes reside at least 3 megabases from the joining regions in the murine immunoglobulin kappa locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, J B; Li, S; Garrard, W T

    1995-01-01

    The immunoglobulin kappa gene locus encodes 95% of the light chains of murine antibody molecules and is thought to contain up to 300 variable (V kappa)-region genes generally considered to comprise 20 families. To delineate the locus we have isolated 29 yeast artificial chromosome genomic clones that form two contigs, span > 3.5 megabases, and contain two known non-immunoglobulin kappa markers. Using PCR primers specific for 19 V kappa gene families and Southern analysis, we have refined the genetically defined order of these V kappa gene families. Of these, V kappa 2 maps at least 3.0 Mb from the joining (J kappa) region and appears to be the most distal V kappa gene segment. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8618913

  19. Sequence analysis of EBV immune evasion gene BNLF2a in EBV associated tumors and healthy individuals from nasopharyngeal carcinoma endemic and non-endemic regions of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Song; Wang, Xiaofeng; Shu, Jun; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Sun, Zhifu; Luo, Bing

    2015-11-01

    BNLF2a is an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) immune evasion gene. Its protein is located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, and can inhibit the antigen transporting function of TAP, thereby perturbing the immune response to EBV in lytic and prelatent phase. In order to explore whether the polymorphism of BNLF2a gene has a role in different types of EBV associated tumors, we conducted complete sequencing of the gene BNLF2a in 408 cases of EBV positive tumors (76 lymphomas, 45 gastric carcinomas, and 85 nasopharyngeal carcinomas in northern China and 27 lymphomas, 30 gastric carcinomas, and 57 nasopharyngeal carcinomas in southern China) and throat washings from healthy individuals (39 in northern China and 49 in southern China). Two main variant types of BNLF2a were identified. Type BNLF2a-A, which was similar to B95-8, was dominant in all sub-populations (66.7-100%) in this study. Type BNLF2a-B was characterized by the mutations at position 8 and 40. The variation patterns of BNLF2a were significantly different between samples from northern and southern China (P China (P China (33.3%), and the proportion of this type was higher in the northern than in the southern NPCs. These data demonstrate that the BNLF2a gene is highly conserved, and its polymorphism is geographically restricted. Type BNLF2a-B is more prevalent in northern China and may be less tumor transformative.

  20. Accelerated evolution in the protein-coding regions is universal in crotalinae snake venom gland phospholipase A2 isozyme genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, K; Nobuhisa, I; Deshimaru, M; Nakai, M; Ogawa, T; Shimohigashi, Y; Fukumaki, Y; Hattori, M; Sakaki, Y; Hattori, S

    1995-06-06

    The nucleotide sequences of four genes encoding Trimeresurus gramineus (green habu snake, crotalinae) venom gland phospholipase A2 (PLA2; phosphatidylcholine 2-acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.4) isozymes were compared internally and externally with those of six genes encoding Trimeresurus flavoviridis (habu snake, crotalinae) venom gland PLA2 isozymes. The numbers of nucleotide substitutions per site (KN) for the noncoding regions including introns were one-third to one-eighth of the numbers of nucleotide substitutions per synonymous site (KS) for the protein-coding regions of exons, indicating that the noncoding regions are much more conserved than the protein-coding regions. The KN values for the introns were found to be nearly equivalent to those of introns of T. gramineus and T. flavoviridis TATA box-binding protein genes, which are assumed to be a general (nonvenomous) gene. Thus, it is evident that the introns of venom gland PLA2 isozyme genes have evolved at a similar rate to those of nonvenomous genes. The numbers of nucleotide substitutions per nonsynonymous site (KA) were close to or larger than the KS values for the protein-coding regions in venom gland PLA2 isozyme genes. All of the data combined reveal that Darwinian-type accelerated evolution has universally occurred only in the protein-coding regions of crotalinae snake venom PLA2 isozyme genes.

  1. Investigation of QTL regions on Chromosome 17 for genes associated with meat color in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, B; Glenn, K L; Geiger, B; Mileham, A; Rothschild, M F

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies have uncovered several significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) relevant to meat colour traits mapped at the end of SSC17 in the pig. Furthermore, results released from the porcine genome sequencing project have identified genes underlying the entire QTL regions and can further contribute to mining the region for likely causative genes. Ten protein coding genes or novel transcripts located within the QTL regions were screened for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Linkage mapping and association studies were carried out in the ISU Berkshire x Yorkshire (B x Y) pig resource family. The total length of the new SSC17 linkage map was 126.6 cM and additional markers including endothelin 3 (EDN3) and phosphatase and actin regulator 3 (PHACTR3) genes were assigned at positions 119.4 cM and 122.9 cM, respectively. A new QTL peak was noted at approximately 120 cM, close to the EDN3 gene, and for some colour traits QTL exceeded the 5% chromosome-wise significance threshold. The association analyses in the B x Y family showed that the EDN3 BslI and PHACTR3 PstI polymorphisms were strongly associated with the subjective colour score and objective colour reflectance measures in the loin, as well as average drip loss percentage and pH value. The RNPC1 DpnII and CTCFL HpyCH4III polymorphisms were associated with some meat colour traits. No significant association between CBLN4, TFAP2C, and four novel transcripts and meat colour traits were detected. The association analyses conducted in one commercial pig line found that both EDN3 BslI and PHACTR3 PstI polymorphisms were associated with meat colour reflectance traits such as centre loin hue angle and Minolta Lightness score. The present findings suggested that the EDN3 and PHACTR3 genes might have potential effects on meat colour in pigs, and molecular mechanisms of their functions are worth exploring.

  2. Absence of mutation at the 5'-upstream promoter region of the TPM4 gene from cardiac mutant axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denz, Christopher R; Zhang, Chi; Jia, Pingping; Du, Jianfeng; Huang, Xupei; Dube, Syamalima; Thomas, Anish; Poiesz, Bernard J; Dube, Dipak K

    2011-09-01

    Tropomyosins are a family of actin-binding proteins that show cell-specific diversity by a combination of multiple genes and alternative RNA splicing. Of the 4 different tropomyosin genes, TPM4 plays a pivotal role in myofibrillogenesis as well as cardiac contractility in amphibians. In this study, we amplified and sequenced the upstream regulatory region of the TPM4 gene from both normal and mutant axolotl hearts. To identify the cis-elements that are essential for the expression of the TPM4, we created various deletion mutants of the TPM4 promoter DNA, inserted the deleted segments into PGL3 vector, and performed promoter-reporter assay using luciferase as the reporter gene. Comparison of sequences of the promoter region of the TPM4 gene from normal and mutant axolotl revealed no mutations in the promoter sequence of the mutant TPM4 gene. CArG box elements that are generally involved in controlling the expression of several other muscle-specific gene promoters were not found in the upstream regulatory region of the TPM4 gene. In deletion experiments, loss of activity of the reporter gene was noted upon deletion which was then restored upon further deletion suggesting the presence of both positive and negative cis-elements in the upstream regulatory region of the TPM4 gene. We believe that this is the first axolotl promoter that has ever been cloned and studied with clear evidence that it functions in mammalian cell lines. Although striated muscle-specific cis-acting elements are absent from the promoter region of TPM4 gene, our results suggest the presence of positive and negative cis-elements in the promoter region, which in conjunction with positive and negative trans-elements may be involved in regulating the expression of TPM4 gene in a tissue-specific manner.

  3. Genomic Regions Associated With Interspecies Communication in Dogs Contain Genes Related to Human Social Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Mia E.; Wright, Dominic; Roth, Lina S. V.; Batakis, Petros; Jensen, Per

    2016-01-01

    Unlike their wolf ancestors, dogs have unique social skills for communicating and cooperating with humans. Previously, significant heritabilities for human-directed social behaviors have been found in laboratory beagles. Here, a Genome-Wide Association Study identified two genomic regions associated with dog’s human-directed social behaviors. We recorded the propensity of laboratory beagles, bred, kept and handled under standardized conditions, to initiate physical interactions with a human during an unsolvable problem-task, and 190 individuals were genotyped with an HD Canine SNP-chip. One genetic marker on chromosome 26 within the SEZ6L gene was significantly associated with time spent close to, and in physical contact with, the human. Two suggestive markers on chromosome 26, located within the ARVCF gene, were also associated with human contact seeking. Strikingly, four additional genes present in the same linkage blocks affect social abilities in humans, e.g., SEZ6L has been associated with autism and COMT affects aggression in adolescents with ADHD. This is, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide study presenting candidate genomic regions for dog sociability and inter-species communication. These results advance our understanding of dog domestication and raise the use of the dog as a novel model system for human social disorders. PMID:27685260

  4. [Gene geography of Chile: regional distribution of American, European and African genetic contributions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Macarena; Pulgar, Iván; Gallo, Carla; Bortolini, María-Cátira; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Bedoya, Gabriel; González-José, Rolando; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Rothhammer, Francisco

    2014-03-01

    The geographical distribution of genes plays a key role in genetic epidemiology. The Chilean population has three major stem groups (Native American, European and African). To estimate the regional rate of American, European and African admixture of the Chilean population. Forty single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP´s) which exhibit substantially different frequencies between Amerindian populations (ancestry-informative markers or AIM´s), were genotyped in a sample of 923 Chilean participants to estimate individual genetic ancestry. The American, European and African individual average admixture estimates for the 15 Chilean Regions were relatively homogeneous and not statistically different. However, higher American components were found in northern and southern Chile and higher European components were found in central Chile. A negative correlation between African admixture and latitude was observed. On the average, American and European genetic contributions were similar and significantly higher than the African contribution. Weighted mean American, European and African genetic contributions of 44.34% ± 3 9%, 51.85% ± 5.44% and 3.81% ± 0.45%, were estimated. Fifty two percent of subjects harbor African genes. Individuals with Aymara and Mapuche surnames have an American admixture of 58.64% and 68.33%, respectively. Half of the Chilean population harbors African genes. Participants with Aymara and Mapuche surnames had a higher American genetic contribution than the general Chilean population. These results confirm the usefulness of surnames as a first approximation to determine genetic ancestry.

  5. Genomic Regions Associated With Interspecies Communication in Dogs Contain Genes Related to Human Social Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Mia E; Wright, Dominic; Roth, Lina S V; Batakis, Petros; Jensen, Per

    2016-09-29

    Unlike their wolf ancestors, dogs have unique social skills for communicating and cooperating with humans. Previously, significant heritabilities for human-directed social behaviors have been found in laboratory beagles. Here, a Genome-Wide Association Study identified two genomic regions associated with dog's human-directed social behaviors. We recorded the propensity of laboratory beagles, bred, kept and handled under standardized conditions, to initiate physical interactions with a human during an unsolvable problem-task, and 190 individuals were genotyped with an HD Canine SNP-chip. One genetic marker on chromosome 26 within the SEZ6L gene was significantly associated with time spent close to, and in physical contact with, the human. Two suggestive markers on chromosome 26, located within the ARVCF gene, were also associated with human contact seeking. Strikingly, four additional genes present in the same linkage blocks affect social abilities in humans, e.g., SEZ6L has been associated with autism and COMT affects aggression in adolescents with ADHD. This is, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide study presenting candidate genomic regions for dog sociability and inter-species communication. These results advance our understanding of dog domestication and raise the use of the dog as a novel model system for human social disorders.

  6. Determination of the promoter region of an early vaccinia virus gene encoding thymidine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, J P; Moss, B

    1987-05-01

    Nine recombinant vaccinia viruses that contain overlapping segments of the putative promoter region of the vaccinia virus thymidine kinase (TK) gene linked to DNA coding for the prokaryotic enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) were constructed. In each case, the RNA start site and 5 bp of DNA downstream were retained. No significant difference in CAT expression occurred as the deletion was extended from 352 to 32 bp before the RNA start site. Deletion of a further 10 bp, however, led to complete cessation of early promoter activity. Primer extension analysis of the 5' ends of the transcripts verified that the natural TK RNA start site was still used when only 32 bp of upstream DNA remained. Loss of early promoter activity was previously found when deletions were extended from 31 to 24 bp before the RNA start site of another vaccinia gene that is expressed constitutively throughout infection (M.A. Cochran, C. Puckett, and B. Moss, 1985, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 19-23). Sequence similarities in the promoter regions of these two genes were noted.

  7. Early life adversity and serotonin transporter gene variation interact to affect DNA methylation of the corticotropin-releasing factor gene promoter region in the adult rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doelen, R.H. van der; Arnoldussen, I.A.C.; Ghareh, H.; Och, L. van; Homberg, J.R.; Kozicz, L.T.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between childhood maltreatment and the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) gene linked polymorphic region has been associated with increased risk to develop major depression. This Gene x Environment interaction has furthermore been linked with increased levels of anxiety and glucocorticoid

  8. An acute dose of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid alters gene expression in multiple mouse brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnackenberg, B J; Saini, U T; Robinson, B L; Ali, S F; Patterson, T A

    2010-10-13

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is normally found in the brain in low concentrations and may function as a neurotransmitter, although the mechanism of action has not been completely elucidated. GHB has been used as a general anesthetic and is currently used to treat narcolepsy and alcoholism. Recreational use of GHB is primarily as a "club drug" and a "date rape drug," due to its amnesic effects. For this study, the hypothesis was that behavioral and neurochemical alterations may parallel gene expression changes in the brain after GHB administration. Adult male C57/B6N mice (n=5/group) were administered a single dose of 500 mg/kg GHB (i.p.) and were sacrificed 1, 2 and 4 h after treatment. Control mice were administered saline. Brains were removed and regionally dissected on ice. Total RNA from the hippocampus, cortex and striatum was extracted, amplified and labeled. Gene expression was evaluated using Agilent whole mouse genome 4x44K oligonucleotide microarrays. Microarray data were analyzed by ArrayTrack and differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified using P or = 1.7 as the criteria for significance. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) showed that samples from each time point clustered into distinct treatment groups with respect to sacrifice time. Ingenuity pathways analysis (IPA) was used to identify involved pathways. The results show that GHB induces gene expression alterations in hundreds of genes in the hippocampus, cortex and striatum, and the number of affected genes increases throughout a 4-h time course. Many of these DEGs are involved in neurological disease, apoptosis, and oxidative stress.

  9. Identifying Regulatory Patterns at the 3'end Regions of Over-expressed and Under-expressed Genes

    KAUST Repository

    Othoum, Ghofran K

    2013-05-01

    Promoters, neighboring regulatory regions and those extending further upstream of the 5’end of genes, are considered one of the main components affecting the expression status of genes in a specific phenotype. More recently research by Chen et al. (2006, 2012) and Mapendano et al. (2010) demonstrated that the 3’end regulatory regions of genes also influence gene expression. However, the association between the regulatory regions surrounding 3’end of genes and their over- or under-expression status in a particular phenotype has not been systematically studied. The aim of this study is to ascertain if regulatory regions surrounding the 3’end of genes contain sufficient regulatory information to correlate genes with their expression status in a particular phenotype. Over- and under-expressed ovarian cancer (OC) genes were used as a model. Exploratory analysis of the 3’end regions were performed by transforming the annotated regions using principal component analysis (PCA), followed by clustering the transformed data thereby achieving a clear separation of genes with different expression status. Additionally, several classification algorithms such as Naïve Bayes, Random Forest and Support Vector Machine (SVM) were tested with different parameter settings to analyze the discriminatory capacity of the 3’end regions of genes related to their gene expression status. The best performance was achieved using the SVM classification model with 10-fold cross-validation that yielded an accuracy of 98.4%, sensitivity of 99.5% and specificity of 92.5%. For gene expression status for newly available instances, based on information derived from the 3’end regions, an SVM predictive model was developed with 10-fold cross-validation that yielded an accuracy of 67.0%, sensitivity of 73.2% and specificity of 61.0%. Moreover, building an SVM with polynomial kernel model to PCA transformed data yielded an accuracy of 83.1%, sensitivity of 92.5% and specificity of 74.8% using

  10. Functional characterization of a novel lytic phage EcSw isolated from Sus scrofa domesticus and its potential for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easwaran, Maheswaran; Paudel, Sarita; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Shin, Hyun-Jin

    2015-06-01

    In this study, multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli Sw1 (E. coli Sw1) and active lytic phage EcSw was isolated from feces samples of Sus scrofa domesticus (piglet) suffering from diarrhea. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that isolated EcSw belongs to the Myoviridae family with an icosahedral head (80 ± 4) and a long tail (180 ± 5 nm). The EcSw phage genome size was estimated to be approximately 75 Kb of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Phage dynamic studies show that the latent period and burst size of EcSw were approximately 20 min and 28 PFU per cell, respectively. Interestingly, the EcSw phage can tolerate a wide range of environmental conditions, such as temperature, pH and ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)). Furthermore, genome sequence analysis revealed that the lytic genes of the EcSw phage are notably similar to those of enterobacteria phages. In addition, phage-antibiotic synergy has notable effects compared with the effects of phages or antibiotics alone. Inhibition of E. coli Sw1 and 0157:H7 strains showed that the limitations of host specificity and infectivity of EcSw. Even though, it has considerable potential for phage therapy for handling the problem of the emergence of multidrug resistant pathogens.

  11. Lysis to Kill: Evaluation of the Lytic Abilities, and Genomics of Nine Bacteriophages Infective for Gordonia spp. and Their Potential Use in Activated Sludge Foam Biocontrol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe A Dyson

    Full Text Available Nine bacteriophages (phages infective for members of the genus Gordonia were isolated from wastewater and other natural water environments using standard enrichment techniques. The majority were broad host range phages targeting more than one Gordonia species. When their genomes were sequenced, they all emerged as double stranded DNA Siphoviridae phages, ranging from 17,562 to 103,424 bp in size, and containing between 27 and 127 genes, many of which were detailed for the first time. Many of these phage genomes diverged from the expected modular genome architecture of other characterized Siphoviridae phages and contained unusual lysis gene arrangements. Whole genome sequencing also revealed that infection with lytic phages does not appear to prevent spontaneous prophage induction in Gordonia malaquae lysogen strain BEN700. TEM sample preparation techniques were developed to view both attachment and replication stages of phage infection.

  12. 2p24 Gain Region Harboring MYCN Gene Compared with MYCN Amplified and Nonamplified Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeison, Marta; Ash, Shifra; Halevy-Berko, Gili; Mardoukh, Jacques; Luria, Drorit; Avigad, Smadar; Feinberg-Gorenshtein, Galina; Goshen, Yacov; Hertzel, Gabriel; Kapelushnik, Joseph; Barak, Ayelet Ben; Attias, Dina; Steinberg, Ran; Stein, Jerry; Stark, Batia; Yaniv, Isaac

    2010-01-01

    Although the role of MYCN amplification in neuroblastoma is well established, the biological and clinical characteristics of the 2p gain region harboring the MYCN gene remain unclear. The aim of this study was to compare the biological and clinical characteristics of these tumors with MYCN amplified and nonamplified neuroblastoma and to determine their impact on disease outcome. Samples from 177 patients were analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, including MYCN, 1p, 17q, and 11q regions; 2p gain was identified in 25 patients, MYCN amplification in 31, and no amplification in 121 patients. Patients with 2p gain had a significantly worse 5-year event-free survival rate than patients with no MYCN amplified (P < 0.001), and an intermediate 5-year overall survival rate difference existed between the MYCN amplified tumors (P = 0.025) and nonamplified (P = 0.003) groups. All of the 2p gain samples were associated with segmental and/or numerical alterations in the other tested regions. The presence of segmental alterations with or without MYCN amplification was recently found to be the strongest predictor of relapse in a multivariate analysis. The results of the present study suggest that the determination of MYCN gene copy number relative to chromosome 2, when evaluating MYCN status at diagnosis, may help to reveal the underlying genetic pattern of these tumors and better understand their clinical behavior. PMID:20395439

  13. Characterisation of the promoter region of the zebrafish six7 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivenes, O; Seo, H C; Fjose, A

    2000-04-25

    The Drosophila homeobox gene sine oculis and its murine homologue Six3 have both been shown to have regulatory functions in eye and brain development. In zebrafish, three Six3-related genes with conserved expression during early eye and head formation have been identified. One of these, six7, is first expressed at the gastrula stage in the involuting axial mesoderm, and later in the overlying neuroectoderm from which the forebrain and optic primordium develop. To elucidate the mechanisms regulating six7 expression, we isolated a 2.7-kb fragment of the 5'-flanking region. Three sequentially deleted fragments of this upstream region were used to produce GFP reporter constructs for analysis of tissue-specific expression in zebrafish embryos. The results show that a 625-bp upstream fragment is sufficient to direct strong expression of the reporter during gastrulation and early neurulation. The proximal part of the promoter contains binding sites for various constitutive transcription factors and an additional upstream element that was shown to be critical in directing expression to the anterior region of the zebrafish brain.

  14. The myotonic dystrophy kinase 3{prime}-untranslated region and its effect on gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, C.W.Y.; Sabourin, L.A.; Narang, M.A. [Univ. of Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disease involving the expansion of an unstable CTG repeat in the 3{prime}-untranslated (3{prime}-UTR) region of the DM kinase (DMK) gene. Increased levels of mRNA in congenital compared to normal tissue have been shown, suggesting elevated DMK levels may be responsible for the disease phenotype. To study the effect of the DMK 3{prime}UTR on gene expression, a reporter gene system was constructed using the constitutive CMV promoter with the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) open reading frame and the DMK 3{prime}UTR containing from 5 repeats up to 90 repeats. Transient transfection into a rhabdomyosarcoma cell line shows a three-fold increase in CAT activity from constructs containing a wildtype 3{prime}UTR (5 and 20 repeats) compared to a control construct containing only a poly(A) signal. Reporter constructs with repeats in the protomutation (50 repeats) and mutation (90 repeats) range show a greater than 10-fold increase over control CAT activity. These results suggest the presence of elements in the DMK 3{prime}UTR capable of conferring increased gene expression. We are currently investigating cell-specific activity of the constructs and conducting deletion mapping to identify regulatory elements in the 3{prime}-UTR.

  15. Cloning and functional analysis of SEL1L promoter region, a pancreas-specific gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, M; Sorio, C; Malferrari, G; Rogozin, I B; Bernard, L; Scarpa, A; Zollo, M; Biunno, I

    2001-01-01

    We examined the promoter activity of SEL1L, the human ortholog of the C. elegans gene sel-1, a negative regulator of LIN-12/NOTCH receptor proteins. To understand the relation in SEL1L transcription pattern observed in different epithelial cells, we determined the transcription start site and sequenced the 5' flanking region. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of consensus promoter elements--GC boxes and a CAAT box--but the absence of a TATA motif. Potential binding sites for transcription factors that are involved in tissue-specific gene expression were identified, including: activator protein-2 (AP-2), hepatocyte nuclear factor-3 (HNF3 beta), homeobox Nkx2-5 and GATA-1. Transcription activity of the TATA-less SEL1L promoter was analyzed by transient transfection using luciferase reporter gene constructs. A core basal promoter of 302 bp was sufficient for constitutive promoter activity in all the cell types studied. This genomic fragment contains a CAAT and several GC boxes. The activity of the SEL1L promoter was considerably higher in mouse pancreatic beta cells (beta TC3) than in several human pancreatic neoplastic cell lines; an even greater reduction of its activity was observed in cells of nonpancreatic origin. These results suggest that SEL1L promoter may be a useful tool in gene therapy applications for pancreatic pathologies.

  16. Structural characteristics of the variable regions of immunoglobulin genes encoding a pathogenic autoantibody in murine lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, B P; Ebling, F M; Roman, C; Panosian-Sahakian, N; Calame, K; Hahn, B H

    1990-02-01

    We have studied several monoclonal anti-double-stranded (ds) DNA antibodies for their ability to accelerate lupus nephritis in young NZB X NZW F1 female mice and to induce it in BALB/c mice. Two identified as pathogens in both strains have characteristics previously associated with nephritogenicity: expression of IgG2a isotype and IdGN2 idiotype. Both pathogenic antibodies used the combination of genes from the VHJ558 and VK9 subfamilies. Two weak pathogens failed to accelerate nephritis in young BW mice, but induced lupus nephritis in BALB/c mice. They both express IdGN2; one is cationic and an IgG3, the other is an IgG2a. Additional MAbs (some IgG2a, one IdGN2-positive) did not accelerate or induce nephritis. We have cloned and sequenced the variable regions of the immunoglobulin genes of one pathogenic autoantibody. No unique V, D, or J gene segments and no evidence of unusual mechanisms in generating diversity were used to construct this antibody. These data argue against use of unique abnormal Ig genes by systemic lupus erythematosus individuals to construct pathogenic autoantibody subsets. Instead, the major abnormality may be immunoregulatory.

  17. The role of RNA structure at 5' untranslated region in microRNA-mediated gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wanjun; Xu, Yuming; Xie, Xueying; Wang, Ting; Ko, Jae-Hong; Zhou, Tong

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the secondary structure of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of messenger RNA (mRNA) is important for microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation in humans. mRNAs that are targeted by miRNA tend to have a higher degree of local secondary structure in their 5' UTR; however, the general role of the 5' UTR in miRNA-mediated gene regulation remains unknown. We systematically surveyed the secondary structure of 5' UTRs in both plant and animal species and found a universal trend of increased mRNA stability near the 5' cap in mRNAs that are regulated by miRNA in animals, but not in plants. Intra-genome comparison showed that gene expression level, GC content of the 5' UTR, number of miRNA target sites, and 5' UTR length may influence mRNA structure near the 5' cap. Our results suggest that the 5' UTR secondary structure performs multiple functions in regulating post-transcriptional processes. Although the local structure immediately upstream of the start codon is involved in translation initiation, RNA structure near the 5' cap site, rather than the structure of the full-length 5' UTR sequences, plays an important role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation.

  18. An antisense transcript in the human cytomegalovirus UL87 gene region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yanping

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid advances in research on antisense transcripts are gradually changing our comprehension of genomic and gene expression aspects of the Herpesviridae. One such herpesvirus is the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. Although transcription of the HCMV UL87 gene has not been specifically investigated, cDNA clones of UL87 antisense transcripts were found in HCMV cDNA libraries previously. In this study, the transcription of the UL87 antisense strand was investigated in three clinically isolated HCMV strains. Results First, an 800 nucleotides transcript having an antisense orientation to the UL87 gene was found in a late HCMV cDNA library. Then, the UL87 antisense transcript was confirmed by Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and Northern blot in three HCMV clinical strains. Two ORFs were predicted in the antisense transcript. The putative protein of ORF 1 showed a high degree of conservation among HCMV and other CMV strains. Conclusion An 800nt antisense transcript in the UL87 gene region exists in HCMV clinical strains.

  19. Polymorphism and gene organization of water buffalo MHC-DQB genes show homology to the BoLA DQB region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, L; Schneider, M P C; Brenig, B B; Honeycutt, R L; Honeycutt, D A; Womack, J E; Skow, L C

    2011-08-01

    In cattle (Bos taurus), there is evidence of more than 50 alleles of BoLA-DQB (bovine lymphocyte antigen DQB) that are distributed across at least five DQB loci, making this region one of the most complex in the BoLA gene family. In this study, DQB alleles were analysed for the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), another economically important bovine species. Twelve alleles for Bubu-DQB (Bubalis bubalis DQB) were determined by nucleotide sequence analysis. A phylogenetic analysis revealed numerous trans-species polymorphisms, with alleles from water buffalo assigned to at least three different loci (BoLA-DQB1, BoLA-DQB3 and BoLA-DQB4) that are also found in cattle. These presumptive loci were analysed for patterns of synonymous (d(S)) and non-synonymous (d(N)) substitution. Like BoLA-DQB1, Bubu-DQB1 was observed to be under strong positive selection for polymorphism. We conclude that water buffalo and cattle share the current arrangement of their DQB region because of their common ancestry. © 2011 The Authors, Animal Genetics © 2011 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  20. Evidence for a novel exon in the coding region of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Ling; St. Denis, K.A.; Bapat, B. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada)

    1995-08-10

    Germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene APC cause familial adenomatous polyposis. Somatic APC alterations are involved in several sporadic neoplasma, including colorectal, duodenal, gastric, and esophageal carcinoma. The APC mRNA is encoded by 15 exons. Additional transcripts have been reported, due to alternative splicing of coding as well as noncoding regions. Two mRNA isoforms occur due to a deletion of exon 7 or a partial deletion of exon 9. We have identified a novel exon, flanked by APC exons 10 and 11, which is expressed as an alternatively transcribed product of the gene. Further, we have shown that the novel exon consists of a heptad repeat motif and is conserved across species. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  1. The clinical impact of hypoxia-regulated gene expression in loco-regional gastroesophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, M.; Alsner, J.; Tramm, T.

    2015-01-01

    squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) compared with adenocarcinomas of the esophago-gastric junction and the stomach (AC), and was a potential prognostic marker in patients with ESCC. The purpose of the present study was to confirm these results. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 152......Purpose/Objective: In a former study (1), the hypoxia gene expression classifier, developed in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, was applied in 89 patients with loco-regional gastroesophageal cancer (GC). Analysis of the 15 genes was indicative of hypoxia being more profound in esophagus...... were available in 135 patients; ESCC: 89 patients (66%), AC: 43 patients (32%) and other carcinomas: 3 patients (2%). Comparing the cohorts of the original and present study, patient characteristics were similar except for a significantly lower T- and N-stage in the present cohort. Tumor specimens were...

  2. Whorl-specific expression of the SUPERMAN gene of Arabidopsis is mediated by cis elements in the transcribed region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Toshiro; Sakai, Hajime; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2003-09-02

    The SUPERMAN (SUP) gene of Arabidopsis is involved in controlling cell proliferation in stamen and carpel primordia and in ovules during flower development. The SUP gene encodes a transcription factor with a C2H2-type zinc finger motif, a serine/proline-rich domain, a basic domain, and a leucine-zipper-like domain and is expressed in a very limited region in stamen primordia and in the developing ovary during flower development. The SUP gene is susceptible to methylation, resulting in epigenetic gene silencing. To understand how the SUP gene is expressed spatially and temporally in its restricted domain, and why methylation of the transcribed region affects early-stage SUP expression, we have identified the SUP cis regulatory elements by characterizing SUP gene fusions. These studies show that the SUP gene has discrete upstream promoter elements required for expression in stamen primordia in early stages and in the ovary in later stages. The promoter activity for stamen primordia is modulated by several positive and negative elements located in the transcribed and translated regions. Several regulatory elements in the transcribed region correlate with the areas of the gene that are heavily methylated in epigenetic alleles; these data provide a possible explanation of how methylation of the transcribed region represses transcription.

  3. A comparative study on the activity of fungal lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for the depolymerization of cellulose in soybean spent flakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Zhang, Zhenghong

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-dependent enzymes capable of the oxidative breakdown of polysaccharides. They are of industrial interest due to their ability to enhance the enzymatic depolymerization of recalcitrant substrates by glycoside hydrolases. In this paper, twenty-...

