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Sample records for lysr type regulator

  1. The Sinorhizobium meliloti LysR family transcriptional factor LsrB is involved in regulation of glutathione biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dawei; Tang, Guirong; Wang, Dong; Luo, Li

    2013-10-01

    Glutathione, a key antioxidant in Sinorhizobium meliloti, is required for the development of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) nitrogen-fixing nodules. This tripeptide can be synthesized by both γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (GshA) and glutathione synthetase (GshB) in Escherichia coli and S. meliloti. Genetic evidence has indicated that the null mutant of S. meliloti gshA or gshB1 does not establish efficient symbiosis on alfalfa. However, the transcriptional regulation of gshA and gshB has not been well understood. Here, S. meliloti LsrB, a member of LysR family transcriptional factors, was found to positively regulate glutathione biosynthesis by activating the transcription of gshA and gshB1 under both free-living and symbiotic conditions. The decrease in glutathione production in the lsrB in-frame deletion mutant (lsrB1-2) was determined by using quadrupole time-of-flight liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The expression of gshA and gshB1 was correspondingly reduced in the mutant under free-living and symbiotic conditions by analyses of real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and promoter-GUS fusions. Interestingly, LsrB positively regulated the transcription of oxyR, which encodes another member of LysR family regulators and responds to oxidative stresses in S. meliloti. The oxyR null mutant produced less glutathione, in which the transcription of gshA was consistently down-regulated. These findings demonstrate that glutathione biosynthesis is positively regulated by both LsrB and OxyR in S. meliloti.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa LysR PA4203 regulator NmoR acts as a repressor of the PA4202 nmoA> gene, encoding a nitronate monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vercammen, Ken; Wei, Qing; Charlier, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    The PA4203 gene encodes a LysR regulator and lies between the ppgL gene (PA4204), which encodes a periplasmic gluconolactonase, and, in the opposite orientation, the PA4202 (nmoA) gene, coding for a nitronate monooxygenase, and ddlA (PA4201), encoding a d-alanine alanine ligase. The intergenic re...

  3. The hexA gene of Erwinia carotovora encodes a LysR homologue and regulates motility and the expression of multiple virulence determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S J; Shih, Y L; Bentley, S D; Salmond, G P

    1998-05-01

    We have identified a gene important for the regulation of exoenzyme virulence factor synthesis in the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora (Ecc) and virulence and motility in Erwinia carotovora ssp. atroseptica (Eca). This gene, hexA (hyperproduction of exoenzymes), is a close relative of the Erwinia chrysanthemi (Echr) gene pecT and encodes a member of the LysR family of transcriptional regulators. hexA mutants in both Ecc and Eca produce abnormally high levels of the exoenzyme virulence factors pectate lyase, cellulase and protease. In addition, Eca hexA mutants show increased expression of the fliA and fliC genes and hypermotility. Consistent with a role as a global regulator, expression of hexA from even a low-copy plasmid can suppress exoenzyme production in Ecc and Eca and motility in Eca. Production of the quorum-sensing pheromone OHHL in Ecc hexA is higher throughout the growth curve compared with the wild-type strain. Overexpression of Ecc hexA also caused widespread effects in several strains of the opportunistic human pathogen, Serratia. Low-copy hexA expression resulted in repression of exoenzyme, pigment and antibiotic production and repression of the spreading phenotype. Finally, mutations in hexA were shown to increase Ecc or Eca virulence in planta.

  4. The solution configurations of inactive and activated DntR have implications for the sliding dimer mechanism of LysR transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerche, Michael; Dian, Cyril; Round, Adam; Lönneborg, Rosa; Brzezinski, Peter; Leonard, Gordon A

    2016-01-28

    LysR Type Transcriptional Regulators (LTTRs) regulate basic metabolic pathways or virulence gene expression in prokaryotes. Evidence suggests that the activation of LTTRs involves a conformational change from an inactive compact apo- configuration that represses transcription to an active, expanded holo- form that promotes it. However, no LTTR has yet been observed to adopt both configurations. Here, we report the results of structural studies of various forms of the LTTR DntR. Crystal structures of apo-DntR and of a partially autoinducing mutant H169T-DntR suggest that active and inactive DntR maintain a compact homotetrameric configuration. However, Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) studies on solutions of apo-, H169T- and inducer-bound holo-DntR indicate a different behaviour, suggesting that while apo-DntR maintains a compact configuration in solution both H169T- and holo-DntR adopt an expanded conformation. Models of the SAXS-obtained solution conformations of apo- and holo-DntR homotetramers in complex with promoter-operator region DNA are consistent with previous observations of a shifting of LTTR DNA binding sites upon activation and a consequent relaxation in the bend of the promoter-operator region DNA. Our results thus provide clear evidence at the molecular level which strongly supports the 'sliding dimer' hypothesis concerning LTTR activation mechanisms.

  5. Standard types of regulation loops; Chaines de regulation types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, M. [ENSAM, Centre d`Enseignement et de Recherche de Lille, 59 - Lille (France)

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to give help in the analysis of industrial regulation problems using different types of real installations. The increasing complexity of industrial systems requires the use of a decomposition-recomposition procedure using a scheme with different blocs. Examples are given to help the non-specialist users in the mastery of essential choices and in the distinction between operational and material separations. The examples concern: the heating loop of a central heating installation, the sensors and actuators of industrial systems (the temperature regulation of a tubular furnace, the electro-hydraulic positioning systems used in machine tools, forming, aeronautics etc.., the regulation of a mixing system for hot and cold fluids, and the regulation of a fluidizing system. The usual types of regulation loops are presented with the different steps of the resolution of a regulation problem. (J.S.) 7 refs.

  6. A Csr-type regulatory system, including small non-coding RNAs, regulates the global virulence regulator RovA of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis through RovM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Böhme, Katja; Rohde, Manfred; Dersch, Petra

    2008-06-01

    The MarR-type regulator RovA controls expression of virulence genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in response to environmental signals. Using a genetic strategy to discover components that influence rovA expression, we identified new regulatory factors with homology to components of the carbon storage regulator system (Csr). We showed that overexpression of a CsrB- or a CsrC-type RNA activates rovA, whereas a CsrA-like protein represses RovA synthesis. We further demonstrate that influence of the Csr system on rovA is indirect and occurs through control of the LysR regulator RovM, which inhibits rovA transcription. The CsrA protein had also a major influence on the motility of Yersinia, which was independent of RovM. The CsrB and CsrC RNAs are differentially expressed in Yersinia. CsrC is highly induced in complex but not in minimal media, indicating that medium-dependent rovM expression is mediated through CsrC. CsrB synthesis is generally very low. However, overexpression of the response regulator UvrY was found to activate CsrB production, which in turn represses CsrC synthesis independent of the growth medium. In summary, the post-transcriptional Csr-type components were shown to be key regulators in the co-ordinated environmental control of physiological processes and virulence factors, which are crucial for the initiation of Yersinia infections.

  7. Characteristics of the LrhA subfamily of transcriptional regulators from Sinorhizobium meliloti

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingsheng Qi; Li Luo; Haiping Cheng; Jiabi Zhu; Guanqiao Yu

    2008-01-01

    In our previous work, we identified 94 putative genes encoding LysR-type transcriptional regulators from Sinorhizobium meliloti. All of these putative lysR genes were mutagenized using plasmid insertions to determine their phenotypes. Six LysR-type regulators, encoded by mutants SMa1979, SMb20715, SMc00820, SMc04163, SMc03975,and SMc04315, showed similar amino acid sequences (30%)and shared the conserved DNA-binding domain with LrhA,HexA, or DgdR. Phenotype analysis of these gene mutants indicated that the regulators control the swimming behaviors of the bacteria, production of quorum-sensing signals, and secretion of extracellular proteins. These characteristics are very similar to those of LrhA, HexA, and DgdR.Thus, we refer to this group as the LrhA subfamily. Sequence analysis showed that a great number of homologous genes of the LrhA subfamily were distributed in the α,β, and γsubdivisions of proteobacteria, and a few in actinobacteria. These findings could provide new clues to the roles of the LysR gene family.

  8. Hantavirus Regulation of Type I Interferon Responses

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    Valery Matthys

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses primarily infect human endothelial cells (ECs and cause two highly lethal human diseases. Early addition of Type I interferon (IFN to ECs blocks hantavirus replication and thus for hantaviruses to be pathogenic they need to prevent early interferon induction. PHV replication is blocked in human ECs, but not inhibited in IFN deficient VeroE6 cells and consistent with this, infecting ECs with PHV results in the early induction of IFNβ and an array of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs. In contrast, ANDV, HTNV, NY-1V and TULV hantaviruses, inhibit early ISG induction and successfully replicate within human ECs. Hantavirus inhibition of IFN responses has been attributed to several viral proteins including regulation by the Gn proteins cytoplasmic tail (Gn-T. The Gn-T interferes with the formation of STING-TBK1-TRAF3 complexes required for IRF3 activation and IFN induction, while the PHV Gn-T fails to alter this complex or regulate IFN induction. These findings indicate that interfering with early IFN induction is necessary for hantaviruses to replicate in human ECs, and suggest that additional determinants are required for hantaviruses to be pathogenic. The mechanism by which Gn-Ts disrupt IFN signaling is likely to reveal potential therapeutic interventions and suggest protein targets for attenuating hantaviruses.

  9. Self-regulation as a type of managerial activity.

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    Anna Algazina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available УДК 342.9The subject. In the context of the ongoing administrative reform in the Russian Federation the issue of self-regulation is becoming increasingly important.Introduction of Institute of self-regulation is intended to reduce the degree of state intervention in private spheres of professional activity, to eliminate excessive administrative barriers, reduce government expenditures on regulation and control in their respective areas of operation, which is especially important in the current economic conditions.However, in Russian legal science is no recognized definition of "self-regulation", but a unity of views on the question of the relationship between self-regulation and state regulation of business relations.In this regard, the author attempts to examine the concept of "self-regulation" through the prism of knowledge about public administration.The purpose of the article is to identify the essential features and to articulate the concept of self-regulation by comparing it with other varieties of regulation.Methodology. The methodological basis for the study: general scientific methods (analysis, synthesis, comparison, description; private and academic (interpretation, formal-legal.Results, scope. Based on the analysis allocated in the science of administrative law approaches to the system of public administration justifies the conclusion that the notion "regulation" is specific in relation to the generic concept of "management" and is a kind of management, consisting in the drafting of rules of conduct and sanctions for non-compliance or inadequate performance.In addition, the article highlights the problem of the genesis of self-regulation, building a system of principles of self-regulation, comparison of varieties of self-regulatory organizations among themselves.Conclusions. The comparison of self-regulation other types of regulation (such as state regulation and co-regulation highlighted the essential features of this phenomenon

  10. Skeletal muscle deiodinase type 2 regulation during illness in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Kwakkel; H.C. van Beeren; M.T. Ackermans; M. Platvoet-ter Schiphorst; E. Fliers; W.M. Wiersinga; A. Boelen

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that skeletal muscle deiodinase type 2 (D2) mRNA (listed as Dio2 in MGI Database) is up-regulated in an animal model of acute illness. However, human Studies on the expression Of muscle D2 during illness report conflicting data. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of skel

  11. Innate-Type and Acquired-Type Allergy Regulated by IL-33

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    Tomohiro Yoshimoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose two types of allergic response: IgE-dependent and IgE-independent, and designate these as 'acquired-type allergy' and 'innate-type allergy', respectively. IL-33 stimulates both innate (basophils, mast cells, or group 2 innate lymphoid cells and acquired (Th2 cells allergy-related cells to induce and/or augment Th2 cytokine production, which leads to eosinophilic inflammation in vivo. Thus, IL-33 is an essential regulator for both 'innate-type allergy' and 'acquired-type allergy', and might be an attractive therapeutic target for allergic diseases.

  12. Adult-type hypolactasia and regulation of lactase expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Jesper Thorvald

    2005-01-01

    A common genetically determined polymorphism in the human population leads to two distinct phenotypes in adults, lactase persistence and adult-type hypolactasia (lactase non-persistence). All healthy newborn children express high levels of lactase and are able to digest large quantities of lactose......, the main carbohydrate in milk. Individuals with adult-type hypolactasia lose their lactase expression before adulthood and consequently often become lactose intolerant with associated digestive problems (e.g. diarrhoea). In contrast, lactase persistent individuals have a lifelong lactase expression...... and are able to digest lactose as adults. Lactase persistence can be regarded as the mutant phenotype since other mammals down-regulate their lactase expression after weaning (the postweaning decline). This phenomenon does not occur in lactase persistent individuals. The regulation of lactase expression...

  13. Yersinia Type III Secretion System Master Regulator LcrF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiesow, Leah; Lam, Hanh

    2015-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens express a type III secretion (T3SS) system to enable growth and survival within a host. The three human-pathogenic Yersinia species, Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica, encode the Ysc T3SS, whose expression is controlled by an AraC-like master regulator called LcrF. In this review, we discuss LcrF structure and function as well as the environmental cues and pathways known to regulate LcrF expression. Similarities and differences in binding motifs and modes of action between LcrF and the Pseudomonas aeruginosa homolog ExsA are summarized. In addition, we present a new bioinformatics analysis that identifies putative LcrF binding sites within Yersinia target gene promoters. PMID:26644429

  14. Yersinia Type III Secretion System Master Regulator LcrF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiesow, Leah; Lam, Hanh; Dersch, Petra; Auerbuch, Victoria

    2015-12-07

    Many Gram-negative pathogens express a type III secretion (T3SS) system to enable growth and survival within a host. The three human-pathogenic Yersinia species, Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica, encode the Ysc T3SS, whose expression is controlled by an AraC-like master regulator called LcrF. In this review, we discuss LcrF structure and function as well as the environmental cues and pathways known to regulate LcrF expression. Similarities and differences in binding motifs and modes of action between LcrF and the Pseudomonas aeruginosa homolog ExsA are summarized. In addition, we present a new bioinformatics analysis that identifies putative LcrF binding sites within Yersinia target gene promoters.

  15. Activated Type 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells regulate Beige Fat Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Woo; Odegaard, Justin I.; Mukundan, Lata; Qiu, Yifu; Molofsky, Ari B.; Nussbaum, Jesse C.; Yun, Karen; Locksley, Richard M.; Chawla, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), an innate source of the type 2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-5 and -13, participate in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Although type 2 immunity is critically important for mediating metabolic adaptations to environmental cold, the functions of ILC2s in beige or brown fat development are poorly defined. We report here that activation of ILC2s by IL-33 is sufficient to promote the growth of functional beige fat in thermoneutral mice. Mechanistically, ILC2 activation results in the proliferation of bipotential adipocyte precursors (APs) and their subsequent commitment to the beige fat lineage. Loss- and gain-of-function studies reveal that ILC2-and eosinophil-derived type 2 cytokines stimulate signaling via the IL-4Rα in PDGFRα+ APs to promote beige fat biogenesis. Together, our results highlight a critical role for ILC2s and type 2 cytokines in the regulation of adipocyte precursor numbers and fate, and as a consequence, adipose tissue homeostasis. PMID:25543153

  16. Rigidity sensing and adaptation through regulation of integrin types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Bazellières, Elsa; Allen, Michael D.; Andreu, Ion; Oria, Roger; Sunyer, Raimon; Gomm, Jennifer J.; Marshall, John F.; Jones, J. Louise; Trepat, Xavier; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2014-06-01

    Tissue rigidity regulates processes in development, cancer and wound healing. However, how cells detect rigidity, and thereby modulate their behaviour, remains unknown. Here, we show that sensing and adaptation to matrix rigidity in breast myoepithelial cells is determined by the bond dynamics of different integrin types. Cell binding to fibronectin through either α5β1 integrins (constitutively expressed) or αvβ6 integrins (selectively expressed in cancer and development) adapts force generation, actin flow and integrin recruitment to rigidities associated with healthy or malignant tissue, respectively. In vitro experiments and theoretical modelling further demonstrate that this behaviour is explained by the different binding and unbinding rates of both integrin types to fibronectin. Moreover, rigidity sensing through differences in integrin bond dynamics applies both when integrins bind separately and when they compete for binding to fibronectin.

  17. 76 FR 50461 - Information Collection Requirement; Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Types of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... Defense Acquisition Regulations System Information Collection Requirement; Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Types of Contracts AGENCY: Defense Acquisition Regulations System, Department of... information collection requirement. SUMMARY: In compliance with Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the...

  18. The highly conserved Escherichia coli transcription factor YhaJ regulates aromatic compound degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Palevsky

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aromatic compound 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT, a common impurity in 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT production, has been suggested as a tracer for the presence of TNT-based landmines due to its stability and high volatility. We have previously described an Escherichia coli bioreporter capable of detecting the presence of DNT vapors, harboring a fusion of the yqjF gene promoter, to a reporter element. However, the DNT metabolite, which is the direct inducer of yqjF, has not yet been identified, nor has the regulatory mechanism of the induction been clarified. We demonstrate here that the YhaJ protein, a member of the LysR type family, acts as a transcriptional regulator of yqjF activation, as well as of a panel of additional E. coli genes. This group of genes share a common sequence motif in their promoters, which is suggested here as a putative YhaJ-box. In addition, we have linked YhaJ to the regulation of quinol-like compound degradation in the cell, and identified yhaK as playing a role in the degradation of DNT.

  19. Regulation of hemolysin expression and virulence of Staphylococcus aureus by a serine/threonine kinase and phosphatase.

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    Kellie Burnside

    Full Text Available Exotoxins, including the hemolysins known as the alpha (alpha and beta (beta toxins, play an important role in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus infections. A random transposon library was screened for S. aureus mutants exhibiting altered hemolysin expression compared to wild type. Transposon insertions in 72 genes resulting in increased or decreased hemolysin expression were identified. Mutations inactivating a putative cyclic di-GMP synthetase and a serine/threonine phosphatase (Stp1 were found to reduce hemolysin expression, and mutations in genes encoding a two component regulator PhoR, LysR family transcriptional regulator, purine biosynthetic enzymes and a serine/threonine kinase (Stk1 increased expression. Transcription of the hla gene encoding alpha toxin was decreased in a Deltastp1 mutant strain and increased in a Deltastk1 strain. Microarray analysis of a Deltastk1 mutant revealed increased transcription of additional exotoxins. A Deltastp1 strain is severely attenuated for virulence in mice and elicits less inflammation and IL-6 production than the Deltastk1 strain. In vivo phosphopeptide enrichment and mass spectrometric analysis revealed that threonine phosphorylated peptides corresponding to Stk1, DNA binding histone like protein (HU, serine-aspartate rich fibrinogen/bone sialoprotein binding protein (SdrE and a hypothetical protein (NWMN_1123 were present in the wild type and not in the Deltastk1 mutant. Collectively, these studies suggest that Stk1 mediated phosphorylation of HU, SrdE and NWMN_1123 affects S. aureus gene expression and virulence.

  20. A LysR-family transcriptional regulator required for virulence in Brucella abortus is highly conserved among the α-proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Lauren M; Budnick, James A; Blanchard, Catlyn; Dunman, Paul M; Caswell, Clayton C

    2015-10-01

    Small RNAs are principal elements of bacterial gene regulation and physiology. Two small RNAs in Brucella abortus, AbcR1 and AbcR2, are required for wild-type virulence. Examination of the abcR loci revealed the presence of a gene encoding a LysR-type transcriptional regulator flanking abcR2 on chromosome 1. Deletion of this lysR gene (bab1_1517) resulted in the complete loss of abcR2 expression while no difference in abcR1 expression was observed. The B. abortus bab1_1517 mutant strain was significantly attenuated in macrophages and mice, and bab1_1517 was subsequently named vtlR for virulence-associated transcriptional LysR-family regulator. Microarray analysis revealed three additional genes encoding small hypothetical proteins also under the control of VtlR. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that VtlR binds directly to the promoter regions of abcR2 and the three hypothetical protein-encoding genes, and DNase I footprint analysis identified the specific nucleotide sequence in these promoters that VtlR binds to and drives gene expression. Strikingly, orthologs of VtlR are encoded in a wide range of host-associated α-proteobacteria, and it is likely that the VtlR genetic system represents a common regulatory circuit critical for host-bacterium interactions.

  1. Regulation of the Yersinia type III secretion system: traffic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewoody, Rebecca S.; Merritt, Peter M.; Marketon, Melanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia species, as well as many other Gram-negative pathogens, use a type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins from the bacterial cytoplasm to the host cytosol. This T3SS resembles a molecular syringe, with a needle-like shaft connected to a basal body structure, which spans the inner and outer bacterial membranes. The basal body of the injectisome shares a high degree of homology with the bacterial flagellum. Extending from the T3SS basal body is the needle, which is a polymer of a single protein, YscF. The distal end of the needle serves as a platform for the assembly of a tip complex composed of LcrV. Though never directly observed, prevailing models assume that LcrV assists in the insertion of the pore-forming proteins YopB and YopD into the host cell membrane. This completes a bridge between the bacterium and host cell to provide a continuous channel through which effectors are delivered. Significant effort has gone into understanding how the T3SS is assembled, how its substrates are recognized and how substrate delivery is controlled. Arguably the latter topic is the least understood; however, recent advances have provided new insight, and therefore, this review will focus primarily on summarizing the current state of knowledge regarding the control of substrate delivery by the T3SS. Specifically, we will discuss the roles of YopK, as well as YopN and YopE, which have long been linked to regulation of translocation. We also propose models whereby the YopK regulator communicates with the basal body of the T3SS to control translocation. PMID:23390616

  2. TYPE I INTERFERON REGULATES THE EXPRESSION OF LONG NONCODING RNAs

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    Elena eCarnero

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Interferons (IFNs are key players in the antiviral response. IFN sensing by the cell activates transcription of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs able to induce an antiviral state by affecting viral replication and release. IFN also induces the expression of ISGs that function as negative regulators to limit the strength and duration of IFN response. The ISGs identified so far belong to coding genes. However, only a small proportion of the transcriptome corresponds to coding transcripts and it has been estimated that there could be as many coding as long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs. To address whether IFN can also regulate the expression of lncRNAs, we analyzed the transcriptome of HuH7 cells treated or not with IFNα2 by expression arrays. Analysis of the arrays showed increased levels of several well-characterized coding genes that respond to IFN both at early or late times. Furthermore, we identified several IFN-stimulated or -downregulated lncRNAs (ISRs and IDRs. Further validation showed that ISR2, 8 and 12 expression mimics that of their neighboring genes GBP1, IRF1 and IL6, respectively, all related to the IFN response. These genes are induced in response to different doses of IFNα2 in different cell lines at early (ISR2 or 8 or later (ISR12 time points. IFNβ also induced the expression of these lncRNAs. ISR2 and 8 were also induced by an influenza virus unable to block the IFN response but not by other wild-type lytic viruses tested. Surprisingly, both ISR2 and 8 were significantly upregulated in cultured cells and livers from patients infected with HCV. Increased levels of ISR2 were also detected in patients chronically infected with HIV. This is relevant as genome-wide guilt-by-association studies predict that ISR2, 8 and 12 may function in viral processes, in the IFN pathway and the antiviral response. Therefore, we propose that these lncRNAs could be induced by IFN to function as positive or negative regulators of the antiviral response.

  3. Opposite regulation of brain angiotensin type 1 and type 2 receptors in cold-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, J F; Phillips, M I

    2001-03-02

    Rats exposed chronically to mild cold (5 degrees C/41 degrees F) develop hypertension. This cold-induced hypertension (CIH) is an environmentally induced, non-surgical, non-pharmacological and non-genetic model for studying hypertension in rats. The blood renin angiotensin system (RAS) appears to play a role in both initiating and maintaining the high blood pressure in CIH. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of brain angiotensin type 1 and type 2 receptors (AT1R and AT2R) in CIH. Sprague-Dawley adult male rats were used. Thirty-six rats were kept in a cold room at 5 degrees C and the other 36 were kept at 24 degrees C as controls. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was recorded by tail cuff. The SBP was elevated in rats exposed to cold within 1 week (n=12, P>0.05), significantly increased at 3 weeks (Pcold-treated and the controls were sacrificed at 1, 3 and 5 weeks. Specific brain sections were removed, either for reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to measure mRNA, or for autoradiography to measure receptor binding for AT1R and AT2R. The AT1R mRNA was increased significantly in hypothalamus and brainstem after the first week in cold-treated rats and was maintained throughout the time of exposure to cold (n=6, Pcold-treated rats after exposure to cold. The experiments show differential regulation of RAS components, AT1R and AT2R, in different brain areas in cold-exposed rats and provide evidence that up-regulated AT1R and down-regulated AT2R in different brain areas are involved in CIH. The opposing directions of expression of AT1R and AT2R suggest that they play counterbalancing roles in brain function.

  4. Vibrio cholerae Response Regulator VxrB Controls Colonization and Regulates the Type VI Secretion System.

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    Andrew T Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS are used by bacteria to sense and respond to their environment. TCS are typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK and a response regulator (RR. The Vibrio cholerae genome encodes 52 RR, but the role of these RRs in V. cholerae pathogenesis is largely unknown. To identify RRs that control V. cholerae colonization, in-frame deletions of each RR were generated and the resulting mutants analyzed using an infant mouse intestine colonization assay. We found that 12 of the 52 RR were involved in intestinal colonization. Mutants lacking one previously uncharacterized RR, VCA0566 (renamed VxrB, displayed a significant colonization defect. Further experiments showed that VxrB phosphorylation state on the predicted conserved aspartate contributes to intestine colonization. The VxrB regulon was determined using whole genome expression analysis. It consists of several genes, including those genes that create the type VI secretion system (T6SS. We determined that VxrB is required for T6SS expression using several in vitro assays and bacterial killing assays, and furthermore that the T6SS is required for intestinal colonization. vxrB is encoded in a four gene operon and the other vxr operon members also modulate intestinal colonization. Lastly, though ΔvxrB exhibited a defect in single-strain intestinal colonization, the ΔvxrB strain did not show any in vitro growth defect. Overall, our work revealed that a small set of RRs is required for intestinal colonization and one of these regulators, VxrB affects colonization at least in part through its regulation of T6SS genes.

  5. Vibrio cholerae Response Regulator VxrB Controls Colonization and Regulates the Type VI Secretion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Andrew T; Ottemann, Karen M; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2015-05-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS) are used by bacteria to sense and respond to their environment. TCS are typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). The Vibrio cholerae genome encodes 52 RR, but the role of these RRs in V. cholerae pathogenesis is largely unknown. To identify RRs that control V. cholerae colonization, in-frame deletions of each RR were generated and the resulting mutants analyzed using an infant mouse intestine colonization assay. We found that 12 of the 52 RR were involved in intestinal colonization. Mutants lacking one previously uncharacterized RR, VCA0566 (renamed VxrB), displayed a significant colonization defect. Further experiments showed that VxrB phosphorylation state on the predicted conserved aspartate contributes to intestine colonization. The VxrB regulon was determined using whole genome expression analysis. It consists of several genes, including those genes that create the type VI secretion system (T6SS). We determined that VxrB is required for T6SS expression using several in vitro assays and bacterial killing assays, and furthermore that the T6SS is required for intestinal colonization. vxrB is encoded in a four gene operon and the other vxr operon members also modulate intestinal colonization. Lastly, though ΔvxrB exhibited a defect in single-strain intestinal colonization, the ΔvxrB strain did not show any in vitro growth defect. Overall, our work revealed that a small set of RRs is required for intestinal colonization and one of these regulators, VxrB affects colonization at least in part through its regulation of T6SS genes.

  6. 75 FR 18034 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Research and Development Contract Type...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... Regulation Supplement; Research and Development Contract Type Determination (DFARS Case 2006-D053) AGENCY... a major defense acquisition program (MDAP) to select the contract type for a development program... requires DoD to modify regulations regarding the determination of contract type for development programs...

  7. Characterisation of SalRAB a salicylic acid inducible positively regulated efflux system of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae 3841.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tett, Adrian J; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Poole, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid is an important signalling molecule in plant-microbe defence and symbiosis. We analysed the transcriptional responses of the nitrogen fixing plant symbiont, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae 3841 to salicylic acid. Two MFS-type multicomponent efflux systems were induced in response to salicylic acid, rmrAB and the hitherto undescribed system salRAB. Based on sequence similarity salA and salB encode a membrane fusion and inner membrane protein respectively. salAB are positively regulated by the LysR regulator SalR. Disruption of salA significantly increased the sensitivity of the mutant to salicylic acid, while disruption of rmrA did not. A salA/rmrA double mutation did not have increased sensitivity relative to the salA mutant. Pea plants nodulated by salA or rmrA strains did not have altered nodule number or nitrogen fixation rates, consistent with weak expression of salA in the rhizosphere and in nodule bacteria. However, BLAST analysis revealed seventeen putative efflux systems in Rlv3841 and several of these were highly differentially expressed during rhizosphere colonisation, host infection and bacteroid differentiation. This suggests they have an integral role in symbiosis with host plants.

  8. Characterisation of SalRAB a salicylic acid inducible positively regulated efflux system of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae 3841.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian J Tett

    Full Text Available Salicylic acid is an important signalling molecule in plant-microbe defence and symbiosis. We analysed the transcriptional responses of the nitrogen fixing plant symbiont, Rhizobium leguminosarum bv viciae 3841 to salicylic acid. Two MFS-type multicomponent efflux systems were induced in response to salicylic acid, rmrAB and the hitherto undescribed system salRAB. Based on sequence similarity salA and salB encode a membrane fusion and inner membrane protein respectively. salAB are positively regulated by the LysR regulator SalR. Disruption of salA significantly increased the sensitivity of the mutant to salicylic acid, while disruption of rmrA did not. A salA/rmrA double mutation did not have increased sensitivity relative to the salA mutant. Pea plants nodulated by salA or rmrA strains did not have altered nodule number or nitrogen fixation rates, consistent with weak expression of salA in the rhizosphere and in nodule bacteria. However, BLAST analysis revealed seventeen putative efflux systems in Rlv3841 and several of these were highly differentially expressed during rhizosphere colonisation, host infection and bacteroid differentiation. This suggests they have an integral role in symbiosis with host plants.

  9. Ocular Albinism Type 1 Regulates Melanogenesis in Mouse Melanocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianzhi Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate whether ocular albinism type 1 (OA1 is differentially expressed in the skin of mice with different coat colors and to determine its correlation with coat color establishment in mouse, the expression patterns and tissue distribution characterization of OA1 in the skin of mice with different coat colors were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence staining and Western blot. The qRT-PCR analysis revealed that OA1 mRNA was expressed in all mice skin samples tested, with the highest expression level in brown skin, a moderate expression level in black skin and the lowest expression level in gray skin. Positive OA1 protein bands were also detected in all skin samples by Western blot analysis. The relative expression levels of OA1 protein in both black and brown skin were significantly higher than that in gray skin, but there was no significant difference between black and brown mice. Immunofluorescence assays revealed that OA1 was mainly expressed in the hair follicle matrix, the inner and outer root sheath in the skin tissues with different coat colors. To get further insight into the important role of OA1 in the melanocytes’ pigmentation, we transfected the OA1 into mouse melanocytes and then detected the relative expression levels of pigmentation-related gene. Simultaneously, we tested the melanin content of melanocytes. As a result, the overexpression of OA1 significantly increased the expression levels of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF, tyrosinase (TYR, tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1 and premelanosome protein (PMEL. However, the tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2 level was attenuated. By contrast, the level of glycoprotein non-metastatic melanoma protein b (GPNMB was unaffected by OA1 overexpression. Furthermore, we observed a significant increase in melanin content in mouse melanocyte transfected OA1. Therefore, we propose that OA1 may

  10. Type I Interferons and Natural Killer Cell Regulation in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lena; Aigner, Petra; Stoiber, Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are known to mediate antitumor effects against several tumor types and have therefore been commonly used in clinical anticancer treatment. However, how IFN signaling exerts its beneficial effects is only partially understood. The clinically relevant activity of type I IFNs has been mainly attributed to their role in tumor immune surveillance. Different mechanisms have been postulated to explain how type I IFNs stimulate the immune system. On the one hand, they modulate innate immune cell subsets such as natural killer (NK) cells. On the other hand, type I IFNs also influence adaptive immune responses. Here, we review evidence for the impact of type I IFNs on immune surveillance against cancer and highlight the role of NK cells therein.

  11. TNFα PRODUCTION AND APOPTOSIS REGULATION IN VIRAL HEPATITIS TYPE C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Novitsky

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Chronical course of infection caused by hepatitis C virus is accompanied by increase Fas-positive lymphocytes of peripheral blood. Cultivation of agglutinin-stimulated mononuclear blood cells of patients with chronic hepatitis C revealed inhibition of apoptotic reactions of blood lymphocytes. This fact correlated with decrease in production of TNFα and accelerated synthesis of soluble receptor for this cytokine. We suggest a virus-specific influence on apoptosis regulation of target cells.

  12. Human muscle fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets by exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Dorte Enggaard; Albers, Peter Hjorth; Prats, Clara

    2015-01-01

    are expressed in a fibre type-dependent manner and that fibre type-specific activation of AMPK and downstream targets is dependent on exercise intensity. Pools of type I and II fibres were prepared from biopsies of m. vastus lateralis from healthy men before and after two exercise trials; A) continuous cycling......AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a regulator of energy homeostasis during exercise. Studies suggest muscle fibre type-specific AMPK expression. However, fibre type-specific regulation of AMPK and downstream targets during exercise has not been proven. We hypothesized that AMPK subunits...

  13. Schisandra lignans production regulated by different bioreactor type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, Agnieszka; Kokotkiewicz, Adam; Luczkiewicz, Maria; Ekiert, Halina

    2017-04-10

    Schisandra chinensis (Chinese magnolia vine) is a rich source of therapeutically relevant dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans with anticancer, immunostimulant and hepatoprotective activities. In this work, shoot cultures of S. chinensis were grown in different types of bioreactors with the aim to select a system suitable for the large scale in vitro production of schisandra lignans. The cultures were maintained in Murashige-Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 3mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine (BA) and 1mg/l 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Five bioreactors differing with respect to cultivation mode were tested: two liquid-phase systems (baloon-type bioreactor and bubble-column bioreactor with biomass immobilization), the gas-phase spray bioreactor and two commercially available temporary immersion systems: RITA(®) and Plantform. The experiments were run for 30 and 60 days in batch mode. The harvested shoots were evaluated for growth and lignan content determined by LC-DAD and LC-DAD-ESI-MS. Of the tested bioreactors, temporary immersion systems provided the best results with respect to biomass production and lignan accumulation: RITA(®) bioreactor yielded 17.86g/l (dry weight) during 60 day growth period whereas shoots grown for 30 days in Plantform bioreactor contained the highest amount of lignans (546.98mg/100g dry weight), with schisandrin, deoxyschisandrin and gomisin A as the major constituents (118.59, 77.66 and 67.86mg/100g dry weight, respectively). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Microbiota regulates type 1 diabetes through Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Michael P; Volchkov, Pavel; Kobayashi, Koichi S; Chervonsky, Alexander V

    2015-08-11

    Deletion of the innate immune adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D) results in microbiota-dependent protection from the disease: MyD88-negative mice in germ-free (GF), but not in specific pathogen-free conditions develop the disease. These results could be explained by expansion of particular protective bacteria ("specific lineage hypothesis") or by dominance of negative (tolerizing) signaling over proinflammatory signaling ("balanced signal hypothesis") in mutant mice. Here we found that colonization of GF mice with a variety of intestinal bacteria was capable of reducing T1D in MyD88-negative (but not wild-type NOD mice), favoring the balanced signal hypothesis. However, the receptors and signaling pathways involved in prevention or facilitation of the disease remained unknown. The protective signals triggered by the microbiota were revealed by testing NOD mice lacking MyD88 in combination with knockouts of several critical components of innate immune sensing for development of T1D. Only MyD88- and TIR-domain containing adapter inducing IFN β (TRIF) double deficient NOD mice developed the disease. Thus, TRIF signaling (likely downstream of Toll-like receptor 4, TLR4) serves as one of the microbiota-induced tolerizing pathways. At the same time another TLR (TLR2) provided prodiabetic signaling by controlling the microbiota, as reduction in T1D incidence caused by TLR2 deletion was reversed in GF TLR2-negative mice. Our results support the balanced signal hypothesis, in which microbes provide signals that both promote and inhibit autoimmunity by signaling through different receptors, including receptors of the TLR family.

  15. Self-Regulation in Three Types of Online Interaction: A Scale Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Moon-Heum; Cho, YoonJung

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a scale with which to examine students' self-regulation (SR) in three types of online interaction. Using scale development steps, we constructed the online self-regulation questionnaire (OSRQ), a self-report survey. A total of 799 online students participated in the study. Data from 400 randomly selected…

  16. Impaired up-regulation of type II corticosteroid receptors in hippocampus of aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, J C; Fleenor, D G; Kerr, D S; Landfield, P W

    1989-01-30

    Several recent investigations have reported a decline of rat hippocampal corticosteroid-binding receptors (CSRs) with aging. This decline has been proposed to be an initial cause (through disinhibition) of the elevated adrenal steroid secretion that apparently occurs with aging; however, it could instead be an effect of corticoid elevation (through down-regulation). In order to assess the effects of age on CSR biosynthetic capacity in the absence of down-regulatory influences of endogenous corticoids, as well as to study aging changes in CSR plasticity, we examined the up-regulation of hippocampal CSR that follows adrenalectomy (ADX). The rat hippocampus contains at least two types of CSR binding and differential analysis of types I and II CSR was accomplished by selective displacement of [3H]corticosterone with RU-28362, a specific type II agonist. In young (3 months old) Fischer-344 rat hippocampus, up-regulation of type II binding above 2-day ADX baseline was present by 3-7 days and increased still further by 8-10 days post-ADX; type I CSR density did not change significantly between 1 and 10 days post-ADX. However, in aged (24-26 months old) rats, type II CSR up-regulation did not occur over the 10 day post-ADX period. Thus, the age-related impairment of type II up-regulation may reflect an intrinsic deficit in CSR biosynthesis or lability that is independent of the acute endogenous adrenal steroid environment.

  17. Regulation of type 1 fimbriae synthesis and biofilm formation by the transcriptional regulator LrhA of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Caroline; Kleefeld, Alexandra; Lehnen, Daniela; Heintz, Margit; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Nagy, Gábor; Michaelis, Kai; Emödy, Levente; Polen, Tino; Rachel, Reinhard; Wendisch, Volker F; Unden, Gottfried

    2005-10-01

    Type 1 fimbriae of Escherichia coli facilitate attachment to the host mucosa and promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The transcriptional regulator LrhA, which is known as a repressor of flagellar, motility and chemotaxis genes, regulates biofilm formation and expression of type 1 fimbriae. Whole-genome expression profiling revealed that inactivation of lrhA results in an increased expression of structural components of type 1 fimbriae. In vitro, LrhA bound to the promoter regions of the two fim recombinases (FimB and FimE) that catalyse the inversion of the fimA promoter, and to the invertible element itself. Translational lacZ fusions with these genes and quantification of fimE transcript levels by real-time PCR showed that LrhA influences type 1 fimbrial phase variation, primarily via activation of FimE, which is required for the ON-to-OFF transition of the fim switch. Enhanced type 1 fimbrial expression as a result of lrhA disruption was confirmed by mannose-sensitive agglutination of yeast cells. Biofilm formation was stimulated by lrhA inactivation and completely suppressed upon LrhA overproduction. The effects of LrhA on biofilm formation were exerted via the changed levels of surface molecules, most probably both flagella and type 1 fimbriae. Together, the data show a role for LrhA as a repressor of type 1 fimbrial expression, and thus as a regulator of the initial stages of biofilm development and, presumably, bacterial adherence to epithelial host cells also.

  18. New Type Regulating Valve Applied in Cooling System of Blast Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Sheng-ping; ZOU De-yu; XU Gang; LU De-chang

    2004-01-01

    A new type regulating valve with the cooling mode of constant temperature difference water supply, temperature difference self-operated regulating valve, was introduced into blast furnace cooling system to overcome shortcomings of the cooling mode of constant flow rate water supply. The results show that the temperature difference between inlet and outlet water of cooling wall can be decreased greatly and steadily, and the water supply for blast furnace cooling can be reduced considerably.

  19. Regulation of the type Mb sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporter expression in the intestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin WANG; Yulong YIN

    2009-01-01

    Phosphate (Pi) plays important roles in growth, development, bone mineralization, energy metabolism, nucleic acid synthesis, cell signaling, and acid-base regulation. The rate of intestinal absorption of Pi is a major determinant of Pi homeostasis. The type lib sodium- dependent Pi cotransporter (NaPi-Iib) is responsible for intestinal Pi absorption. Many physiological factors regulate the rate of Pi absorption via modulating the expression of NaPi-Iib in the intestine. In this review, we summarize the role of these factors in the regulation of NaPi-Iib expression in the intestine.

  20. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina;

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... to control conditions. We therefore hypothesize that cysteine residues increase TRPC6 channel protein expression in humans....

  1. RND-type efflux pumps in multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii: major role for AdeABC overexpression and AdeRS mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2013-07-01

    Increased expression of chromosomal genes for resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux systems plays a major role in the multidrug resistance (MDR) of Acinetobacter baumannii. However, the relative contributions of the three most prevalent pumps, AdeABC, AdeFGH, and AdeIJK, have not been evaluated in clinical settings. We have screened 14 MDR clinical isolates shown to be distinct on the basis of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for the presence and overexpression of the three Ade efflux systems and analyzed the sequences of the regulators AdeRS, a two-component system, for AdeABC and AdeL, a LysR-type regulator, for AdeFGH. Gene adeB was detected in 13 of 14 isolates, and adeG and the intrinsic adeJ gene were detected in all strains. Significant overexpression of adeB was observed in 10 strains, whereas only 7 had moderately increased levels of expression of AdeFGH, and none overexpressed AdeIJK. Thirteen strains had reduced susceptibility to tigecycline, but there was no correlation between tigecycline MICs and the levels of AdeABC expression, suggesting the presence of other mechanisms for tigecycline resistance. No mutations were found in the highly conserved LysR regulator of the nine strains expressing AdeFGH. In contrast, functional mutations were found in conserved domains of AdeRS in all the strains that overexpressed AdeABC with two mutational hot spots, one in AdeS near histidine 149 suggesting convergent evolution and the other in the DNA binding domain of AdeR compatible with horizontal gene transfer. This report outlines the high incidence of AdeABC efflux pump overexpression in MDR A. baumannii as a result of a variety of single mutations in the corresponding two-component regulatory system.

  2. Environmental regulation of type X collagen production by cultures of limb mesenchyme, mesectoderm, and sternal chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solursh, M; Jensen, K L; Reiter, R S; Schmid, T M; Linsenmayer, T F

    1986-09-01

    We have examined whether the production of hypertrophic cartilage matrix reflecting a late stage in the development of chondrocytes which participate in endochondral bone formation, is the result of cell lineage, environmental influence, or both. We have compared the ability of cultured limb mesenchyme and mesectoderm to synthesize type X collagen, a marker highly selective for hypertrophic cartilage. High density cultures of limb mesenchyme from stage 23 and 24 chick embryos contain many cells that react positively for type II collagen by immunohistochemistry, but only a few of these initiate type X collagen synthesis. When limb mesenchyme cells are cultured in or on hydrated collagen gels or in agarose (conditions previously shown to promote chondrogenesis in low density cultures), almost all initiate synthesis of both collagen types. Similarly, collagen gel cultures of limb mesenchyme from stage 17 embryos synthesize type II collagen and with some additional delay type X collagen. However, cytochalasin D treatment of subconfluent cultures on plastic substrates, another treatment known to promote chondrogenesis, induces the production of type II collagen, but not type X collagen. These results demonstrate that the appearance of type X collagen in limb cartilage is environmentally regulated. Mesectodermal cells from the maxillary process of stages 24 and 28 chick embryos were cultured in or on hydrated collagen gels. Such cells initiate synthesis of type II collagen, and eventually type X collagen. Some cells contain only type II collagen and some contain both types II and X collagen. On the other hand, cultures of mandibular processes from stage 29 embryos contain chondrocytes with both collagen types and a larger overall number of chondrogenic foci than the maxillary process cultures. Since the maxillary process does not produce cartilage in situ and the mandibular process forms Meckel's cartilage which does not hypertrophy in situ, environmental influences

  3. LARP6 Meets Collagen mRNA: Specific Regulation of Type I Collagen Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujie Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Type I collagen is the most abundant structural protein in all vertebrates, but its constitutive rate of synthesis is low due to long half-life of the protein (60–70 days. However, several hundred fold increased production of type I collagen is often seen in reparative or reactive fibrosis. The mechanism which is responsible for this dramatic upregulation is complex, including multiple levels of regulation. However, posttranscriptional regulation evidently plays a predominant role. Posttranscriptional regulation comprises processing, transport, stabilization and translation of mRNAs and is executed by RNA binding proteins. There are about 800 RNA binding proteins, but only one, La ribonucleoprotein domain family member 6 (LARP6, is specifically involved in type I collagen regulation. In the 5′untranslated region (5’UTR of mRNAs encoding for type I and type III collagens there is an evolutionally conserved stem-loop (SL structure; this structure is not found in any other mRNA, including any other collagen mRNA. LARP6 binds to the 5′SL in sequence specific manner to regulate stability of collagen mRNAs and their translatability. Here, we will review current understanding of how is LARP6 involved in posttranscriptional regulation of collagen mRNAs. We will also discuss how other proteins recruited by LARP6, including nonmuscle myosin, vimentin, serine threonine kinase receptor associated protein (STRAP, 25 kD FK506 binding protein (FKBP25 and RNA helicase A (RHA, contribute to this process.

  4. The TAM family receptor tyrosine kinase TYRO3 is a negative regulator of type 2 immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Pamela Y.; Carrera Silva, Eugenio A.; De Kouchkovsky, Dimitri; Joannas, Leonel D.; Hao, Liming; Hu, Donglei; Huntsman, Scott; Eng, Celeste; Licona-Limón, Paula; Weinstein, Jason S.; Herbert, De’Broski R.; Craft, Joseph E.; Flavell, Richard A.; Repetto, Silvia; Correale, Jorge; Burchard, Esteban G.; Torgerson, Dara G.; Ghosh, Sourav; Rothlin, Carla V.

    2016-01-01

    Host responses against metazoan parasites or an array of environmental substances elicit type 2 immunity. Despite its protective function, type 2 immunity also drives allergic diseases. The mechanisms that regulate the magnitude of the type 2 response remain largely unknown. Here, we show that genetic ablation of a receptor tyrosine kinase encoded by Tyro3 in mice or the functional neutralization of its ortholog in human dendritic cells resulted in enhanced type 2 immunity. Furthermore, the TYRO3 agonist PROS1 was induced in T cells by the quintessential type 2 cytokine, interleukin-4. T cell–specific Pros1 knockouts phenocopied the loss of Tyro3. Thus, a PROS1-mediated feedback from adaptive immunity engages a rheostat, TYRO3, on innate immune cells to limit the intensity of type 2 responses. PMID:27034374

  5. The dynamic regulation of cortical excitability is altered in episodic ataxia type 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Siebner, H.R.; Giffin, N.; Bestmann, S.; Rothwell, J.C.; Bloem, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 and familial hemiplegic migraine are two rare hereditary disorders that are linked to dysfunctional ion channels and are characterized clinically by paroxysmal neurological symptoms. Impaired regulation of cerebral excitability is thought to play a role in the occurrence of th

  6. Hands-on Experiments on Glycemia Regulation and Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingueneau, M.; Chaix, A.; Scotti, N.; Chaix, J.; Reynders, A.; Hammond, C.; Thimonier, J.

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we describe a 3-day experimental workshop on glycemia regulation and type 1 diabetes that engages students in open-ended investigations and guided experiments leading to results that are not already known to them. After an initial questioning phase during which students observe PowerPoint slides depicting the glycemia…

  7. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor signalling regulates microRNA differentially in cardiac fibroblasts and myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Pia Lindgren; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Schneider, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1) R) is a key regulator of blood pressure and cardiac contractility and is profoundly involved in development of cardiac disease. Since several microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in cardiac disease, we asked whether miRNAs might...

  8. Hands-on Experiments on Glycemia Regulation and Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingueneau, M.; Chaix, A.; Scotti, N.; Chaix, J.; Reynders, A.; Hammond, C.; Thimonier, J.

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we describe a 3-day experimental workshop on glycemia regulation and type 1 diabetes that engages students in open-ended investigations and guided experiments leading to results that are not already known to them. After an initial questioning phase during which students observe PowerPoint slides depicting the glycemia…

  9. The dynamic regulation of cortical excitability is altered in episodic ataxia type 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Siebner, H.R.; Giffin, N.; Bestmann, S.; Rothwell, J.C.; Bloem, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 and familial hemiplegic migraine are two rare hereditary disorders that are linked to dysfunctional ion channels and are characterized clinically by paroxysmal neurological symptoms. Impaired regulation of cerebral excitability is thought to play a role in the occurrence of th

  10. The importance of distinguishing between the different eating disorders (sub)types when assessing emotion regulation strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danner, Unna; Sternheim, Lot; Evers, Catharine

    2014-01-01

    People with eating disorders (ED) have difficulties regulating their emotions adaptively. Little is known about differences and similarities between different types of ED and how these regulation difficulties relate to other emotional problems. The present study examines maladaptive (suppression) an

  11. Regulation of muscle growth by multiple ligands signaling through activin type II receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Jin; Reed, Lori A.; Davies, Monique V.; Girgenrath, Stefan; Goad, Mary E. P.; Tomkinson, Kathy N.; Wright, Jill F.; Barker, Christopher; Ehrmantraut, Gregory; Holmstrom, James; Trowell, Betty; Gertz, Barry; Jiang, Man-Shiow; Sebald, Suzanne M.; Matzuk, Martin; Li, En; Liang, Li-fang; Quattlebaum, Edwin; Stotish, Ronald L.; Wolfman, Neil M.

    2005-01-01

    Myostatin is a secreted protein that normally functions as a negative regulator of muscle growth. Agents capable of blocking the myostatin signaling pathway could have important applications for treating human muscle degenerative diseases as well as for enhancing livestock production. Here we describe a potent myostatin inhibitor, a soluble form of the activin type IIB receptor (ACVR2B), which can cause dramatic increases in muscle mass (up to 60% in 2 weeks) when injected into wild-type mice. Furthermore, we show that the effect of the soluble receptor is attenuated but not eliminated in Mstn-/- mice, suggesting that at least one other ligand in addition to myostatin normally functions to limit muscle growth. Finally, we provide genetic evidence that these ligands signal through both activin type II receptors, ACVR2 and ACVR2B, to regulate muscle growth in vivo. PMID:16330774

  12. Translational regulation of Yersinia enterocolitica mRNA encoding a type III secretion substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopaskie, Karyl S; Ligtenberg, Katherine Given; Schneewind, Olaf

    2013-12-06

    Yersinia enterocolitica type III secretion machines transport YopQ and other Yop effectors into host immune cells. YopD and its chaperone LcrH are essential components of the Yersinia type III pathway, enabling effector translocation into host cells. YopD, LcrH, and YscM1 also regulate yop expression post-transcriptionally in response to environmental signals; however, the molecular mechanisms for this regulation and Yop secretion are unknown. We show here that YopD associates with 30 S ribosomal particles in a manner requiring LcrH. When added to ribosomes, YopD, LcrH, and YscM1 block the translation of yopQ mRNA. We propose a model whereby LcrH-dependent association of YopD with 30 S ribosomal particles enables YscM1 to block yopQ translation unless type III machines are induced to secrete the effector.

  13. Activity-dependent regulation of T-type calcium channels by submembrane calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazade, Magali; Bidaud, Isabelle; Lory, Philippe; Chemin, Jean

    2017-01-21

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels are involved in numerous physiological functions and various mechanisms finely tune their activity, including the Ca(2+) ion itself. This is well exemplified by the Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of L-type Ca(2+) channels, whose alteration contributes to the dramatic disease Timothy Syndrome. For T-type Ca(2+) channels, a long-held view is that they are not regulated by intracellular Ca(2+). Here we challenge this notion by using dedicated electrophysiological protocols on both native and expressed T-type Ca(2+) channels. We demonstrate that a rise in submembrane Ca(2+) induces a large decrease in T-type current amplitude due to a hyperpolarizing shift in the steady-state inactivation. Activation of most representative Ca(2+)-permeable ionotropic receptors similarly regulate T-type current properties. Altogether, our data clearly establish that Ca(2+) entry exerts a feedback control on T-type channel activity, by modulating the channel availability, a mechanism that critically links cellular properties of T-type Ca(2+) channels to their physiological roles.

  14. Calcitonin gene-related peptide regulates type IV hypersensitivity through dendritic cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihisa Mikami

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play essential roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, mutual regulation of the nervous system and immune system is well studied. One of neuropeptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, is a potent regulator in immune responses; in particular, it has anti-inflammatory effects in innate immunity. For instance, a deficiency of the CGRP receptor component RAMP 1 (receptor activity-modifying protein 1 results in higher cytokine production in response to LPS (lipopolysaccharide. On the other hand, how CGRP affects DCs in adaptive immunity is largely unknown. In this study, we show that CGRP suppressed Th1 cell differentiation via inhibition of IL-12 production in DCs using an in vitro co-culture system and an in vivo ovalbumin-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH model. CGRP also down-regulated the expressions of chemokine receptor CCR2 and its ligands CCL2 and CCL12 in DCs. Intriguingly, the frequency of migrating CCR2(+ DCs in draining lymph nodes of RAMP1-deficient mice was higher after DTH immunization. Moreover, these CCR2(+ DCs highly expressed IL-12 and CD80, resulting in more effective induction of Th1 differentiation compared with CCR2(- DCs. These results indicate that CGRP regulates Th1 type reactions by regulating expression of cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in DCs.

  15. Arabidopsis type B cytokinin response regulators ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12 negatively regulate plant responses to drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kien Huu; Ha, Chien Van; Nishiyama, Rie; Watanabe, Yasuko; Leyva-González, Marco Antonio; Fujita, Yasunari; Tran, Uven Thi; Li, Weiqiang; Tanaka, Maho; Seki, Motoaki; Schaller, G Eric; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Tran, L S

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we used a loss-of-function approach to elucidate the functions of three Arabidopsis type B response regulators (ARRs)--namely ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12--in regulating the Arabidopsis plant responses to drought. The arr1,10,12 triple mutant showed a significant increase in drought tolerance versus WT plants, as indicated by its higher relative water content and survival rate on drying soil. This enhanced drought tolerance of arr1,10,12 plants can be attributed to enhanced cell membrane integrity, increased anthocyanin biosynthesis, abscisic acid (ABA) hypersensitivity, and reduced stomatal aperture, but not to altered stomatal density. Further drought-tolerance tests of lower-order double and single mutants indicated that ARR1, ARR10, and ARR12 negatively and redundantly control plant responses to drought, with ARR1 appearing to bear the most critical function among the three proteins. In agreement with these findings, a comparative genome-wide analysis of the leaves of arr1,10,12 and WT plants under both normal and dehydration conditions suggested a cytokinin (CK) signaling-mediated network controlling plant adaptation to drought via many dehydration/drought- and/or ABA-responsive genes that can provide osmotic adjustment and protection to cellular and membrane structures. Expression of all three ARR genes was repressed by dehydration and ABA treatments, inferring that plants down-regulate these genes as an adaptive mechanism to survive drought. Collectively, our results demonstrate that repression of CK response, and thus CK signaling, is one of the strategies plants use to cope with water deficit, providing novel insight for the design of drought-tolerant plants by genetic engineering.

  16. Salidroside-regulated lipid metabolism with down-regulation of miR-370 in type 2 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-ru; Fu, Xiu-juan; Zhu, Da-sheng; Zhang, Chao-zai; Hou, Shi; Li, Min; Yang, Xiao-hong

    2016-05-15

    Salidroside is known for its pharmacological properties and in particular its antioxidation effects. In recent years, it has been recognized that salidroside plays an important role in treating diabetes. Accumulated evidence suggests that microRNAs may be involved in diabetic lipid disorders. We investigated how salidroside regulates lipid metabolism through miR-370 in vivo and in vitro. After 4 weeks of a high-fat diet, and intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (100mg/kg), type 2 diabetes was induced in male C56BL/6J mice. After 4 weeks, mice with fasting blood glucose levels above 7.8mmol/l were divided into five groups: those with diabetes mellitus, and those treated with 40mg/kg, 80mg/kg, and 160mg/kg salidroside, and metformin (480mg/kg), for a further 4 weeks. The hypoglycemic effects of salidroside were consistently demonstrated when measuring fasting blood glucose levels, observing insulin-sensitizing effects, and testing oral glucose tolerance. In addition to this, the expressions of miR-370, and related lipid protein expression in primary hepatocytes, were examined in primary type 2 diabetic mice. The present study has shown that the expression levels of miR-370, SREBP-1 and FAS-1 were significantly elevated in the liver of type 2 diabetic mice. In contrast, the elevated expression levels were reversed by salidroside. The addition of salidroside attenuated the effect of miR-370, and reduced the expression of these lipid metabolism proteins in primary hepatocytes. These findings demonstrate that salidroside can directly decrease the expression of miR-370 in type 2 diabetic mice, and particularly in primary hepatocytes, affecting lipid metabolism in the liver. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. CARABID BEATLES AS INDICATORS REFLECTING RIVERINE ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF RIVER REGULATIONS

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    Renata Kędzior

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to estimate factors responsible for sustaining riverine communities in stream sections with various bank regulation systems. The research were conducted on Porebianka stream in the Polish Western Carpathians, where 10 different types of river regulations were chosen for the analysis (strong incision without alluvial deposits, redeposition with sand and gravel banks, concrete revetment walls along the banks, channel with banks lined with rip-rap and reference unmanaged cross- section. We conclude that the carabid beetles assemblages of the studied river sections respond mainly to hydraulic parameters of the stream. Elimination of frequent natural bank inundation (due to the regulations of the banks is the main factor responsible for the impoverishment and extinction of riverine communities.

  18. Ontogenetic profile and thyroid hormone regulation of type-1 and type-8 glucose transporters in rat Sertoli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carosa, Eleonora; Radico, Carla; Giansante, Nadia; Rossi, Simona; D'Adamo, Fabio; Di Stasi, Savino M; Lenzi, Andrea; Jannini, Emmanuele A

    2005-04-01

    The glucose transporters (GLUTs) gene encode glycoproteins responsible for facilitating transfer of glucose across plasma membrane. In testis, different members of this family are present. In particular the main GLUT mRNA expression within the adult testis is the type 8, while type 1 is more expressed in prepubertal testis. Thyroid hormone, which receptors and function have been characterized in the testis, plays a crucial role in the cellular energetic metabolism. In fact, in the immature Sertoli cells, GLUT1 is up regulated by l-triiodothyronine (T(3)). The aim of this paper is to investigate the expression profile of GLUT1 and GLUT8 in the testis during development and in adulthood and analyse the role of T(3) on their expression. To analyse the expression of GLUT8 and GLUT1 we performed Northern blot and RT-PCR experiments in the whole testis and in Sertoli cells from rats of different ages. Treatments in vivo and in vitro with T(3) were used to study the effect of thyroid hormones on GLUT1 and GLUT8 expression. The activity of the rat GLUT1 promoter and its regulation by T(3) was studied with transient transfections in gonadal and non-gonadal cell lines and in primary Sertoli cell cultures. GLUT8 is expressed at a low level in the prepubertal testis and Sertoli cells and does not appear to be under T(3) control. GLUT1 is the predominant form in immature Sertoli cells. The effect of T(3) on its mRNA accumulation was quantified and confirmed by RT-PCR (control: 0.65 +/- 0.17; T(3): 1.23 +/- 0.04, arbitrary units, p regulate GLUT1 promoter in any cell line tested. This is confirmed by the evidence that, upon extensive analysis, the rat GLUT1 promoter and the first intron sequence do not shows any thyroid responsive elements. Our data demonstrate that GLUT1 and GLUT8 are both expressed in prepubertal testis, but only GLUT1 is regulated by T(3). In addition, we found that the effect of T(3) cannot be attributed to its action on GLUT1 promoter.

  19. The regulation of immune responses by DC derived Type I IFN

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    Jennifer eGommerman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Our immune system bears the tremendous task of mounting effective anti-microbial responses whilst maintaining immunoregulatory functions to avoid autoimmunity. In order to quickly respond to pathogens, Dendritic cells (DC are armed with pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, allowing them to recognize highly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs that are uniquely expressed by invading microbes. PRR activation can trigger DCs to release the pleiotropic cytokine, Type I IFN, which facilitates various biological functions in different immune cell types. In this review, we will discuss the classical PRR-induced Type I IFN response in DCs as well as describe a novel mechanism for Type I IFN induction by the Tumor-Necrosis Factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF members, TNFR-1 and Lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR. While PRR activation during viral infection, produces large amounts of Type I IFN in a relative short period of time, TNFRSF-induced Type I IFN expression is modest with gradual kinetics. Type I IFN can exert pro-inflammatory effects, but in some cases it also facilitates immune-regulatory functions. Therefore, DCs are important regulators of immune responses by carefully modulating Type I IFN expression.

  20. T-type voltage-gated calcium channels regulate the tone of mouse efferent arterioles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian B; Al-Mashhadi, Rozh H; Cribbs, Leanne L;

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels are important for the regulation of renal blood flow and the glomerular filtration rate. Excitation-contraction coupling in afferent arterioles is known to require activation of these channels and we studied their role in the regulation of cortical efferent arteriolar...... tone. We used microdissected perfused mouse efferent arterioles and found a transient vasoconstriction in response to depolarization with potassium; an effect abolished by removal of extracellular calcium. The T-type voltage-gated calcium channel antagonists mibefradil and nickel blocked this potassium....... Low concentrations of nickel, an agent that blocks Ca(v)3.2, had a similar effect. Thus, T-type voltage-gated calcium channels are functionally important for depolarization-induced vasoconstriction and subsequent dilatation in mouse cortical efferent arterioles.Kidney International advance online...

  1. Regulation and evolution of malonate and propionate catabolism in proteobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorova, I A; Ravcheev, D A; Gelfand, M S

    2012-06-01

    Bacteria catabolize malonate via two pathways, encoded by the mdc and mat genes. In various bacteria, transcription of these genes is controlled by the GntR family transcription factors (TFs) MatR/MdcY and/or the LysR family transcription factor MdcR. Propionate is metabolized via the methylcitrate pathway, comprising enzymes encoded by the prp and acn genes. PrpR, the Fis family sigma 54-dependent transcription factor, is known to be a transcriptional activator of the prp genes. Here, we report a detailed comparative genomic analysis of malonate and propionate metabolism and its regulation in proteobacteria. We characterize genomic loci and gene regulation and identify binding motifs for four new TFs and also new regulon members, in particular, tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporters. We describe restructuring of the genomic loci and regulatory interactions during the evolution of proteobacteria.

  2. Regulation of Salmonella enterica pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) by the LysR-type regulator LeuO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Elena; Casadesús, Josep

    2014-03-01

    LeuO is a quiescent LysR-type regulator belonging to the H-NS regulon. Activation of leuO transcription represses expression of pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1) in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and inhibits invasion of epithelial cells. Loss of HilE suppresses LeuO-mediated downregulation of SPI-1. Activation of leuO transcription reduces the level of HilD protein, and loss of HilE restores the wild type HilD level. Hence, LeuO-mediated downregulation of SPI-1 may involve inhibition of HilD activity by HilE, a view consistent with the fact that HilE is a HilD inhibitor. In vivo analyses using β-galactosidase fusions indicate that LeuO activates hilE transcription. In vitro analyses by slot blotting, electrophoretic mobility shift analysis and DNase I footprinting show that LeuO binds the hilE promoter region. Although residual SPI-1 repression by LeuO is observed in the absence of HilE, the LeuO-HilE-HilD 'pathway' appears to be the major mechanism. Because both leuO and SPI-1 are repressed by H-NS, activation of leuO transcription may provide a backup mechanism for SPI-1 repression under conditions that impair H-NS-mediated silencing.

  3. UBR-5, a Conserved HECT-Type E3 Ubiquitin Ligase, Negatively Regulates Notch-Type Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Komal; Gu, Anniya; Xu, Xia; Au, Vinci; Taylor, Jon; Flibotte, Stephane; Moerman, Donald G.; Maine, Eleanor M.

    2016-01-01

    Notch-type signaling mediates cell−cell interactions important for animal development. In humans, reduced or inappropriate Notch signaling activity is associated with various developmental defects and disease states, including cancers. Caenorhabditis elegans expresses two Notch-type receptors, GLP-1 and LIN-12. GLP-1 mediates several cell-signaling events in the embryo and promotes germline proliferation in the developing and adult gonad. LIN-12 acts redundantly with GLP-1 in certain inductive events in the embryo and mediates several cell−cell interactions during larval development. Recovery of genetic suppressors and enhancers of glp-1 or lin-12 loss- or gain-of-function mutations has identified numerous regulators of GLP-1 and LIN-12 signaling activity. Here, we report the molecular identification of sog-1, a gene identified in screens for recessive suppressors of conditional glp-1 loss-of-function mutations. The sog-1 gene encodes UBR-5, the sole C. elegans member of the UBR5/Hyd family of HECT-type E3 ubiquitin ligases. Molecular and genetic analyses indicate that the loss of ubr-5 function suppresses defects caused by reduced signaling via GLP-1 or LIN-12. In contrast, ubr-5 mutations do not suppress embryonic or larval lethality associated with mutations in a downstream transcription factor, LAG-1. In the gonad, ubr-5 acts in the receiving cells (germ cells) to limit GLP-1 signaling activity. SEL-10 is the F-box component of SCFSEL-10 E3 ubiquitin–ligase complex that promotes turnover of Notch intracellular domain. UBR-5 acts redundantly with SEL-10 to limit Notch signaling in certain tissues. We hypothesize that UBR-5 activity limits Notch-type signaling by promoting turnover of receptor or limiting its interaction with pathway components. PMID:27185398

  4. UBR-5, a Conserved HECT-Type E3 Ubiquitin Ligase, Negatively Regulates Notch-Type Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komal Safdar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Notch-type signaling mediates cell−cell interactions important for animal development. In humans, reduced or inappropriate Notch signaling activity is associated with various developmental defects and disease states, including cancers. Caenorhabditis elegans expresses two Notch-type receptors, GLP-1 and LIN-12. GLP-1 mediates several cell-signaling events in the embryo and promotes germline proliferation in the developing and adult gonad. LIN-12 acts redundantly with GLP-1 in certain inductive events in the embryo and mediates several cell−cell interactions during larval development. Recovery of genetic suppressors and enhancers of glp-1 or lin-12 loss- or gain-of-function mutations has identified numerous regulators of GLP-1 and LIN-12 signaling activity. Here, we report the molecular identification of sog-1, a gene identified in screens for recessive suppressors of conditional glp-1 loss-of-function mutations. The sog-1 gene encodes UBR-5, the sole C. elegans member of the UBR5/Hyd family of HECT-type E3 ubiquitin ligases. Molecular and genetic analyses indicate that the loss of ubr-5 function suppresses defects caused by reduced signaling via GLP-1 or LIN-12. In contrast, ubr-5 mutations do not suppress embryonic or larval lethality associated with mutations in a downstream transcription factor, LAG-1. In the gonad, ubr-5 acts in the receiving cells (germ cells to limit GLP-1 signaling activity. SEL-10 is the F-box component of SCFSEL-10 E3 ubiquitin–ligase complex that promotes turnover of Notch intracellular domain. UBR-5 acts redundantly with SEL-10 to limit Notch signaling in certain tissues. We hypothesize that UBR-5 activity limits Notch-type signaling by promoting turnover of receptor or limiting its interaction with pathway components.

  5. Arabidopsis ETO1 specifically interacts with and negatively regulates type 2 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases

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    Saito Koji

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Arabidopsis, ETO1 (ETHYLENE-OVERPRODUCER1 is a negative regulator of ethylene evolution by interacting with AtACS5, an isoform of the rate-limiting enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases (ACC synthase or ACS, in ethylene biosynthetic pathway. ETO1 directly inhibits the enzymatic activity of AtACS5. In addition, a specific interaction between ETO1 and AtCUL3, a constituent of a new type of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, suggests the molecular mechanism in promoting AtACS5 degradation by the proteasome-dependent pathway. Because orthologous sequences to ETO1 are found in many plant species including tomato, we transformed tomato with Arabidopsis ETO1 to evaluate its ability to suppress ethylene production in tomato fruits. Results Transgenic tomato lines that overexpress Arabidopsis ETO1 (ETO1-OE did not show a significant delay of fruit ripening. So, we performed yeast two-hybrid assays to investigate potential heterologous interaction between ETO1 and three isozymes of ACC synthases from tomato. In the yeast two-hybrid system, ETO1 interacts with LE-ACS3 as well as AtACS5 but not with LE-ACS2 or LE-ACS4, two major isozymes whose gene expression is induced markedly in ripening fruits. According to the classification of ACC synthases, which is based on the C-terminal amino acid sequences, both LE-ACS3 and AtACS5 are categorized as type 2 isozymes and possess a consensus C-terminal sequence. In contrast, LE-ACS2 and LE-ACS4 are type 1 and type 3 isozymes, respectively, both of which do not possess this specific C-terminal sequence. Yeast two-hybrid analysis using chimeric constructs between LE-ACS2 and LE-ACS3 revealed that the type-2-ACS-specific C-terminal tail is required for interaction with ETO1. When treated with auxin to induce LE-ACS3, seedlings of ETO1-OE produced less ethylene than the wild type, despite comparable expression of the LE-ACS3 gene in the wild type. Conclusion These results suggest that ETO1

  6. Type I interferons regulate susceptibility to inflammation-induced preterm birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, Monica; Presicce, Pietro; Lawson, Matthew J.; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Stankiewicz, Traci E.; Vanoni, Simone; Harley, Isaac T.W.; McAlees, Jaclyn W.; Giles, Daniel A.; Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E.; Rueda, Cesar M.; Senthamaraikannan, Paranth; Karns, Rebekah; Hoebe, Kasper; Janssen, Edith M.; Karp, Christopher L.; Hildeman, David A.; Hogan, Simon P.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Chougnet, Claire A.; Way, Sing Sing

    2017-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a leading worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in infants. Maternal inflammation induced by microbial infection is a critical predisposing factor for PTB. However, biological processes associated with competency of pathogens, including viruses, to induce PTB or sensitize for secondary bacterial infection–driven PTB are unknown. We show that pathogen/pathogen-associated molecular pattern–driven activation of type I IFN/IFN receptor (IFNAR) was sufficient to prime for systemic and uterine proinflammatory chemokine and cytokine production and induction of PTB. Similarly, treatment with recombinant type I IFNs recapitulated such effects by exacerbating proinflammatory cytokine production and reducing the dose of secondary inflammatory challenge required for induction of PTB. Inflammatory challenge–driven induction of PTB was eliminated by defects in type I IFN, TLR, or IL-6 responsiveness, whereas the sequence of type I IFN sensing by IFNAR on hematopoietic cells was essential for regulation of proinflammatory cytokine production. Importantly, we also show that type I IFN priming effects are conserved from mice to nonhuman primates and humans, and expression of both type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines is upregulated in human PTB. Thus, activation of the type I IFN/IFNAR axis in pregnancy primes for inflammation-driven PTB and provides an actionable biomarker and therapeutic target for mitigating PTB risk. PMID:28289719

  7. The role of type X collagen in facilitating and regulating endochondral ossification of articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, G

    2005-02-01

    AUTHOR: Shen G Objective -This review was compiled to explore the role of type X collagen in growth, development and remodeling of articular cartilage by elucidating the linkage between the synthesis of this protein and the phenotypic changes in chondrogenesis and the onset of endochondral ossification. The current studies closely dedicated to elucidating the role of type X collagen incorporating into chondrogenesis and endochondral ossification of articular cartilage were assessed and analyzed to allow for obtaining the mainstream consensus on the bio-molecular mechanism with which type X collagen functions in articular cartilage. There are spatial and temporal correlations between synthesis of type X collagen and occurrence of endochondral ossification. The expression of type X collagen is confined within hypertrophic condrocytes and precedes the embark of endochondral bone formation. Type X collagen facilitates endochondral ossification by regulating matrix mineralization and compartmentalizing matrix components. Type X collagen is a reliable marker for new bone formation in articular cartilage. The future clinical application of this collagen in inducing or mediating endochondral ossification is perceived, e.g. the fracture healing of synovial joints and adaptive remodeling of madibular condyle.

