WorldWideScience

Sample records for lysosomal degradation pathway

  1. Autophagy-lysosomal pathway is involved in lipid degradation in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skop, V; Cahová, M; Papáčková, Z; Páleníčková, E; Daňková, H; Baranowski, M; Zabielski, P; Zdychová, J; Zídková, J; Kazdová, L

    2012-01-01

    We present data supporting the hypothesis that the lysosomal-autophagy pathway is involved in the degradation of intracellular triacylglycerols in the liver. In primary hepatocytes cultivated in the absence of exogenous fatty acids (FFA), both inhibition of autophagy flux (asparagine) or lysosomal activity (chloroquine) decreased secretion of VLDL (very low density lipoproteins) and formation of FFA oxidative products while the stimulation of autophagy by rapamycine increased some of these parameters. Effect of rapamycine was completely abolished by inactivation of lysosomes. Similarly, when autophagic activity was influenced by cultivating the hepatocytes in "starving" (amino-acid poor medium) or "fed" (serum-supplemented medium) conditions, VLDL secretion and FFA oxidation mirrored the changes in autophagy being higher in starvation and lower in fed state. Autophagy inhibition as well as lysosomal inactivation depressed FFA and DAG (diacylglycerol) formation in liver slices in vitro. In vivo, intensity of lysosomal lipid degradation depends on the formation of autophagolysosomes, i.e. structures bringing the substrate for degradation and lysosomal enzymes into contact. We demonstrated that lysosomal lipase (LAL) activity in liver autophagolysosomal fraction was up-regulated in fasting and down-regulated in fed state together with the increased translocation of LAL and LAMP2 proteins from lysosomal pool to this fraction. Changes in autophagy intensity (LC3-II/LC3-I ratio) followed a similar pattern.

  2. Elimination of paternal mitochondria through the lysosomal degradation pathway in C.elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghua Zhou; Haimin Li; Ding Xue

    2011-01-01

    In mammals,the inheritance of mitochondrion and its DNA (mtDNA) is strictly maternal,despite the fact that a sperm can inject up to 100 functional mitochondria into the oocyte during fertilization.The mechanisms responsible for the elimination of the paternal mitochondria remain largely unknown.We report here that this paternal mitochondrial elimination process is conserved in Caenorhabditis elegans,and that the lysosomal pathway actively participates in this process.Molecular and cell biological analyses indicate that in wild-type animals paternal mitoehondria and mtDNA are destroyed within two hours after fertilization.In animals with compromised lysosomes,paternal mitochondria persist until late embryonic stages.Therefore,the lysosomal pathway plays an important role in degrading paternal mitochondria introduced into the oocyte during fertilization.Our study indicates that C.elegans is an excellent animal model for understanding and dissecting this conserved biological process critical for animal development and reproduction.

  3. WNK4 enhances the degradation of NCC through a sortilin-mediated lysosomal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Zhuang, Jieqiu; Gu, Dingying; Wang, Hua; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Guggino, William B; Cai, Hui

    2010-01-01

    WNK kinase is a serine/threonine kinase that plays an important role in electrolyte homeostasis. WNK4 significantly inhibits the surface expression of the sodium chloride co-transporter (NCC) by enhancing the degradation of NCC through a lysosomal pathway, but the mechanisms underlying this trafficking are unknown. Here, we investigated the effect of the lysosomal targeting receptor sortilin on NCC expression and degradation. In Cos-7 cells, we observed that the presence of WNK4 reduced the steady-state amount of NCC by approximately half. Co-transfection with truncated sortilin (a dominant negative mutant) prevented this WNK4-induced reduction in NCC. NCC immunoprecipitated with both wild-type sortilin and, to a lesser extent, truncated sortilin. Immunostaining revealed that WNK4 increased the co-localization of NCC with the lysosomal marker cathepsin D, and NCC co-localized with wild-type sortilin, truncated sortilin, and WNK4 in the perinuclear region. These findings suggest that WNK4 promotes NCC targeting to the lysosome for degradation via a mechanism involving sortilin.

  4. Revealing the fate of cell surface human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1): The lysosomal degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Kapoor, Khyati; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Patel, Atish; Swaim, William; Ambudkar, Indu S; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2015-10-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transports a variety of chemically dissimilar amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Although mechanisms of P-gp drug transport are widely studied, the pathways involving its internalization are poorly understood. The present study is aimed at elucidating the pathways involved in degradation of cell surface P-gp. The fate of P-gp at the cell surface was determined by biotinylating cell surface proteins followed by flow cytometry and Western blotting. Our data shows that the half-life of endogenously expressed P-gp is 26.7±1.1 h in human colorectal cancer HCT-15 cells. Treatment of cells with Bafilomycin A1 (BafA1) a vacuolar H+ ATPase inhibitor increased the half-life of P-gp at the cell surface to 36.1±0.5 h. Interestingly, treatment with the proteasomal inhibitors MG132, MG115 or lactacystin alone did not alter the half-life of the protein. When cells were treated with both lysosomal and proteasomal inhibitors (BafA1 and MG132), the half-life was further prolonged to 39-50 h. Functional assays done with rhodamine 123 or calcein-AM, fluorescent substrates of P-gp, indicated that the transport function of P-gp was not affected by either biotinylation or treatment with BafA1 or proteasomal inhibitors. Immunofluorescence studies done with the antibody against lysosomal marker LAMP1 and the P-gp-specific antibody UIC2 in permeabilized cells indicated that intracellular P-gp is primarily localized in the lysosomal compartment. Our results suggest that the lysosomal degradation system could be targeted to increase the sensitivity of P-gp- expressing cancer cells towards chemotherapeutic drugs.

  5. Revealing the fate of cell surface human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1): The Lysosomal Degradation Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Kapoor, Khyati; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Patel, Atish; Swaim, William; Ambudkar, Indu S.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transports a variety of chemically dissimilar amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Although mechanisms of P-gp drug transport are widely studied, the pathways involving its internalization are poorly understood. The present study is aimed at elucidating the pathways involved in degradation of cell surface P-gp. The fate of P-gp at the cell surface was determined by biotinylating cell surface proteins followed by flow cytometry and Western blotting. Our data shows that the half-life of endogenously expressed P-gp is 26.7 ± 1.1 h in human colorectal cancer HCT-15 cells. Treatment of cells with Bafilomycin A1 (BafA1) a vacuolar H+ ATPase inhibitor increased the half-life of P-gp at the cell surface to 36.1± 0.5 h. Interestingly, treatment with the proteasomal inhibitors MG132, MG115 or lactacystin alone did not alter the half-life of the protein. When cells were treated with both lysosomal and proteasomal inhibitors (BafA1 and MG132), the half-life was further prolonged to 39-50 h. Functional assays done with rhodamine 123 or calcein-AM, fluorescent substrates of P-gp, indicated that the transport function of P-gp was not affected by either biotinylation or treatment with BafA1 or proteasomal inhibitors. Immunofluorescence studies done with the antibody against lysosomal marker LAMP1 and the P-gp-specific antibody UIC2 in permeabilized cells indicated that intracellular P-gp is primarily localized in the lysosomal compartment. Our results suggest that the lysosomal degradation system could be targeted to increase the sensitivity of P-gp expressing cancer cells towards chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26057472

  6. Urothelial endocytic vesicle recycling and lysosomal degradative pathway regulated by lipid membrane composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, E J; Calderón, R O

    2013-02-01

    The urothelium, a specialized epithelium that covers the mucosa cell surface of the urinary bladder, undergoes dramatic morphological changes during the micturition cycle that involve a membrane apical traffic. This traffic was first described as a lysosomal pathway, in addition to the known endocytosis/exocytosis membrane recycling. In an attempt to understand the role of membrane lipid composition in those effects, we previously described the lipid-dependent leakage of the endocytosed vesicle content. In this work, we demonstrated clear differences in the traffic of both the fluid probe and the membrane-bound probe in urothelial umbrella cells by using spectrofluorometry and/or confocal and epifluorescence microscopy. Different membrane lipid compositions were established by using three diet formulae enriched in oleic acid, linoleic acid and a commercial formula. Between three and five animals for each dietary treatment were used for each analysis. The decreased endocytosis of both fluid and membrane-bound probes (approximately 32 and 49 % lower, respectively) in oleic acid-derived umbrella cells was concomitant with an increased recycling (approximately 4.0 and 3.7 times, respectively) and diminished sorting to the lysosome (approximately 23 and 37 %, respectively) when compared with the control umbrella cells. The higher intravesicular pH and the impairment of the lysosomal pathway of oleic acid diet-derived vesicles compared to linoleic acid diet-derived vesicles and control diet-derived vesicles correlate with our findings of a lower V-ATPase activity previously reported. We integrated the results obtained in the present and previous work to determine the sorting of endocytosed material (fluid and membrane-bound probes) into the different cell compartments. Finally, the weighted average effect of the individual alterations on the intracellular distribution was evaluated. The results shown in this work add evidences for the modulatory role of the membrane

  7. Lipid rafts participate in aberrant degradative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Zhou; Chun Yang; Yufeng Liu; Peng Li; Huiying Yang; Jingxing Dai; Rongmei Qu; Lin Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide is the main component of amyloid plaques, which are found in Alzhei-mer’s disease. The generation and deposition of amyloid-beta is one of the crucial factors for the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Lipid rafts are glycolipid-rich liquid domains of the plasma membrane, where certain types of protein tend to aggregate and intercalate. Lipid rafts are involved in the generation of amyloid-beta oligomers and the formation of amyloid-beta peptides. In this paper, we review the mechanism by which lipid rafts disturb the aberrant deg-radative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta, which plays an important role in the pathological process of Alzheimer’s disease. Moreover, we describe this mechanism from the view of the Two-system Theory of fasciology and thus, suggest that lipid rafts may be a new target of Alzheimer’s disease treatment.

  8. Cx31 is assembled and trafficked to cell surface by ER-Golgi pathway and degraded by proteasomal or lysosomal pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qiang HE; Zhi Gao LONG; He Ping DAI; Kun XIA; Jia Hui XIA; Zhuo Hua ZHANG; Fang CAI; Yu LIU; Mu Jun LIU; Zhi Ping TAN; Qian PAN; Fai Yan FANG; De Sheng LIANG; Ling Qian WU

    2005-01-01

    Gap junctions, consisting of connexins, allow the exchange of small molecules (<1 kD) between adjacent cells, thus providing a mechanism for synchronizing the responses of groups of cells to environmental stimuli. Connexin 31 is a member of the connexin family. Mutations on connexin 31 are associated with erythrokeratodermia variabilis, hearing impairment and peripheral neuropathy. However, the pathological mechanism for connexin 31 mutants in these diseases are still unknown. In this study, we analyzed the assembly, trafficking and metabolism of connexin 31 in HeLa cells stably expressing connexin 31. Calcein transfer assay showed that calcein transfer was inhibited when cells were treated with Brefeldin A or cytochalasin D, but not when treated with nocodazole or α-glycyrrhetinic acid, suggesting that Golgi apparatus and actin filaments, but not microtubules, are crucial to the trafficking and assembly of connexin 31, as well as the formation of gap junction intercellular communication by connexin 31. Additionally, α-glycyrrhetinic acid did not effectively inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication formed by connexin 31. Pulse-chase assay revealed that connexin 31 had a half-life of about 6 h. Moreover, Western blotting and fluorescent staining demonstrated that in HeLa cells stably expressing connexin 31, the amount of connexin 31 was significantly increased after these cells were treated with proteasomal or lysosomal inhibitors. These findings indicate that connexin 31 was rapidly renewed,and possibly degraded by both proteasomal and lysosomal pathways.

  9. Activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway induces UT-A1 urea transporter monoubiquitination and targets it for lysosomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hua; Chen, Minguang; Sands, Jeff M; Chen, Guangping

    2013-12-15

    Regulation of urea transporter UT-A1 in the kidney is important for the urinary concentrating mechanism. We previously reported that activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway by forskolin (FSK) leads to UT-A1 ubiquitination, endocytosis, and degradation. In this study, we discovered that FSK-induced UT-A1 ubiquitination is monoubiquitination as judged by immunoblotting with specific ubiquitin antibodies to the different linkages of the ubiquitin chain. UT-A1 monoubiquitination induced by FSK was processed mainly on the cell plasma membrane. Monoubiquitination facilitates UT-A1 endocytosis, and internalized UT-A1 is accumulated in the early endosome. Inhibition of ubiquitination by E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme inhibitor PYR-41 significantly reduced FSK-induced UT-A1 endocytosis and degradation. Interestingly, FSK-stimulated UT-A1 degradation occurs through a lysosomal protein degradation system. We further found that the PKA phosphorylation sites of UT-A1 at Ser486 and Ser499 are required for FSK-induced UT-A1 monoubiquitination. The physiological significance was confirmed using rat kidney inner medullary collecting duct suspensions, which showed that vasopressin treatment promotes UT-A1 ubiquitination. We conclude that unlike under basal conditions in which UT-A1 is subject to polyubiquitination and proteasome-mediated protein degradation, activation of UT-A1 by FSK induces UT-A1 monoubiquitination and protein lysosomal degradation.

  10. MIR125B1 represses the degradation of the PML-RARA oncoprotein by an autophagy-lysosomal pathway in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Cheng-Wu; Chen, Zhen-Hua; Zhang, Xing-Ju; Han, Bo-Wei; Lin, Kang-Yu; Li, Xiao-Juan; Wei, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Hua; Li, Yangqiu; Chen, Yue-Qin

    2014-10-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is characterized by the t(15;17)-associated PML-RARA fusion gene. We have previously found that MIR125B1 is highly expressed in patients with APL and may be associated with disease pathogenesis; however, the mechanism by which MIR125B1 exerts its oncogenic potential has not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrated that MIR125B1 abundance correlates with the PML-RARA status. MIR125B1 overexpression enhanced PML-RARA expression and inhibited the ATRA-induced degradation of the PML-RARA oncoprotein. RNA-seq analysis revealed a direct link between the PML-RARA degradation pathway and MIR125B1-arrested differentiation. We further demonstrated that the MIR125B1-mediated blockade of PML-RARA proteolysis was regulated via an autophagy-lysosomal pathway, contributing to the inhibition of APL differentiation. Furthermore, we identified DRAM2 (DNA-damage regulated autophagy modulator 2), a critical regulator of autophagy, as a novel target that was at least partly responsible for the function of MIR125B1 involved in autophagy. Importantly, the knockdown phenotypes for DRAM2 are similar to the effects of overexpressing MIR125B1 as impairment of PML-RARA degradation, inhibition of autophagy, and myeloid cell differentiation arrest. These effects of MIR125B1 and its target DRAM2 were further confirmed in an APL mouse model. Thus, MIR125B1 dysregulation may interfere with the effectiveness of ATRA-mediated differentiation through an autophagy-dependent pathway, representing a novel potential APL therapeutic target.