  4. Restriction mapping of a YAC contig in the hemochromatosis gene region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, M.J.; Smit, D.J.; Pyper, W.R. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)

    1994-09-01

    Hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of iron metabolism that can lead to cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, cardiomyopathy, diabetes and anthropathy. We have mapped the hemochromatosis gene to within 1 cM of HLA-A and the microsatellite D6S105, and our allele association studies have shown that D6S105 is the marker most closely associated with the hemochromatosis gene. We are currently constructing a YAC contig and restriction map of this region as part of a positional cloning strategy to identify the hemochromatosis gene. YACs containing HLA-A or D6S105 were selected, and fluorescent-in-situ-hybridization (FISH) was performed to confirm chromosomal location and exclude chimerism. YAC DNA was digested with a panel of rare cutters, separated by pulsed field gel electrophoresis, Southern blotted and probed with the vector arms to create restriction maps. YAC insert terminal ends were isolated using vectorette methodology. A contig extending 600 kb centromeric and 350 kb telomeric of HLA-A has been established. HLA-A, HLA-F and the microsatellite D6S265 have been positioned on this map. The contig does not yet overlap any D6S105 positive YACs but the telomeric end of the contig has been sequenced and is being used to identify additional YACs to bridge this interval. Restriction mapping of three D6S105 YACs has shown the presence of several CpG islands in this region. As these CpG islands are in close proximity to D6S105, they are being used to isolate coding sequences to determine whether any of these mark the position of the hemochromatosis gene.

  5. Herpesviral ICP0 Protein Promotes Two Waves of Heterochromatin Removal on an Early Viral Promoter during Lytic Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses must contend with host cell epigenetic silencing responses acting on their genomes upon entry into the host cell nucleus. In this study, we confirmed that unchromatinized herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 genomes enter primary human foreskin fibroblasts and are rapidly subjected to assembly of nucleosomes and association with repressive heterochromatin modifications such as histone 3 (H3 lysine 9-trimethylation (H3K9me3 and lysine 27-trimethylation (H3K27me3 during the first 1 to 2 h postinfection. Kinetic analysis of the modulation of nucleosomes and heterochromatin modifications over the course of lytic infection demonstrates a progressive removal that coincided with initiation of viral gene expression. We obtained evidence for three phases of heterochromatin removal from an early gene promoter: an initial removal of histones and heterochromatin not dependent on ICP0, a second ICP0-dependent round of removal of H3K9me3 that is independent of viral DNA synthesis, and a third phase of H3K27me3 removal that is dependent on ICP0 and viral DNA synthesis. The presence of ICP0 in transfected cells is also sufficient to promote removal of histones and H3K9me3 modifications of cotransfected genes. Overall, these results show that ICP0 promotes histone removal, a reduction of H3K9me3 modifications, and a later indirect reduction of H3K27me3 modifications following viral early gene expression and DNA synthesis. Therefore, HSV ICP0 promotes the reversal of host epigenetic silencing mechanisms by several mechanisms.

  6. Mutational analysis of the promoter and the coding region of the 5-HT1A gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmann, J.; Noethen, M.M.; Shimron-Abarbanell, D. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Disturbances of serotonergic pathways have been implicated in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Serotonin (5HT) receptors can be subdivided into at least three major families (5HT1, 5HT2, and 5HT3). Five human 5HT1 receptor subtypes have been cloned, namely 1A, 1D{alpha}, 1D{beta}, 1E, and 1F. Of these, the 5HT1A receptor is the best characterized subtype. In the present study we sought to identify genetic variation in the 5HT1A receptor gene which through alteration of protein function or level of expression might contribute to the genetics of neuropsychiatric diseases. The coding region and the 5{prime} promoter region of the 5HT1A gene from 159 unrelated subjects (45 schizophrenic, 46 bipolar affective, and 43 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 25 controls) were analyzed using SSCA. SSCA revealed the presence of two mutations both located in the coding region of the 5HT1A receptor gene. The first mutation is a rare silent C{r_arrow}T substitution at nucleotide position 549. The second mutation is characterized by a base pair substitution (A{r_arrow}G) at the first position of codon 28 and results in an amino acid exchange (Ile{r_arrow}Val). Since Val28 was found only in a single schizophrenic patient and in none of the other patients or controls, we decided to extend our samples and to use a restriction assay for screening a further 74 schizophrenic, 95 bipolar affective, and 49 patients with Tourette`s syndrome, as well as 185 controls, for the presence of the mutation. In total, the mutation was found in 2 schizophrenic patients, in 3 bipolars, in 1 Tourette patient, and in 5 controls. To our knowledge the Ile-28-Val substitution reported here is the first natural occuring molecular variant which has been identified for a serotonin receptor so far.

  7. Regional Association Analysis of MetaQTLs Delineates Candidate Grain Size Genes in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag V. Daware

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mapping studies which aim to identify genetic basis of diverse agronomic traits are vital for marker-assisted crop improvement. Numerous Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs mapped in rice span long genomic intervals with hundreds to thousands of genes, which limits their utilization for marker-assisted genetic enhancement of rice. Although potent, fine mapping of QTLs is challenging task as it requires screening of large number of segregants to identify suitable recombination events. Association mapping offers much higher resolution as compared to QTL mapping, but detects considerable number of spurious QTLs. Therefore, combined use of QTL and association mapping strategies can provide advantages associated with both these methods. In the current study, we utilized meta-analysis approach to identify metaQTLs associated with grain size/weight in diverse Indian indica and aromatic rice accessions. Subsequently, attempt has been made to narrow-down identified grain size/weight metaQTLs through individual SNP- as well as haplotype-based regional association analysis. The study identified six different metaQTL regions, three of which were successfully revalidated, and substantially scaled-down along with GS3 QTL interval (positive control by regional association analysis. Consequently, two potential candidate genes within two reduced metaQTLs were identified based on their differential expression profiles in different tissues/stages of rice accessions during seed development. The developed strategy has broader practical utility for rapid delineation of candidate genes and natural alleles underlying QTLs associated with complex agronomic traits in rice as well as major crop plants enriched with useful genetic and genomic information.

  8. Differentially methylated regions of imprinted genes in prenatal, perinatal and postnatal human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K Murphy

    Full Text Available Epigenetic plasticity in relation to in utero exposures may mechanistically explain observed differences in the likelihood of developing common complex diseases including hypertension, diabetes and cardiovascular disease through the cumulative effects of subtle alterations in gene expression. Imprinted genes are essential mediators of growth and development and are characterized by differentially methylated regulatory regions (DMRs that carry parental allele-specific methylation profiles. This theoretical 50% level of methylation provides a baseline from which endogenously- or exogenously-induced deviations in methylation can be detected. We quantified DNA methylation at imprinted gene DMRs in a large panel of human conceptal tissues, in matched buccal cell specimens collected at birth and at one year of age, and in the major cell fractions of umbilical cord blood to assess the stability of methylation at these regions. DNA methylation was measured using validated pyrosequencing assays at seven DMRs regulating the IGF2/H19, DLK1/MEG3, MEST, NNAT and SGCE/PEG10 imprinted domains. DMR methylation did not significantly differ for the H19, MEST and SGCE/PEG10 DMRs across all conceptal tissues analyzed (ANOVA p>0.10. Methylation differences at several DMRs were observed in tissues from brain (IGF2 and MEG3-IG DMRs, liver (IGF2 and MEG3 DMRs and placenta (both DLK1/MEG3 DMRs and NNAT DMR. In most infants, methylation profiles in buccal cells at birth and at one year of age were comparable, as was methylation in the major cell fractions of umbilical cord blood. Several infants showed temporal deviations in methylation at multiple DMRs. Similarity of inter-individual and intra-individual methylation at some, but not all of the DMRs analyzed supports the possibility that methylation of these regions can serve as useful biosensors of exposure.

  9. Genomic imprinting variations in the mouse type 3 deiodinase gene between tissues and brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M Elena; Charalambous, Marika; Saferali, Aabida; Fiering, Steven; Naumova, Anna K; St Germain, Donald; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C; Hernandez, Arturo

    2014-11-01

    The Dio3 gene, which encodes for the type 3 deiodinase (D3), controls thyroid hormone (TH) availability. The lack of D3 in mice results in tissue overexposure to TH and a broad neuroendocrine phenotype. Dio3 is an imprinted gene, preferentially expressed from the paternally inherited allele in the mouse fetus. However, heterozygous mice with paternal inheritance of the inactivating Dio3 mutation exhibit an attenuated phenotype when compared with that of Dio3 null mice. To investigate this milder phenotype, the allelic expression of Dio3 was evaluated in different mouse tissues. Preferential allelic expression of Dio3 from the paternal allele was observed in fetal tissues and neonatal brain regions, whereas the biallelic Dio3 expression occurred in the developing eye, testes, and cerebellum and in the postnatal brain neocortex, which expresses a larger Dio3 mRNA transcript. The newborn hypothalamus manifests the highest degree of Dio3 expression from the paternal allele, compared with other brain regions, and preferential allelic expression of Dio3 in the brain relaxed in late neonatal life. A methylation analysis of two regulatory regions of the Dio3 imprinted domain revealed modest but significant differences between tissues, but these did not consistently correlate with the observed patterns of Dio3 allelic expression. Deletion of the Dio3 gene and promoter did not result in significant changes in the tissue-specific patterns of Dio3 allelic expression. These results suggest the existence of unidentified epigenetic determinants of tissue-specific Dio3 imprinting. The resulting variation in the Dio3 allelic expression between tissues likely explains the phenotypic variation that results from paternal Dio3 haploinsufficiency.

  10. Oxygen Activation at the Active Site of a Fungal Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, William B; Agarwal, Pratul K; Meilleur, Flora

    2017-01-16

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases have attracted vast attention owing to their abilities to disrupt glycosidic bonds via oxidation instead of hydrolysis and to enhance enzymatic digestion of recalcitrant substrates including chitin and cellulose. We have determined high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of an enzyme from Neurospora crassa in the resting state and of a copper(II) dioxo intermediate complex formed in the absence of substrate. X-ray crystal structures also revealed "pre-bound" molecular oxygen adjacent to the active site. An examination of protonation states enabled by neutron crystallography and density functional theory calculations identified a role for a conserved histidine in promoting oxygen activation. These results provide a new structural description of oxygen activation by substrate free lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases and provide insights that can be extended to reactivity in the enzyme-substrate complex. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Cloning and functional characterization of the 5' regulatory region of ovine Hormone Sensitive Lipase (HSL) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampidonis, Antonis D; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E; Messini-Nikolaki, Niki; Stefos, George C; Margaritis, Lukas H; Argyrokastritis, Alexandros; Bizelis, Iosif; Rogdakis, Emmanuel

    2008-12-31

    Hormone Sensitive Lipase (HSL) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue, thus determining the supply of energy substrates in the body. HSL enzymatic activity is increased by adrenergic agonists, such as catecholamines and glucagons, which induce cyclic AMP (cAMP) intracellular production, subsequently followed by the activation of Protein Kinase A (PKA) and its downstream signaling cascade reactions. HSL constitutes the critical enzyme in the modulation of lipid stores and the only component being subjected to hormonal control in terms of the recently identified Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL). In order to acquire detailed knowledge with regard to the mechanisms regulating ovine HSL (ovHSL) gene transcription activity, we initially isolated and cloned the 5' proximal and distal promoter regions through a genome walking approach, with the utilization of the already characterized ovHSL cDNAs. As evinced by BLAST analysis and a multiple alignment procedure, the isolated genomic fragment of 2.744 kb appeared to contain the already specified 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR), which was interrupted by a relatively large intron of 1.448 kb. Regarding the upstream remaining part of 1.224 kb, it was demonstrated to represent a TATA-less promoter area, harboring several cis-regulatory elements that could be putatively recognized by relatively more general transcription factors, mainly including Stimulating protein 1 (Sp1), CCAAT-box Binding Factors (CBFs), Activator Protein 2 (AP2) and Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR), as well as other cis-acting regions denominated as Insulin Response Element (IRE), Glucose Response Element (GRE), Fat Specific Element (FSE) and cAMP Response Element (CRE), which could likely function in a nourishment (i.e. glucose)-/hormone-dependent fashion. When different genomic fragments were directionally (5' to 3') cloned into a suitable reporter vector upstream of a promoter-less luciferase gene and

  12. Participation of the lytic replicon in bacteriophage P1 plasmid maintenance.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    P1 bacteriophage carries at least two replicons: a plasmid replicon and a viral lytic replicon. Since the isolated plasmid replicon can maintain itself stably at the low copy number characteristic of intact P1 prophage, it has been assumed that this replicon is responsible for driving prophage replication. We provide evidence that when replication from the plasmid replicon is prevented, prophage replication continues, albeit at a reduced rate. The residual plasmid replication is due to incomp...

  13. Involvement of Noxa in mediating cellular ER stress responses to lytic virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Noxa is a Bcl-2 homology domain-containing pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein. Noxa mRNA and protein expression are upregulated by dsRNA or virus, and ectopic Noxa expression enhances cellular sensitivity to virus or dsRNA-induced apoptosis. Here we demonstrate that Noxa null baby mouse kidney (BMK) cells are deficient in normal cytopathic response to lytic viruses, and that reconstitution of the knockout cells with wild type Noxa restored normal cytopathic responses. Noxa regulation by viru...

  14. How Cancer Cells Become Resistant to Cationic Lytic Peptides: It's the Sugar!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Joshua G

    2017-02-16

    In this issue of Cell Chemical Biology, Ishikawa et al. (2017) demonstrate that the loss of cell-surface anionic saccharides can impart resistance toward anticancer peptides. This study provides the first insight into potential resistance mechanisms toward cationic lytic peptides and highlights the important, yet previously unappreciated, role cell-surface glycans can play in cellular resistance mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of the Spore Cortex Lytic Enzyme SleB in Bacillus anthracis

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of the disease anthrax and poses a threat due to its potential to be used as a biological weapon. The spore form of this bacterium is an extremely resistant structure, making spore decontamination exceptionally challenging. During spore germination, nutrient germinants interact with Ger receptors, triggering a cascade of events. A crucial event in this process is degradation of the cortex peptidoglycan by germination-specific lytic enzymes (GSLEs),...

  16. A gene for distal arthrogryposis Type I maps to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamshad, M.; Watkins, W.S.; Zenger, R.K.; Bohnsack, J.F.; Carey, J.C.; Otterud, B.; Krakowiak, P.A.; Robertson, M.; Jorde, L.B. [Univ. of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Club foot is one of the most common human congenital malformations. Distal arthrogryposis type I (DA-1) is a frequent cause of dominantly inherited club foot. Performing a genomewide search using short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphisms, we have mapped a DA-1 gene to the pericentromeric region of chromosome 9 in a large kindred. Linkage analysis has generated a positive lod score of 5.90 at {theta} = 0, with the marker GS-4. Multiple recombinants bracketing the region have been identified. Analysis of an additional family demonstrated no linkage to the same locus, indicating likely locus heterogeneity. Of the autosomal congenital contracture disorders causing positional foot deformities, this is the first to be mapped.

  17. Cloning and characterizing of the ovine MX1 gene promoter/enhancer region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiri, A M; Ott, T L

    2007-01-01

    Ovine MX1 (MX1) is expressed in the uterus during the estrous cycle and is strongly up-regulated during early pregnancy in the uterus and peripheral blood leukocytes. In this study we cloned the MX1 gene promoter/enhancer, and tested its response to interferon tau (IFN-tau). To address the role of IFN tau in regulating MX1 expression, serial deletion mutants were prepared along with a clone that contained a full-length promoter including the two proximal ISREs but lacking an intronic ISRE site. Promoter deletions showed the two proximal ISRE sites, but not the intronic ISRE site, were required for maximal response to IFN tau. Interestingly, MX1 promoter deletion mutants revealed the presence of distal positive (-920 to -715) and negative (-715 to -437) regulatory regions. Identifying positive and negative regulatory regions in MX1 promoter will help define the complex regulation of MX1 during early pregnancy in ruminants.

  18. Novel region within the V kappa gene promoter is responsible for tissue and stage-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes in human lymphoid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossakowska, A E; Urbanski, S J

    1989-03-01

    Immunoglobulin gene-specific transacting factors have been shown to play a role in lymphoid tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes. The role of these factors in B-cell differentiation and stage-specific expression of these genes is, however, not fully understood. We have used a model of human lymphoid neoplasia to address this question. Different fragments of unrearranged human variable region of immunoglobulin kappa gene (V kappa) were used for cell-free in vitro transcription and DNA mobility shift assays. Previously described enhancement of in vitro transcription that was only seen with nuclear extracts derived from B-cell neoplasms corresponding to the late stages of B-cell differentiation was shown to be dependent on the actions of these factor(s) on the DNA region within the V kappa gene promoter. This region is located within the 920 bp fragment located 210 bp upstream from the coding region and this fragment represents a possible novel DNA region, which plays a role in the stage- and tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes.

  19. Exon organization of the mouse entactin gene corresponds to the structural domains of the polypeptide and has regional homology to the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Wewer, U M; Chung, A E

    1995-01-01

    Entactin is a widespread basement membrane protein of 150 kDa that binds to type IV collagen and laminin. The complete exon-intron structure of the mouse entactin gene has been determined from lambda genomic DNA clones. The gene spans at least 65 kb and contains 20 exons. The exon organization...... of the mouse entactin gene closely corresponds to the organization of the polypeptide into distinct structural and functional domains. The two amino-terminal globular domains are encoded by three exons each. Single exons encode the two protease-sensitive, O-glycosylated linking regions. The six EGF......-like repeats and the single thyroglobulin-type repeat are each encoded by separate exons. The carboxyl-terminal half of entactin displays sequence homology to the growth factor-like region of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, and in both genes this region is encoded by eight exons. The positions of four...

  20. BF integrase genes of HIV-1 circulating in Sao Paulo, Brazil, with a recurrent recombination region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atila Iamarino

    Full Text Available Although some studies have shown diversity in HIV integrase (IN genes, none has focused particularly on the gene evolving in epidemics in the context of recombination. The IN gene in 157 HIV-1 integrase inhibitor-naïve patients from the São Paulo State, Brazil, were sequenced tallying 128 of subtype B (23 of which were found in non-B genomes, 17 of subtype F (8 of which were found in recombinant genomes, 11 integrases were BF recombinants, and 1 from subtype C. Crucially, we found that 4 BF recombinant viruses shared a recurrent recombination breakpoint region between positions 4900 and 4924 (relative to the HXB2 that includes 2 gRNA loops, where the RT may stutter. Since these recombinants had independent phylogenetic origin, we argue that these results suggest a possible recombination hotspot not observed so far in BF CRF in particular, or in any other HIV-1 CRF in general. Additionally, 40% of the drug-naïve and 45% of the drug-treated patients had at least 1 raltegravir (RAL or elvitegravir (EVG resistance-associated amino acid change, but no major resistance mutations were found, in line with other studies. Importantly, V151I was the most common minor resistance mutation among B, F, and BF IN genes. Most codon sites of the IN genes had higher rates of synonymous substitutions (dS indicative of a strong negative selection. Nevertheless, several codon sites mainly in the subtype B were found under positive selection. Consequently, we observed a higher genetic diversity in the B portions of the mosaics, possibly due to the more recent introduction of subtype F on top of an ongoing subtype B epidemics and a fast spread of subtype F alleles among the B population.

  1. Evolution of the DAZ gene and the AZFc region on primate Y chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jane-Fang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Azoospermia Factor c (AZFc region of the human Y chromosome is a unique product of segmental duplication. It consists almost entirely of very long amplicons, represented by different colors, and is frequently deleted in subfertile men. Most of the AZFc amplicons have high sequence similarity with autosomal segments, indicating recent duplication and transposition to the Y chromosome. The Deleted in Azoospermia (DAZ gene within the red-amplicon arose from an ancestral autosomal DAZ-like (DAZL gene. It varies significantly between different men regarding to its copy number and the numbers of RNA recognition motif and DAZ repeat it encodes. We used Southern analyses to study the evolution of DAZ and AZFc amplicons on the Y chromosomes of primates. Results The Old World monkey rhesus macaque has only one DAZ gene. In contrast, the great apes have multiple copies of DAZ, ranging from 2 copies in bonobos and gorillas to at least 6 copies in orangutans, and these DAZ genes have polymorphic structures similar to those of their human counterparts. Sequences homologous to the various AZFc amplicons are present on the Y chromosomes of some but not all primates, indicating that they arrived on the Y chromosome at different times during primate evolution. Conclusion The duplication and transposition of AZFc amplicons to the human Y chromosome occurred in three waves, i.e., after the branching of the New World monkey, the gorilla, and the chimpanzee/bonobo lineages, respectively. The red-amplicon, one of the first to arrive on the Y chromosome, amplified by inverted duplication followed by direct duplication after the separation of the Old World monkey and the great ape lineages. Subsequent duplication/deletion in the various lineages gave rise to a spectrum of DAZ gene structure and copy number found in today's great apes.

  2. Study on constructive system of green cave dwelling in Loess Plateau-Interpretation with the "regional gene" theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This article reveals the inherent evolution adjusting mechanism of regional architecture by means of considering the concept and method of "regional gene" as the research approach of regional architecture construction system, and in the meanwhile establishes the "gene database" of regional architecture and optimum technology, on the basis of the principle of sustainable development and scientific evaluation system. In addition, this article chooses the planning of model villages of cave dwellings in Loess Plateau and the construction of ecological cave dwellings for case study to prove the feasibility of the research approach.

  3. Murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 hijacks MAVS and IKKbeta to initiate lytic replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Dong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Upon viral infection, the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS-IKKbeta pathway is activated to restrict viral replication. Manipulation of immune signaling events by pathogens has been an outstanding theme of host-pathogen interaction. Here we report that the loss of MAVS or IKKbeta impaired the lytic replication of gamma-herpesvirus 68 (gammaHV68, a model herpesvirus for human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein-Barr virus. gammaHV68 infection activated IKKbeta in a MAVS-dependent manner; however, IKKbeta phosphorylated and promoted the transcriptional activation of the gammaHV68 replication and transcription activator (RTA. Mutational analyses identified IKKbeta phosphorylation sites, through which RTA-mediated transcription was increased by IKKbeta, within the transactivation domain of RTA. Moreover, the lytic replication of recombinant gammaHV68 carrying mutations within the IKKbeta phosphorylation sites was greatly impaired. These findings support the conclusion that gammaHV68 hijacks the antiviral MAVS-IKKbeta pathway to promote viral transcription and lytic infection, representing an example whereby viral replication is coupled to host immune activation.

  4. Diversity of phage infection types and associated terminology: the problem with 'Lytic or lysogenic'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Zack; Abedon, Stephen T

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses of members of domain Bacteria. These viruses play numerous roles in shaping the diversity of microbial communities, with impact differing depending on what infection strategies specific phages employ. From an applied perspective, these especially are communities containing undesired or pathogenic bacteria that can be modified through phage-mediated bacterial biocontrol, that is, through phage therapy. Here we seek to categorize phages in terms of their infection strategies as well as review or suggest more descriptive, accurate or distinguishing terminology. Categories can be differentiated in terms of (1) whether or not virion release occurs (productive infections versus lysogeny, pseudolysogeny and/or the phage carrier state), (2) the means of virion release (lytic versus chronic release) and (3) the degree to which phages are genetically equipped to display lysogenic cycles (temperate versus non-temperate phages). We address in particular the use or overuse of what can be a somewhat equivocal phrase, 'Lytic or lysogenic', especially when employed as a means of distinguishing among phages types. We suggest that the implied dichotomy is inconsistent with both modern as well as historical understanding of phage biology. We consider, therefore, less ambiguous terminology for distinguishing between 'Lytic' versus 'Lysogenic' phage types.

  5. KSHV Targeted Therapy: An Update on Inhibitors of Viral Lytic Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Coen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is the causative agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman’s disease. Since the discovery of KSHV 20 years ago, there is still no standard treatment and the management of virus-associated malignancies remains toxic and incompletely efficacious. As the majority of tumor cells are latently infected with KSHV, currently marketed antivirals that target the virus lytic cycle have shown inconsistent results in clinic. Nevertheless, lytic replication plays a major role in disease progression and virus dissemination. Case reports and retrospective studies have pointed out the benefit of antiviral therapy in the treatment and prevention of KSHV-associated diseases. As a consequence, potent and selective antivirals are needed. This review focuses on the anti-KSHV activity, mode of action and current status of antiviral drugs targeting KSHV lytic cycle. Among these drugs, different subclasses of viral DNA polymerase inhibitors and compounds that do not target the viral DNA polymerase are being discussed. We also cover molecules that target cellular kinases, as well as the potential of new drug targets and animal models for antiviral testing.

  6. Genetically Engineered Yeast Expressing a Lytic Peptide from Bee Venom (Melittin) Kills Symbiotic Protozoa in the Gut of Formosan Subterranean Termites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husseneder, Claudia; Donaldson, Jennifer R; Foil, Lane D

    2016-01-01

    The Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, is a costly invasive urban pest in warm and humid regions around the world. Feeding workers of the Formosan subterranean termite genetically engineered yeast strains that express synthetic protozoacidal lytic peptides has been shown to kill the cellulose digesting termite gut protozoa, which results in death of the termite colony. In this study, we tested if Melittin, a natural lytic peptide from bee venom, could be delivered into the termite gut via genetically engineered yeast and if the expressed Melittin killed termites via lysis of symbiotic protozoa in the gut of termite workers and/or destruction of the gut tissue itself. Melittin expressing yeast did kill protozoa in the termite gut within 56 days of exposure. The expressed Melittin weakened the gut but did not add a synergistic effect to the protozoacidal action by gut necrosis. While Melittin could be applied for termite control via killing the cellulose-digesting protozoa in the termite gut, it is unlikely to be useful as a standalone product to control insects that do not rely on symbiotic protozoa for survival.

  7. Sequence analysis of the inversion region containing the pilin genes of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulks, K A; Marrs, C F; Stevens, S P; Green, M R

    1990-01-01

    Moraxella bovis EPP63 is able to produce two antigenically distinct pili called Q and I pili (previously called beta and alpha pili). Hybridization studies have shown that the transition between the types is due to inversion of a 2.1-kilobase segment of chromosomal DNA. We present the sequence of a 4.1-kilobase region of cloned DNA spanning the entire inversion region in orientation 1 (Q pilin expressed). Comparison of this sequence with the sequence of the polymerase chain reaction-amplified genomic DNA from orientation 2 (I pilin expressed) allows the site-specific region of recombination to be localized to a 26-base-pair region in which sequence similarity to the left inverted repeat of the Salmonella typhimurium hin system was previously noted. In addition, 50% sequence similarity was seen in a 60-base-pair segment of our sequence to the recombinational enhancer of bacteriophage P1, an inversion system related to the hin system of S. typhimurium. Finally, two open reading frames representing potential genes were identified.

  8. Transcriptional analysis of the 5'-noncoding region of the human involucrin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Bayghen, E; Vega, A; Cadena, A; Granados, S E; Jave, L F; Gariglio, P; Alvarez-Salas, L M

    1996-01-01

    Human involucrin whose gene transcription is directed by a 2456-nucleotide (nt) 5'-noncoding region is a structural component of the epithelial cornified layer. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that this region is transcriptionally active in multiplying keratinocytes and is enhanced by 2 mM CaCl2 treatment. Calcium-independent transcriptional activity and the interaction with the AP-1 transcriptional factor was located on the proximal part (nt -159 to -1) of the 5'-noncoding region. However, CaCl2 responsiveness was mapped to a distal 1185-nt fragment (nt -2456 to -1272). Moreover, this fragment potentiated the Herpes simplex thymidine kinase promoter in normal keratinocytes and is responsive to calcium treatment in a cell type-specific manner. Interestingly, the absence of a 491-nt fragment located between the two enhancer domains (nt -651 to -160) resulted in transcriptional activation in multiplying keratinocytes. This fragment interacts with AP-1 and the YY1 transcriptional silencer. It is concluded that human involucrin 5'-noncoding region contains at least three regulatory domains, a distal CaCl2-responsive enhancer, a putative transcriptional silencer (that interacts with AP-1 and YY1), and a proximal enhancer/promoter (that interacts with AP-1). Thus, this study demonstrates the presence of particular transcriptional factors can potentially regulate the human involucrin expression.

  9. Characterization and lytic activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens phages from sewage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananthi Radhakrishnan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens phages from sewage were tested against P. fluorescens isolates of soil and sewage. The phages were characterized as to host range, morphology, structural proteins and genome fingerprint. Of the seven phages isolated, one was found to be abundant in sewage (5.9×10(7 pfu/mL, having broad host range, and distinct protein and DNA profile when compared to the other six phages. DNA restriction and protein profiles of the phages and their morphology indicate the diversity in the sewage environment. None of the isolates from the rhizosphere regions of various cultivated soils were susceptible to phages isolated from sewage.

  10. Analysis of carbon source-regulated gene expression by the upstream region of the Candida tropicalis malate synthase gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, K; Atomi, H; Izuta, M; Kanai, T; Takeshita, S; Ueda, M; Tanaka, A

    1997-01-03

    We investigated the regulation of expression of a gene encoding malate synthase (MS) of an n-alkane-utilizable yeast Candida tropicalis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where its expression is highly induced by acetate. By comparing levels of gene expression in cells grown on glucose, acetate, lactate, and oleic acid, we found that the increase in gene expression was due to a glucose repression-derepression mechanism. In order to obtain information concerning the regulation of the gene expression, a fusion gene which consists of the 5'-upstream region of MS-2 (UPR-MS-2) and the lacZ gene (encoding Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase), was introduced into S. cerevisiae, and beta-galactosidase activities were measured with cells grown on glucose or acetate. Deletion analysis of UPR-MS-2 revealed that the region between -777 and -448 (against the translation initiation codon) enhanced the level of gene expression in both glucose- and acetate-grown cells. In this region, sequences which resemble binding sites of Rap1p/Grf1p/Tufp, a global transcription activator, were found at seven locations and one was found for another pleiotropic activator Abf1p. The result also suggested the presence of multiple upstream repression sequences (URSs), which function specifically in glucose-grown cells, in the region between -368 and -126. In the repressing region, there were three tandem C(A/T)CTCCC sequences and also a putative binding site of Mig1p, a transcriptional repressor which mediates glucose repression of several other genes. When MIG1 gene of S. cerevisiae was disrupted, the expression of the UPR-MS-2-lacZ gene in glucose-grown cells increased approx. 10-fold. Furthermore, the effect of deletion of a putative Mig1p binding site was abolished in the MIG1-disrupted strain, suggesting Mig1p binds to this site and brings about glucose repression. When the SNF1 gene was disrupted, the high level gene expression observed in acetate-grown cells bearing UPR-MS-2 was

  11. Functional analysis of genes differentially expressed in the Drosophila wing disc: role of transcripts enriched in the wing region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas L; Cain, Donna; Paul, Litty; Justiniano, Steven; Alli, Anwar; Mullins, Jeremi S; Wang, Chun Ping; Butchar, Jon P; Simcox, Amanda

    2006-12-01

    Differential gene expression is the major mechanism underlying the development of specific body regions. Here we assessed the role of genes differentially expressed in the Drosophila wing imaginal disc, which gives rise to two distinct adult structures: the body wall and the wing. Reverse genetics was used to test the function of uncharacterized genes first identified in a microarray screen as having high levels of expression in the presumptive wing. Such genes could participate in elaborating the specific morphological characteristics of the wing. The activity of the genes was modulated using misexpression and RNAi-mediated silencing. Misexpression of eight of nine genes tested caused phenotypes. Of 12 genes tested, 10 showed effective silencing with RNAi transgenes, but only 3 of these had resulting phenotypes. The wing phenotypes resulting from RNAi suggest that CG8780 is involved in patterning the veins in the proximal region of the wing blade and that CG17278 and CG30069 are required for adhesion of wing surfaces. Venation and apposition of the wing surfaces are processes specific to wing development providing a correlation between the expression and function of these genes. The results show that a combination of expression profiling and tissue-specific gene silencing has the potential to identify new genes involved in wing development and hence to contribute to our understanding of this process. However, there are both technical and biological limitations to this approach, including the efficacy of RNAi and the role that gene redundancy may play in masking phenotypes.