  8. Epigenetic regulation of normal human mammary cell type-specific miRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrba, Lukas [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center; Inst. of Plant Molecular Biology, Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic). Biology Centre ASCR; Garbe, James C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Center; Stampfer, Martha R. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Center; Futscher, Bernard W. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Arizona Cancer Center and Dept. of Pharmacology & Toxicology

    2011-08-26

    Epigenetic mechanisms are important regulators of cell type–specific genes, including miRNAs. In order to identify cell type-specific miRNAs regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, we undertook a global analysis of miRNA expression and epigenetic states in three isogenic pairs of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and human mammary fibroblasts (HMF), which represent two differentiated cell types typically present within a given organ, each with a distinct phenotype and a distinct epigenotype. While miRNA expression and epigenetic states showed strong interindividual concordance within a given cell type, almost 10% of the expressed miRNA showed a cell type–specific pattern of expression that was linked to the epigenetic state of their promoter. The tissue-specific miRNA genes were epigenetically repressed in nonexpressing cells by DNA methylation (38%) and H3K27me3 (58%), with only a small set of miRNAs (21%) showing a dual epigenetic repression where both DNA methylation and H3K27me3 were present at their promoters, such as MIR10A and MIR10B. Individual miRNA clusters of closely related miRNA gene families can each display cell type–specific repression by the same or complementary epigenetic mechanisms, such as the MIR200 family, and MIR205, where fibroblasts repress MIR200C/141 by DNA methylation, MIR200A/200B/429 by H3K27me3, and MIR205 by both DNA methylation and H3K27me3. Since deregulation of many of the epigenetically regulated miRNAs that we identified have been linked to disease processes such as cancer, it is predicted that compromise of the epigenetic control mechanisms is important for this process. Overall, these results highlight the importance of epigenetic regulation in the control of normal cell type–specific miRNA expression.

  9. THE FORMATION OF ENTS ADAPTIVE REACTIONS DEPENDING ON THE TYPE OF PSYCHO-VEGETATIVE REGULATION

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    E. M. Kazin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the students (12 to 15 years old examination was to identify the integrative criteria of assessing the nature of the functional relationships between the parameters of the psychosocial and physiological adaptation of students, depending on age, individual-typological peculiarities of vegetative regulation, personal potential at different stages of school education.The study of the characteristics of vegetative regulation of the cardiovascular system was made with a help of an automatic cardiac-rhythm programs. The research of psychophysiological parameters was fulfiled using an automatic complex. The measurement of the speed of simple visual-motor reaction (PSMR, reaction to a moving object (WFD, the level of functional mobility of nervous processes (WFP and health brain (DDM were made before. Features psychosocial adaptation was analyzed using 8-color Luscher test.All examinee were divided into three groups on the basis of the statistical characteristics of the cardiac rhythm by the tone source autonomic tone: “vagotonia” (with a predominance of parasympathetic sistems, “somatotonic” (with domination of the sympatholytic effects, “atonic” (balanced type of vegetative nervous system.Based on the analysis of psychodynamic, neurodynamic and vegetative functions showed that students with initial vagotonies tone are characterized by high levels of situational and personal anxiety, low psychosocial adaptation, decreased activity of neurodynamic functions and psychodynamic processes in the learning dynamics, whereas the individuals with dominance of sympatotonics type regulation have high level of neurodynamic processes, psychosocial adaptation, against the background of significant stress mechanisms of vegetative regulation.Students with initial vegetative tone demonstrate a sufficient level of psychosocial adaptation, activity psychodynamic and neuromotor processes, accompanied by the preservation of the functionality of

  10. The type III secreted protein BspR regulates the virulence genes in Bordetella bronchiseptica.

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    Jun Kurushima

    Full Text Available Bordetella bronchiseptica is closely related with B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, the causative agents of whooping cough. These pathogenic species share a number of virulence genes, including the gene locus for the type III secretion system (T3SS that delivers effector proteins. To identify unknown type III effectors in Bordetella, secreted proteins in the bacterial culture supernatants of wild-type B. bronchiseptica and an isogenic T3SS-deficient mutant were compared with iTRAQ-based, quantitative proteomic analysis method. BB1639, annotated as a hypothetical protein, was identified as a novel type III secreted protein and was designated BspR (Bordetella secreted protein regulator. The virulence of a BspR mutant (ΔbspR in B. bronchiseptica was significantly attenuated in a mouse infection model. BspR was also highly conserved in B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, suggesting that BspR is an essential virulence factor in these three Bordetella species. Interestingly, the BspR-deficient strain showed hyper-secretion of T3SS-related proteins. Furthermore, T3SS-dependent host cell cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity were also enhanced in the absence of BspR. By contrast, the expression of filamentous hemagglutinin, pertactin, and adenylate cyclase toxin was completely abolished in the BspR-deficient strain. Finally, we demonstrated that BspR is involved in the iron-responsive regulation of T3SS. Thus, Bordetella virulence factors are coordinately but inversely controlled by BspR, which functions as a regulator in response to iron starvation.

  11. STAT3 regulates ABCA3 expression and influences lamellar body formation in alveolar type II cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Yohei; Besnard, Valérie; Clark, Jean C; Xu, Yan; Wert, Susan E; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2008-05-01

    ATP-Binding Cassette A3 (ABCA3) is a lamellar body associated lipid transport protein required for normal synthesis and storage of pulmonary surfactant in type II cells in the alveoli. In this study, we demonstrate that STAT3, activated by IL-6, regulates ABCA3 expression in vivo and in vitro. ABCA3 mRNA and immunostaining were decreased in adult mouse lungs in which STAT3 was deleted from the respiratory epithelium (Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice). Consistent with the role of STAT3, intratracheal IL-6 induced ABCA3 expression in vivo. Decreased ABCA3 and abnormalities in the formation of lamellar bodies, the intracellular site of surfactant lipid storage, were observed in Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice. Expression of SREBP1a and 1c, SCAP, ABCA3, and AKT mRNAs was inhibited by deletion of Stat3 in type II cells isolated from Stat3(Delta/Delta) mice. The activities of PI3K and AKT were required for normal Abca3 gene expression in vitro. AKT activation induced SREBP expression and increased the activity of the Abca3 promoter in vitro, consistent with the role of STAT3 signaling, at least in part via SREBP, in the regulation of ABCA3. ABCA3 expression is regulated by IL-6 in a pathway that includes STAT3, PI3K, AKT, SCAP, and SREBP. Activation of STAT3 after exposure to IL-6 enhances ABCA3 expression, which, in turn, influences pulmonary surfactant homeostasis.

  12. MDP Up-Regulates the Gene Expression of Type I Interferons in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

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    Xiumei Xie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Muramyldipeptide (MDP, the minimum essential structure responsible for the immuno-adjuvant activity of peptidoglycan, is recognized by intracellular nuclear-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2. Here, we obtained evidence that the treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs with MDP up-regulated the gene expression of type I interferons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MDP also up-regulated the expression of the receptor NOD2, suggesting that MDP may induce a positive feedback response. The up-regulation of interferons was not dependent on the TNFa signaling, as HAECs did not express TNFa with the stimulation of MDP, and TNFa neutralizing antibody did not decrease the induction of IFNs induced by MDP. RT-PCR results showed that HAECs expressed the gene transcripts of interferon regulatory factor (IRF 1, 2, 3, 9. The western blot results showed that MDP induced the phosphorylation of IRF3. These results suggested that MDP induced the up-regulation of gene transcript of interferons through the activation of IRF3 signaling pathway. Meanwhile, MDP induced the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1ß, IL-8, and MCP-1. Taken together, these results suggested that HAECs may play roles in the anti-infection immune response and in the induction of innate immunity.

  13. MDP up-regulates the gene expression of type I interferons in human aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qingshan; Yang, Mei; Liu, Xueting; Zhou, Lina; Xiao, Zhilin; Chen, Xiaobin; Chen, Meifang; Xie, Xiumei; Hu, Jinyue

    2012-03-23

    Muramyldipeptide (MDP), the minimum essential structure responsible for the immuno-adjuvant activity of peptidoglycan, is recognized by intracellular nuclear-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2). Here, we obtained evidence that the treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) with MDP up-regulated the gene expression of type I interferons in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MDP also up-regulated the expression of the receptor NOD2, suggesting that MDP may induce a positive feedback response. The up-regulation of interferons was not dependent on the TNFa signaling, as HAECs did not express TNFa with the stimulation of MDP, and TNFa neutralizing antibody did not decrease the induction of IFNs induced by MDP. RT-PCR results showed that HAECs expressed the gene transcripts of interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 1, 2, 3, 9. The western blot results showed that MDP induced the phosphorylation of IRF3. These results suggested that MDP induced the up-regulation of gene transcript of interferons through the activation of IRF3 signaling pathway. Meanwhile, MDP induced the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1ß, IL-8, and MCP-1. Taken together, these results suggested that HAECs may play roles in the anti-infection immune response and in the induction of innate immunity.

  14. A comprehensive compartmental model of blood glucose regulation for healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahidi, O; Kwok, K E; Gopaluni, R B

    2016-01-01

    We have expanded a former compartmental model of blood glucose regulation for healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects. The former model was a detailed physiological model which considered the interactions of three substances, glucose, insulin and glucagon on regulating the blood sugar. The main...... drawback of the former model was its restriction on the route of glucose entrance to the body which was limited to the intravenous glucose injection. To handle the oral glucose intake, we have added a model of glucose absorption in the gastrointestinal tract to the former model to address the resultant...... variations of blood glucose concentrations following an oral glucose intake. Another model representing the incretins production in the gastrointestinal tract along with their hormonal effects on boosting pancreatic insulin production is also added to the former model. We have used two sets of clinical data...

  15. Alu Elements as Novel Regulators of Gene Expression in Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-07-13

    Despite numerous studies implicating Alu repeat elements in various diseases, there is sparse information available with respect to the potential functional and biological roles of the repeat elements in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therefore, we performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of T1D candidate genes to identify embedded Alu elements within these genes. We observed significant enrichment of Alu elements within the T1D genes (p-value genes harboring Alus revealed significant enrichment for immune-mediated processes (p-value genes harboring inverted Alus (IRAlus) within their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) that are known to regulate the expression of host mRNAs by generating double stranded RNA duplexes. Our in silico analysis predicted the formation of duplex structures by IRAlus within the 3'UTRs of T1D genes. We propose that IRAlus might be involved in regulating the expression levels of the host T1D genes.

  16. Genetic Design of an Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Controller for Velocity Regulation in a DC Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmin Maldonado

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the design of a Type‐2 Fuzzy Logic Controller (T2‐FLC using Genetic Algorithms (GAs. The T2‐FLC was tested with different levels of uncertainty to regulate velocity in a Direct Current (DC motor. The T2‐FLC was synthesized in Very High Description Language (VHDL code for a Field‐programmable Gate Array (FPGA, using the Xilinx System Generator (XSG of Xilinx ISE and Matlab‐Simulink. Comparisons were made between the Type‐1 Fuzzy Logic Controller and the T2‐FLC in VHDL code and a Proportional Integral Differential (PID Controller so as to regulate the velocity of a DC motor and evaluate the difference in performance of the three types of controllers, using the t‐student test statistic.

  17. Impaired regulation of the incretin effect in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Jonatan I; Knop, Filip K; Lund, Asger;

    2011-01-01

    emptying due to the increasing loads was found in both groups. Incretin hormone responses were similar. Conclusions:Up-regulation of the incretin effect in response to increasing oral glucose loads seems to be crucial for controlling glucose excursions in healthy subjects. Patients with T2DM......Objective:In healthy subjects, the incretin effect during an oral glucose tolerance test increases with the size of glucose load, resulting in similar glucose excursions independently of the glucose loads. Whether patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are able to regulate their incretin...... effect is unknown. Research Design and Methods:Incretin effect was measured over 6 d by means of three 4-h oral glucose tolerance test with increasing glucose loads (25, 75, and 125 g) and three corresponding isoglycemic iv glucose infusions in eight patients with T2DM [fasting plasma glucose, mean 7...

  18. RNF26 temporally regulates virus-triggered type I interferon induction by two distinct mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Qin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Viral infection triggers induction of type I interferons (IFNs, which are critical mediators of innate antiviral immune response. Mediator of IRF3 activation (MITA, also called STING is an adapter essential for virus-triggered IFN induction pathways. How post-translational modifications regulate the activity of MITA is not fully elucidated. In expression screens, we identified RING finger protein 26 (RNF26, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, could mediate polyubiquitination of MITA. Interestingly, RNF26 promoted K11-linked polyubiquitination of MITA at lysine 150, a residue also targeted by RNF5 for K48-linked polyubiquitination. Further experiments indicated that RNF26 protected MITA from RNF5-mediated K48-linked polyubiquitination and degradation that was required for quick and efficient type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokine induction after viral infection. On the other hand, RNF26 was required to limit excessive type I IFN response but not proinflammatory cytokine induction by promoting autophagic degradation of IRF3. Consistently, knockdown of RNF26 inhibited the expression of IFNB1 gene in various cells at the early phase and promoted it at the late phase of viral infection, respectively. Furthermore, knockdown of RNF26 inhibited viral replication, indicating that RNF26 antagonizes cellular antiviral response. Our findings thus suggest that RNF26 temporally regulates innate antiviral response by two distinct mechanisms.

  19. Soybean GmPHD-type transcription regulators improve stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] is one of the most important crops for oil and protein resource. Improvement of stress tolerance will be beneficial for soybean seed production. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Six GmPHD genes encoding Alfin1-type PHD finger protein were identified and their expressions differentially responded to drought, salt, cold and ABA treatments. The six GmPHDs were nuclear proteins and showed ability to bind the cis-element "GTGGAG". The N-terminal domain of GmPHD played a major role in DNA binding. Using a protoplast assay system, we find that GmPHD1 to GmPHD5 had transcriptional suppression activity whereas GmPHD6 did not have. In yeast assay, the GmPHD6 can form homodimer and heterodimer with the other GmPHDs except GmPHD2. The N-terminal plus the variable regions but not the PHD-finger is required for the dimerization. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the GmPHD2 showed salt tolerance when compared with the wild type plants. This tolerance was likely achieved by diminishing the oxidative stress through regulation of downstream genes. SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide important clues for soybean stress tolerance through manipulation of PHD-type transcription regulator.

  20. ID4 regulates transcriptional activity of wild type and mutant p53 via K373 acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Derrick J; Patel, Divya; Joshi, Jugal; Hunt, Aisha; Knowell, Ashley E; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2017-01-10

    Given that mutated p53 (50% of all human cancers) is over-expressed in many cancers, restoration of mutant p53 to its wild type biological function has been sought after as cancer therapy. The conformational flexibility has allowed to restore the normal biological function of mutant p53 by short peptides and small molecule compounds. Recently, studies have focused on physiological mechanisms such as acetylation of lysine residues to rescue the wild type activity of mutant p53. Using p53 null prostate cancer cell line we show that ID4 dependent acetylation promotes mutant p53 DNA-binding capabilities to its wild type consensus sequence, thus regulating p53-dependent target genes leading to subsequent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Specifically, by using wild type, mutant (P223L, V274F, R175H, R273H), acetylation mimics (K320Q and K373Q) and non-acetylation mimics (K320R and K373R) of p53, we identify that ID4 promotes acetylation of K373 and to a lesser extent K320, in turn restoring p53-dependent biological activities. Together, our data provides a molecular understanding of ID4 dependent acetylation that suggests a strategy of enhancing p53 acetylation at sites K373 and K320 that may serve as a viable mechanism of physiological restoration of mutant p53 to its wild type biological function.

  1. The Che4 pathway of Myxococcus xanthus regulates type IV pilus-mediated motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlamakis, Hera C; Kirby, John R; Zusman, David R

    2004-06-01

    Myxococcus xanthus co-ordinates cell movement during its complex life cycle using multiple chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways. These pathways regulate both type IV pilus-mediated social (S) motility and adventurous (A) motility. During a search for new chemoreceptors, we identified the che4 operon, which encodes homologues to a MCP (methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein), two CheWs, a hybrid CheA-CheY, a response regulator and a CheR. Deletion of the che4 operon did not cause swarming or developmental defects in either the wild-type (A(+)S(+)) strain or in a strain sustaining only A motility (A(+)S(-)). However, in a strain displaying only S motility (A(-)S(+)), deletion of the che4 operon or the gene encoding the response regulator, cheY4, caused enhanced vegetative swarming and prevented aggregation and sporulation. In contrast, deletion of mcp4 caused reduced vegetative swarming and enhanced development compared with the parent strain. Single-cell analysis of the motility of the A(-)S(+) parent strain revealed a previously unknown inverse correlation between velocity and reversal frequency. Thus, cells that moved at higher velocities showed a reduced reversal frequency. This co-ordination of reversal frequency and velocity was lost in the mcp4 and cheY4 mutants. The structural components of the S motility apparatus were unaffected in the che4 mutants, suggesting that the Che4 system affects reversal frequency of cells by modulating the function of the type IV pilus.

  2. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 regulates microglial motility and phagocytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon Hyejin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 is the primary inhibitor of urokinase type plasminogen activators (uPA and tissue type plasminogen activators (tPA, which mediate fibrinolysis. PAI-1 is also involved in the innate immunity by regulating cell migration and phagocytosis. However, little is known about the role of PAI-1 in the central nervous system. Methods In this study, we identified PAI-1 in the culture medium of mouse mixed glial cells by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Secretion of PAI-1 from glial cultures was detected by ELISA and western blotting analysis. Cell migration was evaluated by in vitro scratch-wound healing assay or Boyden chamber assay and an in vivo stab wound injury model. Phagocytic activity was measured by uptake of zymosan particles. Results The levels of PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression were increased by lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ stimulation in both microglia and astrocytes. PAI-1 promoted the migration of microglial cells in culture via the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP 1/Janus kinase (JAK/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1 axis. PAI-1 also increased microglial migration in vivo when injected into mouse brain. PAI-1-mediated microglial migration was independent of protease inhibition, because an R346A mutant of PAI-1 with impaired PA inhibitory activity also promoted microglial migration. Moreover, PAI-1 was able to modulate microglial phagocytic activity. PAI-1 inhibited microglial engulfment of zymosan particles in a vitronectin- and Toll-like receptor 2/6-dependent manner. Conclusion Our results indicate that glia-derived PAI-1 may regulate microglial migration and phagocytosis in an autocrine or paracrine manner. This may have important implications in the regulation of brain microglial activities in health and disease.

  3. [Characteristics of the acute phase reaction in humans with various types of autonomic nervous system regulation during simulated hyperthermia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikov, A V; Dorofeĭkov, V V; Freĭdlin, T S; Freĭdlin, I S; Shustov, E B; Shcherbak, I G; Iastrebov, D Iu

    2000-01-01

    Depending on the type of autonomous regulation, differences in basic levels of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) were revealed under conditions of hyperthermia in healthy subjects aged 19-21. A parasympathetic type of autonomous regulation corresponded to higher initial levels of proinflammatory cytokinesis, whereas a dominating sympathetic type corresponded to lower levels of the IL-1 beta and TNF alpha. The subjects with the latter type of regulation revealed an increase in the IL-1 beta TNF alpha combined with a higher heat tolerance. The subjects with the former type of regulation revealed a lower heat tolerance. The increase in the alpha2-macroglobulin appeared to be a most typical acute phase response of the human body to hyperthermia.

  4. DNA polymerase-α regulates type I interferon activation through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J.; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C.; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K.; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R.; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations disrupting nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts expression of POLA1, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency results in increased type I interferon production. This enzyme is necessary for RNA:DNA primer synthesis during DNA replication and strikingly, POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Altogether, this work identified POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response. PMID:27019227

  5. The dynamic regulation of cortical excitability is altered in episodic ataxia type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmich, Rick C; Siebner, Hartwig R; Giffin, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 and familial hemiplegic migraine are two rare hereditary disorders that are linked to dysfunctional ion channels and are characterized clinically by paroxysmal neurological symptoms. Impaired regulation of cerebral excitability is thought to play a role in the occurrence......-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation at an interstimulus interval of 2 and 10 ms to assess intracortical inhibition and facilitation, respectively. The time course of burst-induced excitability changes differed between groups. Healthy controls showed a short-lived increase in excitability that was only present 50...... ms after the burst. In contrast, patients with episodic ataxia type 2 showed an abnormally prolonged increase in corticospinal excitability that was still present 250 ms after the transcranial magnetic stimulation burst. Furthermore, while controls showed a decrease in intracortical facilitation...

  6. CD4+ type II NKT cells mediate ICOS and programmed death-1-dependent regulation of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadri, Nadir; Korpos, Eva; Gupta, Shashank

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that results from T cell-mediated destruction of pancreatic ß cells. CD1d-restricted NKT lymphocytes have the ability to regulate immunity, including autoimmunity. We previously demonstrated that CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells, which carry ...

  7. Domain III regulates N-type (CaV2.2) calcium channel closing kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarotskyy, Viktor; Gao, Guofeng; Peterson, Blaise Z.

    2012-01-01

    CaV2.2 (N-type) and CaV1.2 (L-type) calcium channels gate differently in response to membrane depolarization, which is critical to the unique physiological functions mediated by these channels. We wondered if the source for these differences could be identified. As a first step, we examined the effect of domain exchange between N-type and L-type channels on activation-deactivation kinetics, which were significantly different between these channels. Kinetic analysis of chimeric channels revealed N-channel-like deactivation for all chimeric channels containing N-channel domain III, while activation appeared to be a more distributed function across domains. This led us to hypothesize that domain III was an important regulator of N-channel closing. This idea was further examined with R-roscovitine, which is a trisubstituted purine that slows N-channel deactivation by exclusively binding to activated N-channels. L-channels lack this response to roscovitine, which allowed us to use N-L chimeras to test the role of domain III in roscovitine modulation of N-channel deactivation. In support of our hypothesis, all chimeric channels containing the N-channel domain III responded to roscovitine with slowed deactivation, while those chimeric channels with L-channel domain III did not. Thus a combination of kinetic and pharmacological evidence supports the hypothesis that domain III is an important regulator of N-channel closing. Our results support specialization of gating functions among calcium channel domains. PMID:22205645

  8. PrhN, a putative marR family transcriptional regulator, is involved in positive regulation of type III secretion system and full virulence of Ralstonia solanacearum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang eYong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The MarR-family of transcriptional regulators are involved in various cellular processes, including resistance to multiple antibiotics and other toxic chemicals, adaptation to different environments and pathogenesis in many plant and animal pathogens. Here, we reported a new MarR regulator PrhN, which was involved in the pathogenesis of Ralstonia solanacearum. prhN mutant exhibited significantly reduced virulence and stem colonization compared to that of wild type in tomato plants. prhN mutant caused identical hypersensitive response (HR on resistant plants to the wild type. Deletion of prhN gene substantially reduced the expression of type III secretion system (T3SS in vitro and in planta (mainly in tomato plants, which is essential for pathogenicity of R. solanacearum, and the complemented PrhN could restore its virulence and T3SS expression to that of wild type. T3SS is directly controlled by AraC-type transcriptional regulator HrpB, and the transcription of hrpB is activated by HrpG and PrhG. HrpG and PrhG are homologues but are regulated by the PhcA positively and negatively respectively. Deletion of prhN gene also abolished the expression of hrpB and prhG, but didn't change the expression of hrpG and phcA. Together, these results indicated that PrhN positively regulates T3SS expression through PrhG and HrpB. PrhN and PhcA should regulate prhG expression in a parallel way. This is the first report on the pathogenesis of MarR regulator in R. solanacearum, and this new finding will improve our understanding on the various biological functions of MarR regulator and the complex regulatory network on hrp regulon in R. solanacearum.

  9. CYCD3 D-type cyclins regulate cambial cell proliferation and secondary growth in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Carl; Maruthi, N M; Jahn, Courtney E

    2015-08-01

    A major proportion of plant biomass is derived from the activity of the cambium, a lateral meristem responsible for vascular tissue formation and radial organ enlargement in a process termed secondary growth. In contrast to our relatively good understanding of the regulation of primary meristems, remarkably little is known concerning the mechanisms controlling secondary growth, particularly how cambial cell divisions are regulated and integrated with vascular differentiation. A genetic loss-of-function approach was used here to reveal a rate-limiting role for the Arabidopsis CYCLIN D3 (CYCD3) subgroup of cell-cycle genes in the control of cambial cell proliferation and secondary growth, providing conclusive evidence of a direct link between the cell cycle and vascular development. It is shown that all three CYCD3 genes are specifically expressed in the cambium throughout vascular development. Analysis of a triple loss-of-function CYCD3 mutant revealed a requirement for CYCD3 in promoting the cambial cell cycle since mutant stems and hypocotyls showed a marked reduction in diameter linked to reduced mitotic activity in the cambium. Conversely, loss of CYCD3 provoked an increase in xylem cell size and the expression of differentiation markers, showing that CYCD3 is required to restrain the differentiation of xylem precursor cells. Together, our data show that tight control of cambial cell division through developmental- and cell type-specific regulation of CYCD3 is required for normal vascular development, constituting part of a novel mechanism controlling organ growth in higher plants.

  10. Power regulating range broadening of the WWER-type reactor power units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dement' ev, B.A.; Petrov, V.A.; Proskuryakov, A.G.; Puchkov, V.V. (Moskovskij Ehnergeticheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-02-01

    Calculational studies on the use of sliding pressure (SP) regime to expand the regulating range of the WWER-440 reactor power units are presented. Two operation regimes of a power unit have been considered: according to weekly and daily load swings in electrical grids. The conclusion is made that the use of SP regime in the secondary circuit improves manoeuvable characterstics of the power unit in the second half of operating cycle. T of the reactor (0.6 regulating range broadening of the reactor. Besides, the use of SP regime during power unit operation with decreased loadings is the more efficient the smaller is the load. The range of operating cycle 0.8 <= T <= 1 makes the greatest contribution to regulating range broadening as a result of SP regime use. Conclusions of the calculational studies can be also applied to WWER reactors of other types as well as to RBMK reactors.

  11. Type I Interferons Regulate Immune Responses in Humans with Blood-Stage Plasmodium falciparum Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H.; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Best, Shannon E.; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S.; Edwards, Chelsea L.; Boyle, Glen M.; Price, Ric N.; Anstey, Nicholas M.; Loughland, Jessica R.; Burel, Julie; Doolan, Denise L.; Haque, Ashraful; McCarthy, James S.; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The development of immunoregulatory networks is important to prevent disease. However, these same networks allow pathogens to persist and reduce vaccine efficacy. Here, we identify type I interferons (IFNs) as important regulators in developing anti-parasitic immunity in healthy volunteers infected for the first time with Plasmodium falciparum. Type I IFNs suppressed innate immune cell function and parasitic-specific CD4+ T cell IFNγ production, and they promoted the development of parasitic-specific IL-10-producing Th1 (Tr1) cells. Type I IFN-dependent, parasite-specific IL-10 production was also observed in P. falciparum malaria patients in the field following chemoprophylaxis. Parasite-induced IL-10 suppressed inflammatory cytokine production, and IL-10 levels after drug treatment were positively associated with parasite burdens before anti-parasitic drug administration. These findings have important implications for understanding the development of host immune responses following blood-stage P. falciparum infection, and they identify type I IFNs and related signaling pathways as potential targets for therapies or vaccine efficacy improvement. PMID:27705789

  12. Epigenetic regulation of cell type-specific expression patterns in the human mammary epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reo Maruyama

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation is an epigenetic program that involves the gradual loss of pluripotency and acquisition of cell type-specific features. Understanding these processes requires genome-wide analysis of epigenetic and gene expression profiles, which have been challenging in primary tissue samples due to limited numbers of cells available. Here we describe the application of high-throughput sequencing technology for profiling histone and DNA methylation, as well as gene expression patterns of normal human mammary progenitor-enriched and luminal lineage-committed cells. We observed significant differences in histone H3 lysine 27 tri-methylation (H3K27me3 enrichment and DNA methylation of genes expressed in a cell type-specific manner, suggesting their regulation by epigenetic mechanisms and a dynamic interplay between the two processes that together define developmental potential. The technologies we developed and the epigenetically regulated genes we identified will accelerate the characterization of primary cell epigenomes and the dissection of human mammary epithelial lineage-commitment and luminal differentiation.

  13. Microbiota and epigenetic regulation of inflammatory mediators in type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remely, M; Aumueller, E; Jahn, D; Hippe, B; Brath, H; Haslberger, A G

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with alterations in the structure of the gut microbiota leading to low-grade inflammatory responses. An increased penetration of the impaired gut membrane by bacterial components is believed to induce this inflammation, possibly involving epigenetic alteration of inflammatory molecules such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We evaluated changes of the gut microbiota and epigenetic DNA methylation of TLR2 and TLR4 in three groups of subjects: type 2 diabetics under glucagon-like peptide-1 agonist therapy, obese individuals without established insulin resistance, and a lean control group. Clostridium cluster IV, Clostridium cluster XIVa, lactic acid bacteria, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Bacteroidetes abundances were analysed by PCR and 454 high-throughput sequencing. The epigenetic methylation in the regulatory region of TLR4 and TLR2 was analysed using bisulfite conversion and pyrosequencing. We observed a significantly higher ratio of Firmicutes/ Bacteroidetes in type 2 diabetics compared to lean controls and obese. Major differences were shown in lactic acid bacteria, with the highest abundance in type 2 diabetics, followed by obese and lean participants. In comparison, F. prausnitzii was least abundant in type 2 diabetics, and most abundant in lean controls. Methylation analysis of four CpGs in the first exon of TLR4 showed significantly lower methylation in obese individuals, but no significant difference between type 2 diabetics and lean controls. Methylation of seven CpGs in the promoter region of TLR2 was significantly lower in type 2 diabetics compared to obese subjects and lean controls. The methylation levels of both TLRs were significantly correlated with body mass index. Our data suggest that changes in gut microbiota and thus cell wall components are involved in the epigenetic regulation of inflammatory reactions. An improved diet targeted to induce gut microbial balance and in the following even epigenetic changes of

  14. Type I, II, and III Interferons: Regulating Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travar, Maja; Petkovic, Miroslav; Verhaz, Antonija

    2016-02-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines released by host cells in response to the presence of pathogens or tumor cells. The aim of this review was to present the previously known and new findings about the role of interferons type I and II, and recently discovered type III in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infection control. Infection of various cell types with M. tuberculosis induce both IFN-α and IFN-β synthesis. The majority of the studies support the findings that IFN type I actually promotes infection with M. tuberculosis. It has been well establish that IFN-γ has protective function against M. tuberculosis and the other mycobacteria and that the primary source of this cytokine are CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Recently, it has been shown that also the innate lymphocytes, γδ T cells, natural killer (NK) T cells, and NK cells can also be the source of IFN-γ in response to mycobacterial infection. Several studies have shown that CD4(+) T cells protect mice against M. tuberculosis independently of IFN-γ. The balance between IFN-γ and different cytokines such as IL-10 and other Th2 cell cytokines is likely to influence disease outcome. Type I IFN appears to be detrimental through at least three separate, but overlapping, type I IFN-mediated mechanisms: induction of excessive apoptosis, specific suppression of Th1 and IFN-γ responses, and dampening of the immune response by strong IL-10 induction. Recently it has been found that M. tuberculosis infection in A549 lung epithelial cells stimulate up-regulation of IFN-λ genes in vitro. IFN-λs also have a role in modulation of Th1/Th2 response. IFN-λs are not essential for M. tuberculosis infection control, but can give some contribution in immune response to this pathogen.

  15. Type 2 cannabinoid receptor contributes to the physiological regulation of spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, Daniele; De Domenico, Emanuela; Sette, Claudio; Geremia, Raffaele; Grimaldi, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2) has been proposed to play a pivotal role in meiotic entry of male germ cells, similar to retinoic acid (RA). In this study, we showed that activation of CB2with the specific agonist JWH133 [3-(1',1'-dimethylbutyl)-1-deoxy-8-THC] (IC5010(-6)M) mimics epigenetic events induced by RA (IC5010(-7)M) in spermatogonia. Both JWH133 and RA treatments stimulate the expression of the meiotic genes c-KitandStra8, by up-regulating H3K4me3 and down-regulating H3K9me2 levels in genomic regions flanking the transcription start site. Moreover, both agents increase the expression ofPrdm9, the gene encoding a meiosis-specific histone, H3K4me3 methyltransferase, which marks hotspots of recombination in prophase I, thus resulting in a global increase in H3K4me3. Notably, prolonged administration of JWH133 to immature 7 dpp CD-1 mice induced an acceleration of the onset of spermatogenesis, whereas the specific CB2antagonist delayed germ cell differentiation. Thus, both hyper- and hypostimulation of CB2disrupted the temporal dynamics of the spermatogenic cycle. These findings highlight the importance of proper CB2signaling for the maintenance of a correct temporal progression of spermatogenesis and suggest a possible adverse effect of cannabis in deregulating this process.-Di Giacomo, D., De Domenico, E., Sette, C., Geremia, R., Grimaldi, P. Type 2 cannabinoid receptor contributes to the physiological regulation of spermatogenesis.

  16. Positive regulation of the Hrp type III secretion system in Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Thwaites, Richard; Macho, Alberto P; Mansfield, John W; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2010-05-01

    Disease in compatible hosts and induction of the hypersensitive response in resistant plants by most plant-pathogenic bacteria require a functional type III secretion system (T3SS). Expression of T3SS genes responds to host and environmental factors and is induced within the plant. In Pseudomonas syringae, expression of the T3SS requires HrpL, which is transcriptionally upregulated by HrpR and HrpS. In some pathovars, expression of the hrpRS genes is upregulated by the GacA/S two-component system. Additionally, HrpA, the major component of the T3SS pilus, has also been linked to the regulation of the hrpRS gene expression. Previous studies concerning regulation of hypersensitive response and pathogenesis/hypersensitive response conserved (hrp/hrc) gene expression have used mostly in vitro inducing conditions, different pathovars, and methodology. Here, we analyze the roles of HrpL, GacA, and HrpA in the bean pathogen, using single, double, and triple mutants as well as strains ectopically expressing the regulators. We use real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis in vitro and in planta to quantify gene expression and competitive indices and other assays to assess bacterial fitness. Our results indicate that i) HrpL acts as a general virulence regulator that upregulates non-T3SS virulence determinants and downregulates flagellar function; ii) GacA modulates the expression of hrpL, and its contribution to virulence is entirely HrpL dependent; iii) there is a basal HrpL-independent expression of the T3SS genes in rich medium that is important for full activation of the system, maybe by keeping the system primed for rapid activation upon contact with the plant; and iv) HrpA upregulates expression of the T3SS genes and is essential to activate expression of the hrpZ operon upon contact with the plant.

  17. Finding Balance : self-regulation in overweight patients with type 2 diabetes: from theory to a pilot intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Sasja Deborah

    2008-01-01

    The central focus of this thesis was to examine the role of self-regulation principles in predicting and changing self-care behaviors of diabetes type 2 patients. Overall, the results in this thesis indicate that self-regulation cognitions and skills might be important intervention targets of future

  18. Finding Balance : self-regulation in overweight patients with type 2 diabetes: from theory to a pilot intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Sasja Deborah

    2008-01-01

    The central focus of this thesis was to examine the role of self-regulation principles in predicting and changing self-care behaviors of diabetes type 2 patients. Overall, the results in this thesis indicate that self-regulation cognitions and skills might be important intervention targets of future

  19. Negative-Ion Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Microarray Analyses of Developmentally Regulated Antigens Based on Type 1 and Type 2 Backbone Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Yibing; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Chai, Wengang

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 (Galβ1-3GlcNAc) and type 2 (Galβ1-4GlcNAc) sequences are constituents of the backbones of a large family of glycans of glycoproteins and glycolipids whose branching and peripheral substitutions are developmentally regulated. It is highly desirable to have microsequencing methods that can be used to precisely identify and monitor these oligosaccharide sequences with high sensitivity. Negative-ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation has been used for characterization of branching points, peripheral substitutions, and partial assignment of linkages in reducing oligosaccharides. We now extend this method to characterizing entire sequences of linear type 1 and type 2 chain-based glycans, focusing on the type 1 and type 2 units in the internal regions including the linkages connecting type 1 and type 2 disaccharide units. We apply the principles to sequence analysis of closely related isomeric oligosaccharides and demonstrate by microarray analyses distinct binding activities of antibodies and a lectin toward various combinations of type 1 and 2 units joined by 1,3- and 1,6-linkages. These sequence-specific carbohydrate-binding proteins are in turn valuable tools for detecting and distinguishing the type 1 and type 2-based developmentally regulated glycan sequences.

  20. The Lipid-regulating Effects of Atorvastatin on Type 2 Elder Diabetes Patients with Hyperlipidemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂玲; 刘晓晴; 李仁立; 黄葵; 姚汉华; 范巧

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effect of atorvastatin on lipid metabolism in type 2 elder diabetes patients with hyperlipidemia, 26 patients with type 2 elder diabetes complicated with hyperlipidemia were treated with atorvastatin (10 mg/d) for 8 weeks. The serum triglyceride (TG), high density protein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low density protein cholesterol (LDL-C) were measured before and after the treatment. Meanwhile, the non-denaturing polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis was used for detection of small-sized LDL(SLDL). Our results showed that TG dropped from 4.88±0. 72 mmol/L to 2.65±0.32 mmol/L; HDL-C was increased from 0. 85±0. 31 mmol/L to 1.28±0. 29 mmol/L; LDL-C was declined from 3. 71±2.98 mmol/L to 2.10± 1.22 mmol/L, sLDL-A was increased from (42.49 ± 8. 1) % to (53.27 ± 7.5) %; LDL B was decreased from ( 57.91 ± 8.1) % to (46.73±7.5 %) (P<0.05). The level of blood glucose was not changed at the end of 8th week. It is concluded that atorvastatin has satisfactory lipid-regulating effects on type 2 elder diabetes patients with hyperlipidemia.

  1. The dynamic regulation of cortical excitability is altered in episodic ataxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Rick C; Siebner, Hartwig R; Giffin, Nicola; Bestmann, Sven; Rothwell, John C; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2010-12-01

    Episodic ataxia type 2 and familial hemiplegic migraine are two rare hereditary disorders that are linked to dysfunctional ion channels and are characterized clinically by paroxysmal neurological symptoms. Impaired regulation of cerebral excitability is thought to play a role in the occurrence of these paroxysms, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Normal ion channels are crucial for coordinating neuronal firing in response to facilitatory input. Thus, we hypothesized that channel dysfunction in episodic ataxia type 2 and familial hemiplegic migraine may impair the ability to adjust cerebral excitability after facilitatory events. We tested this hypothesis in patients with episodic ataxia type 2 (n = 6), patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (n = 7) and healthy controls (n = 13). All subjects received a high-frequency burst (10 pulses at 20 Hz) of transcranial magnetic stimulation to transiently increase the excitability of the motor cortex. Acute burst-induced excitability changes were probed at 50, 250, 500 and 1000 ms after the end of the burst. This was done using single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to assess corticospinal excitability, and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation at an interstimulus interval of 2 and 10 ms to assess intracortical inhibition and facilitation, respectively. The time course of burst-induced excitability changes differed between groups. Healthy controls showed a short-lived increase in excitability that was only present 50 ms after the burst. In contrast, patients with episodic ataxia type 2 showed an abnormally prolonged increase in corticospinal excitability that was still present 250 ms after the transcranial magnetic stimulation burst. Furthermore, while controls showed a decrease in intracortical facilitation during the 1 s period following the transcranial magnetic stimulation burst, patients with episodic ataxia type 2 had increased intracortical facilitation 1000 ms after the burst

  2. Negative-ion Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Microarray Analyses of Developmentally-regulated Antigens Based on Type 1 and Type 2 Backbone Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Yibing; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Chai, Wengang

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 (Galβ1-3GlcNAc) and type 2 (Galβ1-4GlcNAc) sequences are constituents of the backbones of a large family of glycans of glycoproteins and glycolipids whose branching and peripheral substitutions are developmentally-regulated. It is highly desirable to have micro-sequencing methods that can be used to precisely identify and monitor these oligosaccharide sequences with high sensitivity. Negative-ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation has been used for characterization of branching points, peripheral substitutions and partial assignment of linkages in reducing oligosaccharides. We now extend this method to characterizing entire sequences of linear type 1 and type 2 chain-based glycans, focusing on the type 1 and -2 units in the internal regions including the linkages connecting type 1 and type 2 disaccharide units. We apply the principles to sequence analysis of closely related isomeric oligosaccharides and demonstrate by microarray analyses distinct binding activities of antibodies and a lectin toward various combinations of type 1 and 2 units joined by 1,3- and 1,6-linkages. These sequence-specific carbohydrate-binding proteins are in turn valuable tools for detecting and distinguishing the type 1 and type 2-based developmentally-regulated glycan sequences. PMID:26530895

  3. Stability Analysis of the Buck-Boost Type Solar Array Regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeong-Hwan; Yoon, Seok-Teak; Park, Hee-Sung; Park, Sung-Woo; Koo, Ja-Chun; Jang, Jin-Baek; Lee, Sang-Kon

    2014-08-01

    The SAR (Solar Array Regulator) is different from a general DC-DC Converter. The input of the SAR is connected to the solar array and the output is connected to the battery. So, the output voltage of the SAR is constant and the input voltage of the SAR is variable. And the solar array current which is the SAR input current is variable according to the solar array voltage. Therefore, the SAR is influenced by the electrical characteristic of the solar array. For these reasons, a small signal model for a general DC-DC converter cannot be applied to the SAR for the stability analysis. In this paper, the small signal model of the BUCK-BOOST type SAR (BBSAR) is introduced and its transfer functions are induced. Using small signal transfer functions, the stability analysis is performed and its results are compared to the simulation result.

  4. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type O regulates development and function of the sensory nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Brito, Manuel R; Bixby, John L

    2009-12-01

    The roles of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in differentiation and axon targeting by dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are essentially unknown. The type III transmembrane PTP, PTPRO, is expressed in DRG neurons, and is implicated in the guidance of motor and retinal axons. We examined the role of PTPRO in DRG development and function using PTPRO(-/-) mice. The number of peptidergic nociceptive neurons in the DRG of PTPRO(-/-) mice was significantly decreased, while the total number of sensory neurons appeared unchanged. In addition, spinal pathfinding by both peptidergic and proprioceptive neurons was abnormal in PTPRO(-/-) mice. Lastly, PTPRO(-/-) mice performed abnormally on tests of thermal pain and sensorimotor coordination, suggesting that both nociception and proprioception were perturbed. Our data indicate that PTPRO is required for peptidergic differentiation and process outgrowth of sensory neurons, as well as mature sensory function, and provide the first evidence that RPTPs regulate DRG development.

  5. Alu Elements as Novel Regulators of Gene Expression in Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies implicating Alu repeat elements in various diseases, there is sparse information available with respect to the potential functional and biological roles of the repeat elements in Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Therefore, we performed a genome-wide sequence analysis of T1D candidate...... genes to identify embedded Alu elements within these genes. We observed significant enrichment of Alu elements within the T1D genes (p-value genes harboring Alus revealed significant enrichment for immune......-mediated processes (p-value genes harboring inverted Alus (IRAlus) within their 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) that are known to regulate the expression of host mRNAs by generating double stranded RNA duplexes. Our in silico analysis predicted the formation of duplex structures...

  6. Regulation of programmed cell death by plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lademann, Ulrik Axel; Rømer, Maria Unni Koefoed

    2008-01-01

    PA) observed in tumours; however, several lines of evidence suggest that PAI-1 may contribute directly to the pathology of the disease. PAI-1 has been reported to have an effect on most of the basic cellular processes including cell adhesion, cell migration, cell invasion, and cell proliferation and increasing......Elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) are associated with poor prognosis in cancer. An explanation to the elevated levels of PAI-1 could be a protective response to the increased proteolytic activity, caused by elevated levels of urokinase- type plasminogen activator (u...... numbers of reports suggest that PAI-1 also can regulate programmed cell death (PCD) in cancer cells and normal cells. A number of reports suggest that PAI-1 can inhibit PCD through its pro-adhesive/anti-proteolytic property whereas other reports suggest that PAI-1 induces PCD through its anti...

  7. Steatogenesis in adult-onset type II citrullinemia is associated with down-regulation of PPARα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Michiharu; Kimura, Takefumi; Yazaki, Masahide; Tanaka, Naoki; Yang, Yang; Nakajima, Takero; Horiuchi, Akira; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Joshita, Satoru; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Umemura, Takeji; Tanaka, Eiji; Gonzalez, Frank J; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2015-03-01

    SLC25A13 (citrin or aspartate-glutamate carrier 2) is located in the mitochondrial membrane in the liver and its genetic deficiency causes adult-onset type II citrullinemia (CTLN2). CTLN2 is one of the urea cycle disorders characterized by sudden-onset hyperammonemia due to reduced argininosuccinate synthase activity. This disorder is frequently accompanied with hepatosteatosis in the absence of obesity and ethanol consumption. However, the precise mechanism of steatogenesis remains unclear. The expression of genes associated with fatty acid (FA) and triglyceride (TG) metabolism was examined using liver samples obtained from 16 CTLN2 patients and compared with 7 healthy individuals. Although expression of hepatic genes associated with lipogenesis and TG hydrolysis was not changed, the mRNAs encoding enzymes/proteins involved in FA oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl-CoA transferase 1α, medium- and very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases, and acyl-CoA oxidase 1), very-low-density lipoprotein secretion (microsomal TG transfer protein), and FA transport (CD36 and FA-binding protein 1), were markedly suppressed in CTLN2 patients. Serum concentrations of ketone bodies were also decreased in these patients, suggesting reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation activity. Consistent with these findings, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of hepatic lipid metabolism, was significantly down-regulated. Hepatic PPARα expression was inversely correlated with severity of steatosis and circulating ammonia and citrulline levels. Additionally, phosphorylation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase was enhanced in CTLN2 livers, which was likely associated with lower hepatic PPARα. Collectively, down-regulation of PPARα is associated with steatogenesis in CTLN2 patients. These findings provide a novel link between urea cycle disorder, lipid metabolism, and PPARα.

  8. Regulation of Membrane-Type 4 Matrix Metalloproteinase by SLUG Contributes to Hypoxia-Mediated Metastasis

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    Chi-Hung Huang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypoxic tumor environment has been shown to be critical to cancer metastasis through the promotion of angiogenesis, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, and acquisition of invasive potential. However, the impact of hypoxia on the expression profile of the proteolytic enzymes involved in invasiveness is relatively unknown. Membrane-type 4 matrix metalloproteinase (MT4-MMP is a glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol-anchored protease that has been shown to be overexpressed in human cancers. However, detailed mechanisms regarding the regulation and function of MT4-MMP expression in tumor cells remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia or overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α induced MT4-MMP expression in human cancer cells. Activation of SLUG, a transcriptional factor regulating the EMT process of human cancers, by HIF-1α was critical for the induction of MT4-MMP under hypoxia. SLUG regulated the transcription of MT4-MMP through direct binding to the E-box located in its proximal promoter. Short-interference RNA-mediated knockdown of MT4-MMP attenuated in vitro invasiveness and in vivo pulmonary colonization of tumor cells without affecting cell migratory ability. MT4-MMP promoted invasiveness and pulmonary colonization through modulation of the expression profile of MMPs and angiogenic factors. Finally, coexpression of HIF-1α and MT4-MMP in human head and neck cancer was predictive of a worse clinical outcome. These findings establish a novel signaling pathway for hypoxia-mediated metastasis and elucidate the underlying regulatory mechanism and functional significance of MT4-MMP in cancer metastasis.

  9. New perspectives on the regulation of type II inflammation in asthma [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireya Becerra-Díaz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the lungs which has been thought to arise as a result of inappropriately directed T helper type-2 (Th2 immune responses of the lungs to otherwise innocuous inhaled antigens. Current asthma therapeutics are directed towards the amelioration of downstream consequences of type-2 immune responses (i.e. β-agonists or broad-spectrum immunosuppression (i.e. corticosteroids. However, few approaches to date have been focused on the primary prevention of immune deviation. Advances in molecular phenotyping reveal heterogeneity within the asthmatic population with multiple endotypes whose varying expression depends on the interplay between numerous environmental factors and the inheritance of a broad range of susceptibility genes. The most common endotype is one described as “type-2-high” (i.e. high levels of interleukin [IL]-13, eosinophilia, and periostin. The identification of multiple endotypes has provided a potential explanation for the observations that therapies directed at typical Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 and their receptors have often fallen short when they were tested in a diverse group of asthmatic patients without first stratifying based on disease endotype or severity. However, despite the incorporation of endotype-dependent stratification schemes into clinical trial designs, variation in drug responses are still apparent, suggesting that additional genetic/environmental factors may be contributing to the diversity in drug efficacy. Herein, we will review recent advances in our understanding of the complex pathways involved in the initiation and regulation of type-2-mediated immune responses and their modulation by host factors (genetics, metabolic status, and the microbiome. Particular consideration will be given to how this knowledge could pave the way for further refinement of disease endotypes and/or the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of asthma.

  10. AHL-type quorum sensing and its regulation on symplasmata formation in Pantoea agglomerans YS19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Wu, Suisui; Wang, Jieru; Feng, Yongjun

    2015-05-01

    Pantoea agglomerans YS19, an endophytic diazotrophic bacterium isolated from rice, is characterized by the formation of multicellular aggregate structure called symplasmata, which not only bestow the strong stress-resistance of the bacterium, but also contribute to the specific adaptation in the endophyte-host association. Acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), as the important signal molecule in the quorum sensing (QS) system of gram-negative bacteria, were demonstrated to regulate motility, cell-aggregation, and other bacterial behaviors. Here, the production of AHL by P. agglomerans YS19 and its regulation on the symplasmata formation were studied. It was revealed that the production of AHL by YS19 was initiated at the exponential growth stage and from then on, reached the peak values at the stationary growth stage in LB medium. The AHL was identified as N-3-oxooctanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (OOHL) by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. The AHL synthesis gene pagI and receptor gene pagR in YS19 were cloned and phylogenetic analysis showed that they were high conservative among strains in species of P. agglomerans. It was revealed that AHL promoted the bacterial growth and symplasmata formation of YS19. Meanwhile, the colonization ability and growth-promoting effect of YS19 on the host plant were also enhanced by AHL. These results strongly suggest the pleiotropic effects of the AHL-type QS system in endophytic life of the strain.

  11. Pregnancy Differentially Regulates the Collagens Types I and III in Left Ventricle from Rat Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon-Miranda, Sarai; Salazar-Enriquez, Diana G.; Muñiz, Jesus; Ramirez-Archila, Mario V.; Sanchez-Pastor, Enrique A.; Andrade, Felipa; Soñanez-Organis, Jose G.; Moran-Palacio, Edgar F.; Virgen-Ortiz, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic cardiac remodeling has been widely documented; however, the physiological cardiac remodeling induced by pregnancy and its reversion in postpartum are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the changes in collagen I (Col I) and collagen III (Col III) mRNA and protein levels in left ventricle from rat heart during pregnancy and postpartum. Col I and Col III mRNA expression in left ventricle samples during pregnancy and postpartum were analyzed by using quantitative PCR. Data obtained from gene expression show that Col I and Col III in left ventricle are upregulated during pregnancy with reversion in postpartum. In contrast to gene expression, the protein expression evaluated by western blot showed that Col I is downregulated and Col III is upregulated in left ventricle during pregnancy. In conclusion, the pregnancy differentially regulates collagens types I and III in heart; this finding could be an important molecular mechanism that regulates the ventricular stiffness in response to blood volume overload present during pregnancy which is reversed in postpartum. PMID:25147829

  12. Phosphorylation regulates binding of the human papillomavirus type 8 E2 protein to host chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, Vandana; McBride, Alison A

    2012-09-01

    The papillomavirus E2 proteins are indispensable for the viral life cycle, and their functions are subject to tight regulation. The E2 proteins undergo posttranslational modifications that regulate their properties and roles in viral transcription, replication, and genome maintenance. During persistent infection, the E2 proteins from many papillomaviruses act as molecular bridges that tether the viral genomes to host chromosomes to retain them within the host nucleus and to partition them to daughter cells. The betapapillomavirus E2 proteins bind to pericentromeric regions of host mitotic chromosomes, including the ribosomal DNA loci. We recently reported that two residues (arginine 250 and serine 253) within the chromosome binding region of the human papillomavirus type 8 (HPV8) E2 protein are required for this binding. In this study, we show that serine 253 is phosphorylated, most likely by protein kinase A, and this modulates the interaction of the E2 protein with cellular chromatin. Furthermore, we show that this phosphorylation occurs in S phase, increases the half-life of the E2 protein, and promotes chromatin binding from S phase through mitosis.

  13. Role of type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 in the regulation of Circadian Per1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungtae Na

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are the endogenous oscillators that regulate rhythmic physiological and behavioral changes to correspond to daily light-dark cycles. Molecular dissections have revealed that transcriptional feedback loops of the circadian clock genes drive the molecular oscillation, in which PER/CRY complexes inhibit the transcriptional activity of the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer to constitute a negative feedback loop. In this study, we identified the type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 as an interacting molecule of CRY1. Although the Prmt5 gene was constitutively expressed, increased interaction of PRMT5 with CRY1 was observed when the Per1 gene was repressed both in synchronized mouse liver and NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, rhythmic recruitment of PRMT5 and CRY1 to the Per1 gene promoter was found to be associated with an increased level of histone H4R3 dimethylation and Per1 gene repression. Consistently, decreased histone H4R3 dimethylation and altered rhythmic Per1 gene expression were observed in Prmt5-depleted cells. Taken together, these findings provide an insight into the link between histone arginine methylation by PRMT5 and transcriptional regulation of the circadian Per1 gene.

  14. Pregnancy Differentially Regulates the Collagens Types I and III in Left Ventricle from Rat Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarai Limon-Miranda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathologic cardiac remodeling has been widely documented; however, the physiological cardiac remodeling induced by pregnancy and its reversion in postpartum are poorly understood. In the present study we investigated the changes in collagen I (Col I and collagen III (Col III mRNA and protein levels in left ventricle from rat heart during pregnancy and postpartum. Col I and Col III mRNA expression in left ventricle samples during pregnancy and postpartum were analyzed by using quantitative PCR. Data obtained from gene expression show that Col I and Col III in left ventricle are upregulated during pregnancy with reversion in postpartum. In contrast to gene expression, the protein expression evaluated by western blot showed that Col I is downregulated and Col III is upregulated in left ventricle during pregnancy. In conclusion, the pregnancy differentially regulates collagens types I and III in heart; this finding could be an important molecular mechanism that regulates the ventricular stiffness in response to blood volume overload present during pregnancy which is reversed in postpartum.

  15. Molecular Pathways Regulating Macrovascular Pathology and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotype in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Casella

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a disease reaching a pandemic proportion in developed countries and a major risk factor for almost all cardiovascular diseases and their adverse clinical manifestations. T2DM leads to several macrovascular and microvascular alterations that influence the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are fundamental players in macrovascular alterations of T2DM patients. VSMCs display phenotypic and functional alterations that reflect an altered intracellular biomolecular scenario of great vessels of T2DM patients. Hyperglycemia itself and through intraparietal accumulation of advanced glycation-end products (AGEs activate different pathways, in particular nuclear factor-κB and MAPKs, while insulin and insulin growth-factor receptors (IGFR are implicated in the activation of Akt and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK 1/2. Nuclear factor-κB is also responsible of increased susceptibility of VSMCs to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Down-regulation of insulin growth-factor 1 receptors (IGFR-1R activity in diabetic vessels also influences negatively miR-133a levels, so increasing apoptotic susceptibility of VSMCs. Alterations of those bimolecular pathways and related genes associate to the prevalence of a synthetic phenotype of VSMCs induces extracellular matrix alterations of great vessels. A better knowledge of those biomolecular pathways and related genes in VSMCs will help to understand the mechanisms leading to macrovascular alterations in T2DM patients and to suggest new targeted therapies.

  16. The known two types of transglutaminases regulate immune and stress responses in white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chin-Chyuan; Chang, Hao-Che; Liu, Kuan-Fu; Cheng, Winton

    2016-06-01

    Transglutaminases (TGs) play critical roles in blood coagulation, immune responses, and other biochemical functions, which undergo post-translational remodeling such as acetylation, phosphorylation and fatty acylation. Two types of TG have been identified in white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, and further investigation on their potential function was conducted by gene silencing in the present study. Total haemocyte count (THC), differential haemocyte count (DHC), phenoloxidase activity, respiratory bursts (release of superoxide anion), superoxide dismutase activity, transglutaminase (TG) activity, haemolymph clotting time, and phagocytic activity and clearance efficiency to the pathogen Vibrio alginolyticus were measured when shrimps were individually injected with diethyl pyrocarbonate-water (DEPC-H2O) or TG dsRNAs. In addition, haemolymph glucose and lactate, and haemocytes crustin, lysozyme, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH), transglutaminaseI (TGI), transglutaminaseII (TGII) and clotting protein (CP) mRNA expression were determined in the dsRNA injected shrimp under hypothermal stress. Results showed that TG activity, phagocytic activity and clearance efficiency were significantly decreased, but THC, hyaline cells (HCs) and haemolymph clotting time were significantly increased in the shrimp which received LvTGI dsRNA and LvTGI + LvTGII dsRNA after 3 days. However, respiratory burst per haemocyte was significantly decreased in only LvTGI + LvTGII silenced shrimp. In hypothermal stress studies, elevation of haemolymph glucose and lactate was observed in all treated groups, and were advanced in LvTGI and LvTGI + LvTGII silenced shrimp following exposure to 22 °C. LvCHH mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated, but crustin and lysozyme mRNA expressions were significantly down-regulated in LvTGI and LvTGI + LvTGII silenced shrimp; moreover, LvTGII was significantly increased, but LvTGI was significantly decreased in LvTGI silenced shrimp

  17. Regulating the beta cell mass as a strategy for type-2 diabetes treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Imane; Muller, Christo; Louw, Johan; Bouwens, Luc

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) increases dramatically worldwide and has created an enormous health care burden. Obesity, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance are major risk factors for the development of T2D, but the major factor leading to the disease is failure of the insulin-producing beta cell mass to compensate for increasing insulin demands of the body. Progression of the disease further diminishes the beta cell mass as a result of lipotoxicity and glucotoxicity for which beta cells are particularly sensitive. Hence, treatment aiming to prevent beta cell loss or increase the number of beta cells could inhibit diabetes progression or lead to restoration of normal metabolism. Whereas current and new antidiabetic drugs are mainly targeting insulin secretion and action or glucose uptake, newer interventions must be found that prevent beta cell loss or increase beta cell number. The targets for this are beta cell proliferation, neogenesis and survival. This review examines major evidence from animal experiments suggesting that it is feasible to regulate the beta cell mass by bioactive compounds like growth factors, cytokines, hormones, phytochemicals and small molecules. Often the mode of action remains unclear due to inadequate methods to assess the effects of the compounds on the beta cell dynamics. Furthermore, a major challenge is to identify compounds with sufficient specificity in order to avoid unwanted effects on other cell types. Provided such safety issues can be solved, this may provide a curative approach for diabetes treatment.

  18. Increased Efferent Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Defective Intrinsic Heart Rate Regulation in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaung, H P Aye; Baldi, J Chris; Wang, Heng-Yu; Hughes, Gillian; Cook, Rosalind F; Bussey, Carol T; Sheard, Phil W; Bahn, Andrew; Jones, Peter P; Schwenke, Daryl O; Lamberts, Regis R

    2015-08-01

    Elevated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) coupled with dysregulated β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) signaling is postulated as a major driving force for cardiac dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes; however, cardiac SNA has never been assessed directly in diabetes. Our aim was to measure the sympathetic input to and the β-AR responsiveness of the heart in the type 2 diabetic heart. In vivo recording of SNA of the left efferent cardiac sympathetic branch of the stellate ganglion in Zucker diabetic fatty rats revealed an elevated resting cardiac SNA and doubled firing rate compared with nondiabetic rats. Ex vivo, in isolated denervated hearts, the intrinsic heart rate was markedly reduced. Contractile and relaxation responses to β-AR stimulation with dobutamine were compromised in externally paced diabetic hearts, but not in diabetic hearts allowed to regulate their own heart rate. Protein levels of left ventricular β1-AR and Gs (guanine nucleotide binding protein stimulatory) were reduced, whereas left ventricular and right atrial β2-AR and Gi (guanine nucleotide binding protein inhibitory regulatory) levels were increased. The elevated resting cardiac SNA in type 2 diabetes, combined with the reduced cardiac β-AR responsiveness, suggests that the maintenance of normal cardiovascular function requires elevated cardiac sympathetic input to compensate for changes in the intrinsic properties of the diabetic heart. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  19. Vacuolar ATPase regulates surfactant secretion in rat alveolar type II cells by modulating lamellar body calcium.

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    Narendranath Reddy Chintagari

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant reduces surface tension and maintains the stability of alveoli. How surfactant is released from alveolar epithelial type II cells is not fully understood. Vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase is the enzyme responsible for pumping H(+ into lamellar bodies and is required for the processing of surfactant proteins and the packaging of surfactant lipids. However, its role in lung surfactant secretion is unknown. Proteomic analysis revealed that vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase dominated the alveolar type II cell lipid raft proteome. Western blotting confirmed the association of V-ATPase a1 and B1/2 subunits with lipid rafts and their enrichment in lamellar bodies. The dissipation of lamellar body pH gradient by Bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1, an inhibitor of V-ATPase, increased surfactant secretion. Baf A1-stimulated secretion was blocked by the intracellular Ca(2+ chelator, BAPTA-AM, the protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor, staurosporine, and the Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, KN-62. Baf A1 induced Ca(2+ release from isolated lamellar bodies. Thapsigargin reduced the Baf A1-induced secretion, indicating cross-talk between lamellar body and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ pools. Stimulation of type II cells with surfactant secretagogues dissipated the pH gradient across lamellar bodies and disassembled the V-ATPase complex, indicating the physiological relevance of the V-ATPase-mediated surfactant secretion. Finally, silencing of V-ATPase a1 and B2 subunits decreased stimulated surfactant secretion, indicating that these subunits were crucial for surfactant secretion. We conclude that V-ATPase regulates surfactant secretion via an increased Ca(2+ mobilization from lamellar bodies and endoplasmic reticulum, and the activation of PKC and CaMKII. Our finding revealed a previously unrealized role of V-ATPase in surfactant secretion.

  20. Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type z negatively regulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination.

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    Kazuya Kuboyama

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fyn tyrosine kinase-mediated down-regulation of Rho activity through activation of p190RhoGAP is crucial for oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. Therefore, the loss of function of its counterpart protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP may enhance myelination during development and remyelination in demyelinating diseases. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether Ptprz, a receptor-like PTP (RPTP expressed abuntantly in oligodendrocyte lineage cells, is involved in this process, because we recently revealed that p190RhoGAP is a physiological substrate for Ptprz. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found an early onset of the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP, a major protein of the myelin sheath, and early initiation of myelination in vivo during development of the Ptprz-deficient mouse, as compared with the wild-type. In addition, oligodendrocytes appeared earlier in primary cultures from Ptprz-deficient mice than wild-type mice. Furthermore, adult Ptprz-deficient mice were less susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE induced by active immunization with myelin/oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG peptide than were wild-type mice. After EAE was induced, the tyrosine phosphorylation of p190RhoGAP increased significantly, and the EAE-induced loss of MBP was markedly suppressed in the white matter of the spinal cord in Ptprz-deficient mice. Here, the number of T-cells and macrophages/microglia infiltrating into the spinal cord did not differ between the two genotypes after MOG immunization. All these findings strongly support the validity of our hypothesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ptprz plays a negative role in oligodendrocyte differentiation in early central nervous system (CNS development and remyelination in demyelinating CNS diseases, through the dephosphorylation of substrates such as p190RhoGAP.

  1. Easy regulation of metabolic flux in Escherichia coli using an endogenous type I-E CRISPR-Cas system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yizhao; Su, Tianyuan; Qi, Qingsheng; Liang, Quanfeng

    2016-11-15

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference (CRISPRi) is a recently developed powerful tool for gene regulation. In Escherichia coli, the type I CRISPR system expressed endogenously shall be easy for internal regulation without causing metabolic burden in compared with the widely used type II system, which expressed dCas9 as an additional plasmid. By knocking out cas3 and activating the expression of CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense (Cascade), we constructed a native CRISPRi system in E. coli. Downregulation of the target gene from 6 to 82% was demonstrated using green fluorescent protein. Regulation of the citrate synthase gene (gltA) in the TCA cycle affected host metabolism. The effect of metabolic flux regulation was demonstrated by the poly-3-hydroxbutyrate (PHB) accumulation in vivo. By regulating native gltA in E. coli using an engineered endogenous type I-E CRISPR system, we redirected metabolic flux from the central metabolic pathway to the PHB synthesis pathway. This study demonstrated that the endogenous type I-E CRISPR-Cas system is an easy and effective method for regulating internal metabolic pathways, which is useful for product synthesis.

  2. cGMP stimulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channels co-expressed with cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II but not type Ibeta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); W.C. Poller; B.C. Tilly (Bernard); A. Smolenski; S. Schneider-Rasp; A.G. Bot (Alice); M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); B.J. Scholte (Bob); T. Jarchau; U. Walter

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn order to investigate the involvement of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK) type II in cGMP-provoked intestinal Cl- secretion, cGMP-dependent activation and phosphorylation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channels was ana

  3. Type II Na+-Pi cotransporters in osteoblast mineral formation: regulation by inorganic phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, Patrik; Murer, Heini; Biber, Jürg

    2007-01-01

    During calcification of bone, large amounts of phosphate (P(i)) must be transported from the circulation to the osteoid. Likely candidates for osteoblast P(i) transport are the type II sodium-phosphate cotransporters NaPi-IIa and NaPi-IIb that facilitate transcellular P(i) flux in kidney and intestine, respectively. We have therefore determined the 'cotransporters' expression in osteoblast-like cells. We have also studied the 'cotransporters' regulation by P(i) and during mineralization in vitro. Phosphate uptake and cotransporter protein expression was investigated at early, late and mineralizing culture stages of mouse (MC3T3-E1) and rat (UMR-106) osteoblast-like cells. Both NaPi-IIa and NaPi-IIb were expressed by both osteoblast-like cell lines. NaPi-IIa was upregulated in both cell lines one week after confluency. After 7 days in 3mM P(i) NaPi-IIa was strongly upregulated in both cell lines. NaPi-IIb expression was unaffected by both culture stage and P(i) supplementation. The expression of both cotransporters was unaffected by P(i) deprivation. In vitro mineralization at 1.5mM P(i) was preceded by a three-fold increase in osteoblast sodium-dependent P(i) uptake and a corresponding upregulation of both NaPi-IIa and NaPi-IIb. Their expression thus seem regulated by phosphate in a manner consistent with their playing a role in transcellular P(i) flux during mineralization.

  4. Phosphorylation regulates human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Rex function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Michael

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a pathogenic complex deltaretrovirus, which is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In addition to the structural and enzymatic viral gene products, HTLV-1 encodes the positive regulatory proteins Tax and Rex along with viral accessory proteins. Tax and Rex proteins orchestrate the timely expression of viral genes important in viral replication and cellular transformation. Rex is a nucleolar-localizing shuttling protein that acts post-transcriptionally by binding and facilitating the export of the unspliced and incompletely spliced viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. HTLV-1 Rex (Rex-1 is a phosphoprotein and general protein kinase inhibition correlates with reduced function. Therefore, it has been proposed that Rex-1 function may be regulated through site-specific phosphorylation. Results We conducted a phosphoryl mapping of Rex-1 over-expressed in transfected 293 T cells using a combination of affinity purification and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We achieved 100% physical coverage of the Rex-1 polypeptide and identified five novel phosphorylation sites at Thr-22, Ser-36, Thr-37, Ser-97, and Ser-106. We also confirmed evidence of two previously identified residues, Ser-70 and Thr-174, but found no evidence of phosphorylation at Ser-177. The functional significance of these phosphorylation events was evaluated using a Rex reporter assay and site-directed mutational analysis. Our results indicate that phosphorylation at Ser-97 and Thr-174 is critical for Rex-1 function. Conclusion We have mapped completely the site-specific phosphorylation of Rex-1 identifying a total of seven residues; Thr-22, Ser-36, Thr-37, Ser-70, Ser-97, Ser-106, and Thr-174. Overall, this work is the first to completely map the phosphorylation sites in Rex-1 and provides important insight into

  5. AMPK Subunit Expression Regulates Intramuscular Fat Content and Muscle Fiber Type in Chickens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye YANG; Jiao SONG; Ruiqi FU; Yanfa SUN; Jie WEN

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the role of AMPK in intramus-cular fat (IMF) and fiber type in chicken muscle. The chickens were slaughtered and their muscles were col ected at the ages of 4, 8, and 16 weeks so as to de-termine the IMF contents, as wel as the expression levels of AMPK subunits, regu-lators of adipogenesis. In addition, the myosin heavy chains (MyHCs) in thigh mus-cle tissues were also measured. The results showed that the IMF contents in 16-week old chickens were higher than those in 4 and 8-week-old chickens (P<0.05). The expression levels of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and fatty aicd translocase CD36 (FAT/CD36) mRNA were increased significantly in samples col ected at the ages of 4 and 16 weeks (P<0.05). The expression levels of MyHC IIa and IIb differed sig-nificantly among al the developmental stages (P<0.05). The AMPKα2, AMPKγ1, and AMPKγ3 mRNA levels were dramatical y decreased with the increase of age (P<0.05). To examine the role of AMPK in adipogenesis regulation, the SV cel s were cultured in an adipogenesis medium and treated with AICAR and Compound C respectively, the specific activator and inhibit of AMPK. The Compound C induced dramatical y a greater expression of C/EBPβ, SREBP1 and PPARγ (P<0.05). In conclusion, the expression of AMPKα2, AMPKγ1, and AMPKγ3 mRNA is signifi-cantly correlated with the adipogenesis in skeletal muscle of chickens.