  11. The late endosome/lysosome-anchored p18-mTORC1 pathway controls terminal maturation of lysosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Nada, Shigeyuki; Mori, Shunsuke; Soma-Nagae, Taeko; Oneyama, Chitose [Department of Oncogene Research, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Okada, Masato, E-mail: okadam@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Oncogene Research, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p18 is a membrane adaptor that anchors mTORC1 to late endosomes/lysosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the role of the p18-mTORC1 pathway in lysosome biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The loss of p18 causes accumulation of intact late endosomes by arresting lysosome maturation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mTORC1 activity with rapamycin phenocopies the defects of p18 loss. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the terminal maturation of lysosomes. -- Abstract: The late endosome/lysosome membrane adaptor p18 (or LAMTOR1) serves as an anchor for the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for its activation on lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes severe defects in cell growth as well as endosome dynamics, including membrane protein transport and lysosome biogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects on lysosome biogenesis remain unknown. Here, we show that the p18-mTORC1 pathway is crucial for terminal maturation of lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes aberrant intracellular distribution and abnormal sizes of late endosomes/lysosomes and an accumulation of late endosome specific components, including Rab7, RagC, and LAMP1; this suggests that intact late endosomes accumulate in the absence of p18. These defects are phenocopied by inhibiting mTORC1 activity with rapamycin. Loss of p18 also suppresses the integration of late endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in the defective degradation of tracer proteins. These results suggest that the p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the late stages of lysosomal maturation, potentially in late endosome-lysosome fusion, which is required for processing of various macromolecules.

  12. Lysosome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ursula Matte BSc, PhD; Gabriela Pasqualim BSc, MSc

    2016-01-01

    Since Christian de Duve first described the lysosome in the 1950s, it has been generally presented as a membrane-bound compartment containing acid hydrolases that enables the cell to degrade molecules...

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor Cytoplasmic Domain Affects ErbB Protein Degradation by the Lysosomal and Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Glogowska

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic domains of EGF-like ligands, including EGF cytoplasmic domain (EGFcyt, have important biological functions. Using specific constructs and peptides of human EGF cytoplasmic domain, we demonstrate that EGFcyt facilitates lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation, and this coincided with growth inhibition of human thyroid and glioma carcinoma cells. EGFcyt and exon 22–23-encoded peptide (EGF22.23 enhanced procathepsin B (procathB expression and procathB-mediated lysosomal degradation of EGFR/ErbB1 as determined by inhibitors for procathB and the lysosomal ATPase inhibitor BafA1. Presence of mbEGFctF, EGFcyt, EGF22.23, and exon 23-encoded peptides suppressed the expression of the deubiqitinating enzyme ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1. This coincided with hyperubiquitination of total cellular proteins and ErbB1/2 and reduced proteasome activity. Upon small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of endogenously expressed UCH-L1, a similar hyperubiquitinylation phenotype, reduced ErbB1/2 content, and attenuated growth was observed. The exon 23-encoded peptide region of EGFcyt was important for these biologic actions. Structural homology modeling of human EGFcyt showed that this molecular region formed an exposed surface loop. Peptides derived from this EGFcyt loop structure may aid in the design of novel peptide therapeutics aimed at inhibiting growth of cancer cells.

  14. Lysosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula Matte BSc, PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Christian de Duve first described the lysosome in the 1950s, it has been generally presented as a membrane-bound compartment containing acid hydrolases that enables the cell to degrade molecules without being digested by autolysis. For those working on the field of lysosomal storage disorders, the lack of one such hydrolase would lead to undegraded or partially degraded substrate storage inside engorged organelles disturbing cellular function by yet poorly explored mechanisms. However, in recent years, a much more complex scenario of lysosomal function has emerged, beyond and above the cellular “digestive” system. Knowledge on how the impairment of this organelle affects cell functioning may shed light on signs and symptoms of lysosomal disorders and open new roads for therapy.

  15. Oxidant-induced autophagy and ferritin degradation contribute to epithelial–mesenchymal transition through lysosomal iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioutas, Apostolos; Vainikka, Linda K; Kentson, Magnus; Dam-Larsen, Sören; Wennerström, Urban; Jacobson, Petra; Persson, Hans Lennart

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 triggers epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) through autophagy, which is partly driven by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to determine whether leaking lysosomes and enhanced degradation of H-ferritin could be involved in EMT and whether it could be possible to prevent EMT by iron chelation targeting of the lysosome. Materials and methods EMT, H-ferritin, and autophagy were evaluated in TGF-β1-stimulated A549 human lung epithelial cells cultured in vitro using Western blotting, with the additional morphological assessment of EMT. By using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, lysosomes and ROS were assessed by acridine orange and 6-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein acetate assays, respectively. Results TGF-β1-stimulated cells demonstrated a loss of H-ferritin, which was prevented by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and inhibitors of lysosomal degradation. TGF-β1 stimulation generated ROS and autophagosome formation and led to EMT, which was further promoted by the additional ROS-generating cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α. Lysosomes of TGF-β1-stimulated cells were sensitized to oxidants but also completely protected by lysosomal loading with dextran-bound deferoxamine (DFO). Autophagy and EMT were prevented by NAC, DFO, and inhibitors of autophagy and lysosomal degradation. Conclusion The findings of this study support the role of enhanced autophagic degradation of H-ferritin as a mechanism for increasing the vulnerability of lysosomes to iron-driven oxidant injury that triggers further autophagy during EMT. This study proposes that lysosomal leakage is a novel pathway of TGF-β1-induced EMT that may be prevented by iron-chelating drugs that target the lysosome.

  16. Rab2 promotes autophagic and endocytic lysosomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lőrincz, Péter; Tóth, Sarolta; Benkő, Péter; Lakatos, Zsolt; Boda, Attila; Glatz, Gábor; Zobel, Martina; Bisi, Sara; Hegedűs, Krisztina; Takáts, Szabolcs; Scita, Giorgio; Juhász, Gábor

    2017-07-03

    Rab7 promotes fusion of autophagosomes and late endosomes with lysosomes in yeast and metazoan cells, acting together with its effector, the tethering complex HOPS. Here we show that another small GTPase, Rab2, is also required for autophagosome and endosome maturation and proper lysosome function in Drosophila melanogaster We demonstrate that Rab2 binds to HOPS, and that its active, GTP-locked form associates with autolysosomes. Importantly, expression of active Rab2 promotes autolysosomal fusions unlike that of GTP-locked Rab7, suggesting that its amount is normally rate limiting. We also demonstrate that RAB2A is required for autophagosome clearance in human breast cancer cells. In conclusion, we identify Rab2 as a key factor for autophagic and endocytic cargo delivery to and degradation in lysosomes. © 2017 Lőrincz et al.

  17. Lysosome Biogenesis and Autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reggiori, Fulvio; Klumperman, Judith|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097273

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes degrade biological components acquired by endocytosis, the major cellular pathway for internalization of extracellular material, and macroautophagy. This chapter presents an overview of these two major degradative intracellular pathways, and highlights the emerging cross talks between

  18. Artesunate induces cell death in human cancer cells via enhancing lysosomal function and lysosomal degradation of ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nai-Di; Tan, Shi-Hao; Ng, Shukie; Shi, Yin; Zhou, Jing; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei; Wong, Wai-Shiu Fred; Shen, Han-Ming

    2014-11-28

    Artesunate (ART) is an anti-malaria drug that has been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity, and functional lysosomes are reported to be required for ART-induced cancer cell death, whereas the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely elusive. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying ART-induced cell death. We first confirmed that ART induces apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Interestingly, we found that ART preferably accumulates in the lysosomes and is able to activate lysosomal function via promotion of lysosomal V-ATPase assembly. Furthermore, we found that lysosomes function upstream of mitochondria in reactive oxygen species production. Importantly, we provided evidence showing that lysosomal iron is required for the lysosomal activation and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production induced by ART. Finally, we showed that ART-induced cell death is mediated by the release of iron in the lysosomes, which results from the lysosomal degradation of ferritin, an iron storage protein. Meanwhile, overexpression of ferritin heavy chain significantly protected cells from ART-induced cell death. In addition, knockdown of nuclear receptor coactivator 4, the adaptor protein for ferritin degradation, was able to block ART-mediated ferritin degradation and rescue the ART-induced cell death. In summary, our study demonstrates that ART treatment activates lysosomal function and then promotes ferritin degradation, subsequently leading to the increase of lysosomal iron that is utilized by ART for its cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. Thus, our data reveal a new mechanistic action underlying ART-induced cell death in cancer cells.

  19. uPARAP/endo180 directs lysosomal delivery and degradation of collagen IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Lars; Engelholm, Lars H; Høyer-Hansen, Maria

    2004-01-01

    transmembrane glycoprotein urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP/endo180) directs collagen IV for lysosomal delivery and degradation. In wild-type fibroblasts, fluorescently labeled collagen IV was first internalized into vesicular structures with diffuse fluorescence eventually......Collagen turnover is crucial for tissue homeostasis and remodeling and pathological processes such as cancer invasion, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. A major pathway appears to be internalization and degradation by fibroblasts. We now show that the endocytic...... appearing uniformly within the wild-type cells after longer incubation times. In these cells, some collagen-containing vesicles were identified as lysosomes by staining for LAMP-1. In contrast, collagen IV remained extracellular and associated with fiber-like structures on uPARAP/endo180-deficient...

  20. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibition promotes lysosomal biogenesis and autophagic degradation of the amyloid-β precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Callum; Carzaniga, Raffaela; Gentleman, Steve M; Van Leuven, Fred; Walter, Jochen; Sastre, Magdalena

    2012-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been associated with altered activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) isozymes, which are proposed to contribute to both neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaque formation. However, the molecular basis by which GSK3 affects the formation of Aβ remains unknown. Our aim was to identify the underlying mechanisms of GSK3-dependent effects on the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP). For this purpose, N2a cells stably expressing APP carrying the Swedish mutation were treated with specific GSK3 inhibitors or transfected with GSK3α/β short interfering RNA. We show that inhibition of GSK3 leads to decreased expression of APP by enhancing its degradation via an increase in the number of lysosomes. This induction of the lysosomal/autophagy pathway was associated with nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis. Our data indicate that GSK3 inhibition reduces Aβ through an increase of the degradation of APP and its carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF) by activation of the lysosomal/autophagy pathway. These results suggest that an increased propensity toward autophagic/lysosomal alterations in AD patients could have consequences for neuronal function.

  1. SIRT1 regulates accumulation of oxidized LDL in HUVEC via the autophagy-lysosomal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanlin; Sun, Juanjuan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Shi, Luyao; Du, Wenxiu; Hu, Lifang; Liu, Chunfeng; Cao, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in the degradation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Sirtuin1 (SIRT1), a new anti-atherosclerotic factor, can induce autophagy in cardiac myocytes. In the present study, we observed the effect of SIRT1 on the accumulation of ox-LDL in HUVECs, and elucidated whether its effect is relative with the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. The results showed that treatment with either SIRT1 siRNA or SIRT1 inhibitor nicotinamide (NAM) increased Dil-labelled-ox-LDL (Dil-ox-LDL) accumulation in HUVECs, and the SIRT1 inducer resveratrol (RSV) decreased it. Knockdown of autophagy-related protein 5 or inhibit the lysosomal degradation by chloroquine (CQ) decreased the effect of RSV. In HUVECs with ox-LDL, expression of LC3II and LC3 puncta was decreased by treatment with SIRT1 siRNA or NAM, but increased by RSV treatment; sequestosome 1 p62 expression showed the opposite effects. Moreover, Dil-ox-LDL combined with SIRT1 siRNA or NAM showed a much smaller degree of overlap of Lamp1 or Cathepsin D with Dil-ox-LDL than in cells with Dil-ox-LDL alone, and RSV treatment resulted in a greater degree of overlap. These results suggest that SIRT1 can decrease the accumulation of ox-LDL in HUVECs, and this effect is related to the autophagy-lysosomal pathway.

  2. Unfolded protein response activates glycogen synthase kinase-3 via selective lysosomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijholt, Diana A T; Nölle, Anna; van Haastert, Elise S; Edelijn, Hessel; Toonen, Ruud F; Hoozemans, Jeroen J M; Scheper, Wiep

    2013-07-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress response that is activated upon disturbed homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum. In Alzheimer's disease, as well as in other tauopathies, the UPR is activated in neurons that contain early tau pathology. A recent genome-wide association study identified genetic variation in a UPR transducer as a risk factor for tauopathy, supporting a functional connection between UPR activation and tau pathology. Here we show that UPR activation increases the activity of the major tau kinase glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 in vitro via a selective removal of inactive GSK-3 phosphorylated at Ser(21/9). We demonstrate that this is mediated by the autophagy/lysosomal pathway. In brain tissue from patients with different tauopathies, lysosomal accumulations of pSer(21/9) GSK-3 are found in neurons with markers for UPR activation. Our data indicate that UPR activation increases the activity of GSK-3 by a novel mechanism, the lysosomal degradation of the inactive pSer(21/9) GSK-3. This may provide a functional explanation for the close association between UPR activation and early tau pathology in neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Sulindac metabolites induce proteosomal and lysosomal degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangburn, Heather A; Ahnen, Dennis J; Rice, Pamela L

    2010-04-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases. In response to ligand, EGFR is internalized and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome/lysosome pathway. We previously reported that metabolites of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac downregulate the expression of EGFR and inhibit basal and EGF-induced EGFR signaling through extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. We now have evaluated the mechanisms of sulindac metabolite-induced downregulation of EGFR. EGF-induced downregulation of EGFR occurs within 10 minutes and lasts for 24 hours. By contrast, downregulation of EGFR by sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone was first evident at 4 and 24 hours, respectively, with maximal downregulation at 72 hours. Pretreatment with either the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine or the proteosomal inhibitor MG132 blocked sulindac metabolite-induced downregulation of EGFR. Sulindac metabolites also increased the ubiquitination of EGFR. Whereas sulindac metabolites inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR pY1068, they increased phosphorylation of EGFR pY1045, the docking site where c-Cbl binds, thereby enabling receptor ubiquitination and degradation. Immunofluorescence analysis of EGF and EGFR distribution confirmed the biochemical observations that sulindac metabolites alter EGFR localization and EGFR internalization in a manner similar to that seen with EGF treatment. Expression of ErbB family members HER2 and HER3 was also downregulated by sulindac metabolites. We conclude that downregulation of EGFR expression by sulindac metabolites is mediated via lysosomal and proteosomal degradation that may be due to drug-induced phosphorylation at pY1045 with resultant ubiquitination of EGFR. Thus, sulindac metabolite-induced downregulation of EGFR seems to be mediated through mechanism(s) similar, at least in part, to those involved in EGF-induced downregulation of EGFR.