  12. Cello-oligosaccharide oxidation reveals differences between two lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (family GH61) from Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bey, Mathieu; Zhou, Simeng; Poidevin, Laetitia; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Sigoillot, Jean-Claude

    2013-01-01

    The genome of the coprophilic ascomycete Podospora anserina encodes 33 different genes encoding copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) from glycoside hydrolase family 61 (GH61). In this study, two of these enzymes (P. anserina GH61A [PaGH61A] and PaGH61B), which both harbored a family 1 carbohydrate binding module, were successfully produced in Pichia pastoris. Synergistic cooperation between PaGH61A or PaGH61B with the cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus on cellulose resulted in the formation of oxidized and nonoxidized cello-oligosaccharides. A striking difference between PaGH61A and PaGH61B was observed through the identification of the products, among which were doubly and triply oxidized cellodextrins, which were released only by the combination of PaGH61B with CDH. The mass spectrometry fragmentation patterns of these oxidized products could be consistent with oxidation at the C-6 position with a geminal diol group. The different properties of PaGH61A and PaGH61B and their effect on the interaction with CDH are discussed in regard to the proposed in vivo function of the CDH/GH61 enzyme system in oxidative cellulose hydrolysis.

  13. In vitro design of a novel lytic bacteriophage cocktail with therapeutic potential against organisms causing diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, João J; Leandro, Clara; Mottola, Carla; Barbosa, Raquel; Silva, Filipa A; Oliveira, Manuela; Vilela, Cristina L; Melo-Cristino, José; Górski, Andrzej; Pimentel, Madalena; São-José, Carlos; Cavaco-Silva, Patrícia; Garcia, Miguel

    2014-08-01

    In patients with diabetes mellitus, foot infections pose a significant risk. These are complex infections commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, all of which are potentially susceptible to bacteriophages. Here, we characterized five bacteriophages that we had determined previously to have antimicrobial and wound-healing potential in chronic S. aureus, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii infections. Morphological and genetic features indicated that the bacteriophages were lytic members of the family Myoviridae or Podoviridae and did not harbour any known bacterial virulence genes. Combinations of the bacteriophages had broad host ranges for the different target bacterial species. The activity of the bacteriophages against planktonic cells revealed effective, early killing at 4 h, followed by bacterial regrowth to pre-treatment levels by 24 h. Using metabolic activity as a measure of cell viability within established biofilms, we found significant cell impairment following bacteriophage exposure. Repeated treatment every 4 h caused a further decrease in cell activity. The greatest effects on both planktonic and biofilm cells occurred at a bacteriophage : bacterium input multiplicity of 10. These studies on both planktonic cells and established biofilms allowed us to better evaluate the effects of a high input multiplicity and a multiple-dose treatment protocol, and the findings support further clinical development of bacteriophage therapy. © 2014 The Authors.

  14. Differential Expression of FosB Proteins and Potential Target Genes in Select Brain Regions of Addiction and Depression Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gajewski, Paula A.; Turecki, Gustavo; Robison, Alfred J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to stress or drugs of abuse has been linked to altered gene expression throughout the body, and changes in gene expression in discrete brain regions are thought to underlie many psychiatric diseases, including major depressive disorder and drug addiction. Preclinical models of these disorders have provided evidence for mechanisms of this altered gene expression, including transcription factors, but evidence supporting a role for these factors in human patients has been slow t...

  15. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  16. Identification of T1D susceptibility genes within the MHC region by combining protein interaction networks and SNP genotyping data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsson, C.; Hansen, Niclas Tue; Hansen, Kasper Lage;

    2009-01-01

    region were analysed in 1000 affected offspring trios generated by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC). The most associated SNP in each gene was chosen and genes were mapped to ppi networks for identification of interaction partners. The association testing and resulting interacting protein...

  17. Gene Expression in Archaea: Studies of Transcriptional Promoters, Messenger RNA Processing, and Five Prime Untranslated Regions in "Methanocaldococcus Jannashchii"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Gene expression in Archaea is less understood than those in Bacteria and Eucarya. In general, three steps are involved in gene expression--transcription, RNA processing, and translation. To expand our knowledge of these processes in Archaea, I have studied transcriptional promoters, messenger RNA processing, and 5'-untranslated regions in…

  18. Extensive families of constant region genes in a phylogenetically primitive vertebrate indicate an additional level of immunoglobulin complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubu, F; Hinds, K; Litman, R; Shamblott, M J; Litman, G W

    1987-01-01

    A homologous probe for the constant region of the Heterodontus francisci (horned shark) immunoglobulin heavy chain was used to screen a genomic DNA library constructed in bacteriophage lambda, and a large number of independent clones were recovered. Their hybridization patterns with segment-specific probes are consistent with the close linkage of heavy-chain constant (CH), joining (JH), and variable (VH) gene segments. Differences in the nucleotide sequences of the first CH exon of five genes primarily are localized to 5' positions; extended regions of sequence identity are noted at 3' positions. The predicted amino acid sequences of each gene are different and are related distantly to the corresponding regions of higher vertebrate immunoglobulins. Gene-specific oligodeoxynucleotide probes were used to establish that at least three of the five genes are transcriptionally active. Quantitative gene titration data are consistent with the large numbers of genes suggested by the library screening analyses. In this representative early vertebrate, it appears that (VH-diversity-JH) segments are associated with individual constant region genes that can differ at the predicted protein level. Images PMID:3475706

  19. TLR9 gene region polymorphisms and susceptibility to tuberculosis in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graustein, A D; Horne, D J; Arentz, M; Bang, N D; Chau, T T H; Thwaites, G E; Caws, M; Thuong, N T T; Dunstan, S J; Hawn, T R

    2015-03-01

    Humans exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) show variation in susceptibility to infection and differences in tuberculosis (TB) disease outcome. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) is a pattern recognition receptor that mediates recognition of Mtb and modulates Mtb-specific T-cell responses. Using a case-population design, we evaluated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the TLR9 gene region are associated with susceptibility to pulmonary or meningeal TB as well as neurologic presentation and mortality in the meningeal TB group. In a discovery cohort (n = 352 cases, 382 controls), three SNPs were associated with TB (all forms, p meningeal tuberculosis (dominant model; p = 0.0002, OR 2.36, CI 1.43-3.87) while rs352143 was associated with pulmonary tuberculosis (recessive model; p = 0.006, OR 5.3, CI 1.26-31.13). None of the SNPs were associated with mortality. This is the first demonstration of an association between a TLR9 gene region SNP and tuberculous meningitis. In addition, this extends previous findings that support associations of TLR9 SNPs with pulmonary tuberculosis.

  20. Conserved gene arrangement in the origin region of the Streptomyces coelicolor chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, M J; Schmidt, F J

    1992-01-01

    A 23-kb fragment of the Streptomyces coelicolor chromosome spanning the dnaA region has been isolated as a cosmid clone. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 5-kb portion shows that the genes for the RNase P protein (rnpA), ribosomal protein L34 (rpmH), the replication initiator protein (dnaA), and the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III (dnaN) are present in the highly conserved gene arrangement found in all eubacterial genomes studied so far. The dnaA-dnaN intergenic region is approximately 1 kb and contains a cluster of at least 12 DnaA boxes with a consensus sequence of TTGTCCACA matching the consensus DnaA box in the phylogenetically related Micrococcus luteus. Two DnaA boxes precede the dnaA sequence. We propose that the chromosomal origin (oriC) of S. coelicolor lies between dnaA and dnaN. In related work, J. Zakrzewska-Czerwinska and H. Schrempf (J. Bacteriol. 174:2688-2693, 1992) have identified the homologous sequence from the closely-related Streptomyces lividans as capable of self-replication. PMID:1577691

  1. Characterisation of the promoter region of the human DNA-repair gene Rad51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbach, L; Haase, S; Fischer, D; Kolberg, H C; Stürzbecher, H W

    2005-01-01

    Regulatory elements of the 5'-flanking region of the DNA-repair gene Rad51 were analysed to characterise pathological alterations of Rad51 mRNA expression during tumour development. Various fragments of the Rad51 promoter were cloned into the pGL3 reporter vector and the respective promoter activity was determined by luciferase assays in transfected U2-OS cells. Transcription factor binding was identified using Protein/DNA arrays. The region encompassing base pairs -204 to -58 was identified as crucial for Rad51 gene transcription. Down regulator sequences are present upstream (-305 to -204) and downstream (-48 and +204) of this core promoter element. Promoter activity is significantly enhanced by substituting G at the polymorphic positions +135 and +172 for C and T, respectively. Transcription factors Ets1/PEA3, E2F1, p53, EGR1, and Stat5 were identified as relevant for regulating expression of Rad51. We identified three separate cis-sequence elements within the Rad51 transcriptional promoter, one ensuring basal levels of expression and two elements limiting expression to relatively low levels. The characterisation of transcription factor binding might help to explain high-level expression of Rad51 in a variety of solid tumours. The polymorphic sites appear important for the increased risk of breast and/or ovarian cancer for BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  2. The genetic polymorphism ofPlasmodium vivax genes in endemic regions of Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Varakorn Kosaisavee; Ian Hastings; Alister Craig; Usa Lek-Uthai

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the genetic polymorphism ofPlasmodium vivax (P. vivax)PvCSP andPvMSP1 genes from field isolates at four endemic regions (North, East, West and South) of Thailand.Methods:The152P. vivax infected cases from dried blood spots wereDNA extracted and confirmed by species-specific primer sets using multiplexPCR method.PvMSP1 fragments F2 andF3; PvCSPwere genotyped usingRFLP-PCR method.Results: Totally amplified DNA which was multiple genotypes for PvMSP1 F2 andPvMSP1 F3 were12.50% and8.55%, respectively while PvCSP was3.95%. The overall frequency of multiple genotypes was25%. There were 12 allele types ofPvMSP1 F2 using AluI enzyme digestion and 8 size variations were found in PvMSP1 F3. The isolates from western region was highly genetic diverse when compare among all isolates. The predominant variant type of PvCSP gene wasVK210 type.Conclusions:The multiple genotypes are common found in Thailand and it might hide the real genotype.PvCSP does not have extensive genetic diversity in this study. However, PvMSP1marker due to multiple genotypes is difficult to be analyzed. The multiple genotypes findings might stem from population migration and vector species findings.

  3. PCR-based panel for regional localization of genes on chromosome 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDaniel, L.D.; Zhang, B.; Schultz, R.A. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (United States)

    1994-09-01

    As the number of genes mapped to specific human chromosomes continues to increase, the feasibility of identifying the gene involved in a human genetic disease via a `candidate gene` approach will continue to improve. Although fluorescence in situ hybridization offers one approach to achieve refined mapping, results are dependent on the size of the probe used, which is not optimal for cDNAs or ESTs. In contrast, a PCR-based approach can achieve mapping for clones <100 bp in size. Through the use of a previously described deletion of chromosome 15 and the 15/17 translocation common to acute promyelocytic leukemia, we have assembled a small panel of somatic cell hybrids that can be used to assign probes to the regions 15p-q15, 15q15-q22, and 15q22-ter. Primers specific for unique cDNA sequences were used to amplify genomic DNA through the polymerase chain reaction. With this approach, we have assigned hexosaminidase A and aggrecan1 to 15q22-qter and leukocyte tyrosine kinase to 15q15-22.

  4. Prioritization of candidate genes in "QTL-hotspot" region for drought tolerance in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Sandip M; Jaganathan, Deepa; Ruperao, Pradeep; Chen, Charles; Punna, Ramu; Kudapa, Himabindu; Thudi, Mahendar; Roorkiwal, Manish; Katta, Mohan A V S K; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Garg, Vanika; Kishor, P B Kavi; Gaur, Pooran M; Nguyen, Henry T; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Sutton, Tim; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2015-10-19

    A combination of two approaches, namely QTL analysis and gene enrichment analysis were used to identify candidate genes in the "QTL-hotspot" region for drought tolerance present on the Ca4 pseudomolecule in chickpea. In the first approach, a high-density bin map was developed using 53,223 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the recombinant inbred line (RIL) population of ICC 4958 (drought tolerant) and ICC 1882 (drought sensitive) cross. QTL analysis using recombination bins as markers along with the phenotyping data for 17 drought tolerance related traits obtained over 1-5 seasons and 1-5 locations split the "QTL-hotspot" region into two subregions namely "QTL-hotspot_a" (15 genes) and "QTL-hotspot_b" (11 genes). In the second approach, gene enrichment analysis using significant marker trait associations based on SNPs from the Ca4 pseudomolecule with the above mentioned phenotyping data, and the candidate genes from the refined "QTL-hotspot" region showed enrichment for 23 genes. Twelve genes were found common in both approaches. Functional validation using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) indicated four promising candidate genes having functional implications on the effect of "QTL-hotspot" for drought tolerance in chickpea.

  5. A synthetic luciferin improves in vivo bioluminescence imaging of gene expression in cardiovascular brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyan, Hayk; Hurr, Chansol; Young, Colin N

    2016-10-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is an effective tool for in vivo investigation of molecular processes. We have demonstrated the applicability of bioluminescence imaging to spatiotemporally monitor gene expression in cardioregulatory brain nuclei during the development of cardiovascular disease, via incorporation of firefly luciferase into living animals, combined with exogenous d-luciferin substrate administration. Nevertheless, d-luciferin uptake into the brain tissue is low, which decreases the sensitivity of bioluminescence detection, particularly when considering small changes in gene expression in tiny central areas. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a synthetic luciferin, cyclic alkylaminoluciferin (CycLuc1), would be superior to d-luciferin for in vivo bioluminescence imaging in cardiovascular brain regions. Male C57B1/6 mice underwent targeted delivery of an adenovirus encoding the luciferase gene downstream of the CMV promoter to the subfornical organ (SFO) or paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus (PVN), two crucial cardioregulatory neural regions. While bioluminescent signals could be obtained following d-luciferin injection (150 mg/kg), CycLuc1 administration resulted in a three- to fourfold greater bioluminescent emission from the SFO and PVN, at 10- to 20-fold lower substrate concentrations (7.5-15 mg/kg). This CycLuc1-mediated enhancement in bioluminescent emission was evident early following substrate administration (i.e., 6-10 min) and persisted for up to 1 h. When the exposure time was reduced from 60 s to 1,500 ms, minimal signal in the PVN was detectable with d-luciferin, whereas bioluminescent images could be reliably captured with CycLuc1. These findings demonstrate that bioluminescent imaging with the synthetic luciferin CycLuc1 provides an improved physiological genomics tool to investigate molecular events in discrete cardioregulatory brain nuclei.

  6. [Analysis of the structure and expression of the cluster of Drosophila melanogaster genes DIP1, CG32500, CG32819, and CG14476 in the flamenco gene region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapova, M V; Nefedova, L N; Kim, A I

    2009-10-01

    The flamenco gene controlling transpositions of the gypsy retrovirus is localized in the 20A1-3 region, in which eight open reading frames organized in a cluster were discovered: DIP1, three repeats of CG32500 and CG32819, and CG14476. Analysis of the genes composing the cluster indicates that their transcription in Drosophila melanogaster is a stage-specific process. Comparison of the expression of these genes in the strains OreR, SS, and MS having the flamenco phenotype and in the strain 413 having the flamenco+ phenotype revealed differences only for the DIP1 gene, transcription of this gene being altered only in the OreR strain. Thus, mutant flamenco alleles are differently expressed in different strains. The structural organization of the flamenco gene region was studied in different Drosophila species: D. sechellia, D. simulans, D. mauritiana, D. yakuba, D. erecta, D. virilis, D. ananassae, D. grimshawi, and D. pseudoobscura. The genes of the cluster were found to be highly conserved in genomes of different species, but in none of them, except D. sechellia, the structural organization of the region repeats the structure of the D. melanogaster cluster.

  7. Gene expression profiling in C57BL/6J and A/J mouse inbred strains reveals gene networks specific for brain regions independent of genetic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvath Steve

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed gene expression profiling of the amygdala and hippocampus taken from inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J and A/J. The selected brain areas are implicated in neurobehavioral traits while these mouse strains are known to differ widely in behavior. Consequently, we hypothesized that comparing gene expression profiles for specific brain regions in these strains might provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of human neuropsychiatric traits. We performed a whole-genome gene expression experiment and applied a systems biology approach using weighted gene co-expression network analysis. Results We were able to identify modules of co-expressed genes that distinguish a strain or brain region. Analysis of the networks that are most informative for hippocampus and amygdala revealed enrichment in neurologically, genetically and psychologically related pathways. Close examination of the strain-specific gene expression profiles, however, revealed no functional relevance but a significant enrichment of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the probe sequences used for array hybridization. This artifact was not observed for the modules of co-expressed genes that distinguish amygdala and hippocampus. Conclusions The brain-region specific modules were found to be independent of genetic background and are therefore likely to represent biologically relevant molecular networks that can be studied to complement our knowledge about pathways in neuropsychiatric disease.

  8. [Sequence characterization of the 5'-Flanking region of the GHR gene in Tibetan sheep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhi-Jie; Wei, Ya-Ping; Zhong, Jin-Cheng; Chen, Zhi-Hua; Lu, Hong; Tong, Zi-Bao

    2007-08-01

    The 5'-Flanking sequence (including the P1 promotor and exon 1A) of the GHR gene in Oura-type Tibetan sheep (O. aries) was cloned by T-A method and sequenced (GenBank accession No. EF116490). Characterization and comparison of this sequence with mouflons (O. musimon), goat (C. hircus), cattle (B. taurus) and European bison (B. bonasus) orthologues were also conducted. Results showed that: 1) The 5'-flanking region contained many potential transcriptional factor binding sites such as those for C/EBPb, C/EBP, SP1, Cap, USF, HFH-2, HNF-3b, and Oct-1, which might have an important effect on transcription activation and regulation as well as tissue-specific expression. The rate of repetitive sequences was 2.55% and no SINEs, LINEs, LTR anti-transcription elements or DNA transposon elements were found, although one (TG)11 microsatellite was found. 2) In the P1 promotor region, sequence homology between the Tibetan sheep and mouflon, goat, cattle and European bison was 99.7%, 94.2%, 85.9% and 86.5%, respectively, while that for exon 1A was 99.0%, 97.0%, 92.7% and 94.6%, respectively. 3) The molecular phylogenetic tree among these species, constructed by the neighborhood joining method based on the sequences of no-coding region of the GHR genes, placed the two Bovinae species on one branch and the three Caprinae species on the other. Tibetan sheep and mouflons were joined first, followed by the goat, and then the Bovinae species, including the cattle and European bison. This result of phylogenetic clustering was not only identical to the taxonomy, but also to the phylogenetic clustering using the mitochondrial DNA of these species.

  9. Inter-ethnic polymorphism of the beta-globin gene locus control region (LCR) in sickle-cell anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périchon, B; Ragusa, A; Lapouméroulie, C; Romand, A; Moi, P; Ikuta, T; Labie, D; Elion, J; Krishnamoorthy, R

    1993-06-01

    Sequence polymorphisms within the 5'HS2 segment of human locus control region is described among sickle cell anemia patients. Distinct polymorphic patterns of a simple sequence repeat are observed in strong linkage disequilibrium with each of the five major beta s haplotypes. Potential functional relevance of this polymorphic region in globin gene expression is discussed.

  10. The preferential codon usages in variable and constant regions of immunoglobulin genes are quite distinct from each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, T; Hayashida, H; Yasunaga, T; Hasegawa, M

    1979-12-20

    The pattern of codon utilization in the variable and constant regions of immunoglobulin genes are compared. It is shown that, in these regions, codon utilizations are quite distinct from one another: For most degenerate codons, there is a selective bias that prefers C and/or G ending codons to U and/or A ending codons in the constant region compared with the bias in the variable region. This would strongly suggest that, in immunoglobulin genes, the bias in code word usage is determined by other factors than those concerning with the translational mechanism such as tRNA availability and codon-anticodon interaction. A possibility is also suggested that this differance of code word usage between them is due to the existence of secondary structure in the constant region but not in the variable region.

  11. Identification and genetic mapping of a homeobox gene to the 4p16. 1 region of human chromosome 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, H.S.; Padanilam, B.J.; Solursh, M. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)); Buetow, K. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Murray, J.C. (Univ. of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City (United States))

    1992-12-01

    A human craniofacial cDNA library was screened with a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on the conserved third helix of homeobox genes. From this screening, we identified a homeobox gene, H6, which shared only 57-65% amino acid identity to previously reported homeodomains. H6 was physically mapped to the 4P16.1 region by using somatic cell hybrids containing specific deletions of human chromosome 4. Linkage data from a single-stranded conformational polymorphism derived from the 3[prime] untranslated region of the H6 cDNA placed this homeobox gene more than 20 centimorgans proximal of the previously mapped HOX7 gene on chromosome 4. Identity comparisons of the H6 Homeodomain with previously reported homeodomains reveal the highest identities to be with the Nk class of homeobox genes in Drosophila melanogaster. 53 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Identification and genetic mapping of a homeobox gene to the 4p16.1 region of human chromosome 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, H S; Padanilam, B J; Buetow, K; Murray, J C; Solursh, M

    1992-12-01

    A human craniofacial cDNA library was screened with a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on the conserved third helix of homeobox genes. From this screening, we identified a homeobox gene, H6, which shared only 57-65% amino acid identity to previously reported homeodomains. H6 was physically mapped to the 4p16.1 region by using somatic cell hybrids containing specific deletions of human chromosome 4. Linkage data from a single-stranded conformational polymorphism derived from the 3' untranslated region of the H6 cDNA placed this homeobox gene more than 20 centimorgans proximal of the previously mapped HOX7 gene on chromosome 4. Identity comparisons of the H6 homeodomain with previously reported homeodomains reveal the highest identities to be with the Nk class of homeobox genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

  13. A group of Giardia lamblia variant-specific surface protein (VSP) genes with nearly identical 5' regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Adam, R D

    1995-12-01

    The surfaces of Giardia lamblia trophozoites contain one of a set of variant-specific surface proteins. The genes encoding these proteins are highly conserved at the 3' terminus, but frequently demonstrate little similarity in the remainder of the coding region. This report describes a family of vsp genes highly similar to a repeat-containing vsp gene (vspC5) at the 5' coding and flanking regions, but which diverge abruptly from vspC5 in the first repeat and do not themselves contain full copies of the repeat. This observation suggests the possibility that recombination among different vsp genes may have played a role in development of the vsp gene repertoire.

  14. Human lambda light-chain constant region gene CMor lambda: the primary structure of lambda VI Bence Jones protein Mor.

    OpenAIRE

    Frangione, B.; Moloshok, T; Prelli, F; Solomon, A

    1985-01-01

    Serologic, structural, and genetic analyses have shown that the constant (C) region of human kappa light chains is encoded by a single gene, whereas that of lambda chains is encoded by multiple genes. We have determined the complete C region amino acid sequence of two monoclonal lambda VI light chains, Bence Jones proteins Sut and Mor. The C region of lambda chains Sut and Mor consists of 105 residues, as is characteristic for human lambda light chains, of which 102 are identical in sequence....

  15. High diversity due to balancing selection in the promoter region of the Medea gene in Arabidopsis lyrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Akira; Fujimoto, Ryo; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2007-11-06

    Molecular imprinting is the differential expression and/or silencing of alleles according to their parent of origin [1, 2]. Conflicts between parents, or parents and offspring, should cause "arms races," with accelerated evolution of the genes involved in imprinting. This should be detectable in the evolution of imprinting genes' protein sequences and in the promoter regions of imprinted genes. Previous studies, however, found no evidence of more amino acid substitutions in imprinting genes [1, 3]. We have analyzed sequence diversity of the Arabidopsis lyrata Medea (MEA) gene and divergence from the A. thaliana sequence, including the first study of the promoter region. In A. thaliana, MEA is imprinted, with paternal alleles silenced in endosperm cells [4, 5], and also functions in the imprinting machinery [4, 6]; MEA protein binding at the MEA promoter region indicates self-regulated imprinting [7-9]. We find the same paternal MEA allele silencing in A. lyrata endosperm but no evidence for adaptive evolution in the coding region, whereas the 5' flanking region displays high diversity, with distinct haplotypes, suggesting balancing selection in the promoter region.

  16. Influenza NA and PB1 Gene Segments Interact during the Formation of Viral Progeny: Localization of the Binding Region within the PB1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Gilbertson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The influenza A virus genome comprises eight negative-sense viral RNAs (vRNAs that form individual ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes. In order to incorporate a complete set of each of these vRNAs, the virus uses a selective packaging mechanism that facilitates co-packaging of specific gene segments but whose molecular basis is still not fully understood. Recently, we used a competitive transfection model where plasmids encoding the A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8 and A/Udorn/307/72 (Udorn PB1 gene segments were competed to show that the Udorn PB1 gene segment is preferentially co-packaged into progeny virions with the Udorn NA gene segment. Here we created chimeric PB1 genes combining both Udorn and PR8 PB1 sequences to further define the location within the Udorn PB1 gene that drives co-segregation of these genes and show that nucleotides 1776–2070 of the PB1 gene are crucial for preferential selection. In vitro assays examining specific interactions between Udorn NA vRNA and purified vRNAs transcribed from chimeric PB1 genes also supported the importance of this region in the PB1-NA interaction. Hence, this work identifies an association between viral genes that are co-selected during packaging. It also reveals a region potentially important in the RNP-RNP interactions within the supramolecular complex that is predicted to form prior to budding to allow one of each segment to be packaged in the viral progeny. Our study lays the foundation to understand the co-selection of specific genes, which may be critical to the emergence of new viruses with pandemic potential.

  17. Localizing F(ST) outliers on a QTL map reveals evidence for large genomic regions of reduced gene exchange during speciation-with-gene-flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Sara; Conte, Gina; Mason-Foley, Casey; Mills, Kelly

    2012-11-01

    Populations that maintain phenotypic divergence in sympatry typically show a mosaic pattern of genomic divergence, requiring a corresponding mosaic of genomic isolation (reduced gene flow). However, mechanisms that could produce the genomic isolation required for divergence-with-gene-flow have barely been explored, apart from the traditional localized effects of selection and reduced recombination near centromeres or inversions. By localizing F(ST) outliers from a genome scan of wild pea aphid host races on a Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) map of key traits, we test the hypothesis that between-population recombination and gene exchange are reduced over large 'divergence hitchhiking' (DH) regions. As expected under divergence hitchhiking, our map confirms that QTL and divergent markers cluster together in multiple large genomic regions. Under divergence hitchhiking, the nonoutlier markers within these regions should show signs of reduced gene exchange relative to nonoutlier markers in genomic regions where ongoing gene flow is expected. We use this predicted difference among nonoutliers to perform a critical test of divergence hitchhiking. Results show that nonoutlier markers within clusters of F(ST) outliers and QTL resolve the genetic population structure of the two host races nearly as well as the outliers themselves, while nonoutliers outside DH regions reveal no population structure, as expected if they experience more gene flow. These results provide clear evidence for divergence hitchhiking, a mechanism that may dramatically facilitate the process of speciation-with-gene-flow. They also show the power of integrating genome scans with genetic analyses of the phenotypic traits involved in local adaptation and population divergence. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Transcription map of the early region of the Streptomyces bacteriophage phi C31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, C J; Smith, M C

    1992-12-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), lysogenised by the temperature-sensitive cts1 mutant of phi C31, can be synchronously induced into the lytic cycle by heat treatment. A transcription map of 10 kb of the phi C31 early gene cluster was deduced using low-resolution S1 nuclease mapping of RNA prepared 10 min after induction. At least nine early transcripts, early (e)RNAs 1-9, were localised reading exclusively rightwards with respect to the standard physical map of phi C31. The mRNAs were extensively overlapping, frequently initiating at the same place but terminating at different sites, and vice versa. Gene expression during the lytic cycle was tightly regulated; no transcription was observed before induction. Transcription was maximal at 10 min post-induction, and at 20 min, eRNAs 5 and 6 persisted whilst eRNAs 7-9 were severely reduced or absent. The pattern of transcription of the early region is consistent with the simultaneous activation of a large number of promoters and differential termination efficiency.

  19. RISSC: a novel database for ribosomal 16S-23S RNA genes spacer regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, J; Bescós, I; Rodríguez-Sala, J J; Rodríguez-Valera, F

    2001-01-01

    A novel database, under the acronym RISSC (Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Sequence Collection), has been created. It compiles more than 1600 entries of edited DNA sequence data from the 16S-23S ribosomal spacers present in most prokaryotes and organelles (e.g. mitochondria and chloroplasts) and is accessible through the Internet (http://ulises.umh.es/RISSC), where systematic searches for specific words can be conducted, as well as BLAST-type sequence searches. Additionally, a characteristic feature of this region, the presence/absence and nature of tRNA genes within the spacer, is included in all the entries, even when not previously indicated in the original database. All these combined features could provide a useful documentation tool for studies on evolution, identification, typing and strain characterization, among others.

  20. Role of Interleukin-10 Gene Promoter Region Polymorphism in the Development of Chronic Lymphoid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsepyan, V A; Gabdulkhakova, A Kh; Shubenkiva, A A; Zotina, E N

    2015-12-01

    Relationship between interleukin-10 (IL-10) gene G-1082A (rs1800896) polymorphism and the risk of development and stages of chronic lymphoid leukemia is studied in ethnic Russian residents of the Kirov region of Russia. Associations of allele -1082A and genotypes (-1082AA/-1082AG) with the risk of chronic lymphoid leukemia are detected (OR=1.39, 95%CI=1.09-1.78 and OR=1.66, 95%CI=1.09-2.54, respectively). In addition, association of 1082AA genotype with late stages of the disease by the moment of diagnosis is detected. These data indicate that IL-10 polymorphism G-1082A may be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic lymphoid leukemia.

  1. Comparative analysis of chicken chromosome 28 provides new clues to the evolutionary fragility of gene-rich vertebrate regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Laurie; Yang, Shan; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Baggott, Dan; Christensen, Mari; Hamilton, Aaron; Crooijmans, Richard; Groenen, Martien; Lucas, Susan; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Stubbs, Lisa

    2007-11-01

    The chicken genome draft sequence has provided a valuable resource for studies of an important agricultural and experimental model species and an important data set for comparative analysis. However, some of the most gene-rich segments are missing from chicken genome draft assemblies, limiting the analysis of a substantial number of genes and preventing a closer look at regions that are especially prone to syntenic rearrangements. To facilitate the functional and evolutionary analysis of one especially gene-rich, rearrangement-prone genomic region, we analyzed sequence from BAC clones spanning chicken microchromosome GGA28; as a complement we also analyzed a gene-sparse, stable region from GGA11. In these two regions we documented the conservation and lineage-specific gain and loss of protein-coding genes and precisely mapped the locations of 31 major human-chicken syntenic breakpoints. Altogether, we identified 72 lineage-specific genes, many of which are found at or near syntenic breaks, implicating evolutionary breakpoint regions as major sites of genetic innovation and change. Twenty-two of the 31 breakpoint regions have been reused repeatedly as rearrangement breakpoints in vertebrate evolution. Compared with stable GC-matched regions, GGA28 is highly enriched in CpG islands, as are break-prone intervals identified elsewhere in the chicken genome; evolutionary breakpoints are further enriched in GC content and CpG islands, highlighting a potential role for these features in genome instability. These data support the hypothesis that chromosome rearrangements have not occurred randomly over the course of vertebrate evolution but are focused preferentially within "fragile" regions with unusual DNA sequence characteristics.