  6. Dietary sodium intake regulates angiotensin II type 1, mineralocorticoid receptor, and associated signaling proteins in heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchiuti, Vincent; Lapointe, Nathalie; Pojoga, Luminita; Yao, Tham; Tran, Loc; Williams, Gordon H; Adler, Gail K

    2011-10-01

    Liberal or high-sodium (HS) intake, in conjunction with an activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, increases cardiovascular (CV) damage. We tested the hypothesis that sodium intake regulates the type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT(1)R), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and associated signaling pathways in heart tissue from healthy rodents. HS (1.6% Na(+)) and low-sodium (LS; 0.02% Na(+)) rat chow was fed to male healthy Wistar rats (n=7 animals per group). Protein levels were assessed by western blot and immunoprecipitation analysis. Fractionation studies showed that MR, AT(1)R, caveolin-3 (CAV-3), and CAV-1 were located in both cytoplasmic and membrane fractions. In healthy rats, consumption of an LS versus a HS diet led to decreased cardiac levels of AT(1)R and MR. Decreased sodium intake was also associated with decreased cardiac levels of CAV-1 and CAV-3, decreased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R-CAV-3 and MR-CAV-3 complexes, but increased immunoprecipitation of AT(1)R/MR complexes. Furthermore, decreased sodium intake was associated with decreased cardiac extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphorylated ERK (pERK), and pERK/ERK ratio; increased cardiac striatin; decreased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated eNOS (peNOS), but increased peNOS/eNOS ratio; and decreased cardiac plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Dietary sodium restriction has beneficial effects on the cardiac expression of factors associated with CV injury. These changes may play a role in the cardioprotective effects of dietary sodium restriction.

  7. The Adaptor Protein SAP Regulates Type II NKT Cell Development, Cytokine Production and Cytotoxicity Against Lymphoma1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiufang; Liao, Chia-Min; Bagchi, Sreya; Cardell, Susanna L.; Stein, Paul L.; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2014-01-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells represent a unique lineage of immunoregulatory T cells that are divided into two groups, type I and type II, based on their TCR usage. Because there are no specific tools to identify type II NKT cells, little is known about their developmental requirements and functional regulation. In our previous study, we showed that signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) is essential for the development of type II NKT cells. Here, using a type II NKT cell TCR transgenic mouse model (24αβTg), we demonstrated that CD1d-expressing hematopoietic cells but not thymic epithelial cells meditate efficient selection of type II NKT cells. Further, we showed that SAP regulates type II NKT cell development by controlling Egr2 and PLZF expression. SAP-deficient 24αβ transgenic T cells (24αβ T cells) exhibited an immature phenotype with reduced Th2 cytokine-producing capacity and diminished cytotoxicity to CD1d-expressing lymphoma cells. The impaired IL-4 production by SAP-deficient 24αβ T cells was associated with reduced IRF4 and GATA-3 induction following TCR stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that SAP is critical for regulating type II NKT cell responses. Aberrant responses of these T cells may contribute to the immune dysregulation observed in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease caused by mutations in SAP. PMID:25236978

  8. MicroRNA as type I interferon-regulated transcripts and modulators of the innate immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel C Forster

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs are an important family of cytokines that regulate innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens, in cancer and inflammatory diseases. While the regulation and role of protein-coding genes involved in these responses are well characterized, the role of non-coding microRNAs in the IFN responses is less developed. We review the emerging picture of microRNA regulation of the IFN response at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. This response forms an important regulatory loop, several microRNAs target transcripts encoding components at many steps of the type I IFN response, both production and action, at the receptor, signaling, transcription factor and regulated gene level. Not only do IFNs regulate positive signaling molecules, but also negative regulators such as SOCS1. In total, 36 microRNA are reported as IFN regulated. Given this apparent multipronged targeting of the IFN response by microRNAs and their well characterized capacity to buffer responses in other situations, the prospects of improved sequencing and microRNA targeting technologies will facilitate the elucidation of the broader regulatory networks of microRNA in this important biological context, and their therapeutic and diagnostic potential.

  9. The importance of distinguishing between the different eating disorders (sub)types when assessing emotion regulation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Unna N; Sternheim, Lot; Evers, Catharine

    2014-03-30

    People with eating disorders (ED) have difficulties regulating their emotions adaptively. Little is known about differences and similarities between different types of ED and how these regulation difficulties relate to other emotional problems. The present study examines maladaptive (suppression) and adaptive (cognitive reappraisal) emotion regulation strategies in women with different ED and relationships with anxiety and depression levels. In 32 women with AN restrictive subtype (ANR), 32 with AN binge-purge subtype (ANBP), 30 with bulimia nervosa (BN), 29 with binge eating disorder (BED), and 64 healthy women, the ERQ (emotion regulation) as well as STAI-T (anxiety), BDI-SF (depression), and EDDS (eating pathology) were administered. Women across different ED subtypes were inclined to suppress emotions and lacked the capacity to reappraise emotions (except women with ANBP). Correlational relations of suppression and reappraisal with anxiety and depression levels differed across ED groups. Emotion regulation problems were found across ED subtypes. However, the types of emotion regulation problems, and the effect of coexisting other emotional problems such as anxiety and depression may differ across ED subtypes. These findings illustrate the importance to of considering ED subtypes in emotion regulation research rather than consider ED as a whole. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional analysis of transcriptional regulation of herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) tegument proteins have important functions in the viral repli- cation process. In order to investigate the role of the HSV-1 tegument protein VP22 in viral replication, its transcriptional regulation of viral promoters was investigated using the chloramphenicol acetyl- transferase (CAT) assay. The results indicate that VP22 exerts a dose-dependent transcriptional in- hibitory effect on the HSV-1 α4, TK, and gC gene promoters. VP22 had the capacity to repress tran- scriptional activation of promoters via different viral transcription regulatory factors such as VP16 and ICP0, as evidenced by the specific repression of the TK and gC gene promoters by ICP0. In addition, VP22 was capable of inhibiting the promotion of ICP0 transcriptional activation in the presence of HAT PCAF, which is even more remarkable than the VP22 repression of ICP0 transcriptional activation. Fi- nally, the transcriptional inhibitory effect of VP22 on other viral promoters was demonstrated by the analysis of β-galactosidase activities in internal controls.

  11. The M-type receptor PLA2R regulates senescence through the p53 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augert, Arnaud; Payré, Christine; de Launoit, Yvan; Gil, Jesus; Lambeau, Gérard; Bernard, David

    2009-03-01

    Senescence is a stable proliferative arrest induced by various stresses such as telomere erosion, oncogenic or oxidative stress. Compelling evidence suggests that it acts as a barrier against tumour development. Describing new mechanisms that favour an escape from senescence can thus reveal new insights into tumorigenesis. To identify new genes controlling the senescence programme, we performed a loss-of-function genetic screen in primary human fibroblasts. We report that knockdown of the M-type receptor PLA2R (phospholipase A2 receptor) prevents the onset of replicative senescence and diminishes stress-induced senescence. Interestingly, expression of PLA2R increases during replicative senescence, and its ectopic expression results in premature senescence. We show that PLA2R regulates senescence in a reactive oxygen species-DNA damage-p53-dependent manner. Taken together, our study identifies PLA2R as a potential new tumour suppressor gene crucial in the induction of cellular senescence through the activation of the p53 pathway.

  12. Functional analysis of transcriptional regulation of herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xian; LI WeiZhong; LIU LongDing; CHE YanChun; CUN Wei; WU Wen Juan; HE ChunYan; SHAO CongWen; LI QiHan

    2008-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) tegument proteins have important functions in the viral repli-cation process. In order to investigate the role of the HSV-1 tegument protein VP22 in viral replication, its transcriptional regulation of viral promoters was investigated using the chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assay. The results indicate that VP22 exerts a dose-dependent transcriptional in-hibitory effect on the HSV-1 α4, TK, and gC gene promoters. VP22 had the capacity to repress tran-scriptional activation of promoters via different viral transcription regulatory factors such as VP16 and ICP0, as evidenced by the specific repression of the TK and gC gene promoters by ICP0. In addition, VP22 was capable of inhibiting the promotion of ICP0 transcriptional activation in the presence of HAT PCAF, which is even more remarkable than the VP22 repression of ICP0 transcriptional activation. Fi-nally, the transcriptional inhibitory effect of VP22 on other viral promoters was demonstrated by the analysis of β-galactosidase activities in internal controls.

  13. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick M Stanley

    Full Text Available Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter.

  14. The Relationship between Personality Types and Self-Regulated Learning Strategies of Language Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Ghyasi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relationship between personality traits, as measured by the NEO Five Factor Inventory, and different learning strategies, measured by the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ, that foreign language student may employ to help them learn the language.  A sample of 231 undergraduate students of English in Iran was administered the Inventory and the MSLQ.  This study is the first to connect learners’ personality traits with general learning strategies, which can be specifically applied to foreign language learning.  Analyzing the data using multiple regressions, the authors found that personality type was able to predict the tendency to use different learning strategies.  Specifically, students who scored high on “conscientiousness” were more likely to use all strategies, particularly managing time and study environment.  Students high on extraversion were more likely to use peer learning and help seeking strategies.  The authors conclude that language teachers could benefit from assessing their students’ personalities and matching strategies to their students’ tendencies. Keywords: Self-regulation; Personality; Five-Factor Inventory; Second language learning

  15. Developmental Stage-dependent Regulation of Prolyl 3-Hydroxylation in Tendon Type I Collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taga, Yuki; Kusubata, Masashi; Ogawa-Goto, Kiyoko; Hattori, Shunji

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxyproline (3-Hyp), which is unique to collagen, is a fairly rare post-translational modification. Recent studies have suggested a function of prolyl 3-hydroxylation in fibril assembly and its relationships with certain disorders, including recessive osteogenesis imperfecta and high myopia. However, no direct evidence for the physiological and pathological roles of 3-Hyp has been presented. In this study, we first estimated the overall alterations in prolyl hydroxylation in collagens purified from skin, bone, and tail tendon of 0.5-18-month-old rats by LC-MS analysis with stable isotope-labeled collagen, which was recently developed as an internal standard for highly accurate collagen analyses. 3-Hyp was found to significantly increase in tendon collagen until 3 months after birth and then remain constant, whereas increased prolyl 3-hydroxylation was not observed in skin and bone collagen. Site-specific analysis further revealed that 3-Hyp was increased in tendon type I collagen in a specific sequence region, including a previously known modification site at Pro(707) and newly identified sites at Pro(716) and Pro(719), at the early ages. The site-specific alterations in prolyl 3-hydroxylation with aging were also observed in bovine Achilles tendon. We postulate that significant increases in 3-Hyp at the consecutive modification sites are correlated with tissue development in tendon. The present findings suggest that prolyl 3-hydroxylation incrementally regulates collagen fibril diameter in tendon.

  16. Cyclic di-GMP riboswitch-regulated type IV pili contribute to aggregation of Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeleau, Eric; Purcell, Erin B; Lafontaine, Daniel A; Fortier, Louis-Charles; Tamayo, Rita; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic Gram-positive bacterium that causes intestinal infections with symptoms ranging from mild diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that typically regulates the switch from motile, free-living to sessile and multicellular behaviors in Gram-negative bacteria. Increased intracellular c-di-GMP concentration in C. difficile was recently shown to reduce flagellar motility and to increase cell aggregation. In this work, we investigated the role of the primary type IV pilus (T4P) locus in c-di-GMP-dependent cell aggregation. Inactivation of two T4P genes, pilA1 (CD3513) and pilB1 (CD3512), abolished pilus formation and significantly reduced cell aggregation under high c-di-GMP conditions. pilA1 is preceded by a putative c-di-GMP riboswitch, predicted to be transcriptionally active upon c-di-GMP binding. Consistent with our prediction, high intracellular c-di-GMP concentration increased transcript levels of T4P genes. In addition, single-round in vitro transcription assays confirmed that transcription downstream of the predicted transcription terminator was dose dependent and specific to c-di-GMP binding to the riboswitch aptamer. These results support a model in which T4P gene transcription is upregulated by c-di-GMP as a result of its binding to an upstream transcriptionally activating riboswitch, promoting cell aggregation in C. difficile.

  17. Mutant huntingtin regulates EGF receptor fate in non-neuronal cells lacking wild-type protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melone, Mariarosa A B; Calarco, Anna; Petillo, Orsolina; Margarucci, Sabrina; Colucci-D'Amato, Luca; Galderisi, Umberto; Koverech, Guido; Peluso, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Huntingtin (htt) is a scaffold protein localized at the subcellular level and is involved in coordinating the activity of several protein for signaling and intracellular transport. The emerging properties of htt in intracellular trafficking prompted us to study the role of mutant htt (polyQ-htt) in the intracellular fate of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), whose activity seems to be strictly regulated by htt. In particular, to evaluate whether protein trafficking dysfunction occurs in non-neuronal cells in the absence of functional htt, we monitored the EGFR protein in fibroblasts from homozygotic HD patients and their healthy counterpart. We found that polyQ-htt controls EGFR degradation and recycling. Lack of wild-type htt caused alteration of the ubiquitination cycle, formation of EGFR-incorporating high-molecular weight protein aggregates and abnormal EGFR distribution in endosomes of the degradation and recycling pathways after EGF stimulation. PolyQ-htt-induced alteration of EGFR trafficking affected cell migration and proliferation, at least in part, through inhibition of ERK signaling. To our knowledge the data here reported represent the first signaling and phenotypic characterization of polyQ-htt involvement in the modulation of growth factor stimulation in non-neuronal cells.

  18. Use of growth regulator of cytokinin type for enhancement and modification of herbicide activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakotov, S D; Zheltova, E V; Putsykin, Y G; Balakin, K V; Shapovalov, A A

    2006-01-01

    The herbicidal action of Betanal Express (BPAM) on Chine jute (Abutilon theophrasti) weed was studied in the presence of a new plant growth regulator of urea type, N-phenyl-N-(1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)urea (PhenylTriazolylUrea, PTU). In the past years, Chine jute has become a major limiting factor in sugar beet production in the southern Russia due to its resistance to BPAM which is an essential herbicide widely used for sugar beet protection. When PTU was added to BPAM, the combination appeared to be more effective than the herbicide alone. The influence of phytohormone PTU was observed at very low application rate of 20-100 g/ha, thus herbicide dose in the ecosystem was reduced. The main visual signs of herbicidal action of the combination BPAM + PTU on Chine jute were inhibition of growth of overground plant and stem, leaves changes and sharp inhibition of root growth. No sugar beet injury was observed when this tank mixture was used. It was found that enhanced performance of the novel herbicide formulation is determined by increased herbicidal action of Ethofumesate, one of the active ingredients of BPAM.

  19. Intestinal Epithelial Cell Regulation of Adaptive Immune Dysfunction in Human Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Christina L.; Li, Jian; LaPato, Melissa; Shapiro, Melanie R.; Glover, Sarah C.; Wallet, Mark A.; Wallet, Shannon M.

    2017-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the initiation, progression, and maintenance of type 1 diabetes (T1D), although a single environmental trigger for disease has not been identified. Studies have documented the contribution of immunity within the gastrointestinal tract (GI) to the expression of autoimmunity at distal sites. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) regulate local and systemic immunologic homeostasis through physical and biochemical interactions with innate and adaptive immune populations. We hypothesize that a loss in the tolerance-inducing nature of the GI tract occurs within T1D and is due to altered IECs’ innate immune function. As a first step in addressing this hypothesis, we contrasted the global immune microenvironment within the GI tract of individuals with T1D as well as evaluated the IEC-specific effects on adaptive immune cell phenotypes. The soluble and cellular immune microenvironment within the duodenum, the soluble mediator profile of primary IECs derived from the same duodenal tissues, and the effect of the primary IECs’ soluble mediator profile on T-cell expansion and polarization were evaluated. Higher levels of IL-17C and beta-defensin 2 (BD-2) mRNA in the T1D-duodenum were observed. Higher frequencies of type 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1) and CD8+CXCR3+ T-cells (Tc1) were also observed in T1D-duodenal tissues, concomitant with lower frequencies of type 3 ILC (ILC3) and CD8+CCR6+ T-cells (Tc17). Higher levels of proinflammatory mediators (IL-17C and BD-2) in the absence of similar changes in mediators associated with homeostasis (interleukin 10 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) were also observed in T1D-derived primary IEC cultures. T1D-derived IEC culture supernatants induced more robust CD8+ T-cell proliferation along with enhanced polarization of Tc1 populations, at the expense of Tc17 polarization, as well as the expansion of CXCR3+CCR6+/− Tregs, indicative of a Th1-like and less regulatory phenotype. These data demonstrate

  20. Genetic analysis of the regulation of type IV pilus function by the Chp chemosensory system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Jacob J; West, Joyce T; Engel, Joanne N

    2010-02-01

    The virulence of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa involves the coordinate expression of many virulence factors, including type IV pili, which are required for colonization of host tissues and for twitching motility. Type IV pilus function is controlled in part by the Chp chemosensory system, which includes a histidine kinase, ChpA, and two CheY-like response regulators, PilG and PilH. How the Chp components interface with the type IV pilus motor proteins PilB, PilT, and PilU is unknown. We present genetic evidence confirming the role of ChpA, PilG, and PilB in the regulation of pilus extension and the role of PilH and PilT in regulating pilus retraction. Using informative double and triple mutants, we show that (i) ChpA, PilG, and PilB function upstream of PilH, PilT, and PilU; (ii) that PilH enhances PilT function; and (iii) that PilT and PilB retain some activity in the absence of signaling input from components of the Chp system. By site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the histidine kinase domain of ChpA and the phosphoacceptor sites of both PilG and PilH are required for type IV pilus function, suggesting that they form a phosphorelay system important in the regulation of pilus extension and retraction. Finally, we present evidence suggesting that pilA transcription is regulated by intracellular PilA levels. We show that PilA is a negative regulator of pilA transcription in P. aeruginosa and that the Chp system functionally regulates pilA transcription by controlling PilA import and export.

  1. Regulation of tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 in cultured rat Sertoli and Leydig cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘以训; 杜群; 周红明; 刘奎; 胡召元

    1996-01-01

    New data are provided to show that (i) rat Sertoli cells produce two types of plasminogen activators, tissue type (tPA) and urokinase type (uPA), and a plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1); (ii) both tPA (but not uPA) and PAI-1 secretion in the culture are modified by FSH, forskolin, dbcAMP, GnRH, PMA and growth factors (EGF and FGF), but not by hCG and androstenedione (△4); (iii) in vitro secretion of tPA and PA-PAI-1 complexes of Sertoli cells are greatly enhanced by presence of Leydig cells which produce negligible tPA but measurable PAI-1 activity;(iv) combination culture of Sertoli and Leydig cells remarkably increases FSH-induced PAI-1 activity and decreases hCG- and forskolin-induced inhibitor activity as compared with that of two cell types cultured alone. These data suggest that rat Sertoli cells, similar to ovarian granulosa cells, are capable of secreting both tPA and uPA, as well as PAI-1. The interaction of Sertoli cells and Leydig cells is essential for the cells to response to

  2. Insight into the flagella type III export revealed by the complex structure of the type III ATPase and its regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Katsumi; Minamino, Tohru; Uchida, Yumiko; Kinoshita, Miki; Namba, Keiichi

    2016-03-29

    FliI and FliJ form the FliI6FliJ ATPase complex of the bacterial flagellar export apparatus, a member of the type III secretion system. The FliI6FliJ complex is structurally similar to the α3β3γ complex of F1-ATPase. The FliH homodimer binds to FliI to connect the ATPase complex to the flagellar base, but the details are unknown. Here we report the structure of the homodimer of a C-terminal fragment of FliH (FliHC2) in complex with FliI. FliHC2 shows an unusually asymmetric homodimeric structure that markedly resembles the peripheral stalk of the A/V-type ATPases. The FliHC2-FliI hexamer model reveals that the C-terminal domains of the FliI ATPase face the cell membrane in a way similar to the F/A/V-type ATPases. We discuss the mechanism of flagellar ATPase complex formation and a common origin shared by the type III secretion system and the F/A/V-type ATPases.

  3. TetR-type transcriptional regulator VtpR functions as a global regulator in Vibrio tubiashii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Häse, Claudia C

    2009-12-01

    Vibrio tubiashii, a causative agent of severe shellfish larval disease, produces multiple extracellular proteins, including a metalloprotease (VtpA), as potential virulence factors. We previously reported that VtpA is toxic for Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae. In this study, we show that extracellular protease production by V. tubiashii was much reduced by elevated salt concentrations, as well as by elevated temperatures. In addition, V. tubiashii produced dramatically less protease in minimal salts medium supplemented with glucose or sucrose as the sole carbon source than with succinate. We identified a protein that belongs to the TetR family of transcriptional regulators, VtpR, which showed high homology with V. cholerae HapR. We conclude that VtpR activates VtpA production based on the following: (i) a VtpR-deficient V. tubiashii mutant did not produce extracellular proteases, (ii) the mutant showed reduced expression of a vtpA-lacZ fusion, and (iii) VtpR activated vtpA-lacZ in a V. cholerae heterologous background. Moreover, we show that VtpR activated the expression of an additional metalloprotease gene (vtpB). The deduced VtpB sequence showed high homology with a metalloprotease, VhpA, from V. harveyi. Furthermore, the vtpR mutant strain produced reduced levels of extracellular hemolysin, which is attributed to the lower expression of the V. tubiashii hemolysin genes (vthAB). The VtpR-deficient mutant also had negative effects on bacterial motility and did not demonstrate toxicity to oyster larvae. Together, these findings establish that the V. tubiashii VtpR protein functions as a global regulator controlling an array of potential virulence factors.

  4. Let-7b regulates the expression of the growth hormone receptor gene in deletion-type dwarf chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shumao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A deletion mutation in the growth hormone receptor (GHR gene results in the inhibition of skeletal muscle growth and fat deposition in dwarf chickens. We used microarray techniques to determine microRNA (miRNA and mRNA expression profiles of GHR in the skeletal muscles of 14-day-old embryos as well as 7-week-old deletion-type dwarf and normal-type chickens. Our aim was to elucidate the miRNA regulation of GHR expression with respect to growth inhibition and fat deposition. Results At the same developmental stages, different expression profiles in skeletal muscles of dwarf and normal chickens occurred for four miRNAs (miR-1623, miR-181b, let-7b, and miR-128. At different developmental stages, there was a significant difference in the expression profiles of a greater number of miRNAs. Eleven miRNAs were up-regulated and 18 down-regulated in the 7-week-old dwarf chickens when compared with profiles in 14-day-old embryos. In 7-week-old normal chickens, seven miRNAs were up-regulated and nine down-regulated compared with those in 14-day-old embryos. In skeletal muscles, 22 genes were up-regulated and 33 down-regulated in 14-day-old embryos compared with 7-week-old dwarf chickens. Sixty-five mRNAs were up-regulated and 108 down-regulated in 14-day-old embryos as compared with 7-week-old normal chickens. Thirty-four differentially expressed miRNAs were grouped into 18 categories based on overlapping seed and target sequences. Only let-7b was found to be complementary to its target in the 3′ untranslated region of GHR, and was able to inhibit its expression. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reactions indicated there were three main signaling pathways regulating skeletal muscle growth and fat deposition of chickens. These were influenced by let-7b-regulated GHR. Suppression of the cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 gene was found to be involved in the signaling pathway of

  5. The Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Controls Ustilago maydis Virulence through Direct Regulation of Mating-Type Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elías-Villalobos, Alberto; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Moreno-Sánchez, Ismael; Helmlinger, Dominique; Ibeas, José I

    2015-08-01

    Morphological changes are critical for host colonisation in plant pathogenic fungi. These changes occur at specific stages of their pathogenic cycle in response to environmental signals and are mediated by transcription factors, which act as master regulators. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, for example by locally modulating the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulators. It has been reported that HDACs play important roles in the virulence of plant fungi. However, the specific environment-sensing pathways that control fungal virulence via HDACs remain poorly characterised. Here we address this question using the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. We find that the HDAC Hos2 is required for the dimorphic switch and pathogenic development in U. maydis. The deletion of hos2 abolishes the cAMP-dependent expression of mating type genes. Moreover, ChIP experiments detect Hos2 binding to the gene bodies of mating-type genes, which increases in proportion to their expression level following cAMP addition. These observations suggest that Hos2 acts as a downstream component of the cAMP-PKA pathway to control the expression of mating-type genes. Interestingly, we found that Clr3, another HDAC present in U. maydis, also contributes to the cAMP-dependent regulation of mating-type gene expression, demonstrating that Hos2 is not the only HDAC involved in this control system. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of HDACs in fungal phytopathogenesis.

  6. Expression and Regulation of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor Type 2 beta in Developing and Mature Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuperman, Yael; Issler, Orna; Vaughan, Joan; Bilezikjian, Louise; Vale, Wylie; Chen, Alon

    2011-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2 (CRFR2) is highly expressed in skeletal muscle (SM) tissue where it is suggested to inhibit interactions between insulin signaling pathway components affecting whole-body glucose homeostasis. However, little is known about factors regulating SM CRFR2 ex

  7. The Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Controls Ustilago maydis Virulence through Direct Regulation of Mating-Type Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Elías-Villalobos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Morphological changes are critical for host colonisation in plant pathogenic fungi. These changes occur at specific stages of their pathogenic cycle in response to environmental signals and are mediated by transcription factors, which act as master regulators. Histone deacetylases (HDACs play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, for example by locally modulating the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulators. It has been reported that HDACs play important roles in the virulence of plant fungi. However, the specific environment-sensing pathways that control fungal virulence via HDACs remain poorly characterised. Here we address this question using the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. We find that the HDAC Hos2 is required for the dimorphic switch and pathogenic development in U. maydis. The deletion of hos2 abolishes the cAMP-dependent expression of mating type genes. Moreover, ChIP experiments detect Hos2 binding to the gene bodies of mating-type genes, which increases in proportion to their expression level following cAMP addition. These observations suggest that Hos2 acts as a downstream component of the cAMP-PKA pathway to control the expression of mating-type genes. Interestingly, we found that Clr3, another HDAC present in U. maydis, also contributes to the cAMP-dependent regulation of mating-type gene expression, demonstrating that Hos2 is not the only HDAC involved in this control system. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of HDACs in fungal phytopathogenesis.

  8. The cardiac L-type calcium channel distal carboxy terminus autoinhibition is regulated by calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Shawn M; Andres, Douglas A; Sievert, Gail; Satin, Jonathan

    2013-02-01

    The L-type calcium channel (LTCC) provides trigger Ca(2+) for sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-release, and LTCC function is influenced by interacting proteins including the LTCC distal COOH terminus (DCT) and calmodulin. DCT is proteolytically cleaved and reassociates with the LTCC complex to regulate calcium channel function. DCT reduces LTCC barium current (I(Ba,L)) in reconstituted channel complexes, yet the contribution of DCT to LTCC Ca(2+) current (I(Ca,L)) in cardiomyocyte systems is unexplored. This study tests the hypothesis that DCT attenuates cardiomyocyte I(Ca,L). We measured LTCC current and Ca(2+) transients with DCT coexpressed in murine cardiomyocytes. We also heterologously coexpressed DCT and Ca(V)1.2 constructs with truncations corresponding to the predicted proteolytic cleavage site, Ca(V)1.2Δ1801, and a shorter deletion corresponding to well-studied construct, Ca(V)1.2Δ1733. DCT inhibited I(Ba,L) in cardiomyocytes, and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing Ca(V)1.2Δ1801 and Ca(V)1.2Δ1733. Ca(2+)-CaM relieved DCT block in cardiomyocytes and HEK cells. The selective block of I(Ba,L) combined with Ca(2+)-CaM effects suggested that DCT-mediated blockade may be relieved under conditions of elevated Ca(2+). We therefore tested the hypothesis that DCT block is dynamic, increasing under relatively low Ca(2+), and show that DCT reduced diastolic Ca(2+) at low stimulation frequencies but spared high frequency Ca(2+) entry. DCT reduction of diastolic Ca(2+) and relief of block at high pacing frequencies and under conditions of supraphysiological bath Ca(2+) suggests that a physiological function of DCT is to increase the dynamic range of Ca(2+) transients in response to elevated pacing frequencies. Our data motivate the new hypothesis that DCT is a native reverse use-dependent inhibitor of LTCC current.

  9. Lovastatin regulates brain spontaneous low-frequency brain activity in Neurofibromatosis type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabernaud, Camille; Mennes, Maarten; Kardel, Peter G.; Gaillard, William D.; Kalbfleisch, M. Layne; VanMeter, John W.; Packer, Roger J.; Milham, Michael P.; Castellanos, Francisco X.; Acosta, Maria T.

    2012-01-01

    In the Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) mouse model, lovastatin, used clinically for hypercholesterolemia, improves cognitive dysfunction. While such impairment has been studied in NF1, the neural substrates remain unclear. The aim of this imaging add-on to a phase-1 open-label trial was to examine the effect of lovastatin on Default Network (DN) resting state functional connectivity (RSFC). Seven children with NF1 (aged 11.9±2.2; 1 female) were treated with lovastatin once daily for 12 weeks. A 7-minute 3-Tesla echo-planar-imaging scan was collected one day before beginning treatment (off-drug) and the last day of treatment (on-drug) while performing a Flanker task. After regressing-out task-associated variance, we used the residual time series as “continuous resting-state data” for RSFC analyses using 11 DN regions of interest. For qualitative comparisons, we included a group of 19 typically developing children (TDC) collected elsewhere. In the on-drug condition, lovastatin increased long-range positive RSFC within DN core regions (i.e., anterior medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex, PCC). In addition, lovastatin produced less diffuse local RSFC in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and PCC. The pattern of RSFC observed in the NF1 participants when on-drug closely resembled the RSFC patterns exhibited by the TDC. Lovastatin administration in this open trial regulated anterior-posterior long-range and local RSFC within the DN. These preliminary results are consistent with a role for lovastatin in normalization of developmental processes and with apparent benefits in a mouse NF1 model. PMID:22433254

  10. Effects of Lycium barbarum. polysaccharide on type 2 diabetes mellitus rats by regulating biological rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui; Gao, Xu; Zhang, Tao; Li, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with circadian disruption. Our previous experimental results have showed that dietary Lycium barbarum. polysaccharide (LBP-4a) exhibited hypoglycemic and improving insulin resistance (IR) activities. This study was to explore the mechanisms of LBP-4a for improving hyperglycemia and IR by regulating biological rhythms in T2DM rats. Materials and Methods: The rats of T2DM were prepared by the high-sucrose-fat diets and injection of streptozotocin (STZ). The levels of insulin, leptin and melatonin were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The effect of LBP-4a on mRNA expression of melatonin receptors (MT2) in epididymal adipose tissue was evaluated by RT-PCR. The expression of CLOCK and BMAL1 in pancreatic islet cells was detected by Western blotting. Results: Our data indicated that the 24-hr rhythm of blood glucose appeared to have consistent with normal rats after gavaged administration of LBP-4a for each day of the 4 weeks, and the effects of hypoglycemia and improving hyperinsulinemia in T2DM rats treated at high dose were much better than that at low dose. The mechanisms were related to increasing MT2 level in epididymal adipose tissue and affecting circadian clocks gene expression of CLOCK and BMAL1 in pancreatic islet cells. Conclusion: LBP-4a administration could treat T2DM rats. These observations provided the background for the further development of LBP-4a as a potential dietary therapeutic agent in the treatment of T2DM. PMID:27803791

  11. Regulation of human T-lymphotropic virus type I latency and reactivation by HBZ and Rex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subha Philip

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I infection is largely latent in infected persons. How HTLV-1 establishes latency and reactivates is unclear. Here we show that most HTLV-1-infected HeLa cells become senescent. By contrast, when NF-κB activity is blocked, senescence is averted, and infected cells continue to divide and chronically produce viral proteins. A small population of infected NF-κB-normal HeLa cells expresses low but detectable levels of Tax and Rex, albeit not Gag or Env. In these "latently" infected cells, HTLV-1 LTR trans-activation by Tax persists, but NF-κB trans-activation is attenuated due to inhibition by HBZ, the HTLV-1 antisense protein. Furthermore, Gag-Pol mRNA localizes primarily in the nuclei of these cells. Importantly, HBZ was found to inhibit Rex-mediated export of intron-containing mRNAs. Over-expression of Rex or shRNA-mediated silencing of HBZ led to viral reactivation. Importantly, strong NF-κB inhibition also reactivates HTLV-1. Hence, during HTLV-1 infection, when Tax/Rex expression is robust and dominant over HBZ, productive infection ensues with expression of structural proteins and NF-κB hyper-activation, which induces senescence. When Tax/Rex expression is muted and HBZ is dominant, latent infection is established with expression of regulatory (Tax/Rex/HBZ but not structural proteins. HBZ maintains viral latency by down-regulating Tax-induced NF-κB activation and senescence, and by inhibiting Rex-mediated expression of viral structural proteins.

  12. Regulation of bone mass, osteoclast function, and ovariectomy-induced bone loss by the type 2 cannabinoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Aymen I; Sophocleous, Antonia; Landao-Bassonga, Euphemie; van't Hof, Robert J; Ralston, Stuart H

    2008-11-01

    The endocannabinoid system has recently been shown to play a role in the regulation of bone metabolism. The type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2) has been reported to regulate bone mass, but conflicting results have been reported with regard to its effects on bone resorption and osteoclast function. Here we investigated the role that CB2 plays in regulating bone mass and osteoclast function using a combination of pharmacological and genetic approaches. The CB2-selective antagonist/inverse agonist AM630 inhibited osteoclast formation and activity in vitro, whereas the CB2-selective agonists JWH133 and HU308 stimulated osteoclast formation. Osteoclasts generated from CB2 knockout mice (CB2-/-) were resistant to the inhibitory effects of AM630 in vitro, consistent with a CB2-mediated effect. There was no significant difference in peak bone mass between CB2-/- mice and wild-type littermates, but after ovariectomy, bone was lost to a greater extent in wild-type compared with CB2-/- mice. Furthermore, AM630 protected against bone loss in wild-type mice, but the effect was blunted in CB2-/- mice. We conclude that CB2 regulates osteoclast formation and bone resorption in vitro and that under conditions of increased bone turnover, such as after ovariectomy, CB2 regulates bone loss. These observations indicate that CB2 regulates osteoclast formation and contributes to ovariectomy-induced bone loss and demonstrate that cannabinoid receptor antagonists/inverse agonists may be of value in the treatment of bone diseases characterized by increased osteoclast activity.

  13. T-helper Cell Type-1 Transcription Factor T-Bet Is Down-regulated in Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Vaseghi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available T cells have been identified as key players in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. However, the exact role of T-cell subpopulations in this pathway is presently unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the expression pattern of two lineage-specifying transcription factors GATA-3 and T-bet, which are important in T helper type 1 (Th1 and Th2 cell development, respectively. Gene expression analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs was performed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Plasma levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 were also determined by ELISA. T-bet and IFN-γ gene expression was significantly lower in patients group compared with healthy controls (p<0.05. The expression of GATA-3 was relatively similar in patients and controls; however, IL-4 mRNAs were significantly increased in the PBMCs from patients as compared with normal controls (p<0.05. In addition, a marked increase in plasma IL-4 levels were observed in patient group compared with controls (p<0.001. To the contrary, IFN-γ protein levels were decreased in patients in comparison with controls (p<0.001. These data suggest additional implications of the role of Th1/Th2 imbalance for the immunopathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. 

  14. Not All Roads Lead to Rome--Comparing Different Types of Motivational Regulation Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwinger, Malte; Steinmayr, Ricarda; Spinath, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    The self-regulation of motivation represents a key feature of self-regulated learning. Recent studies have documented that students use a variety of strategies to sustain their learning motivation and that most of these strategies have positive effects. However, less is known about how students integrate the various motivational strategies into an…

  15. Emotion regulation difficulties in trauma survivors: the role of trauma type and PTSD symptom severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehring, T.; Quack, D.

    2010-01-01

    Two different hypotheses regarding the relationship between emotion regulation and PTSD are described in the literature. First, it has been suggested that emotion regulation difficulties are part of the complex sequelae of early-onset chronic interpersonal trauma and less common following late-onset

  16. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwandeepika, H A Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells.

  17. The adaptor protein SAP regulates type II NKT-cell development, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity against lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xiufang; Liao, Chia-Min; Bagchi, Sreya; Cardell, Susanna L; Stein, Paul L; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2014-12-01

    CD1d-restricted NKT cells represent a unique lineage of immunoregulatory T cells that are divided into two groups, type I and type II, based on their TCR usage. Because there are no specific tools to identify type II NKT cells, little is known about their developmental requirements and functional regulation. In our previous study, we showed that signaling lymphocytic activation molecule associated protein (SAP) is essential for the development of type II NKT cells. Here, using a type II NKT-cell TCR transgenic mouse model, we demonstrated that CD1d-expressing hematopoietic cells, but not thymic epithelial cells, meditate efficient selection of type II NKT cells. Furthermore, we showed that SAP regulates type II NKT-cell development by controlling early growth response 2 protein and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger expression. SAP-deficient 24αβ transgenic T cells (24αβ T cells) exhibited an immature phenotype with reduced Th2 cytokine-producing capacity and diminished cytotoxicity to CD1d-expressing lymphoma cells. The impaired IL-4 production by SAP-deficient 24αβ T cells was associated with reduced IFN regulatory factor 4 and GATA-3 induction following TCR stimulation. Collectively, these data suggest that SAP is critical for regulating type II NKT cell responses. Aberrant responses of these T cells may contribute to the immune dysregulation observed in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease caused by mutations in SAP. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The miR-200 family and its targets regulate type II cell differentiation in human fetal lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlhabib, Houda; Guo, Wei; Pierce, Brianne M; Mendelson, Carole R

    2015-09-11

    Type II cell differentiation and expression of the major surfactant protein, SP-A, in mid-gestation human fetal lung (HFL) are induced by cAMP and inhibited by TGF-β. cAMP induction of SP-A promoter activity is mediated by increased phosphorylation and DNA binding of thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1/Nkx2.1), a master regulator of lung development. To further define mechanisms for developmental induction of surfactant synthesis in HFL, herein, we investigated the potential roles of microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs). To identify and characterize differentially regulated miRNAs in mid-gestation HFL explants during type II pneumocyte differentiation in culture, we performed miRNA microarray of RNA from epithelial cells isolated from mid-gestation HFL explants before and after culture with or without Bt2cAMP. Interestingly, the miR-200 family was significantly up-regulated during type II cell differentiation; miR-200 induction was inversely correlated with expression of known targets, transcription factors ZEB1/2 and TGF-β2. miR-200 antagonists inhibited TTF-1 and surfactant proteins and up-regulated TGF-β2 and ZEB1 expression in type II cells. Overexpression of ZEB1 in type II cells decreased DNA binding of endogenous TTF-1, blocked cAMP stimulation of surfactant proteins, and inhibited miR-200 expression, whereas cAMP markedly inhibited ZEB1/2 and TGF-β. Importantly, overexpression of ZEB1 or miR-200 antagonists in HFL type II cells also inhibited LPCAT1 and ABCA3, enzymes involved in surfactant phospholipid synthesis and trafficking, and blocked lamellar body biogenesis. Our findings suggest that the miR-200 family and ZEB1, which exist in a double-negative feedback loop regulated by TGF-β, serve important roles in the developmental regulation of type II cell differentiation and function in HFL. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation regulates L-type Ca(2+) channel activity inhibited by early sevoflurane exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Huiyun; Tang, Xiaohong; Bai, Wenwen; Wang, Guolin; Tian, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Sevoflurane might be harmful to the developing brain. Therefore, it is essential to reverse sevoflurane-induced brain injury. This study aimed to determine whether low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can regulate L-type Ca(2+) channel activity, which is inhibited by early sevoflurane exposure. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, sevoflurane, and rTMS groups. A Whole-cell patch clamp technique was applied to record L-type Ca(2+) channel currents. The I-V curve, steady-state activation and inactivation curves were studied in rats of each group at different ages (1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, 4 weeks and 5 weeks old). In the control group, L-type Ca(2+) channel current density significantly increased from week 2 to week 3. Compared with the control group, L-type Ca(2+) channel currents of rats in the sevoflurane group were significantly inhibited from week 1 to week 3. Activation curves of L-type Ca(2+) channel shifted significantly towards depolarization at week 1 and week 2. Moreover, steady-state inactivation curves shifted towards hyperpolarization from week 1 to week 3. Compared with the sevoflurane group, rTMS significantly increased L-type Ca(2+) channel currents at week 2 and week 3. Activation curves of L-type Ca(2+) channel significantly shifted towards hyperpolarization at week 2. Meanwhile, steady-state inactivation curves significantly shifted towards depolarization at week 2. The period between week 2 and week 3 is critical for the development of L-type Ca(2+) channels. Early sevoflurane exposure inhibits L-type Ca(2+) channel activity and rTMS can regulate L-type Ca(2+) channel activity inhibited by sevoflurane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hormonal Regulation of Expression of Tissue Type Plasminogen Activator and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 in Cultured Rat Granulosa Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘以训; 彭晓蓉; 刘奎

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, gonadotropin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) regulation of tPA and PAI-1 expression in PMSG-primed granulosa cells has been investigated, (i) Addition of go-nadotropins (FSH and LH) and GnRH agonist (GnRHa) or PMA to the culture increases tPA activity) FSH (or LH) plus GnRHa (or PMA) in the culture further enhances the enzyme production to such an extent that a more obvious effect than the additive effect caused by these hormones used alone has been observed; (ii) in contrast, FSH and LH decrease PAI-1 activity, whereas GnRHa and PMA alone markedly increase PAI-1 mRNA level and PAI-1 activity. Because FSH and LH stimulate tPA production and have no significant effect on PAI-1 mRNA induction, the observed inhibition of PAI-1 activity by gonadotropins may be due to the occurrence of neutralization of PA and PAI-1 proteins in the conditioned media by the formation of complexes between PA and PAI-1 ; (iii) increases in PAI-1 mRNA level and activity by GnRH and PMA are complet

  1. Expression of type I collagen and tenascin C is regulated by actin polymerization through MRTF in dedifferentiated chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreno, Justin; Raju, Sneha; Niaki, Mortah Nabavi; Andrejevic, Katarina; Jiang, Amy; Delve, Elizabeth; Kandel, Rita

    2014-10-16

    This study examined actin regulation of fibroblast matrix genes in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. We demonstrated that dedifferentiated chondrocytes exhibit increased actin polymerization, nuclear localization of myocardin related transcription factor (MRTF), increased type I collagen (col1) and tenascin C (Tnc) gene expression, and decreased Sox9 gene expression. Induction of actin depolymerization by latrunculin treatment or cell rounding, reduced MRTF nuclear localization, repressed col1 and Tnc expression, and increased Sox9 gene expression in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Treatment of passaged chondrocytes with MRTF inhibitor repressed col1 and Tnc expression, but did not affect Sox9 expression. Our results show that actin polymerization regulates fibroblast matrix gene expression through MRTF in passaged chondrocytes.

  2. Clinical value of the major types of reactions of the body’s stress-regulating systems in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Mikhailovich Dolgov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The time course of changes in the parameters reflecting the status of different components of the body’s regulatory systems was studied in 125patients with hemispheric ischemic stroke via comprehensive evaluation of the hypothalamo-pituitary axes and some endocrine glands. There were three types of reactions of the body’s stress-regulating systems: 1 normergic; 2 hyperergic; 3 disergic, which characterized adaptive and disadaptive reactions in stroke. The changes in the nitroxydergic mechanisms of vascular tone regulation, which constrain the possible involvement of the vascular wall endothelium in the body’s adaptive reactions, progress as the condition becomes severe.

  3. Drosophila hnRNP A1 homologs Hrp36/Hrp38 enhance U2-type versus U12-type splicing to regulate alternative splicing of the prospero twintron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Sumit; Wong, Anthony C; Steitz, Joan A

    2009-02-24

    During Drosophila embryogenesis, the transcription factor Prospero is critical for neuronal differentiation and axonal outgrowth. The prospero pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing, but is unique in that it harbors a rare twintron whereby one intron lies embedded within another. The innermost intron is excised by the major U2-type spliceosome and the outermost is excised by the minor U12-type spliceosome. Previously, an intronic purine-rich element (PRE) was identified as an enhancer of both U2- and U12-type splicing, with a greater effect on the U2-type pathway. We find that the PRE binds Drosophila homologs of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1, Hrp38 and Hrp36. RNAi-mediated knockdown of these proteins in S2 cells specifically decreases U2-type splicing of the twintron, which is surprising because hnRNPs usually are repressive. Conversely, tethering Hrp38 to the twintron increases U2-type splicing. Thus, developmentally regulated alternative splicing of the prospero twintron can be explained by documented changes in the abundance of these hnRNP A1-like proteins during embryogenesis.

  4. CYCD3 D-type cyclins regulate cambial cell proliferation and secondary growth in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Carl; Maruthi, M.N.; Courtney E. Jahn

    2015-01-01

    A major proportion of plant biomass is derived from the activity of the cambium, a lateral meristem responsible for vascular tissue formation and radial organ enlargement in a process termed secondary growth. In contrast to our relatively good understanding of the regulation of primary meristems, remarkably little is known concerning the mechanisms controlling secondary growth, particularly how cambial cell divisions are regulated and integrated with vascular differentiation. A genetic loss-o...

  5. Synergistic and multidimensional regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 expression by transforming growth factor type β and epidermal growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Xiaoling; Thalacker, F.W.; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2012-04-06

    The major physiological inhibitor of plasminogen activator, type I plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), controls blood clotting and tissue remodeling events that involve cell migration. Transforming growth factor type β (TGFβ) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) interact synergistically to increase PAI-1 mRNA and protein levels in human HepG2 and mink Mv1Lu cells. Other growth factors that activate tyrosine kinase receptors can substitute for EGF. EGF and TGFβ regulate PAI-1 by synergistically activating transcription, which is further amplified by a decrease in the rate of mRNA degradation, the latter being regulated only by EGF. The combined effect of transcriptional activation and mRNA stabilization results in a rapid 2-order of magnitude increase in the level of PAI-1. TGFβ also increases the sensitivity of the cells to EGF, thereby recruiting the cooperation of EGF at lower than normally effective concentrations. The contribution of EGF to the regulation of PAI-1 involves the MAPK pathway, and the synergistic interface with the TGFβ pathway is downstream of MEK1/2 and involves phosphorylation of neither ERK1/2 nor Smad2/3. Synergism requires the presence of both Smad and AP-1 recognition sites in the promoter. This work demonstrates the existence of a multidimensional cellular mechanism by which EGF and TGFβ are able to promote large and rapid changes in PAI-1 expression.

  6. CRP-Cyclic AMP Regulates the Expression of Type 3 Fimbriae via Cyclic di-GMP in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Ting; Lin, Tien-Huang; Wu, Chien-Chen; Wan, Lei; Huang, Chun-Fa; Peng, Hwei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. However, the effects of elevated blood glucose levels on the virulence of this pathogen remain largely unknown. Type 3 fimbriae, encoded by the mrkABCDF genes, are important virulence factors in K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. In this study, the effects of exogenous glucose and the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway on type 3 fimbriae expression regulation were investigated. The production of MrkA, the major subunit of type 3 fimbriae, was increased in glucose-rich medium, whereas cAMP supplementation reversed the effect. MrkA production was markedly increased by cyaA or crp deletion, but slightly decreased by cpdA deletion. In addition, the mRNA levels of mrkABCDF genes and the activity of PmrkA were increased in Δcrp strain, as well as the mRNA levels of mrkHIJ genes that encode cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-related regulatory proteins that influence type 3 fimbriae expression. Moreover, the activities of PmrkHI and PmrkJ were decreased in ΔlacZΔcrp strain. These results indicate that CRP-cAMP down-regulates mrkABCDF and mrkHIJ at the transcriptional level. Further deletion of mrkH or mrkI in Δcrp strain diminished the production of MrkA, indicating that MrkH and MrkI are required for the CRP regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression. Furthermore, the high activity of PmrkHI in the ΔlacZΔcrp strain was diminished in ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkHI, but increased in the ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkJ strain. Deletion of crp increased the intracellular c-di-GMP concentration and reduced the phosphodiesterase activity. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of multiple genes related to c-di-GMP metabolism were altered in Δcrp strain. These indicate that CRP regulates type 3 fimbriae expression indirectly via the c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In conclusion, we found evidence of a coordinated regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression by the CRP-cAMP and c

  7. Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei cluster 1 type VI secretion system gene expression is negatively regulated by iron and zinc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary N Burtnick

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes glanders in humans and animals. Previous studies have demonstrated that the cluster 1 type VI secretion system (T6SS-1 expressed by this organism is essential for virulence in hamsters and is positively regulated by the VirAG two-component system. Recently, we have shown that T6SS-1 gene expression is up-regulated following internalization of this pathogen into phagocytic cells and that this system promotes multinucleated giant cell formation in infected tissue culture monolayers. In the present study, we further investigated the complex regulation of this important virulence factor. To assess T6SS-1 expression, B. mallei strains were cultured in various media conditions and Hcp1 production was analyzed by Western immunoblotting. Transcript levels of several VirAG-regulated genes (bimA, tssA, hcp1 and tssM were also determined using quantitative real time PCR. Consistent with previous observations, T6SS-1 was not expressed during growth of B. mallei in rich media. Curiously, growth of the organism in minimal media (M9G or minimal media plus casamino acids (M9CG facilitated robust expression of T6SS-1 genes whereas growth in minimal media plus tryptone (M9TG did not. Investigation of this phenomenon confirmed a regulatory role for VirAG in this process. Additionally, T6SS-1 gene expression was significantly down-regulated by the addition of iron and zinc to M9CG. Other genes under the control of VirAG did not appear to be as tightly regulated by these divalent metals. Similar results were observed for B. pseudomallei, but not for B. thailandensis. Collectively, our findings indicate that in addition to being positively regulated by VirAG, B. mallei and B. pseudomallei T6SS-1 gene expression is negatively regulated by iron and zinc.

  8. Type I and Type II Interferon Coordinately Regulate Suppressive Dendritic Cell Fate and Function during Viral Persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron R Cunningham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent viral infections are simultaneously associated with chronic inflammation and highly potent immunosuppressive programs mediated by IL-10 and PDL1 that attenuate antiviral T cell responses. Inhibiting these suppressive signals enhances T cell function to control persistent infection; yet, the underlying signals and mechanisms that program immunosuppressive cell fates and functions are not well understood. Herein, we use lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV to demonstrate that the induction and functional programming of immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs during viral persistence are separable mechanisms programmed by factors primarily considered pro-inflammatory. IFNγ first induces the de novo development of naive monocytes into DCs with immunosuppressive potential. Type I interferon (IFN-I then directly targets these newly generated DCs to program their potent T cell immunosuppressive functions while simultaneously inhibiting conventional DCs with T cell stimulating capacity. These mechanisms of monocyte conversion are constant throughout persistent infection, establishing a system to continuously interpret and shape the immunologic environment. MyD88 signaling was required for the differentiation of suppressive DCs, whereas inhibition of stimulatory DCs was dependent on MAVS signaling, demonstrating a bifurcation in the pathogen recognition pathways that promote distinct elements of IFN-I mediated immunosuppression. Further, a similar suppressive DC origin and differentiation was also observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, HIV infection and cancer. Ultimately, targeting the underlying mechanisms that induce immunosuppression could simultaneously prevent multiple suppressive signals to further restore T cell function and control persistent infections.

  9. White sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) acid-base regulation differs in response to different types of acidoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shartau, Ryan B; Baker, Dan W; Brauner, Colin J

    2017-03-11

    White sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) completely protect intracellular tissue pH (pHi) despite large reductions in extracellular (blood) pH (pHe), termed preferential pHi regulation, in response to elevated environmental PCO2 (hypercarbia) and in general appear to be relatively resilient to stressors. Preferential pHi regulation is thought to be associated with hypercarbia tolerance in general, but has also recently been observed to protect pHi against metabolic acidoses induced by exhaustive exercise and anoxia in a tropical air breathing catfish. We hypothesized that preferential pHi regulation may also be a general strategy of acid-base regulation in sturgeon. To address this hypothesis, severe acidoses were imposed to reduce pHe, and the presence or absence of preferential pHi regulation was assessed in red blood cells (RBC), heart, brain, liver and white muscle. A respiratory acidosis was imposed using hyperoxia, while metabolic acidoses were induced by exhaustive exercise, anoxia or air exposure. Reductions in pHe occurred following hyperoxia (0.15 units), exhaustive exercise (0.30 units), anoxia (0.10 units) and air exposure (0.35 units); all acidoses reduced RBC pHi. Following hyperoxia, heart, brain and liver pHi were preferentially regulated against the reduction in pHe, similar to hypercarbia exposure. Following all metabolic acidoses heart pHi was protected and brain pHi remained unchanged following exhaustive exercise and air exposure, however, brain pHi was reduced following anoxia. Liver and white muscle pHi were reduced following all metabolic acidoses. These results suggest preferential pHi regulation may be a general strategy during respiratory acidoses but during metabolic acidoses, the response differs between source of acidoses and tissues.

  10. Regulation of the type II secretion structural gene xpsE in Xanthomonas campestris Pathovar campestris by the global transcription regulator Clp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chao; He, Chaozu

    2008-02-01

    GspE is an important component of the type II secretion system (T2SS) in Gram-negative bacteria that supplies energy for the process of protein secretion. The role of GspE and its interactions with other components have been intensively studied. However, regulation of the gspE gene is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the transcription of xpsE, a homologue of gspE in Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris (Xcc), is upregulated by Clp, a homologue of the cyclic AMP-receptor protein, by directly binding to the xpsE promoter region. Overexpression of the clp gene in Xcc wild-type strain 8004 enhanced the production of XpsE as well as endoglucanase and extracellular polysaccharide (EPS).

  11. Tropomodulins: pointed-end capping proteins that regulate actin filament architecture in diverse cell types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashiro, Sawako; Gokhin, David S.; Kimura, Sumiko; Nowak, Roberta B.; Fowler, Velia M.

    2012-01-01

    Tropomodulins are a family of four proteins (Tmods 1–4) that cap the pointed ends of actin filaments in actin cytoskeletal structures in a developmentally regulated and tissue-specific manner. Unique among capping proteins, Tmods also bind tropomyosins (TMs), which greatly enhance the actin filament pointed-end capping activity of Tmods. Tmods are defined by a tropomyosin (TM)-regulated/Pointed-End Actin Capping (TM-Cap) domain in their unstructured N-terminal portion, followed by a compact, folded Leucine-Rich Repeat/Pointed-End Actin Capping (LRR-Cap) domain. By inhibiting actin monomer association and dissociation from pointed ends, Tmods regulate regulate actin dynamics and turnover, stabilizing actin filament lengths and cytoskeletal architecture. In this review, we summarize the genes, structural features, molecular and biochemical properties, actin regulatory mechanisms, expression patterns, and cell and tissue functions of Tmods. By understanding Tmods’ functions in the context of their molecular structure, actin regulation, binding partners, and related variants (leiomodins 1–3), we can draw broad conclusions that can explain the diverse morphological and functional phenotypes that arise from Tmod perturbation experiments in vitro and in vivo. Tmod-based stabilization and organization of intracellular actin filament networks provide key insights into how the emergent properties of the actin cytoskeleton drive tissue morphogenesis and physiology. PMID:22488942

  12. Beneficial autoimmunity at body surfaces– immune surveillance and rapid type 2 immunity regulate tissue homeostasis and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eDalessandri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cells line body surface tissues and provide a physicochemical barrier to the external environment. Frequent microbial and non-microbial challenges such as those imposed by mechanical disruption, injury or exposure to noxious environmental substances including chemicals, carcinogens, ultraviolet-irradiation or toxins cause activation of epithelial cells with release of cytokines and chemokines as well as alterations in the expression of cell surface ligands. Such display of epithelial stress is rapidly sensed by tissue resident immunocytes, which can directly interact with self-moieties on epithelial cells and initiate both local and systemic immune responses. Epithelial cells are thus key drivers of immune surveillance at body surface tissues. However, epithelial cells have a propensity to drive type 2 immunity (rather than type 1 upon non-invasive challenge or stress – a type of immunity whose regulation and function still remain enigmatic. Here we review the induction and possible role of type 2 immunity in epithelial tissues and propose that rapid immune surveillance and type 2 immunity are key regulators of tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis.

  13. Injury-Induced Type I IFN Signaling Regulates Inflammatory Responses in the Central Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Innate glial response is critical for the induction of inflammatory mediators and recruitment of leukocytes to sites of the injury in the CNS. We have examined the involvement of type I IFN signaling in the mouse hippocampus following sterile injury (transection of entorhinal afferents). Type I I...

  14. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes: Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Kristin I.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. Exercise improves whole body metabolic health in people with type 2 diabetes, and adaptations to skeletal muscle are essential for this improvement. An acute bout of exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, while chronic exercise training improves mitochondrial…

  15. Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes: Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Glucose Uptake in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Kristin I.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. Exercise improves whole body metabolic health in people with type 2 diabetes, and adaptations to skeletal muscle are essential for this improvement. An acute bout of exercise increases skeletal muscle glucose uptake, while chronic exercise training improves mitochondrial…

  16. MULTIPASS, a rice R2R3-type MYB transcription factor, regulates adaptive growth by integrating multiple hormonal pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Romy; Schippers, Jos H M; Mieulet, Delphine; Obata, Toshihiro; Fernie, Alisdair R; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2013-10-01

    Growth regulation is an important aspect of plant adaptation during environmental perturbations. Here, the role of MULTIPASS (OsMPS), an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor of rice, was explored. OsMPS is induced by salt stress and expressed in vegetative and reproductive tissues. Over-expression of OsMPS reduces growth under non-stress conditions, while knockdown plants display increased biomass. OsMPS expression is induced by abscisic acid and cytokinin, but is repressed by auxin, gibberellin and brassinolide. Growth retardation caused by OsMPS over-expression is partially restored by auxin application. Expression profiling revealed that OsMPS negatively regulates the expression of EXPANSIN (EXP) and cell-wall biosynthesis as well as phytohormone signaling genes. Furthermore, the expression of OsMPS-dependent genes is regulated by auxin, cytokinin and abscisic acid. Moreover, we show that OsMPS is a direct upstream regulator of OsEXPA4, OsEXPA8, OsEXPB2, OsEXPB3, OsEXPB6 and the endoglucanase genes OsGLU5 and OsGLU14. The multiple responses of OsMPS and its target genes to various hormones suggest an integrative function of OsMPS in the cross-talk between phytohormones and the environment to regulate adaptive growth.

  17. Self-regulation and weight reduction in patients with type 2 diabetes : A pilot intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, S.; de Gucht, V.; Maes, S.; Schroevers, M.; Chatrou, M.; Haak, H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of a self-regulation (SR) weight reduction intervention on weight, body mass index(BMI), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (primary outcomes), exercise, nutrition and quality of life (secondary outcomes). Methods: A pilot intervention (n = 53) based on SR-principles

  18. Effects of short chain fatty acid producing bacteria on epigenetic regulation of FFAR3 in type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remely, Marlene; Aumueller, Eva; Merold, Christine; Dworzak, Simone; Hippe, Berit; Zanner, Julia; Pointner, Angelika; Brath, Helmut; Haslberger, Alexander G

    2014-03-01

    The human gut microbiota and microbial influences on lipid and glucose metabolism, satiety, and chronic low-grade inflammation are known to be involved in metabolic syndrome. Fermentation end products, especially short chain fatty acids, are believed to engage the epigenetic regulation of inflammatory reactions via FFARs (free fatty acid receptor) and other short chain fatty acid receptors. We studied a potential interaction of the microbiota with epigenetic regulation in obese and type 2 diabetes patients compared to a lean control group over a four month intervention period. Intervention comprised a GLP-1 agonist (glucagon-like peptide 1) for type 2 diabetics and nutritional counseling for both intervention groups. Microbiota was analyzed for abundance, butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene and for diversity by polymerase chain reaction and 454 high-throughput sequencing. Epigenetic methylation of the promoter region of FFAR3 and LINE1 (long interspersed nuclear element 1) was analyzed using bisulfite conversion and pyrosequencing. The diversity of the microbiota as well as the abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were significantly lower in obese and type 2 diabetic patients compared to lean individuals. Results from Clostridium cluster IV and Clostridium cluster XIVa showed a decreasing trend in type 2 diabetics in comparison to the butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase gene and according to melt curve analysis. During intervention no significant changes were observed in either intervention group. The analysis of five CpGs in the promoter region of FFAR3 showed a significant lower methylation in obese and type 2 diabetics with an increase in obese patients over the intervention period. These results disclosed a significant correlation between a higher body mass index and lower methylation of FFAR3. LINE-1, a marker of global methylation, indicated no significant differences between the three groups or the time points, although methylation of type 2

  19. Endoglin-mediated suppression of prostate cancer invasion is regulated by activin and bone morphogenetic protein type II receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Breen

    Full Text Available Mortality from prostate cancer (PCa is due to the formation of metastatic disease. Understanding how that process is regulated is therefore critical. We previously demonstrated that endoglin, a type III transforming growth factor β (TGFβ superfamily receptor, suppresses human PCa cell invasion and metastasis. Endoglin-mediated suppression of invasion was also shown by us to be dependent upon the type I TGFβ receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 2 (ALK2, and the downstream effector, Smad1. In this study we demonstrate for the first time that two type II TGFβ receptors are required for endoglin-mediated suppression of invasion: activin A receptor type IIA (ActRIIA and bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II (BMPRII. Downstream signaling through these receptors is predominantly mediated by Smad1. ActRIIA stimulates Smad1 activation in a kinase-dependent manner, and this is required for suppression of invasion. In contrast BMPRII regulates Smad1 in a biphasic manner, promoting Smad1 signaling through its kinase domain but suppressing it through its cytoplasmic tail. BMPRII's Smad1-regulatory effects are dependent upon its expression level. Further, its ability to suppress invasion is independent of either kinase function or tail domain. We demonstrate that ActRIIA and BMPRII physically interact, and that each also interacts with endoglin. The current findings demonstrate that both BMPRII and ActRIIA are necessary for endoglin-mediated suppression of human PCa cell invasion, that they have differential effects on Smad1 signaling, that they make separate contributions to regulation of invasion, and that they functionally and physically interact.

  20. Differential regulation of two types of monogalactosyldiacylglylcerol synthase in membrane lipid remodeling under phosphate-limited conditions in sesame plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie eShimojima

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate (Pi limitation causes drastic lipid remodeling in plant membranes. Glycolipids substitute for the phospholipids that are degraded, thereby supplying Pi needed for essential biological processes. Two major types of remodeling of membrane lipids occur in higher plants: whereas one involves an increase in the concentration of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol in plastids to compensate for a decreased concentration of phosphatidylglycerol, the other involves digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG synthesis in plastids and the export of DGDG to extraplastidial membranes to compensate for reduced abundances of phospholipids. Lipid remodeling depends on an adequate supply of monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG, which is a substrate that supports the elevated rate of DGDG synthesis that is induced by low Pi availability. Regulation of MGDG synthesis has been analyzed most extensively using the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, although orthologous genes that encode putative MGDG synthases exist in photosynthetic organisms from bacteria to higher plants. We recently hypothesized that two types of MGDG synthase diverged after the appearance of seed plants. This divergence might have both enabled plants to adapt to a wide range of Pi availability in soils and contributed to the diversity of seed plants. In the work presented here, we found that membrane lipid remodeling also takes place in sesame, which is one of the most common traditional crops grown in Asia. We identified two types of MGDG synthase from sesame (encoded by SeMGD1 and SeMGD2 and analyzed their enzymatic properties. Our results show that both genes correspond to the Arabidopsis type-A and -B isoforms of MGDG synthase. Notably, whereas Pi limitation up-regulates only the gene encoding the type-B isoform of Arabidopsis, low Pi availability up-regulates the expression of both SeMGD1 and SeMGD2. We discuss the significance of the different responses to low Pi availability in sesame and

  1. Cell type and gender-dependent differential regulation of the p202 and Aim2 proteins: implications for the regulation of innate immune responses in SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Duan, Xin; Arumugam, Muthuvel; Shen, Hui; Liu, Hongzhu; Choubey, Divaker

    2011-10-01

    Upon sensing cytosolic double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), the murine Aim2 (encoded by the Aim2 gene) protein forms an inflammasome and promotes the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β and IL-18. In contrast, the p202 protein (encoded by the Ifi202 gene) does not form an inflammasome. Previously, we have reported that the interferon (IFN) and female sex hormone-induced increased nuclear levels of p202 protein in immune cells are associated with increased susceptibility to develop a lupus-like disease. However, signaling pathways that regulate the expression of Aim2 protein remain unknown. Here we report that the expression of Aim2 gene is induced in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) by IFN-α treatment and the expression is, in part, STAT1-dependent. However, treatment of splenic T or B cells with IFN-α or their stimulation, which induced the expression of Ifi202 gene, did not induce the expression of Aim2 gene. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the male hormone androgen increased levels of Aim2 mRNA and protein. Moreover, treatment of murine macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7 and J774A.1) with IFN-α differentially induced the expression of Aim2 and p202 proteins and regulated their sub-cellular localization. Additionally, activation of Toll-like receptors (TLR3, 4, and 9) in BMDMs and cell lines also differentially regulated the expression of Aim2 and Ifi202 genes. Our observations demonstrate that cell type and gender-dependent factors differentially regulate the expression of the Aim2 and p202 proteins, thus, suggesting opposing roles for these two proteins in innate immune responses in lupus disease.

  2. Mathematical modeling of regulation of type III secretion system in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by SirA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Aparna B; Rajasingh, Hannah; Mande, Sharmila S

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium invades the intestinal epithelial cells using type three secretion system (TTSS) encoded on Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1). The key regulator of this secretion system is HilA, which is in turn regulated by HilD, HilC and RtsA. It is also known that SirA/BarA system, a two-component regulatory system plays a crucial role in regulating HilA. There are two different mechanisms that have been proposed earlier for regulation of HilD-HilC-RtsA-HilA network by SirA. One considers SirA to be acting through HilA and HilC, whereas the other considers SirA to be acting through HilD. In this paper, we have built mathematical models corresponding to both these scenarios and carried out simulations under different gene knock-out conditions. Additionally, since the two proposed mechanisms based on the experimental data are equally likely, we also considered a mechanism which is a combination of the two proposed mechanisms. The simulations were carried out to check the levels of HilA, the factor regulating the virulence, as well as the levels of the intermediate components in the network, namely HilC and RtsA. The simulation results were used to check the consistency of various models and also to suggest the most probable mechanism of hilA regulation. The results of our study show that while most of the mathematical models are able to predict the virulence data, the models considering SirA to regulate through HilA and HilC fail to predict the levels of intermediate components, HilC and RtsA. Nevertheless, one of the models considering regulation of virulence by SirA via HilD was able to predict results comparable to the experimental data. In addition, combination of this model (regulation by SirA via HilD) with the model considering regulation by SirA through HilA and HilC, also predicted results consistent with experimental observations. Our conclusions were further validated by testing the stability of the results against

  3. H2S does not regulate proliferation via T-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elies, Jacobo; Johnson, Emily; Boyle, John P; Scragg, Jason L; Peers, Chris

    2015-06-12

    T-type Ca(2+) channels (Cav3.1, 3.2 and 3.3) strongly influence proliferation of various cell types, including vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and certain cancers. We have recently shown that the gasotransmitter carbon monoxide (CO) inhibits T-type Ca(2+) channels and, in so doing, attenuates proliferation of VSMC. We have also shown that the T-type Ca(2+) channel Cav3.2 is selectively inhibited by hydrogen sulfide (H2S) whilst the other channel isoforms (Cav3.1 and Cav3.3) are unaffected. Here, we explored whether inhibition of Cav3.2 by H2S could account for the anti-proliferative effects of this gasotransmitter. H2S suppressed proliferation in HEK293 cells expressing Cav3.2, as predicted by our previous observations. However, H2S was similarly effective in suppressing proliferation in wild type (non-transfected) HEK293 cells and those expressing the H2S insensitive channel, Cav3.1. Further studies demonstrated that T-type Ca(2+) channels in the smooth muscle cell line A7r5 and in human coronary VSMCs strongly influenced proliferation. In both cell types, H2S caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of proliferation, yet by far the dominant T-type Ca(2+) channel isoform was the H2S-insensitive channel, Cav3.1. Our data indicate that inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) channel-mediated proliferation by H2S is independent of the channels' sensitivity to H2S. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. H{sub 2}S does not regulate proliferation via T-type Ca{sup 2+} channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elies, Jacobo; Johnson, Emily; Boyle, John P.; Scragg, Jason L.; Peers, Chris, E-mail: c.s.peers@leeds.ac.uk

    2015-06-12

    T-type Ca{sup 2+} channels (Cav3.1, 3.2 and 3.3) strongly influence proliferation of various cell types, including vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and certain cancers. We have recently shown that the gasotransmitter carbon monoxide (CO) inhibits T-type Ca{sup 2+} channels and, in so doing, attenuates proliferation of VSMC. We have also shown that the T-type Ca{sup 2+} channel Cav3.2 is selectively inhibited by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) whilst the other channel isoforms (Cav3.1 and Cav3.3) are unaffected. Here, we explored whether inhibition of Cav3.2 by H{sub 2}S could account for the anti-proliferative effects of this gasotransmitter. H{sub 2}S suppressed proliferation in HEK293 cells expressing Cav3.2, as predicted by our previous observations. However, H{sub 2}S was similarly effective in suppressing proliferation in wild type (non-transfected) HEK293 cells and those expressing the H{sub 2}S insensitive channel, Cav3.1. Further studies demonstrated that T-type Ca{sup 2+} channels in the smooth muscle cell line A7r5 and in human coronary VSMCs strongly influenced proliferation. In both cell types, H{sub 2}S caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of proliferation, yet by far the dominant T-type Ca{sup 2+} channel isoform was the H{sub 2}S-insensitive channel, Cav3.1. Our data indicate that inhibition of T-type Ca{sup 2+} channel-mediated proliferation by H{sub 2}S is independent of the channels’ sensitivity to H{sub 2}S. - Highlights: • T-type Ca{sup 2+} channels regulate proliferation and are sensitive to the gasotransmitters CO and H{sub 2}S. • H{sub 2}S reduced proliferation in HEK293 cells expressing the H{sub 2}S sensitive Cav3.2 channel. • H{sub 2}S also inhibited proliferation in non-transfected cells and HEK293 cells expressing Cav3.1. • Native smooth muscle cells primarily express Cav3.1. Their proliferation was also inhibited by H{sub 2}S. • Unlike CO, H{sub 2}S does not regulate smooth muscle proliferation via T-type Ca{sup 2

  5. G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type calcium channels by regulators of G protein signalling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, M D; Wittemann, S; Herlitze, S

    2000-10-01

    1. Fast synaptic transmission is triggered by the activation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels which can be inhibited by Gbetagamma subunits via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). Regulators of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins are GTPase-accelerating proteins (GAPs), which are responsible for >100-fold increases in the GTPase activity of G proteins and might be involved in the regulation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels. In this study we investigated the effects of RGS2 on G protein modulation of recombinant P/Q-type channels expressed in a human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cell line using whole-cell recordings. 2. RGS2 markedly accelerates transmitter-mediated inhibition and recovery from inhibition of Ba2+ currents (IBa) through P/Q-type channels heterologously expressed with the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 (mAChR M2). 3. Both RGS2 and RGS4 modulate the prepulse facilitation properties of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. G protein reinhibition is accelerated, while release from inhibition is slowed. These kinetics depend on the availability of G protein alpha and betagamma subunits which is altered by RGS proteins. 4. RGS proteins unmask the Ca2+ channel beta subunit modulation of Ca2+ channel G protein inhibition. In the presence of RGS2, P/Q-type channels containing the beta2a and beta3 subunits reveal significantly altered kinetics of G protein modulation and increased facilitation compared to Ca2+ channels coexpressed with the beta1b or beta4 subunit.