  4. Mild MPP(+) exposure impairs autophagic degradation through a novel lysosomal acidity-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyara, Masatsugu; Kotake, Yaichiro; Tokunaga, Wataru; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, but its underlying cause remains unknown. Although recent studies using PD-related neurotoxin MPP(+) suggest autophagy involvement in the pathogenesis of PD, the effect of MPP(+) on autophagic processes under mild exposure, which mimics the slow progressive nature of PD, remains largely unclear. We examined the effect of mild MPP(+) exposure (10 and 200 μM for 48 h), which induces a more slowly developing cell death, on autophagic processes and the mechanistic differences with acute MPP(+) toxicity (2.5 and 5 mM for 24 h). In SH-SY5Y cells, mild MPP(+) exposure predominantly inhibited autophagosome degradation, whereas acute MPP(+) exposure inhibited both autophagosome degradation and basal autophagy. Mild MPP(+) exposure reduced lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D activity without changing lysosomal acidity, whereas acute exposure decreased lysosomal density. Lysosome biogenesis enhancers trehalose and rapamycin partially alleviated mild MPP(+) exposure induced impaired autophagosome degradation and cell death, but did not prevent the pathogenic response to acute MPP(+) exposure, suggesting irreversible lysosomal damage. We demonstrated impaired autophagic degradation by MPP(+) exposure and mechanistic differences between mild and acute MPP(+) toxicities. Mild MPP(+) toxicity impaired autophagosome degradation through novel lysosomal acidity-independent mechanisms. Sustained mild lysosomal damage may contribute to PD. We examined the effects of MPP(+) on autophagic processes under mild exposure, which mimics the slow progressive nature of Parkinson's disease, in SH-SY5Y cells. This study demonstrated impaired autophagic degradation through a reduction in lysosomal cathepsin D activity without altering lysosomal acidity by mild MPP(+) exposure. Mechanistic differences between acute and mild MPP(+) toxicity were also observed. Sustained mild damage of lysosome may be an underlying cause

  5. LINGO-1 promotes lysosomal degradation of amyloid-β protein precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, Rian; Meabon, James S; Wiley, Jesse C; Hudson, Mark P; Montine, Thomas J; Bothwell, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Sequential proteolytic cleavages of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) by β-secretase and γ-secretase generate amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which are thought to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Much of this processing occurs in endosomes following endocytosis of AβPP from the plasma membrane. However, this pathogenic mode of processing AβPP may occur in competition with lysosomal degradation of AβPP, a common fate of membrane proteins trafficking through the endosomal system. Following up on published reports that LINGO-1 binds and promotes the amyloidogenic processing of AβPP we have examined the consequences of LINGO-1/AβPP interactions. We report that LINGO-1 and its paralogs, LINGO-2 and LINGO-3, decrease processing of AβPP in the amyloidogenic pathway by promoting lysosomal degradation of AβPP. We also report that LINGO-1 levels are reduced in AD brain, representing a possible pathogenic mechanism stimulating the generation of Aβ peptides in AD.

  6. LINGO-1 promotes lysosomal degradation of amyloid-β protein precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rian de Laat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sequential proteolytic cleavages of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP by β-secretase and γ-secretase generate amyloid β (Aβ peptides, which are thought to contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD. Much of this processing occurs in endosomes following endocytosis of AβPP from the plasma membrane. However, this pathogenic mode of processing AβPP may occur in competition with lysosomal degradation of AβPP, a common fate of membrane proteins trafficking through the endosomal system. Following up on published reports that LINGO-1 binds and promotes the amyloidogenic processing of AβPP we have examined the consequences of LINGO-1/AβPP interactions. We report that LINGO-1 and its paralogs, LINGO-2 and LINGO-3, decrease processing of AβPP in the amyloidogenic pathway by promoting lysosomal degradation of AβPP. We also report that LINGO-1 levels are reduced in AD brain, representing a possible pathogenic mechanism stimulating the generation of Aβ peptides in AD.

  7. Debra, a protein mediating lysosomal degradation, is required for long-term memory in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Benjamin; Lampin-Saint-Amaux, Aurélie; Comas, Daniel; Preat, Thomas; Goguel, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    A central goal of neuroscience is to understand how neural circuits encode memory and guide behavior changes. Many of the molecular mechanisms underlying memory are conserved from flies to mammals, and Drosophila has been used extensively to study memory processes. To identify new genes involved in long-term memory, we screened Drosophila enhancer-trap P(Gal4) lines showing Gal4 expression in the mushroom bodies, a specialized brain structure involved in olfactory memory. This screening led to the isolation of a memory mutant that carries a P-element insertion in the debra locus. debra encodes a protein involved in the Hedgehog signaling pathway as a mediator of protein degradation by the lysosome. To study debra's role in memory, we achieved debra overexpression, as well as debra silencing mediated by RNA interference. Experiments conducted with a conditional driver that allowed us to specifically restrict transgene expression in the adult mushroom bodies led to a long-term memory defect. Several conclusions can be drawn from these results: i) debra levels must be precisely regulated to support normal long-term memory, ii) the role of debra in this process is physiological rather than developmental, and iii) debra is specifically required for long-term memory, as it is dispensable for earlier memory phases. Drosophila long-term memory is the only long-lasting memory phase whose formation requires de novo protein synthesis, a process underlying synaptic plasticity. It has been shown in several organisms that regulation of proteins at synapses occurs not only at translation level of but also via protein degradation, acting in remodeling synapses. Our work gives further support to a role of protein degradation in long-term memory, and suggests that the lysosome plays a role in this process.

  8. Debra, a protein mediating lysosomal degradation, is required for long-term memory in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Kottler

    Full Text Available A central goal of neuroscience is to understand how neural circuits encode memory and guide behavior changes. Many of the molecular mechanisms underlying memory are conserved from flies to mammals, and Drosophila has been used extensively to study memory processes. To identify new genes involved in long-term memory, we screened Drosophila enhancer-trap P(Gal4 lines showing Gal4 expression in the mushroom bodies, a specialized brain structure involved in olfactory memory. This screening led to the isolation of a memory mutant that carries a P-element insertion in the debra locus. debra encodes a protein involved in the Hedgehog signaling pathway as a mediator of protein degradation by the lysosome. To study debra's role in memory, we achieved debra overexpression, as well as debra silencing mediated by RNA interference. Experiments conducted with a conditional driver that allowed us to specifically restrict transgene expression in the adult mushroom bodies led to a long-term memory defect. Several conclusions can be drawn from these results: i debra levels must be precisely regulated to support normal long-term memory, ii the role of debra in this process is physiological rather than developmental, and iii debra is specifically required for long-term memory, as it is dispensable for earlier memory phases. Drosophila long-term memory is the only long-lasting memory phase whose formation requires de novo protein synthesis, a process underlying synaptic plasticity. It has been shown in several organisms that regulation of proteins at synapses occurs not only at translation level of but also via protein degradation, acting in remodeling synapses. Our work gives further support to a role of protein degradation in long-term memory, and suggests that the lysosome plays a role in this process.

  9. Endocytic pathway rapidly delivers internalized molecules to lysosomes: an analysis of vesicle trafficking, clustering and mass transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangarkar, Chinmay; Dinh, Anh-Tuan; Mitragotri, Samir

    2012-08-20

    Lysosomes play a critical role in intracellular drug delivery. For enzyme-based therapies, they represent a potential target site whereas for nucleic acid or many protein drugs, they represent the potential degradation site. Either way, understanding the mechanisms and processes involved in routing of materials to lysosomes after cellular entry is of high interest to the field of drug delivery. Most therapeutic cargoes other than small hydrophobic molecules enter the cells through endocytosis. Endocytosed cargoes are routed to lysosomes via microtubule-based transport and are ultimately shared by various lysosomes via tethering and clustering of endocytic vesicles followed by exchange of their contents. Using a combined experimental and numerical approach, here we studied the rates of mass transfer into and among the endocytic vesicles in a model cell line, 3T3 fibroblasts. In order to understand the relationship of mass transfer with microtubular transport and vesicle clustering, we varied both properties through various pharmacological agents. At the same time, microtubular transport and vesicle clustering were modeled through diffusion-advection equations and the Smoluchowski equations, respectively. Our analysis revealed that the rate of mass transfer is optimally related to microtubular transport and clustering properties of vesicles. Further, the rate of mass transfer is highest in the innate state of the cell. Any perturbation to either microtubular transport or vesicle aggregation led to reduced mass transfer to lysosome. These results suggest that in the absence of an external intervention the endocytic pathway appears to maximize molecular delivery to lysosomes. Strategies are discussed to reduce mass transfer to lysosomes so as to extend the residence time of molecules in endosomes or late endosomes, thus potentially increasing the likelihood of their escape before disposition in the lysosomes.

  10. Targeting Androgen Receptor by Lysosomal Degradation in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    were done as described.13 Protein Sample Preparation and Mass Spectrometry Tandem Affinity Purification of FLAG-His-EWS-Fli-1- Interacting Proteins . Forty...incubated with Ni-NTA agarose (Qiagen), FLAG-His-EWS-Fli-1 and its interacting proteins were collected by centrifugation, washed three times with TN buffer...the lysosome fraction was loaded at 100x compared to the input. ■ RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Proteomic Analysis of the EWS-Fli-1- Interacting Proteins To

  11. uPARAP/endo180 directs lysosomal delivery and degradation of collagen IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Lars; Engelholm, Lars H; Høyer-Hansen, Maria

    2004-01-01

    transmembrane glycoprotein urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP/endo180) directs collagen IV for lysosomal delivery and degradation. In wild-type fibroblasts, fluorescently labeled collagen IV was first internalized into vesicular structures with diffuse fluorescence eventually...... appearing uniformly within the wild-type cells after longer incubation times. In these cells, some collagen-containing vesicles were identified as lysosomes by staining for LAMP-1. In contrast, collagen IV remained extracellular and associated with fiber-like structures on uPARAP/endo180-deficient...... fibroblasts. Blocking lysosomal cysteine proteases with the inhibitor E64d resulted in strong accumulation of collagen IV in lysosomes in wild-type cells, but only very weak intracellular fluorescence accumulation in uPARAP/endo180-deficient fibroblasts. We conclude that uPARAP/endo180 is critical...

  12. Wnt Signaling Translocates Lys48-Linked Polyubiquitinated Proteins to the Lysosomal Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjoon Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cellular proteins are degraded in either proteasomes or lysosomes depending on the types of ubiquitin chains that covalently modify them. It is not known whether the choice between these two pathways is physiologically regulated. The Lys48-polyubiquitin chain is the major signal directing proteins for degradation in proteasomes. Here, we report the unexpected finding that canonical Wnt signaling translocates some K48-linked polyubiquitinated proteins to the endolysosomal pathway. Proteasomal target proteins, such as β-catenin, Smad1, and Smad4, were targeted into endolysosomes in a process dependent on GSK3 activity. Relocalization was also dependent on Axin1 and the multivesicular body (MVB proteins HRS/Vps27 and Vps4. The Wnt-induced accumulation of K48-linked polyubiquitinated proteins in endolysosomal organelles was accompanied by a transient decrease in cellular levels of free mono-ubiquitin, which may contribute to Wnt-regulated stabilization of proteins (Wnt/STOP. We conclude that Wnt redirects Lys48-polyubiquitinated proteins that are normally degraded in proteasomes to endolysosomes.

  13. 15-Deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin-J(2) reveals a new pVHL-independent, lysosomal-dependent mechanism of HIF-1alpha degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, Gemma; Arenas, María I; Bienes, Raquel; Calzada, María Jose; Aragonés, Julián; Garcia-Bermejo, Maria Laura; Landazuri, Manuel O; Lucio-Cazaña, Javier

    2009-07-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) protein is degraded under normoxia by its association to von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL) and further proteasomal digestion. However, human renal cells HK-2 treated with 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin-J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) accumulate HIF-1alpha in normoxic conditions. Thus, we aimed to investigate the mechanism involved in this accumulation. We found that 15d-PGJ(2) induced an over-accumulation of HIF-1alpha in RCC4 cells, which lack pVHL and in HK-2 cells treated with inhibitors of the pVHL-proteasome pathway. These results indicated that pVHL-proteasome-independent mechanisms are involved, and therefore we aimed to ascertain them. We have identified a new lysosomal-dependent mechanism of HIF-1alpha degradation as a target for 15d-PGJ(2) based on: (1) HIF-1alpha colocalized with the specific lysosomal marker Lamp-2a, (2) 15d-PGJ(2) inhibited the activity of cathepsin B, a lysosomal protease, and (3) inhibition of lysosomal activity did not result in over-accumulation of HIF-1alpha in 15d-PGJ(2)-treated cells. Therefore, expression of HIF-1alpha is also modulated by lysosomal degradation.

  14. Lysine suppresses protein degradation through autophagic-lysosomal system in C2C12 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomonori; Ito, Yoshiaki; Nedachi, Taku; Nagasawa, Takashi

    2014-06-01

    Muscle mass is determined between protein synthesis and protein degradation. Reduction of muscle mass leads to bedridden condition and attenuation of resistance to diseases. Moreover, bedridden condition leads to additional muscle loss due to disuse muscle atrophy. In our previous study (Sato et al. 2013), we showed that administered lysine (Lys), one of essential amino acid, suppressed protein degradation in skeletal muscle. In this study, we investigated that the mechanism of the suppressive effects of Lys on skeletal muscle proteolysis in C2C12 cell line. C2C12 myotubes were incubated in the serum-free medium containing 10 mM Lys or 20 mM Lys, and myofibrillar protein degradation was determined by the rates of 3-methylhistidine (MeHis) release from the cells. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity from the phosphorylation levels of p70-ribosormal protein S6 kinase 1 and eIF4E-binding protein 1 and the autophagic-lysosomal system activity from the ratio of LC3-II/I in C2C12 myotubes stimulated by 10 mM Lys for 0-3 h were measured. The rates of MeHis release were markedly reduced by addition of Lys. The autophagic-lysosomal system activity was inhibited upon 30 min of Lys supplementation. The activity of mTOR was significantly increased upon 30 min of Lys supplementation. The suppressive effect of Lys on the proteolysis by the autophagic-lysosomal system was maintained partially when mTOR activity was inhibited by 100 nM rapamycin, suggesting that some regulator other than mTOR signaling, for example, Akt, might also suppress the autophagic-lysosomal system. From these results, we suggested that Lys suppressed the activity of the autophagic-lysosomal system in part through activation of mTOR and reduced myofibrillar protein degradation in C2C12 myotubes.