  2. Gene Map of the HLA Region, Graves' Disease and Hashimoto Thyroiditis, and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazuki, Takehiko; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Morishima, Satoko; Morishima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genomic region spanning about 4 Mb is the most gene dense and the polymorphic stretches in the human genome. A total of the 269 loci were identified, including 145 protein coding genes mostly important for immunity and 50 noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Biological function of these ncRNAs remains unknown, becoming hot spot in the studies of HLA-associated diseases. The genomic diversity analysis in the HLA region facilitated by next-generation sequencing will pave the way to molecular understanding of linkage disequilibrium structure, population diversity, histocompatibility in transplantation, and associations with autoimmune diseases. The 4-digit DNA genotyping of HLA for six HLA loci, HLA-A through DP, in the patients with Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) identified six susceptible and three resistant HLA alleles. Their epistatic interactions in controlling the development of these diseases are shown. Four susceptible and one resistant HLA alleles are shared by GD and HT. Two HLA alleles associated with GD or HT control the titers of autoantibodies to thyroid antigens. All these observations led us to propose a new model for the development of GD and HT. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from unrelated donor (UR-HSCT) provides a natural experiment to elucidate the role of allogenic HLA molecules in immune response. Large cohort studies using HLA allele and clinical outcome data have elucidated that (1) HLA locus, allele, and haplotype mismatches between donor and patient, (2) specific amino acid substitution at specific positions of HLA molecules, and (3) ethnic background are all responsible for the immunological events related to UR-HSCT including acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect, and graft failure.

  3. MicroRNA genes and their target 3'-untranslated regions are infrequently somatically mutated in ovarian cancers.

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    Georgina L Ryland

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are key regulators of gene expression and have been shown to have altered expression in a variety of cancer types, including epithelial ovarian cancer. MiRNA function is most often achieved through binding to the 3'-untranslated region of the target protein coding gene. Mutation screening using massively-parallel sequencing of 712 miRNA genes in 86 ovarian cancer cases identified only 5 mutated miRNA genes, each in a different case. One mutation was located in the mature miRNA, and three mutations were predicted to alter the secondary structure of the miRNA transcript. Screening of the 3'-untranslated region of 18 candidate cancer genes identified one mutation in each of AKT2, EGFR, ERRB2 and CTNNB1. The functional effect of these mutations is unclear, as expression data available for AKT2 and EGFR showed no increase in gene transcript. Mutations in miRNA genes and 3'-untranslated regions are thus uncommon in ovarian cancer.

  4. MicroRNA genes and their target 3'-untranslated regions are infrequently somatically mutated in ovarian cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryland, Georgina L; Bearfoot, Jennifer L; Doyle, Maria A; Boyle, Samantha E; Choong, David Y H; Rowley, Simone M; Tothill, Richard W; Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs are key regulators of gene expression and have been shown to have altered expression in a variety of cancer types, including epithelial ovarian cancer. MiRNA function is most often achieved through binding to the 3'-untranslated region of the target protein coding gene. Mutation screening using massively-parallel sequencing of 712 miRNA genes in 86 ovarian cancer cases identified only 5 mutated miRNA genes, each in a different case. One mutation was located in the mature miRNA, and three mutations were predicted to alter the secondary structure of the miRNA transcript. Screening of the 3'-untranslated region of 18 candidate cancer genes identified one mutation in each of AKT2, EGFR, ERRB2 and CTNNB1. The functional effect of these mutations is unclear, as expression data available for AKT2 and EGFR showed no increase in gene transcript. Mutations in miRNA genes and 3'-untranslated regions are thus uncommon in ovarian cancer.

  5. MicroRNA Genes and Their Target 3′-Untranslated Regions Are Infrequently Somatically Mutated in Ovarian Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Maria A.; Boyle, Samantha E.; Choong, David Y. H.; Rowley, Simone M.; Tothill, Richard W.; Gorringe, Kylie L.; Campbell, Ian G.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs are key regulators of gene expression and have been shown to have altered expression in a variety of cancer types, including epithelial ovarian cancer. MiRNA function is most often achieved through binding to the 3′-untranslated region of the target protein coding gene. Mutation screening using massively-parallel sequencing of 712 miRNA genes in 86 ovarian cancer cases identified only 5 mutated miRNA genes, each in a different case. One mutation was located in the mature miRNA, and three mutations were predicted to alter the secondary structure of the miRNA transcript. Screening of the 3′-untranslated region of 18 candidate cancer genes identified one mutation in each of AKT2, EGFR, ERRB2 and CTNNB1. The functional effect of these mutations is unclear, as expression data available for AKT2 and EGFR showed no increase in gene transcript. Mutations in miRNA genes and 3′-untranslated regions are thus uncommon in ovarian cancer. PMID:22536442

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphism mining and nucleotide sequence analysis of Mx1 gene in exonic regions of Japanese quail

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    Diwesh Kumar Niraj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: An attempt has been made to study the Myxovirus resistant (Mx1 gene polymorphism in Japanese quail. Materials and Methods: In the present, investigation four fragments viz. Fragment I of 185 bp (Exon 3 region, Fragment II of 148 bp (Exon 5 region, Fragment III of 161 bp (Exon 7 region, and Fragment IV of 176 bp (Exon 13 region of Mx1 gene were amplified and screened for polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism technique in 170 Japanese quail birds. Results: Out of the four fragments, one fragment (Fragment II was found to be polymorphic. Remaining three fragments (Fragment I, III, and IV were found to be monomorphic which was confirmed by custom sequencing. Overall nucleotide sequence analysis of Mx1 gene of Japanese quail showed 100% homology with common quail and more than 80% homology with reported sequence of chicken breeds. Conclusion: The Mx1 gene is mostly conserved in Japanese quail. There is an urgent need of comprehensive analysis of other regions of Mx1 gene along with its possible association with the traits of economic importance in Japanese quail.

  7. Enrichment of short interspersed transposable elements to embryonic stem cell-specific hypomethylated gene regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramoto, Hiroki; Yagi, Shintaro; Hirabayashi, Keiji; Sato, Shinya; Ohgane, Jun; Tanaka, Satoshi; Shiota, Kunio

    2010-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have a distinctive epigenome, which includes their genome-wide DNA methylation modification status, as represented by the ESC-specific hypomethylation of tissue-dependent and differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs) of Pou5f1 and Nanog. Here, we conducted a genome-wide investigation of sequence characteristics associated with T-DMRs that were differentially methylated between ESCs and somatic cells, by focusing on transposable elements including short interspersed elements (SINEs), long interspersed elements (LINEs) and long terminal repeats (LTRs). We found that hypomethylated T-DMRs were predominantly present in SINE-rich/LINE-poor genomic loci. The enrichment for SINEs spread over 300 kb in cis and there existed SINE-rich genomic domains spreading continuously over 1 Mb, which contained multiple hypomethylated T-DMRs. The characterization of sequence information showed that the enriched SINEs were relatively CpG rich and belonged to specific subfamilies. A subset of the enriched SINEs were hypomethylated T-DMRs in ESCs at Dppa3 gene locus, although SINEs are overall methylated in both ESCs and the liver. In conclusion, we propose that SINE enrichment is the genomic property of regions harboring hypomethylated T-DMRs in ESCs, which is a novel aspect of the ESC-specific epigenomic information.

  8. Performance of genotype imputation for rare variants identified in exons and flanking regions of genes.

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    Li Li

    Full Text Available Genotype imputation has the potential to assess human genetic variation at a lower cost than assaying the variants using laboratory techniques. The performance of imputation for rare variants has not been comprehensively studied. We utilized 8865 human samples with high depth resequencing data for the exons and flanking regions of 202 genes and Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS data to characterize the performance of genotype imputation for rare variants. We evaluated reference sets ranging from 100 to 3713 subjects for imputing into samples typed for the Affymetrix (500K and 6.0 and Illumina 550K GWAS panels. The proportion of variants that could be well imputed (true r(2>0.7 with a reference panel of 3713 individuals was: 31% (Illumina 550K or 25% (Affymetrix 500K with MAF (Minor Allele Frequency less than or equal 0.001, 48% or 35% with 0.0010.05. The performance for common SNPs (MAF>0.05 within exons and flanking regions is comparable to imputation of more uniformly distributed SNPs. The performance for rare SNPs (0.01

  9. Analysis of Alzheimer's disease severity across brain regions by topological analysis of gene co-expression networks

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    Zhang Weixiong

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder involving variations in the transcriptome of many genes. AD does not affect all brain regions simultaneously. Identifying the differences among the affected regions may shed more light onto the disease progression. We developed a novel method involving the differential topology of gene coexpression networks to understand the association among affected regions and disease severity. Methods We analysed microarray data of four regions - entorhinal cortex (EC, hippocampus (HIP, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC and middle temporal gyrus (MTG from AD affected and normal subjects. A coexpression network was built for each region and the topological overlap between them was examined. Genes with zero topological overlap between two region-specific networks were used to characterise the differences between the two regions. Results and conclusion Results indicate that MTG shows early AD pathology compared to the other regions. We postulate that if the MTG gets affected later in the disease, post-mortem analyses of individuals with end-stage AD will show signs of early AD in the MTG, while the EC, HIP and PCC will have severe pathology. Such knowledge is useful for data collection in clinical studies where sample selection is a limiting factor as well as highlighting the underlying biology of disease progression.

  10. Characterization of promoter region and genomic structure of the murine and human genes encoding Src like adapter protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratchmarova, I; Sosinowski, T; Weiss, A; Witter, K; Vincenz, C; Pandey, A

    2001-01-10

    Src-like adapter protein (SLAP) was identified as a signaling molecule in a yeast two-hybrid system using the cytoplasmic domain of EphA2, a receptor protein tyrosine kinase (Pandey et al., 1995. Characterization of a novel Src-like adapter protein that associates with the Eck receptor tyrosine kinase. J. Biol. Chem. 270, 19201-19204). It is very similar to members of the Src family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases in that it contains very homologous SH3 and SH2 domains (Abram and Courtneidge, 2000. Src family tyrosine kinases and growth factor signaling. Exp. Cell. Res. 254, 1-13.). However, instead of a kinase domain at the C-terminus, it contains a unique C-terminal region. In order to exclude the possibility that an alternative form exists, we have isolated genomic clones containing the murine Slap gene as well as the human SLA gene. The coding regions of murine Slap and human SLA genes contain seven exons and six introns. Absence of any kinase domain in the genomic region confirm its designation as an adapter protein. Additionally, we have cloned and sequenced approximately 2.6 kb of the region 5' to the initiator methionine of the murine Slap gene. When subcloned upstream of a luciferase gene, this fragment increased the transcriptional activity about 6-fold in a human Jurkat T cell line and approximately 52-fold in a murine T cell line indicating that this region contains promoter elements that dictate SLAP expression. We have also cloned the promoter region of the human SLA gene. Since SLAP is transcriptionally regulated by retinoic acid and by activation of B cells, the cloning of its promoter region will permit a detailed analysis of the elements required for its transcriptional regulation.

  11. Insertion of part of an intron into the 5[prime] untranslated region of a Caenorhabditis elegans gene converts it into a trans-spliced gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, R.; Thomas, J.; Spieth, J.; Blumenthal, T. (Indiana University, Bloomington (United States))

    1991-04-01

    In nematodes, the RNA products of some genes are trans-spliced to a 22-nucleotide spliced leader (SL), while the RNA products of other genes are not. In Caenorhabditis elegans, there are two SLs, Sl1 and SL2, donated by two distinct small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles in a process functionally quite similar to nuclear intron removal. The authors demonstrate here that it is possible to convert a non-trans-spliced gene into a trans-spliced gene by placement of an intron missing only the 5[prime] splice site into the 5[prime] untranslated region. Stable transgenic strains were isolated expressing a gene in which 69 nucleotides of a vit-5 intron, including the 3[prime] splice site, were inserted into the 5[prime] untranslated region of a vit-2/vit-6 fusion gene. The RNA product of this gene was examined by primer extension and PCR amplification. Although the vit-2/vit-6 transgene product is not normally trans-spliced, the majority of transcripts from this altered gene were trans-spliced to SL1. They termed the region of a trans-spliced mRNA precursor between the 5[prime] end and the first 3[prime] splice site an 'outrun'. The results suggest that if a transcript begins with intronlike sequence followed by a 3[prime] splice site, this alone may constitute an outrun and be sufficient to demarcate a transcript as a trans-splice acceptor. These findings leave open the possibility that specific sequences are required to increase the efficiency of trans-splicing.

  12. Microarray and comparative genomics-based identification of genes and gene regulatory regions of the mouse immune system

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    Katz Jonathan D

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study we have built and mined a gene expression database composed of 65 diverse mouse tissues for genes preferentially expressed in immune tissues and cell types. Using expression pattern criteria, we identified 360 genes with preferential expression in thymus, spleen, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, lymph nodes (unstimulated or stimulated, or in vitro activated T-cells. Results Gene clusters, formed based on similarity of expression-pattern across either all tissues or the immune tissues only, had highly significant associations both with immunological processes such as chemokine-mediated response, antigen processing, receptor-related signal transduction, and transcriptional regulation, and also with more general processes such as replication and cell cycle control. Within-cluster gene correlations implicated known associations of known genes, as well as immune process-related roles for poorly described genes. To characterize regulatory mechanisms and cis-elements of genes with similar patterns of expression, we used a new version of a comparative genomics-based cis-element analysis tool to identify clusters of cis-elements with compositional similarity among multiple genes. Several clusters contained genes that shared 5–6 cis-elements that included ETS and zinc-finger binding sites. cis-Elements AP2 EGRF ETSF MAZF SP1F ZF5F and AREB ETSF MZF1 PAX5 STAT were shared in a thymus-expressed set; AP4R E2FF EBOX ETSF MAZF SP1F ZF5F and CREB E2FF MAZF PCAT SP1F STAT cis-clusters occurred in activated T-cells; CEBP CREB NFKB SORY and GATA NKXH OCT1 RBIT occurred in stimulated lymph nodes. Conclusion This study demonstrates a series of analytic approaches that have allowed the implication of genes and regulatory elements that participate in the differentiation, maintenance, and function of the immune system. Polymorphism or mutation of these could adversely impact immune system functions.

  13. Association between 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter gene-linked polymorphic region and smoking behavior in Chinese males

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Shui-lian; XIAO Dan; WANG Chen; JING Hang

    2009-01-01

    Background Tobacco use is the major risk factor for numerous health problems. However, only 5% of smokers can successfully quit without therapy owing to the highly addictive properties of nicotine. The serotoninergic system may be involved in smoking behavior because nicotine increases brain serotonin secretion, nicotine withdrawal decreases serotonin levels, and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antagonizes the response to nicotine withdrawal. Serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is the most important protein, as it adjusts the serotonin concentration in the synaptic cleft. There is a polymorphism in the upstream regulatory region of the 5-HTT gene, named 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter gene-Iinked poyymorphic region (5-HTTLPR). Compared with the L allele, the S allele of the polymorphism is associated with decreased transcription efficiency of the 5-HTT gene. In this study, we investigated the relationship between this gene polymorphism and smoking behavior in Chinese males.Methods Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to find 5-HTTLPR gene polymorphisms in 144 smokers and 135 age-matched healthy non-smokers. A questionnaire was completed in all recruited subjects.Results The proportion of L/L (15.3% vs 5.2%) and S/L (50.0% vs 33.3%) genotypes was significantly higher in the smokers than that in the non-smokers (χ2=21.9; P <0.01). The odds ratio (OR) adjusted by age, education, effects of family members and friends who smoke, and alcohol intake was 2.9 (95%CI 1.78-4.80). In smokers, the number of cigarettes/day (L/L vs S/L vs S/S: 28+12 vs 20±8 vs 16±6, χ2=18.5, P <0.01), smoking index (L/L vs S/L vs S/S.. 561±446vs 393±341 vs 237+901, χ2=12.5, P <0.01) and score on the Fagerstrom test for nicotine dependence (FTND) (L/L vs S/L vs S/S. 7.8±1.6 vs 6.2±9.5 vs 3.5±9.1, χ2=48.3, P <0.01) were significantly higher in smokers with an L/L or S/L genotype than that in the smokers with the S/S genotype

  14. Structure and boosting activity of a starch-degrading lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Leggio, Leila; Simmons, Thomas J; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Frandsen, Kristian E H; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Stringer, Mary A; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S; De Maria, Leonardo; Harris, Paul V; Soong, Chee-Leong; Dupree, Paul; Tryfona, Theodora; Lenfant, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2015-01-22

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered enzymes that oxidatively deconstruct polysaccharides. LPMOs are fundamental in the effective utilization of these substrates by bacteria and fungi; moreover, the enzymes have significant industrial importance. We report here the activity, spectroscopy and three-dimensional structure of a starch-active LPMO, a representative of the new CAZy AA13 family. We demonstrate that these enzymes generate aldonic acid-terminated malto-oligosaccharides from retrograded starch and boost significantly the conversion of this recalcitrant substrate to maltose by β-amylase. The detailed structure of the enzyme's active site yields insights into the mechanism of action of this important class of enzymes.

  15. Percutaneous aspiration biopsy in cervical spine lytic lesions. Indications and technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tampieri, D.; Weill, A.; Melanson, D.; Ethier, R. (Montreal Neurological Inst. and Hospital, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Neuroradiology)

    1991-02-01

    We describe the technique and the results of the percutaneous aspiration biopsy (PAB) in a series of 9 patients presenting with neck pain and different degrees of myelopathy, in whom the cervical spine X-ray demonstrated lytic lesions of unknown origin. PAB is a useful, relatively safe technique, and leads to histological diagnosis between metastatic and inflammatory processes. Furthermore, in inflammatory lesions with negative hemoculture, PAB may help in detecting the micro-organism responsible and therefore allow a better antibiotic treatment. (orig.).

  16. Association of MICA gene polymorphisms with liver fibrosis in schistosomiasis patients in the Dongting Lake region

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    Zheng Gong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related A (MICA is a highly polymorphic gene located within the MHC class I region of the human genome. Expressed as a cell surface glycoprotein, MICA modulates immune surveillance by binding to its cognate receptor on natural killer cells, NKG2D, and its genetic polymorphisms have been recently associated with susceptibility to some infectious diseases. We determined whether MICA polymorphisms were associated with the high rate of Schistosoma parasitic worm infection or severity of disease outcome in the Dongting Lake region of Hunan Province, China. Polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific priming (PCR-SSP and sequencing-based typing (SBT were applied for high-resolution allele typing of schistosomiasis cases (N = 103, age range = 36.2-80.5 years, 64 males and 39 females and healthy controls (N = 141, age range = 28.6-73.3 years, 73 males and 68 females. Fourteen MICA alleles and five short-tandem repeat (STR alleles were identified among the two populations. Three (MICA*012:01/02, MICA*017 and MICA*027 showed a higher frequency in healthy controls than in schistosomiasis patients, but the difference was not significantly correlated with susceptibility to S. japonicum infection (Pc > 0.05. In contrast, higher MICA*A5 allele frequency was significantly correlated with advanced liver fibrosis (Pc 0.05. This study provides the initial evidence that MICA genetic polymorphisms may underlie the severity of liver fibrosis occurring in schistosomiasis patients from the Dongting Lake region.

  17. Epigenetic changes within the promoter region of the HLA-G gene in ovarian tumors

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    Matyunina Lilya V

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous findings have suggested that epigenetic-mediated HLA-G expression in tumor cells may be associated with resistance to host immunosurveillance. To explore the potential role of DNA methylation on HLA-G expression in ovarian cancer, we correlated differences in HLA-G expression with methylation changes within the HLA-G regulatory region in an ovarian cancer cell line treated with 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC and in malignant and benign ovarian tumor samples and ovarian surface epithelial cells (OSE isolated from patients with normal ovaries. Results A region containing an intact hypoxia response element (HRE remained completely methylated in the cell line after treatment with 5-aza-dC and was completely methylated in all of the ovarian tumor (malignant and benign samples examined, but only variably methylated in normal OSE samples. HLA-G expression was significantly increased in the 5-aza-dC treated cell line but no significant difference was detected between the tumor and OSE samples examined. Conclusion Since HRE is the binding site of a known repressor of HLA-G expression (HIF-1, we hypothesize that methylation of the region surrounding the HRE may help maintain the potential for expression of HLA-G in ovarian tumors. The fact that no correlation exists between methylation and HLA-G gene expression between ovarian tumor samples and OSE, suggests that changes in methylation may be necessary but not sufficient for HLA-G expression in ovarian cancer.

  18. Association of MICA gene polymorphisms with liver fibrosis in schistosomiasis patients in the Dongting Lake region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Zheng; Luo, Qi-Zhi; Lin, Lin [Department of Immunology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province (China); Su, Yu-Ping; Peng, Hai-Bo [Central Blood Bank in Yueyang, Yueyang, Hunan Province (China); Du, Kun; Yu, Ping [Department of Immunology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province (China); Wang, Shi-Ping [Key Laboratory of Schistosomiasis in Hunan, Department of Parasitology, College of Basic Medical Sciences, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province (China)

    2012-03-02

    Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related A (MICA) is a highly polymorphic gene located within the MHC class I region of the human genome. Expressed as a cell surface glycoprotein, MICA modulates immune surveillance by binding to its cognate receptor on natural killer cells, NKG2D, and its genetic polymorphisms have been recently associated with susceptibility to some infectious diseases. We determined whether MICA polymorphisms were associated with the high rate of Schistosoma parasitic worm infection or severity of disease outcome in the Dongting Lake region of Hunan Province, China. Polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific priming (PCR-SSP) and sequencing-based typing (SBT) were applied for high-resolution allele typing of schistosomiasis cases (N = 103, age range = 36.2-80.5 years, 64 males and 39 females) and healthy controls (N = 141, age range = 28.6-73.3 years, 73 males and 68 females). Fourteen MICA alleles and five short-tandem repeat (STR) alleles were identified among the two populations. Three (MICA*012:01/02, MICA*017 and MICA*027) showed a higher frequency in healthy controls than in schistosomiasis patients, but the difference was not significantly correlated with susceptibility to S. japonicum infection (Pc > 0.05). In contrast, higher MICA*A5 allele frequency was significantly correlated with advanced liver fibrosis (Pc < 0.05). Furthermore, the distribution profile of MICA alleles in this Hunan Han population was significantly different from those published for Korean, Thai, American-Caucasian, and Afro-American populations (P < 0.01), but similar to other Han populations within China (P > 0.05). This study provides the initial evidence that MICA genetic polymorphisms may underlie the severity of liver fibrosis occurring in schistosomiasis patients from the Dongting Lake region.

  19. Evidence for a rapid rate of molecular evolution at the hypervariable and immunogenic Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPE38 gene region

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    van Pittius Nicolaas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PPE38 (Rv2352c is a member of the large PPE gene family of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and related mycobacteria. The function of PPE proteins is unknown but evidence suggests that many are cell-surface associated and recognised by the host immune system. Previous studies targeting other PPE gene members suggest that some display high levels of polymorphism and it is thought that this might represent a means of providing antigenic variation. We have analysed the genetic variability of the PPE38 genomic region on a cohort of M. tuberculosis clinical isolates representing all of the major phylogenetic lineages, along with the ancestral M. tuberculosis complex (MTBC member M. canettii, and supplemented this with analysis of publicly available whole genome sequences representing additional M. tuberculosis clinical isolates, other MTBC members and non tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM. Where possible we have extended this analysis to include the adjacent plcABC and PPE39/40 genomic regions. Results We show that the ancestral MTBC PPE38 region comprises 2 homologous PPE genes (PPE38 and PPE71, separated by 2 esat-6 (esx-like genes and that this structure derives from an esx/esx/PPE duplication in the common ancestor of M. tuberculosis and M. marinum. We also demonstrate that this region of the genome is hypervariable due to frequent IS6110 integration, IS6110-associated recombination, and homologous recombination and gene conversion events between PPE38 and PPE71. These mutations result in combinations of gene deletion, gene truncation and gene disruption in the majority of clinical isolates. These mutations were generally found to be IS6110 strain lineage-specific, although examples of additional within-lineage and even within-cluster mutations were observed. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the published M. tuberculosis H37Rv whole genome sequence is inaccurate regarding this region. Conclusion Our results show that this antigen

  20. Plasticity Region Genes jhp0940, jhp0945, jhp0947, and jhp0949 of Helicobacter pylori in Isolates from Mexican Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-González, Carolina; Consuelo-Sánchez, Alejandra; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Velázquez-Guadarrama, Norma; García-Zúñiga, Magdalena; Burgueño-Ferreira, Juan; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    The genes jhp0940, jhp0945, jhp0947, and jhp0949 belong to the plasticity region of the Helicobacter pylori genome. Due to their prevalence in isolates from patients with gastritis, duodenal ulcer, and gastric cancer, they have been proposed as markers of gastroduodenal diseases. These genes are associated with pro-inflammatory cytokine induction through the NF-κB activation pathway. Nevertheless, the status of these genes is unknown in H. pylori isolates from children. The aim of the present work was to determine the frequency of the jhp0940-jhp0945-jhp0947-jhp0949 genes in H. pylori isolates from children. We identified the jhp0940, jhp0945, jhp0947, and jhp0949 genes and the relationship of each with the virulence factors cagA, cagPAI, and dupA by PCR in 49 isolates of H. pylori from children. The results were corroborated using dot blots. In addition, we compared the prevalence of these genes with the prevalence in adults. The prevalence of jhp0940 (53.1%), jhp0945 (44.9%), jhp0947 (77.6%), and jhp0949 (83.7%) was determined in the isolates from children, as was the prevalence of the virulence genes cagA (63.3%), cagPAI (71.4%), and dupA (37.5%). No association was found between the four genes of the plasticity region and the virulence genes. The presence of the intact locus integrated by jhp0940-jhp0945-jhp0947-jhp0949 was very common among the isolates from children. The genes jhp0940, jhp0947, and jhp0949 were present in more than 50% of the H. pylori isolates, and the joint presence of jhp0940-jhp0945-jhp0947-jhp0949 was very frequent. The frequency of these genes in isolates from children could contribute to the virulence of H. pylori and the evolution of the infection. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Genetic effects of polymorphisms in candidate genes and the QTL region on chicken age at first egg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Min

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The age at first egg (AFE, an important indicator for sexual maturation in female chickens, is controlled by polygenes. Based on our knowledge of reproductive physiology, 6 genes including gonadotrophin releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I, neuropeptide Y (NPY, dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP, VIP receptor-1 (VIPR-1, and prolactin (PRL, were selected as candidates for influencing AFE. Additionally, the region between ADL0201 and MCW0241 of chromosome Z was chosen as the candidate QTL region according to some QTL databases. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of mutations in candidate genes and the QTL region on chicken AFE. Results Marker-trait association analysis of 8 mutations in those 6 genes in a Chinese native population found a highly significant association (P G840327C of the GnRH-I gene with AFE, and it remained significant even with Bonferroni correction. Based on the results of the 2-tailed χ2 test, mutations T32742394C, T32742468C, G32742603A, and C33379782T in the candidate QTL region of chromosome Z were selected for marker-trait association analysis. The haplotypes of T32742394C and T32742468C were significantly associated (P T32742394C and T32742468C were located in the intron region of the SH3-domain GRB2-like 2 (SH3GL2 gene, which appeared to be associated in the endocytosis and development of the oocyte. Conclusion This study found that G840327C of the GnRH-I gene and the haplotypes of T32742394C-T32742468C of the SH3GL2 gene were associated with the chicken AFE.

  2. Imaging brain gene expression profiles by antipsychotics: region-specific action of amisulpride on postsynaptic density transcripts compared to haloperidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Marmo, Federica; Buonaguro, Elisabetta Filomena; Rossi, Rodolfo; Tomasetti, Carmine; Iasevoli, Felice

    2013-11-01

    Induction of motor disorders is considered the clinical landmark differentiating typical from atypical antipsychotics, and has been mainly correlated to dopamine D2 receptors blockade in striatum. This view is challenged by benzamides, such as amisulpride, which display low liability for motor side effects despite being D2/D3 receptors high-affinity blocking agents. These effects have been explained with the prominent presynaptic action of amisulpride or with the fast dissociation at D2 receptors, but there is scarce information on the effects of amisulpride on postsynaptic signaling. We carried out a molecular imaging study of gene expression after acute administration of haloperidol (0.8 mg/kg), amisulpride (10 or 35 mg/kg), or vehicle, focusing on postsynaptic genes that are key regulators of synaptic plasticity, such as Arc, c-fos, Zif-268, Norbin, Homer. The last one has been associated to schizophrenia both in clinical and preclinical studies, and is differentially induced by antipsychotics with different D2 receptors affinity. Topography of gene expression revealed that amisulpride, unlike haloperidol, triggers transcripts expression peak in medial striatal regions. Correlation analysis of gene expression revealed a prevalent correlated gene induction within motor corticostriatal regions by haloperidol and a more balanced gene induction within limbic and motor corticostriatal regions by amisulpride. Despite the selective dopaminergic profile of both compounds, our results demonstrated a differential modulation of postsynaptic molecules by amisulpride and haloperidol, the former impacting preferentially medial regions of striatum whereas the latter inducing strong gene expression in lateral regions. Thus, we provided a possible molecular profile of amisulpride, putatively explaining its "atypical atypicality".

  3. Structural and functional characterization of the 5' upstream region of a glutamine synthetase gene from Scots pine

    OpenAIRE

    Avila, Concepción; Cantón, Francisco; Barnestein, Pilar; Suárez, María-Fernanda; Marraccini, Pierre; Rey, Manuel; Humara, Jaime; Ordás, Ricardo; Cánovas, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    International audience; We report here the isolation and characterization of a genomic clone encoding Scots pine (P. sylvestris) cytosolic glutamine synthetase GS1a. The clone contains the 5' half of the gene including part of the coding region organized in seven exons, interrupted by 6 introns and 980 bp upstream of the translation initiation codon. Earlier experiments carried out in our lab have shown that the GS1a gene is expressed in a light dependent fashion during the initial stages of ...

  4. Construction of chimeric antibodies: cloning of immunoglobulin genes including their promoter regions by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocikat, R; Kütemeier, G; Harloff, C

    1992-03-01

    In the production of recombinant antibodies, it is necessary to have an immunoglobulin gene promoter for driving the expression of the antibody genes. Here we describe a simple PCR method that allows cloning of the immunoglobulin genes together with their own promoters despite the fact that the sequence of the upstream part of the gene is unknown.