  6. Niemann-Pick Type C2 Protein Mediates Hepatic Stellate Cells Activation by Regulating Free Cholesterol Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuh-Ching Twu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In chronic liver diseases, regardless of their etiology, the development of fibrosis is the first step toward the progression to cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs are the main profibrogenic cells that promote the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, and so it is important to identify the molecules that regulate HSCs activation and liver fibrosis. Niemann-Pick type C2 (NPC2 protein plays an important role in the regulation of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis by directly binding with free cholesterol. However, the roles of NPC2 in HSCs activation and liver fibrosis have not been explored in detail. Since a high-cholesterol diet exacerbates liver fibrosis progression in both rodents and humans, we propose that the expression of NPC2 affects free cholesterol metabolism and regulates HSCs activation. In this study, we found that NPC2 is decreased in both thioacetamide- and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis tissues. In addition, NPC2 is expressed in quiescent HSCs, but its activation status is down-regulated. Knockdown of NPC2 in HSC-T6 cells resulted in marked increases in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1-induced collagen type 1 α1 (Col1a1, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA expression, and Smad2 phosphorylation. In contrast, NPC2 overexpression decreased TGF-β1-induced HSCs activation. We further demonstrated that NPC2 deficiency significantly increased the accumulation of free cholesterol in HSCs, increasing Col1a1 and α-SMA expression and activating Smad2, and leading to sensitization of HSCs to TGF-β1 activation. In contrast, overexpression of NPC2 decreased U18666A-induced free cholesterol accumulation and inhibited the subsequent HSCs activation. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated that NPC2 plays an important role in HSCs activation by regulating the accumulation of free cholesterol. NPC2 overexpression may thus represent a new treatment strategy for liver fibrosis.

  7. Niemann-Pick Type C2 Protein Mediates Hepatic Stellate Cells Activation by Regulating Free Cholesterol Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twu, Yuh-Ching; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Lin, Yun-Lian; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Wang, Yuan-Hsi; Liao, Chia-Yu; Wang, Chung-Kwe; Liang, Yu-Chih; Liao, Yi-Jen

    2016-07-13

    In chronic liver diseases, regardless of their etiology, the development of fibrosis is the first step toward the progression to cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the main profibrogenic cells that promote the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, and so it is important to identify the molecules that regulate HSCs activation and liver fibrosis. Niemann-Pick type C2 (NPC2) protein plays an important role in the regulation of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis by directly binding with free cholesterol. However, the roles of NPC2 in HSCs activation and liver fibrosis have not been explored in detail. Since a high-cholesterol diet exacerbates liver fibrosis progression in both rodents and humans, we propose that the expression of NPC2 affects free cholesterol metabolism and regulates HSCs activation. In this study, we found that NPC2 is decreased in both thioacetamide- and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis tissues. In addition, NPC2 is expressed in quiescent HSCs, but its activation status is down-regulated. Knockdown of NPC2 in HSC-T6 cells resulted in marked increases in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced collagen type 1 α1 (Col1a1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, and Smad2 phosphorylation. In contrast, NPC2 overexpression decreased TGF-β1-induced HSCs activation. We further demonstrated that NPC2 deficiency significantly increased the accumulation of free cholesterol in HSCs, increasing Col1a1 and α-SMA expression and activating Smad2, and leading to sensitization of HSCs to TGF-β1 activation. In contrast, overexpression of NPC2 decreased U18666A-induced free cholesterol accumulation and inhibited the subsequent HSCs activation. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated that NPC2 plays an important role in HSCs activation by regulating the accumulation of free cholesterol. NPC2 overexpression may thus represent a new treatment strategy for liver fibrosis.

  8. 36 CFR 1201.4 - What types of claims are excluded from these regulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION GENERAL RULES COLLECTION OF CLAIMS Introduction § 1201.4 What types of...) Any debt based in whole or in part on conduct in violation of the antitrust laws or involving fraud...

  9. 45 CFR 2506.4 - What types of debts are excluded from these regulations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COLLECTION OF DEBTS Introduction § 2506.4 What types of debts...) Any debt based in whole or in part on conduct in violation of the antitrust laws or involving fraud...

  10. Fnip1 regulates skeletal muscle fiber type specification, fatigue resistance, and susceptibility to muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Nicholas L; Banks, Glen B; Tsang, Mark; Margineantu, Daciana; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Chan, Jacky; Torres, Michelle; Liggitt, H Denny; Hirenallur-S, Dinesh K; Hockenbery, David M; Raftery, Daniel; Iritani, Brian M

    2015-01-13

    Mammalian skeletal muscle is broadly characterized by the presence of two distinct categories of muscle fibers called type I "red" slow twitch and type II "white" fast twitch, which display marked differences in contraction strength, metabolic strategies, and susceptibility to fatigue. The relative representation of each fiber type can have major influences on susceptibility to obesity, diabetes, and muscular dystrophies. However, the molecular factors controlling fiber type specification remain incompletely defined. In this study, we describe the control of fiber type specification and susceptibility to metabolic disease by folliculin interacting protein-1 (Fnip1). Using Fnip1 null mice, we found that loss of Fnip1 increased the representation of type I fibers characterized by increased myoglobin, slow twitch markers [myosin heavy chain 7 (MyH7), succinate dehydrogenase, troponin I 1, troponin C1, troponin T1], capillary density, and mitochondria number. Cultured Fnip1-null muscle fibers had higher oxidative capacity, and isolated Fnip1-null skeletal muscles were more resistant to postcontraction fatigue relative to WT skeletal muscles. Biochemical analyses revealed increased activation of the metabolic sensor AMP kinase (AMPK), and increased expression of the AMPK-target and transcriptional coactivator PGC1α in Fnip1 null skeletal muscle. Genetic disruption of PGC1α rescued normal levels of type I fiber markers MyH7 and myoglobin in Fnip1-null mice. Remarkably, loss of Fnip1 profoundly mitigated muscle damage in a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results indicate that Fnip1 controls skeletal muscle fiber type specification and warrant further study to determine whether inhibition of Fnip1 has therapeutic potential in muscular dystrophy diseases.

  11. CTSH regulates β-cell function and disease progression in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløyel, Tina; Brorsson, Caroline; Nielsen, Lotte B;

    2014-01-01

    (CTSH) affects disease mechanisms and progression in T1D. The T allele of rs3825932 was associated with lower CTSH expression in human lymphoblastoid cell lines and pancreatic tissue. Proinflammatory cytokines decreased the expression of CTSH in human islets and primary rat β-cells, and overexpression...... of CTSH protected insulin-secreting cells against cytokine-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic studies indicated that CTSH exerts its antiapoptotic effects through decreased JNK and p38 signaling and reduced expression of the proapoptotic factors Bim, DP5, and c-Myc. CTSH overexpression also up-regulated Ins2...... the experimental and clinical data. In line with these observations, healthy human subjects carrying the T allele have lower β-cell function, which was evaluated by glucose tolerance testing. The data provide strong evidence that CTSH is an important regulator of β-cell function during progression of T1D...

  12. 11beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1-driven cortisone reactivation regulates plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 in adipose tissue of obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayachi, S Ei; Paulmyer-Lacroix, O; Verdier, M; Alessi, M-C; Dutour, A; Grino, M

    2006-03-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is the main inhibitor of the fibrinolytic system and contributes to an increased risk of atherothrombosis in insulin-resistant obese patients. In adipose tissue, we have shown that PAI-1 is synthesized mainly in the visceral stromal compartment and is positively regulated by glucocorticoids. We have demonstrated that adipose tissue expression of 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD-1), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of inactive cortisone to active cortisol, is exaggerated in obese patients. We hypothesized that increased action of 11beta-HSD-1 in adipose tissue of obese subjects may contribute to PAI-1 overproduction. Using in situ hybridization, we studied the expression of the mRNAs coding for PAI-1 and 11beta-HSD-1 in the stromal compartment of visceral adipose tissue obtained from obese women. The regulation of PAI-1 secretion from in vitro incubated tissue explants was also investigated. Regression analysis showed a significant positive linear relationship between PAI-1 and 11beta-HSD-1 mRNAs expression. In vitro incubation of adipose tissue explants demonstrated that cortisone stimulated PAI-1 gene expression and secretion, and that these effects were inhibited by co-incubation with the 11beta-HSD inhibitor, glycyrrhetinic acid. Our data demonstrate that 11beta-HSD-1-driven cortisone reactivation regulates adipose PAI-1 synthesis and secretion. They suggest that the increased PAI-1 synthesis and secretion observed in obese patients can be also related, at least in part, to an increased local conversion of cortisone to cortisol. Therefore, local cortisol metabolism in adipose tissue may be involved in increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in obese subjects.

  13. CytR Is a Global Positive Regulator of Competence, Type VI Secretion, and Chitinases in Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samit S Watve

    Full Text Available The facultative pathogen Vibrio cholerae transitions between its human host and aquatic reservoirs where it colonizes chitinous surfaces. Growth on chitin induces expression of chitin utilization genes, genes involved in DNA uptake by natural transformation, and a type VI secretion system that allows contact-dependent killing of neighboring bacteria. We have previously shown that the transcription factor CytR, thought to primarily regulate the pyrimidine nucleoside scavenging response, is required for natural competence in V. cholerae. Through high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq, we show that CytR positively regulates the majority of competence genes, the three type VI secretion operons, and the four known or predicted chitinases. We used transcriptional reporters and phenotypic analysis to determine the individual contributions of quorum sensing, which is controlled by the transcription factors HapR and QstR; chitin utilization that is mediated by TfoX; and pyrimidine starvation that is orchestrated by CytR, toward each of these processes. We find that in V. cholerae, CytR is a global regulator of multiple behaviors affecting fitness and adaptability in the environment.

  14. CytR Is a Global Positive Regulator of Competence, Type VI Secretion, and Chitinases in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watve, Samit S; Thomas, Jacob; Hammer, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    The facultative pathogen Vibrio cholerae transitions between its human host and aquatic reservoirs where it colonizes chitinous surfaces. Growth on chitin induces expression of chitin utilization genes, genes involved in DNA uptake by natural transformation, and a type VI secretion system that allows contact-dependent killing of neighboring bacteria. We have previously shown that the transcription factor CytR, thought to primarily regulate the pyrimidine nucleoside scavenging response, is required for natural competence in V. cholerae. Through high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we show that CytR positively regulates the majority of competence genes, the three type VI secretion operons, and the four known or predicted chitinases. We used transcriptional reporters and phenotypic analysis to determine the individual contributions of quorum sensing, which is controlled by the transcription factors HapR and QstR; chitin utilization that is mediated by TfoX; and pyrimidine starvation that is orchestrated by CytR, toward each of these processes. We find that in V. cholerae, CytR is a global regulator of multiple behaviors affecting fitness and adaptability in the environment.

  15. Type I Interferons as Regulators of Human Antigen Presenting Cell Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Gessani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs are pleiotropic cytokines, initially described for their antiviral activity. These cytokines exhibit a long record of clinical use in patients with some types of cancer, viral infections and chronic inflammatory diseases. It is now well established that IFN action mostly relies on their ability to modulate host innate and adaptive immune responses. Work in recent years has begun to elucidate the mechanisms by which type I IFNs modify the immune response, and this is now recognized to be due to effects on multiple cell types, including monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs, NK cells, T and B lymphocytes. An ensemble of results from both animal models and in vitro studies emphasized the key role of type I IFNs in the development and function of DCs, suggesting the existence of a natural alliance between these cytokines and DCs in linking innate to adaptive immunity. The identification of IFN signatures in DCs and their dysregulation under pathological conditions will therefore be pivotal to decipher the complexity of this DC-IFN interaction and to better exploit the therapeutic potential of these cells.

  16. The type three secreted effector SipC regulates the trafficking of PERP during Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallstrom, Kelly N; McCormick, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica Typhimurium employs type III secreted effectors to induce cellular invasion and pathogenesis. We previously reported the secreted effector SipA is in part responsible for inducing the apical accumulation of the host membrane protein PERP, a host factor we have shown is key to the inflammatory response induced by Salmonella. We now report that the S. Typhimurium type III secreted effector SipC significantly contributes to PERP redistribution to the apical membrane surface. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a role for SipC in directing the trafficking of a host membrane protein to the cell surface. In sum, facilitation of PERP trafficking appears to be a result of type III secreted effector-mediated recruitment of vesicles to the apical surface. Our study therefore reveals a new role for SipC, and builds upon previous reports suggesting recruitment of vesicles to the cell surface is important for Salmonella invasion.

  17. Interval Type-II Fuzzy Rule-Based STATCOM for Voltage Regulation in the Power System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yi Hong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The static synchronous compensator (STATCOM has recently received much attention owing to its ability to stabilize power systems and mitigate voltage variations. This paper investigates a novel interval type-II fuzzy rule-based PID (proportional-integral-derivative controller for the STATCOM to mitigate bus voltage variations caused by large changes in load and the intermittent generation of photovoltaic (PV arrays. The proposed interval type-II fuzzy rule base utilizes the output of the PID controller to tune the signal applied to the STATCOM. The rules involve upper and lower membership functions that ensure the stable responses of the controlled system. The proposed method is implemented using the NEPLAN software package and MATLAB/Simulink with co-simulation. A six-bus system is used to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. Comparative studies show that the proposed method is superior to traditional PID and type-I fuzzy rule-based methods.

  18. Genomic regulation of type 2 diabetes endophenotypes: Contribution from genetic studies in the Goto-Kakizaki rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Lathrop, Mark; Gauguier, Dominique

    2017-08-24

    The inbred Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat strain is a unique model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes mellitus caused by naturally occurring genetic variants that have been selectively isolated from an outbred colony of Wistar rats. Genetic and genomic studies in experimental crosses and congenic strains of the GK have shed light on the complex etiopathogenesis of diabetes phenotypes in this model. Diabetes-related phenotypes in the GK are under polygenic control and distinct genetic loci regulate glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, β-cell mass and plasma lipids. Metabolome and transcriptome profiling data in GK crosses and congenics, combined with GK genome resequencing, have resulted in a comprehensive landscape of genomic regulations of metabolism that can disentangle causal relationships between GK variants and diabetes phenotypes. Application of systems biology and systems genetics in the GK has contributed to improve our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms regulating metabolism. The wealth of physiological, genetic and genomic information in this strain makes it one of the most powerful model systems to improve our understanding of genetic regulations of metabolism and for testing therapeutic solutions for diabetes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Serum response factor regulates smooth muscle contractility via myotonic dystrophy protein kinases and L-type calcium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moon Young; Park, Chanjae; Ha, Se Eun; Park, Paul J.; Berent, Robyn M.; Jorgensen, Brian G.; Corrigan, Robert D.; Grainger, Nathan; Blair, Peter J.; Slivano, Orazio J.; Miano, Joseph M.; Ward, Sean M.; Smith, Terence K.; Sanders, Kenton M.

    2017-01-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) transcriptionally regulates expression of contractile genes in smooth muscle cells (SMC). Lack or decrease of SRF is directly linked to a phenotypic change of SMC, leading to hypomotility of smooth muscle in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, the molecular mechanism behind SRF-induced hypomotility in GI smooth muscle is largely unknown. We describe here how SRF plays a functional role in the regulation of the SMC contractility via myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) and L-type calcium channel CACNA1C. GI SMC expressed Dmpk and Cacna1c genes into multiple alternative transcriptional isoforms. Deficiency of SRF in SMC of Srf knockout (KO) mice led to reduction of SRF-dependent DMPK, which down-regulated the expression of CACNA1C. Reduction of CACNA1C in KO SMC not only decreased intracellular Ca2+ spikes but also disrupted their coupling between cells resulting in decreased contractility. The role of SRF in the regulation of SMC phenotype and function provides new insight into how SMC lose their contractility leading to hypomotility in pathophysiological conditions within the GI tract. PMID:28152551

  20. Research on new type of fast-opening mechanism in steam turbine regulating system and optimization of operation tactic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-xiao LI; Xuan-yin WANG; Fu-shang LI

    2008-01-01

    With the analysis on regulating system in 200 MW steam turbine, the necessity of appending the fast-opening function to the original system is set forth and a new type of fast-opening mechanism is devised. The mathematical model of system is built up. With the use of AMESIM software, the displacement curve of the piston, the force curve of the cartridge valve spool, the pressure curve and the flux curve in the regulation process are obtained based on simulation. The performances of three fast-opening systems composed of cartridge valves with different diameters are compared. Based on the analysis on factors that affect the execution time of fast-opening, the dead zone of the fast-opening system is put forward, To overcome the defect, different operation modes are adopted for different zones. The result shows that with the increase of the valve diameter, the regulating time in the dead zone significantly exceeds the fast-opening time in the whole journey. Accordingly, the optimization operation tactic in the dead zone and the qualification conditions are brought forward. The fast-opening system composed of 32 mm cartridge valves is taken as an example with use of the tactic. The simulation result shows that the maximum regulating time is shortened by 509 ms.

  1. Regulation of feeding behavior and food intake by appetite-regulating peptides in wild-type and growth hormone-transgenic coho salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Samantha L; Volkoff, Helene; Devlin, Robert H

    2016-08-01

    Survival, competition, growth and reproductive success in fishes are highly dependent on food intake, food availability and feeding behavior and are all influenced by a complex set of metabolic and neuroendocrine mechanisms. Overexpression of growth hormone (GH) in transgenic fish can result in greatly enhanced growth rates, feed conversion, feeding motivation and food intake. The objectives of this study were to compare seasonal feeding behavior of non-transgenic wild-type (NT) and GH-transgenic (T) coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), and to examine the effects of intraperitoneal injections of the appetite-regulating peptides cholecystokinin (CCK-8), bombesin (BBS), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) on feeding behavior. T salmon fed consistently across all seasons, whereas NT dramatically reduced their food intake in winter, indicating the seasonal regulation of appetite can be altered by overexpression of GH in T fish. Intraperitoneal injections of CCK-8 and BBS caused a significant and rapid decrease in food intake for both genotypes. Treatment with either GLP-1 or α-MSH resulted in a significant suppression of food intake for NT but had no effect in T coho salmon. The differential response of T and NT fish to α-MSH is consistent with the melanocortin-4 receptor system being a significant pathway by which GH acts to stimulate appetite. Taken together, these results suggest that chronically increased levels of GH alter feeding regulatory pathways to different extents for individual peptides, and that altered feeding behavior in transgenic coho salmon may arise, in part, from changes in sensitivity to peripheral appetite-regulating signals.

  2. Increasing levels of wild-type CREB up-regulates several activity-regulated inhibitor of death (AID genes and promotes neuronal survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Yan-Wei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CREB (cAMP-response element binding protein is the prototypical signal-regulated transcription factor. In neurons, it is the target of the synaptic activity-induced nuclear calcium-calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CaMK IV signaling pathway that controls the expression of genes important for acquired neuroprotection as well as other long-lasting adaptive processes in the nervous system. The function of CREB as a transcriptional activator is controlled by its phosphorylation on serine 133, which can be catalyzed by CaMKIV and leads to the recruitment of the co-activator, CREB binding protein (CBP. Activation of CBP function by nuclear calcium-CaMKIV signaling is a second regulatory step required for CREB/CBP-mediated transcription. Results Here we used recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV to increase the levels of wild type CREB or to overexpress a mutant version of CREB (mCREB containing a serine to alanine mutation at position amino acid 133 in mouse hippocampal neurons. Increasing the levels of CREB was sufficient to boost neuroprotective activity even under basal conditions (i.e., in the absence of stimulation of synaptic activity. In contrast, overexpression of mCREB increased cell death. The ratio of phospho(serine 133CREB to CREB immunoreactivity in unstimulated hippocampal neurons was similar for endogenous CREB and overexpressed wild type CREB and, as expected, dramatically reduced for overexpressed mCREB. A gene expression analysis revealed that increased expression of CREB but not that of mCREB in hippocampal neurons led to elevated expression levels of bdnf as well as that of several members of a previously characterized set of Activity-regulated Inhibitor of Death (AID genes, which include atf3, btg2, gadd45β, and gadd45γ. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the expression levels of wild type CREB are a critical determinant of the ability of hippocampal neurons to survive harmful conditions

  3. AINTEGUMENTA and the D-type cyclin CYCD3;1 regulate root secondary growth and respond to cytokinins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Ricardo S; Miyashima, Shunsuke; Blomster, Tiina; Zhang, Jing; Elo, Annakaisa; Karlberg, Anna; Immanen, Juha; Nieminen, Kaisa; Lee, Ji-Young; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Blajecka, Karolina; Melnyk, Charles W; Alcasabas, Annette; Forzani, Celine; Matsumoto-Kitano, Miho; Mähönen, Ari Pekka; Bhalerao, Rishikesh; Dewitte, Walter; Helariutta, Ykä; Murray, James A H

    2015-09-04

    Higher plant vasculature is characterized by two distinct developmental phases. Initially, a well-defined radial primary pattern is established. In eudicots, this is followed by secondary growth, which involves development of the cambium and is required for efficient water and nutrient transport and wood formation. Regulation of secondary growth involves several phytohormones, and cytokinins have been implicated as key players, particularly in the activation of cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanisms mediating this hormonal control remain unknown. Here we show that the genes encoding the transcription factor AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) and the D-type cyclin CYCD3;1 are expressed in the vascular cambium of Arabidopsis roots, respond to cytokinins and are both required for proper root secondary thickening. Cytokinin regulation of ANT and CYCD3 also occurs during secondary thickening of poplar stems, suggesting this represents a conserved regulatory mechanism. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. AINTEGUMENTA and the D-type cyclin CYCD3;1 regulate root secondary growth and respond to cytokinins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo S. Randall

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Higher plant vasculature is characterized by two distinct developmental phases. Initially, a well-defined radial primary pattern is established. In eudicots, this is followed by secondary growth, which involves development of the cambium and is required for efficient water and nutrient transport and wood formation. Regulation of secondary growth involves several phytohormones, and cytokinins have been implicated as key players, particularly in the activation of cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanisms mediating this hormonal control remain unknown. Here we show that the genes encoding the transcription factor AINTEGUMENTA (ANT and the D-type cyclin CYCD3;1 are expressed in the vascular cambium of Arabidopsis roots, respond to cytokinins and are both required for proper root secondary thickening. Cytokinin regulation of ANT and CYCD3 also occurs during secondary thickening of poplar stems, suggesting this represents a conserved regulatory mechanism.

  5. AINTEGUMENTA and the D-type cyclin CYCD3;1 regulate root secondary growth and respond to cytokinins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Ricardo S.; Miyashima, Shunsuke; Blomster, Tiina; Zhang, Jing; Elo, Annakaisa; Karlberg, Anna; Immanen, Juha; Nieminen, Kaisa; Lee, Ji-Young; Kakimoto, Tatsuo; Blajecka, Karolina; Melnyk, Charles W.; Alcasabas, Annette; Forzani, Celine; Matsumoto-Kitano, Miho; Mähönen, Ari Pekka; Bhalerao, Rishikesh; Dewitte, Walter; Helariutta, Ykä; Murray, James A. H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Higher plant vasculature is characterized by two distinct developmental phases. Initially, a well-defined radial primary pattern is established. In eudicots, this is followed by secondary growth, which involves development of the cambium and is required for efficient water and nutrient transport and wood formation. Regulation of secondary growth involves several phytohormones, and cytokinins have been implicated as key players, particularly in the activation of cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanisms mediating this hormonal control remain unknown. Here we show that the genes encoding the transcription factor AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) and the D-type cyclin CYCD3;1 are expressed in the vascular cambium of Arabidopsis roots, respond to cytokinins and are both required for proper root secondary thickening. Cytokinin regulation of ANT and CYCD3 also occurs during secondary thickening of poplar stems, suggesting this represents a conserved regulatory mechanism. PMID:26340943

  6. The transcription factor Rbf1 is the master regulator for b-mating type controlled pathogenic development in Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Heimel

    Full Text Available In the phytopathogenic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis, sexual and pathogenic development are tightly connected and controlled by the heterodimeric bE/bW transcription factor complex encoded by the b-mating type locus. The formation of the active bE/bW heterodimer leads to the formation of filaments, induces a G2 cell cycle arrest, and triggers pathogenicity. Here, we identify a set of 345 bE/bW responsive genes which show altered expression during these developmental changes; several of these genes are associated with cell cycle coordination, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. 90% of the genes that show altered expression upon bE/bW-activation require the zinc finger transcription factor Rbf1, one of the few factors directly regulated by the bE/bW heterodimer. Rbf1 is a novel master regulator in a multilayered network of transcription factors that facilitates the complex regulatory traits of sexual and pathogenic development.

  7. Evaluation of PD/PID controller for insulin control on blood glucose regulation in a Type-I diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Farhanahani; Isse, Nadir Hussien; Daud, Nur Atikah Mohd; Morsin, Marlia

    2017-01-01

    This project introduces a simulation of Proportional-Derivative (PD) and Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) controller based on a virtual Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) patient: Hovorka diabetic model using MATLAB-Simulink software. The results of these simulations are based on three tuning responses for each controller which are fast, slow and oscillation responses. The main purpose of this simulation is to achieve an acceptable stability and fastness response towards the regulation of glucose concentration using PD and PID controller response with insulin infusion rate. Therefore, in order to analyze and compare the responses of both controller performances, one-day simulations of the insulin-glucose dynamic have been conducted using a typical day meal plan that contains five meals of different bolus size. It is found that the PID closed-loop control with a short rise time is required to retrieve a satisfactory glucose regulation.

  8. The transcription factor Rbf1 is the master regulator for b-mating type controlled pathogenic development in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimel, Kai; Scherer, Mario; Vranes, Miroslav; Wahl, Ramon; Pothiratana, Chetsada; Schuler, David; Vincon, Volker; Finkernagel, Florian; Flor-Parra, Ignacio; Kämper, Jörg

    2010-08-05

    In the phytopathogenic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis, sexual and pathogenic development are tightly connected and controlled by the heterodimeric bE/bW transcription factor complex encoded by the b-mating type locus. The formation of the active bE/bW heterodimer leads to the formation of filaments, induces a G2 cell cycle arrest, and triggers pathogenicity. Here, we identify a set of 345 bE/bW responsive genes which show altered expression during these developmental changes; several of these genes are associated with cell cycle coordination, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. 90% of the genes that show altered expression upon bE/bW-activation require the zinc finger transcription factor Rbf1, one of the few factors directly regulated by the bE/bW heterodimer. Rbf1 is a novel master regulator in a multilayered network of transcription factors that facilitates the complex regulatory traits of sexual and pathogenic development.

  9. A type I IFN-dependent DNA damage response regulates the genetic program and inflammasome activation in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Abigail J; Carrero, Javier A; Hung, Putzer J; Tubbs, Anthony T; Andrews, Jared M; Edelson, Brian T; Calderon, Boris; Innes, Cynthia L; Paules, Richard S; Payton, Jacqueline E; Sleckman, Barry P

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages produce genotoxic agents, such as reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, that kill invading pathogens. Here we show that these agents activate the DNA damage response (DDR) kinases ATM and DNA-PKcs through the generation of double stranded breaks (DSBs) in murine macrophage genomic DNA. In contrast to other cell types, initiation of this DDR depends on signaling from the type I interferon receptor. Once activated, ATM and DNA-PKcs regulate a genetic program with diverse immune functions and promote inflammasome activation and the production of IL-1β and IL-18. Indeed, following infection with Listeria monocytogenes, DNA-PKcs-deficient murine macrophages produce reduced levels of IL-18 and are unable to optimally stimulate IFN-γ production by NK cells. Thus, genomic DNA DSBs act as signaling intermediates in murine macrophages, regulating innate immune responses through the initiation of a type I IFN-dependent DDR. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24655.001 PMID:28362262

  10. Expression of glutamine synthetase in the mouse kidney: localization in multiple epithelial cell types and differential regulation by hypokalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlander, Jill W; Chu, Diana; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2013-09-01

    Renal glutamine synthetase catalyzes the reaction of NH4+ with glutamate, forming glutamine and decreasing the ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine glutamine synthetase's specific cellular expression in the mouse kidney and its regulation by hypokalemia, a common cause of altered renal ammonia metabolism. Glutamine synthetase mRNA and protein were present in the renal cortex and in both the outer and inner stripes of the outer medulla. Immunohistochemistry showed glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in nonproximal tubule cells. Double immunolabel with cell-specific markers demonstrated glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells, non-A, non-B intercalated cells, and distal convoluted tubule cells, but not in principal cells, type B intercalated cells, or connecting segment cells. Hypokalemia induced by feeding a nominally K+ -free diet for 12 days decreased glutamine synthetase expression throughout the entire proximal tubule and in the distal convoluted tubule and simultaneously increased glutamine synthetase expression in type A intercalated cells in both the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct. We conclude that glutamine synthetase is widely and specifically expressed in renal epithelial cells and that the regulation of expression differs in specific cell populations. Glutamine synthetase is likely to mediate an important role in renal ammonia metabolism.

  11. The LysR-type transcription factor PacR is a global regulator of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in Anabaena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picossi, Silvia; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2015-09-01

    Cyanobacteria perform water-splitting photosynthesis and are important primary producers impacting the carbon and nitrogen cycles at global scale. They fix CO2 through ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCo) and have evolved a distinct CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) that builds high CO2 concentrations in the vicinity of RuBisCo favouring its carboxylase activity. Filamentous cyanobacteria such as Anabaena fix CO2 in photosynthetic vegetative cells, which donate photosynthate to heterocysts that rely on a heterotrophic metabolism to fix N2 . CCM elements are induced in response to inorganic carbon limitation, a cue that exposes the photosynthetic apparatus to photodamage by over-reduction. An Anabaena mutant lacking the LysR-type transcription factor All3953 grew poorly and dies under high light. The rbcL operon encoding RuBisCo was induced upon carbon limitation in the wild type but not in the mutant. ChIP-Seq analysis was used to globally identify All3953 targets under carbon limitation. Targets include, besides rbcL, genes encoding CCM elements, photorespiratory pathway- photosystem- and electron transport-related components, and factors, including flavodiiron proteins, with a demonstrated or putative function in photoprotection. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of selected All3953 targets showed regulation in the wild type but not in the mutant. All3953 (PacR) is a global regulator of carbon assimilation in an oxygenic photoautotroph.

  12. Dapagliflozin a glucose-regulating drug with diuretic properties in subjects with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerspink, H. J. Lambers; de Zeeuw, D.; Wie, L.; Leslie, B.; List, J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) reabsorbs glucose and sodium in the renal proximal tubule. Dapagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, targets hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes by increasing renal glucose excretion. To investigate whether the parallel occurring sodium loss would have diuretic-l

  13. The early noncoding region of human papillomavirus type 16 is regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Kristiansen, Karen; Durand, Marjorie

    2010-01-01

    All human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) early mRNAs are polyadenylated at the poly(A) signal within the early 3' untranslated region (3'UTR). The 3'end of the early E5 open reading frame and the 3'UTR of HPV-16 is very AU-rich, with five regions similar to cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (...

  14. Lovastatin regulates brain spontaneous low-frequency brain activity in Neurofibromatosis type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chabernaud, C.; Mennes, M.J.J.; Kardel, P.G.; Gaillard, W.D.; Kalbfleisch, M.L.; Vanmeter, J.W.; Packer, R.J.; Milham, M.P.; Castellanos, F.X.; Acosta, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    In the Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) mouse model, lovastatin, used clinically for hypercholesterolemia, improves cognitive dysfunction. While such impairment has been studied in NF1, the neural substrates remain unclear. The aim of this imaging add-on to a Phase 1 open-label trial was to examine th

  15. Dairy product intake in relation to glucose regulation indices and risk of type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, E.A.; Heraclides, A.; Witte, D.R.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Toft, U.; Lau, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim A high intake of dairy has been linked to lower risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The relationship between dairy intake and glucose metabolism is still not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between the intake of total dairy and dairy subgroups and

  16. Regulating the effects of GPR21, a novel target for type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Siobhán; Kinsella, Gemma K.; Benetti, Elisa; Findlay, John B. C.

    2016-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder primarily caused by insulin resistance to which obesity is a major contributor. Expression levels of an orphan G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), GPR21, demonstrated a trend towards a significant increase in the epididymal fat pads of wild type high fat high sugar (HFHS)-fed mice. To gain further insight into the potential role this novel target may play in the development of obesity-associated type 2 diabetes, the signalling capabilities of the receptor were investigated. Overexpression studies in HEK293T cells revealed GPR21 to be a constitutively active receptor, which couples to Gαq type G proteins leading to the activation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Overexpression of GPR21 in vitro also markedly attenuated insulin signalling. Interestingly, the effect of GPR21 on the MAPKs and insulin signalling was reduced in the presence of serum, inferring the possibility of a native inhibitory ligand. Homology modelling and ligand docking studies led to the identification of a novel compound that inhibited GPR21 activity. Its effects offer potential as an anti-diabetic pharmacological strategy as it was found to counteract the influence of GPR21 on the insulin signalling pathway.

  17. Dapagliflozin a glucose-regulating drug with diuretic properties in subjects with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerspink, H. J. Lambers; de Zeeuw, D.; Wie, L.; Leslie, B.; List, J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) reabsorbs glucose and sodium in the renal proximal tubule. Dapagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, targets hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes by increasing renal glucose excretion. To investigate whether the parallel occurring sodium loss would have diuretic-l

  18. Epidermis-type lipoxygenase 3 regulates adipocyte differentiation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenborg, Philip; Jørgensen, Claus; Petersen, Rasmus K

    2010-01-01

    differentiation has remained enigmatic. Previously, we showed that lipoxygenase (LOX) activity is involved in activation of PPAR gamma during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. Of the seven known murine LOXs, only the unconventional LOX epidermis-type lipoxygenase 3 (eLOX3) is expressed in 3T3-L1...

  19. The maize OST1 kinase homolog phosphorylates and regulates the maize SNAC1-type transcription factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belmiro Vilela

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis kinase OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1 plays a key role in regulating drought stress signalling, particularly stomatal closure. We have identified and investigated the functions of the OST1 ortholog in Z. mays (ZmOST1. Ectopic expression of ZmOST1 in the Arabidopsis ost1 mutant restores the stomatal closure phenotype in response to drought. Furthermore, we have identified the transcription factor, ZmSNAC1, which is directly phosphorylated by ZmOST1 with implications on its localization and protein stability. Interestingly, ZmSNAC1 binds to the ABA-box of ZmOST1, which is conserved in SnRK2s activated by ABA and is part of the contact site for the negative-regulating clade A PP2C phosphatases. Taken together, our results indicate that ZmSNAC1 is a substrate of ZmOST1 and delineate a novel osmotic stress transcriptional pathway in maize.

  20. Agonist-regulated Cleavage of the Extracellular Domain of Parathyroid Hormone Receptor Type 1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Christoph; Schulz, Stefan; Calebiro, Davide; Lohse, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    The receptor for parathyroid hormone (PTHR) is a main regulator of calcium homeostasis and bone maintenance. As a member of class B of G protein-coupled receptors, it harbors a large extracellular domain, which is required for ligand binding. Here, we demonstrate that the PTHR extracellular domain is cleaved by a protease belonging to the family of extracellular metalloproteinases. We show that the cleavage takes place in a region of the extracellular domain that belongs to an unstructured loop connecting the ligand-binding parts and that the N-terminal 10-kDa fragment is connected to the receptor core by a disulfide bond. Cleaved receptor revealed reduced protein stability compared with noncleaved receptor, suggesting degradation of the whole receptor. In the presence of the agonistic peptides PTH(1–34), PTH(1–14), or PTH(1–31), the processing of the PTHR extracellular domain was inhibited, and receptor protein levels were stabilized. A processed form of the PTHR was also detected in human kidney. These findings suggest a new model of PTHR processing and regulation of its stability. PMID:20080964

  1. Agonist-regulated cleavage of the extracellular domain of parathyroid hormone receptor type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Christoph; Schulz, Stefan; Calebiro, Davide; Lohse, Martin J

    2010-03-19

    The receptor for parathyroid hormone (PTHR) is a main regulator of calcium homeostasis and bone maintenance. As a member of class B of G protein-coupled receptors, it harbors a large extracellular domain, which is required for ligand binding. Here, we demonstrate that the PTHR extracellular domain is cleaved by a protease belonging to the family of extracellular metalloproteinases. We show that the cleavage takes place in a region of the extracellular domain that belongs to an unstructured loop connecting the ligand-binding parts and that the N-terminal 10-kDa fragment is connected to the receptor core by a disulfide bond. Cleaved receptor revealed reduced protein stability compared with noncleaved receptor, suggesting degradation of the whole receptor. In the presence of the agonistic peptides PTH(1-34), PTH(1-14), or PTH(1-31), the processing of the PTHR extracellular domain was inhibited, and receptor protein levels were stabilized. A processed form of the PTHR was also detected in human kidney. These findings suggest a new model of PTHR processing and regulation of its stability.

  2. The hypertonic environment differentially regulates wild-type CFTR and TNR-CFTR chloride channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassance-Soares, Roberta M; Cheng, Jie; Krasnov, Kristina; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Cutting, Garry R; Souza-Menezes, Jackson; Morales, Marcelo M; Guggino, William B

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that the hypertonic environment of the renal medulla regulates the expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) and its natural splice variant, TNR-CFTR. To accomplish this, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) stable cell lines expressing TNR-CFTR or CFTR were used. The cells were treated with hypertonic medium made with either NaCl or urea or sucrose (480 mOsm/kg or 560 mOsm/kg) to mimic the tonicity of the renal medulla environment. Western blot data showed that CFTR and TNR-CFTR total cell protein is increased by hypertonic medium, but using the surface biotinylation technique, only CFTR was found to be increased in cell plasma membrane. Confocal microscopy showed TNR-CFTR localization primarily at the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane. In conclusion, CFTR and TNR-CFTR have different patterns of distribution in MDCK cells and they are modulated by a hypertonic environment, suggesting their physiological importance in renal medulla.

  3. Adipokines (Leptin, Adiponectin, Resistin) Differentially Regulate All Hormonal Cell Types in Primary Anterior Pituitary Cell Cultures from Two Primate Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento-Cabral, André; Peinado, Juan R; Halliday, Lisa C; Malagon, María M; Castaño, Justo P; Kineman, Rhonda D; Luque, Raúl M

    2017-03-06

    Adipose-tissue (AT) is an endocrine organ that dynamically secretes multiple hormones, the adipokines, which regulate key physiological processes. However, adipokines and their receptors are also expressed and regulated in other tissues, including the pituitary, suggesting that locally- and AT-produced adipokines might comprise a regulatory circuit that relevantly modulate pituitary cell-function. Here, we used primary pituitary cell-cultures from two normal nonhuman-primate species [Papio-anubis/Macaca-fascicularis] to determine the impact of different adipokines on the functioning of all anterior-pituitary cell-types. Leptin and resistin stimulated GH-release, a response that was blocked by somatostatin. Conversely, adiponectin decreased GH-release, and inhibited GHRH-, but not ghrelin-stimulated GH-secretion. Furthermore: 1) Leptin stimulated PRL/ACTH/FSH- but not LH/TSH-release; 2) adiponectin stimulated PRL-, inhibited ACTH- and did not alter LH/FSH/TSH-release; and 3) resistin increased ACTH-release and did not alter PRL/LH/FSH/TSH-secretion. These effects were mediated through the activation of common (AC/PKA) and distinct (PLC/PKC, intra-/extra-cellular calcium, PI3K/MAPK/mTOR) signaling-pathways, and by the gene-expression regulation of key receptors/transcriptional-factors involved in the functioning of these pituitary cell-types (e.g. GHRH/ghrelin/somatostatin/insulin/IGF-I-receptors/Pit-1). Finally, we found that primate pituitaries expressed leptin/adiponectin/resistin. Altogether, these and previous data suggest that local-production of adipokines/receptors, in conjunction with circulating adipokine-levels, might comprise a relevant regulatory circuit that contribute to the fine-regulation of pituitary functions.

  4. Regulation of type I interferon responses by mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species in plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agod, Zsofia; Fekete, Tünde; Budai, Marietta M; Varga, Aliz; Szabo, Attila; Moon, Hyelim; Boldogh, Istvan; Biro, Tamas; Lanyi, Arpad; Bacsi, Attila; Pazmandi, Kitti

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generated continuously under physiological conditions have recently emerged as critical players in the regulation of immune signaling pathways. In this study we have investigated the regulation of antiviral signaling by increased mtROS production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), which, as major producers of type I interferons (IFN), are the key coordinators of antiviral immunity. The early phase of type I IFN production in pDCs is mediated by endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs), whereas the late phase of IFN response can also be triggered by cytosolic retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I), expression of which is induced upon TLR stimulation. Therefore, pDCs provide an ideal model to study the impact of elevated mtROS on the antiviral signaling pathways initiated by receptors with distinct subcellular localization. We found that elevated level of mtROS alone did not change the phenotype and the baseline cytokine profile of resting pDCs. Nevertheless increased mtROS levels in pDCs lowered the TLR9-induced secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators slightly, whereas reduced type I IFN production markedly via blocking phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), the key transcription factor of the TLR9 signaling pathway. The TLR9-induced expression of RIG-I in pDCs was also negatively regulated by enhanced mtROS production. On the contrary, elevated mtROS significantly augmented the RIG-I-stimulated expression of type I IFNs, as well as the expression of mitochondrial antiviral-signaling (MAVS) protein and the phosphorylation of Akt and IRF3 that are essential components of RIG-I signaling. Collectively, our data suggest that increased mtROS exert diverse immunoregulatory functions in pDCs both in the early and late phase of type I IFN responses depending on which type of viral sensing pathway is stimulated. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ubiquitin Ligase, MuRF-1 regulates myosin heavy chain type IIa transcripts during muscle atrophy under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Sachiko

    Skeletal muscles are vulnerable to marked atrophy under microgravity conditions. We previously reported that gastrocnemius muscle atrophy by spaceflight was specifically sensitive to the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. We also screened more over 26,000 skeletal muscle genes in rats exposed to real weightlessness and found that the expression of Ubiquitin Ligase, Muscle specific Ring Finger-1 (MuRF-1) upregulated under microgravity. In the present study, we examined the role of MuRF-1 in microgravity-induced muscle atrophy. The amounts of MuRF-1 transcripts significantly increased in skeletal muscle after denervation, an in vivo model of microgravity-induced unloading. MuRF-1 deficient (MuRF-1-/-) mice significantly inhibited reduction of muscle weight for muscle atrophy, compared with wild type mice. Interestingly, MuRF-1-/- mice significantly inhibited upregulation of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) type IIa transcrips, while wild type mice significantly increased expression of MyHC type IIa transcripts in denervated skeletal muscle. Our present results suggest that MuRF-1 may play an important role in regulation of MyHC type IIa during muscle atrophy under microgravity conditions.

  6. Clash of the Cytokine Titans: counter-regulation of interleukin-1 and type I interferon-mediated inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Yan, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades the notion of 'inflammation' has been extended beyond the original hallmarks of rubor (redness), calor (heat), tumor (swelling) and dolor (pain) described by Celsus. We have gained a more detailed understanding of the cellular players and molecular mediators of inflammation which is now being applied and extended to areas of biomedical research such as cancer, obesity, heart disease, metabolism, auto-inflammatory disorders, autoimmunity and infectious diseases. Innate cytokines are often central components of inflammatory responses. Here, we discuss how the type I interferon and interleukin-1 cytokine pathways represent distinct and specialized categories of inflammatory responses and how these key mediators of inflammation counter-regulate each other.

  7. Ischemic heart disease down-regulates angiotensin type 1 receptor mRNA in human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackenfors, Angelica; Emilson, Malin; Ingemansson, Richard;

    2004-01-01

    Angiotensin II is important in the development of cardiovascular disease. In the present study, angiotensin II receptor mRNA levels were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) in human coronary arteries from patients with ischemic heart disease and controls. Furthermore......, the suitability of artery culture for studying angiotensin receptor changes was evaluated by in vitro pharmacology and real-time PCR. The angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor mRNA levels were down-regulated in human coronary arteries from patients with ischemic heart disease as compared to controls (P

  8. Th17 Cells in Type 1 Diabetes: Role in the Pathogenesis and Regulation by Gut Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangyang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D is an autoimmune disease which is characterized by progressive destruction of insulin producing pancreatic islet β cells. The risk of developing T1D is determined by both genetic and environmental factors. A growing body of evidence supports an important role of T helper type 17 (Th17 cells along with impaired T regulatory (Treg cells in the development of T1D in animal models and humans. Alteration of gut microbiota has been implicated to be responsible for the imbalance between Th17 and Treg cells. However, there is controversy concerning a pathogenic versus protective role of Th17 cells in murine models of diabetes in the context of influence of gut microbiota. In this review we will summarize current knowledge about Th17 cells and gut microbiota involved in T1D and propose Th17 targeted therapy in children with islet autoimmunity to prevent progression to overt diabetes.

  9. Deletion of a coordinate regulator of type 2 cytokine expression in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohrs, Markus; Blankespoor, Catherine M.; Wang, Zhi-En; Loots, Gaby G.; Hadeiba, Husein; Shinkai, Kanade; Rubin, Edward M.; Locksley, Richard M.

    2001-07-30

    Mechanisms underlying the differentiation of stable T helper subsets will be important in understanding how discrete types of immunity develop in response to different pathogens. An evolutionarily conserved {approx}400 base pair non-coding sequence in the IL-4/IL-13 intergenic region, designated CNS-1, was deleted in mice. The capacity to develop Th2 cells was compromised in vitro and in vivo in the absence of CNS-1. Despite the profound effect in T cells, mast cells from CNS-1-deleted mice maintained their capacity to produce IL-4. A T cell-specific element critical for optimal expression of type 2 cytokines may represent evolution of a regulatory sequence exploited by adaptive immunity.

  10. A conserved pre-block interaction motif regulates potassium channel activation and N-type inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Pfaffinger

    Full Text Available N-type inactivation occurs when the N-terminus of a potassium channel binds into the open pore of the channel. This study examined the relationship between activation and steady state inactivation for mutations affecting the N-type inactivation properties of the Aplysia potassium channel AKv1 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The results show that the traditional single-step model for N-type inactivation fails to properly account for the observed relationship between steady state channel activation and inactivation curves. We find that the midpoint of the steady state inactivation curve depends in part on a secondary interaction between the channel core and a region of the N-terminus just proximal to the pore blocking peptide that we call the Inactivation Proximal (IP region. The IP interaction with the channel core produces a negative shift in the activation and inactivation curves, without blocking the pore. A tripeptide motif in the IP region was identified in a large number of different N-type inactivation domains most likely reflecting convergent evolution in addition to direct descent. Point mutating a conserved hydrophobic residue in this motif eliminates the gating voltage shift, accelerates recovery from inactivation and decreases the amount of pore block produced during inactivation. The IP interaction we have identified likely stabilizes the open state and positions the pore blocking region of the N-terminus at the internal opening to the transmembrane pore by forming a Pre-Block (P state interaction with residues lining the side window vestibule of the channel.

  11. Proteolytic Processing as a Regulator of BMP-type Signaling in Drosophila Development

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A small set of highly conserved signaling molecules performs a great number of tasks in different animals and developmental contexts. Among them, the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) constitute a group of growth and differentiation factors that are involved in numerous developmental processes affecting cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. In the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, three BMP type proteins have been identified, each of which has a homolog in mammals. Decapentapl...

  12. Regulation of blood pressure by the type 1A angiotensin II receptor gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, M.; Oliverio, M I; Mannon, P J; Best, C F; Maeda, N.; Smithies, O.; Coffman, T M

    1995-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system plays a critical role in sodium and fluid homeostasis. Genetic or acquired alterations in the expression of components of this system are strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension. To specifically examine the physiological and genetic functions of the type 1A receptor for angiotensin II, we have disrupted the mouse gene encoding this receptor in embryonic stem cells by gene targeting. Agtr1A(-/-) mice were born in expected numbers, and the histomorph...

  13. 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 regulates glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morgan, Stuart A

    2009-11-01

    Glucocorticoid excess is characterized by increased adiposity, skeletal myopathy, and insulin resistance, but the precise molecular mechanisms are unknown. Within skeletal muscle, 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) converts cortisone (11-dehydrocorticosterone in rodents) to active cortisol (corticosterone in rodents). We aimed to determine the mechanisms underpinning glucocorticoid-induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle and indentify how 11beta-HSD1 inhibitors improve insulin sensitivity.

  14. Biomechanical regulation of type I collagen gene expression in ACLs in organ culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Adam H; Sah, Robert L; Paul Sung, K L

    2002-03-01

    In this study, an ex vivo organ culture system that allows the application of controlled loads to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was designed and used to characterize the influence of a step input in mechanical load on gene expression. A procedure for isolating bone-ACL-bone (B-ACL-B) complexes from rat knees was developed. After harvest and 24 hour culture, B-ACL-B complexes exhibited percentages of viability similar to that in intact ACLs (approximately 90%). Application of a physiologically relevant load of 5 N (superimposed on a I N tare load) resulted in changes in levels of mRNA encoding type I collagen. While levels of type I collagen mRNA significantly increased 32+/-13% (mean +/- standard errors of the mean (SEM)) over controls within the first hour of loading, levels decreased significantly to 44+/-9% of control after 2 h. Displacements induced by the 5 N load were measured by video dimensional analysis. Calculated axial strains of 0.141+/-0.034 were achieved rapidly during the first hour and remained essentially unchanged thereafter. These results demonstrate the feasibility of maintaining ligaments in organ culture and illustrate the time course expression of type I collagen following the application of a mechanical load.

  15. Regulation of transpirational water loss in Quercus suber trees in a Mediterranean-type ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otieno, D O; Schmidt, M W T; Kurz-Besson, C; Lobo Do Vale, R; Pereira, J S; Tenhunen, J D

    2007-08-01

    Sap flux density in branches, leaf transpiration, stomatal conductance and leaf water potentials were measured in 16-year-old Quercus suber L. trees growing in a plantation in southern Portugal to understand how evergreen Mediterranean trees regulate water loss during summer drought. Leaf specific hydraulic conductance and leaf gas exchange were monitored during the progressive summer drought to establish how changes along the hydraulic pathway influence shoot responses. As soil water became limiting, leaf water potential, stomatal conductance and leaf transpiration declined significantly. Predawn leaf water potential reflected soil water potential measured at 1-m depth in the rhizospheres of most trees. The lowest predawn leaf water potential recorded during this period was -1.8 MPa. Mean maximum stomatal conductance declined from 300 to 50 mmol m(-2) s(-1), reducing transpiration from 6 to 2 mmol m(-2) s(-1). Changes in leaf gas exchange were attributed to reduced soil water availability, increased resistances along the hydraulic pathway and, hence, reduced leaf water supply. There was a strong coupling between changes in soil water content and stomatal conductance as well as between stomatal conductance and leaf specific hydraulic conductance. Despite significant seasonal differences among trees in predawn leaf water potential, stomatal conductance, leaf transpiration and leaf specific hydraulic conductance, there were no differences in midday leaf water potentials. The strong regulation of changes in leaf water potential in Q. suber both diurnally and seasonally is achieved through stomatal closure, which is sensitive to changes in both liquid and vapor phase conductance. This sensitivity allows for optimization of carbon and water resource use without compromising the root-shoot hydraulic link.

  16. DNA polymerase-α regulates the activation of type I interferons through cytosolic RNA:DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starokadomskyy, Petro; Gemelli, Terry; Rios, Jonathan J; Xing, Chao; Wang, Richard C; Li, Haiying; Pokatayev, Vladislav; Dozmorov, Igor; Khan, Shaheen; Miyata, Naoteru; Fraile, Guadalupe; Raj, Prithvi; Xu, Zhe; Xu, Zigang; Ma, Lin; Lin, Zhimiao; Wang, Huijun; Yang, Yong; Ben-Amitai, Dan; Orenstein, Naama; Mussaffi, Huda; Baselga, Eulalia; Tadini, Gianluca; Grunebaum, Eyal; Sarajlija, Adrijan; Krzewski, Konrad; Wakeland, Edward K; Yan, Nan; de la Morena, Maria Teresa; Zinn, Andrew R; Burstein, Ezra

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant nucleic acids generated during viral replication are the main trigger for antiviral immunity, and mutations that disrupt nucleic acid metabolism can lead to autoinflammatory disorders. Here we investigated the etiology of X-linked reticulate pigmentary disorder (XLPDR), a primary immunodeficiency with autoinflammatory features. We discovered that XLPDR is caused by an intronic mutation that disrupts the expression of POLA1, which encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-α. Unexpectedly, POLA1 deficiency resulted in increased production of type I interferons. This enzyme is necessary for the synthesis of RNA:DNA primers during DNA replication and, strikingly, we found that POLA1 is also required for the synthesis of cytosolic RNA:DNA, which directly modulates interferon activation. Together this work identifies POLA1 as a critical regulator of the type I interferon response.

  17. β1 -Adrenoceptor, but not β2 -adrenoceptor, subtype regulates heart rate in type 2 diabetic rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Rosalind F; Bussey, Carol T; Mellor, Kimberley M; Cragg, Patricia A; Lamberts, Regis R

    2017-08-01

    What is the central question of the study? The sympathetic system regulates heart rate via β-adrenoceptors; this is impaired during diabetes. However, the specific β-adrenoceptor subtype contributions in heart rate regulation in diabetes in vivo are unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? Telemetric recordings in conscious non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic rats demonstrated that the β1 -adrenoceptor subtype, and not the β2 -adrenoceptor, regulated the lower resting heart rate and increased β-adrenoceptor responsiveness in diabetes in vivo. This provides new physiological insight into the dysregulation of heart rate in type 2 diabetes, which is important for improving therapeutic strategies targeting the diabetic chronotropic incompetence. β-Adrenoceptor blockers are widely used to reduce heart rate, the strongest predictor of mortality in cardiac patients, but are less effective in diabetic patients. This study aimed to determine the specific contributions of β1 - and β2 -adrenoceptor subtypes to chronotropic responses in type 2 diabetes in vivo, which are currently unknown. Type 2 diabetic and non-diabetic rats were implanted with radiotelemeters to measure arterial blood pressure and derive heart rate in conscious conditions. Vascular access ports were implanted to inject isoprenaline (β1 - and β2 -adrenoceptor agonist, 0.1-300 μg kg(-1) ) in the presence of atenolol (β1 -adrenoceptor antagonist, 2000 μg kg(-1) ) or nadolol (β1 - and β2 -adrenoceptor agonist, 4000 μg kg(-1) ) to determine the chronotropic contributions of the β-adrenoceptor subtypes. Resting heart rate was reduced in diabetic rats (388 ± 62 versus 290 ± 37 beats min(-1) non-diabetic versus diabetic, P heart rate at highest dose of isoprenaline: 135 ± 66 versus 205 ± 28 beats min(-1) , non-diabetic versus diabetic, P heart rate at highest dose of isoprenaline: 205 ± 37 versus 195 ± 22 beats min(-1) , non-diabetic versus diabetic, P

  18. Transcriptional regulator LsrB of Sinorhizobium meliloti positively regulates the expression of genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guirong; Wang, Ying; Luo, Li

    2014-09-01

    Rhizobia induce nitrogen-fixing nodules on host legumes, which is important in agriculture and ecology. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced by rhizobia is required for infection or bacteroid survival in host cells. Genes required for LPS biosynthesis have been identified in several Rhizobium species. However, the regulation of their expression is not well understood. Here, Sinorhizobium meliloti LsrB, a member of the LysR family of transcriptional regulators, was found to be involved in LPS biosynthesis by positively regulating the expression of the lrp3-lpsCDE operon. An lsrB in-frame deletion mutant displayed growth deficiency, sensitivity to the detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate, and acidic pH compared to the parent strain. This mutant produced slightly less LPS due to lower expression of the lrp3 operon. Analysis of the transcriptional start sites of the lrp3 and lpsCDE gene suggested that they constitute one operon. The expression of lsrB was positively autoregulated. The promoter region of lrp3 was specifically precipitated by anti-LsrB antibodies in vivo. The promoter DNA fragment containing TN11A motifs was bound by the purified LsrB protein in vitro. These new findings suggest that S. meliloti LsrB is associated with LPS biosynthesis, which is required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation on some ecotypes of alfalfa plants.

  19. Type IV Collagen Controls the Axogenesis of Cerebellar Granule Cells by Regulating Basement Membrane Integrity in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Takeuchi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Granule cells (GCs are the major glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum, and GC axon formation is an initial step in establishing functional cerebellar circuits. In the zebrafish cerebellum, GCs can be classified into rostromedial and caudolateral groups, according to the locations of their somata in the corresponding cerebellar lobes. The axons of the GCs in the caudolateral lobes terminate on crest cells in the dorsal hindbrain, as well as forming en passant synapses with Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. In the zebrafish mutant shiomaneki, the caudolateral GCs extend aberrant axons. Positional cloning revealed that the shiomaneki (sio gene locus encodes Col4a6, a subunit of type IV collagen, which, in a complex with Col4a5, is a basement membrane (BM component. Both col4a5 and col4a6 mutants displayed similar abnormalities in the axogenesis of GCs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. Although type IV collagen is reported to control axon targeting by regulating the concentration gradient of an axonal guidance molecule Slit, Slit overexpression did not affect the GC axons. The structure of the BM surrounding the tectum and dorsal hindbrain was disorganized in the col4a5 and col4a6 mutants. Moreover, the abnormal axogenesis of the caudolateral GCs and the RGCs was coupled with aberrant BM structures in the type IV collagen mutants. The regrowth of GC axons after experimental ablation revealed that the original and newly formed axons displayed similar branching and extension abnormalities in the col4a6 mutants. These results collectively suggest that type IV collagen controls GC axon formation by regulating the integrity of the BM, which provides axons with the correct path to their targets.

  20. Differential type 1 interferon-regulated gene expression in the brain during AIDS: interactions with viral diversity and neurovirulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Maria J; Vivithanaporn, Pornpun; Maingat, Ferdinand G; Walsh, John G; Branton, William; Cohen, Eric A; Meeker, Rick; Power, Christopher

    2013-07-01

    The lentiviruses, human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1 and FIV, respectively), infect the brain and cause neurovirulence, evident as neuronal injury, inflammation, and neurobehavioral abnormalities with diminished survival. Herein, different lentivirus infections in conjunction with neural cell viability were investigated, concentrating on type 1 interferon-regulated pathways. Transcriptomic network analyses showed a preponderance of genes involved in type 1 interferon signaling, which was verified by increased expression of the type 1 interferon-associated genes, Mx1 and CD317, in brains from HIV-infected persons (P<0.05). Leukocytes infected with different strains of FIV or HIV-1 showed differential Mx1 and CD317 expression (P<0.05). In vivo studies of animals infected with the FIV strains, FIV(ch) or FIV(ncsu), revealed that FIV(ch)-infected animals displayed deficits in memory and motor speed compared with the FIV(ncsu)- and mock-infected groups (P<0.05). TNF-α, IL-1β, and CD40 expression was increased in the brains of FIV(ch)-infected animals; conversely, Mx1 and CD317 transcript levels were increased in the brains of FIV(ncsu)-infected animals, principally in microglia (P<0.05). Gliosis and neuronal loss were evident among FIV(ch)-infected animals compared with mock- and FIV(ncsu)-infected animals (P<0.05). Lentiviral infections induce type 1 interferon-regulated gene expression in microglia in a viral diversity-dependent manner, representing a mechanism by which immune responses might be exploited to limit neurovirulence.

  1. Type IV Collagen Controls the Axogenesis of Cerebellar Granule Cells by Regulating Basement Membrane Integrity in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Miki; Yamaguchi, Shingo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kakiguchi, Kisa; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko

    2015-10-01

    Granule cells (GCs) are the major glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum, and GC axon formation is an initial step in establishing functional cerebellar circuits. In the zebrafish cerebellum, GCs can be classified into rostromedial and caudolateral groups, according to the locations of their somata in the corresponding cerebellar lobes. The axons of the GCs in the caudolateral lobes terminate on crest cells in the dorsal hindbrain, as well as forming en passant synapses with Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. In the zebrafish mutant shiomaneki, the caudolateral GCs extend aberrant axons. Positional cloning revealed that the shiomaneki (sio) gene locus encodes Col4a6, a subunit of type IV collagen, which, in a complex with Col4a5, is a basement membrane (BM) component. Both col4a5 and col4a6 mutants displayed similar abnormalities in the axogenesis of GCs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although type IV collagen is reported to control axon targeting by regulating the concentration gradient of an axonal guidance molecule Slit, Slit overexpression did not affect the GC axons. The structure of the BM surrounding the tectum and dorsal hindbrain was disorganized in the col4a5 and col4a6 mutants. Moreover, the abnormal axogenesis of the caudolateral GCs and the RGCs was coupled with aberrant BM structures in the type IV collagen mutants. The regrowth of GC axons after experimental ablation revealed that the original and newly formed axons displayed similar branching and extension abnormalities in the col4a6 mutants. These results collectively suggest that type IV collagen controls GC axon formation by regulating the integrity of the BM, which provides axons with the correct path to their targets.

  2. Hepatitis C virus core protein induces energy metabolism disorders of hepatocytes by down-regulation of silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog-1 and adenosine monophosphate-acti vated protein kinase signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于建武

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the role of silent mating type information regulation2homotog-1(SIRT1)-adenosine monophosphate(AMP)-activated protein kinase(AMPK) signaling pathway in hepatitis C virus core protein(HCV-core)induced energy metabolism disorders

  3. Renal type a intercalated cells contain albumin in organelles with aldosterone-regulated abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Buus Jensen

    Full Text Available Albumin has been identified in preparations of renal distal tubules and collecting ducts by mass spectrometry. This study aimed to establish whether albumin was a contaminant in those studies or actually present in the tubular cells, and if so, identify the albumin containing cells and commence exploration of the origin of the intracellular albumin. In addition to the expected proximal tubular albumin immunoreactivity, albumin was localized to mouse renal type-A intercalated cells and cells in the interstitium by three anti-albumin antibodies. Albumin did not colocalize with markers for early endosomes (EEA1, late endosomes/lysosomes (cathepsin D or recycling endosomes (Rab11. Immuno-gold electron microscopy confirmed the presence of albumin-containing large spherical membrane associated bodies in the basal parts of intercalated cells. Message for albumin was detected in mouse renal cortex as well as in a wide variety of other tissues by RT-PCR, but was absent from isolated connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts. Wild type I MDCK cells showed robust uptake of fluorescein-albumin from the basolateral side but not from the apical side when grown on permeable support. Only a subset of cells with low peanut agglutinin binding took up albumin. Albumin-aldosterone conjugates were also internalized from the basolateral side by MDCK cells. Aldosterone administration for 24 and 48 hours decreased albumin abundance in connecting tubules and cortical collecting ducts from mouse kidneys. We suggest that albumin is produced within the renal interstitium and taken up from the basolateral side by type-A intercalated cells by clathrin and dynamin independent pathways and speculate that the protein might act as a carrier of less water-soluble substances across the renal interstitium from the capillaries to the tubular cells.

  4. Regulation of net hepatic glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis during exercise: impact of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Kitt Falk; Price, Thomas B; Bergeron, Raynald

    2004-09-01

    The effects of type 1 diabetes on the contributions of net hepatic glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis to glucose production (GP) at rest and during moderate (MOD) and high (HI) intensity running were examined in healthy control (n = 6) and type 1 diabetic (n = 5) subjects matched for age, weight, and maximum aerobic capacity by combined noninvasive measurements of hepatic glycogen content using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and determination of GP using [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose. In the control subjects, GP increased in proportion to the intensity of the exercise [at rest (REST), 14.3 +/- 0.5; MOD, 18.1 +/- 0.9; HI, 28.8 +/- 1.3 micromol/(kg-min); P = 0.001, three-way comparison], and this was accounted for by an increase in the percent contribution of net hepatic glycogenolysis to GP (REST, 32 +/- 1%; MOD, 49 +/- 5%; HI, 57 +/- 5%; P = 0.006). In the diabetic subjects, resting rates of GP were 60% higher than those in the control subjects (P glycogenolysis to GP were consistently lower than those in the control subjects (REST, 20 +/- 6%; MOD, 32 +/- 13%; HI, 32 +/- 3%; P = 0.006 vs. control), and the exaggerated rates of GP could be entirely accounted for by increased rates of gluconeogenesis. In conclusion, 1) increases in GP in healthy control subjects with exercise intensity can be entirely attributed to increases in net hepatic glycogenolysis. 2) In contrast, moderately controlled type 1 diabetic subjects exhibit increased rates of GP both at rest and during exercise, which can be entirely accounted for by increased gluconeogenesis.

  5. Dynamic simulation of road vehicle door window regulator mechanism of cross arm type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklos, I. Zs; Miklos, C.; Alic, C.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents issues related to the dynamic simulation of a motor-drive operating mechanism of cross arm type, for the manipulation of road vehicle door windows, using Autodesk Inventor Professional software. The dynamic simulation of the mechanism involves a 3D modelling, kinematic coupling, drive motion parameters and external loads, as well as the graphically view of the kinematic and kinetostatic results for the various elements and kinematic couplings of the mechanism, under real operating conditions. Also, based on the results, the analysis of the mechanism components has been carried out using the finite element method.

  6. Soybean GmPHD-Type Transcription Regulators Improve Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wei; Jian Huang; Yu-Jun Hao; Hong-Feng Zou; Hui-Wen Wang; Jing-Yun Zhao; Xue-Yi Liu; Wan-Ke Zhang; Biao Ma; Jin-Song Zhang; Shou-Yi Chen

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is one of the most important crops for oil and protein resource. Improvement of stress tolerance will be beneficial for soybean seed production. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Six GmPHD genes encoding Alfin1-type PHD finger protein were identified and their expressions differentially responded to drought, salt, cold and ABA treatments. The six GmPHDs were nuclear proteins and showed ability to bind the cis-element "GTGGAG". The N-terminal domain of GmPHD play...

  7. CTCF mediates the cell-type specific spatial organization of the Kcnq5 locus and the local gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licheng Ren

    Full Text Available Chromatin loops play important roles in the dynamic spatial organization of genes in the nucleus. Growing evidence has revealed that the multivalent functional zinc finger protein CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF is a master regulator of genome spatial organization, and mediates the ubiquitous chromatin loops within the genome. Using circular chromosome conformation capture (4C methodology, we discovered that CTCF may be a master organizer in mediating the spatial organization of the kcnq5 gene locus. We characterized the cell-type specific spatial organization of the kcnq5 gene locus mediated by CTCF in detail using chromosome conformation capture (3C and 3C-derived techniques. Cohesion also participated in mediating the organization of this locus. RNAi-mediated knockdown of CTCF sharply diminished the interaction frequencies between the chromatin loops of the kcnq5 gene locus and down-regulated local gene expression. Functional analysis showed that the interacting chromatin loops of the kcnq5 gene locus can repress the gene expression in a luciferase reporter assay. These interacting chromatin fragments were a series of repressing elements whose contacts were mediated by CTCF. Therefore, these findings suggested that the dynamical spatial organization of the kcnq5 locus regulates local gene expression.

  8. Anchored PDE4 regulates chloride conductance in wild-type and ΔF508-CFTR human airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Elise; Zlock, Lorna; Lao, Anna; Mika, Delphine; Namkung, Wan; Xie, Moses; Scheitrum, Colleen; Gruenert, Dieter C; Verkman, Alan S; Finkbeiner, Walter E; Conti, Marco; Richter, Wito

    2014-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that impair its expression and/or chloride channel function. Here, we provide evidence that type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4s) are critical regulators of the cAMP/PKA-dependent activation of CFTR in primary human bronchial epithelial cells. In non-CF cells, PDE4 inhibition increased CFTR activity under basal conditions (ΔISC 7.1 μA/cm(2)) and after isoproterenol stimulation (increased ΔISC from 13.9 to 21.0 μA/cm(2)) and slowed the return of stimulated CFTR activity to basal levels by >3-fold. In cells homozygous for ΔF508-CFTR, the most common mutation found in CF, PDE4 inhibition alone produced minimal channel activation. However, PDE4 inhibition strongly amplified the effects of CFTR correctors, drugs that increase expression and membrane localization of CFTR, and/or CFTR potentiators, drugs that increase channel gating, to reach ∼ 25% of the chloride conductance observed in non-CF cells. Biochemical studies indicate that PDE4s are anchored to CFTR and mediate a local regulation of channel function. Taken together, our results implicate PDE4 as an important determinant of CFTR activity in airway epithelia, and support the use of PDE4 inhibitors to potentiate the therapeutic benefits of CFTR correctors and potentiators.