  15. Turnover of C99 is Controlled by a Crosstalk between ERAD and Ubiquitin-Independent Lysosomal Degradation in Human Neuroglioma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Hianara A.; Rivera-Dictter, Andrés; Cavieres, Viviana A.; Muñoz, Vanessa C.; González, Alexis; Lin, Yimo; Mardones, Gonzalo A.; Burgos, Patricia V.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by the buildup of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) aggregates derived from proteolytic processing of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP). Amyloidogenic cleavage of APP by β-secretase/BACE1 generates the C-terminal fragment C99/CTFβ that can be subsequently cleaved by γ-secretase to produce Aβ. Growing evidence indicates that high levels of C99/CTFβ are determinant for AD. Although it has been postulated that γ-secretase-independent pathways must control C99/CTFβ levels, the contribution of organelles with degradative functions, such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or lysosomes, is unclear. In this report, we investigated the turnover and amyloidogenic processing of C99/CTFβ in human H4 neuroglioma cells, and found that C99/CTFβ is localized at the Golgi apparatus in contrast to APP, which is mostly found in endosomes. Conditions that localized C99/CTFβ to the ER resulted in its degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner that first required polyubiquitination, consistent with an active role of the ER associated degradation (ERAD) in this process. Furthermore, when proteasomal activity was inhibited C99/CTFβ was degraded in a chloroquine (CQ)-sensitive compartment, implicating lysosomes as alternative sites for its degradation. Our results highlight a crosstalk between degradation pathways within the ER and lysosomes to avoid protein accumulation and toxicity. PMID:24376644

  16. The LXR-IDOL axis defines a clathrin-, caveolae-, and dynamin-independent endocytic route for LDLR internalization and lysosomal degradation[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Nelson, Jessica K.; Maspero, Elena; Marques, André R. A.; Scheer, Lilith; Polo, Simona; Zelcer, Noam

    2013-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is taken up into cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the LDL receptor (LDLR). Following dissociation of the LDLR-LDL complex, LDL is directed to lysosomes whereas the LDLR recycles to the plasma membrane. Activation of the sterol-sensing nuclear receptors liver X receptors (LXRs) enhances degradation of the LDLR. This depends on the LXR target gene inducible degrader of the LDLR (IDOL), an E3-ubiquitin ligase that promotes ubiquitylation and lysosomal degradation of the LDLR. How ubiquitylation of the LDLR by IDOL controls its endocytic trafficking is currently unknown. Using genetic- and pharmacological-based approaches coupled to functional assessment of LDL uptake, we show that the LXR-IDOL axis targets a LDLR pool present in lipid rafts. IDOL-dependent internalization of the LDLR is independent of clathrin, caveolin, macroautophagy, and dynamin. Rather, it depends on the endocytic protein epsin. Consistent with LDLR ubiquitylation acting as a sorting signal, degradation of the receptor can be blocked by perturbing the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) or by USP8, a deubiquitylase implicated in sorting ubiquitylated cargo to multivesicular bodies. In summary, we provide evidence for the existence of an LXR-IDOL-mediated internalization pathway for the LDLR that is distinct from that used for lipoprotein uptake. PMID:23733886

  17. Evidence for lysosomal exocytosis and release of aggrecan-degrading hydrolases from hypertrophic chondrocytes, in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R. Bastow

    2012-02-01

    The abundant proteoglycan, aggrecan, is resorbed from growth plate cartilage during endochondral bone ossification, yet mice with genetically-ablated aggrecan-degrading activity have no defects in bone formation. To account for this apparent anomaly, we propose that lysosomal hydrolases degrade extracellular, hyaluronan-bound aggrecan aggregates in growth plate cartilage, and that lysosomal hydrolases are released from hypertrophic chondrocytes into growth plate cartilage via Ca2+-dependent lysosomal exocytosis. In this study we confirm that hypertrophic chondrocytes release hydrolases via lysosomal exocytosis in vitro and we show in vivo evidence for lysosomal exocytosis in hypertrophic chondrocytes during skeletal development. We show that lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1 is detected at the cell surface following in vitro treatment of epiphyseal chondrocytes with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin. Furthermore, we show that in addition to the lysosomal exocytosis markers, cathepsin D and β-hexosaminidase, ionomycin induces release of aggrecan- and hyaluronan-degrading activity from cultured epiphyseal chondrocytes. We identify VAMP-8 and VAMP7 as v-SNARE proteins with potential roles in lysosomal exocytosis in hypertrophic chondrocytes, based on their colocalisation with LAMP1 at the cell surface in secondary ossification centers in mouse tibiae. We propose that resorbing growth plate cartilage involves release of destructive hydrolases from hypertrophic chondrocytes, via lysosomal exocytosis.

  18. CUP-5, the C. elegans ortholog of the mammalian lysosomal channel protein MLN1/TRPML1, is required for proteolytic degradation in autolysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Wang, Xingwei; Lu, Qun; Ren, Haiyan; Zhang, Hong

    2011-11-01

    The process of macroautophagy (herein referred to as autophagy) involves the formation of a closed double-membrane structure, called the autophagosome, and its subsequent fusion with lysosomes to form an autolysosome. Lysosomes are regenerated from autolysosomes after degradation of the sequestrated materials. In this study, we showed that mutations in cup-5, encoding the C. elegans Mucolipin 1 homolog, cause defects in the autophagy pathway. In cup-5 mutants, a variety of autophagy substrates accumulate in enlarged vacuoles that display characteristics of late endosomes and lysosomes, indicating defective proteolytic degradation in autolysosomes. We further revealed that lysosomes in coelomocytes (scavenger cells located in the body cavity) are smaller in size and more numerous in mutants with loss of autophagy activity. Furthermore, the enlarged vacuole accumulation abnormality and embryonic lethality of cup-5 mutants are partially suppressed by reduced autophagy activity. Our results indicate that the basal constitutive level of autophagy activity regulates the size and number of lysosomes and provides insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying mucolipidosis type IV disease.

  19. Presenilin 1 regulates epidermal growth factor receptor turnover and signaling in the endosomal-lysosomal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Emanuela; Yoon, Il-Sang; Zheng, Hui; Kang, David E

    2007-10-26

    Mutations in the gene encoding presenilin 1 (PS1) cause the most aggressive form of early-onset familial Alzheimer disease. In addition to its well established role in Abeta production and Notch proteolysis, PS1 has been shown to mediate other physiological activities, such as regulation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway, modulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and MEK/ERK signaling, and trafficking of select membrane proteins and/or intracellular vesicles. In this study, we present evidence that PS1 is a critical regulator of a key signaling receptor tyrosine kinase, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Specifically, EGFR levels were robustly increased in fibroblasts deficient in both PS1 and PS2 (PS(-/-)) due to delayed turnover of EGFR protein. Stable transfection of wild-type PS1 but not PS2 corrected EGFR to levels comparable to PS(+/+) cells, while FAD PS1 mutations showed partial loss of activity. The C-terminal fragment of PS1 was sufficient to fully reduce EGFR levels. In addition, the rapid ligand-induced degradation of EGFR was markedly delayed in PS(-/-) cells, resulting in prolonged signal activation. Despite the defective turnover of EGFR, ligand-induced autophosphorylation, ubiquitination, and endocytosis of EGFR were not affected by the lack of PS1. Instead, the trafficking of EGFR from early endosomes to lysosomes was severely delayed by PS1 deficiency. Elevation of EGFR was also seen in brains of adult mice conditionally ablated in PS1 and in skin tumors associated with the loss of PS1. These findings demonstrate a critical role of PS1 in the trafficking and turnover of EGFR and suggest potential pathogenic effects of elevated EGFR as well as perturbed endosomal-lysosomal trafficking in cell cycle control and Alzheimer disease.

  20. Constitutively internalized dopamine transporter is targeted to late endosomes and lysosomal degradation in heterologous cell lines and dopaminergic neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jacob; Madsen, Kenneth; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard;

    (leupeptin, chloroquine, or ammonium chloride) increased the amount of transporter accumulated intracellularly over time, suggesting that constitutively endocytosed transporter was targeted to lysosomal degradation. This was further supported by expression of Tac-DAT in the immortalized dopaminergic cell...

  1. Sub-lethal oxidative stress induces lysosome biogenesis via a lysosomal membrane permeabilization-cathepsin-caspase 3-transcription factor EB-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, San Min; Chua, Shu Xian Serene; Venkatachalam, Gireedhar; Shen, Liang; Luo, Le; Clement, Marie-Veronique

    2016-12-18

    Here we provide evidence to link sub-lethal oxidative stress to lysosomal biogenesis. Exposure of cells to sub-lethal concentrations of exogenously added hydrogen peroxide resulted in cytosol to nuclear translocation of the Transcription Factor EB (TFEB), the master controller of lysosome biogenesis and function. Nuclear translocation of TFEB was dependent upon the activation of a cathepsin-caspase 3 signaling pathway, downstream of a lysosomal membrane permeabilization and accompanied by a significant increase in lysosome numbers as well as induction of TFEB dependent lysosome-associated genes expression such as Ctsl, Lamp2 and its spliced variant Lamp2a, Neu1and Ctsb and Sqstm1 and Atg9b. The effects of sub-lethal oxidative stress on lysosomal gene expression and biogenesis were rescued upon gene silencing of caspase 3 and TFEB. Notably, caspase 3 activation was not associated with phenotypic hallmarks of apoptosis, evidenced by the absence of caspase 3 substrate cleavage, such as PARP, Lamin A/C or gelsolin. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time an unexpected and non-canonical role of a cathepsin-caspase 3 axis in the nuclear translocation of TFEB leading to lysosomes biogenesis under conditions of sub-lethal oxidative stress.

  2. Size-dependent accumulation of particles in lysosomes modulates dendritic cell function through impaired antigen degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seydoux, Emilie; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Nita, Izabela M; Balog, Sandor; Gazdhar, Amiq; Stumbles, Philip A; Petri-Fink, Alke; Blank, Fabian; von Garnier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nanosized particles may enable therapeutic modulation of immune responses by targeting dendritic cell (DC) networks in accessible organs such as the lung. To date, however, the effects of nanoparticles on DC function and downstream immune responses remain poorly understood. Methods Bone marrow–derived DCs (BMDCs) were exposed in vitro to 20 or 1,000 nm polystyrene (PS) particles. Particle uptake kinetics, cell surface marker expression, soluble protein antigen uptake and degradation, as well as in vitro CD4+ T-cell proliferation and cytokine production were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, co-localization of particles within the lysosomal compartment, lysosomal permeability, and endoplasmic reticulum stress were analyzed. Results The frequency of PS particle–positive CD11c+/CD11b+ BMDCs reached an early plateau after 20 minutes and was significantly higher for 20 nm than for 1,000 nm PS particles at all time-points analyzed. PS particles did not alter cell viability or modify expression of the surface markers CD11b, CD11c, MHC class II, CD40, and CD86. Although particle exposure did not modulate antigen uptake, 20 nm PS particles decreased the capacity of BMDCs to degrade soluble antigen, without affecting their ability to induce antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Co-localization studies between PS particles and lysosomes using laser scanning confocal microscopy detected a significantly higher frequency of co-localized 20 nm particles as compared with their 1,000 nm counterparts. Neither size of PS particle caused lysosomal leakage, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress gene markers, or changes in cytokines profiles. Conclusion These data indicate that although supposedly inert PS nanoparticles did not induce DC activation or alteration in CD4+ T-cell stimulating capacity, 20 nm (but not 1,000 nm) PS particles may reduce antigen degradation through interference in the lysosomal compartment. These findings emphasize the

  3. Genetic perspective on the role of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan-Or, Ziv; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD), once considered as a prototype of a sporadic disease, is now known to be considerably affected by various genetic factors, which interact with environmental factors and the normal process of aging, leading to PD. Large studies determined that the hereditary component of PD is at least 27%, and in some populations, single genetic factors are responsible for more than 33% of PD patients. Interestingly, many of these genetic factors, such as LRRK2, GBA, SMPD1, SNCA, PARK2, PINK1, PARK7, SCARB2, and others, are involved in the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). Some of these genes encode lysosomal enzymes, whereas others correspond to proteins that are involved in transport to the lysosome, mitophagy, or other autophagic-related functions. Is it possible that all these factors converge into a single pathway that causes PD? In this review, we will discuss these genetic findings and the role of the ALP in the pathogenesis of PD and will try to answer this question. We will suggest a novel hypothesis for the pathogenic mechanism of PD that involves the lysosome and the different autophagy pathways. PMID:26207393

  4. Inhibitors and pathways of hepatocytic protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seglen, P O; Gordon, P B; Grinde, B; Solheim, A; Kovács, A L; Poli, A

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of experiments using amino acids and various inhibitors (lysosomotropic amines, leupeptin, chymostatin, vanadate, vinblastine, anoxia, methylaminopurines), five different modes of endogenous protein degradation in isolated rat hepatocytes can be distinguished. The two non-lysosomal (amine-resistant) mechanisms preferentially degrade relatively labile (short-lived) proteins: one of these mechanisms is energy-dependent and chymostatin-sensitive, the other is not. Of the three lysosomal (amine-sensitive) mechanisms, one--quantitatively minor--is amino acid-resistant and preferentially degrades labile proteins. The two amino acid-sensitive mechanisms each seen account for about one-half of the degradation of relatively stable (long-lived) proteins; one of them is suppressed by leucine and apparently corresponds to the formation of electron microscopically visible autophagosomes; the other may represent a different type of autophagy, inhibited by asparagine and glutamine. A new class of inhibitors, the purine derivatives (methylated 6-aminopurines, and 6-mercaptopurines) appear to specifically suppress autophagic/lysosomal protein degradation, and may help to further elucidate the mechanisms of autophagy.