  5. Characterization of the Promoter Regions of Two Sheep Keratin-Associated Protein Genes for Hair Cortex-Specific Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhichao; Liu, Guangbin; Li, Xinyun; Huang, Ji; Xiao, Yujing; Du, Xiaoyong; Yu, Mei

    2016-01-01

    The keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) are the structural proteins of hair fibers and are thought to play an important role in determining the physical properties of hair fibers. These proteins are activated in a striking sequential and spatial pattern in the keratinocytes of hair fibers. Thus, it is important to elucidate the mechanism that underlies the specific transcriptional activity of these genes. In this study, sheep KRTAP 3-3 and KRTAP11-1 genes were found to be highly expressed in wool follicles in a tissue-specific manner. Subsequently, the promoter regions of the two genes that contained the 5' flanking/5' untranslated regions and the coding regions were cloned. Using an in vivo transgenic approach, we found that the promoter regions from the two genes exhibited transcriptional activity in hair fibers. A much stronger and more uniformly expressed green fluorescent signal was observed in the KRTAP11-1-ZsGreen1 transgenic mice. In situ hybridization revealed the symmetrical expression of sheep KRTAP11-1 in the entire wool cortex. Consistently, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the pattern of ZsGreen1 expression in the hair cortex of transgenic mice matches that of the endogenous KRTAP11-1 gene, indicating that the cloned promoter region contains elements that are sufficient to govern the wool cortex-specific transcription of KRTAP11-1. Furthermore, regulatory regions in the 5' upstream sequence of the sheep KRTAP11-1 gene that may regulate the observed hair keratinocyte specificity were identified using in vivo reporter assays.

  6. Identification of Novel Small Organic Compounds with Diverse Structures for the Induction of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Lytic Cycle in EBV-Positive Epithelial Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chung King; Ho, Dona N; Hui, Kwai Fung; Kao, Richard Y; Chiang, Alan K S

    2015-01-01

    Phorbol esters, which are protein kinase C (PKC) activators, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, which cause enhanced acetylation of cellular proteins, are the main classes of chemical inducers of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lytic cycle in latently EBV-infected cells acting through the PKC pathway. Chemical inducers which induce EBV lytic cycle through alternative cellular pathways may aid in defining the mechanisms leading to lytic cycle reactivation and improve cells' responsiveness towards lytic induction. We performed a phenotypic screening on a chemical library of 50,240 novel small organic compounds to identify novel class(es) of strong inducer(s) of EBV lytic cycle in gastric carcinoma (GC) and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells. Five hit compounds were selected after three successive rounds of increasingly stringent screening. All five compounds are structurally diverse from each other and distinct from phorbol esters or HDAC inhibitors. They neither cause hyperacetylation of histone proteins nor significant PKC activation at their working concentrations, suggesting that their biological mode of action are distinct from that of the known chemical inducers. Two of the five compounds with rapid lytic-inducing action were further studied for their mechanisms of induction of EBV lytic cycle. Unlike HDAC inhibitors, lytic induction by both compounds was not inhibited by rottlerin, a specific inhibitor of PKCδ. Interestingly, both compounds could cooperate with HDAC inhibitors to enhance EBV lytic cycle induction in EBV-positive epithelial cancer cells, paving way for the development of strategies to increase cells' responsiveness towards lytic reactivation. One of the two compounds bears structural resemblance to iron chelators and the other strongly activates the MAPK pathways. These structurally diverse novel organic compounds may represent potential new classes of chemicals that can be used to investigate any alternative mechanism(s) leading to EBV

  7. Hybridization study of developmental plastid gene expression in mustard (Sinapsis alba L.) with cloned probes for most plastid DNA regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, G

    1984-07-01

    An approach to assess the extent of developmental gene expression of various regions of plastid (pt)DNA in mustard (Sinapis alba L.) is described. It involves cloning of most ptDNA regions. The cloned regions then serve as hybridization probes to detect and assess the abundance of complementary RNA sequences represented in total plastid RNA. By comparison of the hybridization pattern observed with plastid RNA from either dark-grown or light-grown plants it was found that many ptDNA regions are constitutively expressed, while several 'inducible' regions account for much higher transcript levels in the chloroplast than in the etioplast stage. The reverse situation, i.e. 'repressed' regions which would account for higher transcript levels in the etioplast, was not observed. The hybridization results obtained with RNA from 'intermediatetype' plastids suggest that transient gene expression is a common feature during light-induced chloroplast development. The time-course of gene expression differs for various ptDNA regions.

  8. Structural feature of sorghum chloroplast psbA gene and regulation effects of its 5’-noncoding region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴乃虎; 方晓华; 施晓梅; 张晓武; 周立; 黄美娟

    1999-01-01

    Comparative analysis reveals remarkable homology between the sequences of both psbA gene nucleotides and the inferred amino acids of sorghum, a C4 plant, and those of rice, a C3 plant. The 5’-noncoding region of sorghum psbA gene contains the conservative promoter elements, "-35" element and "-10" element, like the prokaryote and the promoter element, TATA box, like the eukaryote. As compared with that of the rice, an extra sequence of 7 bp is found in the leader sequence of the mRNA in the former. Using an in vitro system, it has been demonstrated that protein factor exists in sorghum chloroplast protein extract which specifically binds to the 5’-noncoding region of psbA gene. Measurement of the expression of luciferase shows a 2—5 time greater reaction of the expression plasmids pALqs which contain leader region of sorghum psbA gene than that of the expression plasmids pALqr which contain leader region of rice psbA gene in E. coli.

  9. Chick homeobox gene cDlx expression demarcates the forebrain anlage, indicating the onset of forebrain regional specification at gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghjid, S; Siddiqui, M A

    2000-01-01

    Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a chick homeobox-containing gene, cDlx, which shows greater than 85% homology to the homeodomain of other vertebrate Distal-less genes. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization studies reveal that cDlx expression is developmentally regulated and is tissue specific. In particular, the developmental expression pattern is characterized by an early appearance of cDlx transcript in the prospective forebrain region of gastrulating embryos. During neurulation, cDlx is consistently expressed in a spatially restricted domain in the presumptive ventral forebrain region of the neural plate that will give rise to the hypothalamus and the adenohypophysis. Our data support the notion that members of the Dlx gene family are part of a homeobox gene code in forebrain pattern formation and suggest that regional specification of the forebrain occurs at much earlier stages than previously thought. The homeobox gene cDlx may thus play a role in defining forebrain regional identity as early as gastrulation.

  10. Protozoacidal Trojan-Horse: use of a ligand-lytic peptide for selective destruction of symbiotic protozoa within termite guts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Amit; Delatte, Jennifer; Foil, Lane; Husseneder, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    For novel biotechnology-based termite control, we developed a cellulose bait containing freeze-dried genetically engineered yeast which expresses a protozoacidal lytic peptide attached to a protozoa-recognizing ligand. The yeast acts as a 'Trojan-Horse' that kills the cellulose-digesting protozoa in the termite gut, which leads to the death of termites, presumably due to inefficient cellulose digestion. The ligand targets the lytic peptide specifically to protozoa, thereby increasing its protozoacidal efficiency while protecting non-target organisms. After ingestion of the bait, the yeast propagates in the termite's gut and is spread throughout the termite colony via social interactions. This novel paratransgenesis-based strategy could be a good supplement for current termite control using fortified biological control agents in addition to chemical insecticides. Moreover, this ligand-lytic peptide system could be used for drug development to selectively target disease-causing protozoa in humans or other vertebrates.

  11. Mapping of the human bradikinin B2 receptor gene and GALC gene at 14q31-32.1, the region of the Machado Joseph disease locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, V.T.T.; Cox, D.W. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)]|[Univ. of Toronto (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Bradykinin is a nine amino acid peptide liberated from the {alpha}2 globulin, kininogen, during inflammatory responses. Substantial evidence shows that bradikinin is involved in human inflammatory disorders. There are two types of kinin receptors: B1 and B2. The human bradikinin B2 receptor (BKRB2) gene was previously localized to chromosome 14 by somatic cell hybrids. Krabbe disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of galactocerebrosidase (GALC). GALC has been previously localized to chromosome 14 at q31 by in situ hybridization. We have further defined the localization of the BKRB2 and GALC genes by physical and genetic linkage mapping. Primers were designed from the 3{prime} untranslated region of each gene. PCR was performed on human/rodent somatic cell hybrid carrying portions of chromosome 14, and on flow sorted chromosome DNA of patients with a deletion or translocation on chromosome 14. Results place the two genes between D14S48 and Pl, the same region as the Machado Joseph disease (MJD) gene. The genomic chromosome 14-specific cosmid library (DOE, Los Alamos) was screened using PCR products obtained from both sets of primers as probes. Positive clones for each gene were screened for di, tri and tetranucleotide repeats. A polymorphic CA repeat marker was obtained from the BKRB2 clones. CEPH families which show recombinants between D14S48 and Pl were typed with this marker and other published markers, which we have mapped in the region: D14S140, D14S68, D14S73, D14S67, D14S256 and D14S81. This positions BDRB2 more precisely and also provides an important map for further localization of the MJD gene.

  12. Association between SNP rs10569304 on the Second Expressed Region of Hole Gene and the Congenital Heart Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚莉; 徐琳; 邱健; 李志梁; 李林海; 任广立; 董爱荣; 李炳玲; 葛明晓; 蒙仕仁; 王剑青

    2010-01-01

    The correlation of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs10569304 on the second expressed region of hole gene and congenital heart disease (CHD) of human being, and the effect of hole gene on CHD were investigated. 179 patients with CHD as CHD group and 183 healthy people as control group were selected in the case-control study. DNA was abstracted from the peripheral blood by phenol-chloroform method. Primer was designed for the flanking sequence of SNP rs10569304 on the second expressed region of hole gen...

  13. Interleukin 10.G microsatellite in the promoter region of the interleukin-10 gene in severe sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background The highly polymorphic interleukin 10.G (IL10.G) microsatellite located in the promoter region of the interleukin-10 (IL-10) gene exerts a positive transcriptional regulatory effect on IL-10 gene expression and correlates with the in vitro IL-10 secretion. This study was conducted to investigate whether IL10.G microsatellite is associated with the incidence and /or the outcome of severe sepsis.Methods One hundred and fifteen patients with severe sepsis who had been treated at the intensive care unit of the university hospital were studied. One hundred and forty-one healthy individuals served as controls. IL10.G microsatellite genotyping was performed with the following two methods: fluorescent based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques and silver staining of the amplified DNA fragment in polyacrylamide gel. Alleles were defined according to the size of the amplified DNA product.Results Ten alleles and 36 genotypes were detected both in the patients with severe sepsis and in the healthy controls. Allele IL10.G9 and allele IL10.G13 were the commonest alleles with the frequencies of 32.6% and 21.3% respectively in the patients with severe sepsis, and 34% and 27% respectively in the healthy controls. The allele frequencies of IL10.G microsatellite were neither different between the patients with severe sepsis and the healthy controls (P > 0.05), nor between survivors and non-survivors (P > 0.05). However, the frequency of one common allele IL10.G13 was slightly lower in the patients with severe sepsis than in the healthy controls (21.3% vs 27%, P > 0.05), and the frequency of allele IL10.G9 was slightly higher in the non-survivors than in the survivors (37.1% vs 28.1%, P > 0.05).Conclusion IL10.G microsatellite may neither contribute to the susceptibility to severe sepsis nor to the fatal outcome of severe sepsis.

  14. Frameshift mutation of WISP3 gene and its regional heterogeneity in gastric and colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Hwa; Choi, Youn Jin; Je, Eun Mi; Kim, Ho Shik; Yoo, Nam Jin; Lee, Sug Hyung

    2016-04-01

    WISP3 is involved in many cancer-related processes including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cell death, invasion, and metastasis and is considered a tumor suppressor. The aim of our study was to find whether WISP3 gene was mutated and expressionally altered in gastric (GC) and colorectal cancers (CRCs). WISP3 gene possesses a mononucleotide repeat in the coding sequence that could be mutated in cancers with high microsatellite instability (MSI-H). We analyzed 79 GCs and 156 CRCs, and found that GCs (8.8%) and CRCs (10.5%) with MSI-H, but not those with microsatellite stable/low MSI, harbored a frameshift mutation. We also analyzed intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) of the frameshift mutation in 16 CRCs and found that the WISP3 mutation exhibited regional ITH in 25% of the CRCs. In immunohistochemistry, loss of WISP3 expression was identified in 24% of GCs and 21% of CRCs. The loss of expression was more common in those with WISP3 mutation than with wild-type WISP3 and those with MSI-H than with microsatellite stable/low MSI. Our data indicate that WISP3 harbored not only frameshift mutation but also mutational ITH and loss of expression, which together might play a role in tumorigenesis of GC and CRC with MSI-H by inhibiting tumor suppressor functions of WISP3. Our data also suggest that mutation analysis in multiregions is needed for a proper evaluation of mutation status in GC and CRC with MSI-H.

  15. PARP1 Differentially Interacts with Promoter region of DUX4 Gene in FSHD Myoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vishakha; Pandey, Sachchida Nand; Khawaja, Hunain; Brown, Kristy J; Hathout, Yetrib; Chen, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of the study is to identity proteins, which interact with the promoter region of double homeobox protein 4 (DUX4) gene known to be causative for the autosomal dominant disorder Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD). Methods We performed a DNA pull down assay coupled with mass spectrometry analysis to identify proteins that interact with a DUX4 promoter probe in Rhabdomyosarcomca (RD) cells. We selected the top ranked protein poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) from our mass spectrometry data for further ChIP-qPCR validation using patients' myoblasts. We then treated FSHD myoblasts with PARP1 inhibitors to investigate the role of PARP1 in the FSHD myoblasts. Results In our mass spectrometry analysis, PARP1 was found to be the top ranked protein interacting preferentially with the DUX4 promoter probe in RD cells. We further validated this interaction by immunoblotting in RD cells (2-fold enrichment compared to proteins pulled down by a control probe, pfisetin (0.5 mM), a polyphenol compound with PARP1 inhibitory property, for 24 h also suppressed the expression of DUX4 (44.8 fold, p<0.01) and ZSCAN4 (2.2 fold, p<0.05) in the FSHD myoblasts. We further showed that DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), a gene regulated by PARP1 was also enriched at the DUX4 promoter in RD cells through immunoblotting (2-fold, p<0.01) and immortalized FSHD myoblasts (42-fold, p<0.01) but not control myoblasts through ChIP qPCR. Conclusion Our results showed that PARP1 and DNMT1 interacted with DUX4 promoter and may be involved in modulating DUX4 expression in FSHD. PMID:27722032

  16. Identification and uniparental expression of a novel gene from the Prader-Willi region of chromosome 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wevrick, R.; Kerns, J.A.; Francke, U. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurobehavioral disorder which occurs at a frequency of about 1/25,000. Most patients ({approximately}70%) have a cytogentic deletion of their paternal 15q11-q13 region, while {approximately}30% have uniparental maternal disomy. The parent of origin dependence of the phenotype is thought to be reflective of the uniparental pattern of expression of genes in the region, a phenomenon known as genomic imprinting. A small subset of PWS patient with a typical cytogenetic rearrangements has defined a critical region for genes involved in PWS. We have used STSs from the region to construct a YAC contig including the entire PWS critical region, which is about 350 kb considering presently characterized deletions. We are now using these YACs to isolate and characterize novel genes potentially involved in PWS. Overlapping YACs from the critical region were subjected to the technique of cDNA selection. Gel-purified YAC DNA was biotinylated during PCR amplification and annealed in solution to amplified cDNA. cDNAs remaining after hybridization washing, and denaturation of the hybrids were tested for localization within the YAC contig. One such cDNA mapped back to the YAC contig and was further analyzed. A full length cDNA clone was isolated from a fetal brain library and sequenced. The pattern of expression was determined in cell lines derived from Prader-Willi and Angelman patients and in normal individuals. The gene was found to have monoallelic, paternal expression in normal individuals and is marginally or not expressed in cell lines derived form Prader-Willi individuals. Expression in cell lines from Angelman patients, who are deleted for the same region on the maternal chromosome 15, was normal. Thus this apparently maternally imprinted gene is a candidate for involvement in the Prader-Willi phenotype.

  17. New PAH gene promoter KLF1 and 3'-region C/EBPalpha motifs influence transcription in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Kristel; Stankovic, Biljana; Kotur, Nikola; Djordjevic, Maja; Zukic, Branka; Nikcevic, Gordana; Ugrin, Milena; Spasovski, Vesna; Srzentic, Sanja; Pavlovic, Sonja; Stojiljkovic, Maja

    2017-02-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a metabolic disease caused by mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Although the PAH genotype remains the main determinant of PKU phenotype severity, genotype-phenotype inconsistencies have been reported. In this study, we focused on unanalysed sequences in non-coding PAH gene regions to assess their possible influence on the PKU phenotype. We transiently transfected HepG2 cells with various chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter constructs which included PAH gene non-coding regions. Selected non-coding regions were indicated by in silico prediction to contain transcription factor binding sites. Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and supershift assays were performed to identify which transcriptional factors were engaged in the interaction. We found novel KLF1 motif in the PAH promoter, which decreases CAT activity by 50 % in comparison to basal transcription in vitro. The cytosine at the c.-170 promoter position creates an additional binding site for the protein complex involving KLF1 transcription factor. Moreover, we assessed for the first time the role of a multivariant variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) region located in the 3'-region of the PAH gene. We found that the VNTR3, VNTR7 and VNTR8 constructs had approximately 60 % of CAT activity. The regulation is mediated by the C/EBPalpha transcription factor, present in protein complex binding to VNTR3. Our study highlighted two novel promoter KLF1 and 3'-region C/EBPalpha motifs in the PAH gene which decrease transcription in vitro and, thus, could be considered as PAH expression modifiers. New transcription motifs in non-coding regions will contribute to better understanding of the PKU phenotype complexity and may become important for the optimisation of PKU treatment.

  18. Promoter region sequence differences in the A and G gamma globin genes of Brazilian sickle cell anemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.G. Barbosa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Fetal hemoglobin (HbF, encoded by the HBG2 and HBG1 genes, is the best-known genetic modulator of sickle cell anemia, varying dramatically in concentration in the blood of these patients. This variation is partially associated with polymorphisms located in the promoter region of the HBG2 and HBG1 genes. In order to explore known and unknown polymorphisms in these genes, the sequences of their promoter regions were screened in sickle cell anemia patients and correlated with both their HbF levels and their βS-globin haplotypes. Additionally, the sequences were compared with genes from 2 healthy groups, a reference one (N = 104 and an Afro-descendant one (N = 98, to identify polymorphisms linked to the ethnic background.The reference group was composed by healthy individuals from the general population. Four polymorphisms were identified in the promoter region of HBG2 and 8 in the promoter region of HBG1 among the studied groups. Four novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP located at positions -324, -317, -309 and -307 were identified in the reference group. A deletion located between -396 and -391 in the HBG2 promoter region and the SNP -271 C→T in the HBG1 promoter region were associated with the Central African Republic βS-globin haplotype. In contrast, the -369 C→G and 309 A→G SNPs in the HBG2 promoter region were correlated to the Benin haplotype. The polymorphisms -396_-391 del HBG2, -369 SNP HBG2 and -271 SNP HBG1 correlated with HbF levels. Hence, we suggest an important role of HBG2 and HBG1 gene polymorphisms on the HbF synthesis.

  19. Promoter region sequence differences in the A and G gamma globin genes of Brazilian sickle cell anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, C G; Goncalves-Santos, N J; Souza-Ribeiro, S B; Moura-Neto, J P; Takahashi, D; Silva, D O; Hurtado-Guerrero, A F; Reis, M G; Goncalves, M S

    2010-08-01

    Fetal hemoglobin (HbF), encoded by the HBG2 and HBG1 genes, is the best-known genetic modulator of sickle cell anemia, varying dramatically in concentration in the blood of these patients. This variation is partially associated with polymorphisms located in the promoter region of the HBG2 and HBG1 genes. In order to explore known and unknown polymorphisms in these genes, the sequences of their promoter regions were screened in sickle cell anemia patients and correlated with both their HbF levels and their betaS-globin haplotypes. Additionally, the sequences were compared with genes from 2 healthy groups, a reference one (N = 104) and an Afro-descendant one (N = 98), to identify polymorphisms linked to the ethnic background.The reference group was composed by healthy individuals from the general population. Four polymorphisms were identified in the promoter region of HBG2 and 8 in the promoter region of HBG1 among the studied groups. Four novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) located at positions -324, -317, -309 and -307 were identified in the reference group. A deletion located between -396 and -391 in the HBG2 promoter region and the SNP -271 C-->T in the HBG1 promoter region were associated with the Central African Republic betaS-globin haplotype. In contrast, the -369 C-->G and 309 A-->G SNPs in the HBG2 promoter region were correlated to the Benin haplotype. The polymorphisms -396_-391 del HBG2, -369 SNP HBG2 and -271 SNP HBG1 correlated with HbF levels. Hence, we suggest an important role of HBG2 and HBG1 gene polymorphisms on the HbF synthesis.

  20. Lack of TEK Gene Mutation in Patients with Cutaneomucosal Venous Malformations from the North-Western Region of Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Brahami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Venous malformations (VM result from an error in vascular morphogenesis. The first gene suspected in their development is the TEK gene (tyrosine kinase, endothelial. Mutations of this gene have been identified in several Belgian families with a dominant form of the disease. Therefore, we investigated whether mutations in this TEK gene could explain the MV development in patients of families from Tlemcen region (north-western Algeria. Methods. Genomic DNA was extracted from leucocytes of ten patients. The search for mutations in all the 23 exons and in the 5′ and 3′ intronic sequences flanking the TEK gene was performed using PCR amplification and direct sequencing of amplified genomic DNA. Additionally, a search for somatic mutations of the gene TEK was performed on a biopsy of the venous malformation from one of the ten eligible patients. Results. The sequencing of the 23 exons of the TEK gene revealed neither germinal mutation in our ten patients nor somatic mutation in the tissue of the biopsy. Conclusion. The absence of mutation in the TEK gene in the population studied suggests that the TEK gene is not necessarily involved in the onset of VM; its association with these malformations may differ from one population to another.

  1. Scanning for genes in large genomic regions: cosmid-based exon trapping of multiple exons in a single product.

    OpenAIRE

    Datson, N.A.; Vosse, E van de; Dauwerse, H.G.; Bout, M; van Ommen, G J; J T den Dunnen

    1996-01-01

    To facilitate the scanning of large genomic regions for the presence of exonic gene segments we have constructed a cosmid-based exon trap vector. The vector serves a dual purpose since it is also suitable for contig construction and physical mapping. The exon trap cassette of vector sCOGH1 consists of the human growth hormone gene driven by the mouse mettallothionein-1 promoter. Inserts are cloned in the multicloning site located in intron 2 of the hGH gene. The efficiency of the system is de...

  2. Correlation between ECT2 gene expression and methylation change of ECT2 promoter region in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mang-Li Zhang; Sen Lu; Lin Zhou; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is closely related to epigenetic abnormality. The epithelial cell transforming sequence 2 gene (ECT2) plays a critical role in Rho activation during cytokinesis, and thus may play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the relationships between aberrant expression and epigenetic changes of the ECT2 gene in pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Four cell lines (PANC-1, Colo357, T3M-4 and PancTuⅠ) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tissues were used for mRNA detection. After restriction isoschizomer endonucleases (MspⅠ/HpaⅡ) were used to digest the DNA sequence (5'-CCGG-3'), PCR was made to amplify the product. And RT-PCR was applied to determine the expression of the gene. RESULTS: The mRNA expression of the ECT2 gene was higher in pancreatic tumor tissue than in normal tissue. The gene was also expressed in the 4 PDAC cell lines. The methylation states of the upstream regions of the ECT2 gene were almost identical in normal, tumor pancreatic tissues, and the 4 PDAC cell lines. Some of the 5'-CCGG-3' areas in the upstream region of ECT2 were methylated, while others were unmethylated. CONCLUSIONS: The oncogene ECT2 is overexpressed in pancreatic tumor tissues as veriifed by RT-PCR detection. The methylation status of DNA in promoter areas is involved in the gene expression, along with other factors, in pancreatic cancer.

  3. Regional repression of a Drosophila POU box gene in the endoderm involves inductive interactions between germ layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, M; Walldorf, U; Kloter, U; Schier, A F; Gehring, W J

    1993-04-01

    An induction process occurring between the mesodermal and the endodermal germ layers has recently been described in the regulation of the Drosophila homeotic gene labial (lab). We report here that proper spatial regulation of the Drosophila POU box gene pdm-1 products also involves interaction between these two germ layers. pdm-1 transcripts are initially present in both the anterior and the posterior endodermal midgut primordia. Upon fusion of the two primordia, transcripts disappear from two regions in the endoderm, a central domain and an anterior domain. The anterior repression domain of pdm-1 is independent of the expression of known homeotic genes and genes encoding secreted signalling molecules in the visceral mesoderm, both for its positioning and its repression. Repression in the central domain requires both the homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and the decapentaplegic (dpp) gene, which encodes a secreted protein. Both of these genes are also required for lab induction. However, the analysis of pdm-1 expression in various mutant backgrounds indicates that the regulation of lab and pdm-1 across germ layers is controlled by different genetic cascades. Our study indicates that dpp is not the signal that dictates central pdm-1 repression across germ layers and suggests that in the same midgut region, different signalling pathways result in the differential activation or repression of potential transcription factors.

  4. Sexual epigenetics: gender-specific methylation of a gene in the sex determining region of Populus balsamifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräutigam, Katharina; Soolanayakanahally, Raju; Champigny, Marc; Mansfield, Shawn; Douglas, Carl; Campbell, Malcolm M.; Cronk, Quentin

    2017-01-01

    Methylation has frequently been implicated in gender determination in plants. The recent discovery of the sex determining region (SDR) of balsam poplar, Populus balsamifera, pinpointed 13 genes with differentiated X and Y copies. We tested these genes for differential methylation using whole methylome sequencing of xylem tissue of multiple individuals grown under field conditions in two common gardens. The only SDR gene to show a marked pattern of gender-specific methylation is PbRR9, a member of the two component response regulator (type-A) gene family, involved in cytokinin signalling. It is an ortholog of Arabidopsis genes ARR16 and ARR17. The strongest patterns of differential methylation (mostly male-biased) are found in the putative promoter and the first intron. The 4th intron is strongly methylated in both sexes and the 5th intron is unmethylated in both sexes. Using a statistical learning algorithm we find that it is possible accurately to assign trees to gender using genome-wide methylation patterns alone. The strongest predictor is the region coincident with PbRR9, showing that this gene stands out against all genes in the genome in having the strongest sex-specific methylation pattern. We propose the hypothesis that PbRR9 has a direct, epigenetically mediated, role in poplar sex determination. PMID:28345647

  5. Simian virus 40 late proteins possess lytic properties that render them capable of permeabilizing cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Robert; Rusan, Nasser M; Wilbuer, Anne-Kathrin; Norkin, Leonard C; Wadsworth, Patricia; Hebert, Daniel N

    2006-07-01

    Many nonenveloped viruses have evolved an infectious cycle that culminates in the lysis or permeabilization of the host to enable viral release. How these viruses initiate the lytic event is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrated that the simian virus 40 progeny accumulated at the nuclear envelope prior to the permeabilization of the nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum, and plasma membranes at a time which corresponded with the release of the progeny. The permeabilization of these cellular membranes temporally correlated with late protein expression and was not observed upon the inhibition of their synthesis. To address whether one or more of the late proteins possessed an inherent capacity to induce membrane permeabilization, we examined the permeability of Escherichia coli that separately expressed the late proteins. VP2 and VP3, but not VP1, caused the permeabilization of bacterial membranes. Additionally, VP3 expression resulted in bacterial cell lysis. These findings demonstrate that VP3 possesses an inherent lytic property that is independent of eukaryotic signaling or cell death pathways.

  6. Calcium Signaling throughout the Toxoplasma gondii Lytic Cycle: A STUDY USING GENETICALLY ENCODED CALCIUM INDICATORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges-Pereira, Lucas; Budu, Alexandre; McKnight, Ciara A; Moore, Christina A; Vella, Stephen A; Hortua Triana, Miryam A; Liu, Jing; Garcia, Celia R S; Pace, Douglas A; Moreno, Silvia N J

    2015-11-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that invades host cells, creating a parasitophorous vacuole where it communicates with the host cell cytosol through the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. The lytic cycle of the parasite starts with its exit from the host cell followed by gliding motility, conoid extrusion, attachment, and invasion of another host cell. Here, we report that Ca(2+) oscillations occur in the cytosol of the parasite during egress, gliding, and invasion, which are critical steps of the lytic cycle. Extracellular Ca(2+) enhances each one of these processes. We used tachyzoite clonal lines expressing genetically encoded calcium indicators combined with host cells expressing transiently expressed calcium indicators of different colors, and we measured Ca(2+) changes in both parasites and host simultaneously during egress. We demonstrated a link between cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillations in the host and in the parasite. Our approach also allowed us to measure two new features of motile parasites, which were enhanced by Ca(2+) influx. This is the first study showing, in real time, Ca(2+) signals preceding egress and their direct link with motility, an essential virulence trait.

  7. Viroporin potential of the lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP domains of the HIV-1 gp41 protein

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    Garry Robert F

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms by which HIV-1 mediates reductions in CD4+ cell levels in infected persons are being intensely investigated, and have broad implications for AIDS drug and vaccine development. Virally induced changes in membrane ionic permeability induced by lytic viruses of many families contribute to cytopathogenesis. HIV-1 induces disturbances in plasma membrane ion transport. The carboxyl terminus of TM (gp41 contains potential amphipathic α-helical motifs identified through their structural similarities to naturally occurring cytolytic peptides. These sequences have been dubbed lentiviral lytic peptides (LLP -1, -2, and -3. Results Peptides corresponding to the LLP domains (from a clade B virus partition into lipid membranes, fold into α-helices and disrupt model membrane permeability. A peptide corresponding to the LLP-1 domain of a clade D HIV-1 virus, LLP-1D displayed similar activity to the LLP-1 domain of the clade B virus in all assays, despite a lack of amino acid sequence identity. Conclusion These results suggest that the C-terminal domains of HIV-1 Env proteins may form an ion channel, or viroporin. Increased understanding of the function of LLP domains and their role in the viral replication cycle could allow for the development of novel HIV drugs.

  8. Parosteal osteosarcoma dedifferentiating into telangiectatic osteosarcoma: importance of lytic changes and fluid cavities at imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azura, M. [Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Musculoskeletal Oncological Surgery Department, Bologna (Italy); University of Malaya, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Vanel, D. [Radiology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Istituti Rizzoli, Anatomia Patologica, Bologna (Italy); Alberghini, M. [Pathology, Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Picci, P.; Staals, E.; Mercuri, M. [Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Musculoskeletal Oncological Surgery Department, Bologna (Italy)

    2009-07-15

    This study was performed to assess the imaging findings in cases of parosteal osteosarcoma dedifferentiated into telangiectatic osteosarcoma. Parosteal osteosarcoma is a low-grade well-differentiated malignant tumor. Dedifferentiation into a more aggressive lesion is frequent and usually visible on imaging as a central lytic area in a sclerotic mass. Only one case of differentiation into a telangiectatic osteosarcoma has been reported. As it has practical consequences, with a need for aggressive chemotherapy, we looked for this rather typical imaging pattern. Review of 199 cases of surface osteosarcomas (including 86 parosteal, of which 23 were dedifferentiated) revealed lesions suggesting a possible telangiectatic osteosarcoma on imaging examinations in five cases (cavities with fluid). Histology confirmed three cases (the two other only had hematoma inside a dedifferentiated tumor). There were three males, aged 24, 28, and 32. They had radiographs and CT, and two an MR examination. Lesions involved the distal femur, proximal tibia, and proximal humerus. The parosteal osteosarcoma was a sclerotic, regular mass, attached to the cortex. A purely lytic mass, partially composed of fluid cavities was easily detected on CT and MR. It involved the medullary cavity twice, and remained outside the bone once. Histology confirmed the two components in each case. Two patients died of pulmonary metastases and one is alive. Knowledge of this highly suggestive pattern should help guide the initial biopsy to diagnose the two components of the tumor, and guide aggressive treatment. (orig.)