  9. Exercise might improve cardiovascular autonomic regulation in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucini, Daniela; Zuccotti, Gian Vincenzo; Scaramuzza, Andrea; Malacarne, Mara; Gervasi, Federico; Pagani, Massimo

    2013-06-01

    Considering that changes in exercise routines might have relevance in treatment of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus, we sought to assess whether spontaneous modifications to weekly exercise habits might occur in these patients and whether such variations would be accompanied by alterations in autonomic profile. In this observational study, we examined 77 patients (age 15.0 ± 0.6 years.) who in addition to a tailored optimal insulin treatment were invited to perform at least 1 h a day of moderate, aerobic exercise, as suggested by recent guidelines. Patients were studied at baseline (T0) and after 15.8 ± 0.7 months (T1). They were divided into three subgroups according to increased, unchanged and diminished total estimated weekly METs between T0 and T1. Autonomic profile was evaluated by assessing spontaneous baroreflex gain and low-frequency oscillation in arterial pressure, using spectral analysis of RR and systolic arterial pressure time series. Insulin therapy and biochemical data were similar among the 3 groups at T0 and T1, while body mass index standard deviation score was slightly reduced (p performance were improved (alpha index, from 17 ± 1 to 20 ± 2 ms/mmHg, p adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

  10. Spiking sychronization regulated by noise in three types of Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zheng-Zhen; Zeng Shang-You; Tang Wen-Yan; Hu Jin-Lin; Zeng Shao-Wen; Ning Wei-Lian; Qiu Yi; Wu Hui-Si

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we study spiking synchronization in three different types of Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks,which are the small-world,regular,and random neuronal networks. All the neurons are subjected to subthreshold stimulus and external noise. It is found that in each of all the neuronal networks there is an optimal strength of noise to induce the maximal spiking synchronization.We further demonstrate that in each of the neuronal networks there is a range of synaptic conductance to induce the effect that an optimal strength of noise maximizes the spiking synchronization.Only when the magnitude of the synaptic conductance is moderate,will the effect be considerable.However,if the synaptic conductance is small or large,the effect vanishes.As the connections between neurons increase,the synaptic conductance to maximize the effect decreases.Therefore,we show quantitatively that the noise-induced maximal synchronization in the Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal network is a general effect,regardless of the specific type of neuronal network.

  11. NFATc1 Controls Skeletal Muscle Fiber Type and Is a Negative Regulator of MyoD Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L. Ehlers

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle comprises a heterogeneous population of fibers with important physiological differences. Fast fibers are glycolytic and fatigue rapidly. Slow fibers utilize oxidative metabolism and are fatigue resistant. Muscle diseases such as sarcopenia and atrophy selectively affect fast fibers, but the molecular mechanisms regulating fiber type-specific gene expression remain incompletely understood. Here, we show that the transcription factor NFATc1 controls fiber type composition and is required for fast-to-slow fiber type switching in response to exercise in vivo. Moreover, MyoD is a crucial transcriptional effector of the fast fiber phenotype, and we show that NFATc1 inhibits MyoD-dependent fast fiber gene promoters by physically interacting with the N-terminal activation domain of MyoD and blocking recruitment of the essential transcriptional coactivator p300. These studies establish a molecular mechanism for fiber type switching through direct inhibition of MyoD to control the opposing roles of MyoD and NFATc1 in fast versus slow fiber phenotypes.

  12. Phospholipid Scramblase 1 regulates Toll-like receptor 9-mediated type Ⅰ interferon production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amjad H Talukder; Musheng Bao; Tae Whan Kim; Valeria Facchinetti; Shino Hanabuchi; Laura Bover; Tomasz Zal; Yong-Jun Liu

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) senses microbial DNA in the endosomes of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and triggers MyD88-dependent type 1 interferon (IFN) responses.To better understand TLR9 biology in pDCs,we established a yeast two-hybrid library for the identification of TLR9-interacting proteins.Here,we report that an IFN-inducible protein,phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1),interacts with TLR9 in pDCs.Knockdown of PLSCR1 expression by siRNA in human pDC cell line led to a 60-70% reduction of IFN-α responses following CpG-ODN (oligodeoxynucleotide) stimulation.Primary pDCs from PLSCR1-deficient mice produced lower amount of type 1 IFN than pDCs from the wild-type mice in response to CpG-ODN,herpes simplex virus and influenza A virus.Following CpG-A stimulation,there were much lower amounts of TLR9 in the early endosomes together with CpG-A in pDCs from PLSCRl-deficient mice.Our study demonstrates that PLSCR1 is a TLR9-interacting protein that plays an important role in pDC's type 1 IFN responses by regulating TLR9 trafficking to the endosomal compartment.

  13. Phospholipid Scramblase 1 regulates Toll-like receptor 9-mediated type I interferon production in plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Amjad H; Bao, Musheng; Kim, Tae Whan; Facchinetti, Valeria; Hanabuchi, Shino; Bover, Laura; Zal, Tomasz; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) senses microbial DNA in the endosomes of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and triggers MyD88-dependent type I interferon (IFN) responses. To better understand TLR9 biology in pDCs, we established a yeast two-hybrid library for the identification of TLR9-interacting proteins. Here, we report that an IFN-inducible protein, phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1), interacts with TLR9 in pDCs. Knockdown of PLSCR1 expression by siRNA in human pDC cell line led to a 60-70% reduction of IFN-α responses following CpG-ODN (oligodeoxynucleotide) stimulation. Primary pDCs from PLSCR1-deficient mice produced lower amount of type 1 IFN than pDCs from the wild-type mice in response to CpG-ODN, herpes simplex virus and influenza A virus. Following CpG-A stimulation, there were much lower amounts of TLR9 in the early endosomes together with CpG-A in pDCs from PLSCR1-deficient mice. Our study demonstrates that PLSCR1 is a TLR9-interacting protein that plays an important role in pDC's type 1 IFN responses by regulating TLR9 trafficking to the endosomal compartment. PMID:22453241

  14. Regulation of Nuclear Positioning and Dynamics of the Silent Mating Type Loci by the Yeast Ku70/Ku80 Complex▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystricky, Kerstin; Van Attikum, Haico; Montiel, Maria-Dolores; Dion, Vincent; Gehlen, Lutz; Gasser, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    We have examined the hypothesis that the highly selective recombination of an active mating type locus (MAT) with either HMLα or HMRa is facilitated by the spatial positioning of relevant sequences within the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) nucleus. However, both position relative to the nuclear envelope (NE) and the subnuclear mobility of fluorescently tagged MAT, HML, or HMR loci are largely identical in haploid a and α cells. Irrespective of mating type, the expressed MAT locus is highly mobile within the nuclear lumen, while silent loci move less and are found preferentially near the NE. The perinuclear positions of HMR and HML are strongly compromised in strains lacking the Silent information regulator, Sir4. However, HMLα, unlike HMRa and most telomeres, shows increased NE association in a strain lacking yeast Ku70 (yKu70). Intriguingly, we find that the yKu complex is associated with HML and HMR sequences in a mating-type-specific manner. Its abundance decreases at the HMLα donor locus and increases transiently at MATa following DSB induction. Our data suggest that mating-type-specific binding of yKu to HMLα creates a local chromatin structure competent for recombination, which cooperates with the recombination enhancer to direct donor choice for gene conversion of the MATa locus. PMID:19047366

  15. Cancer-type regulation of MIG-6 expression by inhibitors of methylation and histone deacetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wen Zhang

    Full Text Available Epigenetic silencing is one of the mechanisms leading to inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene, either by DNA methylation or histone modification in a promoter regulatory region. Mitogen inducible gene 6 (MIG-6, mainly known as a negative feedback inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR family, is a tumor suppressor gene that is associated with many human cancers. To determine if MIG-6 is inactivated by epigenetic alteration, we identified a group of human lung cancer and melanoma cell lines in which its expression is either low or undetectable and studied the effects of methylation and of histone deacetylation on its expression. The DNA methyltransferase (DNMT inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC induced MIG-6 expression in melanoma cell lines but little in lung cancer lines. By contrast, the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA induced MIG-6 expression in lung cancer lines but had little effect in melanoma lines. However, the MIG-6 promoter itself did not appear to be directly affected by either methylation or histone deacetylation, indicating an indirect regulatory mechanism. Luciferase reporter assays revealed that a short segment of exon 1 in the MIG-6 gene is responsible for TSA response in the lung cancer cells; thus, the MIG-6 gene can be epigenetically silenced through an indirect mechanism without having a physical alteration in its promoter. Furthermore, our data also suggest that MIG-6 gene expression is differentially regulated in lung cancer and melanoma.

  16. Structure, function and regulation of versican: the most abundant type of proteoglycan in the extracellular matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fattah Sotoodehnejadnematalahi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main members of the large aggregating proteoglycans (PGs family is versican which is able to bind to hyaluronate. Versican is a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan and is a key ingredient of the extracellular matrix.  Due to its widespread expression in the body, versican is involved in cell adhesion, proliferation and migration. Induced expression of versican is often observed in tissues such as breast, brain, ovary, gastrointestinal tract, prostate, and melanoma. In addition, versican has important role in development. For example, versican conducts the embryonic cell migration which is essential in the formation of the heart and outlining the path for neural crest cell migration. Several studies in the past decade up to now have shown that versican produced by mononuclear cells has an important role in wound healing and blood vessel formation and suggested that it promotes tumorigenesis and angiogenesis. In this mini-review, we summarise and discuss the role of versican in healthy and pathological tissues and suggest the possible function of transcription factors and signalling pathway in regulation of versican.

  17. Up-regulation of phosphoinositide metabolism in tobacco cells constitutively expressing the human type I inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Imara Y.; Love, John; Heilmann, Ingo; Thompson, William F.; Boss, Wendy F.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of suppressing inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) in plants, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) cells were transformed with the human type I inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase (InsP 5-ptase), an enzyme which specifically hydrolyzes InsP(3). The transgenic cell lines showed a 12- to 25-fold increase in InsP 5-ptase activity in vitro and a 60% to 80% reduction in basal InsP(3) compared with wild-type cells. Stimulation with Mas-7, a synthetic analog of the wasp venom peptide mastoparan, resulted in an approximately 2-fold increase in InsP(3) in both wild-type and transgenic cells. However, even with stimulation, InsP(3) levels in the transgenic cells did not reach wild-type basal values, suggesting that InsP(3) signaling is compromised. Analysis of whole-cell lipids indicated that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdInsP(2)), the lipid precursor of InsP(3), was greatly reduced in the transgenic cells. In vitro assays of enzymes involved in PtdInsP(2) metabolism showed that the activity of the PtdInsP(2)-hydrolyzing enzyme phospholipase C was not significantly altered in the transgenic cells. In contrast, the activity of the plasma membrane PtdInsP 5 kinase was increased by approximately 3-fold in the transgenic cells. In vivo labeling studies revealed a greater incorporation of (32)P into PtdInsP(2) in the transgenic cells compared with the wild type, indicating that the rate of PtdInsP(2) synthesis was increased. These studies show that the constitutive expression of the human type I InsP 5-ptase in tobacco cells leads to an up-regulation of the phosphoinositide pathway and highlight the importance of PtdInsP(2) synthesis as a regulatory step in this system.

  18. Cholinergic Abnormalities, Endosomal Alterations and Up-Regulation of Nerve Growth Factor Signaling in Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabeza Carolina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotrophins and their receptors regulate several aspects of the developing and mature nervous system, including neuronal morphology and survival. Neurotrophin receptors are active in signaling endosomes, which are organelles that propagate neurotrophin signaling along neuronal processes. Defects in the Npc1 gene are associated with the accumulation of cholesterol and lipids in late endosomes and lysosomes, leading to neurodegeneration and Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease. The aim of this work was to assess whether the endosomal and lysosomal alterations observed in NPC disease disrupt neurotrophin signaling. As models, we used i NPC1-deficient mice to evaluate the central cholinergic septo-hippocampal pathway and its response to nerve growth factor (NGF after axotomy and ii PC12 cells treated with U18666A, a pharmacological cellular model of NPC, stimulated with NGF. Results NPC1-deficient cholinergic cells respond to NGF after axotomy and exhibit increased levels of choline acetyl transferase (ChAT, whose gene is under the control of NGF signaling, compared to wild type cholinergic neurons. This finding was correlated with increased ChAT and phosphorylated Akt in basal forebrain homogenates. In addition, we found that cholinergic neurons from NPC1-deficient mice had disrupted neuronal morphology, suggesting early signs of neurodegeneration. Consistently, PC12 cells treated with U18666A presented a clear NPC cellular phenotype with a prominent endocytic dysfunction that includes an increased size of TrkA-containing endosomes and reduced recycling of the receptor. This result correlates with increased sensitivity to NGF, and, in particular, with up-regulation of the Akt and PLC-γ signaling pathways, increased neurite extension, increased phosphorylation of tau protein and cell death when PC12 cells are differentiated and treated with U18666A. Conclusions Our results suggest that the NPC cellular phenotype causes neuronal

  19. Co-ordinated regulation of plasmacytoid dendritic cell surface receptors upon stimulation with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Philipp; Donhauser, Norbert; Pritschet, Kathrin; Ries, Moritz; Haupt, Sabrina; Kittan, Nicolai A; Korn, Klaus; Schmidt, Barbara

    2010-02-01

    Human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) are crucial for innate and adaptive immune responses against viral infections, mainly through production of type I interferons. Evidence is accumulating that PDC surface receptors play an important role in this process. To investigate the PDC phenotype in more detail, a chip-based expression analysis of surface receptors was combined with respective flow cytometry data obtained from fresh PDC, PDC exposed to interleukin-3 (IL-3) and/or herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). CD156b, CD229, CD305 and CD319 were newly identified on the surface of PDC, and CD180 was identified as a new intracellular antigen. After correction for multiple comparisons, a total of 33 receptors were found to be significantly regulated upon exposure to IL-3, HSV-1 or IL-3 and HSV-1. These were receptors involved in chemotaxis, antigen uptake, activation and maturation, migration, apoptosis, cytotoxicity and costimulation. Infectious and ultraviolet-inactivated HSV-1 did not differentially affect surface receptor regulation, consistent with the lack of productive virus infection in PDC, which was confirmed by HSV-1 real-time polymerase chain reaction and experiments involving autofluorescing HSV-1 particles. Viral entry was mediated at least in part by endocytosis. Time-course experiments provided evidence of a co-ordinated regulation of PDC surface markers, which play a specific role in different aspects of PDC function such as attraction to inflamed tissue, antigen recognition and subsequent migration to secondary lymphatic tissue. This knowledge can be used to investigate PDC surface receptor functions in interactions with other cells of the innate and adaptive immune system, particularly natural killer cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

  20. Notch-ligand expression by NALT dendritic cells regulates mucosal Th1- and Th2-type responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Tokuhara, Daisuke [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Immunobiology Vaccine Center, The Institute of Oral Health Research, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 (United States); Division of Mucosal Immunology, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Sekine, Shinichi [Department of Preventive Dentistry, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kataoka, Kosuke [Department of Preventive Dentistry, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8504 (Japan); Markham, Jonathan D.; Irwin, Allyson R.; Moon, Grace H.; Tokuhara, Yuka; Fujihashi, Keiko [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Immunobiology Vaccine Center, The Institute of Oral Health Research, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 (United States); Davydova, Julia; Yamamoto, Masato [Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Gilbert, Rebekah S. [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Immunobiology Vaccine Center, The Institute of Oral Health Research, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 (United States); Fujihashi, Kohtaro, E-mail: kohtarof@uab.edu [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Immunobiology Vaccine Center, The Institute of Oral Health Research, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007 (United States)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nasal Ad-FL effectively up-regulates APC function by CD11c{sup +} DCs in mucosal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nasal Ad-FL induces Notch ligand (L)-expressing CD11c{sup +} DCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch L-expressing DCs support the induction of Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses. -- Abstract: Our previous studies showed that an adenovirus (Ad) serotype 5 vector expressing Flt3 ligand (Ad-FL) as nasal adjuvant activates CD11c{sup +} dendritic cells (DCs) for the enhancement of antigen (Ag)-specific IgA antibody (Ab) responses. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism for activation of CD11c{sup +} DCs and their roles in induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-cell responses. Ad-FL activated CD11c{sup +} DCs expressed increased levels of the Notch ligand (L)-expression and specific mRNA. When CD11c{sup +} DCs from various mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues of mice given nasal OVA plus Ad-FL were cultured with CD4{sup +} T cells isolated from non-immunized OVA TCR-transgenic (OT II) mice, significantly increased levels of T cell proliferative responses were noted. Furthermore, Ad-FL activated DCs induced IFN-{gamma}, IL-2 and IL-4 producing CD4{sup +} T cells. Of importance, these APC functions by Ad-FL activated DCs were down-regulated by blocking Notch-Notch-L pathway. These results show that Ad-FL induces CD11c{sup +} DCs to the express Notch-ligands and these activated DCs regulate the induction of Ag-specific Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses.

  1. Performance Analysis of Fuzzy-PID Controller for Blood Glucose Regulation in Type-1 Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Jyoti; Rani, Asha; Singh, Vijander

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents Fuzzy-PID (FPID) control scheme for a blood glucose control of type 1 diabetic subjects. A new metaheuristic Cuckoo Search Algorithm (CSA) is utilized to optimize the gains of FPID controller. CSA provides fast convergence and is capable of handling global optimization of continuous nonlinear systems. The proposed controller is an amalgamation of fuzzy logic and optimization which may provide an efficient solution for complex problems like blood glucose control. The task is to maintain normal glucose levels in the shortest possible time with minimum insulin dose. The glucose control is achieved by tuning the PID (Proportional Integral Derivative) and FPID controller with the help of Genetic Algorithm and CSA for comparative analysis. The designed controllers are tested on Bergman minimal model to control the blood glucose level in the facets of parameter uncertainties, meal disturbances and sensor noise. The results reveal that the performance of CSA-FPID controller is superior as compared to other designed controllers.

  2. 17β-estradiol regulation of T-type calcium channels in gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunguang; Bosch, Martha A.; Rick, Elizabeth A.; Kelly, Martin J.; Ronnekleiv, Oline K.

    2009-01-01

    T-type calcium channels are responsible for generating low-threshold spikes that facilitate burst firing and neurotransmitter release in neurons. GnRH neurons exhibit burst firing, but the underlying conductances are not known. Previously, we have found that 17β-estradiol (E2) increases T-type channel expression and excitability of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus neurons. Therefore, we used ovariectomized oil- or E2-treated EGFP-GnRH mice to explore the expression and E2-regulation of T-type channels in GnRH neurons. Based on single cell RT-PCR and real-time PCR quantification of the T-type channel α1-subunits, we found that all three subunits were expressed in GnRH neurons with Cav3.3≥Cav3.2>Cav3.1. The mRNA expression of the three subunits was increased with surge-inducing levels of E2 during the morning. During the afternoon, Cav3.3 mRNA expression remained elevated, whereas Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were decreased. The membrane estrogen receptor agonist STX increased the expression of Cav3.3, but not Cav3.2 in GnRH neurons. Whole-cell patch recordings in GnRH neurons revealed that E2 treatment significantly augmented T-type current density at both time-points, and increased the rebound excitation during the afternoon. Although E2 regulated the mRNA expression of all three subunits in GnRH neurons, the increased expression combined with the slower inactivation kinetics of the T-type current indicates that Cav3.3 may be the most important for bursting activity associated with the GnRH/LH surge. The E2-induced increase in mRNA expression, which depends in part on membrane-initiated signaling, leads to increased channel function and neuronal excitability, and could be a mechanism by which E2 facilitates burst firing and cyclic GnRH neurosecretion. PMID:19710308

  3. The yeast p5 type ATPase, spf1, regulates manganese transport into the endoplasmic reticulum.

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    Yifat Cohen

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a large, multifunctional and essential organelle. Despite intense research, the function of more than a third of ER proteins remains unknown even in the well-studied model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One such protein is Spf1, which is a highly conserved, ER localized, putative P-type ATPase. Deletion of SPF1 causes a wide variety of phenotypes including severe ER stress suggesting that this protein is essential for the normal function of the ER. The closest homologue of Spf1 is the vacuolar P-type ATPase Ypk9 that influences Mn(2+ homeostasis. However in vitro reconstitution assays with Spf1 have not yielded insight into its transport specificity. Here we took an in vivo approach to detect the direct and indirect effects of deleting SPF1. We found a specific reduction in the luminal concentration of Mn(2+ in ∆spf1 cells and an increase following it's overexpression. In agreement with the observed loss of luminal Mn(2+ we could observe concurrent reduction in many Mn(2+-related process in the ER lumen. Conversely, cytosolic Mn(2+-dependent processes were increased. Together, these data support a role for Spf1p in Mn(2+ transport in the cell. We also demonstrate that the human sequence homologue, ATP13A1, is a functionally conserved orthologue. Since ATP13A1 is highly expressed in developing neuronal tissues and in the brain, this should help in the study of Mn(2+-dependent neurological disorders.

  4. MiR-125b Regulates Primordial Follicle Assembly by Targeting Activin Receptor Type 2a in Neonatal Mouse Ovary.

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    Wang, Shufen; Liu, Jiali; Li, Xinqiang; Ji, Xiaowen; Zhang, Jianfang; Wang, Yue; Cui, Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The establishment of the primordial follicle pool is crucial for fertility in mammalian females, and the interruption of overall micro-RNA production byDicer1conditional knockout in the female reproductive system results in infertility. However, there are few reports about the functions of individual micro-RNA in regulating primordial follicle assembly. The present study aimed to investigate the function of miR-125b, which is conserved and preferentially expressed in mammalian ovary during primordial follicle assembly. Detection of miR-125b in the developing mouse ovaries by real-time PCR and in situ hybridization showed that it was highly expressed perinatally and specifically located in the ovarian somatic cells. MiR-125b overexpression blocked the process of primordial follicle assembly in cultured newborn mouse ovaries, while its knockdown promoted this process. Further studies showed that miR-125b regulated the activin/Smad2 signaling in neonatal mouse ovary by directly targeting the 3'-untranslated region of activin receptor type 2a (Acvr2a). Overexpression of miR-125b in neonatal mouse ovary suppressed theAcvr2aprotein level, attenuating activin/Smad2 signaling, while knockdown of miR-125b showed the opposite effects. In addition, recombinant human activin A (rh-ActA) down-regulated miR-125b in the neonatal mouse ovary. Overexpression of miR-125b attenuated the promoting effects of rh-ActA on primordial follicle assembly. Taken together, these data suggest that miR-125b blocks the process of primordial follicle assembly, and miR-125b may play this role by regulating the expression ofAcvr2ain the activin/Smad2 signaling pathway. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  5. Down regulation of NF-kappa B as a therapeutic strategy for type 1 diabetes: effect of flavonoids

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    Amin Ardestani

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB is a redox-sensitive transcription factor that plays a critical role in the regulation of a variety of genes important in cellular responses, including inflammation, innate immunity, growth, and cell death. There are growing evidences that activation of NF-κB by acute oxidative stress may be the critical signal initiating the cascade of events leading to β-cell death and type 1 diabetes. This activation results in an increase in inflammatory and immune responses and leads to an amplification of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO production which, in turn, ultimately leads to the destruction of the β-cells, hyperglycemia and the development of type 1 diabetes. The key role of NF-κB in controlling the expression of multiple inflammatory and immune genes involved in type 1 diabetes makes this factor as a central and favorable target for therapeutic intervention of this disease. Polyphenolic plant-derived flavonoids display characteristic inhibitory patterns toward the NF-κB signal transduction pathways. In various types of cells, flavonoids, as natural polyphenolic antioxidants, strongly block cytokine- or LPS-induced NF-κB activation, which is crucial for iNOS expression in β-cells. Recently, we have suggested that a number of flavonoids might exert protective effects on pancreatic β-cell and therefore this could be considered as potential therapeutic agents for type 1 diabetes. On the other hand, studies investigating cytokine-induced pancreatic β-cells death models of type 1 diabetes, have found that flavonoids are effective for type 1 diabetes at least partly through inhibition of NF-κB activation. The importance of NF-κB in β-cell inflammatory responses is underscored by the fact that blockade of NF-κB in in vitro and in vivo models, by means of flavonoids, may prevents β-cell destruction and type 1 diabetes. In view of their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant abilities and their

  6. Regulation of pulmonary surfactant synthesis in fetal rat type II alveolar epithelial cells by microRNA-26a.

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    Zhang, Xiao-Qun; Zhang, Pan; Yang, Yang; Qiu, Jie; Kan, Qin; Liang, Hong-Lu; Zhou, Xiao-Yu; Zhou, Xiao-Guang

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary surfactant, a unique developmentally regulated, phospholipid-rich lipoprotein, is synthesized by the type II epithelial cells (AECII) of the pulmonary alveolus, where it is stored in organelles termed lamellar bodies. The synthesis of pulmonary surfactant is under multifactorial control and is regulated by a number of hormones and factors, including glucocorticoids, prolactin, insulin, growth factors, estrogens, androgens, thyroid hormones, and catecholamines acting through beta-adrenergic receptors, and cAMP. While there is increasing evidence that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the regulation of almost every cellular and physiological process, the potential role of miRNAs in the regulation of pulmonary surfactant synthesis remains unknown. miRNA-26a (miR-26a) has been predicted to target SMAD1, one of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor downstream signaling proteins that plays a key role in differentiation of lung epithelial cells during lung development. In this study, we explored the regulation role of miR-26a in the synthesis of pulmonary surfactant. An adenoviral miR-26a overexpression vector was constructed and introduced into primary cultured fetal AECII. GFP fluorescence was observed to determinate the transfection efficiency and miR-26a levels were measured by RT-PCR. MTT was performed to analyze AECII viability. qRT-PCR and Western blotting were used to determine the mRNA and protein level of SMAD1 and surfactant-associated proteins. The results showed that miR-26a in fetal AECII was overexpressed after the transfection, and that the overexpression of miR-26a inhibited pulmonary surfactant synthesis in AECII. There was no significant change in cell proliferation. Our results further showed that overexpression of miR-26a reduced the SMAD1 expression both in mRNA and protein level in fetal AECII. These findings indicate that miR-26a regulates surfactant synthesis in fetal AECII through SMAD1.

  7. Inducer responses of BenM, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator from Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1

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    Craven, Sarah H.; Ezezika, Obidimma C.; Haddad, Sandra; Hall, Ruth A.; Momany, Cory; Neidle, Ellen L.; Georgia

    2009-06-25

    BenM and CatM control transcription of a complex regulon for aromatic compound degradation. These Acinetobacter baylyi paralogues belong to the largest family of prokaryotic transcriptional regulators, the LysR-type proteins. Whereas BenM activates transcription synergistically in response to two effectors, benzoate and cis,cis-muconate, CatM responds only to cis,cis-muconate. Here, site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine the physiological significance of an unexpected benzoate-binding pocket in BenM discovered during structural studies. Residues in BenM were changed to match those of CatM in this hydrophobic pocket. Two BenM residues, R160 and Y293, were found to mediate the response to benzoate. Additionally, alteration of these residues caused benzoate to inhibit activation by cis,cis-muconate, positioned in a separate primary effector-binding site of BenM. The location of the primary site, in an interdomain cleft, is conserved in diverse LysR-type regulators. To improve understanding of this important family, additional regulatory mutants were analysed. The atomic-level structures were characterized of the effector-binding domains of variants that do not require inducers for activation, CatM(R156H) and BenM(R156H,T157S). These structures clearly resemble those of the wild-type proteins in their activated muconate-bound complexes. Amino acid replacements that enable activation without effectors reside at protein interfaces that may impact transcription through effects on oligomerization.

  8. Plexin D1 determines body fat distribution by regulating the type V collagen microenvironment in visceral adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minchin, James E N; Dahlman, Ingrid; Harvey, Christopher J; Mejhert, Niklas; Singh, Manvendra K; Epstein, Jonathan A; Arner, Peter; Torres-Vázquez, Jesús; Rawls, John F

    2015-04-07

    Genome-wide association studies have implicated PLEXIN D1 (PLXND1) in body fat distribution and type 2 diabetes. However, a role for PLXND1 in regional adiposity and insulin resistance is unknown. Here we use in vivo imaging and genetic analysis in zebrafish to show that Plxnd1 regulates body fat distribution and insulin sensitivity. Plxnd1 deficiency in zebrafish induced hyperplastic morphology in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and reduced lipid storage. In contrast, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) growth and morphology were unaffected, resulting in altered body fat distribution and a reduced VAT:SAT ratio in zebrafish. A VAT-specific role for Plxnd1 appeared conserved in humans, as PLXND1 mRNA was positively associated with hypertrophic morphology in VAT, but not SAT. In zebrafish plxnd1 mutants, the effect on VAT morphology and body fat distribution was dependent on induction of the extracellular matrix protein collagen type V alpha 1 (col5a1). Furthermore, after high-fat feeding, zebrafish plxnd1 mutant VAT was resistant to expansion, and excess lipid was disproportionately deposited in SAT, leading to an even greater exacerbation of altered body fat distribution. Plxnd1-deficient zebrafish were protected from high-fat-diet-induced insulin resistance, and human VAT PLXND1 mRNA was positively associated with type 2 diabetes, suggesting a conserved role for PLXND1 in insulin sensitivity. Together, our findings identify Plxnd1 as a novel regulator of VAT growth, body fat distribution, and insulin sensitivity in both zebrafish and humans.

  9. Alteration of inflammatory cytokines, energy metabolic regulators, and muscle fiber type in the skeletal muscle of postweaning piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F; Li, Y; Tan, B; Wang, J; Duan, Y; Guo, Q; Liu, Y; Kong, X; Li, T; Tang, Y; Yin, Y

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to determine the alterations of inflammatory cytokines, energy metabolic regulators, and muscle fiber type in the LM of the piglets postweaning. Crossbred piglets (Landrace × Large White) weaned at 14 d age were randomly selected from 8 litters and slaughtered at 0 (W0), 1 (W1), 3 (W3), 5 (W5), or 7 (W7) days postweaning. The glycogen content, free glucose concentration, and enzyme activities, including ATPase (Na/K, Ca/Mg), creatine kinase, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), were detected in the skeletal muscle tissue. Concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and anti-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), were measured in serum. The mRNA abundance of the above cytokines, energy metabolic regulators, and muscle fiber type related genes were determined via real-time quantitative PCR analysis. The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) signaling was measured by Western blot analysis. Our results showed ATPase activities were lower on W7 d but LDH activity was higher on W3 d after weaning ( cytokines were reduced to a low point on W5 d after weaning. Additionally, the IL-6 mRNA abundance was upregulated during W3 to W7 d, but cytokine TNF-α was upregulated just on W7 d ( cytokines, which then stimulated the AMPKα and UCP involved in energy metabolism events, accompanied by significant alterations in muscle fiber type.

  10. Gene transcription and splicing of T-type channels are evolutionarily-conserved strategies for regulating channel expression and gating.

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    Adriano Senatore

    Full Text Available T-type calcium channels operate within tightly regulated biophysical constraints for supporting rhythmic firing in the brain, heart and secretory organs of invertebrates and vertebrates. The snail T-type gene, LCa(v3 from Lymnaea stagnalis, possesses alternative, tandem donor splice sites enabling a choice of a large exon 8b (201 aa or a short exon 25c (9 aa in cytoplasmic linkers, similar to mammalian homologs. Inclusion of optional 25c exons in the III-IV linker of T-type channels speeds up kinetics and causes hyperpolarizing shifts in both activation and steady-state inactivation of macroscopic currents. The abundant variant lacking exon 25c is the workhorse of embryonic Ca(v3 channels, whose high density and right-shifted activation and availability curves are expected to increase pace-making and allow the channels to contribute more significantly to cellular excitation in prenatal tissue. Presence of brain-enriched, optional exon 8b conserved with mammalian Ca(v3.1 and encompassing the proximal half of the I-II linker, imparts a ~50% reduction in total and surface-expressed LCa(v3 channel protein, which accounts for reduced whole-cell calcium currents of +8b variants in HEK cells. Evolutionarily conserved optional exons in cytoplasmic linkers of Ca(v3 channels regulate expression (exon 8b and a battery of biophysical properties (exon 25c for tuning specialized firing patterns in different tissues and throughout development.

  11. Expression of apoptosis-regulating genes in the rat prostate following botulinum toxin type a injection

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    Gorgal Tiago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Onabotulinumtoxin A (OnabotA injection has been investigated as a novel treatment for benign prostatic enlargement caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia. An OnabotA - induced volume reduction caused by sympathetic fibers impairment has been proposed as a potential mechanism of action. Our aim was to investigate the expression of apoptosis-regulating proteins in the rat prostate following OnabotA intraprostatic injection. Methods Adult Wistar rats were injected in the ventral lobes of the prostate with 10 U of OnabotA or saline. A set of OnabotA-injected animals was further treated with 0.5 mg/kg of phenylephrine (PHE subcutaneously daily. All animals were sacrificed after 1 week and had their prostates harvested. Immunohistochemical staining was performed for Bax, Bcl-xL and caspase-3 proteins and visualized by the avidin-biotin method. The optical density of the glandular cells was also determined, with measurement of differences between average optical densities for each group. Results Saline-treated animals showed intense epithelial staining for Bcl-xL and a faint labelling for both Bax and Caspase-3. OnabotA-treated rats showed a reduced epithelial staining of Bcl-xL and a consistently increased Bax and Caspase-3 staining when compared with saline-treated animals. PHE-treated animals showed a stronger Bcl-xL staining and reduced staining of both Bax and Caspase-3 when compared to the OnabotA group. Mean signal intensity measurements for each immunoreaction confirmed a significant decrease of the signal intensity for Bcl-xL and a significant increase of the signal intensity for Bax and Caspase 3 in OnabotA-injected animals when compared with the control group. In OnabotA+PHE treated animals mean signal intensity for Bcl-xL, Bax and Caspase 3 immunoreactions was identical to that of the control animals. Conclusions These results support the hypothesis that OnabotA activates apoptotic pathways in the rat prostate through a

  12. Oligomeric state regulated trafficking of human platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monillas, Elizabeth S; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Thévenin, Anastasia F; Bahnson, Brian J

    2015-05-01

    The intracellular enzyme platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II (PAFAH-II) hydrolyzes platelet-activating factor and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. PAFAH-II in its resting state is mainly cytoplasmic, and it responds to oxidative stress by becoming increasingly bound to endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes. Numerous studies have indicated that this enzyme is essential for protecting cells from oxidative stress induced apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the oxidative stress response by PAFAH-II has not been fully resolved. Here, changes to the oligomeric state of human PAFAH-II were investigated as a potential regulatory mechanism toward enzyme trafficking. Native PAGE analysis in vitro and photon counting histogram within live cells showed that PAFAH-II is both monomeric and dimeric. A Gly-2-Ala site-directed mutation of PAFAH-II demonstrated that the N-terminal myristoyl group is required for homodimerization. Additionally, the distribution of oligomeric PAFAH-II is distinct within the cell; homodimers of PAFAH-II were localized to the cytoplasm while monomers were associated to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We propose that the oligomeric state of PAFAH-II drives functional protein trafficking. PAFAH-II localization to the membrane is critical for substrate acquisition and effective oxidative stress protection. It is hypothesized that the balance between monomer and dimer serves as a regulatory mechanism of a PAFAH-II oxidative stress response.

  13. STING regulates intracellular DNA-mediated, type I interferon-dependent innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hiroki; Ma, Zhe; Barber, Glen N

    2009-10-08

    The innate immune system is critical for the early detection of invading pathogens and for initiating cellular host defence countermeasures, which include the production of type I interferon (IFN). However, little is known about how the innate immune system is galvanized to respond to DNA-based microbes. Here we show that STING (stimulator of interferon genes) is critical for the induction of IFN by non-CpG intracellular DNA species produced by various DNA pathogens after infection. Murine embryonic fibroblasts, as well as antigen presenting cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells (exposed to intracellular B-form DNA, the DNA virus herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) or bacteria Listeria monocytogenes), were found to require STING to initiate effective IFN production. Accordingly, Sting-knockout mice were susceptible to lethal infection after exposure to HSV-1. The importance of STING in facilitating DNA-mediated innate immune responses was further evident because cytotoxic T-cell responses induced by plasmid DNA vaccination were reduced in Sting-deficient animals. In the presence of intracellular DNA, STING relocalized with TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) from the endoplasmic reticulum to perinuclear vesicles containing the exocyst component Sec5 (also known as EXOC2). Collectively, our studies indicate that STING is essential for host defence against DNA pathogens such as HSV-1 and facilitates the adjuvant activity of DNA-based vaccines.

  14. Regulation of EGFR protein stability by the HECT-type ubiquitin ligase SMURF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Dipankar; Ahsan, Aarif; Helman, Abigail; Chen, Guoan; Hegde, Ashok; Gurjar, Susmita Ramanand; Zhao, Lili; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Beer, David G; Lawrence, Theodore S; Nyati, Mukesh K

    2011-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in a variety of epithelial tumors and is considered to be an important therapeutic target. Although gene amplification is responsible for EGFR overexpression in certain human malignancies including lung and head and neck cancers, additional molecular mechanisms are likely. Here, we report a novel interaction of EGFR with an HECT-type ubiquitin ligase SMURF2, which can ubiquitinate, but stabilize EGFR by protecting it from c-Cbl-mediated degradation. Conversely, small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of SMURF2 destabilized EGFR, induced an autophagic response and reduced the clonogenic survival of EGFR-expressing cancer cell lines, with minimal effects on EGFR-negative cancer cells, normal fibroblasts, and normal epithelial cells. UMSCC74B head and neck squamous cancer cells, which form aggressive tumors in nude mice, significantly lost in vivo tumor-forming ability on siRNA-mediated SMURF2 knockdown. Gene expression microarray data from 443 lung adenocarcinoma patients, and tissue microarray data from 67 such patients, showed a strong correlation of expression between EGFR and SMURF2 at the messenger RNA and protein levels, respectively. Our findings suggest that SMURF2-mediated protective ubiquitination of EGFR may be responsible for EGFR overexpression in certain tumors and support targeting SMURF2-EGFR interaction as a novel therapeutic approach in treating EGFR-addicted tumors.

  15. Regulation of EGFR Protein Stability by the HECT-type Ubiquitin Ligase SMURF2

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    Dipankar Ray

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is overexpressed in a variety of epithelial tumors and is considered to be an important therapeutic target. Although gene amplification is responsible for EGFR overexpression in certain human malignancies including lung and head and neck cancers, additional molecular mechanisms are likely. Here, we report a novel interaction of EGFR with an HECT-type ubiquitin ligase SMURF2, which can ubiquitinate, but stabilize EGFR by protecting it from c-Cbl-mediated degradation. Conversely, small interfering RNA (siRNA-mediated knockdown of SMURF2 destabilized EGFR, induced an autophagic response and reduced the clonogenic survival of EGFR-expressing cancer cell lines, with minimal effects on EGFR-negative cancer cells, normal fibroblasts, and normal epithelial cells. UMSCC74B head and neck squamous cancer cells, which form aggressive tumors in nudemice, significantly lost in vivo tumor-forming ability on siRNA-mediated SMURF2 knockdown. Gene expressionmicroarray data from 443 lung adenocarcinoma patients, and tissue microarray data from 67 such patients, showed a strong correlation of expression between EGFR and SMURF2 at the messenger RNA and protein levels, respectively. Our findings suggest that SMURF2-mediated protective ubiquitination of EGFR may be responsible for EGFR overexpression in certain tumors and support targeting SMURF2-EGFR interaction as a novel therapeutic approach in treating EGFR-addicted tumors.

  16. Dairy product intake in relation to glucose regulation indices and risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Struijk, E A; Heraclides, A; Witte, Daniel Rinse

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: A high intake of dairy has been linked to lower risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). The relationship between dairy intake and glucose metabolism is still not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between the intake of total dairy and dairy subgroups...... and T2D and measures of glucose metabolism. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 5953 Danish men and women aged 30-60 years without baseline diabetes or cardiovascular diseases were included in this prospective analysis. The dairy intake at baseline was categorised into low-fat dairy, full-fat dairy, milk...... and milk products, cheese and fermented dairy. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose (2hPG), HbA(1c), insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR) and beta-cell function (HOMA2-B) were considered at 5-year follow-up. In the maximally-adjusted model (demographics, lifestyle factors, dietary factors and waist...

  17. HpaA from Xanthomonas is a regulator of type III secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Christian; Kirchner, Oliver; Egler, Monique; Stuttmann, Johannes; Bonas, Ulla; Büttner, Daniela

    2008-07-01

    The Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria employs a type III secretion (T3S) system to inject effector proteins into the host cell cytoplasm. Efficient secretion of several effector proteins depends on the cytoplasmic global T3S chaperone HpaB. In this study, we show that HpaB interacts with the virulence factor HpaA, which is secreted by the T3S system and translocated into the plant cell. HpaA promotes secretion of pilus, translocon and effector proteins and therefore appears to be an important control protein of the T3S system. Protein-protein interaction studies and the analysis of HpaA deletion derivatives revealed that the C-terminal protein region, which contains a HpaB binding site, is crucial for the contribution of HpaA to T3S. Secretion of pilus and translocon proteins is not affected when HpaA is expressed as an N-terminal deletion derivative that lacks the secretion and translocation signal. Our data suggest that binding of HpaA to HpaB within the bacterial cell favours secretion of extracellular components of the secretion apparatus. Secretion of HpaA presumably liberates HpaB and thus promotes effector protein secretion after assembly of the T3S apparatus.

  18. [Effects of different nitrogen regulators on nitrogen transformation in different soil types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Tao; Xu, Jing; Sun, Zhi-Mei; Cui, Shao-Xiong; Wang, Xue

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory incubation experiments were conducted to compare the inhibitory effects of dicyandiamide (DCD) and 3,5-dimethylpyrazole (DMP) on nitrification in meadow-cinnamon soil and fluvo-aquic soil, the main soil types of North China Plain. The synergistic effect of DMP combined with urease inhibitor hydroquinone (HQ) on nitrogen transformation in fluvo-aquic soil was further studied. The results indicated that, in contrast to DCD, DMP had a stronger inhibitory effect on the nitrification in the two tested soils. In comparison with the treatment without any inhibitor, the soil NH(4+)-N content in the treatment with DMP increased significantly by 149.5%-387.2% at the peak of nitrogen transformation stage, and the soil NO(3-)-N content reduced by 22.3%-55.3%. The inhibitory effects of DCD and DMP in fluvo-aquic soil were both stronger than in meadow-cinnamon soil. In addition, the application of DMP combined with HQ had a significantly synergistic effect on soil nitrogen transformation.

  19. Regulation of cell wall-bound invertase in pepper leaves by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria type three effectors.

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    Sophia Sonnewald

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv possess a type 3 secretion system (T3SS to deliver effector proteins into its Solanaceous host plants. These proteins are involved in suppression of plant defense and in reprogramming of plant metabolism to favour bacterial propagation. There is increasing evidence that hexoses contribute to defense responses. They act as substrates for metabolic processes and as metabolic semaphores to regulate gene expression. Especially an increase in the apoplastic hexose-to-sucrose ratio has been suggested to strengthen plant defense. This shift is brought about by the activity of cell wall-bound invertase (cw-Inv. We examined the possibility that Xcv may employ type 3 effector (T3E proteins to suppress cw-Inv activity during infection. Indeed, pepper leaves infected with a T3SS-deficient Xcv strain showed a higher level of cw-Inv mRNA and enzyme activity relative to Xcv wild type infected leaves. Higher cw-Inv activity was paralleled by an increase in hexoses and mRNA abundance for the pathogenesis-related gene PRQ. These results suggest that Xcv suppresses cw-Inv activity in a T3SS-dependent manner, most likely to prevent sugar-mediated defense signals. To identify Xcv T3Es that regulate cw-Inv activity, a screen was performed with eighteen Xcv strains, each deficient in an individual T3E. Seven Xcv T3E deletion strains caused a significant change in cw-Inv activity compared to Xcv wild type. Among them, Xcv lacking the xopB gene (Xcv ΔxopB caused the most prominent increase in cw-Inv activity. Deletion of xopB increased the mRNA abundance of PRQ in Xcv ΔxopB-infected pepper leaves, but not of Pti5 and Acre31, two PAMP-triggered immunity markers. Inducible expression of XopB in transgenic tobacco inhibited Xcv-mediated induction of cw-Inv activity observed in wild type plants and resulted in severe developmental phenotypes. Together, these data suggest that XopB interferes with cw-Inv activity in planta to

  20. Spouses' attempts to regulate day-to-day dietary adherence among patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Franks, Melissa M; Rook, Karen S; Iida, Masumi; Hemphill, Rachel C; Salem, James K

    2013-10-01

    To investigate daily dietary adherence and diabetes-specific distress among older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as a function of spouses' diet-related support and diet-related control (persuasion and pressure) and whether these daily processes differ among couples who do and do not appraise responsibility for managing T2DM as shared. End-of-day diaries were completed by 126 couples in which one partner had T2DM (patient) and the other did not (spouse). Using electronic diary methods, each partner independently recorded data for 24 consecutive days (patients recorded their day's dietary adherence and diabetes-specific distress; spouses recorded their day's involvement in patients' dietary management). To assess dietary adherence, patients reported the extent to which they followed dietary recommendations that day with items from the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Measure. To assess diabetes-specific distress, patients reported the extent to which they worried about diabetes that day using items from the Problem Areas in Diabetes (PAID) scale. Multilevel modeling revealed that, relative to the prior day, spouses' diet-related support was associated with increases in patients' adherence whereas diet-related persuasion and pressure were associated with decreases in adherence; spouses' pressure was associated with increases in patients' diabetes-specific distress. When partners appraised responsibility for managing T2DM as shared, support was associated with decreases in diabetes-specific distress; pressure was associated with decreases in adherence. Our findings offer insight into partners' day-to-day disease-related interactions and identify those that are likely to be beneficial versus detrimental for patients' physical and psychological health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Metformin regulates glycemic homeostasis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an NO donor

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    Ivan Sergeevich Kuznetsov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the influence of metformin on nitric oxide bioavailability in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM regarding glycemic homeostasis, and to investigate a correlation between metformin dosage and NO levels in vivo.Materials and Methods. Two groups – primary and control – were assembled for the clinical section of this study. Patients with newly diagnosed T2DM on metformin therapy were included to the primary group, while drug-naïve T2DM patients were enrolled as control subjects. Glycemic parameters and NO bioavailability was tested in both groups prior to and after the follow-up period. Experimental section was dedicated to the elucidation of potential dose-dependent effects of metformin on NO bioavailability. Mice were intraperitoneally infused with metformin at 0.5; 1.1; 5.6 mg per subject. Tissue detection of NO was performed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DETC iron complexes to form mononitrosyl iron compounds (MIC with paramagnetic properties. Control rodents were intraperitoneally infused with metformin without spin trapping.Results. We found nitrite and methaemoglobin (a marker for NO bioavailability to increase in parallel along with glycemic compensation in the primary but not control group. In vivo rodent models showed linear correlation between accumulation of DETC/MIC and dose of metformin, as well as formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes, known as endogenous NO transporters.Conclusion. Our data suggests that metformin benefits glycemic homeostasis in T2DM as an NO donor via formation of dinitrosyl iron complexes.

  2. Galectin-1 is expressed in early-type neural progenitor cells and down-regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imaizumi Yoichi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the adult mammalian brain, neural stem cells (NSCs proliferate in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and generate new neurons throughout life. A multimodal protein, Galectin-1, is expressed in neural progenitor cells (NPCs and implicated in the proliferation of the NPCs in the DG. However, little is known about its detailed expression profile in the NPCs and functions in adult neurogenesis in the DG. Results Our immunohistochemical and morphological analysis showed that Galectin-1 was expressed in the type 1 and 2a cells, which are putative NSCs, in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the adult mouse DG. To study Galectin-1's function in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, we made galectin-1 knock-out mice on the C57BL6 background and characterized the effects on neurogenesis. In the SGZ of the galectin-1 knock-out mice, increased numbers of type 1 cells, DCX-positive immature progenitors, and NeuN-positive newborn neurons were observed. Using triple-labeling immunohistochemistry and morphological analyses, we found that the proliferation of the type-1 cells was increased in the SGZ of the galectin-1 knock-out mice, and we propose that this proliferation is the mechanism for the net increase in the adult neurogenesis in these knock-out mice DG. Conclusions Galectin-1 is expressed in the neural stem cells and down-regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus.

  3. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 channel regulates diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and leptin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjung; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Hun; Patel, Payal R; Hu, Xiaodi; Lee, Yongjin; Azuma, Yoshihiro; Wang, Hsun-Fan; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Shafiq, Umber; Kwon, Jung Yeon; Lee, Hyong Joo; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jason K

    2015-08-01

    Insulin resistance is a major characteristic of obesity and type 2 diabetes, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Recent studies have shown a metabolic role of capsaicin that may be mediated via the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel. In this study, TRPV1 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice (as controls) were fed a high-fat diet (HFD), and metabolic studies were performed to measure insulin and leptin action. The TRPV1 KO mice became more obese than the WT mice after HFD, partly attributed to altered energy balance and leptin resistance in the KO mice. The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp experiment showed that the TRPV1 KO mice were more insulin resistant after HFD because of the ∼40% reduction in glucose metabolism in the white and brown adipose tissue, compared with that in the WT mice. Leptin treatment failed to suppress food intake, and leptin-mediated hypothalamic signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 activity was blunted in the TRPV1 KO mice. We also found that the TRPV1 KO mice were more obese and insulin resistant than the WT mice at 9 mo of age. Taken together, these results indicate that lacking TRPV1 exacerbates the obesity and insulin resistance associated with an HFD and aging, and our findings further suggest that TRPV1 has a major role in regulating glucose metabolism and hypothalamic leptin's effects in obesity. © FASEB.

  4. Drug and cell type-specific regulation of genes with different classes of estrogen receptor beta-selective agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasan Paruthiyil

    Full Text Available Estrogens produce biological effects by interacting with two estrogen receptors, ERalpha and ERbeta. Drugs that selectively target ERalpha or ERbeta might be safer for conditions that have been traditionally treated with non-selective estrogens. Several synthetic and natural ERbeta-selective compounds have been identified. One class of ERbeta-selective agonists is represented by ERB-041 (WAY-202041 which binds to ERbeta much greater than ERalpha. A second class of ERbeta-selective agonists derived from plants include MF101, nyasol and liquiritigenin that bind similarly to both ERs, but only activate transcription with ERbeta. Diarylpropionitrile represents a third class of ERbeta-selective compounds because its selectivity is due to a combination of greater binding to ERbeta and transcriptional activity. However, it is unclear if these three classes of ERbeta-selective compounds produce similar biological activities. The goals of these studies were to determine the relative ERbeta selectivity and pattern of gene expression of these three classes of ERbeta-selective compounds compared to estradiol (E(2, which is a non-selective ER agonist. U2OS cells stably transfected with ERalpha or ERbeta were treated with E(2 or the ERbeta-selective compounds for 6 h. Microarray data demonstrated that ERB-041, MF101 and liquiritigenin were the most ERbeta-selective agonists compared to estradiol, followed by nyasol and then diarylpropionitrile. FRET analysis showed that all compounds induced a similar conformation of ERbeta, which is consistent with the finding that most genes regulated by the ERbeta-selective compounds were similar to each other and E(2. However, there were some classes of genes differentially regulated by the ERbeta agonists and E(2. Two ERbeta-selective compounds, MF101 and liquiritigenin had cell type-specific effects as they regulated different genes in HeLa, Caco-2 and Ishikawa cell lines expressing ERbeta. Our gene profiling studies

  5. Mechanism for Muscarinic Inhibitory Regulation of the L-type Ca2 + Current in Cardiac Ventricular Myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋彬; 杨向军; 惠杰; 蒋廷波; 宋建平; 刘志华

    2004-01-01

    @@ Objective The autonomic nervous system plays a key role in regulating cardiac function by modifying heart rate, contractility and impulse. The parasympathetic neurotransmitter acetyl-choline and muscarinic agonist carbachol (Cch) inhibit excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac ventricular myocytes. Muscarinic agonists suppress adenylyl cyclase (AC) acitivity and,by reducing activation of the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)cascade, inhibit the L-type Ca2+ current (ICa(L) ). They also increase the content of cGMP by stimulating guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity. The role of nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP in muscarinic inhibition has undergone considerable scrutiny. The role of the NO/cGMP pathway in the inhibition of ICa(L) by Cch was examined in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes.

  6. Proteomic analysis reveals down-regulation of surfactant protein B in murine type II pneumocytes infected with influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebaabetswe, Lemme P; Haick, Anoria K; Gritsenko, Marina A; Fillmore, Thomas L; Chu, Rosalie K; Purvine, Samuel O; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Matzke, Melissa M; Smith, Richard D; Waters, Katrina M; Metz, Thomas O; Miura, Tanya A

    2015-09-01

    Infection of type II alveolar epithelial (ATII) cells by influenza A viruses (IAV) correlates with severe respiratory disease in humans and mice. To understand pathogenic mechanisms during IAV infection of ATII cells, murine ATII cells were cultured to maintain a differentiated phenotype, infected with IAV-PR8, which causes severe lung pathology in mice, and proteomics analyses were performed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. PR8 infection increased levels of proteins involved in interferon signaling, antigen presentation, and cytoskeleton regulation. Proteins involved in mitochondrial membrane permeability, energy metabolism, and chromatin formation had reduced levels in PR8-infected cells. Phenotypic markers of ATII cells in vivo were identified, confirming the differentiation status of the cultures. Surfactant protein B had decreased levels in PR8-infected cells, which was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. Analysis of ATII cell protein profiles will elucidate cellular processes in IAV pathogenesis, which may provide insight into potential therapies to modulate disease severity.

  7. Splice variants of the CaV1.3 L-type calcium channel regulate dendritic spine morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanika, Ruslan; Campiglio, Marta; Pinggera, Alexandra; Lee, Amy; Striessnig, Jörg; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Obermair, Gerald J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic compartments of glutamatergic synapses in the brain. Their number and shape are subject to change in synaptic plasticity and neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders and Parkinson’s disease. The L-type calcium channel CaV1.3 constitutes an important calcium entry pathway implicated in the regulation of spine morphology. Here we investigated the importance of full-length CaV1.3L and two C-terminally truncated splice variants (CaV1.342A and CaV1.343S) and their modulation by densin-180 and shank1b for the morphology of dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons. Live-cell immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy of epitope-tagged CaV1.3L revealed its localization at the base-, neck-, and head-region of dendritic spines. Expression of the short splice variants or deletion of the C-terminal PDZ-binding motif in CaV1.3L induced aberrant dendritic spine elongation. Similar morphological alterations were induced by co-expression of densin-180 or shank1b with CaV1.3L and correlated with increased CaV1.3 currents and dendritic calcium signals in transfected neurons. Together, our findings suggest a key role of CaV1.3 in regulating dendritic spine structure. Under physiological conditions it may contribute to the structural plasticity of glutamatergic synapses. Conversely, altered regulation of CaV1.3 channels may provide an important mechanism in the development of postsynaptic aberrations associated with neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27708393

  8. Unaltered Angiogenesis-Regulating Activities of Platelets in Mild Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus despite a Marked Platelet Hyperreactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xinyan; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Zhangsen

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with platelet dysfunction and impaired angiogenesis. Aim of the study is to investigate if platelet dysfunction might hamper platelet angiogenic activities in T2DM patients. Sixteen T2DM patients and gender/age-matched non-diabetic controls were studied. Flow cytometry and endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC) tube formation on matrigel were used to assess platelet reactivity and angiogenic activity, respectively. Thrombin receptor PAR1-activating peptide (PAR1-AP) induced higher platelet P-selectin expression, and evoked more rapid and intense platelet annexin V binding in T2DM patients, seen as a more rapid increase of annexin V+ platelets (24.3±6.4% vs 12.6±3.8% in control at 2 min) and a higher elevation (30.9±5.1% vs 24.3±3.0% at 8 min). However, PAR1-AP and PAR4-AP induced similar releases of angiogenic regulators from platelets, and both stimuli evoked platelet release of platelet angiogenic regulators to similar extents in T2DM and control subjects. Thus, PAR1-stimulated platelet releasate (PAR1-PR) and PAR4-PR similarly enhanced capillary-like network/tube formation of ECFCs, and the enhancements did not differ between T2DM and control subjects. Direct supplementation of platelets to ECFCs at the ratio of 1:200 enhanced ECFC tube formation even more markedly, leading to approximately 100% increases of the total branch points of ECFC tube formation, for which the enhancements were also similar between patients and controls. In conclusion, platelets from T2DM subjects are hyperreactive. Platelet activation induced by high doses of PAR1-AP, however, results in similar releases of angiogenic regulators in mild T2DM and control subjects. Platelets from T2DM and control subjects also demonstrate similar enhancements on ECFC angiogenic activities. PMID:27612088

  9. C-type natriuretic peptide regulates endochondral bone growth through p38 MAP kinase-dependent and – independent pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serra Rosa

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP has recently been identified as an important anabolic regulator of endochondral bone growth, but the molecular mechanisms mediating its effects are not completely understood. Results We demonstrate in a tibia organ culture system that pharmacological inhibition of p38 blocks the anabolic effects of CNP. We further show that CNP stimulates endochondral bone growth largely through expansion of the hypertrophic zone of the growth plate, while delaying mineralization. Both effects are reversed by p38 inhibition. We also performed Affymetrix microarray analyses on micro-dissected tibiae to identify CNP target genes. These studies confirmed that hypertrophic chondrocytes are the main targets of CNP signaling in the growth plate, since many more genes were regulated by CNP in this zone than in the others. While CNP receptors are expressed at similar levels in all three zones, cGMP-dependent kinases I and II, important transducers of CNP signaling, are expressed at much higher levels in hypertrophic cells than in other areas of the tibia, providing a potential explanation for the spatial distribution of CNP effects. In addition, our data show that CNP induces the expression of NPR3, a decoy receptor for natriuretic peptides, suggesting the existence of a feedback loop to limit CNP signaling. Finally, detailed analyses of our microarray data showed that CNP regulates numerous genes involved in BMP signaling and cell adhesion. Conclusion Our data identify novel target genes of CNP and demonstrate that the p38 pathway is a novel, essential mediator of CNP effects on endochondral bone growth, with potential implications for understanding and treatment of numerous skeletal diseases.

  10. A type-B response regulator drives the expression of the hydroxymethylbutenyl diphosphate synthase gene in periwinkle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginis, Olivia; Oudin, Audrey; Guirimand, Grégory; Chebbi, Mouadh; Courdavault, Vincent; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Papon, Nicolas; Crèche, Joel; Courtois, Martine

    2012-10-15

    In plant cytokinin (CK) signaling, type-B response regulators (RRs) act as major players in orchestrating the transcriptome changes in response to CK. However, their direct targets are poorly known. The identification of putative type-ARR1 motifs located within the promoter of the CK-responsive hydroxyl methyl butenyl diphosphate synthase (HDS) gene from the methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway prompted us to investigate the ability of a previously isolated periwinkle type-B RR (CrRR5) that presents high homologies with ARR1 to interact with the promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated that the CrRR5 DNA-binding domain binds specifically type-ARR1 motifs within the HDS promoter. We also established through yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) imaging the targeting of CrRR5 into cell nucleus in accordance with its putative function of transcription factor. In transient assays performed on periwinkle cells cultivated with CK, overexpression of the full-length CrRR5 or a truncated CrRR5 engineering a constitutive active form (35S:ΔDDK) did not affect the HDS promoter activity that reached a threshold. By contrast, in absence of CK, overexpression of CrRR5ΔDDK enhanced promoter activity up to the threshold level observed in cells grown with CK. Our results strongly suggest that CrRR5 directly transactivates the HDS promoter. CrRR5 is the first identified transcription factor mediating the CK signaling that targets a gene from the MEP pathway involved in isoprenoid metabolism. Moreover, CrRR5 could play a role in a regulatory mechanism controlling CK homeostasis in periwinkle cells.

  11. Science Signaling Podcast for 24 January 2017: Tissue-specific regulation of L-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Johannes W; Navedo, Manuel F; VanHook, Annalisa M

    2017-01-24

    This Podcast features an interview with Johannes Hell and Manuel Navedo, senior authors of two Research Articles that appear in the 24 January 2017 issue of Science Signaling, about tissue-specific regulation of the L-type calcium channel CaV1.2. This channel is present in many tissues, including the heart, vasculature, and brain, and allows calcium to flow into cells when it is activated. Signaling through the β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) stimulates CaV1.2 activity in heart cells and neurons to accelerate heart rate and increase neuronal excitability, respectively. Using mouse models, Qian et al found that βAR-mediated enhancement of CaV1.2 activity in the brain required phosphorylation of Ser(1928), whereas βAR-mediated enhancement of CaV1.2 activity in the heart did not require phosphorylation of this residue. In a related study, Nystoriak et al demonstrated that phosphorylation of Ser(1928) in arterial myocytes was required for vasoconstriction during acute hyperglycemia and in diabetic mice. These findings demonstrate tissue-specific differences in CaV1.2 regulation and suggest that it may be possible to design therapies to target this channel in specific tissues.Listen to Podcast. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Differential regulation of oxytocin receptor in various adipose tissue depots and skeletal muscle types in obese Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdosechova, L; Krskova, K; Olszanecki, R; Zorad, S

    2015-07-01

    Multifunctional peptide oxytocin currently undergoes intensive research due to its proposed anti-obesity properties. Until now, little is known about regulation of oxytocin receptor in metabolically active tissues in obesity. The aim of the present study was to measure expression of oxytocin receptor upon obese phenotype with respect to the variety among adipose tissue and skeletal muscles with distinct anatomical localisation. Total homogenates were prepared from epididymal, retroperitoneal and inguinal adipose tissues as well as quadriceps and soleus muscle from lean and obese Zucker rats. Oxytocin receptor protein was determined by immunoblot. Interestingly, elevated oxytocin receptor was observed in epididymal adipose tissue of obese rats in contrast to its downregulation in subcutaneous and no change in retroperitoneal fat. In lean animals, oxytocin receptor protein was expressed at similar levels in all adipose depots. This uniformity was not observed in the case of skeletal muscle in which fibre type composition seems to be determinant of oxytocin receptor expression. Quadriceps muscle with the predominance of glycolytic fibres exhibits higher oxytocin receptor expression than almost exclusively oxidative soleus muscle. Oxytocin receptor protein levels were decreased in both skeletal muscles analysed upon obese phenotype. The present work demonstrates that even under identical endocrine circumstances, oxytocin receptor is differentially regulated in adipose tissue of obese rats depending on fat depot localisation. These results also imply which tissues may be preferentially targeted by oxytocin treatment in metabolic disease.

  13. Exercise-induced regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in the skeletal muscle of subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Bergdahl, Andreas; Schjerling, Peter; Qvortrup, Klaus; Koskinen, Satu O; Dela, Flemming

    2014-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMP) play a critical role during vascular remodelling, in both health and disease. Impaired MMP regulation is associated with many diabetes-related complications. This study examined whether exercise-induced regulation of MMPs is maintained in the skeletal muscle of patients with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Subjects [12 T2DM, 9 healthy control subjects (CON)] underwent 8 weeks of physical training. Messenger RNA (mRNA) was measured at baseline, during and after 8 weeks of training. Protein was measured pre- and post-training. At baseline, there were no effects of diabetes on MMP or TIMP mRNA or protein. mRNA and protein response to training was similar in both groups, except active MMP-2 protein was elevated post training in T2DM only. Our results indicate that exercise-induced stimulation of MMPs is preserved in skeletal muscle of patients with T2DM. This early stage of diabetes may provide an opportunity for intervention and prevention of complications. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Modeling CaMKII-mediated regulation of L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in the heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Greenstein

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-contraction coupling (ECC in the cardiac myocyte is mediated by a number of highly integrated mechanisms of intracellular Ca2+ transport. Voltage- and Ca2+-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (LCCs allow for Ca2+ entry into the myocyte, which then binds to nearby ryanodine receptors (RyRs and triggers Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a process known as Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. The highly coordinated Ca2+-mediated interaction between LCCs and RyRs is further regulated by the cardiac isoform of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII. Because CaMKII targets and modulates the function of many ECC proteins, elucidation of its role in ECC and integrative cellular function is challenging and much insight has been gained through the use of detailed computational models. Multiscale models that can both reconstruct the detailed nature of local signaling events within the cardiac dyad and predict their functional consequences at the level of the whole cell have played an important role in advancing our understanding of CaMKII function in ECC. Here, we review experimentally based models of CaMKII function with a focus on LCC and RyR regulation, and the mechanistic insights that have been gained through their application.

  15. Receptor-Type Guanylyl Cyclase at 76C (Gyc76C) Regulates De Novo Lumen Formation during Drosophila Tracheal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Unisha

    2016-01-01

    Lumen formation and maintenance are important for the development and function of essential organs such as the lung, kidney and vasculature. In the Drosophila embryonic trachea, lumena form de novo to connect the different tracheal branches into an interconnected network of tubes. Here, we identify a novel role for the receptor type guanylyl cyclase at 76C (Gyc76C) in de novo lumen formation in the Drosophila trachea. We show that in embryos mutant for gyc76C or its downsteam effector protein kinase G (PKG) 1, tracheal lumena are disconnected. Dorsal trunk (DT) cells of gyc76C mutant embryos migrate to contact each other and complete the initial steps of lumen formation, such as the accumulation of E-cadherin (E-cad) and formation of an actin track at the site of lumen formation. However, the actin track and E-cad contact site of gyc76C mutant embryos did not mature to become a new lumen and DT lumena did not fuse. We also observed failure of the luminal protein Vermiform to be secreted into the site of new lumen formation in gyc76C mutant trachea. These DT lumen formation defects were accompanied by altered localization of the Arf-like 3 GTPase (Arl3), a known regulator of vesicle-vesicle and vesicle-membrane fusion. In addition to the DT lumen defect, lumena of gyc76C mutant terminal cells were shorter compared to wild-type cells. These studies show that Gyc76C and downstream PKG-dependent signaling regulate de novo lumen formation in the tracheal DT and terminal cells, most likely by affecting Arl3-mediated luminal secretion. PMID:27642749

  16. Up-regulation of Nrf2 is involved in FGF21-mediated fenofibrate protection against type 1 diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanli; Zhang, Jingjing; Guo, Weiying; Li, Fengsheng; Sun, Weixia; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Chi; Lu, Xuemian; Tan, Yi; Feng, Wenke; Fu, Yaowen; Liu, Gilbert C; Xu, Zhonggao; Cai, Lu

    2016-04-01

    The lipid lowering medication, fenofibrate (FF), is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARα) agonist, possessing beneficial effects for type 2 diabetic nephropathy (DN). We investigated whether FF can prevent the development of type 1 DN, and the underlying mechanisms. Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin in C57BL/6J mice. Mice were treated with oral gavage of FF at 100mg/kg every other day for 3 and 6 months. Diabetes-induced renal oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, lipid and collagen accumulation, and renal dysfunction were accompanied by significant decrease in PI3K, Akt, and GSK-3β phosphorylation as well as an increase in the nuclear accumulation of Fyn [a negative regulator of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)]. All these adverse effects were significantly attenuated by FF treatment. FF also significantly increased fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) expression and enhanced Nrf2 function in diabetic and non-diabetic kidneys. Moreover, FF-induced amelioration of diabetic renal damage, including the stimulation of PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β/Fyn pathway and the enhancement of Nrf2 function were abolished in FGF21-null mice, confirming the critical role of FGF21 in FF-induced renal protection. These results suggest for the first time that FF prevents the development of DN via up-regulating FGF21 and stimulating PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β/Fyn-mediated activation of the Nrf2 pathway.

  17. Levels of pro-apoptotic regulator Bad and anti-apoptotic regulator Bcl-xL determine the type of the apoptotic logic gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdał, Marta N; Hat, Beata; Kochańczyk, Marek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2013-07-24

    Apoptosis is a tightly regulated process: cellular survive-or-die decisions cannot be accidental and must be unambiguous. Since the suicide program may be initiated in response to numerous stress stimuli, signals transmitted through a number of checkpoints have to be eventually integrated. In order to analyze possible mechanisms of the integration of multiple pro-apoptotic signals, we constructed a simple model of the Bcl-2 family regulatory module. The module collects upstream signals and processes them into life-or-death decisions by employing interactions between proteins from three subgroups of the Bcl-2 family: pro-apoptotic multidomain effectors, pro-survival multidomain restrainers, and pro-apoptotic single domain BH3-only proteins. Although the model is based on ordinary differential equations (ODEs), it demonstrates that the Bcl-2 family module behaves akin to a Boolean logic gate of the type dependent on levels of BH3-only proteins (represented by Bad) and restrainers (represented by Bcl-xL). A low level of pro-apoptotic Bad or a high level of pro-survival Bcl-xL implies gate AND, which allows for the initiation of apoptosis only when two stress stimuli are simultaneously present: the rise of the p53 killer level and dephosphorylation of kinase Akt. In turn, a high level of Bad or a low level of Bcl-xL implies gate OR, for which any of these stimuli suffices for apoptosis. Our study sheds light on possible signal integration mechanisms in cells, and spans a bridge between modeling approaches based on ODEs and on Boolean logic. In the proposed scheme, logic gates switching results from the change of relative abundances of interacting proteins in response to signals and involves system bistability. Consequently, the regulatory system may process two analogous inputs into a digital survive-or-die decision.

  18. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroetz, Danielle N; Allen, Ronald M; Schaller, Matthew A; Cavallaro, Cleyton; Ito, Toshihiro; Kunkel, Steven L

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ) are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I) potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and alveolar Mϕ in the

  19. Type I Interferon Induced Epigenetic Regulation of Macrophages Suppresses Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Acute Respiratory Viral Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle N Kroetz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV is an airborne pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality each year. Macrophages (Mϕ are the first immune population to encounter IAV virions in the lungs and are required to control infection. In the present study, we explored the mechanism by which cytokine signaling regulates the phenotype and function of Mϕ via epigenetic modification of chromatin. We have found that type I interferon (IFN-I potently upregulates the lysine methyltransferase Setdb2 in murine and human Mϕ, and in turn Setdb2 regulates Mϕ-mediated immunity in response to IAV. The induction of Setdb2 by IFN-I was significantly impaired upon inhibition of the JAK-STAT signaling cascade, and chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that both STAT1 and interferon regulatory factor 7 bind upstream of the transcription start site to induce expression. The generation of Setdb2LacZ reporter mice revealed that IAV infection results in systemic upregulation of Setdb2 in myeloid cells. In the lungs, alveolar Mϕ expressed the highest level of Setdb2, with greater than 70% lacZ positive on day 4 post-infection. Silencing Setdb2 activity in Mϕ in vivo enhanced survival in lethal IAV infection. Enhanced host protection correlated with an amplified antiviral response and less obstruction to the airways. By tri-methylating H3K9, Setdb2 silenced the transcription of Mx1 and Isg15, antiviral effectors that inhibit IAV replication. Accordingly, a reduced viral load in knockout mice on day 8 post-infection was linked to elevated Isg15 and Mx1 transcript in the lungs. In addition, Setdb2 suppressed the expression of a large number of other genes with proinflammatory or immunomodulatory function. This included Ccl2, a chemokine that signals through CCR2 to regulate monocyte recruitment to infectious sites. Consistently, knockout mice produced more CCL2 upon IAV infection and this correlated with a 2-fold increase in the number of inflammatory monocytes and

  20. Implications of Spatiotemporal Regulation of Shigella flexneri Type Three Secretion Activity on Effector Functions: Think Globally, Act Locally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Valois, F.-X.; Pontier, Stéphanie M.