  5. BECN1/Beclin 1 sorts cell-surface APP/amyloid β precursor protein for lysosomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Gayathri; Zhu, Wan; Plowey, Edward D

    2016-12-01

    The regulation of plasma membrane (PM)-localized transmembrane protein/receptor trafficking has critical implications for cell signaling, metabolism and survival. In this study, we investigated the role of BECN1 (Beclin 1) in the degradative trafficking of PM-associated APP (amyloid β precursor protein), whose metabolism to amyloid-β, an essential event in Alzheimer disease, is dependent on divergent PM trafficking pathways. We report a novel interaction between PM-associated APP and BECN1 that recruits macroautophagy/endosomal regulatory proteins PIK3C3 and UVRAG. We found that BECN1 promotes surface APP internalization and sorting predominantly to endosomes and endolysosomes. BECN1 also promotes the targeting of a smaller fraction of internalized APP to LC3-positive phagophores, suggesting a role for BECN1-dependent PM macroautophagy in APP degradation. Furthermore, BECN1 facilitates lysosomal degradation of surface APP and reduces the secretion of APP metabolites (soluble ectodomains, sAPP). The association between APP and BECN1 is dependent on the evolutionarily conserved domain (ECD) of BECN1 (amino acids 267-337). Deletion of a BECN1 ECD subregion (amino acids 285-299) did not impair BECN1- PIK3C3 interaction, PtdIns3K function or macroautophagy, but was sufficient to impair the APP-BECN1 interaction and BECN1's effects on surface APP internalization and degradation, resulting in increased secretion of sAPPs. Interestingly, both the BECN1-APP association and BECN1-dependent APP endocytosis and degradative trafficking were negatively regulated by active AKT. Our results further implicate phosphorylation of the BECN1 Ser295 residue in the inhibition of APP degradation by AKT. Our studies reveal a novel function for BECN1 in the sorting of a plasma membrane protein for endolysosomal and macroautophagic degradation.

  6. A genetic screen in Drosophila reveals novel cytoprotective functions of the autophagy-lysosome pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Arsham

    Full Text Available The highly conserved autophagy-lysosome pathway is the primary mechanism for breakdown and recycling of macromolecular and organellar cargo in the eukaryotic cell. Autophagy has recently been implicated in protection against cancer, neurodegeneration, and infection, and interest is increasing in additional roles of autophagy in human health, disease, and aging. To search for novel cytoprotective features of this pathway, we carried out a genetic mosaic screen for mutations causing increased lysosomal and/or autophagic activity in the Drosophila melanogaster larval fat body. By combining Drosophila genetics with live-cell imaging of the fluorescent dye LysoTracker Red and fixed-cell imaging of autophagy-specific fluorescent protein markers, the screen was designed to identify essential metazoan genes whose disruption causes increased flux through the autophagy-lysosome pathway. The screen identified a large number of genes associated with the protein synthesis and ER-secretory pathways (e.g. aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, Oligosaccharyl transferase, Sec61alpha, and with mitochondrial function and dynamics (e.g. Rieske iron-sulfur protein, Dynamin-related protein 1. We also observed that increased lysosomal and autophagic activity were consistently associated with decreased cell size. Our work demonstrates that disruption of the synthesis, transport, folding, or glycosylation of ER-targeted proteins at any of multiple steps leads to autophagy induction. In addition to illuminating cytoprotective features of autophagy in response to cellular damage, this screen establishes a genetic methodology for investigating cell biological phenotypes in live cells, in the context of viable wild type organisms.

  7. Preubiquitinated chimeric ErbB2 is constitutively endocytosed and subsequently degraded in lysosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuong, Tram Thu [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Berger, Christian [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Bertelsen, Vibeke; Rødland, Marianne Skeie [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Stang, Espen [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Madshus, Inger Helene, E-mail: i.h.madshus@medisin.uio.no [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway)

    2013-02-01

    The oncoprotein ErbB2 is endocytosis-deficient, probably due to its interaction with Heat shock protein 90. We previously demonstrated that clathrin-dependent endocytosis of ErbB2 is induced upon incubation of cells with Ansamycin derivatives, such as geldanamycin and its derivative 17-AAG. Furthermore, we have previously demonstrated that a preubiquitinated chimeric EGFR (EGFR-Ub{sub 4}) is constitutively endocytosed in a clathrin-dependent manner. We now demonstrate that also an ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} chimera is endocytosed constitutively and clathrin-dependently. Upon expression, the ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} was further ubiquitinated, and by Western blotting, we demonstrated the formation of both Lys48-linked and Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} was constitutively internalized and eventually sorted to late endosomes and lysosomes where the fusion protein was degraded. ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} was not cleaved prior to internalization. Interestingly, over-expression of Ubiquitin Interaction Motif-containing dominant negative fragments of the clathrin adaptor proteins epsin1 and Eps15 negatively affected endocytosis of ErbB2. Altogether, this argues that ubiquitination is sufficient to induce clathrin-mediated endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the otherwise plasma membrane localized ErbB2. Also, it appears that C-terminal cleavage is not required for endocytosis. -- Highlights: ► A chimera containing ErbB2 and a tetra-Ubiquitin chain internalizes constitutively. ► Receptor fragmentation is not required for endocytosis of ErbB2. ► Ubiquitination is sufficient to induce endocytosis and degradation of ErbB2. ► ErbB2-Ub4 is internalized clathrin-dependently.

  8. Size-dependent accumulation of particles in lysosomes modulates dendritic cell function through impaired antigen degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seydoux E

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Emilie Seydoux,1,2 Barbara Rothen-Rutishauser,1,3 Izabela M Nita,1 Sandor Balog,3 Amiq Gazdhar,1 Philip A Stumbles,4,5 Alke Petri-Fink,3,6 Fabian Blank,1,* Christophe von Garnier1,*1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, 2Graduate School for Cellular and Biomedical Sciences, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; 3Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland; 4School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Molecular and Biomedical Sciences, Murdoch University, Perth, WA, Australia; 5Telethon Kids Institute, Perth, WA, Australia; 6Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland*These authors contributed equally to the manuscriptIntroduction: Nanosized particles may enable therapeutic modulation of immune responses by targeting dendritic cell (DC networks in accessible organs such as the lung. To date, however, the effects of nanoparticles on DC function and downstream immune responses remain poorly understood. Methods: Bone marrow–derived DCs (BMDCs were exposed in vitro to 20 or 1,000 nm polystyrene (PS particles. Particle uptake kinetics, cell surface marker expression, soluble protein antigen uptake and degradation, as well as in vitro CD4+ T-cell proliferation and cytokine production were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, co-localization of particles within the lysosomal compartment, lysosomal permeability, and endoplasmic reticulum stress were analyzed. Results: The frequency of PS particle–positive CD11c+/CD11b+ BMDCs reached an early plateau after 20 minutes and was significantly higher for 20 nm than for 1,000 nm PS particles at all time-points analyzed. PS particles did not alter cell viability or modify expression of the surface markers CD11b, CD11c, MHC class II, CD40, and CD86. Although particle exposure did not modulate antigen uptake, 20 nm PS particles decreased the capacity

  9. Arsenic induces apoptosis by the lysosomal-mitochondrial pathway in INS-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao; Jiang, Liping; Zhong, Laifu; Geng, Chengyan; Jia, Li; Liu, Shuang; Guan, Huai; Yang, Guang; Yao, Xiaofeng; Piao, Fengyuan; Sun, Xiance

    2016-02-01

    Recently, long term arsenic exposure was considered to be associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus. While a relation of cause-and-effect between apoptosis of pancreatic β-cells and arsenic exposure, the precise mechanisms of these events remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore arsenic-induced pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and the mechanisms of through the possible link between lysosomal and the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. After exposure to 10 μM of arsenic, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level was significantly increased at 12 h, while the mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced at 24 h and the lysosomal membrane integrity was disrupted at 48 h. A significant increase in protein expression for cytochrome c was also observed using Western blot analysis after exposure to arsenic for 48 h. To further demonstrate that arsenic reduced the lysosomal membrane integrity, cells pretreated with NH4 Cl and exposed to arsenic harbored a lower fluorescence increase than cells that were only exposed to arsenic. In addition, apoptosis was mesured using Hoechst 33342/PI dual staining by microscopy and annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide dual staining by flow cytometry. The results show an increased uptake of the arsenic dose and the cells changed from dark blue to light blue, karyopyknosis, nuclear chromatin condensation, side set or fracture, and a correlation was found between the number of apoptotic cells and arsenic dose. The result of present study suggest that arsenic may induce pancreatic β-cell apoptosis through activation of the lysosome-mitochondrial pathway.

  10. Graded Proteasome Dysfunction in Caenorhabditis elegans Activates an Adaptive Response Involving the Conserved SKN-1 and ELT-2 Transcription Factors and the Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Scott A; Maddux, Sarah K; Zhong, Yayu; Chinchankar, Meghna N; Ferguson, Annabel A; Ghazi, Arjumand; Fisher, Alfred L

    2016-02-01

    The maintenance of cellular proteins in a biologically active and structurally stable state is a vital endeavor involving multiple cellular pathways. One such pathway is the ubiquitin-proteasome system that represents a major route for protein degradation, and reductions in this pathway usually have adverse effects on the health of cells and tissues. Here, we demonstrate that loss-of-function mutants of the Caenorhabditis elegans proteasome subunit, RPN-10, exhibit moderate proteasome dysfunction and unexpectedly develop both increased longevity and enhanced resistance to multiple threats to the proteome, including heat, oxidative stress, and the presence of aggregation prone proteins. The rpn-10 mutant animals survive through the activation of compensatory mechanisms regulated by the conserved SKN-1/Nrf2 and ELT-2/GATA transcription factors that mediate the increased expression of genes encoding proteasome subunits as well as those mediating oxidative- and heat-stress responses. Additionally, we find that the rpn-10 mutant also shows enhanced activity of the autophagy-lysosome pathway as evidenced by increased expression of the multiple autophagy genes including atg-16.2, lgg-1, and bec-1, and also by an increase in GFP::LGG-1 puncta. Consistent with a critical role for this pathway, the enhanced resistance of the rpn-10 mutant to aggregation prone proteins depends on autophagy genes atg-13, atg-16.2, and prmt-1. Furthermore, the rpn-10 mutant is particularly sensitive to the inhibition of lysosome activity via either RNAi or chemical means. We also find that the rpn-10 mutant shows a reduction in the numbers of intestinal lysosomes, and that the elt-2 gene also plays a novel and vital role in controlling the production of functional lysosomes by the intestine. Overall, these experiments suggest that moderate proteasome dysfunction could be leveraged to improve protein homeostasis and organismal health and longevity, and that the rpn-10 mutant provides a unique

  11. Graded Proteasome Dysfunction in Caenorhabditis elegans Activates an Adaptive Response Involving the Conserved SKN-1 and ELT-2 Transcription Factors and the Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Keith

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of cellular proteins in a biologically active and structurally stable state is a vital endeavor involving multiple cellular pathways. One such pathway is the ubiquitin-proteasome system that represents a major route for protein degradation, and reductions in this pathway usually have adverse effects on the health of cells and tissues. Here, we demonstrate that loss-of-function mutants of the Caenorhabditis elegans proteasome subunit, RPN-10, exhibit moderate proteasome dysfunction and unexpectedly develop both increased longevity and enhanced resistance to multiple threats to the proteome, including heat, oxidative stress, and the presence of aggregation prone proteins. The rpn-10 mutant animals survive through the activation of compensatory mechanisms regulated by the conserved SKN-1/Nrf2 and ELT-2/GATA transcription factors that mediate the increased expression of genes encoding proteasome subunits as well as those mediating oxidative- and heat-stress responses. Additionally, we find that the rpn-10 mutant also shows enhanced activity of the autophagy-lysosome pathway as evidenced by increased expression of the multiple autophagy genes including atg-16.2, lgg-1, and bec-1, and also by an increase in GFP::LGG-1 puncta. Consistent with a critical role for this pathway, the enhanced resistance of the rpn-10 mutant to aggregation prone proteins depends on autophagy genes atg-13, atg-16.2, and prmt-1. Furthermore, the rpn-10 mutant is particularly sensitive to the inhibition of lysosome activity via either RNAi or chemical means. We also find that the rpn-10 mutant shows a reduction in the numbers of intestinal lysosomes, and that the elt-2 gene also plays a novel and vital role in controlling the production of functional lysosomes by the intestine. Overall, these experiments suggest that moderate proteasome dysfunction could be leveraged to improve protein homeostasis and organismal health and longevity, and that the rpn-10 mutant

  12. Ouabain-induced internalization and lysosomal degradation of the Na+/K+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniavsky-Lev, Marina; Golani, Ofra; Karlish, Steven J D; Garty, Haim

    2014-01-10

    Internalization of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (the Na(+) pump) has been studied in the human lung carcinoma cell line H1299 that expresses YFP-tagged α1 from its normal genomic localization. Both real-time imaging and surface biotinylation have demonstrated internalization of α1 induced by ≥100 nm ouabain which occurs in a time scale of hours. Unlike previous studies in other systems, the ouabain-induced internalization was insensitive to Src or PI3K inhibitors. Accumulation of α1 in the cells could be augmented by inhibition of lysosomal degradation but not by proteosomal inhibitors. In agreement, the internalized α1 could be colocalized with the lysosomal marker LAMP1 but not with Golgi or nuclear markers. In principle, internalization could be triggered by a conformational change of the ouabain-bound Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase molecule or more generally by the disruption of cation homeostasis (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+)) due to the partial inhibition of active Na(+) and K(+) transport. Overexpression of ouabain-insensitive rat α1 failed to inhibit internalization of human α1 expressed in the same cells. In addition, incubating cells in a K(+)-free medium did not induce internalization of the pump or affect the response to ouabain. Thus, internalization is not the result of changes in the cellular cation balance but is likely to be triggered by a conformational change of the protein itself. In physiological conditions, internalization may serve to eliminate pumps that have been blocked by endogenous ouabain or other cardiac glycosides. This mechanism may be required due to the very slow dissociation of the ouabain·Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase complex.

  13. EGF Uptake and Degradation Assay to Determine the Effect of HTLV Regulatory Proteins on the ESCRT-Dependent MVB Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Colin; Sheehy, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) pathway plays key roles in multivesicular bodies (MVBs) formation and lysosomal degradation of membrane receptors, viral budding, and midbody abscission during cytokinesis. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is regarded as a prototypical cargo of the MVB/ESCRT pathway and following stimulation by epidermal growth factor (EGF) EGFR/EGF complexes are internalized, sorted into MVBs, and degraded by lysosomes or recycled back to the cell membrane. Here, we describe an assay to analyze the effect of human T-cell leukemia (HTLV) regulatory proteins on the functionality of ESCRT-dependent MVB/lysosomal trafficking of EGFR/EGF complexes. This is performed by direct visualization and quantification of the rate of EGF-Alexa595/EGFR internalization and degradation in HeLa cells expressing HTLV regulatory proteins by immunofluorescence and western blot.