  9. Preliminary survey of local bacteriophages with lytic activity against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latz, Simone; Wahida, Adam; Arif, Assuda; Häfner, Helga; Hoß, Mareike; Ritter, Klaus; Horz, Hans-Peter

    2016-10-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) represent a potential alternative for combating multi-drug resistant bacteria. Because of their narrow host range and the ever emergence of novel pathogen variants the continued search for phages is a prerequisite for optimal treatment of bacterial infections. Here we performed an ad hoc survey in the surroundings of a University hospital for the presence of phages with therapeutic potential. To this end, 16 aquatic samples of different origins and locations were tested simultaneously for the presence of phages with lytic activity against five current, but distinct strains each from the ESKAPE-group (i.e., Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter cloacae). Phages could be isolated for 70% of strains, covering all bacterial species except S. aureus. Apart from samples from two lakes, freshwater samples were largely devoid of phages. By contrast, one liter of hospital effluent collected at a single time point already contained phages active against two-thirds of tested strains. In conclusion, phages with lytic activity against nosocomial pathogens are unevenly distributed across environments with the prime source being the immediate hospital vicinity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Investigating the lytic activity and structural properties of Staphylococcus aureus phenol soluble modulin (PSM) peptide toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laabei, Maisem; Jamieson, W David; Yang, Yi; van den Elsen, Jean; Jenkins, A Toby A

    2014-12-01

    The ubiquitous bacterial pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, expresses a large arsenal of virulence factors essential for pathogenesis. The phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) are a family of cytolytic peptide toxins which have multiple roles in staphylococcal virulence. To gain an insight into which specific factors are important in PSM-mediated cell membrane disruption, the lytic activity of individual PSM peptides against phospholipid vesicles and T cells was investigated. Vesicles were most susceptible to lysis by the PSMα subclass of peptides (α1-3 in particular), when containing between 10 and 30mol% cholesterol, which for these vesicles is the mixed solid ordered (so)-liquid ordered (lo) phase. Our results show that the PSMβ class of peptides has little effect on vesicles at concentrations comparable to that of the PSMα class and exhibited no cytotoxicity. Furthermore, within the PSMα class, differences emerged with PSMα4 showing decreased vesicle and cytotoxic activity in comparison to its counterparts, in contrast to previous studies. In order to understand this, peptides were studied using helical wheel projections and circular dichroism measurements. The degree of amphipathicity, alpha-helicity and properties such as charge and hydrophobicity were calculated, allowing a structure-function relationship to be inferred. The degree of alpha-helicity of the peptides was the single most important property of the seven peptides studied in predicting their lytic activity. These results help to redefine this class of peptide toxins and also highlight certain membrane parameters required for efficient lysis.

  11. Effect of metals on the lytic cycle of the coccolithovirus, EhV86.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha eGledhill

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we show that metals, and in particular copper (Cu, can disrupt the lytic cycle in the Emiliania huxleyi - EhV86 host-virus system. Numbers of virus particles produced per E. huxleyi cell and E. huxleyi lysis rates were reduced by Cu at total metal concentrations over 500 nM in the presence of EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, and 250 nM in the absence of EDTA in acute short term exposure experiments. Zinc (Zn, cadmium (Cd and cobalt (Co were not observed to affect the lysis rate of EhV86 in these experiments. The cellular glutathione (GSH content increased in virus infected cells, but not as a result of metal exposure. In contrast, the cellular content of phytochelatins (PCs increased only in response to metal exposure. The increase in gluthatione content is consistent with increases in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS on viral infection, while increases in PC content are likely linked to metal homeostasis and indicate that metal toxicity to the host was not affected by viral infection. We propose that Cu prevents lytic production of EhV86 by interfering with virus DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis through a transcriptional block, which ultimately suppresses the formation of ROS, a biochemical response required for successful virus infection.

  12. PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A LYTIC METHICILLIN RESISTANT-STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS BACTERIOPHAGE

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    Sulaiman Al-Yousef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A marked increase in the infection incidence caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains has been noted in medical practice in recent years. This study was conducted to study the biological and characterize of MRSA-phage. Methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus was detected and confirmed by determining of the MIC of oxacillin by the standard agar dilution method. Phage was biologically purified using single plaque technique, then phage characterization were studied using host range, adsorption time, particle morphology and its structural protein. MRSA phage showing lytic nature was purified by repeated plating after picking of single isolated plaques. This phage is active against all 11 isolates either of S. aureus or MRSA tested as hosts. Phage produced clear plaques indicating their lytic nature. This phage was concentrated employing polyethylene glycol (PEG-NaCl precipitation method. Morphologically, MRSA Phage has a hexagonal head having a long non-contractile tail, indicating his icosahedral nature. Adsorption studies showed 100% adsorption of MRSA-Phage after 35 minutes of exposure. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE experimentation indicated that the phage particles contain one major structural protein (about 30 Kda.

  13. Segmental duplication as one of the driving forces underlying the diversity of the human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable gene region

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    Gao Richeng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Segmental duplication and deletion were implicated for a region containing the human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV gene segments, 1.9III/hv3005 (possible allelic variants of IGHV3-30 and hv3019b9 (a possible allelic variant of IGHV3-33. However, very little is known about the ranges of the duplication and the polymorphic region. This is mainly because of the difficulty associated with distinguishing between allelic and paralogous sequences in the IGHV region containing extensive repetitive sequences. Inability to separate the two parental haploid genomes in the subjects is another serious barrier. To address these issues, unique DNA sequence tags evenly distributed within and flanking the duplicated region implicated by the previous studies were selected. The selected tags in single sperm from six unrelated healthy donors were amplified by multiplex PCR followed by microarray detection. In this way, individual haplotypes of different parental origins in the sperm donors could be analyzed separately and precisely. The identified polymorphic region was further analyzed at the nucleotide sequence level using sequences from the three human genomic sequence assemblies in the database. Results A large polymorphic region was identified using the selected sequence tags. Four of the 12 haplotypes were shown to contain consecutively undetectable tags spanning in a variable range. Detailed analysis of sequences from the genomic sequence assemblies revealed two large duplicate sequence blocks of 24,696 bp and 24,387 bp, respectively, and an incomplete copy of 961 bp in this region. It contains up to 13 IGHV gene segments depending on haplotypes. A polymorphic region was found to be located within the duplicated blocks. The variants of this polymorphism unusually diverged at the nucleotide sequence level and in IGHV gene segment number, composition and organization, indicating a limited selection pressure in general. However

  14. Identification of lytic bacteriophage MmP1, assigned to a new member of T7-like phages infecting Morganella morganii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junmin; Rao, Xiancai; Tan, Yinling; Xiong, Kun; Hu, Zhen; Chen, Zhijin; Jin, Xiaolin; Li, Shu; Chen, Yao; Hu, Fuquan

    2010-09-01

    MmP1 (Morganella morganii phage 1) is a lytic bacteriophage newly isolated from the host bacterium M. morganii. The entire genome was sequenced, and final assembly yielded a 38,234bp linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a G+C content of 46.5%. In the MmP1 genome, 49 putative genes, 10 putative promoters and 2 predicted sigma-independent terminators were determined through bioinformatic analysis. A striking feature of the MmP1 genome is its high degree of similarity to the T7 group of phages. All of the 49 predicted genes exist on the same DNA strand, and functions were assigned to 35 genes based on the similarity of the homologues deposited in GenBank, which share 30-80% identity to their counterparts in T7-like phages. The analyses of MmP1 using CoreGenes, phylogenetic tree of RNA polymerase and structural proteins have demonstrated that bacteriophage MmP1 should be assigned as a new member of T7-like phages but as a relatively distant member of this family. This is the first report that a T7-like phage adaptively parasitizes in M. morganii, and this will advance our understanding of biodiversity and adaptive evolution of T7-like phages.

  15. Social Support Modulates Stress-Related Gene Expression in Various Brain Regions of Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitz, Ellen; Hameister, Theresa; Tuchscherer, Armin; Tuchscherer, Margret; Puppe, Birger

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an affiliative conspecific may alleviate an individual’s stress response in threatening conditions. However, the mechanisms and neural circuitry underlying the process of social buffering have not yet been elucidated. Using the domestic pig as an animal model, we examined the effect of a 4-h maternal and littermate deprivation on stress hormones and on mRNA expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11ß-HSD) types 1 and 2 and the immediate early gene c-fos in various brain regions of 7-, 21- and 35-day old piglets. The deprivation occurred either alone or with a familiar or unfamiliar age-matched piglet. Compared to piglets deprived alone, the presence of a conspecific animal significantly reduced free plasma cortisol concentrations and altered the MR/GR balance and 11ß-HSD2 and c-fos mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), amygdala and hypothalamus, but not in the hippocampus. The alterations in brain mRNA expression were particularly found in 21- or 35-day old piglets, which may reflect the species-specific postnatal ontogeny of the investigated brain regions. The buffering effects of social support were most pronounced in the amygdala, indicating its significance both for the assessment of social conspecifics as biologically relevant stimuli and for the processing of emotional states. In conclusion, the present findings provide further evidence for the importance of the cortico-limbic network underlying the abilities of individuals to cope with social stress and strongly emphasize the benefits of social partners in livestock with respect to positive welfare and health. PMID:27965550

  16. Fungal cell-wall lytic enzymes, antifungal metabolite(s) production, and characterization from Streptomyces exfoliatus MT9 for controlling fruit-rotting fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Bharti; Nagpure, Anand; Gupta, Rajinder K

    2014-12-01

    An antifungal actinomycete strain MT9 was isolated from Loktak Lake, Manipur, India and its cultural characteristics, fatty acid methyl ester, 16S rRNA gene analysis suggests that strain MT9 is identical to Streptomyces exfoliatus. Strain MT9 displayed strong and broad-spectrum antagonism towards several fruit-rotting fungi by mycelial growth suppression. Crude fungal cell-wall lytic enzymes, i.e., chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase, and protease produced by S. exfoliatus MT9 were optimally active at pH 8.0 and 50 °C, pH 5.0 and 60 °C, pH 9.0 and 70 °C, respectively. All three mycolytic enzymes had good stability over a wide pH range of 5.0-10.0, with protease being more thermostable than both chitinase and β-1,3-glucanase. Interestingly zymogram analysis revealed that S. exfoliatus MT9 secretes six distinct chitinase isoenzymes with approximate molecular weights of 9.42, 13.93, 27.87, 36.43, 54.95, 103.27 kDa, six active protease isoenzymes with apparent molecular weights of 12.45, 30.20, 37.45, 46.32, 52.46, 131.46 kDa, and an active band of 119.39 kDa as β-1,3-glucanase enzyme. Extracellular fluid and its organic solvent extracts also exhibited inhibitory activity to various fruit-rotting fungi. The MIC value of n-butanol extract was 2-25 µg/ml against tested fruit-rotting fungi. Antifungal secondary metabolite(s) was found to be polyene in nature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on extracellular production of fungal cell-wall lytic enzymes and antifungal metabolites by bioactive S. exfoliatus MT9 under submerged fermentation.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of glucocorticoid receptor binding regions in adipocytes reveal gene network involved in triglyceride homeostasis.

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    Chi-Yi Yu

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids play important roles in the regulation of distinct aspects of adipocyte biology. Excess glucocorticoids in adipocytes are associated with metabolic disorders, including central obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. To understand the mechanisms underlying the glucocorticoid action in adipocytes, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing to isolate genome-wide glucocorticoid receptor (GR binding regions (GBRs in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, gene expression analyses were used to identify genes that were regulated by glucocorticoids. Overall, 274 glucocorticoid-regulated genes contain or locate nearby GBR. We found that many GBRs were located in or nearby genes involved in triglyceride (TG synthesis (Scd-1, 2, 3, GPAT3, GPAT4, Agpat2, Lpin1, lipolysis (Lipe, Mgll, lipid transport (Cd36, Lrp-1, Vldlr, Slc27a2 and storage (S3-12. Gene expression analysis showed that except for Scd-3, the other 13 genes were induced in mouse inguinal fat upon 4-day glucocorticoid treatment. Reporter gene assays showed that except Agpat2, the other 12 glucocorticoid-regulated genes contain at least one GBR that can mediate hormone response. In agreement with the fact that glucocorticoids activated genes in both TG biosynthetic and lipolytic pathways, we confirmed that 4-day glucocorticoid treatment increased TG synthesis and lipolysis concomitantly in inguinal fat. Notably, we found that 9 of these 12 genes were induced in transgenic mice that have constant elevated plasma glucocorticoid levels. These results suggested that a similar mechanism was used to regulate TG homeostasis during chronic glucocorticoid treatment. In summary, our studies have identified molecular components in a glucocorticoid-controlled gene network involved in the regulation of TG homeostasis in adipocytes. Understanding the regulation of this gene network should provide important insight for future therapeutic developments for metabolic diseases.

  18. Preclinical evaluation of gene delivery methods for the treatment of loco-regional disease in breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2012-01-31

    Preclinical results with various gene therapy strategies indicate significant potential for new cancer treatments. However, many therapeutics fail at clinical trial, often due to differences in tissue physiology between animal models and humans, and tumor phenotype variation. Clinical data relevant to treatment strategies may be generated prior to clinical trial through experimentation using intact patient tissue ex vivo. We developed a novel tumor slice model culture system that is universally applicable to gene delivery methods, using a realtime luminescence detection method to assess gene delivery. Methods investigated include viruses (adenovirus [Ad] and adeno-associated virus), lipofection, ultrasound (US), electroporation and naked DNA. Viability and tumor populations within the slices were well maintained for seven days, and gene delivery was qualitatively and quantitatively examinable for all vectors. Ad was the most efficient gene delivery vector with transduction efficiency >50%. US proved the optimal non-viral gene delivery method in human tumor slices. The nature of the ex vivo culture system permitted examination of specific elements. Parameters shown to diminish Ad gene delivery included blood, regions of low viability and secondary disease. US gene delivery was significantly reduced by blood and skin, while tissue hyperthermia improved gene delivery. US achieved improved efficacy for secondary disease. The ex vivo model was also suitable for examination of tissue-specific effects on vector expression, with Ad expression mediated by the CXCR4 promoter shown to provide a tumor selective advantage over the ubiquitously active cytomegalovirus promoter. In conclusion, this is the first study incorporating patient tissue models in comparing gene delivery from various vectors, providing knowledge on cell-type specificity and examining the crucial biological factors determining successful gene delivery. The results highlight the importance of in

  19. Preclinical evaluation of gene delivery methods for the treatment of loco-regional disease in breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2011-04-01

    Preclinical results with various gene therapy strategies indicate significant potential for new cancer treatments. However, many therapeutics fail at clinical trial, often due to differences in tissue physiology between animal models and humans, and tumor phenotype variation. Clinical data relevant to treatment strategies may be generated prior to clinical trial through experimentation using intact patient tissue ex vivo. We developed a novel tumor slice model culture system that is universally applicable to gene delivery methods, using a realtime luminescence detection method to assess gene delivery. Methods investigated include viruses (adenovirus [Ad] and adeno-associated virus), lipofection, ultrasound (US), electroporation and naked DNA. Viability and tumor populations within the slices were well maintained for seven days, and gene delivery was qualitatively and quantitatively examinable for all vectors. Ad was the most efficient gene delivery vector with transduction efficiency >50%. US proved the optimal non-viral gene delivery method in human tumor slices. The nature of the ex vivo culture system permitted examination of specific elements. Parameters shown to diminish Ad gene delivery included blood, regions of low viability and secondary disease. US gene delivery was significantly reduced by blood and skin, while tissue hyperthermia improved gene delivery. US achieved improved efficacy for secondary disease. The ex vivo model was also suitable for examination of tissue-specific effects on vector expression, with Ad expression mediated by the CXCR4 promoter shown to provide a tumor selective advantage over the ubiquitously active cytomegalovirus promoter. In conclusion, this is the first study incorporating patient tissue models in comparing gene delivery from various vectors, providing knowledge on cell-type specificity and examining the crucial biological factors determining successful gene delivery. The results highlight the importance of in

  20. Bronchogenic adenocarcinoma presenting as a synchronous solitary lytic skull lesion with ischaemic stroke--case report and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, David

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a rare case of metastatic bronchogenic adenocarcinoma in a 55-year-old man presenting with concomittant solitary lytic skull lesion and ischaemic stroke. Metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma is known to present as lytic skull lesions. Primary brain tumours are also known to cause ischaemic brain injury. An underlying stroke risk may be exagerated by cranial tumour surgery. Patients with brain tumours are well known to be predisposed to an increased risk of developing thromboembolic disease. It is unusual to see metastatic bronchogenic adenocarcinoma presenting as ischaemic stroke with a background of concomittant cerebral metastasis. The aetio-pathogenesis of this rare occurrence is discussed with a review of literature.

  1. Origin of the CMS gene locus in rapeseed cybrid mitochondria: active and inactive recombination produces the complex CMS gene region in the mitochondrial genomes of Brassicaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Masao; Kikuchi, Rie; Imamura, Jun; Handa, Hirokazu

    2010-01-01

    CMS (cytoplasmic male sterile) rapeseed is produced by asymmetrical somatic cell fusion between the Brassica napus cv. Westar and the Raphanus sativus Kosena CMS line (Kosena radish). The CMS rapeseed contains a CMS gene, orf125, which is derived from Kosena radish. Our sequence analyses revealed that the orf125 region in CMS rapeseed originated from recombination between the orf125/orfB region and the nad1C/ccmFN1 region by way of a 63 bp repeat. A precise sequence comparison among the related sequences in CMS rapeseed, Kosena radish and normal rapeseed showed that the orf125 region in CMS rapeseed consisted of the Kosena orf125/orfB region and the rapeseed nad1C/ccmFN1 region, even though Kosena radish had both the orf125/orfB region and the nad1C/ccmFN1 region in its mitochondrial genome. We also identified three tandem repeat sequences in the regions surrounding orf125, including a 63 bp repeat, which were involved in several recombination events. Interestingly, differences in the recombination activity for each repeat sequence were observed, even though these sequences were located adjacent to each other in the mitochondrial genome. We report results indicating that recombination events within the mitochondrial genomes are regulated at the level of specific repeat sequences depending on the cellular environment.

  2. Comparative analysis on the structural features of the 5' flanking region of κ-casein genes from six different species

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    Whitelaw C Bruce A

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract κ-casein plays an essential role in the formation, stabilisation and aggregation of milk micelles. Control of κ-casein expression reflects this essential role, although an understanding of the mechanisms involved lags behind that of the other milk protein genes. We determined the 5'-flanking sequences for the murine, rabbit and human κ-casein genes and compared them to the published ruminant sequences. The most conserved region was not the proximal promoter region but an approximately 400 bp long region centred 800 bp upstream of the TATA box. This region contained two highly conserved MGF/STAT5 sites with common spacing relative to each other. In this region, six conserved short stretches of similarity were also found which did not correspond to known transcription factor consensus sites. On the contrary to ruminant and human 5' regulatory sequences, the rabbit and murine 5'-flanking regions did not harbour any kind of repetitive elements. We generated a phylogenetic tree of the six species based on multiple alignment of the κ-casein sequences. This study identified conserved candidate transcriptional regulatory elements within the κ-casein gene promoter.

  3. Molecular cloning, SNP detection and association analysis of 5' flanking region of the goat IGF1 gene with prolificacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Naicy; Venkatachalapathy, Thirupathy; Aravindakshan, Thazhathuveettil; Raghavan, K C

    2016-04-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 has an important role in reproduction, foetal development and growth. It regulates the secretion of gonadotrophin releasing hormone, stimulates ovarian function and steroidogenesis. The present study was conducted to characterise the 5' flanking region of goat IGF 1 gene, ascertain ovarian expression of the IGF1 gene, detect SNPs and assess the association with prolificacy in the two indigenous goat breeds of South India viz., low prolific Attappady Black and high prolific Malabari. The 5' flanking region of IGF1 gene was PCR amplified, cloned and sequenced from both breeds. Genotyping was performed in 277 goats from the two genetic groups using the PCR-Single Strand Conformational Polymorphism (SSCP) and the expression of the IGF1 gene in the ovary was analysed by quantitative real time PCR. The 5' flanking region of the IGF1 gene was 601 bp long and located at 450 bp upstream of the start codon. Sequence exhibited 97-99% similarity with that of the sheep, cattle and sika deer IGF1 genes. Three genotypes, PP, PQ and QR were observed at this locus with the frequency of 0.62, 0.30 and 0.08, respectively. Sequencing of the representative PCR products from each genotype revealed two SNPs, g.224A>G and g.227C>T. The population was found to be in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium at both loci. Statistical results indicated that these loci were associated with litter size (P ≤ 0.05). However, no significant difference was found in the expression of the IGF1 gene in the ovaries of the two goat breeds. These results suggest the significant influence of the IGF1 gene on prolificacy in goats and identified SNPs would benefit the selection of prolific animals in future breeding programs.

  4. An evolutionary conserved region (ECR in the human dopamine receptor D4 gene supports reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from the rat cortex

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    Haddley Kate

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting functional variants contributing to diversity of behaviour is crucial for dissecting genetics of complex behaviours. At a molecular level, characterisation of variation in exons has been studied as they are easily identified in the current genome annotation although the functional consequences are less well understood; however, it has been difficult to prioritise regions of non-coding DNA in which genetic variation could also have significant functional consequences. Comparison of multiple vertebrate genomes has allowed the identification of non-coding evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs, in which the degree of conservation can be comparable with exonic regions suggesting functional significance. Results We identified ECRs at the dopamine receptor D4 gene locus, an important gene for human behaviours. The most conserved non-coding ECR (D4ECR1 supported high reporter gene expression in primary cultures derived from neonate rat frontal cortex. Computer aided analysis of the sequence of the D4ECR1 indicated the potential transcription factors that could modulate its function. D4ECR1 contained multiple consensus sequences for binding the transcription factor Sp1, a factor previously implicated in DRD4 expression. Co-transfection experiments demonstrated that overexpression of Sp1 significantly decreased the activity of the D4ECR1 in vitro. Conclusion Bioinformatic analysis complemented by functional analysis of the DRD4 gene locus has identified a a strong enhancer that functions in neurons and b a transcription factor that may modulate the function of that enhancer.

  5. The use of lytic bacteriophages to reduce E. coli O157:H7 on fresh cut lettuce introduced through cross-contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield) at 108 PFU/ml or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either 1) spraying on to lettuce piec...

  6. Phage lysin LysK can be truncated to its CHAP domain and retain lytic activity against live antibiotic-resistant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, Marianne; O'Flynn, Gary; Garry, Jennifer; Cooney, Jakki; Coffey, Aidan; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2009-02-01

    A truncated derivative of the phage endolysin LysK containing only the CHAP (cysteine- and histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase) domain exhibited lytic activity against live clinical staphylococcal isolates, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This is the first known report of a truncated phage lysin which retains high lytic activity against live staphylococcal cells.

  7. Association of interleukin-12 p40 gene 3'-untranslated region polymorphism and outcome of HCV infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Min Yin; Qi-Xin Wang; Yan Gao; Hui Zhuang; Wan-Fu Zhu; Lai Wei; Xiao-Yuan Xu; De-Gui Sun; Yan-Bin Wang; Wen-Mei Fan; Min Yu; Xiu-Lan Tian

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of interleukin-12 p40 gene (IL12B) 3'-untranslated region polymorphism on the outcome of HCV infection.METHODS: A total of 133 patients who had been infected with HCV for 12-25 (18.2±3.8) years, were enrolled in this study. Liver biochemical tests were performed with an automated analyzer and HCV RNA was detected by fiuorogenic quantitative polymerase chain reaction. B-mode ultrasound was used for liver examination. Polymerase chain reactionrestriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used for the detection of IL12B (1188A/C) polymorphism.RESULTS: Self-limited infection was associated with AC genotype (OR = 3.48; P = 0.001) and persistent infection was associated with AA genotype (OR = 0.34; P = 0.014)at site 1188 of IL12B. In patients with persistent HCV infection, no significant differences were found regarding the age, gender, duration of infection and biochemical characteristics (P>0.05). According to B-mode ultrasound imaging and clinical diagnosis, patients with persistent infection were divided into groups based on the severity of infection. No significant differences were found in the frequency of IL-12 genotype (1188A/C) between different groups (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: The polymorphism of IL12B (1188A/C)appears to have some influence on the outcome of HCV infection.

  8. Mutations in the translated region of the lactase gene (LCT) underlie congenital lactase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuokkanen, Mikko; Kokkonen, Jorma; Enattah, Nabil Sabri; Ylisaukko-Oja, Tero; Komu, Hanna; Varilo, Teppo; Peltonen, Leena; Savilahti, Erkki; Jarvela, Irma

    2006-02-01

    Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) is a severe gastrointestinal disorder characterized by watery diarrhea in infants fed with breast milk or other lactose-containing formulas. We initially assigned the CLD locus by linkage and linkage disequilibrium on 2q21 in 19 Finnish families. Here we report the molecular background of CLD via characterization of five distinct mutations in the coding region of the lactase (LCT) gene. Twenty-seven patients out of 32 (84%) were homozygous for a nonsense mutation, c.4170T-->A (Y1390X), designated "Fin(major)." Four rare mutations--two that result in a predicted frameshift and early truncation at S1666fsX1722 and S218fsX224 and two point mutations that result in substitutions Q268H and G1363S of the 1,927-aa polypeptide--confirmed the lactase mutations as causative for CLD. These findings facilitate genetic testing in clinical practice and enable genetic counseling for this severe disease. Further, our data demonstrate that, in contrast to common adult-type hypolactasia (lactose intolerance) caused by a variant of the regulatory element, the severe infancy form represents the outcome of mutations affecting the structure of the protein inactivating the enzyme.

  9. A small intergenic region drives exclusive tissue-specific expression of the adjacent genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    Valle Estela M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II is unidirectional from most genes. In plants, divergent genes, defined as non-overlapping genes organized head-to-head, are highly represented in the Arabidopsis genome. Nevertheless, there is scarce evidence on functional analyses of these intergenic regions. The At5g06290 and At5g06280 loci are head-to-head oriented and encode a chloroplast-located 2-Cys peroxiredoxin B (2CPB and a protein of unknown function (PUF, respectively. The 2-Cys peroxiredoxins are proteins involved in redox processes, they are part of the plant antioxidant defence and also act as chaperons. In this study, the transcriptional activity of a small intergenic region (351 bp shared by At5g06290 and At5g06280 in Arabidopsis thaliana was characterized. Results Activity of the intergenic region in both orientations was analyzed by driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS reporter gene during the development and growth of Arabidopsis plants under physiological and stressful conditions. Results have shown that this region drives expression either of 2cpb or puf in photosynthetic or vascular tissues, respectively. GUS expression driven by the promoter in 2cpb orientation was enhanced by heat stress. On the other hand, the promoter in both orientations has shown similar down-regulation of GUS expression under low temperatures and other stress conditions such as mannitol, oxidative stress, or fungal elicitor. Conclusion The results from this study account for the first evidence of an intergenic region that, in opposite orientation, directs GUS expression in different spatially-localized Arabidopsis tissues in a mutually exclusive manner. Additionally, this is the first demonstration of a small intergenic region that drives expression of a gene whose product is involved in the chloroplast antioxidant defence such as 2cpb. Furthermore, these results contribute to show that 2cpb is related to the heat stress defensive system

  10. Mapping of a gene for epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma to the region of the acidic keratin gene cluster at 17q12-q21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, A; Küster, W; Eckardt, R; Sperling, K

    1992-01-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) (Vörner-Unna-Thost) is an autosomal dominantly inherited skin disease of unknown etiology characterized by diffuse severe hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles and, histologically, by cellular degeneration. We have mapped a gene for EPPK to chromosome 17q11-q23, with linkage analysis using microsatellite DNA-polymorphisms, in a single large family of 7 generations. A maximum lod score of z = 6.66 was obtained with the probe D17S579 at a recombination fraction of theta = 0.00. This locus maps to the same region as the type I (acidic) keratin gene cluster. Keratins, members of the intermediate filament family, the major proteins of the cytoskeleton in epidermis, are differentially expressed in a tissue-specific manner. One acidic keratin, keratin 9 (KRT9), is expressed only in the terminally differentiated epidermis of palms and soles. The KRT9 gene has not yet been cloned; however, since the genes for most acidic keratins are clustered, it is highly probable that it too will map to this region. We therefore propose KRT9 as the candidate gene for EPPK.

  11. Molecular phylogeny of OVOL genes illustrates a conserved C2H2 zinc finger domain coupled by hypervariable unstructured regions.

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    Abhishek Kumar

    Full Text Available OVO-like proteins (OVOL are members of the zinc finger protein family and serve as transcription factors to regulate gene expression in various differentiation processes. Recent studies have shown that OVOL genes are involved in epithelial development and differentiation in a wide variety of organisms; yet there is a lack of comprehensive studies that describe OVOL proteins from an evolutionary perspective. Using comparative genomic analysis, we traced three different OVOL genes (OVOL1-3 in vertebrates. One gene, OVOL3, was duplicated during a whole-genome-duplication event in fish, but only the copy (OVOL3b was retained. From early-branching metazoa to humans, we found that a core domain, comprising a tetrad of C2H2 zinc fingers, is conserved. By domain comparison of the OVOL proteins, we found that they evolved in different metazoan lineages by attaching intrinsically-disordered (ID segments of N/C-terminal extensions of 100 to 1000 amino acids to this conserved core. These ID regions originated independently across different animal lineages giving rise to different types of OVOL genes over the course of metazoan evolution. We illustrated the molecular evolution of metazoan OVOL genes over a period of 700 million years (MY. This study both extends our current understanding of the structure/function relationship of metazoan OVOL genes, and assembles a good platform for further characterization of OVOL genes from diverged organisms.

  12. An adaptive transposable element insertion in the regulatory region of the EO gene in the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Shen, Yi-Hong; Han, Min-Jin; Cao, Yun-Feng; Zhang, Ze

    2014-12-01

    Although there are many studies to show a key role of transposable elements (TEs) in adaptive evolution of higher organisms, little is known about the molecular mechanisms. In this study, we found that a partial TE (Taguchi) inserted in the cis-regulatory region of the silkworm ecdysone oxidase (EO) gene, which encodes a crucial enzyme to reduce the titer of molting hormone (20-hydroxyecdysone, 20E). The TE insertion occurred during domestication of silkworm and the frequency of the TE insertion in the domesticated silkworm (Bombyx mori) is high, 54.24%. The linkage disequilibrium in the TE inserted strains of the domesticated silkworm was elevated. Molecular population genetics analyses suggest that this TE insertion is adaptive for the domesticated silkworm. Luminescent reporter assay shows that the TE inserted in the cis-regulatory region of the EO gene functions as a 20E-induced enhancer of the gene expression. Further, phenotypic bioassay indicates that the silkworm with the TE insertion exhibited more stable developmental phenotype than the silkworm without the TE insertion when suffering from food shortage. Thus, the inserted TE in the cis-regulatory region of the EO gene increased developmental uniformity of silkworm individuals through regulating 20E metabolism, partially explaining transformation of a domestication developmental trait in the domesticated silkworm. Our results emphasize the exceptional role of gene expression regulation in developmental transition of domesticated animals.