    2016-01-01

    Shigella spp. are Gram-negative bacterial pathogens that infect human colonic epithelia and cause bacterial dysentery. These bacteria express multiple copies of a syringe-like protein complex, the Type Three Secretion apparatus (T3SA), which is instrumental in the etiology of the disease. The T3SA triggers the plasma membrane (PM) engulfment of the bacteria by host cells during the initial entry process. It then enables bacteria to escape the resulting phagocytic-like vacuole. Freed bacteria form actin comets to move in the cytoplasm, which provokes bacterial collision with the inner leaflet of the PM. This phenomenon culminates in T3SA-dependent secondary uptake and vacuolar rupture in neighboring cells in a process akin to what is observed during entry and named cell-to-cell spread. The activity of the T3SA of Shigella flexneri was recently demonstrated to display an on/off regulation during the infection. While the T3SA is active when bacteria are in contact with PM-derived compartments, it switches to an inactive state when bacteria are released within the cytosol. These observations indicate that effector proteins transiting through the T3SA are therefore translocated in a highly time and space constrained fashion, likely impacting on their cellular distribution. Herein, we present what is currently known about the composition, the assembly and the regulation of the T3SA activity and discuss the consequences of the on/off regulation of T3SA on Shigella effector properties and functions during the infection. Specific examples that will be developed include the role of effectors IcsB and VirA in the escape from LC3/ATG8-positive vacuoles formed during cell-to-cell spread and of IpaJ protease activity against N-miristoylated proteins. The conservation of a similar regulation of T3SA activity in other pathogens such as Salmonella or Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli will also be briefly discussed. PMID:27014638

  1. Two-component systems are involved in the regulation of botulinum neurotoxin synthesis in Clostridium botulinum type A strain Hall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connan, Chloé; Brüggemann, Holger; Brueggemann, Holger; Mazuet, Christelle; Raffestin, Stéphanie; Cayet, Nadège; Popoff, Michel R

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum synthesizes a potent neurotoxin (BoNT) which associates with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs) to form complexes of various sizes. The bont and antp genes are clustered in two operons. In C. botulinum type A, bont/A and antp genes are expressed during the end of the exponential growth phase and the beginning of the stationary phase under the control of an alternative sigma factor encoded by botR/A, which is located between the two operons. In the genome of C. botulinum type A strain Hall, 30 gene pairs predicted to encode two-component systems (TCSs) and 9 orphan regulatory genes have been identified. Therefore, 34 Hall isogenic antisense strains on predicted regulatory genes (29 TCSs and 5 orphan regulatory genes) have been obtained by a mRNA antisense procedure. Two TCS isogenic antisense strains showed more rapid growth kinetics and reduced BoNT/A production than the control strain, as well as increased bacterial lysis and impairment of the bacterial cell wall structure. Three other TCS isogenic antisense strains induced a low level of BoNT/A and ANTP production. Interestingly, reduced expression of bont/A and antp genes was shown to be independent of botR/A. These results indicate that BoNT/A synthesis is under the control of a complex network of regulation including directly at least three TCSs.

  2. Two-component systems are involved in the regulation of botulinum neurotoxin synthesis in Clostridium botulinum type A strain Hall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloé Connan

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum synthesizes a potent neurotoxin (BoNT which associates with non-toxic proteins (ANTPs to form complexes of various sizes. The bont and antp genes are clustered in two operons. In C. botulinum type A, bont/A and antp genes are expressed during the end of the exponential growth phase and the beginning of the stationary phase under the control of an alternative sigma factor encoded by botR/A, which is located between the two operons. In the genome of C. botulinum type A strain Hall, 30 gene pairs predicted to encode two-component systems (TCSs and 9 orphan regulatory genes have been identified. Therefore, 34 Hall isogenic antisense strains on predicted regulatory genes (29 TCSs and 5 orphan regulatory genes have been obtained by a mRNA antisense procedure. Two TCS isogenic antisense strains showed more rapid growth kinetics and reduced BoNT/A production than the control strain, as well as increased bacterial lysis and impairment of the bacterial cell wall structure. Three other TCS isogenic antisense strains induced a low level of BoNT/A and ANTP production. Interestingly, reduced expression of bont/A and antp genes was shown to be independent of botR/A. These results indicate that BoNT/A synthesis is under the control of a complex network of regulation including directly at least three TCSs.

  3. Oxidant-NO dependent gene regulation in dogs with type I diabetes: impact on cardiac function and metabolism

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    Ojaimi Caroline

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms responsible for the cardiovascular mortality in type I diabetes (DM have not been defined completely. We have shown in conscious dogs with DM that: 1 baseline coronary blood flow (CBF was significantly decreased, 2 endothelium-dependent (ACh coronary vasodilation was impaired, and 3 reflex cholinergic NO-dependent coronary vasodilation was selectively depressed. The most likely mechanism responsible for the depressed reflex cholinergic NO-dependent coronary vasodilation was the decreased bioactivity of NO from the vascular endothelium. The goal of this study was to investigate changes in cardiac gene expression in a canine model of alloxan-induced type 1 diabetes. Methods Mongrel dogs were chronically instrumented and the dogs were divided into two groups: one normal and the other diabetic. In the diabetic group, the dogs were injected with alloxan monohydrate (40-60 mg/kg iv over 1 min. The global changes in cardiac gene expression in dogs with alloxan-induced diabetes were studied using Affymetrix Canine Array. Cardiac RNA was extracted from the control and DM (n = 4. Results The array data revealed that 797 genes were differentially expressed (P 2+ cycling genes (ryanodine receptor; SERCA2 Calcium ATPase, structural proteins (actin alpha. Of particular interests are genes involved in glutathione metabolism (glutathione peroxidase 1, glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase, which were markedly down regulated. Conclusion our findings suggest that type I diabetes might have a direct effect on the heart by impairing NO bioavailability through oxidative stress and perhaps lipid peroxidases.

  4. Roscovitine: a novel regulator of P/Q-type calcium channels and transmitter release in central neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhen; Chi, Ping; Bibb, James A; Ryan, Timothy A; Greengard, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Roscovitine is widely used for inhibition of cdk5, a cyclin-dependent kinase expressed predominantly in the brain. A novel function of roscovitine, i.e. an effect on Ca2+ channels and transmitter release in central neurons, was studied by whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings and time-lapse fluorescence imaging techniques. Extracellular application of roscovitine markedly enhanced the tail calcium current following repolarization from depolarized voltages. This effect was rapid, reversible and dose dependent. Roscovitine dramatically slowed the deactivation kinetics of calcium channels. The deactivation time constant was increased 3- to 6-fold, suggesting that roscovitine could prolong the channel open state and increase the calcium influx. The potentiation of tail calcium currents caused by roscovitine and by the L-channel activator Bay K 8644 was not occluded but additive. Roscovitine-induced potentiation of tail calcium currents was significantly blocked by the P/Q-channel blocker CgTx-MVIIC, indicating that the major target of roscovitine is the P/Q-type calcium channel. In mutant mice with targeted deletion of p35, a neuronal specific activator of cdk5, roscovitine regulated calcium currents in a manner similar to that observed in wild-type mice. Moreover, intracellular perfusion of roscovitine failed to modulate calcium currents. These results suggest that roscovitine acts on extracellular site(s) of calcium channels via a cdk5-independent mechanism. Roscovitine potentiated glutamate release at presynaptic terminals of cultured hippocampal neurons detected with the vesicle trafficking dye FM1–43, consistent with the positive effect of roscovitine on the P/Q-type calcium channel, the major mediator of action potential-evoked transmitter release in the mammalian CNS. PMID:11986366

  5. Cambodian Phellinus linteus inhibits experimental metastasis of melanoma cells in mice via regulation of urokinase type plasminogen activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Jung; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Lim, Eu-Soo; Ahn, Kyoo-Seok; Shim, Beom-Sang; Kim, Hyung-Min; Gong, Soo-Ja; Kim, Dae-Keun; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2005-01-01

    Phellinus linteus (PL) is a fungus mainly found in tropical America, Africa and Asian countries including Korea, Japan and China. PL has been traditionally used for the treatment of arthritis, liver damage and cancer. However, little was known on the biological activity and characterization of Phellinus species in Cambodia. Thus, in the present study, the anti-metastatic mechanism of aqueous extract of Cambodian Phellinus linteus (CPL) was evaluated. Cambodian mushroom was identified as a Phellinus species with 99% homology of Phellinus linteus by DNA sequence analysis and comparison by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. CPL did not exhibit any significant cytotoxicity against B16BL6 cells, invasive melanoma cells at 1 mg/ml. However, CPL inhibited platelet aggregation induced by B16BL6 cells and also disrupted the adhesion to gelatin and invasion of B16BL6 cells in a concentration dependent manner. Similarly, CPL dose-dependently inhibited the pulmonary metastatic colonies in C57BL/6 mice intravenously injected by B16BL6 cells up to 55.5% at a dose of 50 mg/kg compared with untreated control. CPL also down-regulated the expression of urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA), one of key proteins associated with invasion and metastasis of tumor cells in a concentration dependent fashion, while CPL didn't significantly affect the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2 (TIMP-2) by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Taken together, these findings indicate that Cambodian Phellinus linteus may inhibit metastasis at least partly via regulation of uPA associated with tumor cell induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA) and also suggest a further study for isolation of active ingredients and the involvement of adhesion molecule signaling pathway.

  6. Biochemical and Functional Insights into the Integrated Regulation of Innate Immune Cell Responses by Teleost Leukocyte Immune-Type Receptors

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    Chenjie Fei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Across vertebrates, innate immunity consists of a complex assortment of highly specialized cells capable of unleashing potent effector responses designed to destroy or mitigate foreign pathogens. The execution of various innate cellular behaviors such as phagocytosis, degranulation, or cell-mediated cytotoxicity are functionally indistinguishable when being performed by immune cells isolated from humans or teleost fishes; vertebrates that diverged from one another more than 450 million years ago. This suggests that vital components of the vertebrate innate defense machinery are conserved and investigating such processes in a range of model systems provides an important opportunity to identify fundamental features of vertebrate immunity. One characteristic that is highly conserved across vertebrate systems is that cellular immune responses are dependent on specialized immunoregulatory receptors that sense environmental stimuli and initiate intracellular cascades that can elicit appropriate effector responses. A wide variety of immunoregulatory receptor families have been extensively studied in mammals, and many have been identified as cell- and function-specific regulators of a range of innate responses. Although much less is known in fish, the growing database of genomic information has recently allowed for the identification of several immunoregulatory receptor gene families in teleosts. Many of these putative immunoregulatory receptors have yet to be assigned any specific role(s, and much of what is known has been based solely on structural and/or phylogenetic relationships with mammalian receptor families. As an attempt to address some of these shortcomings, this review will focus on our growing understanding of the functional roles played by specific members of the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus leukocyte immune-type receptors (IpLITRs, which appear to be important regulators of several innate cellular responses via classical as well

  7. The genome sequence of the most widely cultivated cacao type and its use to identify candidate genes regulating pod color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motamayor, Juan C; Mockaitis, Keithanne; Schmutz, Jeremy; Haiminen, Niina; Livingstone, Donald; Cornejo, Omar; Findley, Seth D; Zheng, Ping; Utro, Filippo; Royaert, Stefan; Saski, Christopher; Jenkins, Jerry; Podicheti, Ram; Zhao, Meixia; Scheffler, Brian E; Stack, Joseph C; Feltus, Frank A; Mustiga, Guiliana M; Amores, Freddy; Phillips, Wilbert; Marelli, Jean Philippe; May, Gregory D; Shapiro, Howard; Ma, Jianxin; Bustamante, Carlos D; Schnell, Raymond J; Main, Dorrie; Gilbert, Don; Parida, Laxmi; Kuhn, David N

    2013-06-03

    Theobroma cacao L. cultivar Matina 1-6 belongs to the most cultivated cacao type. The availability of its genome sequence and methods for identifying genes responsible for important cacao traits will aid cacao researchers and breeders. We describe the sequencing and assembly of the genome of Theobroma cacao L. cultivar Matina 1-6. The genome of the Matina 1-6 cultivar is 445 Mbp, which is significantly larger than a sequenced Criollo cultivar, and more typical of other cultivars. The chromosome-scale assembly, version 1.1, contains 711 scaffolds covering 346.0 Mbp, with a contig N50 of 84.4 kbp, a scaffold N50 of 34.4 Mbp, and an evidence-based gene set of 29,408 loci. Version 1.1 has 10x the scaffold N50 and 4x the contig N50 as Criollo, and includes 111 Mb more anchored sequence. The version 1.1 assembly has 4.4% gap sequence, while Criollo has 10.9%. Through a combination of haplotype, association mapping and gene expression analyses, we leverage this robust reference genome to identify a promising candidate gene responsible for pod color variation. We demonstrate that green/red pod color in cacao is likely regulated by the R2R3 MYB transcription factor TcMYB113, homologs of which determine pigmentation in Rosaceae, Solanaceae, and Brassicaceae. One SNP within the target site for a highly conserved trans-acting siRNA in dicots, found within TcMYB113, seems to affect transcript levels of this gene and therefore pod color variation. We report a high-quality sequence and annotation of Theobroma cacao L. and demonstrate its utility in identifying candidate genes regulating traits.

  8. EMMPRIN/CD147 up-regulates urokinase-type plasminogen activator: implications in oral tumor progression

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    Lescaille Géraldine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds An elevated level of EMMPRIN in cancer tissues have been correlated with tumor invasion in numerous cancers including oral cavity and larynx. Although EMMPRIN's effect has been generally attributed to its MMP inducing activity, we have previously demonstrated in breast cancer model that EMMPRIN can also enhance invasion by upregulating uPA. In this study, the role of EMMPRIN in regulating uPA and invasion was investigated in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC progression. Methods Precancerous and invasive oral tumoral tissues were used as well as the corresponding cell lines, DOK and SCC-9 respectively. The paracrine regulation of uPA by EMMPRIN was investigated by treating culture cells with EMMPRIN-enriched membrane vesicles. UPA expression was analyzed by qPCR and immunostaining and the consequence on the invasion capacity was studied using modified Boyden chamber assay, in the presence or absence of EMMPRIN blocking antibody, the uPA inhibitor amiloride or the MMP inhibitor marimastat. Results OSCC tumors were shown to express more EMMPRIN and uPA compared to dysplastic lesions. The corresponding cell models, SCC-9 and DOK cells, displayed similar expression pattern. In both cell types EMMPRIN upregulated the expression of uPA as well as that of MMP-2 and MMP-9. EMMPRIN treatment led to a significant increase in cell invasion both in the invasive SCC-9 and in the less invasive dysplastic DOK cells, in an MMP and uPA dependent manner. Conclusions Our results suggest that the upregulation of uPA contributes to EMMPRIN's effect in promoting oral tumor invasion.

  9. Actin cytoskeleton-dependent Rab GTPase-regulated angiotensin type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Sun, Yuansheng; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic regulation of the cellular trafficking of human angiotensin (Ang) type 1 receptor (AT1R) is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the cellular trafficking of AT1R-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (AT1R-EGFP) heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells by determining the change in donor lifetime (AT1R-EGFP) in the presence or absence of acceptor(s) using fluorescence lifetime imaging-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy. The average lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in our donor-alone samples was ~2.33 ns. The basal state lifetime was shortened slightly in the presence of Rab5 (2.01+/-0.10 ns) or Rab7 (2.11+/-0.11 ns) labeled with Alexa 555, as the acceptor fluorophore. A 5-min Ang II treatment markedly shortened the lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in the presence of Rab5-Alexa 555 (1.78+/-0.31 ns) but was affected minimally in the presence of Rab7-Alexa 555 (2.09+/-0.37 ns). A 30-min Ang II treatment further decreased the AT1R-EGFP lifetime in the presence of both Rab5- and Rab7-Alexa 555. Latrunculin A but not nocodazole pretreatment blocked the ability of Ang II to shorten the AT1R-EGFP lifetime. The occurrence of FRET between AT1R-EGFP (donor) and LAMP1-Alexa 555 (acceptor) with Ang II stimulation was impaired by photobleaching the acceptor. These studies demonstrate that Ang II-induced AT1R lysosomal degradation through its association with LAMP1 is regulated by Rab5/7 via mechanisms that are dependent on intact actin cytoskeletons.

  10. Muscarinic cholinergic regulation of L-type calcium channel in heart of embryonic mice at different developmental stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-min LIANG; Su-yun LI; Ling-ling LAI; Juergen HESCHELER; Ming TANG; Chang-jin LIU; Hong-yan LUO; Yuan-long SONG; Xin-wu HU; Jiao-ya XI; Lin-lin GAO; Bin NIE

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the muscarinic regulation of L-type calcium current (ICa-L) during development. METHODS:The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Ica- L in mice embryonic cardiomyocytes at different stages (the early developmental stage, EDS; the intermediate developmental stage, IDS; and the late developmental stage, LDS). Carbachol (CCh) was used to stimulate M-receptor in the embryonic cardiomyocytes of mice.RESULTS: The expression of Ica-L density did not change in different developmental stages (P>0.05). There was no difference in the sensitivity of ICa-L to CCh during development (P>0.05). This inhibitory action of CCh was mediated by inhibition of cyclic AMP since 8-bromo-cAMP completely reversed the muscarinic inhibitory action.IBMX, a non-selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE), reversed the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-Lcurrent by 71.2 %±9.2 % (n=8) and 11.3 %±2.5 % (n=9) in EDS and LDS respectively. However forskolin, an agonist of adenylyl cyclase (AC), reversed the action of CCh by 14.5 %±3.5 % (n=5) and 82.7 %±10.4 % (n=7) in EDS and LDS respectively. CONCLUSION: The inhibitory action of CCh on ICa-L current was mediated in different pathways: in EDS, the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the stimulation of PDE. However, in LDS, the regulation by M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the inactivation of AC.

  11. Muscarinic cholinergic regulation of L-type calcium channel in heart of embryonic mice at different developmental stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-minLIANG; MingTANG; Chang-jinLIU; Hong-yanLUO; Yuan-longSONG; Xin-wuHU; Jiao-yaXI; Lin-linGAO; BinNIE; Su-yunLI; Ling-lingLAI; JuergenHESCHELER

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the muscarinic regulation of L-type calcium current (ICa-L) during development. METHODS:The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used to record ICa-L in mice embryonic cardiomyocytes at different stages (the early developmental stage, EDS; the intermediate developmental stage, IDS; and the late developmental stage, LDS). Carbachol (CCh) was used to stimulate M-receptor in the embryonic cardiomyocytes of mice.RESULTS: The expression of lCa.L density did not change in different developmental stages (P>0.05). There was no difference in the sensitivity of ICa-L to CCh during development (P>0.05). This inhibitory action of CCh was mediated by inhibition of cyclic AMP since 8-bromo-cAMP completely reversed the muscarinic inhibitory action. IBMX, a non-selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE), reversed the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L current by 71.2 %±9.2% (n=8) and 11.3%±2.5% (n=9) in EDS and LDS respectively. However forskolin, an agonist of adenylyl cyclase (AC), reversed the action of CCh by 14.5%±3.5% (n=5) and 82.7%± 10.4% (n=7) in EDS and LDS respectively. CONCLUSION: The inhibitory action of CCh on lca.L current was mediated in different pathways: in EDS, the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the stimulation of PDE. However, in LDS, the regulation by M-receptor on lCa.L channel mainly depended on the inactivation of AC.

  12. Negative and positive mRNA splicing elements act competitively to regulate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vif gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exline, C M; Feng, Z; Stoltzfus, C M

    2008-04-01

    Over 40 different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mRNAs are produced by alternative splicing of the primary HIV-1 RNA transcripts. In addition, approximately half of the viral RNA remains unspliced and is used as genomic RNA and as mRNA for the Gag and Pol gene products. Regulation of splicing at the HIV-1 3' splice sites (3'ss) requires suboptimal polypyrimidine tracts, and positive or negative regulation occurs through the binding of cellular factors to cis-acting splicing regulatory elements. We have previously shown that splicing at HIV-1 3'ss A1, which produces single-spliced vif mRNA and promotes the inclusion of HIV exon 2 into both completely and incompletely spliced viral mRNAs, is increased by optimizing the 5' splice site (5'ss) downstream of exon 2 (5'ss D2). Here we show that the mutations within 5'ss D2 that are predicted to lower or increase the affinity of the 5'ss for U1 snRNP result in reduced or increased Vif expression, respectively. Splicing at 5'ss D2 was not necessary for the effect of 5'ss D2 on Vif expression. In addition, we have found that mutations of the GGGG motif proximal to the 5'ss D2 increase exon 2 inclusion and Vif expression. Finally, we report the presence of a novel exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) element within the 5'-proximal region of exon 2 that facilitates both exon inclusion and Vif expression. This ESE binds specifically to the cellular SR protein SRp75. Our results suggest that the 5'ss D2, the proximal GGGG silencer, and the ESE act competitively to determine the level of vif mRNA splicing and Vif expression. We propose that these positive and negative splicing elements act together to allow the accumulation of vif mRNA and unspliced HIV-1 mRNA, compatible with optimal virus replication.

  13. Impaired contextual fear extinction learning is associated with aberrant regulation of CHD-type chromatin remodeling factors

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    Alexandra eWille

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Successful attenuation of fearful memories is a cognitive process requiring initiation of highly coordinated transcription programs. Chromatin-modulating mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, including acetylation, are key regulators of these processes. However, knowledge concerning the role of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors (ChRFs being required for successful fear extinction is lacking. Underscoring the potential importance of these factors that alter histone-DNA contacts within nucleosomes are recent genome-wide association studies linking several ChRFs to various human cognitive and psychiatric disorders. To better understand the role of ChRFs in the brain, and since to date little is known about ChRF expression in the brain, we performed a comprehensive survey of expression levels of 24 ATP-dependent remodelers across different brain areas, and we identified several distinct high molecular weight complexes by chromatographic methods. We next aimed to gain novel insight into the potential regulation of ChRFs in different brain regions in association with normal and impaired fear extinction learning. To this end, we established the 129S1/SvImJ (S1 laboratory mouse strain as a model for compromised contextual fear extinction learning that can be rescued by dietary zinc restriction. Using this model along with genetically related but fear extinction-competent 129S6/SvEv (S6 mice as controls, we found that impaired fear extinction in S1 was associated with enhanced ventral hippocampal expression of CHD1 and reduced expression of CHD5 that was normalized following successful rescue of impaired fear extinction. Moreover, a select reduction in CHD3 expression was observed in the ventral hippocampus following successful rescue of fear extinction in S1 mice. Taken together, these data provide novel insight into the regulation of specific ChRFs following an impaired cognitive process and its rescue, and they suggest

  14. Epigenetic regulation of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in mesenteric arteries of aging hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jingwen; Zhang, Yanyan; Ye, Fang; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Yu; Zeng, Fanxing; Shi, Lijun

    2016-11-24

    Accumulating evidence has shown that epigenetic regulation is involved in hypertension and aging. L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs), the dominant channels in vascular myocytes, greatly contribute to arteriole contraction and blood pressure (BP) control. We investigated the dynamic changes and epigenetic regulation of LTCC in the mesenteric arteries of aging hypertensive rats. LTCC function was evaluated by using microvascular rings and whole-cell patch-clamp in the mesenteric arteries of male Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats at established hypertension (3 month old) and an aging stage (16 month old), respectively. The expression of the LTCC α1C subunit was determined in the rat mesenteric microcirculation. The expression of miR-328, which targets α1C mRNA, and the DNA methylation status at the promoter region of the α1C gene (CACNA1C) were also determined. In vitro experiments were performed to assess α1C expression after transfection of the miR-328 mimic into cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The results showed that hypertension superimposed with aging aggravated BP and vascular remodeling. Both LTCC function and expression were significantly increased in hypertensive arteries and downregulated with aging. miR-328 expression was inhibited in hypertension, but increased with aging. There was no significant difference in the mean DNA methylation of CACNA1C among groups, whereas methylation was enhanced in the hypertensive group at specific sites on a CpG island located upstream of the gene promoter. Overexpression of miR-328 inhibited the α1C level of cultured VSMCs within 48 h. The results of the present study indicate that the dysfunction of LTCCs may exert an epigenetic influence at both pre- and post-transcriptional levels during hypertension pathogenesis and aging progression. miR-328 negatively regulated LTCC expression in both aging and hypertension.Hypertension Research advance online publication, 24

  15. Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptors on Sim1-expressing neurons regulate energy expenditure in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Pierre; Bellocchio, Luigi; Guzmán-Quevedo, Omar; André, Caroline; Clark, Samantha; Elie, Melissa; Leste-Lasserre, Thierry; Gonzales, Delphine; Cannich, Astrid; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cota, Daniela

    2015-02-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) regulates energy balance by modulating not only food intake, but also energy expenditure (EE) and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis. To test the hypothesis that cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor in PVN neurons might control these processes, we used the Cre/loxP system to delete CB1 from single-minded 1 (Sim1) neurons, which account for the majority of PVN neurons. On standard chow, mice lacking CB1 receptor in Sim1 neurons (Sim1-CB1-knockout [KO]) had food intake, body weight, adiposity, glucose metabolism, and EE comparable with wild-type (WT) (Sim1-CB1-WT) littermates. However, maintenance on a high-fat diet revealed a gene-by-diet interaction whereby Sim1-CB1-KO mice had decreased adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity, and increased EE, whereas feeding behavior was similar to Sim1-CB1-WT mice. Additionally, high-fat diet-fed Sim1-CB1-KO mice had increased mRNA expression of the β3-adrenergic receptor, as well as of uncoupling protein-1, cytochrome-c oxidase subunit IV and mitochondrial transcription factor A in the brown adipose tissue, all molecular changes suggestive of increased thermogenesis. Pharmacological studies using β-blockers suggested that modulation of β-adrenergic transmission play an important role in determining EE changes observed in Sim1-CB1-KO. Finally, chemical sympathectomy abolished the obesity-resistant phenotype of Sim1-CB1-KO mice. Altogether, these findings reveal a diet-dependent dissociation in the CB1 receptor control of food intake and EE, likely mediated by the PVN, where CB1 receptors on Sim1-positive neurons do not impact food intake but hinder EE during dietary environmental challenges that promote body weight gain.

  16. Identifying Cell Type-Specific Transcription Factors by Integrating ChIP-seq and eQTL Data-Application to Monocyte Gene Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Mudra; Ramsey, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel computational approach to identify transcription factors (TFs) that are candidate regulators in a human cell type of interest. Our approach involves integrating cell type-specific expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data and TF data from chromatin immunoprecipitation-to-tag-sequencing (ChIP-seq) experiments in cell lines. To test the method, we used eQTL data from human monocytes in order to screen for TFs. Using a list of known monocyte-regulating TFs, we tested the hypothesis that the binding sites of cell type-specific TF regulators would be concentrated in the vicinity of monocyte eQTLs. For each of 397 ChIP-seq data sets, we obtained an enrichment ratio for the number of ChIP-seq peaks that are located within monocyte eQTLs. We ranked ChIP-seq data sets according to their statistical significances for eQTL overlap, and from this ranking, we observed that monocyte-regulating TFs are more highly ranked than would be expected by chance. We identified 27 TFs that had significant monocyte enrichment scores and mapped them into a protein interaction network. Our analysis uncovered two novel candidate monocyte-regulating TFs, BCLAF1 and SIN3A. Our approach is an efficient method to identify candidate TFs that can be used for any cell/tissue type for which eQTL data are available.

  17. The Cytoplasmic Domain of CD4 Is Sufficient for Its Down-Regulation from the Cell Surface by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef

    OpenAIRE

    S. J. Anderson; Lenburg, M; Landau, N R; Garcia, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef down-regulates surface expression of murine and human CD4 but not human CD8. We recently reported that the cytoplasmic domain of CD4 is required for its down-regulation by Nef. Using a chimeric molecule composed of the extracellular and transmembrane domains of human CD8 fused to the cytoplasmic domain of human CD4, we show here that the cytoplasmic domain of CD4 is sufficient for down-regulation by Nef. Since the cytoplasmic domain of CD4 is also the s...

  18. Arabidopsis HFR1 is a potential nuclear substrate regulated by the Xanthomonas type III effector XopD(Xcc8004).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Choon Meng; Li, Meng-Ying; Yang, Pei-Yun; Chang, Shu Heng; Ho, Yi-Ping; Lin, Hong; Deng, Wen-Ling; Yang, Jun-Yi

    2015-01-01

    XopDXcc8004, a type III effector of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) 8004, is considered a shorter version of the XopD, which lacks the N-terminal domain. To understand the functions of XopDXcc8004, in planta, a transgenic approach combined with inducible promoter to analyze the effects of XopDXcc8004 in Arabidopsis was done. Here, the expression of XopDXcc8004, in Arabidopsis elicited the accumulation of host defense-response genes. These molecular changes were dependent on salicylic acid and correlated with lesion-mimic phenotypes observed in XVE::XopDXcc8004 transgenic plants. Moreover, XopDXcc8004 was able to desumoylate HFR1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor involved in photomorphogenesis, through SUMO protease activity. Interestingly, the hfr1-201 mutant increased the expression of host defense-response genes and displayed a resistance phenotype to Xcc8004. These data suggest that HFR1 is involved in plant innate immunity and is potentially regulated by XopDXcc8004.

  19. Arabidopsis HFR1 Is a Potential Nuclear Substrate Regulated by the Xanthomonas Type III Effector XopDXcc8004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Choon Meng; Li, Meng-Ying; Yang, Pei-Yun; Chang, Shu Heng; Ho, Yi-Ping; Lin, Hong; Deng, Wen-Ling; Yang, Jun-Yi

    2015-01-01

    XopDXcc8004, a type III effector of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) 8004, is considered a shorter version of the XopD, which lacks the N-terminal domain. To understand the functions of XopDXcc8004, in planta, a transgenic approach combined with inducible promoter to analyze the effects of XopDXcc8004 in Arabidopsis was done. Here, the expression of XopDXcc8004, in Arabidopsis elicited the accumulation of host defense-response genes. These molecular changes were dependent on salicylic acid and correlated with lesion-mimic phenotypes observed in XVE::XopDXcc8004 transgenic plants. Moreover, XopDXcc8004 was able to desumoylate HFR1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor involved in photomorphogenesis, through SUMO protease activity. Interestingly, the hfr1-201 mutant increased the expression of host defense-response genes and displayed a resistance phenotype to Xcc8004. These data suggest that HFR1 is involved in plant innate immunity and is potentially regulated by XopDXcc8004. PMID:25647296

  20. Arabidopsis HFR1 is a potential nuclear substrate regulated by the Xanthomonas type III effector XopD(Xcc8004.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Meng Tan

    Full Text Available XopDXcc8004, a type III effector of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc 8004, is considered a shorter version of the XopD, which lacks the N-terminal domain. To understand the functions of XopDXcc8004, in planta, a transgenic approach combined with inducible promoter to analyze the effects of XopDXcc8004 in Arabidopsis was done. Here, the expression of XopDXcc8004, in Arabidopsis elicited the accumulation of host defense-response genes. These molecular changes were dependent on salicylic acid and correlated with lesion-mimic phenotypes observed in XVE::XopDXcc8004 transgenic plants. Moreover, XopDXcc8004 was able to desumoylate HFR1, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor involved in photomorphogenesis, through SUMO protease activity. Interestingly, the hfr1-201 mutant increased the expression of host defense-response genes and displayed a resistance phenotype to Xcc8004. These data suggest that HFR1 is involved in plant innate immunity and is potentially regulated by XopDXcc8004.

  1. Negative regulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor on free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fugao Zhu; Dawei Sun; Yanqing Wang; Rui Zhou; Junfeng Wen; Xiuming Wan; Yanjun Wang; Banghua Liu

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that muscarinic, and nicotinic receptors increase free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus via various channels following facial nerve injury. However, intracellular Ca2+ overload can trigger either necrotic or apoptotic cell death. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an important inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, exists in the facial nerve nucleus. It is assumed that GABA negatively regulates free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus. The present study investigated GABA type A (GABAA) receptor expression in the facial nerve nucleus in a rat model of facial nerve injury using immunohistochemistry and laser confocal microscopy, as well as the regulatory effects of GABAA receptor on nicotinic receptor response following facial nerve injury. Subunits α1, α3, α5, β1, β2, δ, and γ3 of GABAA receptors were expressed in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury. In addition, GABAA receptor expression significantly inhibited the increase in nicotinic receptor-mediated free Ca2+ levels in the facial nerve nucleus following facial nerve injury in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results suggest that GABAA receptors exhibit negative effects on nicotinic receptor responses following facial nerve injury.

  2. Independent Regulation of Type VI Secretion in Vibrio cholerae by TfoX and TfoY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C. Metzger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs are nanomachines used for interbacterial killing and intoxication of eukaryotes. Although Vibrio cholerae is a model organism for structural studies on T6SSs, the underlying regulatory network is less understood. A recent study showed that the T6SS is part of the natural competence regulon in V. cholerae and is activated by the regulator TfoX. Here, we identify the TfoX homolog TfoY as a second activator of the T6SS. Importantly, despite inducing the same T6SS core machinery, the overall regulons differ significantly for TfoX and TfoY. We show that TfoY does not contribute to competence induction. Instead, TfoY drives the production of T6SS-dependent and T6SS-independent toxins, together with an increased motility phenotype. Hence, we conclude that V. cholerae uses its sole T6SS in response to diverse cues and for distinctive outcomes: either to kill for the prey’s DNA, leading to horizontal gene transfer, or as part of a defensive escape reaction.

  3. Independent Regulation of Type VI Secretion in Vibrio cholerae by TfoX and TfoY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Lisa C; Stutzmann, Sandrine; Scrignari, Tiziana; Van der Henst, Charles; Matthey, Noémie; Blokesch, Melanie

    2016-05-03

    Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are nanomachines used for interbacterial killing and intoxication of eukaryotes. Although Vibrio cholerae is a model organism for structural studies on T6SSs, the underlying regulatory network is less understood. A recent study showed that the T6SS is part of the natural competence regulon in V. cholerae and is activated by the regulator TfoX. Here, we identify the TfoX homolog TfoY as a second activator of the T6SS. Importantly, despite inducing the same T6SS core machinery, the overall regulons differ significantly for TfoX and TfoY. We show that TfoY does not contribute to competence induction. Instead, TfoY drives the production of T6SS-dependent and T6SS-independent toxins, together with an increased motility phenotype. Hence, we conclude that V. cholerae uses its sole T6SS in response to diverse cues and for distinctive outcomes: either to kill for the prey's DNA, leading to horizontal gene transfer, or as part of a defensive escape reaction. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Receptor-type Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase β Regulates Met Phosphorylation and Function in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiru Xu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC is the sixth most common cancer and has a high rate of mortality. Emerging evidence indicates that hepatocyte growth factor receptor (or Met pathway plays a pivotal role in HNSCC metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy. Met function is dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation that is under direct control by receptor-type protein tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTP-β. We report here that RPTP-β expression is significantly downregulated in HNSCC cells derived from metastatic tumors compared to subject-matched cells from primary tumors. Knockdown of endogenous RPTP-β in HNSCC cells from primary tumor potentiated Met tyrosine phosphorylation, downstream mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathway activation, cell migration, and invasion. Conversely, restoration of RPTP-β expression in cells from matched metastatic tumor decreased Met tyrosine phosphorylation and downstream functions. Furthermore, we observed that six of eight HNSCC tumors had reduced levels of RPTP-β protein in comparison with normal oral tissues. Collectively, the results demonstrate the importance of RPTP-β in tumor biology of HNSCC through direct dephosphorylation of Met and regulation of downstream signal transduction pathways. Reduced RPTP-β levels, with or without Met overexpression, could promote Met activation in HNSCC tumors.

  5. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose regulation in overweight and obese children and adolescents living in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, R; Mitrovic, K; Milenkovic, T; Todorovic, S; Zdravkovic, D

    2012-11-01

    An increase in the prevalence of pediatric type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been reported by numerous studies in the United States during the past two decades. Available data from Europe are scarce, but also suggest the rising prevalence of this disease in overweight children. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of previously undiagnosed T2DM, impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in a clinic cohort of otherwise healthy overweight and obese Caucasian children and adolescents living in Serbia. The study group consisted of 301 subjects (176 girls, 125 boys) aged 5.2-18.9 years, with body mass index >90th percentile. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed in all subjects. Previously undiagnosed T2DM was discovered in 0.3% (n=1) and impaired glucose regulation in 15.9% (n=48) of the subjects. Isolated IFG was detected in 4.3% (n=13), isolated IGT in 8.3% (n=25) and combined IFG and IGT in 3.3% (n=10) of the subjects. Disturbances of glucose metabolism were present in a substantial number of the subjects, which emphasizes the need for prevention and treatment of childhood obesity.

  6. Cell type-restricted activity of hnRNPM promotes breast cancer metastasis via regulating alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yilin; Gao, Xin D; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Huang, Huilin; Tan, Haiyan; Ahn, Jaegyoon; Reinke, Lauren M; Peter, Marcus E; Feng, Yue; Gius, David; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Peng, Junmin; Xiao, Xinshu; Cheng, Chonghui

    2014-06-01

    Tumor metastasis remains the major cause of cancer-related death, but its molecular basis is still not well understood. Here we uncovered a splicing-mediated pathway that is essential for breast cancer metastasis. We show that the RNA-binding protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNPM) promotes breast cancer metastasis by activating the switch of alternative splicing that occurs during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Genome-wide deep sequencing analysis suggests that hnRNPM potentiates TGFβ signaling and identifies CD44 as a key downstream target of hnRNPM. hnRNPM ablation prevents TGFβ-induced EMT and inhibits breast cancer metastasis in mice, whereas enforced expression of the specific CD44 standard (CD44s) splice isoform overrides the loss of hnRNPM and permits EMT and metastasis. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that the ubiquitously expressed hnRNPM acts in a mesenchymal-specific manner to precisely control CD44 splice isoform switching during EMT. This restricted cell-type activity of hnRNPM is achieved by competition with ESRP1, an epithelial splicing regulator that binds to the same cis-regulatory RNA elements as hnRNPM and is repressed during EMT. Importantly, hnRNPM is associated with aggressive breast cancer and correlates with increased CD44s in patient specimens. These findings demonstrate a novel molecular mechanism through which tumor metastasis is endowed by the hnRNPM-mediated splicing program.

  7. Regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in ovarian cancer: a potential role for BRCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Fang-Fang; Li, Da; Cao, Chen; Li, Chun-Yan; Yang, Qing

    2013-12-09

    Both BRCA1 and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) play a critical role in ovarian cancer progression. However, the crosstalk between BRCA1 and AGTR1 signaling pathways remains largely unknown. BRCA1 promoter methylation was analyzed by bisulfite sequence using primers focused on the core promoter region. Expression levels of BRCA1 and AGTR1 were assessed by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Regression analysis was used to examine the possible relationship between BRCA1 and AGTR1 protein levels. Knockdown or overexpression of BRCA1 was achieved by using a lentiviral vector in 293 T cells and SKOV3 ovarian carcinoma cells, and primary non-mutated and BRCA1-mutated ovarian cancer cells. BRCA1 dysfunction (BRCA1 mutation or hypermethylated BRCA1 promoter) ovarian cancer showed decreased AGTR1 levels compared to normal tissue. In contrast, AGTR1 expression was increased in non-BRCA1-mutated ovarian cancer. Notably, BRCA1 activation was an effective way to induce AGTR1 expression in primary ovarian cancer cells and a positive correlation exists between BRCA1 and AGTR1 expression in human ovarian cancer specimens. These results indicate that BRCA1 may be a potential trigger involved in the transcriptional regulation of AGTR1 in the development of ovarian cancer.

  8. Structural basis of typhoid: Salmonella typhi type IVb pilin (PiLS) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishna, A.M.; Saxena, A.; Mok, H. Y.-K.; Swaminathan, K.

    2009-11-01

    The type IVb pilus of the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella typhi is a major adhesion factor during the entry of this pathogen into gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Its target of adhesion is a stretch of 10 residues from the first extracellular domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The crystal structure of the N-terminal 25 amino acid deleted S. typhi native PilS protein ({Delta}PilS), which makes the pilus, was determined at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method. Also, the structure of the complex of {Delta}PilS and a target CFTR peptide, determined at 1.8 {angstrom}, confirms that residues 113-117 (NKEER) of CFTR are involved in binding with the pilin protein and gives us insight on the amino acids that are essential for binding. Furthermore, we have also explored the role of a conserved disulfide bridge in pilus formation. The subunit structure and assembly architecture are crucial for understanding pilus functions and designing suitable therapeutics against typhoid.

  9. Structural basis of typhod: Salmonella typhi type IVb pilin (PilS) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishna, A.; Saxena, A; Mok, H; Swaminathan, K

    2009-01-01

    The type IVb pilus of the enteropathogenic bacteria Salmonella typhi is a major adhesion factor during the entry of this pathogen into gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Its target of adhesion is a stretch of 10 residues from the first extracellular domain of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The crystal structure of the N-terminal 25 amino acid deleted S. typhi native PilS protein (PilS), which makes the pilus, was determined at 1.9 A resolution by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method. Also, the structure of the complex of PilS and a target CFTR peptide, determined at 1.8 A, confirms that residues 113-117 (NKEER) of CFTR are involved in binding with the pilin protein and gives us insight on the amino acids that are essential for binding. Furthermore, we have also explored the role of a conserved disulfide bridge in pilus formation. The subunit structure and assembly architecture are crucial for understanding pilus functions and designing suitable therapeutics against typhoid.

  10. Type I and II positive allosteric modulators differentially modulate agonist-induced up-regulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-10-01

    Long-term treatment with nicotine or selective α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists increases the number of α7 nAChRs and this up-regulation may be involved in the mechanism underlying the sustained procognitive effect of these compounds. Here, we investigate the influence of type I and II α7 nAChR positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) on agonist-induced α7 nAChR up-regulation. We show that the type II PAMs, PNU-120596 (10 μM) or TQS (1 and 10 μM), inhibit up-regulation, as measured by protein levels, induced by the α7 nAChR agonist A-582941 (10 nM or 10 μM), in SH-EP1 cells stably expressing human α7 nAChR, whereas the type I PAMs AVL-3288 or NS1738 do not. Contrarily, neither type I nor II PAMs affect 10 μM nicotine-induced receptor up-regulation, suggesting that nicotine and A-582941 induce up-regulation through different mechanisms. We further show in vivo that 3 mg/kg PNU-120596 inhibits up-regulation of the α7 nAChR induced by 10 mg/kg A-582941, as measured by [(125)I]-bungarotoxin autoradiography, whereas 1 mg/kg AVL-3288 does not. Given that type II PAMs decrease desensitization of the receptor, whereas type I PAMs do not, these results suggest that receptor desensitization is involved in A-582941-induced up-regulation. Our results are the first to show an in vivo difference between type I and II α7 nAChR PAMs, and demonstrate an agonist-dependent effect of type II PAMs occurring on a much longer time scale than previously appreciated. Furthermore, our data suggest that nicotine and A-582941 induce up-regulation through different mechanisms, and that this confers differential sensitivity to the effects of α7 nAChR PAMs. These results may have implications for the clinical development of α7 nAChR PAMs.

  11. Heart specific up-regulation of genes for B-type and C-type natriuretic peptide receptors in diabetic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Christina; Bartels, E D; Nielsen, L B

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes may cause cardiomyopathy characterized by cardiac fibrosis. Recent studies of genetically modified mice have elucidated a role of the natriuretic peptides (NP), type-A and type-B (ANP and BNP), and their common receptor [natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR), type-A] in development of cardi...

  12. CCR2 and CXCR3 agonistic chemokines are differently expressed and regulated in human alveolar epithelial cells type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasse Antje

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The attraction of leukocytes from circulation to inflamed lungs depends on the activation of both the leukocytes and the resident cells within the lung. In this study we determined gene expression and secretion patterns for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2 and T-cell specific CXCR3 agonistic chemokines (Mig/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11 in TNF-α-, IFN-γ-, and IL-1β-stimulated human alveolar epithelial cells type II (AEC-II. AEC-II constitutively expressed high level of CCL2 mRNA in vitro and in situ , and released CCL2 protein in vitro . Treatment of AEC-II with proinflammatory cytokines up-regulated both CCL2 mRNA expression and release of immunoreactive CCL2, whereas IFN-γ had no effect on CCL2 release. In contrast, CXCR3 agonistic chemokines were not detected in freshly isolated AEC-II or in non-stimulated epithelial like cell line A549. IFN-γ, alone or in combination with IL-1β and TNF-α resulted in an increase in CXCL10, CXCL11, and CXCL9 mRNA expression and generation of CXCL10 protein by AEC-II or A549 cells. CXCL10 gene expression and secretion were induced in dose-dependent manner after cytokine-stimulation of AEC-II with an order of potency IFN-γ>>IL-1β ≥ TNF-α. Additionally, we localized the CCL2 and CXCL10 mRNAs in human lung tissue explants by in situ hybridization, and demonstrated the selective effects of cytokines and dexamethasone on CCL2 and CXCL10 expression. These data suggest that the regulation of the CCL2 and CXCL10 expression exhibit significant differences in their mechanisms, and also demonstrate that the alveolar epithelium contributes to the cytokine milieu of the lung, with the ability to respond to locally generated cytokines and to produce potent mediators of the local inflammatory response.

  13. Co-Regulated Pendrin and Aquaporin 5 Expression and Trafficking in Type-B Intercalated Cells under Potassium Depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Procino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We recently reported that aquaporin 5 (AQP5, a water channel never identified in the kidney before, co-localizes with pendrin at the apical membrane of type-B intercalated cells in the kidney cortex. Since co-expression of AQP5 and pendrin in the apical membrane domain is a common feature of several other epithelia such as cochlear and bronchial epithelial cells, we evaluated here whether this strict membrane association may reflect a co-regulation of the two proteins. To investigate this possibility, we analyzed AQP5 and pendrin expression and trafficking in mice under chronic K+ depletion, a condition that results in an increased ability of renal tubule to reabsorb bicarbonate, often leads to metabolic alkalosis and is known to strongly reduce pendrin expression. Methods: Mice were housed in metabolic cages and pair-fed with either a standard laboratory chow or a K+-deficient diet. AQP5 abundance was assessed by western blot in whole kidney homogenates and AQP5 and pendrin were localized by confocal microscopy in kidney sections from those mice. In addition, the short-term effect of changes in external pH on pendrin trafficking was evaluated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET in MDCK cells, and the functional activity of pendrin was tested in the presence and absence of AQP5 in HEK 293 Phoenix cells. Results: Chronic K+ depletion caused a strong reduction in pendrin and AQP5 expression. Moreover, both proteins shifted from the apical cell membrane to an intracellular compartment. An acute pH shift from 7.4 to 7.0 caused pendrin internalization from the plasma membrane. Conversely, a pH shift from 7.4 to 7.8 caused a significant increase in the cell surface expression of pendrin. Finally, pendrin ion transport activity was not affected by co-expression with AQP5. Conclusions: The co-regulation of pendrin and AQP5 membrane expression under chronic K+-deficiency indicates that these two molecules could cooperate as an

  14. Co-regulated pendrin and aquaporin 5 expression and trafficking in Type-B intercalated cells under potassium depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procino, Giuseppe; Milano, Serena; Tamma, Grazia; Dossena, Silvia; Barbieri, Claudia; Nicoletti, Maria Celeste; Ranieri, Marianna; Di Mise, Annarita; Nofziger, Charity; Svelto, Maria; Paulmichl, Markus; Valenti, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that aquaporin 5 (AQP5), a water channel never identified in the kidney before, co-localizes with pendrin at the apical membrane of type-B intercalated cells in the kidney cortex. Since co-expression of AQP5 and pendrin in the apical membrane domain is a common feature of several other epithelia such as cochlear and bronchial epithelial cells, we evaluated here whether this strict membrane association may reflect a co-regulation of the two proteins. To investigate this possibility, we analyzed AQP5 and pendrin expression and trafficking in mice under chronic K(+) depletion, a condition that results in an increased ability of renal tubule to reabsorb bicarbonate, often leads to metabolic alkalosis and is known to strongly reduce pendrin expression. Mice were housed in metabolic cages and pair-fed with either a standard laboratory chow or a K(+)-deficient diet. AQP5 abundance was assessed by western blot in whole kidney homogenates and AQP5 and pendrin were localized by confocal microscopy in kidney sections from those mice. In addition, the short-term effect of changes in external pH on pendrin trafficking was evaluated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in MDCK cells, and the functional activity of pendrin was tested in the presence and absence of AQP5 in HEK 293 Phoenix cells. Chronic K(+) depletion caused a strong reduction in pendrin and AQP5 expression. Moreover, both proteins shifted from the apical cell membrane to an intracellular compartment. An acute pH shift from 7.4 to 7.0 caused pendrin internalization from the plasma membrane. Conversely, a pH shift from 7.4 to 7.8 caused a significant increase in the cell surface expression of pendrin. Finally, pendrin ion transport activity was not affected by co-expression with AQP5. The co-regulation of pendrin and AQP5 membrane expression under chronic K(+)-deficiency indicates that these two molecules could cooperate as an osmosensor to rapidly detect and respond to alterations

  15. In vitro evaluation of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase reporter system in dynamic studies of transcriptional gene regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, C.-H. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); National Yang-Ming University Medical School and National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-E. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Deng, W.-P. [Institute of Biomedical Material, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Chen, J.-C. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Chen, F.-D. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China) and Institute of Radiological Sciences, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology Taichung 112, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: d49220009@ym.edu.tw

    2006-07-15

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) reporter system is being used to directly and indirectly monitor therapeutic gene expression, immune cell trafficking and protein-protein interactions in various living animals. However, the issues of HSV1-TK enzyme stability in living cells and whether this reporter system is optimal for dynamic studies of gene expression events in genetic imaging have not be addressed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the application of this reporter system in dynamic studies of transcriptional gene regulation. To achieve this purpose, we established two tetracycline-inducible murine sarcoma cell lines, tetracycline-turn-off HSV1-tk-expressing cell line (NG4TL4/tet-off-HSV1-tk) and tetracycline-turn-off Luc-expressing cell line (NG4TL4/tet-off-Luc), to create an artificially regulated gene expression model in vitro. The dynamic transcriptional events mediating a series of doxycycline (Dox) inductions were monitored by HSV1-TK or by the firefly luciferase reporter gene using HSV1-TK enzyme activity assay and luciferase assay, respectively. The results of dynamic gene expression studies showed that the luciferase gene is an optimal reporter gene for monitoring short-timescale, dynamic transcriptional events mediating a series of Dox inductions, whereas the HSV1-tk is not optimal to achieve this purpose. Furthermore, the enzyme half-life of HSV1-TK in NG4TL4 cells is about 35 h after cycloheximide-induced protein inhibition. On the other hand, the results of an efflux assay of [{sup 131}I] FIAU and [{sup 3}H] GCV revealed that the molecular probe phosphorylated by HSV1-TK can be trapped long term within HSV1-TK stably transformed cells. Therefore, a long half-life radionuclide is not suitable for dynamic gene expression studies. Based on these results, we suggest that the HSV1-TK reporter system is not optimal for monitoring short-timescale dynamic processes such as kinetic gene expression controlled by

  16. Negative and Positive mRNA Splicing Elements Act Competitively To Regulate Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vif Gene Expression▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exline, C. M.; Feng, Z.; Stoltzfus, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    Over 40 different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mRNAs are produced by alternative splicing of the primary HIV-1 RNA transcripts. In addition, approximately half of the viral RNA remains unspliced and is used as genomic RNA and as mRNA for the Gag and Pol gene products. Regulation of splicing at the HIV-1 3′ splice sites (3′ss) requires suboptimal polypyrimidine tracts, and positive or negative regulation occurs through the binding of cellular factors to cis-acting splicing regulatory elements. We have previously shown that splicing at HIV-1 3′ss A1, which produces single-spliced vif mRNA and promotes the inclusion of HIV exon 2 into both completely and incompletely spliced viral mRNAs, is increased by optimizing the 5′ splice site (5′ss) downstream of exon 2 (5′ss D2). Here we show that the mutations within 5′ss D2 that are predicted to lower or increase the affinity of the 5′ss for U1 snRNP result in reduced or increased Vif expression, respectively. Splicing at 5′ss D2 was not necessary for the effect of 5′ss D2 on Vif expression. In addition, we have found that mutations of the GGGG motif proximal to the 5′ss D2 increase exon 2 inclusion and Vif expression. Finally, we report the presence of a novel exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) element within the 5′-proximal region of exon 2 that facilitates both exon inclusion and Vif expression. This ESE binds specifically to the cellular SR protein SRp75. Our results suggest that the 5′ss D2, the proximal GGGG silencer, and the ESE act competitively to determine the level of vif mRNA splicing and Vif expression. We propose that these positive and negative splicing elements act together to allow the accumulation of vif mRNA and unspliced HIV-1 mRNA, compatible with optimal virus replication. PMID:18272582

  17. Regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 messenger RNA level in Y-79 retinoblastoma cells: potential implications for human stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Vamvakopoulos, N C; Sioutopoulou, T. O.; Mamuris, Z.; Marcoulatos, P.; Avgerinos, P. C.

    1996-01-01

    We report the regulation of type 1 receptor mRNA in Y-79 human retinoblastoma cells, grown in the absence or presence of pharmacological levels of phorbol esters, forskolin, glucocorticoids and their combinations. To control for inducibility and for assessing the sensitivity of the Y-79 system to glucocorticoids, corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA levels were measured in parallel. All treatments stimulated corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene expression relative to baseline....

  18. Biosynthesis of the antimicrobial cyclic lipopeptides nunamycin and nunapeptin by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain In5 is regulated by the LuxR-type transcriptional regulator NunF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2017-01-01

    spectrometry (LC-HRMS) showed that CLP biosynthesis is regulated by nunF. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of the NRPS genes catalyzing CLP production is strongly reduced when nunF is mutated indicating that nunF is part of the nun-nup regulon. Swarming and biofilm formation...

  19. Inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α regulate p75NTR expression in CNS neurons and astrocytes by distinct cell-type-specific signalling mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma J Friedman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The p75NTR (where NTR is neurotrophin receptor can mediate many distinct cellular functions, including cell survival and apoptosis, axonal growth and cell proliferation, depending on the cellular context. This multifunctional receptor is widely expressed in the CNS (central nervous system during development, but its expression is restricted in the adult brain. However, p75NTR is induced by a variety of pathophysiological insults, including seizures, lesions and degenerative disease. We have demonstrated previously that p75NTR is induced by seizures in neurons, where it induces apoptosis, and in astrocytes, where it may regulate proliferation. In the present study, we have investigated whether the inflammatory cytokines IL (interleukin-1β and TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor-α, that are commonly elevated in these pathological conditions, mediate the regulation of p75NTR in neurons and astrocytes. We have further analysed the signal transduction pathways by which these cytokines induce p75NTR expression in the different cell types, specifically investigating the roles of the NF-κB (nuclear factor κB and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. We have demonstrated that both cytokines regulate p75NTR expression; however, the mechanisms governing this regulation are cytokine- and cell-type specific. The distinct mechanisms of cytokine-mediated p75NTR regulation that we demonstrate in the present study may facilitate therapeutic intervention in regulation of this receptor in a cell-selective manner.

  20. Origin of the voltage dependence of G-protein regulation of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Chen, Yu-Hang; Bangaru, Saroja D; He, Linling; Abele, Kathryn; Tanabe, Shihori; Kozasa, Tohru; Yang, Jian

    2008-12-24

    G-protein (Gbetagamma)-mediated voltage-dependent inhibition of N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels contributes to presynaptic inhibition and short-term synaptic plasticity. The voltage dependence derives from the dissociation of Gbetagamma from the inhibited channels, but the underlying molecular and biophysical mechanisms remain largely unclear. In this study we investigated the role in this process of Ca(2+) channel beta subunit (Ca(v)beta) and a rigid alpha-helical structure between the alpha-interacting domain (AID), the primary Ca(v)beta docking site on the channel alpha(1) subunit, and the pore-lining IS6 segment. Gbetagamma inhibition of P/Q-type channels was reconstituted in giant inside-out membrane patches from Xenopus oocytes. Large populations of channels devoid of Ca(v)beta were produced by washing out a mutant Ca(v)beta with a reduced affinity for the AID. These beta-less channels were still inhibited by Gbetagamma, but without any voltage dependence, indicating that Ca(v)beta is indispensable for voltage-dependent Gbetagamma inhibition. A truncated Ca(v)beta containing only the AID-binding guanylate kinase (GK) domain could fully confer voltage dependence to Gbetagamma inhibition. Gbetagamma did not alter inactivation properties, and channels recovered from Gbetagamma inhibition exhibited the same activation property as un-inhibited channels, indicating that Gbetagamma does not dislodge Ca(v)beta from the inhibited channel. Furthermore, voltage-dependent Gbetagamma inhibition was abolished when the rigid alpha-helix between the AID and IS6 was disrupted by insertion of multiple glycines, which also eliminated Ca(v)beta regulation of channel gating, revealing a pivotal role of this rigid alpha-helix in both processes. These results suggest that depolarization-triggered movement of IS6, coupled to the subsequent conformational change of the Gbetagamma-binding pocket through a rigid alpha-helix induced partly by the Ca(v)beta GK domain, causes the

  1. Analysis of DNA binding and transcriptional activation by the LysR-type transcriptional regulator CbbR of Xanthobacter flavus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keulen, G; Ridder, ANJA; Dijkhuizen, L; Meijer, WG; Meijer, Wim G.

    2003-01-01

    The LysR-type transcriptional regulator CbbR controls the expression of the cbb and gap-pgk operons in Xanthobacter flavus, which encode the majority of the enzymes of the Calvin cycle required for autotrophic CO2 fixation. The cbb operon promoter of this chemoautotrophic bacterium contains three po

  2. Construct Validation of a Program to Increase Use of Self-Regulation for Physical Activity among Overweight and Obese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosa, R. Lingyak; Silfee, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have revealed that overweight adults with type 2 diabetes have low rates of physical activity and are resistant to change. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to use construct validation of intervention methods to examine the impact of a 4-week behavioral intervention on the use of self-regulation skills for physical…

  3. Regulation of the Type I-F CRISPR-Cas system by CRP-cAMP and GalM controls spacer acquisition and interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Adrian G; Chang, James T; Taylor, Corinda; Fineran, Peter C

    2015-07-13

    The CRISPR-Cas prokaryotic 'adaptive immune systems' represent a sophisticated defence strategy providing bacteria and archaea with protection from invading genetic elements, such as bacteriophages or plasmids. Despite intensive research into their mechanism and application, how CRISPR-Cas systems are regulated is less clear, and nothing is known about the regulation of Type I-F systems. We used Pectobacterium atrosepticum, a Gram-negative phytopathogen, to study CRISPR-Cas regulation, since it contains a single Type I-F system. The CRP-cAMP complex activated the cas operon, increasing the expression of the adaptation genes cas1 and cas2-3 in addition to the genes encoding the Csy surveillance complex. Mutation of crp or cyaA (encoding adenylate cyclase) resulted in reductions in both primed spacer acquisition and interference. Furthermore, we identified a galactose mutarotase, GalM, which reduced cas operon expression in a CRP- and CyaA-dependent manner. We propose that the Type I-F system senses metabolic changes, such as sugar availability, and regulates cas genes to initiate an appropriate defence response. Indeed, elevated glucose levels reduced cas expression in a CRP- and CyaA-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings highlight that a metabolite-sensing regulatory pathway controls expression of the Type I-F CRISPR-Cas system to modulate levels of adaptation and interference.

  4. REGULATION OF INSTANTANEOUS POWER OUTPUT VALUE IN MAGNETRON WITH CONTINUOUS GENERATION MODE (M-105-, M-112-TYPES BEING PART OF PLASMA TECHNOLOGICAL UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Bordusov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations pertaining to the possibility of regulating instantaneous power output  in a magnetron of M-105 (M-112-type by changing the capacity value of a capacitor in structure diagram for doubling voltage of high-voltage power supply on the basis of a step-up transformer operating in the saturation regime.

  5. Huntingtin-interacting protein 14 is a type 1 diabetes candidate protein regulating insulin secretion and beta-cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchtold, Lukas Adrian; Størling, Zenia Marian; Ortis, Fernanda; Lage, Kasper; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus; Bergholdt, Regine; Hald, Jacob; Brorsson, Caroline Anna; Eizirik, Decio Laks; Pociot, Flemming; Brunak, Søren; Størling, Joachim

    2011-09-13

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a complex disease characterized by the loss of insulin-secreting β-cells. Although the disease has a strong genetic component, and several loci are known to increase T1D susceptibility risk, only few causal genes have currently been identified. To identify disease-causing genes in T1D, we performed an in silico "phenome-interactome analysis" on a genome-wide linkage scan dataset. This method prioritizes candidates according to their physical interactions at the protein level with other proteins involved in diabetes. A total of 11 genes were predicted to be likely disease genes in T1D, including the INS gene. An unexpected top-scoring candidate gene was huntingtin-interacting protein (HIP)-14/ZDHHC17. Immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic sections demonstrated that HIP14 is almost exclusively expressed in insulin-positive cells in islets of Langerhans. RNAi knockdown experiments established that HIP14 is an antiapoptotic protein required for β-cell survival and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IFN-γ) that mediate β-cell dysfunction in T1D down-regulated HIP14 expression in insulin-secreting INS-1 cells and in isolated rat and human islets. Overexpression of HIP14 was associated with a decrease in IL-1β-induced NF-κB activity and protection against IL-1β-mediated apoptosis. Our study demonstrates that the current network biology approach is a valid method to identify genes of importance for T1D and may therefore embody the basis for more rational and targeted therapeutic approaches.

  6. High salt intake down-regulates colonic mineralocorticoid receptors, epithelial sodium channels and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lienhard

    Full Text Available Besides the kidneys, the gastrointestinal tract is the principal organ responsible for sodium homeostasis. For sodium transport across the cell membranes the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC is of pivotal relevance. The ENaC is mainly regulated by mineralocorticoid receptor mediated actions. The MR activation by endogenous 11β-hydroxy-glucocorticoids is modulated by the 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2. Here we present evidence for intestinal segment specific 11β-HSD2 expression and hypothesize that a high salt intake and/or uninephrectomy (UNX affects colonic 11β-HSD2, MR and ENaC expression. The 11β-HSD2 activity was measured by means of 3H-corticosterone conversion into 3H-11-dehydrocorticosterone in Sprague Dawley rats on a normal and high salt diet. The activity increased steadily from the ileum to the distal colon by a factor of about 3, an observation in line with the relevance of the distal colon for sodium handling. High salt intake diminished mRNA and protein of 11β-HSD2 by about 50% (p<0.001 and reduced the expression of the MR (p<0.01. The functionally relevant ENaC-β and ENaC-γ expression, a measure of mineralocorticoid action, diminished by more than 50% by high salt intake (p<0.001. The observed changes were present in rats with and without UNX. Thus, colonic epithelial cells appear to contribute to the protective armamentarium of the mammalian body against salt overload, a mechanism not modulated by UNX.

  7. Apigenin and naringenin regulate glucose and lipid metabolism, and ameliorate vascular dysfunction in type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Bei; Qin, Weiwei; Wu, Feihua; Wang, Shanshan; Pan, Cheng; Wang, Liying; Zeng, Biao; Ma, Shiping; Liang, Jingyu

    2016-02-15

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction is regarded as the initial step of vascular complications in diabetes mellitus. This study investigated the amelioration of apigenin and naringenin in type 2 diabetic (T2D) rats induced by high-fat diet and streptozotocin and explored the underlying mechanism. Apigenin or naringenin was intragastrically administered at 50 or 100mg/kg once a day for 6 weeks. Biochemical parameters including blood glucose, glycated serum protein, serum lipid, insulin, superoxide dismutase (SOD), malonaldehyde and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were measured. Vascular reactivity in isolated thoracic aortic rings was examined. Pathological features of the thoracic aorta were further observed through optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Lastly, we evaluated their effects on insulin resistance of palmitic acid (PA)-induced endothelial cells. Compared with diabetic control group, apigenin and naringenin significantly decreased the levels of blood glucose, serum lipid, malonaldehyde, ICAM-1 and insulin resistance index, increased SOD activity and improved impaired glucose tolerance. Apigenin and naringenin restored phenylephrine-mediated contractions and acetylcholine or insulin-induced relaxations in aortic tissues. Furthermore, pathological damage in the thoracic aorta of apigenin and naringenin groups was more remissive than diabetic control group. In vitro, apigenin and naringenin inhibited NF-κB activation and ICAM-1 mRNA expression in PA-treated endothelial cells and improved nitric oxide production in the presence of insulin. In conclusion, both apigenin and naringenin can ameliorate glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as endothelial dysfunction in T2D rats at least in part by down-regulating oxidative stress and inflammation. In general, apigenin showed greater potency than naringenin equivalent.

  8. Interactions between Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases and growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases regulate tracheal tube formation in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mili Jeon

    2012-04-01

    The respiratory (tracheal system of the Drosophila melanogaster larva is an intricate branched network of air-filled tubes. Its developmental logic is similar in some ways to that of the vertebrate vascular system. We previously described a unique embryonic tracheal tubulogenesis phenotype caused by loss of both of the Type III receptor tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs, Ptp4E and Ptp10D. In Ptp4E Ptp10D double mutants, the linear tubes in unicellular and terminal tracheal branches are converted into bubble-like cysts that incorporate apical cell surface markers. This tube geometry phenotype is modulated by changes in the activity or expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr tyrosine kinase (TK. Ptp10D physically interacts with Egfr. Here we demonstrate that the Ptp4E Ptp10D phenotype is the consequence of the loss of negative regulation by the RPTPs of three growth factor receptor TKs: Egfr, Breathless and Pvr. Reducing the activity of any of the three kinases by tracheal expression of dominant-negative mutants suppresses cyst formation. By competing dominant-negative and constitutively active kinase mutants against each other, we show that the three RTKs have partially interchangeable activities, so that increasing the activity of one kinase can compensate for the effects of reducing the activity of another. This implies that SH2-domain downstream effectors that are required for the phenotype are likely to be able to interact with phosphotyrosine sites on all three receptor TKs. We also show that the phenotype involves increases in signaling through the MAP kinase and Rho GTPase pathways.

  9. Cloning, expression and characterisation of a type II cystatin from Schistosoma japonicum, which could regulate macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Liu, Ju; Yue, Yuan; Chen, Wei; Song, Man; Zhan, Ximei; Wu, Zhongkai

    2014-11-01

    Cystatin play an important role in parasite immune evasion. It is involved in many immune responses processes regulations such as inhibiting antigen presentation, modifying cytokines production and macrophage polarization. In recent years, more and more cystatins were used in treating some inflammatory diseases such as asthma and inflammation bowel diseases; however, cystatins from Schistosoma japonicum were rarely studied. In the present study, we have cloned a cystatin from the adult stage of Schistosoma japonicum, named as SjCystatin, and its sequence shares conserved domains with other type II family cystatins. It was further verified by enzyme inhibition assays. SjCystatin retained its inhibitory activity under a wide range of pH values and temperatures, can maintain its inhibitory activity at pH 6.5-7.5 and 37 °C, respectively. Then, we investigated the effects of SjCystatin on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activated RAW264.7. Results showed that SjCystatin inhibit LPS-induced nitric oxide production in a dose-dependent manner. LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-6 production began to be inhibited at least 6 h after SjCystatin stimulation. SjCystatin significantly increased IL-10 production at 6 h after stimulation and its effect on IL-10 production diminished quickly. These results imply that SjCystatin can induce M2 macrophage polarization and can be expected to serve as a potential drug source for the medication of inflammatory disorders like other cystatins.

  10. Genome-wide comparative analysis of type-A Arabidopsis response regulator genes by overexpression studies re-veals their diverse roles and regulatory mechanisms in cytokinin signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Ren; Yan Liang; Yan Deng; Qingguo Chen; Jian Zhang; Xiaohui Yang; Jianru Zuo

    2009-01-01

    Cytokinin is a critical growth regulator for various aspects of plant growth and development. In Arabidopsis, cyto-kinin signaling is mediated by a two-component system-based phosphorelay that transmits a signal from the recep-tors, through histidine phosphotransfer proteins, to the downstream response regulators (ARRs). Of these ARRs, type-A ARR genes, whose transcription can be rapidly induced by cytokinin, act as negative regulators of cytokinin signaling. However, because of functional redundancy, the function of type-A ARR genes in plant growth and de-velopment is not well understood by analyzing loss-of-function mutants. In this study, we performed a comparative functional study on all ten type-A ARR genes by analyzing transgenic plants overexpressing these ARR genes fused to a MYC epitope tag. Overexpression of ARR genes results in a variety of cytokinin-associated phenotypes. Notably, overexpression of different ARR transgenes causes diverse phenotypes, even between phylogenetically closely-related gene pairs, such as within the ARR3-ARR4 and ARRS-ARR6 pairs. We found that the accumulation of a subset of ARR proteins (ARR3, ARR5, ARR7, ARR16 and ARR17; possibly ARR8 and ARR15) is increased by MGI32, a spe-cific proteasomal inhibitor, indicating that stability of these proteins is regulated by proteasomal degradation. More-over, similar to that of previously characterized ARR5, ARR6 and ARR7, stability of ARR16 and ARR17, possibly including ARR8 and ARRI5, is regulated by cytokinin. These results suggest that type-A ARR proteins are regulated by a combinatorial mechanism involving both the cytokinin and proteasome pathways, thereby executing distinctive functions in plant growth and development.

  11. From ingestion to colonization: the influence of the host environment on regulation of the LEE encoded type III secretion system in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P R Connolly

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC binds to host tissue and intimately attaches to intestinal cells using a dedicated type III secretion system (T3SS. This complex multi-protein organelle is encoded within a large pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE, which is subject to extensive regulatory control. Over the past 15 years we have gained a wealth of knowledge concerning how the LEE is regulated transcriptionally by specific, global and phage encoded regulators, but more recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of how specific signals, including host or microbiota derived metabolic products and various nutrient sources, can affect how the LEE encoded T3SS is regulated. In this review we discuss transcriptional regulation of the LEE in EHEC, focusing on how these physiologically relevant signals are sensed and how they affect the expression of this major virulence factor. The implications for understanding the disease process by specific regulatory mechanisms are also discussed.