  14. CHIP controls necroptosis through ubiquitylation- and lysosome-dependent degradation of RIPK3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jinho; Lee, Eun-Woo; Sung, Hyerim; Seong, Daehyeon; Dondelinger, Yves; Shin, Jihye; Jeong, Manhyung; Lee, Hae-Kyung; Kim, Jung-Hoon; Han, Su Yeon; Lee, Cheolju; Seong, Je Kyung; Vandenabeele, Peter; Song, Jaewhan

    2016-03-01

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) functions as a key regulator of necroptosis. Here, we report that the RIPK3 expression level is negatively regulated by CHIP (carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein; also known as STUB1) E3 ligase-mediated ubiquitylation. Chip(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts and CHIP-depleted L929 and HT-29 cells exhibited higher levels of RIPK3 expression, resulting in increased sensitivity to necroptosis induced by TNF (also known as TNFα). These phenomena are due to the CHIP-mediated ubiquitylation of RIPK3, which leads to its lysosomal degradation. Interestingly, RIPK1 expression is also negatively regulated by CHIP-mediated ubiquitylation, validating the major role of CHIP in necrosome formation and sensitivity to TNF-mediated necroptosis. Chip(-/-) mice (C57BL/6) exhibit inflammation in the thymus and massive cell death and disintegration in the small intestinal tract, and die within a few weeks after birth. These phenotypes are rescued by crossing with Ripk3(-/-) mice. These results imply that CHIP is a bona fide negative regulator of the RIPK1-RIPK3 necrosome formation leading to desensitization of TNF-mediated necroptosis.

  15. A molecular mechanism to regulate lysosome motility for lysosome positioning and tubulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinran; Rydzewski, Nicholas; Hider, Ahmad; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Junsheng; Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Cheng, Xiping; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-04-01

    To mediate the degradation of biomacromolecules, lysosomes must traffic towards cargo-carrying vesicles for subsequent membrane fusion or fission. Mutations of the lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 cause lysosomal storage disease (LSD) characterized by disordered lysosomal membrane trafficking in cells. Here we show that TRPML1 activity is required to promote Ca(2+)-dependent centripetal movement of lysosomes towards the perinuclear region (where autophagosomes accumulate) following autophagy induction. ALG-2, an EF-hand-containing protein, serves as a lysosomal Ca(2+) sensor that associates physically with the minus-end-directed dynactin-dynein motor, while PtdIns(3,5)P(2), a lysosome-localized phosphoinositide, acts upstream of TRPML1. Furthermore, the PtdIns(3,5)P(2)-TRPML1-ALG-2-dynein signalling is necessary for lysosome tubulation and reformation. In contrast, the TRPML1 pathway is not required for the perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes observed in many LSDs, which is instead likely to be caused by secondary cholesterol accumulation that constitutively activates Rab7-RILP-dependent retrograde transport. Ca(2+) release from lysosomes thus provides an on-demand mechanism regulating lysosome motility, positioning and tubulation.

  16. Formation of distinct inclusion bodies by inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Junho; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Joe, Cheol O. [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seok-Seong, E-mail: sskang@ivi.int [Laboratory Sciences Division, International Vaccine Institute, Seoul 151-919 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Distinct inclusion bodies are developed by inhibition of UPP and ALP. {yields} The inclusion bodies differ in morphology, localization and formation process. {yields} The inclusion bodies are distinguishable by the localization of TSC2. {yields} Inhibition of both UPP and ALP simultaneously induces those inclusion bodies. -- Abstract: Accumulation of misfolded proteins is caused by the impairment of protein quality control systems, such as ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). In this study, the formation of inclusion bodies was examined after the blockade of UPP and/or ALP in A549 cells. UPP inhibition induced a single and large inclusion body localized in microtubule-organizing center. Interestingly, however, ALP inhibition generated dispersed small inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm. Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 was selectively accumulated in the inclusion bodies of UPP-inhibited cells, but not those of ALP-inhibited cells. Blockade of transcription and translation entirely inhibited the formation of inclusion body induced by UPP inhibition, but partially by ALP inhibition. Moreover, the simultaneous inhibition of two protein catabolic pathways independently developed two distinct inclusion bodies within a single cell. These findings clearly demonstrated that dysfunction of each catabolic pathway induced formation and accumulation of unique inclusion bodies on the basis of morphology, localization and formation process in A549 cells.

  17. Formation of distinct inclusion bodies by inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junho; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Joe, Cheol O; Kang, Seok-Seong

    2011-01-14

    Accumulation of misfolded proteins is caused by the impairment of protein quality control systems, such as ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). In this study, the formation of inclusion bodies was examined after the blockade of UPP and/or ALP in A549 cells. UPP inhibition induced a single and large inclusion body localized in microtubule-organizing center. Interestingly, however, ALP inhibition generated dispersed small inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm. Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 was selectively accumulated in the inclusion bodies of UPP-inhibited cells, but not those of ALP-inhibited cells. Blockade of transcription and translation entirely inhibited the formation of inclusion body induced by UPP inhibition, but partially by ALP inhibition. Moreover, the simultaneous inhibition of two protein catabolic pathways independently developed two distinct inclusion bodies within a single cell. These findings clearly demonstrated that dysfunction of each catabolic pathway induced formation and accumulation of unique inclusion bodies on the basis of morphology, localization and formation process in A549 cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The autophagic- lysosomal pathway determines the fate of glial cells under manganese- induced oxidative stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorojod, R M; Alaimo, A; Porte Alcon, S; Pomilio, C; Saravia, F; Kotler, M L

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) overexposure is frequently associated with the development of a neurodegenerative disorder known as Manganism. The Mn-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) promotes cellular damage, finally leading to apoptotic cell death in rat astrocytoma C6 cells. In this scenario, the autophagic pathway could play an important role in preventing cytotoxicity. In the present study, we found that Mn induced an increase in the amount and total volume of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs), a process usually related to the activation of the autophagic pathway. Particularly, the generation of enlarged AVOs was a ROS- dependent event. In this report we demonstrated for the first time that Mn induces autophagy in glial cells. This conclusion emerged from the results obtained employing a battery of autophagy markers: a) the increase in LC3-II expression levels, b) the formation of autophagic vesicles labeled with monodansylcadaverine (MDC) or LC3 and, c) the increase in Beclin 1/ Bcl-2 and Beclin 1/ Bcl-X(L) ratio. Autophagy inhibition employing 3-MA and mAtg5(K130R) resulted in decreased cell viability indicating that this event plays a protective role in Mn- induced cell death. In addition, mitophagy was demonstrated by an increase in LC3 and TOM-20 colocalization. On the other hand, we proposed the occurrence of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) based in the fact that cathepsins B and D activities are essential for cell death. Both cathepsin B inhibitor (Ca-074 Me) or cathepsin D inhibitor (Pepstatin A) completely prevented Mn- induced cytotoxicity. In addition, low dose of Bafilomycin A1 showed a similar effect, a finding that adds evidence about the lysosomal role in Mn cytotoxicity. Finally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that Mn induces injury and alters LC3 expression levels in rat striatal astrocytes. In summary, our results demonstrated that autophagy is activated to counteract the harmful effect caused by Mn. These data is valuable to

  19. Cellular Anti-Melanogenic Effects of a Euryale ferox Seed Extract Ethyl Acetate Fraction via the Lysosomal Degradation Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hwa Baek

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ethyl acetate fraction of Euryale ferox seed extracts (Efse-EA on melanogenesis in immortalized mouse melanocyte cell line, melan-a. Efse-EA showed strong dose-dependent mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity. Treatment of melan-a cells with 30 μg/mL Efse-EA produced strong inhibition of cellular tyrosinase and melanin synthesis. Efse-EA significantly reduced the levels of melanogenesis-related proteins, such as tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related proteins 1 and 2, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Because Efse-EA treatment reduced tyrosinase protein levels without changing its mRNA expression, we investigated whether this decrease was related to proteasomal or lysosomal degradation of tyrosinase. We found that chloroquine, a lysosomal proteolysis inhibitor, almost completely abolished both the down-regulation of tyrosinase and the inhibition of melanin synthesis induced by Efse-EA. These results suggested that Efse-EA may contribute to the inhibition of melanogenesis by altering lysosomal degradation of tyrosinase, and that this extract may provide a new cosmetic skin-whitening agent.

  20. Cellular Anti-Melanogenic Effects of a Euryale ferox Seed Extract Ethyl Acetate Fraction via the Lysosomal Degradation Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Hwa; Nam, In-Jeong; Kwak, Hyeong Seob; Kim, Ki-Chan; Lee, Sang-Han

    2015-04-23

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ethyl acetate fraction of Euryale ferox seed extracts (Efse-EA) on melanogenesis in immortalized mouse melanocyte cell line, melan-a. Efse-EA showed strong dose-dependent mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity. Treatment of melan-a cells with 30 μg/mL Efse-EA produced strong inhibition of cellular tyrosinase and melanin synthesis. Efse-EA significantly reduced the levels of melanogenesis-related proteins, such as tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related proteins 1 and 2, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Because Efse-EA treatment reduced tyrosinase protein levels without changing its mRNA expression, we investigated whether this decrease was related to proteasomal or lysosomal degradation of tyrosinase. We found that chloroquine, a lysosomal proteolysis inhibitor, almost completely abolished both the down-regulation of tyrosinase and the inhibition of melanin synthesis induced by Efse-EA. These results suggested that Efse-EA may contribute to the inhibition of melanogenesis by altering lysosomal degradation of tyrosinase, and that this extract may provide a new cosmetic skin-whitening agent.

  1. Two novel human cytomegalovirus NK cell evasion functions target MICA for lysosomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Ceri A; Aicheler, Rebecca; Stanton, Richard J; Wang, Eddie C Y; Han, Song; Seirafian, Sepehr; Davies, James; McSharry, Brian P; Weekes, Michael P; Antrobus, P Robin; Prod'homme, Virginie; Blanchet, Fabien P; Sugrue, Daniel; Cuff, Simone; Roberts, Dawn; Davison, Andrew J; Lehner, Paul J; Wilkinson, Gavin W G; Tomasec, Peter

    2014-05-01

    NKG2D plays a major role in controlling immune responses through the regulation of natural killer (NK) cells, αβ and γδ T-cell function. This activating receptor recognizes eight distinct ligands (the MHC Class I polypeptide-related sequences (MIC) A andB, and UL16-binding proteins (ULBP)1-6) induced by cellular stress to promote recognition cells perturbed by malignant transformation or microbial infection. Studies into human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) have aided both the identification and characterization of NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs). HCMV immediate early (IE) gene up regulates NKGDLs, and we now describe the differential activation of ULBP2 and MICA/B by IE1 and IE2 respectively. Despite activation by IE functions, HCMV effectively suppressed cell surface expression of NKGDLs through both the early and late phases of infection. The immune evasion functions UL16, UL142, and microRNA(miR)-UL112 are known to target NKG2DLs. While infection with a UL16 deletion mutant caused the expected increase in MICB and ULBP2 cell surface expression, deletion of UL142 did not have a similar impact on its target, MICA. We therefore performed a systematic screen of the viral genome to search of addition functions that targeted MICA. US18 and US20 were identified as novel NK cell evasion functions capable of acting independently to promote MICA degradation by lysosomal degradation. The most dramatic effect on MICA expression was achieved when US18 and US20 acted in concert. US18 and US20 are the first members of the US12 gene family to have been assigned a function. The US12 family has 10 members encoded sequentially through US12-US21; a genetic arrangement, which is suggestive of an 'accordion' expansion of an ancestral gene in response to a selective pressure. This expansion must have be an ancient event as the whole family is conserved across simian cytomegaloviruses from old world monkeys. The evolutionary benefit bestowed by the combinatorial effect of US18 and US20 on MICA

  2. Two novel human cytomegalovirus NK cell evasion functions target MICA for lysosomal degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceri A Fielding

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available NKG2D plays a major role in controlling immune responses through the regulation of natural killer (NK cells, αβ and γδ T-cell function. This activating receptor recognizes eight distinct ligands (the MHC Class I polypeptide-related sequences (MIC A andB, and UL16-binding proteins (ULBP1-6 induced by cellular stress to promote recognition cells perturbed by malignant transformation or microbial infection. Studies into human cytomegalovirus (HCMV have aided both the identification and characterization of NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs. HCMV immediate early (IE gene up regulates NKGDLs, and we now describe the differential activation of ULBP2 and MICA/B by IE1 and IE2 respectively. Despite activation by IE functions, HCMV effectively suppressed cell surface expression of NKGDLs through both the early and late phases of infection. The immune evasion functions UL16, UL142, and microRNA(miR-UL112 are known to target NKG2DLs. While infection with a UL16 deletion mutant caused the expected increase in MICB and ULBP2 cell surface expression, deletion of UL142 did not have a similar impact on its target, MICA. We therefore performed a systematic screen of the viral genome to search of addition functions that targeted MICA. US18 and US20 were identified as novel NK cell evasion functions capable of acting independently to promote MICA degradation by lysosomal degradation. The most dramatic effect on MICA expression was achieved when US18 and US20 acted in concert. US18 and US20 are the first members of the US12 gene family to have been assigned a function. The US12 family has 10 members encoded sequentially through US12-US21; a genetic arrangement, which is suggestive of an 'accordion' expansion of an ancestral gene in response to a selective pressure. This expansion must have be an ancient event as the whole family is conserved across simian cytomegaloviruses from old world monkeys. The evolutionary benefit bestowed by the combinatorial effect of US18 and US

  3. Two novel human cytomegalovirus NK cell evasion functions target MICA for lysosomal degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceri A Fielding

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available NKG2D plays a major role in controlling immune responses through the regulation of natural killer (NK cells, αβ and γδ T-cell function. This activating receptor recognizes eight distinct ligands (the MHC Class I polypeptide-related sequences (MIC A andB, and UL16-binding proteins (ULBP1-6 induced by cellular stress to promote recognition cells perturbed by malignant transformation or microbial infection. Studies into human cytomegalovirus (HCMV have aided both the identification and characterization of NKG2D ligands (NKG2DLs. HCMV immediate early (IE gene up regulates NKGDLs, and we now describe the differential activation of ULBP2 and MICA/B by IE1 and IE2 respectively. Despite activation by IE functions, HCMV effectively suppressed cell surface expression of NKGDLs through both the early and late phases of infection. The immune evasion functions UL16, UL142, and microRNA(miR-UL112 are known to target NKG2DLs. While infection with a UL16 deletion mutant caused the expected increase in MICB and ULBP2 cell surface expression, deletion of UL142 did not have a similar impact on its target, MICA. We therefore performed a systematic screen of the viral genome to search of addition functions that targeted MICA. US18 and US20 were identified as novel NK cell evasion functions capable of acting independently to promote MICA degradation by lysosomal degradation. The most dramatic effect on MICA expression was achieved when US18 and US20 acted in concert. US18 and US20 are the first members of the US12 gene family to have been assigned a function. The US12 family has 10 members encoded sequentially through US12-US21; a genetic arrangement, which is suggestive of an 'accordion' expansion of an ancestral gene in response to a selective pressure. This expansion must have be an ancient event as the whole family is conserved across simian cytomegaloviruses from old world monkeys. The evolutionary benefit bestowed by the combinatorial effect of US18 and US