  13. Investigating association of four gene regions (GABRB3, MAOB, PAH, and SLC6A4) with five symptoms in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingchun; Jayathilake, Karu; Zhao, Zhongming; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2012-07-30

    Recently, microsatellite polymorphisms have been reported to be associated with four genes, GABRB3, MAOB, PAH, and SLC6A4, and their relationships have been tested to five symptom factors: hallucinations, delusions, negative symptoms, mania, and depression. These factors were frequently present in schizophrenia spectrum disorders in the Irish Study of High Density Schizophrenia Families (ISHDSF) with a proband with the diagnosis of schizophrenia (Bergen et al., 2009). Of these, GABRB3 and PAH were reported to be significantly associated with hallucinations and delusions in a 90-family subset of the ISHDSF, respectively. In this study, we tested the association of genetic markers from these four gene regions with the approximate five clinical symptoms, based upon 256 schizophrenia patients, with genotypic data obtained by higher resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. We found one GABRB3 SNP (rs1426891, 70.8kb downstream of this gene) and haplotype constructed by three SNPs (rs1426891, rs2912602, and rs2912600) were significantly associated with hallucinations in Caucasians after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (Bonferroni corrected P: 0.032 and 0.016, respectively). Additionally, we found one haplotype constructed by two SNPs, rs5905587-rs37615860, in MAOB/NDP gene region was significantly associated with delusions in all samples tested (Bonferroni corrected P: 0.048). These results provide additional evidence that GABRB3 and MAOB/NDP gene regions might constitute risk factors for hallucinations and delusions in schizophrenia.

  14. [Methylation of FHIT gene promoter region in DNA from plasma of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and demethylating effect of decitabine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yin-Fen; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xiu-Qun; Hu, Ming-Qiu; Dai, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Zhong; Xu, Yan-Li

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to detect the methylation status of FHIT gene promoter region in the DNA from plasma of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and to investigate the demethylating effect of decitabine. Methylation-specific PCR method was used to detect the methylation status of FHIT gene promoter region in the DNA from plasma of 4 patients with MDS before and after treatment with decitabine plus semis CAG therapy (among them, 1 case of newly diagnosed MDS, 3 cases progressed into acute leukemia). The results indicated that 3 cases were found to have an increased methylation in the promoter region. After treatment with decitabine plus semis CAG, increased methylation was reversed in 2 cases. In 4 cases, 2 cases displayed clinical response. It is concluded that FHIT gene hypermethylation is associated with MDS pathogenesis. Decitabine has demethylating effect on the FHIT gene hypermethylation of plasma from MDS patients. Detecting the methylation status of FHIT gene in DNA from plasma may play a role in MDS auxiliary diagnosis or prognosis.

  15. Identification of Polymorphisms in the Enhancer Region of the Bovine Prolactin Gene and Association with Fertility in Beef Cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives were to investigate the polymorphic nature of the enhancer region of the bovine prolactin (PRL) gene and determine the association of these polymorphisms with fertility in beef cows. Primers were designed to amplify a 500 base pair fragment 892 to 1392 bases upstream of the bovine PRL gen...

  16. Conserved pattern of antisense overlapping transcription in the homologous ERCC-1 and yeast RAD10 DNA repair gene regions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Duin (Mark); J. van den Tol; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk); I.P. Rupp; P. Reynolds (Paul); L. Prakash; S. Prakash

    1989-01-01

    textabstractWe report that the genes for the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD10 and human ERCC-1 DNA excision repair proteins harbor overlapping antisense transcription units in their 3' regions. Since naturally occurring antisense transcription is rare in S. cerevisiae and humans (this is

  17. Polymorphisms of Flanking Region of the ASB15 Gene and Their Associations with Performance Traits in Chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y C; Han, R L; Li, Z J; Geng, J; Tian, Y D; Jiang, R R; Wu, J P; Kang, X T

    2017-01-02

    Research on the identity of genes and their relationship with traits of economic importance in chickens could assist in the selection of poultry. In this study, an F2 resource population of Gushi chickens crossed with Anka broilers was used to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the flanking region of the ASB15 gene by DNA sequencing and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). One SNP of -1271 C>T in 5' flanking region of the chicken ASB15 gene and two SNPs of the 10618 A>G and 10716 G>A in 3' flanking region were identified. Furthermore, the 10618 A>G and 10716 G>A in 3' flanking region were in complete linkage. Association analysis results showed that -1271 C>T was not associated with performance traits, while the 10618 A>G and 10716 G>A were significantly associated with BW2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, SL12, CD8, CW4, 8, 12, BSL4, 8, 12, and SEW, EW, WW, BMW, LW, CW, SFT. Our results suggest that the ASB15 gene profoundly affects chicken performance traits.

  18. Identifying Causal Genes at the Multiple Sclerosis Associated Region 6q23 Using Capture Hi-C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul; McGovern, Amanda; Massey, Jonathan; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Duffus, Kate; Yarwood, Annie; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Fraser, Peter; Eyre, Stephen; Orozco, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    The chromosomal region 6q23 has been found to be associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) predisposition through genome wide association studies (GWAS). There are four independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with MS in this region, which spans around 2.5 Mb. Most GWAS variants associated with complex traits, including these four MS associated SNPs, are non-coding and their function is currently unknown. However, GWAS variants have been found to be enriched in enhancers and there is evidence that they may be involved in transcriptional regulation of their distant target genes through long range chromatin looping. The aim of this work is to identify causal disease genes in the 6q23 locus by studying long range chromatin interactions, using the recently developed Capture Hi-C method in human T and B-cell lines. Interactions involving four independent associations unique to MS, tagged by rs11154801, rs17066096, rs7769192 and rs67297943 were analysed using Capture Hi-C Analysis of Genomic Organisation (CHiCAGO). We found that the pattern of chromatin looping interactions in the MS 6q23 associated region is complex. Interactions cluster in two regions, the first involving the rs11154801 region and a second containing the rs17066096, rs7769192 and rs67297943 SNPs. Firstly, SNPs located within the AHI1 gene, tagged by rs11154801, are correlated with expression of AHI1 and interact with its promoter. These SNPs also interact with other potential candidate genes such as SGK1 and BCLAF1. Secondly, the rs17066096, rs7769192 and rs67297943 SNPs interact with each other and with immune-related genes such as IL20RA, IL22RA2, IFNGR1 and TNFAIP3. Finally, the above-mentioned regions interact with each other and therefore, may co-regulate these target genes. These results suggest that the four 6q23 variants, independently associated with MS, are involved in the regulation of several genes, including immune genes. These findings could help understand mechanisms

  19. Regional Homogeneity of Resting-State Brain Activity Suppresses the Effect of Dopamine-Related Genes on Sensory Processing Sensitivity.

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    Chunhui Chen

    Full Text Available Sensory processing sensitivity (SPS is an intrinsic personality trait whose genetic and neural bases have recently been studied. The current study used a neural mediation model to explore whether resting-state brain functions mediated the effects of dopamine-related genes on SPS. 298 healthy Chinese college students (96 males, mean age = 20.42 years, SD = 0.89 were scanned with magnetic resonance imaging during resting state, genotyped for 98 loci within the dopamine system, and administered the Highly Sensitive Person Scale. We extracted a "gene score" that summarized the genetic variations representing the 10 loci that were significantly linked to SPS, and then used path analysis to search for brain regions whose resting-state data would help explain the gene-behavior association. Mediation analysis revealed that temporal homogeneity of regional spontaneous activity (ReHo in the precuneus actually suppressed the effect of dopamine-related genes on SPS. The path model explained 16% of the variance of SPS. This study represents the first attempt at using a multi-gene voxel-based neural mediation model to explore the complex relations among genes, brain, and personality.

  20. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused by homozygous genomic deletion in the PSORS1 region encompassing the CDSN gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Furio, Laetitia; Igawa, Satomi; Honma, Masaru; Tron, Elodie; Malan, Valerie; Murakami, Masamoto; Hovnanian, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome (PSS) type B is a rare recessive genodermatosis characterized by lifelong widespread, reddish peeling of the skin with pruritus. The disease is caused by small-scale mutations in the Corneodesmosin gene (CDSN) leading to premature termination codons. We report for the first time a Japanese case resulting from complete deletion of CDSN. Corneodesmosin was undetectable in the epidermis, and CDSN was unamplifiable by PCR. QMPSF analysis demonstrated deletion of CDSN exons inherited from each parent. Deletion mapping using microsatellite haplotyping, CGH array and PCR analysis established that the genomic deletion spanned 49-72 kb between HCG22 and TCF19, removing CDSN as well as five other genes within the psoriasis susceptibility region 1 (PSORS1) on 6p21.33. This observation widens the spectrum of molecular defects underlying PSS type B and shows that loss of these five genes from the PSORS1 region does not result in an additional cutaneous phenotype.

  1. V.F. Gening and research problems of the glyadenovo-pyanoborye times in the Cis-Urals region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldina Rimma D.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The studies by the outstanding archaeologist V.F. Gening in the field of the Volga-Ural antiquities of the turn of the eras, namely the Glyadenovo-Pyanoborye community of the Kama region are analyzed. In this region, V.F. Gening supervised field research of a number of settlements and burial grounds. He singled out a number of cultures that had previously been considered local variants, namely the Osinovo, Garevaya, Azelino and Mazunino cultures, whose status within this community, as well dating are still debatable. The cultural and historical assessment of the unique monuments such as bone beds by him is regarded as incorrect by the author. V.F. Gening attributed them as burial grounds, whereas today they are viewed as traces of human sacrifice.

  2. Absence of association between a polymorphic GGC repeat in the 5' untranslated region of the reelin gene and autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, M O; Betancur, C; Leroy, S; Bourdel, M C; Gillberg, C; Leboyer, M

    2002-01-01

    Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with severe cognitive and communication disabilities, that has a strong genetic predisposition. Reelin, a protein involved in neuronal migration during development, is encoded by a gene located on 7q22, within the candidate region on 7q showing increased allele sharing in previous genome scans. A case/control and family-based association study recently reported a positive association between a trinucleotide repeat polymorphism (GGC) located in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the reelin gene and autism. We performed a transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) analysis of the 5'UTR polymorphism in 167 families including 218 affected subjects (117 trios and 50 affected sib pairs) and found no evidence of linkage/association. Our results do not support previous findings and suggest that this GGC polymorphism of the reelin gene is unlikely to be a major susceptibility factor in autism and/or genetic heterogeneity.

  3. Frequent somatic hypermutation of the 5' noncoding region of the BCL6 gene in B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliazza, A; Martinotti, S; Chen, W; Fusco, C; Ye, B H; Knowles, D M; Offit, K; Chaganti, R S; Dalla-Favera, R

    1995-01-01

    The BCL6 gene encodes a zinc-finger transcription factor and is altered by chromosomal arrangements in its 5' noncoding region in approximately 30% of diffuse large-cell lymphoma (DLCL). We report here that, in 22/30 (73%) DLCL and 7/15 (47%) follicular lymphoma (FL), but not in other tumor types, the BCL6 gene is also altered by multiple (1.4 x 10(-3) -1.6 x 10(-2) per bp), often biallelic, mutations clustering in its 5' noncoding region. These mutations are of somatic origin and are found in cases displaying either normal or rearranged BLC6 alleles indicating their independence from chromosomal rearrangements and linkage to immunoglobulin genes. These alterations identify a mechanism of genetic instability in malignant B cells and may have been selected during lymphomagenesis for their role in altering BCL6 expression. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8618933

  4. Consensus and Variable Region PCR Analysis of Helicobacter pylori 3′ Region of cagA Gene in Isolates from Individuals with or without Peptic Ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rota, Cláudia Augustin; Pereira-Lima, Júlio C.; Blaya, Carolina; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2001-01-01

    The clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection may be associated with the cagA bacterial genotype. To investigate the cagA status of H. pylori-infected patients and the relationship between cagA and peptic ulcer disease, gastric biopsy specimens from 103 Caucasian patients in Brazil were analyzed by PCR. Since allelic variation in cagA exists and distinct H. pylori subgenotypes may circulate in different regions, PCR using primers for a variable 3′ region of the cagA gene according to a Japanese methodology and for a consensus cagA 3′ region used in Western methods was used for cagA detection. cagA was present in 53 (71%) of 75 H. pylori-positive cases when analyzed by the consensus region method and was associated with duodenal ulcer disease (P = 0.02), but not with gastric ulcer (P = 0.26), when compared to patients with duodenitis or gastritis. The variable region PCR method was able to detect 43 (57%) cagA-positive cases within the same group of H. pylori-positive patients and showed three subtypes of cagA (A, B/D, and C) that were not associated with clinical outcome. However, in 8 (18%) of the cases, more than one subtype was present, and an association between patients with multiple subtypes and disease outcome was observed when compared to patients with isolated subtypes (P = 0.048). cagA was a marker of H. pylori strains for duodenal ulcer disease in our population, and in spite of the differences in the 3′ region of the cagA gene, the Japanese methodology was able to detect the cagA status in most cases. The presence of multiple subgenotypes of cagA was associated with gastric ulcer. PMID:11158115

  5. Identification and gene prediction of a 24 kb region containing xa5, a recessive bacterial blight resistance gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Yiming; JIANG Guanghuai; CHEN Xuewei; XIA Zhihui; LI Xiaobing; ZHU Lihuang; ZHAI Wenxue

    2003-01-01

    Rice xa5 gene provides recessive, race-specific resistance to bacterial blight disease caused by the pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae and has great value for research and breeding. In an effort to clone xa5, an F2 population of 4892 individuals was developed from the xa5 near isogenic lines, IR24 and IRBB5. A fine mapping procedure was conducted and tightly linked RFLP markers were used to screen a BAC library of IRBB56, a resistant rice line containing the xa5 gene. A 213 kb contig covering the xa5 locus was constructed. According to the sequences from the International Rice Genome Sequening Project (IRGSP), the Chinese Superhybrid Rice Genome Project (SRGP) and some sub-clones of the contig, twelve SSLP and CAPS markers were developed for fine mapping. The xa5 gene was mapped to a 0.3 cM interval between markers K5 and T4, which spanned an interval of approximately 24 kb, co-segregating with marker T2. Sequence analysis of the 24 kb region revealed that an ABC transporter and a basal transcription factor (TFIIa) were potential candidates for the xa5 resistance gene product. The molecular mechanism by which the xa5 gene provides recessive, race-specific resistance to bacterial blight will be elucidated by the functional tests of the 24 kb DNA and the candidate genes.

  6. Mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene cluster in two regions of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaul, M J; Marcelli, M; Zoppi, S; Wilson, C M; Griffin, J E; Wilson, J D

    1992-11-01

    We have analyzed the nucleotide sequence of the androgen receptor from 22 unrelated subjects with substitution mutations of the hormone-binding domain. Eleven had the phenotype of complete testicular feminization, four had incomplete testicular feminization, and seven had Reifenstein syndrome. The underlying functional defect in cultured skin fibroblasts included individuals with absent, qualitative, or quantitative defects in ligand binding. 19 of the 21 substitution mutations (90%) cluster in two regions that account for approximately 35% of the hormone-binding domain, namely, between amino acids 726 and 772 and between amino acids 826 and 864. The fact that one of these regions is homologous to a region of the human thyroid hormone receptor (hTR-beta) which is a known cluster site for mutations that cause thyroid hormone resistance implies that this localization of mutations is not a coincidence. These regions of the androgen receptor may be of particular importance for the formation and function of the hormone-receptor complex.

  7. Evidence for gene-specific rather than transcription rate-dependent histone H3 exchange in yeast coding regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat-Viks, Irit; Vingron, Martin

    2009-02-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, histones are dynamically exchanged independently of DNA replication. Recent reports show that different coding regions differ in their amount of replication-independent histone H3 exchange. The current paradigm is that this histone exchange variability among coding regions is a consequence of transcription rate. Here we put forward the idea that this variability might be also modulated in a gene-specific manner independently of transcription rate. To that end, we study transcription rate-independent replication-independent coding region histone H3 exchange. We term such events relative exchange. Our genome-wide analysis shows conclusively that in yeast, relative exchange is a novel consistent feature of coding regions. Outside of replication, each coding region has a characteristic pattern of histone H3 exchange that is either higher or lower than what was expected by its RNAPII transcription rate alone. Histone H3 exchange in coding regions might be a way to add or remove certain histone modifications that are important for transcription elongation. Therefore, our results that gene-specific coding region histone H3 exchange is decoupled from transcription rate might hint at a new epigenetic mechanism of transcription regulation.

  8. Characterization of a complete immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable region germ-line gene of rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, T; Chen, T; Törmänen, V

    1990-10-01

    A germ-line heavy-chain variable region (VH) gene (RTVH431) has been isolated from a rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and characterized by complete nucleotide sequencing. It is characteristic of VH, as shown by the conserved octamer and TATA motif in the 5' region, the heptamernonamer recombination signal sequence in the 3' region, and the 18-amino-acid-long hydrophobic leader interrupted by an intron. The 98-amino-acid-long VH coding region has 50-70% nucleotide sequence homology and 40-60% amino acid sequence homology with VHS of various vertebrate species. We have also found unique or species-specific amino acid residues in the VHS of rainbow trout, amphibia (Xenopus), reptile (Caiman), and shark (Heterodontus) in our sequence analyses. The RTVH431 has an unusual amino acid in the conserved 34th position in complementarity-determining region 1 of VH. Southern hybridization results suggest the presence of a large gene family related to RTVH431 in the trout genome. The complex evolution of antibody V genes is discussed.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Lytic Properties of Bacteriophages Specific for M. haemolytica Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Urban-Chmiel

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was isolation and morphological characterization of temperate bacteriophages obtained from M. haemolytica strains and evaluation of their lytic properties in vitro against M. haemolytica isolated from the respiratory tract of calves.The material for the study consisted of the reference strain M. haemolytica serotype 1 (ATCC® BAA-410™, reference serotypes A1, A2, A5, A6, A7, A9 and A11, and wild-type isolates of M. haemolytica. Bacteriophages were induced from an overnight bacterial starter culture of all examined M. haemolytica strains treated with mitomycin C. The lytic properties and host ranges were determined by plaque assays. The morphology of the bacteriophages was examined in negative-stained smears with 5% uranyl acetate solution using a transmission electron microscope. The genetic analysis of the bacteriophages was followed by restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA. This was followed by analysis of genetic material by polymerase chain reaction (PCR.Eight bacteriophages were obtained, like typical of the families Myoviridae, Siphoviridae and Podoviridae. Most of the bacteriophages exhibited lytic properties against the M. haemolytica strains. Restriction analysis revealed similarities to the P2-like phage obtained from the strain M. haemolytica BAA-410. The most similar profiles were observed in the case of bacteriophages φA1 and φA5. All of the bacteriophages obtained were characterized by the presence of additional fragments in the restriction profiles with respect to the P2-like reference phage. In the analysis of PCR products for the P2-like reference phage phi-MhaA1-PHL101 (DQ426904 and the phages of the M. haemolytica serotypes, a 734-bp phage PCR product was obtained. The primers were programmed in Primer-Blast software using the structure of the sequence DQ426904 of reference phage PHL101.The results obtained indicate the need for further research aimed at isolating and characterizing

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Lytic Properties of Bacteriophages Specific for M. haemolytica Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Chmiel, Renata; Wernicki, Andrzej; Stęgierska, Diana; Dec, Marta; Dudzic, Anna; Puchalski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was isolation and morphological characterization of temperate bacteriophages obtained from M. haemolytica strains and evaluation of their lytic properties in vitro against M. haemolytica isolated from the respiratory tract of calves. The material for the study consisted of the reference strain M. haemolytica serotype 1 (ATCC®) BAA-410™, reference serotypes A1, A2, A5, A6, A7, A9 and A11, and wild-type isolates of M. haemolytica. Bacteriophages were induced from an overnight bacterial starter culture of all examined M. haemolytica strains treated with mitomycin C. The lytic properties and host ranges were determined by plaque assays. The morphology of the bacteriophages was examined in negative-stained smears with 5% uranyl acetate solution using a transmission electron microscope. The genetic analysis of the bacteriophages was followed by restriction analysis of bacteriophage DNA. This was followed by analysis of genetic material by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Eight bacteriophages were obtained, like typical of the families Myoviridae, Siphoviridae and Podoviridae. Most of the bacteriophages exhibited lytic properties against the M. haemolytica strains. Restriction analysis revealed similarities to the P2-like phage obtained from the strain M. haemolytica BAA-410. The most similar profiles were observed in the case of bacteriophages φA1 and φA5. All of the bacteriophages obtained were characterized by the presence of additional fragments in the restriction profiles with respect to the P2-like reference phage. In the analysis of PCR products for the P2-like reference phage phi-MhaA1-PHL101 (DQ426904) and the phages of the M. haemolytica serotypes, a 734-bp phage PCR product was obtained. The primers were programmed in Primer-Blast software using the structure of the sequence DQ426904 of reference phage PHL101. The results obtained indicate the need for further research aimed at isolating and characterizing bacteriophages

  11. Morphallactic regeneration as revealed by region-specific gene expression in the digestive tract of Enchytraeus japonensis (Oligochaeta, Annelida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeo, Makoto; Yoshida-Noro, Chikako; Tochinai, Shin

    2008-05-01

    Enchytraeus japonensis is a small oligochaete, which primarily reproduces asexually by fragmentation and regeneration. For precise analysis of the pattern formation during regeneration, we isolated three region-specific genes (EjTuba, mino, and horu) expressed in the digestive tract. In growing worms, the expression of EjTuba in the head and mino in the trunk region just posterior to the head were observed in defined body segments, while the expression areas of EjTuba in the trunk and horu were proportional to the total number of body segments. In the regeneration process, expression of these genes disappeared once and recovered to their original pattern by day 7. In abnormal regeneration such as a bipolar head, mino was still expressed in the region next to both the normal and the ectopic heads. These results suggest that there is morphallactic as well as epimorphic or inductive regulation of the body patterning during regeneration of E. japonensis.

  12. The 5' flanking region of a barley B hordein gene controls tissue and developmental specific CAT expression in tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marris, C; Gallois, P; Copley, J; Kreis, M

    1988-07-01

    The 549 base pairs of the 5' flanking region of a barley seed storage protein (B1 hordein) gene were linked to the reporter gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT). The chimaeric gene was transferred into tobacco plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. CAT enzyme activity was detected in the seeds, but not in the leaves, of the transgenic plants. Furthermore, enzyme activity was found only in the endosperm, and only from fifteen days after pollination. In contrast, the constitutive 19S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) directed the expression of the CAT gene in the leaves as well as in both the endosperm and embryo and at all stages in seed development.

  13. Differential protein-DNA interactions at the promoter and enhancer regions of developmentally regulated U4 snRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, J H; Botros, I W; Stumph, W E

    1992-01-01

    In the chicken genome there are two closely-linked genes, U4B and U4X, that code for different sequence variants of U4 small nuclear RNA (snRNA). Both genes are expressed with nearly equal efficiency in the early embryo, but U4X gene expression is specifically down-regulated relative to U4B as development proceeds. At the present time, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate differential expression of snRNA genes. We have now identified a novel chicken factor, PPBF, that binds sequence-specifically in vitro to the proximal regulatory region of the U4X gene, but not to the proximal region of the U4B gene. PPBF is itself regulated during development and may therefore be a key factor involved in differentially regulating U4X gene transcription relative to U4B. The U4X and U4B enhancers contain distinct sequence variants of two essential motifs (octamer and SPH). The Oct-1 transcription factor binds with similar affinities to both the U4X and U4B octamer motifs. However, a second essential snRNA enhancer-binding protein, SBF, has a 20- to 30-fold lower affinity for the SPH motif in the U4X enhancer than for the homologous SPH motif in the U4B enhancer. A potential role therefore exists for SBF, as well as PPBF, in the preferential down-regulation of the U4X RNA gene during chicken development.

  14. The Investigation of Haplotype Phasing Efficiency at the PAH Gene Region in Iranian Family Trios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Fazeli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The haplotype phasing is more useful than genotyping markers independently at carrier detection and prena­tal diagnosis of diseases. The PAH gene region contains several markers used in detection of PKU disease. In the present study, the efficiency of BglII-EcoRI-VNTR haplotype phasing in Iranian family trios was investigated. Then, this informa­tion was compared with those obtained for unrelated individuals."nMethods: Blood samples were collected from 20 healthy family trios and 60 unrelated individuals. The genomic DNA was ex­tracted by use of salting-out procedure. The two markers BglII and EcoRI were genotyped by use of PCR-RFLP. The geno­type of VNTR marker was identified by use of PCR and electrophoresis. The genotyping data obtained from family trios was used to infer haplotype phase. We also compared this data with results obtained from a widely used method for hap­lotype frequency inference from unrelated individuals, the PHASE program."nResults: The haplotype phase of all members was only ascertained at eight family trios.  The comparison of this data with the results obtained by use of PHASE program showed that eight haplotypes [211, 221, 215, 216, 214, 121, 225 and 111] were in­formative haplotypes in Iranian population."nConclusion: Since diversity of BglII-EcoRI-VNTR haplotypes was high in Iranian population, haplotype phasing at family trios was difficult. The results of this study showed that the genotyping data obtained from family trios could not provide enough information for BglII-EcoRI-VNTR haplotype phasing at Iranian PKU families and the genotyping of other family mem­bers was necessary at most cases.

  15. Probing the structure of glucan lyases – the lytic members of GH31 - by sequence analysis, circular dichroism and proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Heidi; Lo Leggio, Leila; Yu, Shukun

    2005-01-01

    Glucan lyase (GL) is a polysaccharide lyase with unique characteristics. It is involved in an alternative pathway for the degradation of alpha-glucans, the anhydrofructose pathway. Sequence similarity suggests that this lytic enzyme belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 31, for which until very r...

  16. Lytic Infection of Lactococcus lactis by Bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 Triggers Alternative Transcriptional Host Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainsworth, S.; Zomer, A.L.; Mahony, J.; Sinderen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed thro

  17. Epiphyseal involvement in Erdheim-Chester disease: radiographic and scintigraphic findings in a case with lytic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Hernandez, G.; Tajahuerce-Romera, G.M.; Latorre-Ibanez, M.D.; Lara-Pomares, A. [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Provincial de Castellon (Spain); Vila-Fayos, V. [Servicio de Reumatologia, Hospital Comarcal de Vinaroz (Spain)

    2000-08-01

    We reported a symmetric increase of activity in lower links secondary to Erdheim-Chester disease and demonstrated by bone scans and radiographs. An inusual scintigraphic and radiographic appearance with epiphyseal involvement and lytic lesions is described. Differential diagnosis of bone scan and radiographic findings is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Oxidative cleavage and hydrolytic boosting of cellulose in soybean spent flakes by Trichoderma reesei Cel61A lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wittrup Agger, Jane; Wichmann, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    The auxiliary activity family 9 (AA9) copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) from Trichoderma reesei (EG4; TrCel61A) was investigated for its ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides from soybean. The substrate specificity of the enzyme was assessed against a variety...

  19. Lytic Infection of Lactococcus lactis by Bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 Triggers Alternative Transcriptional Host Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainsworth, S.; Zomer, A.L.; Mahony, J.; Sinderen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed

  20. High resolution crystal structures of the Escherichia coli lytic transglycosylase Slt70 and its complex with a peptidoglycan fragment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, Erik J. van; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W.H.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1999-01-01

    The 70 kDa soluble lytic transglycosylase (Slt70) from Escherichia coli is an exo-muramidase, that catalyses the cleavage of the glycosidic bonds between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetylglucosamine residues in peptidoglycan, the main structural component of the bacterial cell wall. This cleavage is

  1. Probing the structure of glucan lyases – the lytic members of GH31 - by sequence analysis, circular dichroism and proteolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Heidi; Lo Leggio, Leila; Yu, Shukun

    2005-01-01

    Glucan lyase (GL) is a polysaccharide lyase with unique characteristics. It is involved in an alternative pathway for the degradation of alpha-glucans, the anhydrofructose pathway. Sequence similarity suggests that this lytic enzyme belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 31, for which until very r...

  2. Isolation and characterization of lytic vibriophage against Vibrio cholerae O1 from environmental water samples in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fendi, Ali; Shueb, Rafidah Hanim; Ravichandran, Manickam; Yean, Chan Yean

    2014-10-01

    Water samples from a variety of sources in Kelantan, Malaysia (lakes, ponds, rivers, ditches, fish farms, and sewage) were screened for the presence of bacteriophages infecting Vibrio cholerae. Ten strains of V. cholerae that appeared to be free of inducible prophages were used as the host strains. Eleven bacteriophage isolates were obtained by plaque assay, three of which were lytic and further characterized. The morphologies of the three lytic phages were similar with each having an icosahedral head (ca. 50-60 nm in diameter), a neck, and a sheathed tail (ca. 90-100 nm in length) characteristic of the family Myoviridae. The genomes of the lytic phages were indistinguishable in length (ca. 33.5 kb), nuclease sensitivity (digestible with DNase I, but not RNase A or S1 nuclease), and restriction enzyme sensitivity (identical banding patterns with HindIII, no digestion with seven other enzymes). Testing for infection against 46 strains of V. cholerae and 16 other species of enteric bacteria revealed that all three isolates had a narrow host range and were only capable of infecting V. cholerae O1 El Tor Inaba. The similar morphologies, indistinguishable genome characteristics, and identical host ranges of these lytic isolates suggests that they represent one phage, or several very closely related phages, present in different water sources. These isolates are good candidates for further bio-phage-control studies. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism in Southern African blacks: P gene-associated haplotypes suggest a major mutation in the 5{prime} region of the gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsay, M.; Stevens, G.; Beukering, J. van [Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA) occurs with a prevalence of 1 in 3900 among Southern African (SA) blacks. The major contributors to morbidity and mortality are skin cancer and decreased visual acuity. Two distinct phenotypes occur, namely individuals with ephelides (darkly pigmented patches) and those without. There is complete concordance with regard to ephelus status among siblings. The disorder is linked to markers on chromosome 15q11.2-q12, and no obligatory cross-overs were observed with polymophic markers at the human homolog, P, of the mouse pink eyed dilute gene, p. Contrary to what has been shown for Caucasoid ty-pos OCA, this condition shows locus homogeneity among SA blacks. The P gene is an excellent candidate for ty-pos OCA and mutations in this gene will confirm its role in causing the common form of albinism in SA. Numerous P gene mutations have been described in other populations. In an attempt to detect mutations, the P gene cDNA was used to search for structural rearrangements or polymorphisms. Six polymorphisms (plR10/Scal, 912/Xbal, 912/HincII, 912/TaqI, 1412/TaqI [two systems] and 1412/HindIII) were detected with subclones of the P cDNA and haplotypes were determined in each family. None were clearly associated with an albinism-related rearrangement. However, strong linkage disequilibrium was observed with alleles at loci toward the 5{prime} region of the gene ({triangle}=0.65, 0.57 and 0.80 for the three polymorphisms detected with the 912 subclone), suggesting a major ty-pos OCA mutation in this region. Haplotype analysis provides evidence for a major mutation associated with the same haplotype in individuals with ephelides (8/12 OCA chromosomes) and those without ephelides (24:30). The presence of other ty-pos OCA associated haplotypes indicates several other less common mutations.