  12. From ingestion to colonization: the influence of the host environment on regulation of the LEE encoded type III secretion system in enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, James P R; Finlay, B Brett; Roe, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) binds to host tissue and intimately attaches to intestinal cells using a dedicated type III secretion system (T3SS). This complex multi-protein organelle is encoded within a large pathogenicity island called the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), which is subject to extensive regulatory control. Over the past 15 years we have gained a wealth of knowledge concerning how the LEE is regulated transcriptionally by specific, global and phage encoded regulators. More recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of how specific signals, including host or microbiota derived metabolic products and various nutrient sources, can affect how the LEE-encoded T3SS is regulated. In this review we discuss regulation of the LEE, focusing on how these physiologically relevant signals are sensed and how they affect the expression of this major virulence factor. The implications for understanding the disease process by specific regulatory mechanisms are also discussed.

  13. Individual differences and day-to-day fluctuations in perceived self-regulation associated with daily adherence in late adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Cynthia A; Wiebe, Deborah J; Suchy, Yana; Hughes, Amy E; Anderson, Jessica H; Godbey, Elida I; Butner, Jonathan; Tucker, Christy; Franchow, Emilie I; Pihlaskari, Andrea K; King, Pamela S; Murray, Mary A; White, Perrin C

    2014-10-01

    To examine whether individual differences and intraindividual (within-person day-to-day) fluctuations in late adolescents' self-regulation were associated with daily adherence to the type 1 diabetes regimen.   110 school seniors (M age = 17.78 years) and their mothers assessed adolescents' skills underlying self-regulation (executive function, attention, self-control, behavioral inhibition and activation, emotion regulation) and adherence, with glycosylated hemoglobin from medical records. Teens completed daily diaries reporting self-regulation failures surrounding monitoring blood glucose, adherence, and number of blood glucose checks each day for 14 days.   Hierarchical Linear Models indicated that better daily adherence was associated with teen and mother reports of better self-regulation skills and teens' reports of fewer daily self-regulation failures. Daily adherence was unrelated to temperamental differences in behavioral inhibition and activation.   Results indicate that both individual and intraindividual differences in self-regulation contribute to daily adherence highlighting the importance of daily self-regulatory challenges to adherence. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Exercise-induced regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in the skeletal muscle of subjects with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Bergdahl, Andreas; Schjerling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMP) play a critical role during vascular remodelling, in both health and disease. Impaired MMP regulation is associated with many diabetes-related complications. This study examined whether exercise-induced regulation of MMPs...

  15. Impact of a brief intervention on self-regulation, self-efficacy and physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Erin A; McAuley, Edward

    2015-12-01

    Despite evidence of the benefits of physical activity, most individuals with type 2 diabetes do not meet physical activity recommendations. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a brief intervention targeting self-efficacy and self-regulation to increase physical activity in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Older adults (Mage = 61.8 ± 6.4) with type 2 diabetes or metabolic syndrome were randomized into a titrated physical activity intervention (n = 58) or an online health education course (n = 58). The intervention included walking exercise and theory-based group workshops. Self-efficacy, self-regulation and physical activity were assessed at baseline, post-intervention, and a follow-up. Results indicated a group by time effect for self-regulation [F(2,88) = 14.021, p self-efficacy [F(12,77) = 2.322, p self-efficacy and self-regulation. Future research warrants adjusting intervention strategies to increase long-term change.

  16. Regulation of budding yeast mating-type switching donor preference by the FHA domain of Fkh1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Coïc, Eric; Lee, Kihoon; Lee, Cheng-Sheng; Kim, Jung-Ae; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E

    2012-01-01

    During Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type switching, an HO endonuclease-induced double-strand break (DSB) at MAT is repaired by recombining with one of two donors, HMLα or HMRa, located at opposite ends of chromosome III. MATa cells preferentially recombine with HMLα; this decision depends on the Recombination Enhancer (RE), located about 17 kb to the right of HML. In MATα cells, HML is rarely used and RE is bound by the MATα2-Mcm1 corepressor, which prevents the binding of other proteins to RE. In contrast, in MATa cells, RE is bound by multiple copies of Fkh1 and a single copy of Swi4/Swi6. We report here that, when RE is replaced with four LexA operators in MATa cells, 95% of cells use HMR for repair, but expression of a LexA-Fkh1 fusion protein strongly increases HML usage. A LexA-Fkh1 truncation, containing only Fkh1's phosphothreonine-binding FHA domain, restores HML usage to 90%. A LexA-FHA-R80A mutant lacking phosphothreonine binding fails to increase HML usage. The LexA-FHA fusion protein associates with chromatin in a 10-kb interval surrounding the HO cleavage site at MAT, but only after DSB induction. This association occurs even in a donorless strain lacking HML. We propose that the FHA domain of Fkh1 regulates donor preference by physically interacting with phosphorylated threonine residues created on proteins bound near the DSB, thus positioning HML close to the DSB at MAT. Donor preference is independent of Mec1/ATR and Tel1/ATM checkpoint protein kinases but partially depends on casein kinase II. RE stimulates the strand invasion step of interchromosomal recombination even for non-MAT sequences. We also find that when RE binds to the region near the DSB at MATa then Mec1 and Tel1 checkpoint kinases are not only able to phosphorylate histone H2A (γ-H2AX) around the DSB but can also promote γ-H2AX spreading around the RE region.

  17. Regulation of budding yeast mating-type switching donor preference by the FHA domain of Fkh1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    Full Text Available During Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type switching, an HO endonuclease-induced double-strand break (DSB at MAT is repaired by recombining with one of two donors, HMLα or HMRa, located at opposite ends of chromosome III. MATa cells preferentially recombine with HMLα; this decision depends on the Recombination Enhancer (RE, located about 17 kb to the right of HML. In MATα cells, HML is rarely used and RE is bound by the MATα2-Mcm1 corepressor, which prevents the binding of other proteins to RE. In contrast, in MATa cells, RE is bound by multiple copies of Fkh1 and a single copy of Swi4/Swi6. We report here that, when RE is replaced with four LexA operators in MATa cells, 95% of cells use HMR for repair, but expression of a LexA-Fkh1 fusion protein strongly increases HML usage. A LexA-Fkh1 truncation, containing only Fkh1's phosphothreonine-binding FHA domain, restores HML usage to 90%. A LexA-FHA-R80A mutant lacking phosphothreonine binding fails to increase HML usage. The LexA-FHA fusion protein associates with chromatin in a 10-kb interval surrounding the HO cleavage site at MAT, but only after DSB induction. This association occurs even in a donorless strain lacking HML. We propose that the FHA domain of Fkh1 regulates donor preference by physically interacting with phosphorylated threonine residues created on proteins bound near the DSB, thus positioning HML close to the DSB at MAT. Donor preference is independent of Mec1/ATR and Tel1/ATM checkpoint protein kinases but partially depends on casein kinase II. RE stimulates the strand invasion step of interchromosomal recombination even for non-MAT sequences. We also find that when RE binds to the region near the DSB at MATa then Mec1 and Tel1 checkpoint kinases are not only able to phosphorylate histone H2A (γ-H2AX around the DSB but can also promote γ-H2AX spreading around the RE region.

  18. AcEST: BP914794 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available se/recombinase OS=Bordete... 33 6.7 tr|Q11FQ4|Q11FQ4_MESSB Transcriptional regulator, LysR family OS... 33 8...1 RHPASTLVYGKV 402 >tr|Q11FQ4|Q11FQ4_MESSB Transcriptional regulator, LysR family

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0991 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0991 ref|YP_574775.1| transcriptional regulator, LysR family [Chromohalobacter salex...igens DSM 3043] gb|ABE60076.1| transcriptional regulator, LysR family [Chromohalobacter salexigens DSM 3043] YP_574775.1 9.3 31% ...

  20. ATP regulation of type-1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity does not require walker A-type ATP-binding motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzenhauser, Matthew J; Wagner, Larry E; Park, Hyung Seo; Yule, David I

    2009-06-12

    ATP is known to increase the activity of the type-1 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R1). This effect is attributed to the binding of ATP to glycine rich Walker A-type motifs present in the regulatory domain of the receptor. Only two such motifs are present in neuronal S2+ splice variant of InsP3R1 and are designated the ATPA and ATPB sites. The ATPA site is unique to InsP3R1, and the ATPB site is conserved among all three InsP3R isoforms. Despite the fact that both the ATPA and ATPB sites are known to bind ATP, the relative contribution of these two sites to the enhancing effects of ATP on InsP3R1 function is not known. We report here a mutational analysis of the ATPA and ATPB sites and conclude neither of these sites is required for ATP modulation of InsP3R1. ATP augmented InsP3-induced Ca2+ release from permeabilized cells expressing wild type and ATP-binding site-deficient InsP3R1. Similarly, ATP increased the single channel open probability of the mutated InsP3R1 to the same extent as wild type. ATP likely exerts its effects on InsP3R1 channel function via a novel and as yet unidentified mechanism.

  1. Type I and II positive allosteric modulators differentially modulate agonist-induced up-regulation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2012-01-01

    and II α7 nAChR positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) on agonist-induced α7 nAChR up-regulation. We show that the type II PAMs, PNU-120596 (10 μM) or TQS (1 and 10 μM), inhibit up-regulation, as measured by protein levels, induced by the α7 nAChR agonist A-582941 (10 nM or 10 μM), in SH-EP1 cells stably...... and A-582941 induce up-regulation through different mechanisms, and that this confers differential sensitivity to the effects of α7 nAChR PAMs. These results may have implications for the clinical development of α7 nAChR PAMs....

  2. Principle Analysis and Test of M-type Voltage Regulator%M型电压调节器的原理分析与检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安明华

    2012-01-01

    The development of auto generator voltage regulator has gone through four stages: mechanical contact, transistor, integrated circuit, electronic control. The principle and test method of integrated circuit voltage regulator are analyzed with the example of DENSO M-type regulator.%汽车发电机电压调节器经历了机械触点式、晶体管式、集成电路式、微机控制式的发展。本文以电装M型电压调节器为例。分析集成电路电压调节器的原理及检测方法。

  3. MAPK Phosphatase 5 Expression Induced by Influenza and Other RNA Virus Infection Negatively Regulates IRF3 Activation and Type I Interferon Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmy J. James

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The type I interferon system is essential for antiviral immune response and is a primary target of viral immune evasion strategies. Here, we show that virus infection induces the expression of MAPK phosphatase 5 (MKP5, a dual-specificity phosphatase (DUSP, in host cells. Mice deficient in MKP5 were resistant to H1N1 influenza infection, which is associated with increased IRF3 activation and type I interferon expression in comparison with WT mice. Increased type I interferon responses were also observed in MKP5-deficient cells and animals upon other RNA virus infection, including vesicular stomatitis virus and sendai virus. These observations were attributed to the ability of MKP5 to interact with and dephosphorylate IRF3. Our study reveals a critical function of a DUSP in negative regulation of IRF3 activity and demonstrates a mechanism by which influenza and other RNA viruses inhibit type I interferon response in the host through MKP5.

  4. 4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase, an enzyme of the sex hormone pathway in Mucor mucedo, is constitutively transcribed but its activity is differently regulated in (+) and (-) mating types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimek, Christine; Petzold, Annett; Schultze, Kornelia; Wetzel, Jana; Wolschendorf, Frank; Burmester, Anke; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2005-09-01

    4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase (TDH) converts the (+) mating type sex pheromone 4-dihydromethyltrisporate into methyltrisporate. In Mucor mucedo, this conversion is required only in the (-) mating type. Expression of the TDH encoding TSP1 gene was analyzed qualitatively using reverse-transcribed PCR. TSP1 is constitutively transcribed in the (+) and in the (-) mating type, irrespective of the mating situation. By immunodetection, the translation product is also formed constitutively. In contrast to gene expression, TDH enzyme activity depends on the sexual status of the mycelium. Activity is restricted to the sexually stimulated (-) mating type. Non-stimulated (-), as well as stimulated and non-stimulated (+) mycelia exhibit no activity and do not influence activity in stimulated (-) mycelia. Time course analysis shows strongly increased enzyme activity at 80 min after stimulation. Low activity exists from the onset of stimulation, indicating that additional regulation mechanisms are involved in TDH function.

  5. Regulation of L-type Voltage Gated Calcium Channel CACNA1S in Macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Cecil; Mehto, Subhash; Tiwari, Brijendra K; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated earlier the inhibitory role played by Voltage Gated Calcium Channels (VGCCs) in regulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) survival and pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated mechanisms and key players that regulate the surface expression of VGCC-CACNA1S by Rv2463 and M. tb infection in macrophages. Our earlier work identified Rv2463 to be expressed at early times post infection in macrophages that induced suppressor responses to dendritic cells and macrophages. Our results in this study demonstrate a role of MyD88 independent TLR pathway in mediating CACNA1S expression. Dissecting the role for second messengers, we show that calcium homeostasis plays a key role in CACNA1S expression during M. tb infection. Using siRNAs against molecular sensors of calcium regulation, we show an involvement of ER associated Stromal Interaction Molecules 1 and 2 (STIM1 and STIM2), and transcription factor pCREB, towards CACNA1S expression that also involved the MyD88 independent pathway. Interestingly, reactive oxygen species played a negative role in M. tb mediated CACNA1S expression. Further, a cross-regulation of ROS and pCREB was noted that governed CACNA1S expression. Characterizing the mechanisms governing CACNA1S expression would improve our understanding of the regulation of VGCC expression and its role in M. tb pathogenesis during M. tb infection.

  6. Hair-cycle-dependent expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein and its type I receptor: evidence for regulation at the anagen to catagen transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Mee; Woodard, Grant L; Dunbar, Maureen; Gocken, Todd; Jimènez, Juan A; Foley, John

    2003-05-01

    The humoral hypercalcemia factor parathyroid hormone-related protein is a paracrine-signaling molecule that regulates the development of several organ systems, including the skin. In pathologic circumstances such as hypercalcemia and in development, parathyroid hormone-related protein signaling appears to be mediated by the type I parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related protein receptor. In order to clarify the role of the ligand and receptor pair in cutaneous biology, gene expression was monitored in a series of murine skin samples ranging from embryonic day 14 to 2 y with in situ hybridization and RNase protection. In all samples, high levels of parathyroid hormone-related protein transcripts were exclusively expressed in the developing and adult hair follicle but were not observed in the interfollicular epidermis. In the adult, parathyroid hormone-related protein mRNA expression was dynamically regulated as a function of the murine hair cycle in a way similar to other signaling molecules that regulate the anagen to catagen transition. PTH receptor transcripts were abundantly expressed in the developing dermis. In the adult skin, PTH receptor mRNA was markedly reduced, but again demonstrated hair-cycle-dependent expression. The dorsal skin of the keratin 14-parathyroid hormone-related protein mouse was used to evaluate the impact of overexpression of the peptide on the murine hair cycle. All types of hair were 30-40% shorter in adult keratin 14-parathyroid hormone-related protein mice as compared with wild-type littermates. This appeared to result from a premature entry into the catagen phase of the hair cycle. Finally, the relationship between parathyroid hormone-related protein signaling and other growth factors that regulate the hair cycle was examined by cross-breeding experiments employing keratin 14-parathyroid hormone-related protein mice and fibroblast growth factor-5-knockout mice. It appears that parathyroid hormone-related protein and

  7. TET1 and TET3 are essential in induction of Th2-type immunity partly through regulation of IL-4/13A expression in zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Li, Zhuo; Kang, Wei; Tian, Yu; Yan, Yuzhu; Chen, Wei

    2016-10-10

    It has been considered that epigenetic modulation can affect a diverse array of cellular activities, in which ten eleven translocation (TET) methylcytosine dioxygenase family members refer to a group of fundamental components involved in catalyzation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and modification of gene expression. Even though the function of TET proteins has been gradually revealed, their roles in immune regulation are still largely unknown. Recent studies provided clues that TET2 could regulate several innate immune-related inflammatory mediators in mammals. This study sought to explore the function of TET family members in potential T-helper (Th) cell differentiation involved in adaptive immunity by utilizing a zebrafish model. As shown by results, soluble antigens could induce expression of zebrafish IL-4/13A (i.e. a pivotal Th2-type cytokine essential in Th2 cell differentiation and functions), and further trigger the expression of Th1- and Th2-related genes. It is noteworthy that this response was accompanied by the up-regulation of two TET family members (TET1 and TET3) both in immune organs (spleen and kidney) and cells (peripheral lymphocytes). Knocking-down of TET1 and TET3 will give rise to the decreased responses of IL-4/13A induction against exogenous soluble antigen stimulation, and further restrain the expression of Th2-related genes, which indicates a restrained Th2 cell differentiation. Nonetheless, TET2 did not exhibit effect on the modification of Th1/Th2 related gene expression. Hence, these data showed that TET1 and TET3 might be two significant epigenetic regulators involved in Th2 differentiation through regulation of IL-4/13A expression. This is the first report to show that TET family members play indispensable roles in Th2-type immunity, indicating an epigenetic modulation manner involved in adaptive immune regulations and responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell type- and isotype-specific expression and regulation of β-tubulins in primary olfactory ensheathing cells and Schwann cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Mohamed; Hansmann, Florian; Kreutzer, Robert; Kreutzer, Mihaela; Brandes, Gudrun; Wewetzer, Konstantin

    2013-05-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) and Schwann cells (SCs) are closely-related cell types with regeneration-promoting properties. Comparative gene expression analysis is particularly relevant since it may explain cell type-specific effects and guide the use of each cell type into special clinical applications. In the present study, we focused on β-tubulin isotype expression in primary adult canine glia as a translational large animal model. β-tubulins so far have been studied mainly in non-neuronal tumors and implied in tumorigenic growth. We show here that primary OECs and SCs expressed βII-V isotype mRNA. Interestingly, βIII-tubulin mRNA and protein expression was high in OECs and low in SCs, while fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) induced its down-regulation in both cell types to the same extent. This was in contrast to βV-tubulin mRNA which was similarly expressed in both cell types and unaltered by FGF-2. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that OEC cultures contained a higher percentage of βIII-tubulin-positive cells compared to SC cultures. Addition of FGF-2 reduced the number of βIII-tubulin-positive cells in both cultures and significantly increased the percentage of cells with a multipolar morphology. Taken together, we demonstrate cell type-specific expression (βIII) and isotype-specific regulation (βIII, βV) of β-tubulin isotypes in OECs and SCs. While differential expression of βIII-tubulin in primary glial cell types with identical proliferative behaviour argues for novel functions unrelated to tumorigenic growth, strong βIII-tubulin expression in OECs may help to explain the specific properties of this glial cell type.

  9. A novel role for fibronectin type I domain in the regulation of human hematopoietic cell adhesiveness through binding to follistatin domains of FLRG and follistatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguer-Satta, Véronique; Forissier, Stéphanie; Bartholin, Laurent; Martel, Sylvie; Jeanpierre, Sandrine; Bachelard, Elodie; Rimokh, Ruth

    2006-02-15

    FLRG and follistatin belong to the family of follistatin proteins involved in the regulation of various biological effects, such as hematopoiesis, mediated by their binding to activin and BMP, both members of the TGFbeta family. To further characterize the function of FLRG, we searched for other possible functional partners using a yeast two-hybrid screen. We identified human fibronectin as a new partner for both FLRG and follistatin. We also demonstrated that their physical interaction is mediated by type I motifs of fibronectin and follistatin domains. We then analyzed the biological consequences of these protein interactions on the regulation of hematopoiesis. For the first time, we associated a biological effect with the regulation of human hematopoietic cell adhesiveness of both the type I motifs of fibronectin and the follistatin domains of FLRG and follistatin. Indeed, we observed a significant and specific dose-dependent increase of cell adhesion to fibronectin in the presence of FLRG or follistatin, using either a human hematopoietic cell line or primary cells. In particular, we observed a significantly increased adhesion of immature hematopoietic precursors (CFC, LTC-IC). Altogether these results highlight a new mechanism by which FLRG and follistatin regulate human hematopoiesis.

  10. A previously uncharacterized gene stm0551 plays a repressive role in the regulation of type 1 fimbriae in Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ke-Chuan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium produces surface-associated fimbriae that facilitate adherence of the bacteria to a variety of cells and tissues. Type 1 fimbriae with binding specificity to mannose residues are the most commonly found fimbrial type. In vitro, static-broth culture favors the growth of S. Typhimurium with type 1 fimbriae, whereas non-type 1 fimbriate bacteria are obtained by culture on solid-agar media. Previous studies demonstrated that the phenotypic expression of type 1 fimbriae is the result of the interaction and cooperation of the regulatory genes fimZ, fimY, fimW, and fimU within the fim gene cluster. Genome sequencing revealed a novel gene, stm0551, located between fimY and fimW that encodes an 11.4-kDa putative phosphodiesterase specific for the bacterial second messenger cyclic-diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP. The role of stm0551 in the regulation of type 1 fimbriae in S. Typhimurium remains unclear. Results A stm0551-deleted stain constructed by allelic exchange constitutively produced type 1 fimbriae in both static-broth and solid-agar medium conditions. Quantative RT-PCR revealed that expression of the fimbrial major subunit gene, fimA, and one of the regulatory genes, fimZ, were comparably increased in the stm0551-deleted strain compared with those of the parental strain when grown on the solid-agar medium, a condition that normally inhibits expression of type 1 fimbriae. Following transformation with a plasmid possessing the coding sequence of stm0551, expression of fimA and fimZ decreased in the stm0551 mutant strain in both culture conditions, whereas transformation with the control vector pACYC184 relieved this repression. A purified STM0551 protein exhibited a phosphodiesterase activity in vitro while a point mutation in the putative EAL domain, substituting glutamic acid (E with alanine (A, of STM0551 or a FimY protein abolished this activity. Conclusions The finding that the

  11. Lipid control and use of lipid-regulating drugs for prevention of cardiovascular events in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Peter CY

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dyslipidaemia is an important but modifiable risk factor of cardiovascular disease (CVD in type 2 diabetes. Yet, the effectiveness of lipid regulating drugs in Asians is lacking. We examined the effects of lipid control and treatment with lipid regulating drugs on new onset of CVD in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients. Methods In this prospective cohort consisting of 4521 type 2 diabetic patients without history of CVD and naïve for lipid regulating treatment recruited consecutively from 1996 to 2005, 371 developed CVD after a median follow-up of 4.9 years. We used Cox proportional hazard regression to obtain the hazard ratios (HR of lipids and use of lipid regulating drugs for risk of CVD. Results The multivariate-adjusted HR (95% confidence interval of CVD in patients with high LDL-cholesterol (≥ 3.0 mmol/L was 1.36 (1.08 - 1.71, compared with lower values. Using the whole range value of HDL-cholesterol, the risk of CVD was reduced by 41% with every 1 mmol/L increase in HDL-cholesterol. Plasma triglyceride did not predict CVD. Statins use was associated with lower CVD risk [HR = 0.66 (0.50 - 0.88]. In sub-cohort analysis, statins use was associated with a HR of 0.60 (0.44 - 0.82 in patients with high LDL-cholesterol (≥ 3.0 mmol/L and 0.49 (0.28 - 0.88 in patients with low HDL-cholesterol. In patients with LDL-cholesterol Conclusions In Chinese type 2 diabetic patients, high LDL-cholesterol and low HDL-cholesterol predicted incident CVD. Overall, patients treated with statins had 40-50% risk reduction in CVD compared to non-users.

  12. Negative Autogenous Control of the Master Type III Secretion System Regulator HrpL in Pseudomonas syringae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Christopher; Schumacher, Jörg; Jovanovic, Milija; Bennett, Mark; Buck, Martin

    2017-01-24

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a principal virulence determinant of the model bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae T3SS effector proteins inhibit plant defense signaling pathways in susceptible hosts and elicit evolved immunity in resistant plants. The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor HrpL coordinates the expression of most T3SS genes. Transcription of hrpL is dependent on sigma-54 and the codependent enhancer binding proteins HrpR and HrpS for hrpL promoter activation. hrpL is oriented adjacently to and divergently from the HrpL-dependent gene hrpJ, sharing an intergenic upstream regulatory region. We show that association of the RNA polymerase (RNAP)-HrpL complex with the hrpJ promoter element imposes negative autogenous control on hrpL transcription in P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The hrpL promoter was upregulated in a ΔhrpL mutant and was repressed by plasmid-borne hrpL In a minimal Escherichia coli background, the activity of HrpL was sufficient to achieve repression of reconstituted hrpL transcription. This repression was relieved if both the HrpL DNA-binding function and the hrp-box sequence of the hrpJ promoter were compromised, implying dependence upon the hrpJ promoter. DNA-bound RNAP-HrpL entirely occluded the HrpRS and partially occluded the integration host factor (IHF) recognition elements of the hrpL promoter in vitro, implicating inhibition of DNA binding by these factors as a cause of negative autogenous control. A modest increase in the HrpL concentration caused hypersecretion of the HrpA1 pilus protein but intracellular accumulation of later T3SS substrates. We argue that negative feedback on HrpL activity fine-tunes expression of the T3SS regulon to minimize the elicitation of plant defenses. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization has warned that agriculture will need to satisfy a 50% to 70% increase in global food demand if the human population reaches 9 billion by 2050 as predicted. However, diseases

  13. The familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutation K1336E affects direct G protein-mediated regulation of neuronal P/Q-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-López, Edgar; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Gandini, María A; Sandoval, Alejandro; Felix, Ricardo

    2013-04-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1) is an autosomal dominant form of migraine with aura characterized by recurrent migraine, hemiparesis and ataxia. FHM-1 has been linked to missense mutations in the CACNA1A gene encoding the pore-forming subunit of the neuronal voltage-gated P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.1α1). Here, we explored the effects of the FHM-1 K1336E mutation on G protein-dependent modulation of the recombinant P/Q-type channel. The mutation was introduced into the human CaV2.1α1 subunit and its functional consequences investigated after heterologous expression in HEK-293 cells using patch-clamp recordings. Functional analysis of the K1336E mutation revealed a reduction of Ca(2+) current densities, a ∼10 mV left-shift in the current-voltage relationship, and the slowing of current inactivation kinetics. When co-expressed along with the human μ-opioid receptor, application of the agonist DAMGO inhibited whole-cell currents through both the wild-type and the mutant channels. Prepulse facilitation was also reduced by the K1336E mutation. Likewise, the kinetic analysis of the onset and decay of facilitation showed that the mutation affects the apparent dissociation and reassociation rates of the Gβγ dimer from the channel complex. These results suggest that the extent of G-protein-mediated inhibition is significantly reduced in the K1336E mutant CaV2.1 Ca(2+) channels. This alteration would contribute to render the neuronal network hyperexcitable, possibly as a consequence of reduced presynaptic inhibition, and may help to explain some aspects of the FHM-1 pathophysiology.

  14. Coordinated Regulation of Tissue Type Plasminogen Activator and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type-1 Gene Expression in Hypophysectomized Rat Ovaries During GnRHa-Induced Ovulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘以训; 刘奎; 彭晓蓉; T.Ny

    1994-01-01

    In this study we have demonstrated that both granulosa and theca-interstitial cells of hy-pophysectomized rat ovaries are capable of synthesizing tPA and PAI-1.Injection of a GnRH agonist canmarkedly induce these gene expressions in the ovary in a cell-specific and time-coordinated manner,so that asurge of tPA mRNA and its activity in both granulosa and theca-interstitial cells was obtained just prior toovulation.Theca-interstitial cells make PAI-1 become the most active in the ovary.Both the amount PAI-1mRNA and its activity in the cells reach the maximum level 6 h before the tPA peak.By contrast,granulosacells produce only a little amount of PAI-1 (most increase tPA activity),and both PAI-1 mRNA and activityin the cells reach the maximum after ovulation.The coordinated regulation of tPA and PAI-1 in the ovarymay fine-tune the peak of tPA activity which may be important for the regulation of the ovulatory process.The changes of tPA and PAI-1 in the ovarian cells of hypophysectomized rats during GnRHa-induced ovula-tion are similar to that in intact rats during hCG-induced ovulation,suggesting that the ovulatory process canbe modulated by different regulatory signals mediated by influencing the coordinated expression of both tPAand PAI-1.

  15. L-type calcium channels may regulate neurite initiation in cultured chick embryo brain neurons and N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C; Lomme, M; Shugarts, D; Rosack, J; Caracciolo, P; Gisi, T; Nichols, P

    1990-08-01

    The intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, plays an important role in regulating neurite growth in cultured neurons. Insofar as [Ca2+]i is partly a function of Ca2+ influx through voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC), Ca2+ entry through VSCC should influence neurite growth. Vertebrate neurons may possess several types of VSCC. The most frequently described VSCC types are usually designated L, T and N. In most preparations, these VSCC types respond differently to certain pharmacological agents, including Cd2+, Ni2+, the dihydropyridines nifedipine and BAY K8644, and the aminoglycoside antibiotics. We used these agents to study the role of Ca2+ influx in regulating neurite initiation and length in cultures of chick embryo brain neurons and N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells. In chick neurons, nifedipine and Cd2+ (less than 50 microM), which have been reported to inhibit L-type channels, reduced neurite initiation, but not mean neurite length. Ni2+ (less than 100 microM), reported to inhibit T-type channels, had no effect on either initiation or length. Low concentrations of most aminoglycosides (less than 300 microM), reported to inhibit N-type channels, had no effect on neurite initiation, but high concentrations of streptomycin (great than 300 microM), reported to inhibit both L- and N-type channels, reduced neurite initiation. BAY K8644, which enhances current flow through L-type channels, had no effect except at high concentration (50 microM), which inhibited initiation. N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells have been reported to contain L-type and T-type channels, but thus far no channel similar to the N-type has been described. In cultured N1E-115 cells, nifedipine (5 microM), Cd2+ (5 microM), and streptomycin (200 microM) reduced neurite initiation, while nickel (50 microM) and neomycin (100 microM) did not affect initiation. None of these agents altered neurite length. In N1E-115 cells, whole-cell voltage clamp recordings showed that nifedipine and Cd2

  16. Disruption of mechanical stress in extracellular matrix is related to Stanford type A aortic dissection through down-regulation of Yes-associated protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen-Jian; Ren, Wei-Hong; Liu, Xu-Jie; Liu, Yan; Wu, Fu-Jian; Sun, Li-Zhong; Lan, Feng; Du, Jie; Zhang, Hong-Jia

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we assessed whether the down-regulation of Yes-associated protein (YAP) is involved in the pathogenesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanical stress-induced Stanford type A aortic dissection (STAAD). Human aortic samples were obtained from heart transplantation donors as normal controls and from STAAD patients undergoing surgical replacement of the ascending aorta. Decreased maximum aortic wall velocity, ECM disorders, increased VSMC apoptosis, and YAP down-regulation were identified in STAAD samples. In a mouse model of STAAD, YAP was down-regulated over time during the development of ECM damage, and increased VSMC apoptosis was also observed. YAP knockdown induced VSMC apoptosis under static conditions in vitro, and the change in mechanical stress induced YAP down-regulation and VSMC apoptosis. This study provides evidence that YAP down-regulation caused by the disruption of mechanical stress is associated with the development of STAAD via the induction of apoptosis in aortic VSMCs. As STAAD is among the most elusive and life-threatening vascular diseases, better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of STAAD is critical to improve clinical outcome. PMID:27608489

  17. Disruption of mechanical stress in extracellular matrix is related to Stanford type A aortic dissection through down-regulation of Yes-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen-Jian; Ren, Wei-Hong; Liu, Xu-Jie; Liu, Yan; Wu, Fu-Jian; Sun, Li-Zhong; Lan, Feng; Du, Jie; Zhang, Hong-Jia

    2016-09-05

    In this study, we assessed whether the down-regulation of Yes-associated protein (YAP) is involved in the pathogenesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanical stress-induced Stanford type A aortic dissection (STAAD). Human aortic samples were obtained from heart transplantation donors as normal controls and from STAAD patients undergoing surgical replacement of the ascending aorta. Decreased maximum aortic wall velocity, ECM disorders, increased VSMC apoptosis, and YAP down-regulation were identified in STAAD samples. In a mouse model of STAAD, YAP was down-regulated over time during the development of ECM damage, and increased VSMC apoptosis was also observed. YAP knockdown induced VSMC apoptosis under static conditions in vitro, and the change in mechanical stress induced YAP down-regulation and VSMC apoptosis. This study provides evidence that YAP down-regulation caused by the disruption of mechanical stress is associated with the development of STAAD via the induction of apoptosis in aortic VSMCs. As STAAD is among the most elusive and life-threatening vascular diseases, better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of STAAD is critical to improve clinical outcome.

  18. Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin (ERM) proteins function as pleiotropic regulators of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yoshinao; Yoshii, Hiroaki; Kamiyama, Haruka; Tominaga, Chika; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Sato, Hironori; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2008-05-25

    Ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins supply functional linkage between integral membrane proteins and cytoskeleton in mammalian cells to regulate membrane protein dynamisms and cytoskeleton rearrangement. To assess potential role of the ERM proteins in HIV-1 lifecycle, we examined if suppression of ERM function in human cells expressing HIV-1 infection receptors influences HIV-1 envelope (Env)-mediated HIV-1-vector transduction and cell-cell fusion. Expression of an ezrin dominant negative mutant or knockdown of ezrin, radixin, or moesin with siRNA uniformly decreased transduction titers of HIV-1 vectors having X4-tropic Env. In contrast, transduction titers of R5-tropic Env HIV-1 vectors were decreased only by radixin knockdown: ezrin knockdown had no detectable effects and moesin knockdown rather increased transduction titer. Each of the ERM suppressions had no detectable effects on cell surface expression of CD4, CCR5, and CXCR4 or VSV-Env-mediated HIV-1 vector transductions. Finally, the individual knockdown of ERM mRNAs uniformly decreased efficiency of cell-cell fusion mediated by X4- or R5-tropic Env and HIV-1 infection receptors. These results suggest that (i) the ERM proteins function as positive regulators of infection by X4-tropic HIV-1, (ii) moesin additionally functions as a negative regulator of R5-tropic HIV-1 virus infection at the early step(s) after the membrane fusion, and (iii) receptor protein dynamisms are regulated differently in R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1 infections.

  19. The role of cis-zeatin-type cytokinins in plant growth regulation and mediating responses to environmental interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, Martin; Brütting, Christoph; Meza-Canales, Ivan David;

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins (CKs) are well-established as important phytohormonal regulators of plant growth and development. An increasing number of studies have also revealed the function of these hormones in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. While the function of certain CK classes, including tra...

  20. Three fim genes required for the regulation of length and mediation of adhesion of Escherichia coli type 1 fimbriae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, P; Christiansen, Gunna

    1987-01-01

    Three novel fim genes of Escherichia coli, fimF, fimG and fimH, were characterized. These genes were not necessary for the production of fimbriae but were shown to be involved in the adhesive property and longitudinal regulation of these structures. Complementation experiments indicated that both...

  1. Changes of MMP-1 and collagen type Ialpha1 by UVA, UVB and IRA are differentially regulated by Trx-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechner, Nicole; Schroeder, Peter; Jakob, Sascha; Kunze, Kerstin; Maresch, Tanja; Calles, Christian; Krutmann, Jean; Haendeler, Judith

    2008-07-01

    Exposure of human skin to solar radiation, which includes ultraviolet (UV) radiation (UVA and UVB) visible light and infrared radiation, induces skin aging. The effects of light have been attributed to irradiation-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, but the specific signaling pathways are not well understood. Detrimental effects of solar radiation are dermal diseases and photoaging. Exposure of cultured human dermal fibroblasts to UVA, UVB or IRA increased ROS formation in vitro. One important redox regulator is the oxidoreductase thioredoxin-1 (Trx). Trx is ubiquitously expressed and has anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic properties. Besides its function to reduce H(2)O(2), Trx binds to and regulates transcription factors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Trx influences the regulation of MMP-1 and collagen Ialpha1 by UVA, UVB and IRA. We irradiated human dermal fibroblasts with UVA, UVB and IRA. UVA, UVB and IRA upregulated MMP-1 expression. Trx inhibited UVA-induced MMP-1 upregulation in a NFkappaB dependent manner. UVA, UVB and IRA reduced collagen Ialpha1 expression. Incubation with Trx inhibited the effects of UVB and IRA on collagen Ialpha1 expression. In conclusion, MMP-1 and collagen Ialpha1, which play important roles in aging processes, seems to be regulated by different transcriptional mechanisms and Trx can only influence distinct signaling pathways induced by UVA, UVB and probably IRA. Thus, Trx may serve as an important contributor to an "anti-aging therapeutic cocktail".

  2. DMPD: Principles of interleukin (IL)-6-type cytokine signalling and its regulation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available on. Heinrich PC, Behrmann I, Haan S, Hermanns HM, Muller-Newen G, Schaper F. Biochem J. 2003 Aug 15;374(Pt 1...ne signalling and its regulation. Authors Heinrich PC, Behrmann I, Haan S, Hermanns HM, Muller-Newen G, Scha

  3. 17β-Estradiol Regulation of the mRNA Expression of T-type Calcium Channel subunits: Role of Estrogen Receptor α and Estrogen Receptor β

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Martha A.; Hou, Jingwen; Fang, Yuan; Kelly, Martin J.; Rønnekleiv., Oline K.

    2009-01-01

    Low voltage-activated (T-type) calcium channels are responsible for burst firing and transmitter release in neurons and are important for exocytosis and hormone secretion in pituitary cells. T-type channels contain an α1 subunit, of which there are three subtypes, Cav3.1, 3.2 and 3.3, and each subtype has distinct kinetic characteristics. Although 17β-estradiol modulates T-type calcium channel expression and function, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. Presently, we used real-time PCR quantification of RNA extracted from hypothalamic nuclei and pituitary in vehicle and E2-treated C57BL/6 mice to elucidate E2-mediated regulation of Cav3.1, 3.2 and 3.3 subunits. The three subunits were expressed in both the hypothalamus and the pituitary. E2 treatment increased the mRNA expression of Cav3.1 and 3.2, but not Cav3.3, in the medial preoptic area and the arcuate nucleus. In the pituitary, Cav3.1 was increased with E2-treatment and Cav3.2 and 3.3 were decreased. In order to examine whether the classical estrogen receptors (ERs) were involved in the regulation, we used ERα- and ERβ-deficient C57BL/6 mice and explored the effects of E2 on T-type channel subtypes. Indeed, we found that the E2-induced increase in Cav3.1 in the hypothalamus was dependent on ERα, whereas the E2 effect on Cav3.2 was dependent on both ERα and ERβ. However, the E2-induced effects in the pituitary were dependent on only the expression of ERα. The robust E2-regulation of the T-type calcium channels could be an important mechanism by which E2 increases the excitability of hypothalamic neurons and modulates pituitary secretion. PMID:19003958

  4. Vibrio cholerae leuO Transcription Is Positively Regulated by ToxR and Contributes to Bile Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ante, Vanessa M; Bina, X Renee; Howard, Mondraya F; Sayeed, Sameera; Taylor, Dawn L; Bina, James E

    2015-11-01

    Vibrio cholerae is an aquatic organism and facultative human pathogen that colonizes the small intestine. In the small intestine, V. cholerae is exposed to a variety of antimicrobial compounds, including bile. V. cholerae resistance to bile is multifactorial and includes alterations in the membrane permeability barrier that are mediated by ToxR, a membrane-associated transcription factor. ToxR has also been shown to be required for activation of the LysR family transcription factor leuO in response to cyclic dipeptides. LeuO has been implicated in the regulation of multiple V. cholerae phenotypes, including biofilm production and virulence. In this study, we investigated the effects of bile on leuO expression. We show that leuO transcription increased in response to bile and bile salts but not in response to other detergents. The bile-dependent increase in leuO expression was dependent on ToxR, which was found to bind directly to the leuO promoter. The periplasmic domain of ToxR was required for basal leuO expression and for the bile-dependent induction of both leuO and ompU transcription. V. cholerae mutants that did not express leuO exhibited increased bile susceptibility, suggesting that LeuO contributes to bile resistance. Our collective results demonstrate that ToxR activates leuO expression in response to bile and that LeuO is a component of the ToxR-dependent responses that contribute to bile resistance. The success of Vibrio cholerae as a human pathogen is dependent upon its ability to rapidly adapt to changes in its growth environment. Growth in the human gastrointestinal tract requires the expression of genes that provide resistance to host antimicrobial compounds, including bile. In this work, we show for the first time that the LysR family regulator LeuO mediates responses in V. cholerae that contribute to bile resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Gene expression in skeletal muscle biopsies from people with type 2 diabetes and relatives: differential regulation of insulin signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Palsgaard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene expression alterations have previously been associated with type 2 diabetes, however whether these changes are primary causes or secondary effects of type 2 diabetes is not known. As healthy first degree relatives of people with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, they provide a good model in the search for primary causes of the disease. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle biopsies from Caucasian males with type 2 diabetes, healthy first degree relatives, and healthy controls. Gene expression was measured using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays covering the entire human genome. These arrays have not previously been used for this type of study. We show for the first time that genes involved in insulin signaling are significantly upregulated in first degree relatives and significantly downregulated in people with type 2 diabetes. On the individual gene level, 11 genes showed altered expression levels in first degree relatives compared to controls, among others KIF1B and GDF8 (myostatin. LDHB was found to have a decreased expression in both groups compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We hypothesize that increased expression of insulin signaling molecules in first degree relatives of people with type 2 diabetes, work in concert with increased levels of insulin as a compensatory mechanism, counter-acting otherwise reduced insulin signaling activity, protecting these individuals from severe insulin resistance. This compensation is lost in people with type 2 diabetes where expression of insulin signaling molecules is reduced.

  6. RU486 (mifepristone) ameliorates cognitive dysfunction and reverses the down-regulation of astrocytic N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 in streptozotocin-induced type-1 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Z-F; Wang, W; Niu, L; Kou, Z-Z; Zhu, C; Wang, W; Zhao, X-H; Luo, D-S; Zhang, T; Zhang, F-X; Liu, X-Z; Wu, S-X; Li, Y-Q

    2011-09-08

    Diabetic cognitive dysfunction (DCD), usually accompanied with chronically elevated glucocorticoids and hippocampal astrocytic alterations, is one of the most serious complications in patients with type-1 diabetes. However, the role for chronically elevated glucocorticoids and hippocampal astrocytic activations in DCD remains to be elucidated, and it is not clear whether astrocytic N-myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2, involved in cell differentiation and development) participated in DCD. In the present study, three months after streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type-1 diabetes onset, rats showed cognitive impairments in Morris water maze test as well as elevated corticosterone level. Diabetic rats also presented down-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a key indicator of astrocytic reactivity) and NDRG2 in hippocampus revealed by immunohistochemistry staining, real-time PCR and Western blot. Moreover, the diabetic cognitive impairments were ameliorated by 9-day glucocorticoids receptor (GR) blockade with RU486, and the down-regulation of hippocampal NDRG2 and GFAP in diabetic animals was also attenuated by 9-day GR blockade. These results suggest that glucocorticoids-GR system is crucial for DCD, and that astrocytic reactivity and NDRG2 are involved in these processes. Thus, inhibiting GR activation in the hippocampus may be a novel therapeutic strategy for treating DCD.

  7. 调速控制技术在静压传动叉车中的应用%Application of Speed Regulation Technology to Hydrostatic Drive Type Forklift

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张战团

    2012-01-01

    In order to upgrade work efficiency of the hydrostatic-driven forklift truck a method was taken to regulate RPM of the hydraulic motor by readjusting the motor's capacity so that the forklift truck can change its speed according to loaded or unloaded work conditions. 2 types of fork-lift truck were taken for instance, one type is for loading and unloading containers, and the other one is an off-highway type, which was followed by introduction of the 2 types' hydrostatic power regulation.%为提高静压传动叉车的工作效率,采用改变液压马达容积进行调速的方法,使叉车的行走速度能够根据空载和满载的作业工况进行变化.以箱内作业车和越野型叉车为例,分别介绍两种静压传动叉车的调速方法.

  8. S-palmitoylation regulates biogenesis of core glycosylated wild-type and F508del CFTR in a post-ER compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Michelle L; Wen, Hui; Fortenberry, James; Hong, Jeong S; Sorscher, Eric J

    2014-04-15

    Defects in CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) maturation are central to the pathogenesis of CF (cystic fibrosis). Palmitoylation serves as a key regulator of maturational processing in other integral membrane proteins, but has not been tested previously for functional effects on CFTR. In the present study, we used metabolic labelling to confirm that wild-type and F508del CFTR are palmitoylated, and show that blocking palmitoylation with the pharmacologic inhibitor 2-BP (2-bromopalmitate) decreases steady-state levels of both wild-type and low temperature-corrected F508del CFTR, disrupts post-ER (endoplasmic reticulum) maturation and reduces ion channel function at the cell surface. PATs (protein acyl transferases) comprise a family of 23 gene products that contain a DHHC motif and mediate palmitoylation. Recombinant expression of specific PATs led to increased levels of CFTR protein and enhanced palmitoylation as judged by Western blot and metabolic labelling. Specifically, we show that DHHC-7 (i) increases steady-state levels of wild-type and F508del CFTR band B, (ii) interacts preferentially with the band B glycoform, and (iii) augments radiolabelling by [3H]palmitic acid. Interestingly, immunofluorescence revealed that DHHC-7 also sequesters the F508del protein to a post-ER (Golgi) compartment. Our findings point to the importance of palmitoylation during wild-type and F508del CFTR trafficking.

  9. Mouse Skeletal Muscle Fiber-Type-Specific Macroautophagy and Muscle Wasting Are Regulated by a Fyn/STAT3/Vps34 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eijiro Yamada

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy induced by aging (sarcopenia, inactivity, and prolonged fasting states (starvation is predominantly restricted to glycolytic type II muscle fibers and typical spares oxidative type I fibers. However, the mechanisms accounting for muscle fiber-type specificity of atrophy have remained enigmatic. In the current study, although the Fyn tyrosine kinase activated the mTORC1 signaling complex, it also induced marked atrophy of glycolytic fibers with relatively less effect on oxidative muscle fibers. This was due to inhibition of macroautophagy via an mTORC1-independent but STAT3-dependent reduction in Vps34 protein levels and decreased Vps34/p150/Beclin1/Atg14 complex 1. Physiologically, in the fed state endogenous Fyn kinase activity was increased in glycolytic but not oxidative skeletal muscle. In parallel, Y705-STAT3 phosphorylation increased with decreased Vps34 protein levels. Moreover, fed/starved regulation of Y705-STAT3 phosphorylation and Vps34 protein levels was prevented in skeletal muscle of Fyn null mice. These data demonstrate a Fyn/STAT3/Vps34 pathway that is responsible for fiber-type-specific regulation of macroautophagy and skeletal muscle atrophy.

  10. Catabolite control protein E (CcpE) is a LysR-type transcriptional regulator of tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Torsten; Zhang, Bo; Baronian, Grégory; Schulthess, Bettina; Homerova, Dagmar; Grubmüller, Stephanie; Kutzner, Erika; Gaupp, Rosmarie; Bertram, Ralph; Powers, Robert; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Kormanec, Jan; Herrmann, Mathias; Molle, Virginie; Somerville, Greg A; Bischoff, Markus

    2013-12-13

    The tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) is a central metabolic pathway that provides energy, reducing potential, and biosynthetic intermediates. In Staphylococcus aureus, TCA cycle activity is controlled by several regulators (e.g. CcpA, CodY, and RpiRc) in response to the availability of sugars, amino acids, and environmental stress. Developing a bioinformatic search for additional carbon catabolite-responsive regulators in S. aureus, we identified a LysR-type regulator, catabolite control protein E (CcpE), with homology to the Bacillus subtilis CcpC regulator. Inactivation of ccpE in S. aureus strain Newman revealed that CcpE is a positive transcriptional effector of the first two enzymes of the TCA cycle, aconitase (citB) and to a lesser extent citrate synthase (citZ). Consistent with the transcriptional data, aconitase activity dramatically decreased in the ccpE mutant relative to the wild-type strain. The effect of ccpE inactivation on citB transcription and the lesser effect on citZ transcription were also reflected in electrophoretic mobility shift assays where CcpE bound to the citB promoter but not the citZ promoter. Metabolomic studies showed that inactivation of ccpE resulted in increased intracellular concentrations of acetate, citrate, lactate, and alanine, consistent with a redirection of carbon away from the TCA cycle. Taken together, our data suggest that CcpE is a major direct positive regulator of the TCA cycle gene citB.

  11. RcRR1, a Rosa canina type-A response regulator gene, is involved in cytokinin-modulated rhizoid organogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Gao

    Full Text Available In vitro, a new protocol of plant regeneration in rose was achieved via protocorm-like bodies (PLBs induced from the root-like organs named rhizoids that developed from leaf explants. The development of rhizoids is a critical stage for efficient regeneration, which is triggered by exogenous auxin. However, the role of cytokinin in the control of organogenesis in rose is as yet uncharacterized. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism of cytokinin-modulated rhizoid formation in Rosa canina. Here, we found that cytokinin is a key regulator in the formation of rhizoids. Treatment with cytokinin reduced callus activity and significantly inhibited rhizoid formation in Rosa canina. We further isolated the full-length cDNA of a type-A response regulator gene of cytokinin signaling, RcRR1, from which the deduced amino acid sequence contained the conserved DDK motif. Gene expression analysis revealed that RcRR1 was differentially expressed during rhizoid formation and its expression level was rapidly up-regulated by cytokinin. In addition, the functionality of RcRR1 was tested in Arabidopsis. RcRR1 was found to be localized to the nucleus in GFP-RcRR1 transgenic plants and overexpression of RcRR1 resulted in increased primary root length and lateral root density. More importantly, RcRR1 overexpression transgenic plants also showed reduced sensitivity to cytokinin during root growth; auxin distribution and the expression of auxin efflux carriers PIN genes were altered in RcRR1 overexpression plants. Taken together, these results demonstrate that RcRR1 is a functional type-A response regulator which is involved in cytokinin-regulated rhizoid formation in Rosa canina.

  12. Essential role for the response regulator PmrA in Coxiella burnetii type 4B secretion and colonization of mammalian host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beare, Paul A; Sandoz, Kelsi M; Larson, Charles L; Howe, Dale; Kronmiller, Brent; Heinzen, Robert A

    2014-06-01

    Successful host cell colonization by the Q fever pathogen, Coxiella burnetii, requires translocation of effector proteins into the host cytosol by a Dot/Icm type 4B secretion system (T4BSS). In Legionella pneumophila, the two-component system (TCS) PmrAB regulates the Dot/Icm T4BSS and several additional physiological processes associated with pathogenesis. Because PmrA consensus regulatory elements are associated with some dot/icm and substrate genes, a similar role for PmrA in regulation of the C. burnetii T4BSS has been proposed. Here, we constructed a C. burnetii pmrA deletion mutant to directly probe PmrA-mediated gene regulation. Compared to wild-type bacteria, C. burnetii ΔpmrA exhibited severe intracellular growth defects that coincided with failed secretion of effector proteins. Luciferase gene reporter assays demonstrated PmrA-dependent expression of 5 of 7 dot/icm operons and 9 of 11 effector-encoding genes with a predicted upstream PmrA regulatory element. Mutational analysis verified consensus sequence nucleotides required for PmrA-directed transcription. RNA sequencing and whole bacterial cell mass spectrometry of wild-type C. burnetii and the ΔpmrA mutant uncovered new components of the PmrA regulon, including several genes lacking PmrA motifs that encoded Dot/Icm substrates. Collectively, our results indicate that the PmrAB TCS is a critical virulence factor that regulates C. burnetii Dot/Icm secretion. The presence of PmrA-responsive genes lacking PmrA regulatory elements also suggests that the PmrAB TCS controls expression of regulatory systems associated with the production of additional C. burnetii proteins involved in host cell parasitism.

  13. RovM, a novel LysR-type regulator of the virulence activator gene rovA, controls cell invasion, virulence and motility of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Dersch, Petra

    2006-12-01

    RovA is a MarR-type transcriptional regulator that controls transcription of rovA, the expression of the primary invasive factor invasin and other virulence genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis in response to environmental signals. Using a genetic approach to identify regulatory components that negatively influence rovA expression, we identified a new LysR-type regulatory protein, designated RovM, which exhibits homology to the virulence regulator PecT/HexA of plant pathogenic Erwinia species. DNA-binding studies revealed that RovM interacts specifically with a short binding site between promoters P1 and P2 within the rovA regulatory region and negatively modulates rovA transcription in cooperation with the histone-like protein H-NS. The rovM gene itself is under positive autoregulatory control and is significantly induced during growth in minimal media as shown in regulation studies. Disruption of the rovM gene leads to a significant increase of RovA and invasin synthesis and enhances internalization of Y. pseudotuberculosis into host cells. Finally, we show that a Y. pseudotuberculosis rovM mutant is more virulent than wild type and higher numbers of the bacteria are detectable in gut-associated lymphatic tissues and organs in the mouse infection model system. In contrast, elevated levels of the RovM protein, which exert a positive effect on flagellar motility, severely attenuate the ability of Y. pseudotuberculosis to disseminate to deeper tissues. Together, our data show, that RovM is a key regulator implicated in the environmental control of virulence factors, which are crucial for the initiation of a Yersinia infection.

  14. Is there a role for T-type Ca2+ channels in regulation of vasomotor tone in mesenteric arterioles?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Jørn; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2009-01-01

    was predominantly expressed in endothelial cells. Voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry was inhibited by the new specific T-type blockers R(-)-efonidipine and NNC 55-0396. The effect of NNC 55-0396 persisted in depolarized arterioles, suggesting an unusually high activation threshold of mesenteric T-type channels. T......-type channels were not necessary for conduction of vasoconstriction, but appear to be important for local electromechanical coupling in VSMC. The first direct demonstration of endothelial T-type channels warrants new investigations of their role in vascular biology.......The largest peripheral blood pressure drop occurs in terminal arterioles (channels (VDCCs) are considered the primary pathway for Ca2+ influx during physiologic activation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Recent evidence suggests...

  15. Myoscape controls cardiac calcium cycling and contractility via regulation of L-type calcium channel surface expression

    OpenAIRE

    Eden, Matthias; Meder, Benjamin; V?lkers, Mirko; Poomvanicha, Montatip; Domes, Katrin; Branchereau, M.; Marck, P.; Will, Rainer; Bernt, Alexander; Rangrez, Ashraf; Busch, Matthias; ,; Adler, Thure; Busch, Dirk H.; Antonio Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Calcium signalling plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart failure. Here we describe a cardiac protein named Myoscape/FAM40B/STRIP2, which directly interacts with the L-type calcium channel. Knockdown of Myoscape in cardiomyocytes decreases calcium transients associated with smaller Ca2+ amplitudes and a lower diastolic Ca2+ content. Likewise, L-type calcium channel currents are significantly diminished on Myoscape ablation, and downregulation of Myoscape significantly reduces cont...

  16. Regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 messenger RNA level in Y-79 retinoblastoma cells: potential implications for human stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Vamvakopoulos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the regulation of type 1 receptor mRNA in Y-79 human retinoblastoma cells, grown in the absence or presence of pharmacological levels of phorbol esters, forskolin, glucocorticoids and their combinations. To control for inducibility and for assessing the sensitivity of the Y-79 system to glucocorticoids, corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA levels were measured in parallel. All treatments stimulated corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene expression relative to baseline. A weak suppression of corticotropin releasing hormone mRNA level was observed during dexamethasone treatment. The cell line expressed ten-fold excess of receptor to ligand mRNA under basal conditions. The findings predict the presence of functional phorbol ester, cyclic AMP and glucocorticoid response elements in the promoter region of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor type 1 gene and support a potential role for its product during chronic stress and immune/inflammatory reaction.

  17. Ezrin, Radixin, and Moesin (ERM) proteins function as pleiotropic regulators of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins supply functional linkage between integral membrane proteins and cytoskeleton in mammalian cells to regulate membrane protein dynamisms and cytoskeleton rearrangement. To assess potential role of the ERM proteins in HIV-1 lifecycle, we examined if suppression of ERM function in human cells expressing HIV-1 infection receptors influences HIV-1 envelope (Env)-mediated HIV-1-vector transduction and cell-cell fusion. Expression of an ezrin dominant negati...

  18. Nitrogen dose and type of herbicide used for growth regulation on the green coloration intensity of Emerald grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raíssa Pereira Dinalli Gazola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Nitrogen (N is the main nutrient responsible for the green coloration of lawns but also stimulates the growth of the aerial portion of grass, thus increasing mowing expenses. Therefore, herbicides may be used as a growth regulator. The ideal herbicide will reduce lawn height without affecting esthetics. Toward this end, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the green coloration of Emerald grass ( Zoysia japonica Steud. under the effect of different N doses or herbicides used as growth regulators. The study site consisted of randomized blocks containing 20 treatments arranged in a 5×4 factorial design with four treatment groups: four herbicides (glyphosate, imazaquin, imazethapyr, and metsulfuron-methyl, accounting for 200, 420, 80, and 140g ha-1 of the active ingredient, respectively and the control sample (no herbicide; and three doses of N in the form of urea (5, 10, and 20g m-2, divided into five applications per year, in addition to a treatment without N. Leaf chlorophyll content (LCC was assessed and the aerial portion of the lawn was measured with digital image analysis. Doses of N ranging from 10 to 20g m-2, divided into five applications a year, provided the lawn with intense green coloration, and the herbicides glyphosate (200g ha-1, imazaquin (420g ha-1, and imazethapyr (80g ha-1 were reported to be suitable for use as growth regulators of the study species, considering maintenance of esthetic quality (green coloration. The digital image analysis of the aerial portion provided more accurate results than use of a chlorophyll meter with regard to the recommendation of both N dose and herbicides to be used as growth regulators of Emerald grass.

  19. Type I NKT-cell-mediated TNF-α is a positive regulator of NLRP3 inflammasome priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Melvyn T; Duret, Helene; Andrews, Daniel M; Faveeuw, Christelle; Möller, Andreas; Smyth, Mark J; Paget, Christophe

    2014-07-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome plays a crucial role in the innate immune response to pathogens and exogenous or endogenous danger signals. Its activity must be precisely and tightly regulated to generate tailored immune responses. However, the immune cell subsets and cytokines controlling NLRP3 inflammasome activity are still poorly understood. Here, we have shown a link between NKT-cell-mediated TNF-α and NLRP3 inflammasome activity. The NLRP3 inflammasome in APCs was critical to potentiate NKT-cell-mediated immune responses, since C57BL/6 NLRP3 inflammasome-deficient mice exhibited reduced responsiveness to α-galactosylceramide. Importantly, NKT cells were found to act as regulators of NLRP3 inflammasome signaling, as NKT-cell-derived TNF-α was required for optimal IL-1β and IL-18 production by myeloid cells in response to α-galactosylceramide, by acting on the NLRP3 inflammasome priming step. Thus, NKT cells play a role in the positive regulation of NLRP3 inflammasome priming by mediating the production of TNF-α, thus demonstrating another means by which NKT cells control early inflammation.

  20. Distinct types of protease systems are involved in homeostasis regulation of mitochondrial morphology via balanced fusion and fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saita, Shotaro; Ishihara, Takaya; Maeda, Maki; Iemura, Shun-Ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Mihara, Katsuyoshi; Ishihara, Naotada

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial morphology is dynamically regulated by fusion and fission. Several GTPase proteins control fusion and fission, and posttranslational modifications of these proteins are important for the regulation. However, it has not been clarified how the fusion and fission is balanced. Here, we report the molecular mechanism to regulate mitochondrial morphology in mammalian cells. Ablation of the mitochondrial fission, by repression of Drp1 or Mff, or by over-expression of MiD49 or MiD51, results in a reduction in the fusion GTPase mitofusins (Mfn1 and Mfn2) in outer membrane and long form of OPA1 (L-OPA1) in inner membrane. RNAi- or CRISPR-induced ablation of Drp1 in HeLa cells enhanced the degradation of Mfns via the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). We further found that UPS-related protein BAT3/BAG6, here we identified as Mfn2-interacting protein, was implicated in the turnover of Mfns in the absence of mitochondrial fission. Ablation of the mitochondrial fission also enhanced the proteolytic cleavage of L-OPA1 to soluble S-OPA1, and the OPA1 processing was reversed by inhibition of the inner membrane protease OMA1 independent on the mitochondrial membrane potential. Our findings showed that the distinct degradation systems of the mitochondrial fusion proteins in different locations are enhanced in response to the mitochondrial morphology.

  1. IRF-3, IRF-5, and IRF-7 coordinately regulate the type I IFN response in myeloid dendritic cells downstream of MAVS signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Lazear

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the transcription factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are considered master regulators of type I interferon (IFN induction and IFN stimulated gene (ISG expression, Irf3(-/-×Irf7(-/- double knockout (DKO myeloid dendritic cells (mDC produce relatively normal levels of IFN-β after viral infection. We generated Irf3(-/-×Irf5(-/-×Irf7(-/- triple knockout (TKO mice to test whether IRF-5 was the source of the residual induction of IFN-β and ISGs in mDCs. In pathogenesis studies with two unrelated positive-sense RNA viruses (West Nile virus (WNV and murine norovirus, TKO mice succumbed at rates greater than DKO mice and equal to or approaching those of mice lacking the type I IFN receptor (Ifnar(-/-. In ex vivo studies, after WNV infection or exposure to Toll-like receptor agonists, TKO mDCs failed to produce IFN-β or express ISGs. In contrast, this response was sustained in TKO macrophages following WNV infection. To define IRF-regulated gene signatures, we performed microarray analysis on WNV-infected mDC from wild type (WT, DKO, TKO, or Ifnar(-/- mice, as well as from mice lacking the RIG-I like receptor adaptor protein MAVS. Whereas the gene induction pattern in DKO mDC was similar to WT cells, remarkably, almost no ISG induction was detected in TKO or Mavs(-/- mDC. The relative equivalence of TKO and Mavs(-/- responses suggested that MAVS dominantly regulates ISG induction in mDC. Moreover, we showed that MAVS-dependent induction of ISGs can occur through an IRF-5-dependent yet IRF-3 and IRF-7-independent pathway. Our results establish IRF-3, -5, and -7 as the key transcription factors responsible for mediating the type I IFN and ISG response in mDC during WNV infection and suggest a novel signaling link between MAVS and IRF-5.

  2. IRF-3, IRF-5, and IRF-7 coordinately regulate the type I IFN response in myeloid dendritic cells downstream of MAVS signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Lazear

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the transcription factors IRF-3 and IRF-7 are considered master regulators of type I interferon (IFN induction and IFN stimulated gene (ISG expression, Irf3(-/-×Irf7(-/- double knockout (DKO myeloid dendritic cells (mDC produce relatively normal levels of IFN-β after viral infection. We generated Irf3(-/-×Irf5(-/-×Irf7(-/- triple knockout (TKO mice to test whether IRF-5 was the source of the residual induction of IFN-β and ISGs in mDCs. In pathogenesis studies with two unrelated positive-sense RNA viruses (West Nile virus (WNV and murine norovirus, TKO mice succumbed at rates greater than DKO mice and equal to or approaching those of mice lacking the type I IFN receptor (Ifnar(-/-. In ex vivo studies, after WNV infection or exposure to Toll-like receptor agonists, TKO mDCs failed to produce IFN-β or express ISGs. In contrast, this response was sustained in TKO macrophages following WNV infection. To define IRF-regulated gene signatures, we performed microarray analysis on WNV-infected mDC from wild type (WT, DKO, TKO, or Ifnar(-/- mice, as well as from mice lacking the RIG-I like receptor adaptor protein MAVS. Whereas the gene induction pattern in DKO mDC was similar to WT cells, remarkably, almost no ISG induction was detected in TKO or Mavs(-/- mDC. The relative equivalence of TKO and Mavs(-/- responses suggested that MAVS dominantly regulates ISG induction in mDC. Moreover, we showed that MAVS-dependent induction of ISGs can occur through an IRF-5-dependent yet IRF-3 and IRF-7-independent pathway. Our results establish IRF-3, -5, and -7 as the key transcription factors responsible for mediating the type I IFN and ISG response in mDC during WNV infection and suggest a novel signaling link between MAVS and IRF-5.

  3. Cav2-type calcium channels encoded by cac regulate AP-independent neurotransmitter release at cholinergic synapses in adult Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huaiyu; Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M; Iniguez, Jorge; Su, Hailing; Hoang, Andy An; Lavian, Monica; Sun, Xicui; O'Dowd, Diane K

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels containing alpha1 subunits encoded by Ca(v)2 family genes are critical in regulating release of neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In Drosophila, cac is the only Ca(v)2-type gene. Cacophony (CAC) channels are localized in motor neuron terminals where they have been shown to mediate evoked, but not AP-independent, release of glutamate at the larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Cultured embryonic neurons also express CAC channels, but there is no information about the properties of CAC-mediated currents in adult brain nor how these channels regulate transmission in central neural circuits where fast excitatory synaptic transmission is predominantly cholinergic. Here we report that wild-type neurons cultured from late stage pupal brains and antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs) examined in adult brains, express calcium currents with two components: a slow-inactivating current sensitive to the spider toxin Plectreurys toxin II (PLTXII) and a fast-inactivating PLTXII-resistant component. CAC channels are the major contributors to the slow-inactivating PLTXII-sensitive current based on selective reduction of this component in hypomorphic cac mutants (NT27 and TS3). Another characteristic of cac mutant neurons both in culture and in whole brain recordings is a reduced cholinergic miniature excitatory postsynaptic current frequency that is mimicked in wild-type neurons by acute application of PLTXII. These data demonstrate that cac encoded Ca(v)2-type calcium channels regulate action potential (AP)-independent release of neurotransmitter at excitatory cholinergic synapses in the adult brain, a function not predicted from studies at the larval NMJ.

  4. Effect of physical activity measurement type on the association between walking activity and glucose regulation in a high-risk population recruited from primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Thomas; Henson, Joe; Khunti, Kamlesh; Morris, Danielle H; Edwardson, Charlotte; Brady, Emer; Davies, Melanie J

    2013-04-01

    We investigate associations of self-reported and objectively assessed walking activity with measures of glucose regulation in a multi-ethnic population at high risk of type 2 diabetes. This study reports data from a 2009-2011 screening programme for impaired glucose regulation (IGR) within a high-risk primary care population in Leicestershire, UK; 2532 participants (38% women, 8% South Asian) with a mean age of 64 ± 8 years and an average BMI of 32.1 ± 5.6 kg/m(2) were included. Walking activity was measured by self-report (International Physical Activity Questionnaire) and objectively (pedometer). Glucose regulation assessments included 2h post-challenge glucose, fasting glucose and HbA1c. Higher levels of self-reported walking activity and pedometer steps were associated with lower 2h post-challenge glucose after controlling for several known confounding variables, including BMI. Similarly, when categorized in tertiles, both measures were associated with a lower odds of having any form of IGR; odds ratio for lowest vs highest tertile was 0.64 (0.51-0.80) for self-report and 0.69 (0.55-0.87) for pedometer steps. There was no significant difference between self-reported and objective measures in the strength of associations with glucose regulation; associations with self-report were maintained when further adjusted for pedometer steps. Stronger associations between self-reported walking activity and glucose regulation were observed in South Asians compared with White Europeans. Self-reported and objectively measured walking activity were equally associated with indices of glucose regulation. Associations with self-reported walking activity were maintained when further adjusted for pedometer steps, suggesting that self-reported walking activity may measure facets of physical activity that are beyond total volume.

  5. Variable suites of non-effector genes are co-regulated in the type III secretion virulence regulon across the Pseudomonas syringae phylogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana S Mucyn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae is a phylogenetically diverse species of Gram-negative bacterial plant pathogens responsible for crop diseases around the world. The HrpL sigma factor drives expression of the major P. syringae virulence regulon. HrpL controls expression of the genes encoding the structural and functional components of the type III secretion system (T3SS and the type three secreted effector proteins (T3E that are collectively essential for virulence. HrpL also regulates expression of an under-explored suite of non-type III effector genes (non-T3E, including toxin production systems and operons not previously associated with virulence. We implemented and refined genome-wide transcriptional analysis methods using cDNA-derived high-throughput sequencing (RNA-seq data to characterize the HrpL regulon from six isolates of P. syringae spanning the diversity of the species. Our transcriptomes, mapped onto both complete and draft genomes, significantly extend earlier studies. We confirmed HrpL-regulation for a majority of previously defined T3E genes in these six strains. We identified two new T3E families from P. syringae pv. oryzae 1_6, a strain within the relatively underexplored phylogenetic Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST group IV. The HrpL regulons varied among strains in gene number and content across both their T3E and non-T3E gene suites. Strains within MLST group II consistently express the lowest number of HrpL-regulated genes. We identified events leading to recruitment into, and loss from, the HrpL regulon. These included gene gain and loss, and loss of HrpL regulation caused by group-specific cis element mutations in otherwise conserved genes. Novel non-T3E HrpL-regulated genes include an operon that we show is required for full virulence of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A on French bean. We highlight the power of integrating genomic, transcriptomic, and phylogenetic information to drive concise functional experimentation and to

  6. NECK LEAF 1, a GATA type transcription factor, modulates organogenesis by regulating the expression of multiple regulatory genes during reproductive development in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Wang; Hengfu Yin; Qian Qian; Jun Yang; Chaofeng Huang; Xiaohe Hu; Da Luo

    2009-01-01

    In the monocot rice species Oryza sativa L., one of the most striking morphological processes during reproductive development is the concurrence of panicle development with the sequential elongation of upper internodes (UPIs). To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms, we cloned the rice gene NECK LEAF 1 (NL1), which when mutated results in delays in flowering time, smaller panicles with overgrown bracts and abnormal UPI elongation patterns. The NL1 gene encodes a GATA-type transcription factor with a single zinc finger domain, and its transcripts are de-tected predominantly in the bract primordia, which normally degenerate in the wild-type plants. Overexpression of NL1 in transgenic plants often gives rise to severe growth retardation, less vegetative phytomers and smaller leaves, suggesting that NL1 plays an important role in organ differentiation. A novel mutant allele of PLASTOCHRON1 (PLA1), a gene known to play a key role in regulating leaf initiation, was identified in this study. Genetic analysis demonstrated an interaction between nll and plal, with NL1 acting upstream of PLA1. The expression level and spatial pattern of PLA1 were found to be altered in the nll mutant. Furthermore, the expression of two regulators of flowering, Hd3a and OsMADS1, was also affected in the nll mutant. On the basis of these findings, we propose that NL1 is an intrinsic factor that modulates and coordinates organogenesis through regulating the expression of PLA1 and other regulatory genes during reproductive development in rice.