  4. The autophagy/lysosome pathway is impaired in SCA7 patients and SCA7 knock-in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves, Sandro; Cormier-Dequaire, Florence; Marinello, Martina; Marais, Thibaut; Muriel, Marie-Paule; Beaumatin, Florian; Charbonnier-Beaupel, Fanny; Tahiri, Khadija; Seilhean, Danielle; El Hachimi, Khalid; Ruberg, Merle; Stevanin, Giovanni; Barkats, Martine; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Priault, Muriel; Brice, Alexis; Durr, Alexandra; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Sittler, Annie

    2014-01-01

    There is still no treatment for polyglutamine disorders, but clearance of mutant proteins might represent a potential therapeutic strategy. Autophagy, the major pathway for organelle and protein turnover, has been implicated in these diseases. To determine whether the autophagy/lysosome system

  5. Age-related dysfunctions of the autophagy lysosomal pathway in hippocampal pyramidal neurons under proteasome stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilán, Elena; Pintado, Cristina; Gavilan, Maria P; Daza, Paula; Sánchez-Aguayo, Inmaculada; Castaño, Angélica; Ruano, Diego

    2015-05-01

    Autophagy plays a key role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, and autophagy deregulation gives rise to severe disorders. Many of the signaling pathways regulating autophagy under stress conditions are still poorly understood. Using a model of proteasome stress in rat hippocampus, we have characterized the functional crosstalk between the ubiquitin proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosome pathway, identifying also age-related modifications in the crosstalk between both proteolytic systems. Under proteasome inhibition, both autophagy activation and resolution were efficiently induced in young but not in aged rats, leading to restoration of protein homeostasis only in young pyramidal neurons. Importantly, proteasome stress inhibited glycogen synthase kinase-3β in young but activated in aged rats. This age-related difference could be because of a dysfunction in the signaling pathway of the insulin growth factor-1 under stress situations. Present data highlight the potential role of glycogen synthase kinase-3β in the coordination of both proteolytic systems under stress situation, representing a key molecular target to sort out this deleterious effect.

  6. DNA damage, lysosomal degradation and Bcl-xL deamidation in doxycycline- and minocycline-induced cell death in the K562 leukemic cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Mona; Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr; Hassan, Moustapha; Potácová, Zuzana

    2015-07-31

    We investigated mechanisms of cytotoxicity induced by doxycycline (doxy) and minocycline (mino) in the chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cell line. Doxy and mino induced cell death in exposure-dependent manner. While annexin V/propidium iodide staining was consistent with apoptosis, the morphological changes in Giemsa staining were more equivocal. A pancaspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK partially reverted cell death morphology, but concurrently completely prevented PARP cleavage. Mitochondrial involvement was detected as dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome C release. DNA double strand breaks detected with γH2AX antibody and caspase-2 activation were found early after the treatment start, but caspase-3 activation was a late event. Decrement of Bcl-xL protein levels and electrophoretic shift of Bcl-xL molecule were induced by both drugs. Phosphorylation of Bcl-xL at serine 62 was ruled out. Similarly, Bcr/Abl tyrosine kinase levels were decreased. Lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine restored Bcl-xL and Bcr/Abl protein levels and inhibited caspase-3 activation. Thus, the cytotoxicity of doxy and mino in K562 cells is mediated by DNA damage, Bcl-xL deamidation and lysosomal degradation with activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Coronavirus cell entry occurs through the endo-/lysosomal pathway in a proteolysis-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Burkard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Enveloped viruses need to fuse with a host cell membrane in order to deliver their genome into the host cell. While some viruses fuse with the plasma membrane, many viruses are endocytosed prior to fusion. Specific cues in the endosomal microenvironment induce conformational changes in the viral fusion proteins leading to viral and host membrane fusion. In the present study we investigated the entry of coronaviruses (CoVs. Using siRNA gene silencing, we found that proteins known to be important for late endosomal maturation and endosome-lysosome fusion profoundly promote infection of cells with mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV. Using recombinant MHVs expressing reporter genes as well as a novel, replication-independent fusion assay we confirmed the importance of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and demonstrated that trafficking of MHV to lysosomes is required for fusion and productive entry to occur. Nevertheless, MHV was shown to be less sensitive to perturbation of endosomal pH than vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus, which fuse in early and late endosomes, respectively. Our results indicate that entry of MHV depends on proteolytic processing of its fusion protein S by lysosomal proteases. Fusion of MHV was severely inhibited by a pan-lysosomal protease inhibitor, while trafficking of MHV to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases was no longer required when a furin cleavage site was introduced in the S protein immediately upstream of the fusion peptide. Also entry of feline CoV was shown to depend on trafficking to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases. In contrast, MERS-CoV, which contains a minimal furin cleavage site just upstream of the fusion peptide, was negatively affected by inhibition of furin, but not of lysosomal proteases. We conclude that a proteolytic cleavage site in the CoV S protein directly upstream of the fusion peptide is an essential determinant of the intracellular site of fusion.

  8. Coronavirus cell entry occurs through the endo-/lysosomal pathway in a proteolysis-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, Christine; Verheije, Monique H; Wicht, Oliver; van Kasteren, Sander I; van Kuppeveld, Frank J; Haagmans, Bart L; Pelkmans, Lucas; Rottier, Peter J M; Bosch, Berend Jan; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2014-11-01

    Enveloped viruses need to fuse with a host cell membrane in order to deliver their genome into the host cell. While some viruses fuse with the plasma membrane, many viruses are endocytosed prior to fusion. Specific cues in the endosomal microenvironment induce conformational changes in the viral fusion proteins leading to viral and host membrane fusion. In the present study we investigated the entry of coronaviruses (CoVs). Using siRNA gene silencing, we found that proteins known to be important for late endosomal maturation and endosome-lysosome fusion profoundly promote infection of cells with mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV). Using recombinant MHVs expressing reporter genes as well as a novel, replication-independent fusion assay we confirmed the importance of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and demonstrated that trafficking of MHV to lysosomes is required for fusion and productive entry to occur. Nevertheless, MHV was shown to be less sensitive to perturbation of endosomal pH than vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus, which fuse in early and late endosomes, respectively. Our results indicate that entry of MHV depends on proteolytic processing of its fusion protein S by lysosomal proteases. Fusion of MHV was severely inhibited by a pan-lysosomal protease inhibitor, while trafficking of MHV to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases was no longer required when a furin cleavage site was introduced in the S protein immediately upstream of the fusion peptide. Also entry of feline CoV was shown to depend on trafficking to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases. In contrast, MERS-CoV, which contains a minimal furin cleavage site just upstream of the fusion peptide, was negatively affected by inhibition of furin, but not of lysosomal proteases. We conclude that a proteolytic cleavage site in the CoV S protein directly upstream of the fusion peptide is an essential determinant of the intracellular site of fusion.

  9. The phylogeny and evolution of deoxyribonuclease II: An enzyme essential for lysosomal DNA degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Shpak, Max; Kugelman, Jeffrey R.; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Aguilera, Renato J.

    2007-01-01

    Deoxyribonuclease II (DNase II) is an endonuclease with optimal activity at low pH, localized within the lysosomes of higher eukaryotes. The origin of this enzyme remains in dispute, and its phylogenetic distribution leaves many questions about its subsequent evolutionary history open. Earlier studies have documented its presence in various metazoans, as well as in Dictyostelium, Trichomonas and, anomalously, a single genus of bacteria (Burkholderia). This study makes use of searches of the g...

  10. Regulation of lysosomal ion homeostasis by channels and transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomes are the major organelles that carry out degradation functions. They integrate and digest materials compartmentalized by endocytosis, phagocytosis or autophagy. In addition to more than 60 hydrolases residing in the lysosomes, there are also ion channels and transporters that mediate the flux or transport of H(+), Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) across the lysosomal membranes. Defects in ionic exchange can lead to abnormal lysosome morphology, defective vesicle trafficking, impaired autophagy, and diseases such as neurodegeneration and lysosomal storage disorders. The latter are characterized by incomplete lysosomal digestion and accumulation of toxic materials inside enlarged intracellular vacuoles. In addition to degradation, recent studies have revealed the roles of lysosomes in metabolic pathways through kinases such as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transcriptional regulation through calcium signaling molecules such as transcription factor EB (TFEB) and calcineurin. Owing to the development of new approaches including genetically encoded fluorescence probes and whole endolysosomal patch clamp recording techniques, studies on lysosomal ion channels have made remarkable progress in recent years. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge of lysosome-resident ion channels and transporters, discuss their roles in maintaining lysosomal function, and evaluate how their dysfunction can result in disease.

  11. Arsenic promotes ubiquitinylation and lysosomal degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Coutermarsh, Bonita A; Barnaby, Roxanna L; Stanton, Bruce A

    2012-05-18

    Arsenic exposure significantly increases respiratory bacterial infections and reduces the ability of the innate immune system to eliminate bacterial infections. Recently, we observed in the gill of killifish, an environmental model organism, that arsenic exposure induced the ubiquitinylation and degradation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride channel that is essential for the mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens in humans. Accordingly, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that low dose arsenic exposure reduces the abundance and function of CFTR in human airway epithelial cells. Arsenic induced a time- and dose-dependent increase in multiubiquitinylated CFTR, which led to its lysosomal degradation, and a decrease in CFTR-mediated chloride secretion. Although arsenic had no effect on the abundance or activity of USP10, a deubiquitinylating enzyme, siRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, abolished the arsenic-stimulated degradation of CFTR. Arsenic enhanced the degradation of CFTR by increasing phosphorylated c-Cbl, which increased its interaction with CFTR, and subsequent ubiquitinylation of CFTR. Because epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic increases the incidence of respiratory infections, this study suggests that one potential mechanism of this effect involves arsenic-induced ubiquitinylation and degradation of CFTR, which decreases chloride secretion and airway surface liquid volume, effects that would be proposed to reduce mucociliary clearance of respiratory pathogens.

  12. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Stephan T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  13. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Stephan T; Adiseshaiah, Pavan P; Crist, Rachael M

    2012-06-14

    The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy) pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  14. The serotonin transporter undergoes constitutive internalization and is primarily sorted to late endosomes and lysosomal degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Bay, Tina; Eriksen, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) plays a critical role in regulating serotonin signaling by mediating reuptake of serotonin from the extracellular space. The molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling SERT levels in the membrane remain poorly understood. To study trafficking of surface resident....... Furthermore, internalized SERT co-localized with the lysosomal marker LysoTracker and not with transferrin. The sorting pattern was further confirmed by visualizing internalization of SERT using the fluorescent cocaine analogue JHC1-64, and by reversible and pulse chase biotinylation assays showing evidence...

  15. A hedgehog-responsive region in the Drosophila wing disc is defined by debra-mediated ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of Ci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ping; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2003-06-01

    Transcription factor Ci mediates Hedgehog (Hh) signaling to determine the anterior/posterior (A/P) compartment of Drosophila wing disc. While Hh-inducible genes are expressed in A compartment cells abutting the A/P border, it is unclear how the boundaries of this region are established. Here, we have identified a Ci binding protein, Debra, that is expressed at relatively high levels in the band abutting the border of the Hh-responsive A compartment region. Debra mediates the polyubiquitination of full-length Ci, which then leads to its lysosomal degradation. Debra is localized in the multivesicular body, suggesting that the polyubiquitination of Ci directs its sorting into lysosome. Thus, Debra defines the border of the Hh-responsive region in the A compartment by inducing the lysosomal degradation of Ci.

  16. Internalization, lysosomal degradation and new synthesis of surface membrane CD4 in phorbol ester-activated T-lymphocytes and U-937 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, C M; Christensen, E I; Andresen, B S

    1992-01-01

    degradation was low in resting cells. Endocytosis and/or degradation of anti-CD4 mAb was suppressed by H7, and by inhibitors of membrane traffic (Monensin) and lysosome function (methylamine, chloroquine). Immunocytochemistry localized CD4 to the surface of unstimulated T-cells. Upon PMA stimulation...... occasional labeling was seen in endosomes but whole cell CD4 decreased dramatically. However, methylamine-treated PMA blasts showed accumulation of CD4 in lysosomes and accordingly, pulse-chase experiments in biolabeled cell cultures suggested a manifest reduction of CD4 half-life in response to PMA. Despite...... in activated cells was further evidenced by metabolic labeling and Northern blot analysis demonstrating unaltered or slightly increased CD4 protein and mRNA levels resulting from PMA. Our findings demonstrate that phorbol esters downregulate the cellular CD4 pool by endocytosis and subsequent lysosomal...

  17. A lysosome-centered view of nutrient homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mony, Vinod K; Benjamin, Shawna; O'Rourke, Eyleen J

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are highly acidic cellular organelles traditionally viewed as sacs of enzymes involved in digesting extracellular or intracellular macromolecules for the regeneration of basic building blocks, cellular housekeeping, or pathogen degradation. Bound by a single lipid bilayer, lysosomes receive their substrates by fusing with endosomes or autophagosomes, or through specialized translocation mechanisms such as chaperone-mediated autophagy or microautophagy. Lysosomes degrade their substrates using up to 60 different soluble hydrolases and release their products either to the cytosol through poorly defined exporting and efflux mechanisms or to the extracellular space by fusing with the plasma membrane. However, it is becoming evident that the role of the lysosome in nutrient homeostasis goes beyond the disposal of waste or the recycling of building blocks. The lysosome is emerging as a signaling hub that can integrate and relay external and internal nutritional information to promote cellular and organismal homeostasis, as well as a major contributor to the processing of energy-dense molecules like glycogen and triglycerides. Here we describe the current knowledge of the nutrient signaling pathways governing lysosomal function, the role of the lysosome in nutrient mobilization, and how lysosomes signal other organelles, distant tissues, and even themselves to ensure energy homeostasis in spite of fluctuations in energy intake. At the same time, we highlight the value of genomics approaches to the past and future discoveries of how the lysosome simultaneously executes and controls cellular homeostasis.