  4. SNP mapping and candidate gene sequencing in the class I region of the HLA complex: searching for multiple sclerosis susceptibility genes in Tasmanians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burfoot, R K; Jensen, C J; Field, J; Stankovich, J; Varney, M D; Johnson, L J; Butzkueven, H; Booth, D; Bahlo, M; Tait, B D; Taylor, B V; Speed, T P; Heard, R; Stewart, G J; Foote, S J; Kilpatrick, T J; Rubio, J P

    2008-01-01

    This study is an extension to previously published work that has linked variation in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I region with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) in Australians from the Island State of Tasmania. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping was performed on an 865-kb candidate region (D6S1683-D6S265) in 166 Tasmanian MS families, and seven candidate genes [ubiquitin D (UBD), olfactory receptor 2H3 (OR2H3), gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptor 1 (GABBR1), myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), HLA-F, HLA complex group 4 (HCG4) and HLA-G] were resequenced. SNPs tagging the extended MS susceptibility haplotype were genotyped in an independent sample of 356 Australian MS trios and SNPs in the MOG gene were significantly over-transmitted to MS cases. We identified significant effects on MS susceptibility of HLA-A*2 (OR: 0.51; P = 0.05) and A*3 (OR: 2.85; P = 0.005), and two coding polymorphisms in the MOG gene (V145I: P = 0.01, OR: 2.2; V142L: P = 0.04, OR: 0.45) after full conditioning on HLA-DRB1. We have therefore identified plausible candidates for the causal MS susceptibility allele, and although not conclusive at this stage, our data provide suggestive evidence for multiple class I MS susceptibility genes.

  5. Cloning of nod gene regions from mesquite rhizobia and bradyrhizobia and nucleotide sequence of the nodD gene from mesquite rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P M; Golly, K F; Virginia, R A; Zyskind, J W

    1995-09-01

    Nitrogen-fixing symbiosis between bacteria and the tree legume mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) is important for the maintenance of many desert ecosystems. Genes essential for nodulation and for extending the host range to mesquite were isolated from cosmid libraries of Rhizobium (mesquite) sp. strain HW17b and Bradyrhizobium (mesquite) sp. strain HW10h and were shown to be closely linked. All of the cosmid clones of rhizobia that extended the host range of Rhizobium (Parasponia) sp. strain NGR234CS to mesquite also supported nodulation of a Sym- mesquite strain. The cosmid clones of bradyrhizobia that extended the host range of Rhizobium (Parasponia) sp. strain NGR234CS to mesquite were only able to confer nodulation ability in the Sym- mesquite strain if they also contained a nodD-hybridizing region. Subclones containing just the nodD genes of either genus did not extend the host range of Rhizobium (Parasponia) sp. to mesquite, indicating that the nodD gene is insufficient for mesquite nodulation. The nodD gene region is conserved among mesquite-nodulating rhizobia regardless of the soil depth from which they were collected, indicating descent from a common ancestor. In a tree of distance relationships, the NodD amino acid sequence from mesquite rhizobia clusters with homologs from symbionts that can infect both herbaceous and tree legumes, including Rhizobium tropici, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv; phaseoli, Rhizobium loti, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

  6. An evolutionarily mobile antigen receptor variable region gene: doubly rearranging NAR-TcR genes in sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscitiello, Michael F; Saltis, Mark; Flajnik, Martin F

    2006-03-28

    Distinctive Ig and T cell receptor (TcR) chains define the two major lineages of vertebrate lymphocyte yet similarly recognize antigen with a single, membrane-distal variable (V) domain. Here we describe the first antigen receptor chain that employs two V domains, which are generated by separate VDJ gene rearrangement events. These molecules have specialized "supportive" TcRdeltaV domains membrane-proximal to domains with most similarity to IgNAR V. The ancestral NAR V gene encoding this domain is hypothesized to have recombined with the TRD locus in a cartilaginous fish ancestor >200 million years ago and encodes the first V domain shown to be used in both Igs and TcRs. Furthermore, these data support the view that gamma/delta TcRs have for long used structural conformations recognizing free antigen.

  7. "Lytic" lesions in autologous bone grafts: demonstration of medullary air pockets on post mortem computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotman, A; Hamilton, K; O'Donnell, C

    2007-12-01

    Donor bone grafts are an important aspect of orthopaedic surgery. The use of plain film as a pathological screening tool before donor bone dispatch has revealed "lytic" lesions in proximal humeri. Donor demographics did not support the diagnosis of myeloma and subsequent computed tomography (CT) scans of these bones identified the lesions as air, not pathology. In total, 27 long bones were scanned and 100% (27/27 cases) exhibited air within the trabecular bone. Three distinct patterns were found: ovoid, linear/branching, and broad channel. A longitudinal course of CT scans was performed to identify at which stage air appeared within the bone. Pre-retrieval, preprocessing, and postprocessing scans revealed that air originated between the retrieval and preprocessing stages of donor bone preparation. There may be multiple aetiology of this phenomenon, including bone retrieval and natural decomposition.

  8. Multiple Lytic Origins of Replication Are Required for Optimal Gammaherpesvirus Fitness In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Sattler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An unresolved question in herpesvirus biology is why some herpesviruses contain more than one lytic origin of replication (oriLyt. Using murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68 as model virus containing two oriLyts, we demonstrate that loss of either of the two oriLyts was well tolerated in some situations but not in others both in vitro and in vivo. This was related to the cell type, the organ or the route of inoculation. Depending on the cell type, different cellular proteins, for example Hexim1 and Rbbp4, were found to be associated with oriLyt DNA. Overexpression or downregulation of these proteins differentially affected the growth of mutants lacking either the left or the right oriLyt. Thus, multiple oriLyts are required to ensure optimal fitness in different cell types and tissues.

  9. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases: a crystallographer's view on a new class of biomass-degrading enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian E. H. Frandsen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs are a new class of microbial copper enzymes involved in the degradation of recalcitrant polysaccharides. They have only been discovered and characterized in the last 5–10 years and have stimulated strong interest both in biotechnology and in bioinorganic chemistry. In biotechnology, the hope is that these enzymes will finally help to make enzymatic biomass conversion, especially of lignocellulosic plant waste, economically attractive. Here, the role of LPMOs is likely to be in attacking bonds that are not accessible to other enzymes. LPMOs have attracted enormous interest since their discovery. The emphasis in this review is on the past and present contribution of crystallographic studies as a guide to functional understanding, with a final look towards the future.

  10. Immediate-early gene region of human cytomegalovirus trans-activates the promoter of human immunodeficiency virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.G.; Kenney, S.C.; Kamine, J.; Pagano, J.S.; Huang, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    Almost all homosexual patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are also actively infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The authors have hypothesized that an interaction between HCMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may exist at a molecular level and contribute to the manifestations of HIV infection. In this report, they demonstrate that the immediate-early gene region of HCMV, in particular immediate-early region 2, trans-activates the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase that is fused to the HIV long terminal repeat and carried by plasmid pHIV-CAT. The HCMV immediate-early trans-activator increases the level of mRNA from the plamid pHIV-CAT. The sequences of HIV that are responsive to trans-activation by the HDMV immediate-early region are distinct from HIV sequences that are required for response to the HIV tat. The stimulation of HIV gene expression by HDMV gene functions could enhance the consequences of HIV infection in persons with previous or concurrent HCMV infection.

  11. Genetic variants in promoters and coding regions of the muscle glycogen synthase and the insulin-responsive GLUT4 genes in NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørbaek, C; Echwald, Søren Morgenthaler; Hubricht, P

    1994-01-01

    regions and regions of importance for translation, as well as coding sequences of the two genes, were studied using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA sequencing. The genetic analyses were performed in subgroups of 52 Caucasian NIDDM patients and 25 age-matched healthy......To examine the hypothesis that variants in the regulatory or coding regions of the glycogen synthase (GS) and insulin-responsive glucose transporter (GLUT4) genes contribute to insulin-resistant glucose processing of muscle from non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients, promoter......'-untranslated region, and the coding region of the GLUT4 gene showed four polymorphisms, all single nucleotide substitutions, positioned at -581, 1, 30, and 582. None of the three changes in the regulatory region of the gene had any major influence on expression of the GLUT4 gene in muscle. The variant at 582...

  12. Isolation and characterization of a T7-like lytic phage for Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the proven relevance of Pseudomonas fluorescens as a spoilage microorganism in milk, fresh meats and refrigerated food products and the recognized potential of bacteriophages as sanitation agents, so far no phages specific for P. fluorescens isolates from dairy industry have been closely characterized in view of their lytic efficiency. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a lytic phage capable to infect a variety of P. fluorescens strains isolated from Portuguese and United States dairy industries. Results Several phages were isolated which showed a different host spectrum and efficiency of lysis. One of the phages, phage ϕIBB-PF7A, was studied in detail due to its efficient lysis of a wide spectrum of P. fluorescens strains and ribotypes. Phage ϕIBB-PF7A with a head diameter of about 63 nm and a tail size of about 13 × 8 nm belongs morphologically to the Podoviridae family and resembles a typical T7-like phage, as analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The phage growth cycle with a detected latent period of 15 min, an eclipse period of 10 min, a burst size of 153 plaque forming units per infected cell, its genome size of approximately 42 kbp, and the size and N-terminal sequence of one of the protein bands, which gave similarity to the major capsid protein 10A, are consistent with this classification. Conclusion The isolated T7-like phage, phage ϕIBB-PF7A, is fast and efficient in lysing different P. fluorescens strains and may be a good candidate to be used as a sanitation agent to control the prevalence of spoilage causing P. fluorescens strains in dairy and food related environments.

  13. In vitro management of hospital Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm using indigenous T7-like lytic phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahiwale, Sangeeta; Tamboli, Nilofer; Thorat, Kiran; Kulkarni, Rajendra; Ackermann, Hans; Kapadnis, Balasaheb

    2011-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen capable of forming biofilm and contaminating medical settings, is responsible for 65% mortality in the hospitals all over the world. This study was undertaken to isolate lytic phages against biofilm forming Ps. aeruginosa hospital isolates and to use them for in vitro management of biofilms in the microtiter plate. Multidrug resistant strains of Ps. aeruginosa were isolated from the hospital environment in and around Pimpri-Chinchwad, Maharashtra by standard microbiological methods. Lytic phages against these strains were isolated from the Pavana river water by double agar layer plaque assay method. A wide host range phage bacterial virus Ps. aeruginosa phage (BVPaP-3) was selected. Electron microscopy revealed that BVPaP-3 phage is a T7-like phage and is a relative of phage species gh-1. A phage at MOI-0.001 could prevent biofilm formation by Ps. aeruginosa hospital strain-6(HS6) on the pegs within 24 h. It could also disperse pre-formed biofilms of all hospital isolates (HS1-HS6) on the pegs within 24 h. Dispersion of biofilm was studied by monitoring log percent reduction in cfu and log percent increase in pfu of respective bacterium and phage on the peg as well as in the well. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that phage BVPaP-3 indeed causes biofilm reduction and bacterial cell killing. Laboratory studies prove that BVPaP-3 is a highly efficient phage in preventing and dispersing biofilms of Ps. aeruginosa. Phage BVPaP-3 can be used as biological disinfectant to control biofilm problem in medical devices.

  14. Trypanosome lytic factor, an antimicrobial high-density lipoprotein, ameliorates Leishmania infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Samanovic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Trypanosome Lytic Factor (TLF is a minor sub-fraction of human high-density lipoprotein that provides innate immunity by completely protecting humans from infection by most species of African trypanosomes, which belong to the Kinetoplastida order. Herein, we demonstrate the broader protective effects of human TLF, which inhibits intracellular infection by Leishmania, a kinetoplastid that replicates in phagolysosomes of macrophages. We show that TLF accumulates within the parasitophorous vacuole of macrophages in vitro and reduces the number of Leishmania metacyclic promastigotes, but not amastigotes. We do not detect any activation of the macrophages by TLF in the presence or absence of Leishmania, and therefore propose that TLF directly damages the parasite in the acidic parasitophorous vacuole. To investigate the physiological relevance of this observation, we have reconstituted lytic activity in vivo by generating mice that express the two main protein components of TLFs: human apolipoprotein L-I and haptoglobin-related protein. Both proteins are expressed in mice at levels equivalent to those found in humans and circulate within high-density lipoproteins. We find that TLF mice can ameliorate an infection with Leishmania by significantly reducing the pathogen burden. In contrast, TLF mice were not protected against infection by the kinetoplastid Trypanosoma cruzi, which infects many cell types and transiently passes through a phagolysosome. We conclude that TLF not only determines species specificity for African trypanosomes, but can also ameliorate an infection with Leishmania, while having no effect on T. cruzi. We propose that TLFs are a component of the innate immune system that can limit infections by their ability to selectively damage pathogens in phagolysosomes within the reticuloendothelial system.

  15. Structure of the Bacteriophage [phi]KZ Lytic Transglycosylase gp144

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokine, Andrei; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G. (SOIBC); (Purdue)

    2008-04-02

    Lytic transglycosylases are enzymes that act on the peptidoglycan of bacterial cell walls. They cleave the glycosidic linkage between N-acetylmuramoyl and N-acetylglucosaminyl residues with the concomitant formation of a 1,6-anhydromuramoyl product. The x-ray structure of the lytic transglycosylase gp144 from the Pseudomonas bacteriophage {phi}KZ has been determined to 2.5-{angstrom} resolution. This protein is probably employed by the bacteriophage in the late stage of the virus reproduction cycle to destroy the bacterial cell wall to release the phage progeny. {phi}KZ gp144 is a 260-residue {alpha}-helical protein composed of a 70-residue N-terminal cell wall-binding domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The fold of the N-terminal domain is similar to the peptidoglycan-binding domain from Streptomyces albus G d-Ala-d-Ala carboxypeptidase and to the N-terminal prodomain of human metalloproteinases that act on extracellular matrices. The C-terminal catalytic domain of gp144 has a structural similarity to the catalytic domain of the transglycosylase Slt70 from Escherichia coli and to lysozymes. The gp144 catalytic domain has an elongated groove that can bind at least five sugar residues at sites A-E. As in other lysozymes, the peptidoglycan cleavage (catalyzed by Glu{sup 115} in gp144) occurs between sugar-binding subsites D and E. The x-ray structure of the {phi}KZ transglycosylase complexed with the chitotetraose (N-acetylglucosamine){sub 4} has been determined to 2.6-{angstrom} resolution. The N-acetylglucosamine residues of the chitotetraose bind in sites A-D.

  16. 16S-23S rRNA Gene Intergenic Spacer Region Variability Helps Resolve Closely Related Sphingomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokajian, Sima; Issa, Nahla; Salloum, Tamara; Ibrahim, Joe; Farah, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonads comprise a physiologically versatile group many of which appear to be adapted to oligotrophic environments, but several also had features in their genomes indicative of host associations. In this study, the extent variability of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer (ITS) sequences of 14 ATCC reference sphingomonad strains and 23 isolates recovered from drinking water was investigated through PCR amplification and sequencing. Sequencing analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS region revealed that the ITS sizes for all studied isolates varied between 415 and 849 bp, while their G+C content was 42.2-57.9 mol%. Five distinct ITS types were identified: ITS(none) (without tRNA genes), ITS(Ala(TGC)), ITS(Ala(TGC)+Ile(GAT)), ITS(Ile(GAT)+Ala(TGC)), and ITS (Ile(GAT)+Pseudo). All of the identified tRNA(Ala(TGC)) molecules consisted of 73 bases, and all of the tRNA(Ile(GAT)) molecules consisted of 74 bases. We also detected striking variability in the size of the ITS region among the various examined isolates. Highest variability was detected within the ITS-2. The importance of this study is that this is the first comparison of the 16S-23S rDNA ITS sequence similarities and tRNA genes from sphingomonads. Collectively the data obtained in this study revealed the heterogeneity and extent of variability within the ITS region compared to the 16S rRNA gene within closely related isolates. Sequence and length polymorphisms within the ITS region along with the ITS types (tRNA-containing or lacking and the type of tRNA) and ITS-2 size and sequence similarities allowed us to overcome the limitation we previously encountered in resolving closely related isolates based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence.

  17. Regional rearrangements in chromosome 15q21 cause formation of cryptic promoters for the CYP19 (aromatase) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demura, Masashi; Martin, Regina M; Shozu, Makio; Sebastian, Siby; Takayama, Kazuto; Hsu, Wei-Tong; Schultz, Roger A; Neely, Kirk; Bryant, Michael; Mendonca, Berenice B; Hanaki, Keiichi; Kanzaki, Susumu; Rhoads, David B; Misra, Madhusmita; Bulun, Serdar E

    2007-11-01

    Production of appropriate quantities of estrogen in various tissues is essential for human physiology. A single gene (CYP19), regulated via tissue-specific promoters, encodes the enzyme aromatase, which catalyzes the key step in estrogen biosynthesis. Aromatase excess syndrome is inherited as autosomal dominant and characterized by high systemic estrogen levels, short stature, prepubertal gynecomastia and testicular failure in males, and premature breast development and uterine pathology in females. The underlying genetic mechanism is poorly understood. Here, we characterize five distinct heterozygous rearrangements responsible for aromatase excess syndrome in three unrelated families and two individuals (nine patients). The constitutively active promoter of one of five ubiquitously expressed genes located within the 11.2 Mb region telomeric to the CYP19 gene in chromosome 15q21 cryptically upregulated aromatase expression in several tissues. Four distinct inversions reversed the transcriptional direction of the promoter of a gene (CGNL1, TMOD3, MAPK6 or TLN2), placing it upstream of the CYP19 coding region in the opposite strand, whereas a deletion moved the promoter of a fifth gene (DMXL2), normally transcribed from the same strand, closer to CYP19. The proximal breakpoints of inversions were located 17-185 kb upstream of the CYP19 coding region. Sequences at the breakpoints suggested that the inversions were caused by intrachromosomal nonhomologous recombination. Splicing the untranslated exon downstream of each promoter onto the identical junction upstream of the translation initiation site created CYP19 mRNA encoding functional aromatase protein. Taken together, small rearrangements may create cryptic promoters that direct inappropriate transcription of CYP19 or other critical genes.

  18. Rapid evolutionary dynamics in a 2.8-Mb chromosomal region containing multiple prolamin and resistance gene families in Aegilops tauschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lingli; Huo, Naxin; Wang, Yi; Deal, Karin; Wang, Daowen; Hu, Tiezhu; Dvorak, Jan; Anderson, Olin D; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Gu, Yong Q

    2016-09-01

    Prolamin and resistance gene families are important in wheat food use and in defense against pathogen attacks, respectively. To better understand the evolution of these multi-gene families, the DNA sequence of a 2.8-Mb genomic region, representing an 8.8 cM genetic interval and harboring multiple prolamin and resistance-like gene families, was analyzed in the diploid grass Aegilops tauschii, the D-genome donor of bread wheat. Comparison with orthologous regions from rice, Brachypodium, and sorghum showed that the Ae. tauschii region has undergone dramatic changes; it has acquired more than 80 non-syntenic genes and only 13 ancestral genes are shared among these grass species. These non-syntenic genes, including prolamin and resistance-like genes, originated from various genomic regions and likely moved to their present locations via sequence evolution processes involving gene duplication and translocation. Local duplication of non-syntenic genes contributed significantly to the expansion of gene families. Our analysis indicates that the insertion of prolamin-related genes occurred prior to the separation of the Brachypodieae and Triticeae lineages. Unlike in Brachypodium, inserted prolamin genes have rapidly evolved and expanded to encode different classes of major seed storage proteins in Triticeae species. Phylogenetic analyses also showed that the multiple insertions of resistance-like genes and subsequent differential expansion of each R gene family. The high frequency of non-syntenic genes and rapid local gene evolution correlate with the high recombination rate in the 2.8-Mb region with nine-fold higher than the genome-wide average. Our results demonstrate complex evolutionary dynamics in this agronomically important region of Triticeae species.

  19. Organization and expression of genes in the genomic region surrounding the glutamine synthetase gene Gln1 from Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thykjaer, T; Danielsen, D; She, Q

    1997-01-01

    a segment carrying two apparently non-functional, fragmented copia-like retroelements, dRtp1 and dRtp2, was identified. Sequence similarity to reverse transcriptase- and RNaseH-coding regions defined the defective retro-elements dRtp1 and dRtp2 within this segment. Terminal repeats were not found but three...

  20. Characterization of the homeobox-containing gene GH6 identifies novel regions of homeobox gene expression in the developing chick embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, H S; Solursh, M

    1994-01-01

    Homeobox genes are a major group of genes involved in regulating, embryogenesis. Here we describe the identification of GH6, a novel chicken homeobox-containing gene and its spatial and temporal expression pattern in the developing chick embryo. Identity comparisons of the GH6 homeodomain suggest that it is closely related to the human homeobox gene H6, with 93% amino acid conservation. Temporally, GH6 expression is highest between embryonic stages 23 and 26; however, some expression is also detectable as early as stage 13. In situ hybridization of stage 23 embryos indicates that GH6 expression occurs at high levels in discrete craniofacial regions including the second branchial arch, the neural retina, the lens epithelium, the optic nerve, and the infundibulum. GH6 expression was also seen in the developing ventricular myocardium, representing the first report of homeobox gene expression in the developing ventricle. GH6 is also expressed in sensory spinal and cranial ganglia, suggesting that GH6 plays several roles not only in the development of craniofacial structures such as the eye and ear, but also in formation of functionally defined ganglia and myocardial structures.

  1. TM6, a novel nuclear matrix attachment region, enhances its flanking gene expression through influencing their chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lusha; Xu, Rui; Lu, Longtao; Zhang, Jiedao; Yang, Guodong; Huang, Jinguang; Wu, Changai; Zheng, Chengchao

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear matrix attachment regions (MARs) regulate the higher-order organization of chromatin and affect the expression of their flanking genes. In this study, a tobacco MAR, TM6, was isolated and demonstrated to remarkably increase the expression of four different promoters that drive gusA gene and adjacent nptII gene. In turn, this expression enhanced the transformation frequency of transgenic tobacco. Deletion analysis of topoisomerase II-binding site, AT-rich element, and MAR recognition signature (MRS) showed that MRS has the highest contribution (61.7%) to the TM6 sequence-mediated transcription activation. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) accessibility assay showed that 35S and NOS promoter regions with TM6 are more sensitive than those without TM6. The analysis also revealed that TM6 reduces promoter DNA methylation which can affect the gusA expression. In addition, two tobacco chromatin-associated proteins, NtMBP1 and NtHMGB, isolated using a yeast one-hybrid system, specifically bound to the TM6II-1 region (761 bp to 870 bp) and to the MRS element in the TM6II-2 (934 bp to 1,021 bp) region, respectively. We thus suggested that TM6 mediated its chromatin opening and chromatin accessibility of its flanking promoters with consequent enhancement of transcription.

  2. Comparing partial least square approaches in a gene- or region-based association study for multiple quantitative phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhongshang; Zhang, Xiaoshuai; Li, Fangyu; Zhao, Jinghua; Xue, Fuzhong

    2014-01-01

    On thinking quantitatively of complex diseases, there are at least three statistical strategies for association studies: one single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on a single trait, gene or region (with multiple SNPs) on a single trait, and gene or region on multiple traits. The third approach is the most general in dissecting genetic mechanisms underlying complex diseases underpinning multiple quantitative traits. Gene or region association methods based on partial least square (PLS) approaches have been shown to have apparent power advantage. However, few approaches have been developed for multiple quantitative phenotypes or traits underlying a condition or disease, and the performance of various PLS approaches used in association studies for multiple quantitative traits have not been assessed. Here we exploit association between multiple SNPs and multiple phenotypes or traits, from a regression perspective, through exhaustive scan statistics (sliding window) using PLS and sparse PLS regressions. Simulations were conducted to assess the performance of the proposed scan statistics and compare them with existing methods. The proposed methods were applied to 12 regions of genome-wide association study data from the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer-Norfolk study.

  3. The study of ministellite region polymorphisms at 3' end of apollpoprotein B gene in atherosclerotic cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yong; Qin Zen

    2000-01-01

    Objective Atheroselerotic cerebral infarction ACI) as agradually progresive atherosclerotic disorder has been thought be a hetero-ground and multictor of environment There are in different epidemiologic state. The relationship of ministellite region polymorphisms at 3′-end of apolipoprotein B gene in Chinese ACI and normal healthy controls were observed. Method The 3′ hyprevariabieministellite polymorphism of apolipoprotein B gene were examined by polymerase chain reaction technique in 84 patients with ACI and 107 age-matched Chinese bealthy controls.The targeted ministellite region were amplified rapidly and accurately, and than identified. Results The frequency distribution of apolipoprotion B 3'ministellite region alleles were in monomold peaks at 37,39 repeat uints in both group,and the big number repeat units(MSRB) is higher in ACI than normal controls.The homozygote genotype of the big number repeat units alleles had a relationship to the high level of apolipoprotein and LDL.There were same tandency in ACI and controls. Conclusion The possibility that there apolipoprotein B 3′ gene ministellite region alleles polymorphism increase the susceptibility to atheroscierosis by means other than by altering lipoprotein levels deserves further consideration

  4. Identification and genetic mapping of a homeobox gene to the 4p16.1 region of human chromosome 4.

    OpenAIRE

    Stadler, H S; Padanilam, B J; Buetow, K; Murray, J.C.; Solursh, M

    1992-01-01

    A human craniofacial cDNA library was screened with a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on the conserved third helix of homeobox genes. From this screening, we identified a homeobox gene, H6, which shared only 57-65% amino acid identity to previously reported homeodomains. H6 was physically mapped to the 4p16.1 region by using somatic cell hybrids containing specific deletions of human chromosome 4. Linkage data from a single-stranded conformational polymorphism derived from the 3' untra...

  5. Copy number loss in the region of the ASPN gene in patients with acetabular dysplasia: ASPN CNV in acetabular dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, T; Ishii, M; Emi, M; Kurogi, S; Funamoto, T; Yonezawa, Y; Tajima, T; Sakamoto, T; Hamada, H; Chosa, E

    2017-07-01

    We have previously investigated an association between the genome copy number variation (CNV) and acetabular dysplasia (AD). Hip osteoarthritis is associated with a genetic polymorphism in the aspartic acid repeat in the N-terminal region of the asporin (ASPN) gene; therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether the CNV of ASPN is involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Acetabular coverage of all subjects was evaluated using radiological findings (Sharp angle, centre-edge (CE) angle, acetabular roof obliquity (ARO) angle, and minimum joint space width). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. Agilent's region-targeted high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarray was used to analyse 64 female AD patients and 32 female control subjects. All statistical analyses were performed using EZR software (Fisher's exact probability test, Pearson's correlation test, and Student's t-test). CNV analysis of the ASPN gene revealed a copy number loss in significantly more AD patients (9/64) than control subjects (0/32; p = 0.0212). This loss occurred within a 60 kb region on 9q22.31, which harbours the gene for ASPN. The mean radiological parameters of these AD patients were significantly worse than those of the other subjects (Sharp angle, p = 0.0056; CE angle, p = 0.0076; ARO angle, p = 0.0065), and all nine patients required operative therapy such as total hip arthroplasty or pelvic osteotomy. Moreover, six of these nine patients had a history of operative or conservative therapy for developmental dysplasia of the hip. Copy number loss within the region harbouring the ASPN gene on 9q22.31 is associated with severe AD. A copy number loss in the ASPN gene region may play a role in the aetiology of severe AD.Cite this article: T. Sekimoto, M. Ishii, M. Emi, S. Kurogi, T. Funamoto, Y. Yonezawa, T. Tajima, T. Sakamoto, H. Hamada, E. Chosa. Copy number loss in the region of the ASPN gene in patients with acetabular dysplasia: ASPN CNV in acetabular

  6. Genome walk of an unknown upstream region of myostatin gene in Spanish goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myostatin (MSTN) gene product also known as growth differentiation factor (GDF8) is a member of the TGF-ß family of secreted proteins. It is shown to be a negative regulator of muscle mass development. Mutations in the MSTN gene have been reported in mice, cattle and humans that lead to muscular hyp...

  7. Mosaic tetracycline Genes and their Flanking Regions in Bifidobacterium thermophilum and lactobacillus johnsonii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Mayrhofer, S.; Domig, K.J.; Flórez, A.B.; Ammor, M.S.; Mayo, B.; Aarts, H.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    For the first time, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes were identified in Lactobacillus johnsonii and in Bifidobacterium thermophilum strains. The L. johnsonii strain investigated contains a complex hybrid gene, tet(O/W/32/O/W/O), whereas the five bifidobacterial strains possess two different

  8. Identifying polymorphisms in the Rattus norvegicus D3 dopamine receptor gene and regulatory region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.M.; D'Souza, U.M.; Berezikov, E.; Cuppen, E.; Sluyter, F.

    2004-01-01

    The D(3) dopamine receptor has been implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and addiction. Sequence variation in the D(3) gene can lead to subtle alteration in receptor structure or gene expression and thus to a different phenotype. In this

  9. Isolation and characterization of the genomic region from Drosophila kuntzei containing the Adh and Adhr genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppentocht, JE; van Delden, W; van de Zande, L

    2002-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the Adh and Adhr genes of Drosophila kuntzei were derived from combined overlapping sequences of clones isolated from a genomic library and from cloned PCR and inverse-PCR fragments. Only a proximal promoter was detected upstream of the Adh gene, indicating that D. kuntze

  10. Association of gene polymorphisms in ABO blood group chromosomal regions and menstrual disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yong; Kong, Gui-Lian; Su, Ya-Li; Zhou, Yan; Lv, Li-Fang; Wang, Qiong; Huang, Bao-Ping; Zheng, Rui-Zhi; Li, Quan-Zhong; Yuan, Hui-Juan; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located near the gene of the ABO blood group play an important role in the genetic aetiology of menstrual disorders (MDs). Polymerase chain reaction-ligase detection reaction technology was used to detect eight SNPs near the ABO gene location on the chromosomes in 250 cases of MD and 250 cases of normal menstruation. The differences in the distribution of each genotype, as well as the allele frequency in the normal and control groups, were analysed using Pearson's χ(2) test to search for disease-associated loci. SHEsis software was used to analyse the linkage disequilibrium and haplotype frequencies and to inspect the correlation between haplotypes and the disease. Compared with the control group, the experimental group exhibited statistically significant differences in the genotype distribution frequencies of the rs657152 locus of the ABO blood group gene and the rs17250673 locus of the tumour necrosis factor cofactor 2 (TRAF2) gene, which is located downstream of the ABO gene. The allele distribution frequencies of rs657152 and rs495828 loci in the ABO blood group gene exhibited significant differences between the groups. Dominant and recessive genetic model analysis of each locus revealed that the experimental group exhibited statistically significant differences from the control group in the genotype distribution frequencies of rs657152 and rs495828 loci, respectively. These results indicate that the ABO blood group gene and TRAF2 gene may be a cause of MDs.

  11. Adipose and muscle tissue gene expression of two genes (NCAPG and LCORL located in a chromosomal region associated with cattle feed intake and gain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K Lindholm-Perry

    Full Text Available A region on bovine chromosome 6 has been implicated in cattle birth weight, growth, and length. Non-SMC conodensin I complex subunit G (NCAPG and ligand dependent nuclear receptor corepressor-like protein (LCORL are positional candidate genes within this region<