  7. H-NS Nucleoid Protein Controls Virulence Features of Klebsiella pneumoniae by Regulating the Expression of Type 3 Pili and the Capsule Polysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Miguel A.; Fernández-Vázquez, José L.; Rosales-Reyes, Roberto; Jarillo-Quijada, Ma. Dolores; von Bargen, Kristine; Torres, Javier; González-y-Merchand, Jorge A.; Alcántar-Curiel, María D.; De la Cruz, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen causing nosocomial infections. Main virulence determinants of K. pneumoniae are pili, capsular polysaccharide, lipopolysaccharide, and siderophores. The histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS) is a pleiotropic regulator found in several gram-negative pathogens. It has functions both as an architectural component of the nucleoid and as a global regulator of gene expression. We generated a Δhns mutant and evaluated the role of the H-NS nucleoid protein on the virulence features of K. pneumoniae. A Δhns mutant down-regulated the mrkA pilin gene and biofilm formation was affected. In contrast, capsule expression was derepressed in the absence of H-NS conferring a hypermucoviscous phenotype. Moreover, H-NS deficiency affected the K. pneumoniae adherence to epithelial cells such as A549 and HeLa cells. In infection experiments using RAW264.7 and THP-1 differentiated macrophages, the Δhns mutant was less phagocytized than the wild-type strain. This phenotype was likely due to the low adherence to these phagocytic cells. Taken together, our data indicate that H-NS nucleoid protein is a crucial regulator of both T3P and CPS of K. pneumoniae. PMID:26904512

  8. A generalised PID-type control scheme with simple tuning for the global regulation of robot manipulators with constrained inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Marco; Zavala-Río, Arturo; Santibáñez, Víctor; Reyes, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a globally stabilising PID-type control scheme with a generalised saturating structure for robot manipulators under input constraints is proposed. It gives rise to various families of bounded PID-type controllers whose implementation is released from the exact knowledge of the system parameters and model structure. Compared to previous approaches of the kind, the proposed scheme is not only characterised by its generalised structure but also by its very simple tuning criterion, the simplest hitherto obtained in the considered analytical framework. Experimental results on a 3-degree-of-freedom direct-drive manipulator corroborate the efficiency of the proposed approach.

  9. The properties of genome conformation and spatial gene interaction and regulation networks of normal and malignant human cell types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wang

    Full Text Available The spatial conformation of a genome plays an important role in the long-range regulation of genome-wide gene expression and methylation, but has not been extensively studied due to lack of genome conformation data. The recently developed chromosome conformation capturing techniques such as the Hi-C method empowered by next generation sequencing can generate unbiased, large-scale, high-resolution chromosomal interaction (contact data, providing an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the spatial structure of a genome and its applications in gene regulation, genomics, epigenetics, and cell biology. In this work, we conducted a comprehensive, large-scale computational analysis of this new stream of genome conformation data generated for three different human leukemia cells or cell lines by the Hi-C technique. We developed and applied a set of bioinformatics methods to reliably generate spatial chromosomal contacts from high-throughput sequencing data and to effectively use them to study the properties of the genome structures in one-dimension (1D and two-dimension (2D. Our analysis demonstrates that Hi-C data can be effectively applied to study tissue-specific genome conformation, chromosome-chromosome interaction, chromosomal translocations, and spatial gene-gene interaction and regulation in a three-dimensional genome of primary tumor cells. Particularly, for the first time, we constructed genome-scale spatial gene-gene interaction network, transcription factor binding site (TFBS - TFBS interaction network, and TFBS-gene interaction network from chromosomal contact information. Remarkably, all these networks possess the properties of scale-free modular networks.

  10. Relationships between glucose excursion and the activation of oxidative stress in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fenping; Lu, Weina; Jia, Chengfang; Li, Hong; Wang, Zhou; Jia, Weiping

    2010-02-01

    The effect of glucose excursions on oxidative stress is an important topic in diabetes research. We investigated this relationship by analyzing markers of oxidative stress and glycemic data from a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) in 30 individuals with normal glucose regulation (NGR), 27 subjects with impaired glucose regulation (IGR), and 27 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2DM). We compared the mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE), mean postprandial glucose excursion (MPPGE), and mean postprandial incremental area under the curve (IAUC) with plasma levels of oxidative stress markers 8-iso-PGF2α, 8-OH-dG, and protein carbonyl content in the study subjects. Patients with T2DM or IGR had significantly higher glucose excursions and plasma levels of oxidative stress markers compared to normal controls (P oxidative stress.

  11. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi conceals the invasion-associated type three secretion system from the innate immune system by gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Sebastian E; Winter, Maria G; Poon, Victor; Keestra, A Marijke; Sterzenbach, Torsten; Faber, Franziska; Costa, Luciana F; Cassou, Fabiane; Costa, Erica A; Alves, Geraldo E S; Paixão, Tatiane A; Santos, Renato L; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-07-01

    Delivery of microbial products into the mammalian cell cytosol by bacterial secretion systems is a strong stimulus for triggering pro-inflammatory host responses. Here we show that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), the causative agent of typhoid fever, tightly regulates expression of the invasion-associated type III secretion system (T3SS-1) and thus fails to activate these innate immune signaling pathways. The S. Typhi regulatory protein TviA rapidly repressed T3SS-1 expression, thereby preventing RAC1-dependent, RIP2-dependent activation of NF-κB in epithelial cells. Heterologous expression of TviA in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) suppressed T3SS-1-dependent inflammatory responses generated early after infection in animal models of gastroenteritis. These results suggest that S. Typhi reduces intestinal inflammation by limiting the induction of pathogen-induced processes through regulation of virulence gene expression.

  12. YAP modifies cancer cell sensitivity to EGFR and survivin inhibitors and is negatively regulated by the non-receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J-M; Nagatomo, I; Suzuki, E; Mizuno, T; Kumagai, T; Berezov, A; Zhang, H; Karlan, B; Greene, M I; Wang, Q

    2013-04-25

    The Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional factor involved in tissue development and tumorigenesis. Although YAP has been recognized as a key element of the Hippo signaling pathway, the mechanisms that regulate YAP activities remain to be fully characterized. In this study, we demonstrate that the non-receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase 14 (PTPN14) functions as a negative regulator of YAP. We show that YAP forms a protein complex with PTPN14 through the WW domains of YAP and the PPXY motifs of PTPN14. In addition, PTPN14 inhibits YAP-mediated transcriptional activities. Knockdown of YAP sensitizes cancer cells to various anti-cancer agents, such as cisplatin, the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib and the small-molecule antagonist of survivin, S12. YAP-targeted modalities may be used in combination with other cancer drugs to achieve maximal therapeutic effects.

  13. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi conceals the invasion-associated type three secretion system from the innate immune system by gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian E Winter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of microbial products into the mammalian cell cytosol by bacterial secretion systems is a strong stimulus for triggering pro-inflammatory host responses. Here we show that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi, the causative agent of typhoid fever, tightly regulates expression of the invasion-associated type III secretion system (T3SS-1 and thus fails to activate these innate immune signaling pathways. The S. Typhi regulatory protein TviA rapidly repressed T3SS-1 expression, thereby preventing RAC1-dependent, RIP2-dependent activation of NF-κB in epithelial cells. Heterologous expression of TviA in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium suppressed T3SS-1-dependent inflammatory responses generated early after infection in animal models of gastroenteritis. These results suggest that S. Typhi reduces intestinal inflammation by limiting the induction of pathogen-induced processes through regulation of virulence gene expression.

  14. The calcitonin receptor gene is a candidate for regulation of susceptibility to herpes simplex type 1 neuronal infection leading to encephalitis in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is a fatal infection of the central nervous system (CNS predominantly caused by Herpes simplex virus type 1. Factors regulating the susceptibility to HSE are still largely unknown. To identify host gene(s regulating HSE susceptibility we performed a genome-wide linkage scan in an intercross between the susceptible DA and the resistant PVG rat. We found one major quantitative trait locus (QTL, Hse1, on rat chromosome 4 (confidence interval 24.3-31 Mb; LOD score 29.5 governing disease susceptibility. Fine mapping of Hse1 using recombinants, haplotype mapping and sequencing, as well as expression analysis of all genes in the interval identified the calcitonin receptor gene (Calcr as the main candidate, which also is supported by functional studies. Thus, using unbiased genetic approach variability in Calcr was identified as potentially critical for infection and viral spread to the CNS and subsequent HSE development.

  15. Is there a role for T-type Ca2+ channels in regulation of vasomotor tone in mesenteric arterioles?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Jørn; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2009-01-01

    The largest peripheral blood pressure drop occurs in terminal arterioles (<40 microm lumen diameter). L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) are considered the primary pathway for Ca2+ influx during physiologic activation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Recent evidence suggests th...

  16. Anti-diabetic effects of rice hull smoke extract on glucose-regulating mechanism in type 2 diabetic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study is to determine the protective effect of a liquid rice hull smoke extract (RHSE) against type 2 diabetes induced by a high fat diet administered to mice. Dietary administration of 0.5% or 1% RHSE for 7 weeks results in significantly reduced blood glucose and triglyceride and to...

  17. Motivation and self-regulated learning in secondary vocational education : information-processing type and gender differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, JS; Minnaert, A; Boekaerts, M

    2001-01-01

    In this article, information-processing type and gender differences in the interplay between motivational aspects (i.e., interest, persistence, test anxiety, and performance anxiety) and information processing were investigated. We argue that the two common information-processing modes, surface- and

  18. Huntingtin-interacting protein 14 is a type 1 diabetes candidate protein regulating insulin secretion and β-cell apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berchtold, Lukas Adrian; Størling, Zenia Marian; Ortis, Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a complex disease characterized by the loss of insulin-secreting β-cells. Although the disease has a strong genetic component, and several loci are known to increase T1D susceptibility risk, only few causal genes have currently been identified. To identify disease-causing...

  19. Serotonin Regulates the Firing of Principal Cells of the Subiculum by Inhibiting a T-type Ca(2+) Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anders V; Jensen, Camilla S; Crépel, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    and calcium imaging, we demonstrate that 5-HT2C receptors reduce bursting activity by inhibiting a low-threshold calcium current mediated by T-type Ca(2+) channels in principal cells of the subiculum. In addition, we show that the activation of this novel pathway decreases bursting activity and the occurrence...

  20. Reduced silent information regulator 1 signaling exacerbates myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in type 2 diabetic rats and the protective effect of melatonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liming; Liang, Hongliang; Dong, Xiaochao; Zhao, Guolong; Jin, Zhenxiao; Zhai, Mengen; Yang, Yang; Chen, Wensheng; Liu, Jincheng; Yi, Wei; Yang, Jian; Yi, Dinghua; Duan, Weixun; Yu, Shiqiang

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) increases myocardial oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Melatonin confers cardioprotective effect by suppressing oxidative damage. However, the effect and mechanism of melatonin on myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (MI/R) injury in type 2 diabetic state are still unknown. In this study, we developed high-fat diet-fed streptozotocin (HFD-STZ) rat, a well-known type 2 diabetic model, to evaluate the effect of melatonin on MI/R injury with a focus on silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) signaling, oxidative stress, and PERK/eIF2α/ATF4-mediated ER stress. HFD-STZ treated rats were exposed to melatonin treatment in the presence or the absence of sirtinol (a SIRT1 inhibitor) and subjected to MI/R surgery. Compared with nondiabetic animals, type 2 diabetic rats exhibited significantly decreased myocardial SIRT1 signaling, increased apoptosis, enhanced oxidative stress, and ER stress. Additionally, further reduced SIRT1 signaling, aggravated oxidative damage, and ER stress were found in diabetic animals subjected to MI/R surgery. Melatonin markedly reduced MI/R injury by improving cardiac functional recovery and decreasing myocardial apoptosis in type 2 diabetic animals. Melatonin treatment up-regulated SIRT1 expression, reduced oxidative damage, and suppressed PERK/eIF2α/ATF4 signaling. However, these effects were all attenuated by SIRT1 inhibition. Melatonin also protected high glucose/high fat cultured H9C2 cardiomyocytes against simulated ischemia-reperfusion injury-induced ER stress by activating SIRT1 signaling while SIRT1 siRNA blunted this action. Taken together, our study demonstrates that reduced cardiac SIRT1 signaling in type 2 diabetic state aggravates MI/R injury. Melatonin ameliorates reperfusion-induced oxidative stress and ER stress via activation of SIRT1 signaling, thus reducing MI/R damage and improving cardiac function.

  1. D-type Cyclins are important downstream effectors of cytokine signaling that regulate the proliferation of normal and neoplastic mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Sakamoto, Kazuhito; Wagner, Kay-Uwe

    2014-01-25

    In response to the ligand-mediated activation of cytokine receptors, cells decide whether to proliferate or to undergo differentiation. D-type Cyclins (Cyclin D1, D2, or D3) and their associated Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4, CDK6) connect signals from cytokines to the cell cycle machinery, and they propel cells through the G1 restriction point and into the S phase, after which growth factor stimulation is no longer essential to complete cell division. D-type Cyclins are upregulated in many human malignancies including breast cancer to promote an uncontrolled proliferation of cancer cells. After summarizing important aspects of the cytokine-mediated transcriptional regulation and the posttranslational modification of D-type Cyclins, this review will highlight the physiological significance of these cell cycle regulators during normal mammary gland development as well as the initiation and promotion of breast cancer. Although the vast majority of published reports focus almost exclusively on the role of Cyclin D1 in breast cancer, we summarize here previous and recent findings that demonstrate an important contribution of the remaining two members of this Cyclin family, in particular Cyclin D3, for the growth of ErbB2-associated breast cancer cells in humans and in mouse models. New data from genetically engineered models as well as the pharmacological inhibition of CDK4/6 suggest that targeting the combined functions of D-type Cyclins could be a suitable strategy for the treatment of ErbB2-positive and potentially other types of breast cancer.

  2. Gclust Server: 29557 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available al regulator of oxidative stress, regulates intracellular hydrogen peroxide (LysR family) 3 1.00e-16 0.0 0.0... Representative annotation transcriptional regulator of oxidative stress, regulates intracellular hydrogen p

  3. Negative regulation of type I IFN expression by OASL1 permits chronic viral infection and CD8⁺ T-cell exhaustion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myeong Sup Lee

    Full Text Available The type I interferons (IFN-Is are critical not only in early viral control but also in prolonged T-cell immune responses. However, chronic viral infections such as those of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV in humans and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV in mice overcome this early IFN-I barrier and induce viral persistence and exhaustion of T-cell function. Although various T-cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors are known to contribute to induction of chronic conditions, the roles of IFN-I negative regulators in chronic viral infections have been largely unexplored. Herein, we explored whether 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase-like 1 (OASL1, a recently defined IFN-I negative regulator, plays a key role in the virus-specific T-cell response and viral defense against chronic LCMV. To this end, we infected Oasl1 knockout and wild-type mice with LCMV CL-13 (a chronic virus and monitored T-cell responses, serum cytokine levels, and viral titers. LCMV CL-13-infected Oasl1 KO mice displayed a sustained level of serum IFN-I, which was primarily produced by splenic plasmacytoid dendritic cells, during the very early phase of infection (2-3 days post-infection. Oasl1 deficiency also led to the accelerated elimination of viremia and induction of a functional antiviral CD8 T-cell response, which critically depended on IFN-I receptor signaling. Together, these results demonstrate that OASL1-mediated negative regulation of IFN-I production at an early phase of infection permits viral persistence and suppresses T-cell function, suggesting that IFN-I negative regulators, including OASL1, could be exciting new targets for preventing chronic viral infection.

  4. Pancreatic stone protein/regenerating protein (PSP/reg): a novel secreted protein up-regulated in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiayue; Li, Ling; Raptis, Dimitri; Li, Xiaoshan; Li, Fengfei; Chen, Bijun; He, Jiajia; Graf, Rolf; Sun, Zilin

    2015-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has insulin resistance (IR) or reduced β-cell mass, partially due to an increased β-cell apoptosis rate. Pancreatic stone protein/regenerating protein (PSP/reg) is a secretory protein produced in the pancreas and up-regulated dramatically during pancreatic disease. Recent studies revealed that β-cells undergoing apoptosis induce PSP/reg expression in surviving neighboring cells. Further experiments demonstrated that PSP/reg was elevated during disease progression in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). However, the association between PSP/reg and T2DM patients is unknown. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate PSP/reg in different clinical stages of T2DM and evaluate its correlation with chronic complications of diabetes. A total of 1,121 participants (479 males, 642 females; age range 23-80 years) were enrolled in this study. PSP/reg serum values were measured by a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We analyzed its correlation with clinical and biochemical parameters in subjects with T2DM at different clinical phases. Statistical analyses were conducted using SPSS 17.0 software. Correlations of PSP/reg and clinical parameters were performed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Differences between groups were determined by Nemenyi test. PSP/reg was elevated in high-risk and impaired glucose regulation (IGR) patients (pPSP/reg was significantly up-regulated in newly diagnosed T2DM patients and long-term diabetes patients with complications (pPSP/reg levels correlated with the duration of diabetes (pPSP/reg is significantly up-regulated in T2DM patients, and PSP/reg levels are related to the duration of diabetes. Therefore, PSP/reg might be useful as a predictor of T2DM and disease progression.

  5. Molecular cloning of a novel human I-mfa domain-containing protein that differently regulates human T-cell leukemia virus type I and HIV-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébault, S; Gachon, F; Lemasson, I; Devaux, C; Mesnard, J M

    2000-02-18

    Regulation of viral genome expression is the result of complex cooperation between viral proteins and host cell factors. We report here the characterization of a novel cellular factor sharing homology with the specific cysteine-rich C-terminal domain of the basic helix-loop-helix repressor protein I-mfa. The synthesis of this new factor, called HIC for Human I-mfa domain-Containing protein, is controlled at the translational level by two different codons, an ATG and an upstream non-ATG translational initiator, allowing the production of two protein isoforms, p32 and p40, respectively. We show that the HIC protein isoforms present different subcellular localizations, p32 being mainly distributed throughout the cytoplasm, whereas p40 is targeted to the nucleolus. Moreover, in trying to understand the function of HIC, we have found that both isoforms stimulate in T-cells the expression of a luciferase reporter gene driven by the human T-cell leukemia virus type I-long terminal repeat in the presence of the viral transactivator Tax. We demonstrate by mutagenesis that the I-mfa-like domain of HIC is involved in this regulation. Finally, we also show that HIC is able to down-regulate the luciferase expression from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1-long terminal repeat induced by the viral transactivator Tat. From these results, we propose that HIC and I-mfa represent two members of a new family of proteins regulating gene expression and characterized by a particular cysteine-rich C-terminal domain.

  6. Regulation of activin receptor-interacting protein 2 expression in mouse hepatoma Hepal-6 cells and its relationship with collagen type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the regulation of activin receptor-interacting protein 2 (ARIP2) expression and its possible relationships with collagen type Ⅳ (collagen Ⅳ) in mouse hepatoma cell line Hepal-6 cells.METHODS: The ARIP2 mRNA expression kinetics in Hepal-6 cells was detected by RT-PCR, and its regulation factors were analyzed by treatment with signal transduction activators such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), forskolin and A23187. After pcDNA3-ARIP2 was transfected into Hepal-6 cells, the effects of ARIP2 overexpression on activin type Ⅱ receptor (ActRII)and collagen Ⅳ expression were evaluated.RESULTS: The expression levels of ARIP2 mRNA in Hapel-6 cells were elevated in time-dependent manner 12 h after treatment with activin A and endotoxin LPS, but not changed evidently in the early stage of stimulation (2 or 4 h). TheARIP2 mRNA expression was increased after stimulated with signal transduction activators such as PMA and forskolin in Hepal-6 cells, whereas decreased after treatment with A23187 (25.3% ± 5.7% vS 48.1% ± 3.6%, P < 0.01). ARIP2 overexpression could remarkably suppress the expression of ActRIIA mRNA in dose-dependent manner, but has no effect on ActRIIB in Hepal-6 cells induced by activin A. Furthermore, we have found that overexpression of ARIP2 could inhibit collagen Ⅳ mRNA and protein expressions induced by activin A in Hapel-6 cells.CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that ARIP2 expression can be influenced by various factors. ARIP2 may participate in the negative feedback regulation of signal transduction in the late stage by affecting the expression of ActRIIA and play an important role in regulation of development of liver fibrosis induced by activin.

  7. T helper 2 (Th2) cell differentiation, type 2 innate lymphoid cell (ILC2) development and regulation of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-13 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinfang

    2015-09-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5 and IL-13, the signature cytokines that are produced during type 2 immune responses, are critical for protective immunity against infections of extracellular parasites and are responsible for asthma and many other allergic inflammatory diseases. Although many immune cell types within the myeloid lineage compartment including basophils, eosinophils and mast cells are capable of producing at least one of these cytokines, the production of these "type 2 immune response-related" cytokines by lymphoid lineages, CD4 T helper 2 (Th2) cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) in particular, are the central events during type 2 immune responses. In this review, I will focus on the signaling pathways and key molecules that determine the differentiation of naïve CD4 T cells into Th2 cells, and how the expression of Th2 cytokines, especially IL-4 and IL-13, is regulated in Th2 cells. The similarities and differences in the differentiation of Th2 cells, IL-4-producing T follicular helper (Tfh) cells and ILC2s as well as their relationships will also be discussed.

  8. Correlation between the decrease of cholesterol efflux from macrophages in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and down-regulated CYP7A1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, L D; Li, C Q; Peng, R; Ren, X H; Ma, R L; Wang, Y; Lv, H J

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this study was to examine the changes of cellular cholesterol efflux from macrophages in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM), and to determine the expression of CYP7A1, ABCG5, and LXRβ therein. We recruited 30 patients with type II DM (including 15 patients complicated with coronary heart disease and 15 patients with DM only) and 15 normal controls for this study. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated for macrophage culture. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CYP7A1, ABCG5, and LXRβ were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The macrophage cholesterol efflux rate was determined with 10% autoserum and standard serum as receptors. We determined that the expression levels of macrophage CYP7A1 mRNA and protein in the type II DM group were significantly lower than those in the control group, but no differences were found in the ABCG5 and LXRβ expression levels between the groups. The macrophage cholesterol efflux rate in the patients with type II DM was also significantly decreased compared with that of the normal control subjects (P CYP7A1 mRNA expression and macrophage cholesterol efflux rate were significantly positively correlated. In summary, this study demonstrated that the macrophage cholesterol efflux in patients with type II DM was significantly reduced, and that this reduction was associated with the down-regulation of CYP7A1 expression.

  9. OxLDL up-regulates Niemann-Pick type C1 expression through ERK1/2/COX-2/ PPARα-signaling pathway in macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohua yu; Chaoke Tang; Xiaoxu Li; Guojun Zhao; Ji Xiao; Zhongcheng Mo; Kai Yin; Zhisheng Jiang; Yuchang Fu; Xiaohui Zha

    2012-01-01

    The Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) is located mainly in the membranes of the late endosome/lysosome and controls the intracellular cholesterol trafficking from the late endosome/lysosome to the plasma membrane.It has been reported that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) can up-regulate NPC1 expression.However,the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood.In this study,we investigated the effect of oxLDL stimulation on NPC1 expression in THP-1 macrophages.Our results showed that oxLDL up-regulated NPC1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner.In addition,oxLDL also induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2).Treatment with oxLDL significantly increased cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)mRNA and protein expression in the macrophages,and these increases were suppressed by the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 or ERK1/2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) treatment.OxLDL up-regulated the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) at the mRNA and protein levels,which could be abolished by COX-2 siRNA or COX-2 inhibitor NS398 treatment in these macrophages.OxLDL dramatically elevated cellular cholesterol efflux,which was abrogated by inhibiting ERK1/2 and/or COX-2.In addition,oxLDL-induced NPC1 expression and cellular cholesterol effiux were reversed by PPARα siRNA or GW6471,an antagonist of PPARα.Taken together,these results provide the evidence that oxLDL can up-regulate the expression of the NPC1 through ERK1/2/COX-2/PPARα-signaling pathway in macrophages.

  10. BCL6--regulated by AhR/ARNT and wild-type MEF2B--drives expression of germinal center markers MYBL1 and LMO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jie; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Geffers, Robert; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Nagel, Stefan; Pommerenke, Claudia; Romani, Julia; Scherr, Michaela; Vaas, Lea A I; Zaborski, Margarete; Drexler, Hans G; Quentmeier, Hilmar

    2015-06-01

    Genetic heterogeneity is widespread in tumors, but poorly documented in cell lines. According to immunoglobulin hypermutation analysis, the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell line U-2932 comprises two subpopulations faithfully representing original tumor subclones. We set out to identify molecular causes underlying subclone-specific expression affecting 221 genes including surface markers and the germinal center oncogenes BCL6 and MYC. Genomic copy number variations explained 58/221 genes differentially expressed in the two U-2932 clones. Subclone-specific expression of the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and the resulting activity of the AhR/ARNT complex underlaid differential regulation of 11 genes including MEF2B. Knock-down and inhibitor experiments confirmed that AhR/ARNT regulates MEF2B, a key transcription factor for BCL6. AhR, MEF2B and BCL6 levels correlated not only in the U-2932 subclones but in the majority of 23 cell lines tested, indicting overexpression of AhR as a novel mechanism behind BCL6 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Enforced modulation of BCL6 affected 48/221 signature genes. Although BCL6 is known as a transcriptional repressor, 28 genes were up-regulated, including LMO2 and MYBL1 which, like BCL6, signify germinal center diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Supporting the notion that BCL6 can induce gene expression, BCL6 and the majority of potential targets were co-regulated in a series of B-cell lines. In conclusion, genomic copy number aberrations, activation of AhR/ARNT, and overexpression of BCL6 are collectively responsible for differential expression of more than 100 genes in subclones of the U-2932 cell line. It is particularly interesting that BCL6 - regulated by AhR/ARNT and wild-type MEF2B - may drive expression of germinal center markers in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

  11. cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I Is Implicated in the Regulation of the Timing and Quality of Sleep and Wakefulness

    OpenAIRE

    Sonja Langmesser; Paul Franken; Susanne Feil; Yann Emmenegger; Urs Albrecht; Robert Feil

    2009-01-01

    Many effects of nitric oxide (NO) are mediated by the activation of guanylyl cyclases and subsequent production of the second messenger cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP). cGMP activates cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PRKGs), which can therefore be considered downstream effectors of NO signaling. Since NO is thought to be involved in the regulation of both sleep and circadian rhythms, we analyzed these two processes in mice deficient for cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PRKG1) ...

  12. Binding of the Fkh1 Forkhead Associated Domain to a Phosphopeptide within the Mph1 DNA Helicase Regulates Mating-Type Switching in Budding Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette M Dummer

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Fkh1 protein has roles in cell-cycle regulated transcription as well as a transcription-independent role in recombination donor preference during mating-type switching. The conserved FHA domain of Fkh1 regulates donor preference by juxtaposing two distant regions on chromosome III to promote their recombination. A model posits that this Fkh1-mediated long-range chromosomal juxtaposition requires an interaction between the FHA domain and a partner protein(s, but to date no relevant partner has been described. In this study, we used structural modeling, 2-hybrid assays, and mutational analyses to show that the predicted phosphothreonine-binding FHA domain of Fkh1 interacted with multiple partner proteins. The Fkh1 FHA domain was important for its role in cell-cycle regulation, but no single interaction partner could account for this role. In contrast, Fkh1's interaction with the Mph1 DNA repair helicase regulated donor preference during mating-type switching. Using 2-hybrid assays, co-immunoprecipitation, and fluorescence anisotropy, we mapped a discrete peptide within the regulatory Mph1 C-terminus required for this interaction and identified two threonines that were particularly important. In vitro binding experiments indicated that at least one of these threonines had to be phosphorylated for efficient Fkh1 binding. Substitution of these two threonines with alanines (mph1-2TA specifically abolished the Fkh1-Mph1 interaction in vivo and altered donor preference during mating-type switching to the same degree as mph1Δ. Notably, the mph1-2TA allele maintained other functions of Mph1 in genome stability. Deletion of a second Fkh1-interacting protein encoded by YMR144W also resulted in a change in Fkh1-FHA-dependent donor preference. We have named this gene FDO1 for Forkhead one interacting protein involved in donor preference. We conclude that a phosphothreonine-mediated protein-protein interface between Fkh1-FHA and

  13. Regulation by ToxR-Like Proteins Converges on vttRB Expression To Control Type 3 Secretion System-Dependent Caco2-BBE Cytotoxicity in Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Kelly A.; Sofia, Madeline K.; Weaver, Jacob W. A.; Christopher H. Seward; Dziejman, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Genes carried on the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) pathogenicity island of Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 serogroup strain AM-19226 must be precisely regulated in order for bacteria to cause disease. Previously reported results showed that both T3SS function and the presence of bile are required to cause Caco2-BBE cell cytotoxicity during coculture with strain AM-19226. We therefore investigated additional parameters affecting in vitro cell death, including bacterial load and the role of th...

  14. Regulation by ToxR-Like Proteins Converges on vttRB Expression To Control Type 3 Secretion System-Dependent Caco2-BBE Cytotoxicity in Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Kelly A.; Sofia, Madeline K.; Weaver, Jacob W. A.; Seward, Christopher H.; Dziejman, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Genes carried on the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) pathogenicity island of Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 serogroup strain AM-19226 must be precisely regulated in order for bacteria to cause disease. Previously reported results showed that both T3SS function and the presence of bile are required to cause Caco2-BBE cell cytotoxicity during coculture with strain AM-19226. We therefore investigated additional parameters affecting in vitro cell death, including bacterial load and the role of th...

  15. DDX6 regulates sequestered nuclear CUG-expanded DMPK-mRNA in dystrophia myotonica type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettersson, Olof Joakim; Aagaard, Lars; Andrejeva, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by CUG triplet expansions in the 3′ UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA). The etiology of this multi-systemic disease involves pre-mRNA splicing defects elicited by the ability of the CUG-expanded mRNA to ‘sp......Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by CUG triplet expansions in the 3′ UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA). The etiology of this multi-systemic disease involves pre-mRNA splicing defects elicited by the ability of the CUG-expanded m...

  16. Type I Interferon at the Interface of Antiviral Immunity and Immune Regulation: The Curious Case of HIV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Boasso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferon (IFN-I play a critical role in the innate immune response against viral infections. They actively participate in antiviral immunity by inducing molecular mechanisms of viral restriction and by limiting the spread of the infection, but they also orchestrate the initial phases of the adaptive immune response and influence the quality of T cell immunity. During infection with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, the production of and response to IFN-I may be severely altered by the lymphotropic nature of the virus. In this review I consider the different aspects of virus sensing, IFN-I production, signalling, and effects on target cells, with a particular focus on the alterations observed following HIV-1 infection.

  17. Exercise reduces adipose tissue via cannabinoid receptor type 1 which is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Zhen Cheng; Liu, Dao Yan; Zhang, Li Li

    2007-01-01

    Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-delta)-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow...... or a high-fat diet without and with regular endurance exercise. Exercise in rats on high-fat diet significantly reduced visceral fat mass, blood pressure, and adipocyte size (each p......Obesity is one major cardiovascular risk factor. We tested effects of endurance exercise on cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-delta)-dependent pathways in adipose tissue. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to standard laboratory chow...

  18. Fisetin up-regulates the expression of adiponectin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes via the activation of silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1)-deacetylase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Taewon; Kim, Oh Yoen; Shin, Min-Jeong; Choi, Eun Young; Lee, Sung Sook; Han, Ye Sun; Chung, Ji Hyung

    2014-10-29

    Adiponectin, an adipokine, has been described as showing physiological benefits against obesity-related malfunctions and vascular dysfunction. Several natural compounds that promote the expression and secretion of adipokines in adipocytes could be useful for treating metabolic disorders. This study investigated the effect of fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, on the regulation of adiponectin in adipocytes using 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. The expression and secretion of adiponectin increased in 3T3-L1 cells upon treatment with fisetin in a dose-dependent manner. Fisetin-induced adiponectin secretion was inhibited by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) antagonists. It was also revealed that fisetin increased the activities of PPARs and silent mating type information regulation 2 homologue 1 (SIRT1) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the up-regulation of adiponectin and the activation of PPARs induced by fisetin were prevented by a SIRT1 inhibitor. Fisetin also promoted deacetylation of PPAR γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1) and its interaction with PPARs. SIRT knockdown by siRNA significantly decreased both adiponectin production and PPARs-PGC-1 interaction. These results provide evidence that fisetin promotes the gene expression of adiponectin through the activation of SIRT1 and PPARs in adipocytes.

  19. Functional domains of wild-type and mutant p53 proteins involved in transcriptional regulation, transdominant inhibition, and transformation suppression.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    The wild-type (wt) p53 protein has transcriptional activation functions which may be linked to its tumor suppressor activity. Many mutant p53 proteins expressed in cancers have lost the ability to function as transcriptional activators and furthermore may inhibit wt p53 function. To study the mechanisms by which mutant forms of p53 have lost their transactivation function and can act in a dominant negative manner, a structure-function analysis of both mutant and engineered truncated forms of ...

  20. Regulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in ovarian cancer: a potential role for BRCA1

    OpenAIRE

    Bi, Fang-Fang; Li, Da; Cao, Chen; Li, Chun-Yan; Yang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Background Both BRCA1 and angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) play a critical role in ovarian cancer progression. However, the crosstalk between BRCA1 and AGTR1 signaling pathways remains largely unknown. Methods BRCA1 promoter methylation was analyzed by bisulfite sequence using primers focused on the core promoter region. Expression levels of BRCA1 and AGTR1 were assessed by immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Regression analysis was used to examine the possible relationship between ...

  1. One type of chalcone synthase gene expressed during embryogenesis regulates the flavonoid accumulation in citrus cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, T; Kita, M; Tomono, Y; EndoInagaki, T; Omura, M

    1999-06-01

    To elucidate the relationship between the expression of chalcone synthase (CHS) genes and the production of flavonoid in citrus cell cultures, two cDNA clones encoding CHS were isolated (CitCHS1 and CitCHS2) from the citrus. The accumulation of CitCHS2 mRNA was notably induced by embryogenesis but CitCHS1 mRNA was not. There was no detectable accumulation of flavonoid in the undifferentiated calli, but flavonoid accumulated after the morphological changes to embryoids. These results indicate that two CHS genes differentially expressed during citrus somatic embryogenesis and CitCHS2 may regulate the accumulation of flavonoid in citrus cell cultures.

  2. Plant regeneration of non-toxic Jatropha curcas—impacts of plant growth regulators, source and type of explants

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish

    2011-01-28

    Jatropha curcas is an oil bearing species with multiple uses and considerable economic potential as a biofuel plant, however, oil and deoiled cake are toxic. A non-toxic variety of J. curcas is reported from Mexico. The present investigation explores the effects of different plant growth regulators (PGRs) viz. 6-benzyl aminopurine (BAP) or thidiazuron (TDZ) individually and in combination with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), on regeneration from in vitro and field-grown mature leaf explants, in vitro and glasshouse-grown seedlings cotyledonary leaf explants of non-toxic J. curcas. In all the tested parameters maximum regeneration efficiency (81.07%) and the number of shoot buds per explants (20.17) was observed on 9.08 μM TDZ containing Murashige and Skoog’s (MS) medium from in vitro cotyledonary leaf explants. The regenerated shoot buds were transferred to MS medium containing 10 μM kinetin (Kn), 4.5 μM BAP and 5.5 μM α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) for shoot proliferation. The proliferated shoots could be elongated on MS medium supplemented with 2.25 μM BAP and 8.5 μM IAA. Rooting was achieved when the basal cut end of elongated shoots were dipped in half strength MS liquid medium containing different concentrations and combinations of IBA, IAA and NAA for four days followed by transfer to growth regulators free half strength MS medium supplemented 0.25 mg/l activated charcoal. The rooted plants could be established in soil with more than 90% survival rate.

  3. [Considerations about study on the underlying mechanism of acu-moxibustion in the treatment of obesity type polycystic ovary syndrome by regulating adiponectin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yan-Jun; Shi, Yin; Yu, Li-Qing; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2012-02-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common reproductive endocrine disease in women of reproductive age, and the obesity and insulin resistance are considered to be the key link in the pathophysiological process of PCOS of obesity type. Adiponectin, a protein hormone, is closely related to insulin resistance and obesity, which has been being researched extensively in recent years. The authors of the present article review the pathogenesis of PCOS of obesity type from the relationship between adiponectin and obesity, and between adiponectin and insulin resistance, separately. In particular, the authors review studies on the underlying mechanism of acupuncture and moxibustion interventions in regulating adiponectin level briefly. The authors think of that acupuncture and moxibustion interventions induced increase of adiponectin level is possibly to improve insulin resistance in obesity and/or PCOS patients, hoping to provide a new target for clinical treatment of PCOS.

  4. Response of Vibrio cholerae to Low-Temperature Shifts: CspV Regulation of Type VI Secretion, Biofilm Formation, and Association with Zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsley, Loni; Sison Mangus, Marilou P.; Mehic, Sanjin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to sense and adapt to temperature fluctuation is critical to the aquatic survival, transmission, and infectivity of Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the disease cholera. Little information is available on the physiological changes that occur when V. cholerae experiences temperature shifts. The genome-wide transcriptional profile of V. cholerae upon a shift in human body temperature (37°C) to lower temperatures, 15°C and 25°C, which mimic those found in the aquatic environment, was determined. Differentially expressed genes included those involved in the cold shock response, biofilm formation, type VI secretion, and virulence. Analysis of a mutant lacking the cold shock gene cspV, which was upregulated >50-fold upon a low-temperature shift, revealed that it regulates genes involved in biofilm formation and type VI secretion. CspV controls biofilm formation through modulation of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate and regulates type VI-mediated interspecies killing in a temperature-dependent manner. Furthermore, a strain lacking cspV had significant defects for attachment and type VI-mediated killing on the surface of the aquatic crustacean Daphnia magna. Collectively, these studies reveal that cspV is a major regulator of the temperature downshift response and plays an important role in controlling cellular processes crucial to the infectious cycle of V. cholerae. IMPORTANCE Little is known about how human pathogens respond and adapt to ever-changing parameters of natural habitats outside the human host and how environmental adaptation alters dissemination. Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the severe diarrheal disease cholera, experiences fluctuations in temperature in its natural aquatic habitats and during the infection process. Furthermore, temperature is a critical environmental signal governing the occurrence of V. cholerae and cholera outbreaks. In this study, we showed that V. cholerae reprograms its transcriptome in

  5. A LysR-Type Transcriptional Regulator, RovM, Senses Nutritional Cues Suggesting that It Is Involved in Metabolic Adaptation of Yersinia pestis to the Flea Gut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Vadyvaloo

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis has evolved as a clonal variant of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to cause flea-borne biofilm-mediated transmission of the bubonic plague. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator, RovM, is highly induced only during Y. pestis infection of the flea host. RovM homologs in other pathogens regulate biofilm formation, nutrient sensing, and virulence; including in Y. pseudotuberculosis, where RovM represses the major virulence factor, RovA. Here the role that RovM plays during flea infection was investigated using a Y. pestis KIM6+ strain deleted of rovM, ΔrovM. The ΔrovM mutant strain was not affected in characteristic biofilm gut blockage, growth, or survival during single infection of fleas. Nonetheless, during a co-infection of fleas, the ΔrovM mutant exhibited a significant competitive fitness defect relative to the wild type strain. This competitive fitness defect was restored as a fitness advantage relative to the wild type in a ΔrovM mutant complemented in trans to over-express rovM. Consistent with this, Y. pestis strains, producing elevated transcriptional levels of rovM, displayed higher growth rates, and differential ability to form biofilm in response to specific nutrients in comparison to the wild type. In addition, we demonstrated that rovA was not repressed by RovM in fleas, but that elevated transcriptional levels of rovM in vitro correlated with repression of rovA under specific nutritional conditions. Collectively, these findings suggest that RovM likely senses specific nutrient cues in the flea gut environment, and accordingly directs metabolic adaptation to enhance flea gut colonization by Y. pestis.

  6. Epidermal growth factor regulation in adult rat alveolar type II cells of amiloride-sensitive cation channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, P J; Borok, Z; Kim, K J; Lubman, R L; Danto, S I; Crandall, E D

    1999-12-01

    Using the patch-clamp technique, we studied the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on whole cell and single channel currents in adult rat alveolar epithelial type II cells in primary culture in the presence or absence of EGF for 48 h. In symmetrical sodium isethionate solutions, EGF exposure caused a significant increase in the type II cell whole cell conductance. Amiloride (10 microM) produced approximately 20-30% inhibition of the whole cell conductance in both the presence and absence of EGF, such that EGF caused the magnitude of the amiloride-sensitive component to more than double. Northern analysis showed that alpha-, beta- and gamma-subunits of rat epithelial Na(+) channel (rENaC) steady-state mRNA levels were all significantly decreased by EGF. At the single channel level, all active inside-out patches demonstrated only 25-pS channels that were amiloride sensitive and relatively nonselective for cations (P(Na(+))/P(K(+)) approximately 1.0:0.48). Although the biophysical characteristics (conductance, open-state probability, and selectivity) of the channels from EGF-treated and untreated cells were essentially identical, channel density was increased by EGF; the modal channel per patch was increased from 1 to 2. These findings indicate that EGF increases expression of nonselective, amiloride-sensitive cation channels in adult alveolar epithelial type II cells. The contribution of rENaC to the total EGF-dependent cation current under these conditions is quantitatively less important than that of the nonselective cation channels in these cells.

  7. Differential regulation of type I interferon and epidermal growth factor pathways by a human Respirovirus virulence factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Caignard

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of paramyxoviruses are responsible for acute respiratory infections in children, elderly and immuno-compromised individuals, resulting in airway inflammation and exacerbation of chronic diseases like asthma. To understand the molecular pathogenesis of these infections, we searched for cellular targets of the virulence protein C of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (hPIV3-C. We found that hPIV3-C interacts directly through its C-terminal domain with STAT1 and GRB2, whereas C proteins from measles or Nipah viruses failed to do so. Binding to STAT1 explains the previously reported capacity of hPIV3-C to block type I interferon signaling, but the interaction with GRB2 was unexpected. This adaptor protein bridges Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF receptor to MAPK/ERK pathway, a signaling cascade recently found to be involved in airway inflammatory response. We report that either hPIV3 infection or transient expression of hPIV3-C both increase cellular response to EGF, as assessed by Elk1 transactivation and phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2, 40S ribosomal subunit protein S6 and translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E. Furthermore, inhibition of MAPK/ERK pathway with U0126 prevented viral protein expression in infected cells. Altogether, our data provide molecular basis to explain the role of hPIV3-C as a virulence factor and determinant of pathogenesis and demonstrate that Paramyxoviridae have evolved a single virulence factor to block type I interferon signaling and to boost simultaneous cellular response to growth factors.

  8. Pulmonary alveolar epithelial uptake of S-nitrosothiols is regulated by L-type amino acid transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granillo, Olivia M; Brahmajothi, Mulugu V; Li, Sheng; Whorton, A Richard; Mason, S Nicholas; McMahon, Timothy J; Auten, Richard L

    2008-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) effects are often mediated via S-nitrosothiol (SNO) formation; SNO uptake has recently been shown to be mediated in some cell types via system L-type amino acid transporters (LAT-1, 2). Inhaled NO therapy may exert some biological effects via SNO formation. We therefore sought to determine if pulmonary epithelial SNO uptake depended on LAT or peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2). Both LAT-1 and PEPT2 proteins were detected by immunoblot and immunocytochemistry in L2 cells and rat lung. We tested SNO uptake through the transporters by exposing rat alveolar epithelial cells (L2 and type II) to RSNOs: S-nitrosoglutathione, S-nitrosocysteinylglycine (SNO-Cys-Gly), S-nitrosocysteine (CSNO), and to NO donor diethylamine NONOate (DEA-NONOate). SNO was detected in cell lysates by ozone chemiluminescence. NO uptake was detected by fluorescence in alveolar epithelial cells loaded with 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM) diacetate cultured in submersion and exposed to RSNOs and DEA NONOate. Addition of L-Cys but not D-Cys to RSNOs or DEA NONOate increased SNO and DAF-FM signal that was inhibited by coincubation with LAT competitors. Incubation of cells with PEPT2 substrate SNO-Cys-Gly showed no increase in SNO or DAF-FM signal unless incubated with L-Cys. This was unaffected by PEPT2 inhibition. We conclude that RSNOs (thionitrites, S-nitrosothiols) and NO enter alveolar epithelial cells predominantly by S-nitrosation of L-Cys, which is then imported through LAT.

  9. Arabidopsis HFR1 Is a Potential Nuclear Substrate Regulated by the Xanthomonas Type III Effector XopD Xcc8004

    OpenAIRE

    Choon Meng Tan; Meng-Ying Li; Pei-Yun Yang; Shu Heng Chang; Yi-Ping Ho; Hong Lin; Wen-Ling Deng; Jun-Yi Yang

    2015-01-01

    XopD Xcc8004, a type III effector of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) 8004, is considered a shorter version of the XopD, which lacks the N-terminal domain. To understand the functions of XopD Xcc8004, in planta, a transgenic approach combined with inducible promoter to analyze the effects of XopD Xcc8004 in Arabidopsis was done. Here, the expression of XopD Xcc8004, in Arabidopsis elicited the accumulation of host defense-response genes. These molecular changes were dependent on sa...

  10. CagY Is an Immune-Sensitive Regulator of the Helicobacter pylori Type IV Secretion System.

    OpenAIRE

    Barrozo, RM; Hansen, LM; Lam, AM; Skoog, EC; Martin, ME; Cai, LP; Lin, Y; Latoscha, A; Suerbaum, S; Canfield, DR; Solnick, JV

    2016-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer are caused most often by Helicobacter pylori strains that harbor the cag pathogenicity island, which encodes a type IV secretion system (T4SS) that injects the CagA oncoprotein into host cells. cagY is an essential gene in the T4SS and has an unusual DNA repeat structure that predicts in-frame insertions and deletions. These cagY recombination events typically lead to a reduction in T4SS function in mouse and primate models. We examined the role of the ...

  11. Role of protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 7 in the regulation of TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Huiyun; Lee, In-Seon; Park, Jae Eun; Park, Sung Goo; Lee, Do Hee; Park, Byoung Chul; Cho, Sayeon

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases play key roles in a diverse range of cellular processes such as differentiation, cell proliferation, apoptosis, immunological signaling, and cytoskeletal function. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 7 (PTPN7), a member of the phosphatase family, specifically inactivates mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Here, we report that PTPN7 acts as a regulator of pro-inflammatory TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 cells that are stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that acts as an endotoxin and elicits strong immune responses in animals. Stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with LPS leads to a transient decrease in the levels of PTPN7 mRNA and protein. The overexpression of PTPN7 inhibits LPS-stimulated production of TNF-α. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) analysis showed that knock-down of PTPN7 in RAW 264.7 cells increased TNF-α production. PTPN7 has a negative regulatory function to extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 that increase LPS-induced TNF-α production in macrophages. Thus, our data presents PTPN7 as a negative regulator of TNF-α expression and the inflammatory response in macrophages.

  12. Human β Cell Transcriptome Analysis Uncovers lncRNAs That Are Tissue-Specific, Dynamically Regulated, and Abnormally Expressed in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán, Ignasi; Akerman, İldem; van de Bunt, Martijn; Xie, Ruiyu; Benazra, Marion; Nammo, Takao; Arnes, Luis; Nakić, Nikolina; García-Hurtado, Javier; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Sauty-Colace, Claire; Beucher, Anthony; Scharfmann, Raphael; van Arensbergen, Joris; Johnson, Paul R; Berry, Andrew; Lee, Clarence; Harkins, Timothy; Gmyr, Valery; Pattou, François; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Berney, Thierry; Hanley, Neil A; Gloyn, Anna L; Sussel, Lori; Langman, Linda; Brayman, Kenneth L; Sander, Maike; McCarthy, Mark I.; Ravassard, Philippe; Ferrer, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A significant portion of the genome is transcribed as long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), several of which are known to control gene expression. The repertoire and regulation of lncRNAs in disease-relevant tissues, however, has not been systematically explored. We report a comprehensive strand-specific transcriptome map of human pancreatic islets and β-cells, and uncover >1100 intergenic and antisense islet-cell lncRNA genes. We find islet lncRNAs that are dynamically regulated, and show that they are an integral component of the β-cell differentiation and maturation program. We sequenced the mouse islet transcriptome, and identify lncRNA orthologs that are regulated like their human counterparts. Depletion of HI-LNC25, a β-cell specific lncRNA, downregulated GLIS3 mRNA, thus exemplifying a gene regulatory function of islet lncRNAs. Finally, selected islet lncRNAs were dysregulated in type 2 diabetes or mapped to genetic loci underlying diabetes susceptibility. These findings reveal a new class of islet-cell genes relevant to β-cell programming and diabetes pathophysiology. PMID:23040067

  13. Role of protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 7 in the regulation of TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyun Seo

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatases play key roles in a diverse range of cellular processes such as differentiation, cell proliferation, apoptosis, immunological signaling, and cytoskeletal function. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 7 (PTPN7, a member of the phosphatase family, specifically inactivates mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs. Here, we report that PTPN7 acts as a regulator of pro-inflammatory TNF-α production in RAW 264.7 cells that are stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS that acts as an endotoxin and elicits strong immune responses in animals. Stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with LPS leads to a transient decrease in the levels of PTPN7 mRNA and protein. The overexpression of PTPN7 inhibits LPS-stimulated production of TNF-α. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA analysis showed that knock-down of PTPN7 in RAW 264.7 cells increased TNF-α production. PTPN7 has a negative regulatory function to extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and p38 that increase LPS-induced TNF-α production in macrophages. Thus, our data presents PTPN7 as a negative regulator of TNF-α expression and the inflammatory response in macrophages.

  14. The regulated secretory pathway in CD4(+ T cells contributes to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 cell-to-cell spread at the virological synapse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Jolly

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Direct cell-cell spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1 at the virological synapse (VS is an efficient mode of dissemination between CD4(+ T cells but the mechanisms by which HIV-1 proteins are directed towards intercellular contacts is unclear. We have used confocal microscopy and electron tomography coupled with functional virology and cell biology of primary CD4(+ T cells from normal individuals and patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome and report that the HIV-1 VS displays a regulated secretion phenotype that shares features with polarized secretion at the T cell immunological synapse (IS. Cell-cell contact at the VS re-orientates the microtubule organizing center (MTOC and organelles within the HIV-1-infected T cell towards the engaged target T cell, concomitant with polarization of viral proteins. Directed secretion of proteins at the T cell IS requires specialized organelles termed secretory lysosomes (SL and we show that the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env localizes with CTLA-4 and FasL in SL-related compartments and at the VS. Finally, CD4(+ T cells that are disabled for regulated secretion are less able to support productive cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread. We propose that HIV-1 hijacks the regulated secretory pathway of CD4(+ T cells to enhance its dissemination.

  15. The Regulated Secretory Pathway in CD4+ T cells Contributes to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Cell-to-Cell Spread at the Virological Synapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Clare; Welsch, Sonja; Michor, Stefanie; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2011-01-01

    Direct cell-cell spread of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) at the virological synapse (VS) is an efficient mode of dissemination between CD4+ T cells but the mechanisms by which HIV-1 proteins are directed towards intercellular contacts is unclear. We have used confocal microscopy and electron tomography coupled with functional virology and cell biology of primary CD4+ T cells from normal individuals and patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome and report that the HIV-1 VS displays a regulated secretion phenotype that shares features with polarized secretion at the T cell immunological synapse (IS). Cell-cell contact at the VS re-orientates the microtubule organizing center (MTOC) and organelles within the HIV-1-infected T cell towards the engaged target T cell, concomitant with polarization of viral proteins. Directed secretion of proteins at the T cell IS requires specialized organelles termed secretory lysosomes (SL) and we show that the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) localizes with CTLA-4 and FasL in SL-related compartments and at the VS. Finally, CD4+ T cells that are disabled for regulated secretion are less able to support productive cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread. We propose that HIV-1 hijacks the regulated secretory pathway of CD4+ T cells to enhance its dissemination. PMID:21909273

  16. Identification of host cytosolic sensors and bacterial factors regulating the type I interferon response to Legionella pneumophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Monroe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a gram-negative bacterial pathogen that replicates in host macrophages and causes a severe pneumonia called Legionnaires' Disease. The innate immune response to L. pneumophila remains poorly understood. Here we focused on identifying host and bacterial factors involved in the production of type I interferons (IFN in response to L. pneumophila. It was previously suggested that the delivery of L. pneumophila DNA to the host cell cytosol is the primary signal that induces the type I IFN response. However, our data are not easily reconciled with this model. We provide genetic evidence that two RNA-sensing proteins, RIG-I and MDA5, participate in the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Importantly, these sensors do not seem to be required for the IFN response to L. pneumophila DNA, whereas we found that RIG-I was required for the response to L. pneumophila RNA. Thus, we hypothesize that bacterial RNA, or perhaps an induced host RNA, is the primary stimulus inducing the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Our study also identified a secreted effector protein, SdhA, as a key suppressor of the IFN response to L. pneumophila. Although viral suppressors of cytosolic RNA-sensing pathways have been previously identified, analogous bacterial factors have not been described. Thus, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which an intracellular bacterial pathogen activates and also represses innate immune responses.

  17. The SOD2 gene, encoding a manganese-type superoxide dismutase, is up-regulated during conidiogenesis in the plant-pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, G-C; Hanau, R M; Vaillancourt, L J

    2002-07-01

    The SOD2 gene, encoding a manganese-type superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), was identified from Colletotrichum graminicola among a collection of cDNAs representing genes that are up-regulated during conidiogenesis. The SOD2 gene consists of a 797-bp open reading frame that is interrupted by three introns and is predicted to encode a polypeptide of 208 amino acids. All conserved residues of the MnSOD protein family, including four consensus metal binding domains, are present in the predicted SOD2 protein. However, the predicted protein does not appear to contain a signal peptide that would target it to the mitochondria. Northern hybridizations revealed that expression of the approximately 900-bp SOD2 transcript is closely associated with differentiation of both oval and falcate conidia. Southern analysis indicated that there is only a single copy of the gene. SOD2 disruption strains were morphologically and pathogenically indistinguishable from wild-type strains. The dispensability of the MnSOD enzyme may be due to the activities of two other SOD enzymes, a highly expressed iron-type superoxide dismutase and a much less abundant copper/zinc type, that were also detected in C. graminicola.

  18. Cross-Regulation of Two Type I Interferon Signaling Pathways in Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Controls Anti-malaria Immunity and Host Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Cai, Baowei; Wang, Mingjun; Tan, Peng; Ding, Xilai; Wu, Jian; Li, Jian; Li, Qingtian; Liu, Pinghua; Xing, Changsheng; Wang, Helen Y; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2016-11-15

    Type I interferon (IFN) is critical for controlling pathogen infection; however, its regulatory mechanisms in plasmacytoid cells (pDCs) still remain unclear. Here, we have shown that nucleic acid sensors cGAS-, STING-, MDA5-, MAVS-, or transcription factor IRF3-deficient mice produced high amounts of type I IFN-α and IFN-β (IFN-α/β) in the serum and were resistant to lethal plasmodium yoelii YM infection. Robust IFN-α/β production was abolished when gene encoding nucleic acid sensor TLR7, signaling adaptor MyD88, or transcription factor IRF7 was ablated or pDCs were depleted. Further, we identified SOCS1 as a key negative regulator to inhibit MyD88-dependent type I IFN signaling in pDCs. Finally, we have demonstrated that pDCs, cDCs, and macrophages were required for generating IFN-α/β-induced subsequent protective immunity. Thus, our findings have identified a critical regulatory mechanism of type I IFN signaling in pDCs and stage-specific function of immune cells in generating potent immunity against lethal YM infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of steroid 5-{alpha} reductase type 2 (Srd5a2) by sterol regulatory element binding proteins and statin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Young-Kyo [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Zhu, Bing [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0144 (United States); Jeon, Tae-Il [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Osborne, Timothy F., E-mail: tfosborn@uci.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we show that sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) regulate expression of Srd5a2, an enzyme that catalyzes the irreversible conversion of testosterone to dihydroxytestosterone in the male reproductive tract and is highly expressed in androgen-sensitive tissues such as the prostate and skin. We show that Srd5a2 is induced in livers and prostate from mice fed a chow diet supplemented with lovastatin plus ezitimibe (L/E), which increases the activity of nuclear SREBP-2. The three fold increase in Srd5a2 mRNA mediated by L/E treatment was accompanied by the induction of SREBP-2 binding to the Srd5a2 promoter detected by a ChIP-chip assay in liver. We identified a SREBP-2 responsive region within the first 300 upstream bases of the mouse Srd5a2 promoter by co-transfection assays which contain a site that bound SREBP-2 in vitro by an EMSA. Srd5a2 protein was also induced in cells over-expressing SREBP-2 in culture. The induction of Srd5a2 through SREBP-2 provides a mechanistic explanation for why even though statin therapy is effective in reducing cholesterol levels in treating hypercholesterolemia it does not compromise androgen production in clinical studies.

  20. Glutamine synthetase stability and subcellular distribution in astrocytes are regulated by γ-aminobutyric type B receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyghe, Deborah; Nakamura, Yasuko; Terunuma, Miho; Faideau, Mathilde; Haydon, Philip; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J

    2014-10-17

    Emerging evidence suggests that functional γ-aminobutyric acid B receptors (GABABRs) are expressed by astrocytes within the mammalian brain. GABABRs are heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors that are composed of R1/R2 subunits. To date, they have been characterized in neurons as the principal mediators of sustained inhibitory signaling; however their roles in astrocytic physiology have been ill defined. Here we reveal that the cytoplasmic tail of the GABABR2 subunit binds directly to the astrocytic protein glutamine synthetase (GS) and that this interaction determines the subcellular localization of GS. We further demonstrate that the binding of GS to GABABR2 increases the steady state expression levels of GS in heterologous cells and in mouse primary astrocyte culture. Mechanistically this increased stability of GS in the presence of GABABR2 occurs via reduced proteasomal degradation. Collectively, our results suggest a novel role for GABABRs as regulators of GS stability. Given the critical role that GS plays in the glutamine-glutamate cycle, astrocytic GABABRs may play a critical role in supporting both inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission.

  1. Efficient plant regeneration protocol through callus for Saussurea obvallata (DC.) Edgew. (Asteraceae): effect of explant type, age and plant growth regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Uppeandra; Joshi, Mitali

    2005-06-01

    A callus induction and in vitro plantlet regeneration system for the endangered state flower of Uttaranchal (Saussurea obvallata) was optimized by studying the influence of explant type (root, hypocotyl, cotyledon and leaf), age and different concentrations of plant growth regulators. Explants from 10 to 15-day-old seedlings showed maximum callus induction. Callus formation and shoot differentiation was initiated on Murashige-Skoog (MS) medium containing 6-benzyladenine (BA) and alpha-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) in all explant types. The best results were obtained using leaf explants: 100% callusing was achieved in MS medium supplemented with 2.5 microM BA and 1.0 microM NAA, and 100% differentiation along with a multiplication rate of 12 shoots per explant with a combination of 5.0 microM BA and 1.0 microM NAA. However, the results reflected the existence of high inter-explant variability in response to growth regulators. In vitro rooting of shoots was achieved at an efficiency of 100% in one-half strength MS medium supplemented with 2.5 microM indole-3-butyric acid. Application of this protocol has potential for mass multiplication of the target species in a limited time period.

  2. Evidence that the Agr-like quorum sensing system regulates the toxin production, cytotoxicity and pathogenicity of Clostridium perfringens type C isolate CN3685.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Jorge E; Ma, Menglin; Saputo, Julian; Garcia, Jorge; Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens possesses at least two functional quorum sensing (QS) systems, i.e. an Agr-like system and a LuxS-dependent AI-2 system. Both of those QS systems can reportedly control in vitro toxin production by C. perfringens but their importance for virulence has not been evaluated. Therefore, the current study assessed whether these QS systems might regulate the pathogenicity of CN3685, a C. perfringens type C strain. Since type C isolates cause both haemorrhagic necrotic enteritis and fatal enterotoxemias (where toxins produced in the intestines are absorbed into the circulation to target other internal organs), the ability of isogenic agrB or luxS mutants to cause necrotizing enteritis in rabbit small intestinal loops or enterotoxemic lethality in mice was evaluated. Results obtained strongly suggest that the Agr-like QS system, but not the LuxS-dependent AI-2 QS system, is required for CN3685 to cause haemorrhagic necrotizing enteritis, apparently because the Agr-like system regulates the production of beta toxin, which is essential for causing this pathology. The Agr-like system, but not the LuxS-mediated AI-2 system, was also important for CN3685 to cause fatal enterotoxemia. These results provide the first direct evidence supporting a role for any QS system in clostridial infections.

  3. Host cell type-dependent translocation and PhoP-mediated positive regulation of the effector SseK1 of Salmonella enterica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando eBaisón-Olmo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica expresses two virulence-related type III secretion systems (T3SSs encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1 and SPI2, respectively. SseK1 is a poorly characterized substrate of the SPI2-encoded T3SS. Here, we show that this effector is essential to get full virulence both in oral and intraperitoneal mice infections, in spite of not having a role in invasion or intracellular proliferation in cultured mammalian cells. In vitro, expression of sseK1 was higher in media mimicking intracellular conditions, when SPI2 was induced, but it was also significant under SPI1 inducing conditions. A detailed analysis of translocation of SseK1 into host cells unveiled that it was a substrate of both, T3SS1 and T3SS2, although with different patterns and kinetics depending on the specific host cell type (epithelial, macrophages or fibroblasts. The regulation of the expression of sseK1 was examined using lacZ and bioluminescent lux fusions. The two-component system PhoQ/PhoP is a positive regulator of this gene. A combination of sequence analysis, directed mutagenesis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that phosphorylated PhoP binds directly to the promoter region of sseK1 and revealed a PhoP binding site located upstream of the predicted -35 hexamer of this promoter.

  4. Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Mutant E7 Protein Induces Oncogenic Transformation via Up-regulation of Cyclin A and cdc25A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-hua LIU; Yu-liang ZHANG; Li-qin ZHU; Yin-yu XU; Min ZHAO; Xin-xing WU

    2008-01-01

    A new mutant human papiUomavirus type 16 E7 gene, termed HPV16 HBE7, was isolated from cervical carcinoma biopsy samples from patients in an area with high incidence of cervical cancer (Hubei province, China). A previous study showed that the HPVI6 HBE7 protein was primarily cytoplasmic while wild-type HPV16 E7 protein, termed HPV16 WET, was concentrated in the nucleus. With the aim of studying the biological functions of HPV16 HBE7, the transforming potential of HPV16 HBE7 in NIH/3T3 cells was detected through observation of cell morphology, cell proliferation assay and anchorage-independent growth assay. The effect of HPVI6 HBE7 on cell cycle was examined by flow cytometry. Dual-luciferase reporter assay and RT-PCR were used to investigate the influence of HPVI6 HBE7 protein on the expression of regulation factors associated with GI/S checkpoint. The results showed that HPV16 HBE7 protein, as well as HPV16 WE7 protein, held transformation activity. NIH/3T3 cells expressing HPV16 HBE7 could easily transition from G1 phase into S phase and expressed high level of cyclin A and cdc25A. These results indicated HPV16 mutant E7 protein, located in the cytoplasm, induces oncogenic transformation of NIH/3T3 cells via up-regulation of cyclin A and cdc25A.

  5. The VirS/VirR two-component system regulates the anaerobic cytotoxicity, intestinal pathogenicity, and enterotoxemic lethality of Clostridium perfringens type C isolate CN3685.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Menglin; Vidal, Jorge; Saputo, Juliann; McClane, Bruce A; Uzal, Francisco

    2011-01-25

    Clostridium perfringens vegetative cells cause both histotoxic infections (e.g., gas gangrene) and diseases originating in the intestines (e.g., hemorrhagic necrotizing enteritis or lethal enterotoxemia). Despite their medical and veterinary importance, the molecular pathogenicity of C. perfringens vegetative cells causing diseases of intestinal origin remains poorly understood. However, C. perfringens beta toxin (CPB) was recently shown to be important when vegetative cells of C. perfringens type C strain CN3685 induce hemorrhagic necrotizing enteritis and lethal enterotoxemia. Additionally, the VirS/VirR two-component regulatory system was found to control CPB production by CN3685 vegetative cells during aerobic infection of cultured enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. Using an isogenic virR null mutant, the current study now reports that the VirS/VirR system also regulates CN3685 cytotoxicity during infection of Caco-2 cells under anaerobic conditions, as found in the intestines. More importantly, the virR mutant lost the ability to cause hemorrhagic necrotic enteritis in rabbit small intestinal loops. Western blot analyses demonstrated that the VirS/VirR system mediates necrotizing enteritis, at least in part, by controlling in vivo CPB production. In addition, vegetative cells of the isogenic virR null mutant were, relative to wild-type vegetative cells, strongly attenuated in their lethality in a mouse enterotoxemia model. Collectively, these results identify the first regulator of in vivo pathogenicity for C. perfringens vegetative cells causing disease originating in the complex intestinal environment. Since VirS/VirR also mediates histotoxic infections, this two-component regulatory system now assumes a global role in regulating a spectrum of infections caused by C. perfringens vegetative cells.

  6. The telomeric protein AKTIP interacts with A- and B-type lamins and is involved in regulation of cellular senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burla, Romina; Carcuro, Mariateresa; Torre, Mattia La; Fratini, Federica; Crescenzi, Marco; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Spitalieri, Paola; Raffa, Grazia Daniela; Astrologo, Letizia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Cundari, Enrico; Raimondo, Domenico; Biroccio, Annamaria; Gatti, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    AKTIP is a shelterin-interacting protein required for replication of telomeric DNA. Here, we show that AKTIP biochemically interacts with A- and B-type lamins and affects lamin A, but not lamin C or B, expression. In interphase cells, AKTIP localizes at the nuclear rim and in discrete regions of the nucleoplasm just like lamins. Double immunostaining revealed that AKTIP partially co-localizes with lamin B1 and lamin A/C in interphase cells, and that proper AKTIP localization requires functional lamin A. In mitotic cells, AKTIP is enriched at the spindle poles and at the midbody of late telophase cells similar to lamin B1. AKTIP-depleted cells show senescence-associated markers and recapitulate several aspects of the progeroid phenotype. Collectively, our results indicate that AKTIP is a new player in lamin-related processes, including those that govern nuclear architecture, telomere homeostasis and cellular senescence. PMID:27512140

  7. What is the contribution of two genetic variants regulating VEGF levels to type 2 diabetes risk and to microvascular complications?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnefond, Amélie; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Stathopoulou, Maria G

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key chemokine involved in tissue growth and organ repair processes, particularly angiogenesis. Elevated circulating VEGF levels are believed to play a role in type 2 diabetes (T2D) microvascular complications, especially diabetic retinopathy. Recently...... associations were assessed using logistic or linear regressions.In the French population, we found an association between the G-allele of rs6921438, shown to increase circulating VEGF levels, and increased T2D risk (OR¿=¿1.15; P¿=¿3.7×10(-5)). Furthermore, the same allele was associated with higher glycated...... on diabetic microvascular complications or the variation in related traits in T2D patients.In spite of their impact on the variance in circulating VEGF, we did not find any association between SNPs rs6921438 and rs10738760, and the risk of T2D, diabetic nephropathy or retinopathy. The link between VEGF and T2...

  8. Insulin-like growth factor type-1 receptor down-regulation associated with dwarfism in Holstein calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, J W; Elsasser, T H; Greger, D L; Wittenberg, S; de Vries, F; Distl, O

    2007-10-01

    Perturbations in endocrine functions can impact normal growth. Endocrine traits were studied in three dwarf calves exhibiting retarded but proportionate growth and four phenotypically normal half-siblings, sired by the same bull, and four unrelated control calves. Plasma 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine and thyroxine concentrations in dwarfs and half-siblings were in the physiological range and responded normally to injected thyroid-releasing hormone. Plasma glucagon concentrations were different (dwarfs, controls>half-siblings; Pcontrols, Pcontrols, P=0.08). Responses of GH to xylazine and to a GH-releasing-factor analogue were similar in dwarfs and half-siblings. Relative gene expression of IGF-1, IGF-2, GH receptor (GHR), insulin receptor, IGF-1 type-1 and -2 receptors (IGF-1R, IGF-2R), and IGF binding proteins were measured in liver and anconeus muscle. GHR mRNA levels were different in liver (dwarfsdwarfism in studied calves.

  9. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Regulation by Type I and II Interferons in the Pathogenesis of Acquired Aplastic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne N.P. Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aplastic anemia (AA occurs when the bone marrow fails to support production of all three lineages of blood cells, which are necessary for tissue oxygenation, infection control, and hemostasis. The etiology of acquired AA is elusive in the vast majority of cases but involves exhaustion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC, which are usually present in the bone marrow in a dormant state, and are responsible for lifelong production of all cells within the hematopoietic system. This destruction is immune-mediated and the role of interferons remains incompletely characterized. Interferon gamma (IFNγ has been associated with AA and type I IFNs (alpha and beta are well documented to cause bone marrow aplasia during viral infection. In models of infection and inflammation, IFNγ activates HSCs to differentiate and impairs their ability to self-renew, ultimately leading to HSC exhaustion. Recent evidence demonstrating that IFNγ also impacts the HSC microenvironment or niche, raises new questions regarding how IFNγ impairs HSC function in AA. Immune activation can also elicit type I interferons, which may exert effects both distinct from and overlapping with IFNγ on HSCs. IFNα/β increase HSC proliferation in models of sterile inflammation induced by polyI:C and lead to BM aplasia during viral infection. Moreover, patients being treated with IFNα exhibit cytopenias, in part due to BM suppression. Herein we review the current understanding of how interferons contribute to the pathogenesis of acquired AA, and we explore additional potential mechanisms by which interferons directly and indirectly impair HSCs. A comprehensive understanding of how interferons impact hematopoiesis is necessary in order to identify novel therapeutic approaches for treating AA patients.

  10. Differences between Mice and Humans in Regulation and the Molecular Network of Collagen, Type III, Alpha-1 at the Gene Expression Level: Obstacles that Translational Research Must Overcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishi Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Collagen, type III, alpha-1 (COL3A1 is essential for normal collagen I fibrillogenesis in many organs. There are differences in phenotypes of mutations in the COL3A1 gene in humans and mutations in mice. In order to investigate whether the regulation and gene network of COL3A1 is the same in healthy populations of mice and humans, we compared the quantitative trait loci (QTL that regulate the expression level of COL3A1 and the gene network of COL3A1 pathways between humans and mice using whole genome expression profiles. Our results showed that, for the regulation of expression of Col3a1 in mice, an eQTL on chromosome (Chr 12 regulates the expression of Col3a1. However, expression of genes in the syntenic region on human Chr 7 has no association with the expression level of COL3A1. For the gene network comparison, we identified 44 top genes whose expression levels are strongly associated with that of Col3a1 in mice. We next identified 41 genes strongly associated with the expression level of COL3A1 in humans. There are a few but significant differences in the COL3A1 gene network between humans and mice. Several genes showed opposite association with expression of COL3A1. These genes are known to play important roles in development and function of the extracellular matrix of the lung. Difference in the molecular pathway of key genes in the COL3A1 gene network in humans and mice suggest caution should be used in extrapolating results from models of human lung diseases in mice to clinical lung diseases in humans. These differences may influence the efficacy of drugs in humans whose development employed mouse models.

  11. Alternative mating type configurations (a/α versus a/a or α/α of Candida albicans result in alternative biofilms regulated by