  18. A Comparative Study on the Alterations of Endocytic Pathways in Multiple Lysosomal Storage Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Jeff; Manthe, Rachel L; Solomon, Melani; Garnacho, Carmen; Muro, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Many cellular activities and pharmaceutical interventions involve endocytosis and delivery to lysosomes for processing. Hence, lysosomal processing defects can cause cell and tissue damage, as in lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) characterized by lysosomal accumulation of undegraded materials. This storage causes endocytic and trafficking alterations, which exacerbate disease and hinder treatment. However, there have been no systematic studies comparing different endocytic routes in LSDs. Here, we used genetic and pharmacological models of four LSDs (type A Niemann-Pick, type C Niemann-Pick, Fabry, and Gaucher diseases) and evaluated the pinocytic and receptor-mediated activity of the clathrin-, caveolae-, and macropinocytic routes. Bulk pinocytosis was diminished in all diseases, suggesting a generic endocytic alteration linked to lysosomal storage. Fluid-phase (dextran) and ligand (transferrin) uptake via the clathrin route were lower for all LSDs. Fluid-phase and ligand (cholera toxin B) uptake via the caveolar route were both affected but less acutely in Fabry or Gaucher diseases. Epidermal growth factor-induced macropinocytosis was altered in Niemann-Pick cells but not other LSDs. Intracellular trafficking of ligands was also distorted in LSD versus wild-type cells. The extent of these endocytic alterations paralleled the level of cholesterol storage in disease cell lines. Confirming this, pharmacological induction of cholesterol storage in wild-type cells disrupted endocytosis, and model therapeutics restored uptake in proportion to their efficacy in attenuating storage. This suggests a proportional and reversible relationship between endocytosis and lipid (cholesterol) storage. By analogy, the accumulation of biological material in other diseases, or foreign material from drugs or their carriers, may cause similar deficits, warranting further investigation.

  19. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Targets IFNAR1 for Lysosomal Degradation in Free Fatty Acid Treated HCV Cell Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Kurt

    Full Text Available Hepatic steatosis is a risk factor for both liver disease progression and an impaired response to interferon alpha (IFN-α-based combination therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Previously, we reported that free fatty acid (FFA-treated HCV cell culture induces hepatocellular steatosis and impairs the expression of interferon alpha receptor-1 (IFNAR1, which is why the antiviral activity of IFN-α against HCV is impaired.To investigate the molecular mechanism by which IFNAR1 expression is impaired in HCV cell culture with or without free fatty acid-treatment.HCV-infected Huh 7.5 cells were cultured with or without a mixture of saturated (palmitate and unsaturated (oleate long-chain free fatty acids (FFA. Intracytoplasmic fat accumulation in HCV-infected culture was visualized by oil red staining. Clearance of HCV in FFA cell culture treated with type I IFN (IFN-α and Type III IFN (IFN-λ was determined by Renilla luciferase activity, and the expression of HCV core was determined by immunostaining. Activation of Jak-Stat signaling in the FFA-treated HCV culture by IFN-α alone and IFN-λ alone was examined by Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy. Lysosomal degradation of IFNAR1 by chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA in the FFA-treated HCV cell culture model was investigated.FFA treatment induced dose-dependent hepatocellular steatosis and lipid droplet accumulation in HCV-infected Huh-7.5 cells. FFA treatment of infected culture increased HCV replication in a concentration-dependent manner. Intracellular lipid accumulation led to reduced Stat phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, causing an impaired IFN-α antiviral response and HCV clearance. Type III IFN (IFN-λ, which binds to a separate receptor, induces Stat phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation as well as antiviral clearance in FFA-treated HCV cell culture. We show here that the HCV-induced autophagy response is increased in FFA-treated cell culture

  20. Disruption of Lysosome Function Promotes Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Drosophila *

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Congwu; Zhu, Huanhu; Han,Min; Zhuang, Yuan; Wu, Xiaohui; Xu, Tian

    2010-01-01

    Lysosome function is essential to many physiological processes. It has been suggested that deregulation of lysosome function could contribute to cancer. Through a genetic screen in Drosophila, we have discovered that mutations disrupting lysosomal degradation pathway components contribute to tumor development and progression. Loss-of-function mutations in the Class C vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) gene, deep orange (dor), dramatically promote tumor overgrowth and invasion of the RasV12 cells....

  1. The proteome of lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Bernd A; Wrocklage, Christian; Hasilik, Andrej; Saftig, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Lysosomes are organelles of eukaryotic cells that are critically involved in the degradation of macromolecules mainly delivered by endocytosis and autophagocytosis. Degradation is achieved by more than 60 hydrolases sequestered by a single phospholipid bilayer. The lysosomal membrane facilitates interaction and fusion with other compartments and harbours transport proteins catalysing the export of catabolites, thereby allowing their recycling. Lysosomal proteins have been addressed in various proteomic studies that are compared in this review regarding the source of material, the organelle/protein purification scheme, the proteomic methodology applied and the proteins identified. Distinguishing true constituents of an organelle from co-purifying contaminants is a central issue in subcellular proteomics, with additional implications for lysosomes as being the site of degradation of many cellular and extracellular proteins. Although many of the lysosomal hydrolases were identified by classical biochemical approaches, the knowledge about the protein composition of the lysosomal membrane has remained fragmentary for a long time. Using proteomics many novel lysosomal candidate proteins have been discovered and it can be expected that their functional characterisation will help to understand functions of lysosomes at a molecular level that have been characterised only phenomenologically so far and to generally deepen our understanding of this indispensable organelle.

  2. Lysosomal degradation of receptor-bound urokinase-type plasminogen activator is enhanced by its inhibitors in human trophoblastic choriocarcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Poul Henning; Christensen, Erik Ilsø; Ebbesen, P.

    1990-01-01

    in an apparently intact form in the medium or was still cell associated. The degradation could be inhibited by inhibitors of vesicle transport and lysosomal hydrolases. By electron microscopic autoradiography, both 125I-u-PA and 125I-u-PA-inhibitor complexes were located over the cell membrane at 4 degrees C......, with the highest density of grains over the membrane at cell-cell interphases, but, after incubation at 37 degrees C, 17 and 27% of the grains for u-PA and u-PA-PAI-1 complexes, respectively, appeared over lysosomal-like bodies. These findings suggest that the u-PA receptor possesses a clearance function...

  3. Lysosome/lipid droplet interplay in metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugail, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes and lipid droplets are generally considered as intracellular compartments with divergent roles in cell metabolism, lipid droplets serving as lipid reservoirs in anabolic pathways, whereas lysosomes are specialized in the catabolism of intracellular components. During the last few years, new insights in the biology of lysosomes has challenged this view by providing evidence for the importance of lysosome recycling as a sparing mechanism to maintain cellular fitness. On the other hand the understanding of lipid droplets has evolved from an inert intracellular deposit toward the status of an intracellular organelle with dynamic roles in cellular homeostasis beyond storage. These unrelated aspects have also recently converged in the finding of unexpected lipid droplet/lysosome communication through autophagy, and the discovery of lysosome-mediated lipid droplet degradation called lipopagy. Furthermore, adipocytes which are professional cells for lipid droplet formation were also shown to be active in peptide antigen presentation a pathway requiring lysosomal activity. The potential importance of lipid droplet/lysosome interplay is discussed in the context of metabolic diseases and the setting of chronic inflammation.

  4. Substrate-favored lysosomal and proteasomal pathways participate in the normal balance control of insulin precursor maturation and disposal in β-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Zhang

    Full Text Available Our recent studies have uncovered that aggregation-prone proinsulin preserves a low relative folding rate and maintains a homeostatic balance of natively and non-natively folded states (i.e., proinsulin homeostasis, PIHO in β-cells as a result of the integration of maturation and disposal processes. Control of precursor maturation and disposal is thus an early regulative mechanism in the insulin production of β-cells. Herein, we show pathways involved in the disposal of endogenous proinsulin at the early secretory pathway. We conducted metabolic-labeling, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry studies to examine the effects of selective proteasome and lysosome or autophagy inhibitors on the kinetics of proinsulin and control proteins in various post-translational courses. Our metabolic-labeling studies found that the main lysosomal and ancillary proteasomal pathways participate in the heavy clearance of insulin precursor in mouse islets/β-cells cultured at the mimic physiological glucose concentrations. Further immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry studies in cloned β-cells validated that among secretory proteins, insulin precursor is heavily and preferentially removed. The rapid disposal of a large amount of insulin precursor after translation is achieved mainly through lysosomal autophagy and the subsequent basal disposals are carried out by both lysosomal and proteasomal pathways within a 30 to 60-minute post-translational process. The findings provide the first clear demonstration that lysosomal and proteasomal pathways both play roles in the normal maintenance of PIHO for insulin production, and defined the physiological participation of lysosomal autophagy in the protein quality control at the early secretory pathway of pancreatic β-cells.

  5. Prion infection impairs lysosomal degradation capacity by interfering with rab7 membrane attachment in neuronal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Su Yeon Shim; Srinivasarao Karri; Sampson Law; Schatzl, Hermann M.; Sabine Gilch

    2016-01-01

    Prions are proteinaceous infectious particles which cause fatal neurodegenerative disorders in humans and animals. They consist of a mostly β-sheeted aggregated isoform (PrPSc) of the cellular prion protein (PrPc). Prions replicate autocatalytically in neurons and other cell types by inducing conformational conversion of PrPc into PrPSc. Within neurons, PrPSc accumulates at the plasma membrane and in vesicles of the endocytic pathway. To better understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal dy...

  6. ATP6V0C knockdown in neuroblastoma cells alters autophagy-lysosome pathway function and metabolism of proteins that accumulate in neurodegenerative disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandra R Mangieri

    Full Text Available ATP6V0C is the bafilomycin A1-binding subunit of vacuolar ATPase, an enzyme complex that critically regulates vesicular acidification. We and others have shown previously that bafilomycin A1 regulates cell viability, autophagic flux and metabolism of proteins that accumulate in neurodegenerative disease. To determine the importance of ATP6V0C for autophagy-lysosome pathway function, SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells differentiated to a neuronal phenotype were nucleofected with non-target or ATP6V0C siRNA and following recovery were treated with either vehicle or bafilomycin A1 (0.3-100 nM for 48 h. ATP6V0C knockdown was validated by quantitative RT-PCR and by a significant decrease in Lysostracker Red staining. ATP6V0C knockdown significantly increased basal levels of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II, α-synuclein high molecular weight species and APP C-terminal fragments, and inhibited autophagic flux. Enhanced LC3 and LAMP-1 co-localization following knockdown suggests that autophagic flux was inhibited in part due to lysosomal degradation and not by a block in vesicular fusion. Knockdown of ATP6V0C also sensitized cells to the accumulation of autophagy substrates and a reduction in neurite length following treatment with 1 nM bafilomycin A1, a concentration that did not produce such alterations in non-target control cells. Reduced neurite length and the percentage of propidium iodide-positive dead cells were also significantly greater following treatment with 3 nM bafilomycin A1. Together these results indicate a role for ATP6V0C in maintaining constitutive and stress-induced ALP function, in particular the metabolism of substrates that accumulate in age-related neurodegenerative disease and may contribute to disease pathogenesis.

  7. The role of autophagic and lysosomal pathways in ischemic brain injury******

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaohua Gu; Nan Shi; Qian Zhang; Wei Zhang; Meizhen Zhao; Xiaojiang Sun; Yinyi Sun; Kangyong Liu; Fen Wang; Ting Zhang; Qiang Li; Liwei Shen; Ling Zhou; Liang Dong

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in neural cel death after cerebral ischemia. Our previous studies showed that rapamycin-induced autophagy decreased the rate of apoptosis, but the rate of apoptosis was creased after the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, was used. In this study, a suture-occluded method was performed to generate a rat model of brain ischemia. Under a transmission electron microscope, autophagic bodies and autophagy lysosomes were markedly accumulated in neurons at 4 hours post brain ischemic injury, with their numbers gradual y reducing over time. Western blotting demonstrated that protein levels of light chain 3-II and cathepsin B were significantly in-creased within 4 hours of ischemic injury, but these levels were not persistently upregulated over time. Confocal microscopy showed that autophagy was mainly found in neurons with positive light chain 3 signal. Injection of rapamycin via tail vein promoted the occurrence of autophagy in rat brain tissue after cerebral ischemia and elevated light chain 3 and cathepsin B expression. However, in-jection of 3-methyladenine significantly diminished light chain 3-II and cathepsin B expression. Results verified that autophagic and lysosomal activity is increased in ischemic neurons. Abnormal components in cel s can be eliminated through upregulating cel autophagy or inhibiting autophagy after ischemic brain injury, resulting in a dynamic balance of substances in cel s. Moreover, drugs that interfere with autophagy may be potential therapies for the treatment of brain injury.

  8. Alternative germ cell death pathway in Drosophila involves HtrA2/Omi, lysosomes, and a caspase-9 counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacobi-Sharon, Keren; Namdar, Yuval; Arama, Eli

    2013-04-15

    In both flies and mammals, almost one-third of the newly emerging male germ cells are spontaneously eliminated before entering meiosis. Here, we show that in Drosophila, germ cell death (GCD) involves the initiator caspase Dronc independently of the apoptosome and the main executioner caspases. Electron microscopy of dying germ cells revealed mixed morphologies of apoptosis and necrosis. We further show that the lysosomes and their catabolic enzymes, but not macroautophagy, are involved in the execution of GCD. We then identified, in a screen, the Parkinson's disease-associated mitochondrial protease, HtrA2/Omi, as an important mediator of GCD, acting mainly through its catalytic activity rather than by antagonizing inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. Concomitantly, other mitochondrial-associated factors were also implicated in GCD, including Pink1 (but not Parkin), the Bcl-2-related proteins, and endonuclease G, which establish the mitochondria as central mediators of GCD. These findings uncover an alternative developmental cell death pathway in metazoans.

  9. Severe Ankyrin-R deficiency results in impaired surface retention and lysosomal degradation of RhAG in human erythroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satchwell, Timothy J.; Bell, Amanda J.; Hawley, Bethan R.; Pellegrin, Stephanie; Mordue, Kathryn E.; van Deursen, Cees Th. B. M.; Braak, Nicole Heitink-ter; Huls, Gerwin; Leers, Mathie P.G; Overwater, Eline; Tamminga, Rienk Y. J.; van der Zwaag, Bert; Fermo, Elisa; Bianchi, Paola; van Wijk, Richard; Toye, Ashley M.

    2016-01-01

    Ankyrin-R provides a key link between band 3 and the spectrin cytoskeleton that helps to maintain the highly specialized erythrocyte biconcave shape. Ankyrin deficiency results in fragile spherocytic erythrocytes with reduced band 3 and protein 4.2 expression. We use in vitro differentiation of erythroblasts transduced with shRNAs targeting ANK1 to generate erythroblasts and reticulocytes with a novel ankyrin-R ‘near null’ human phenotype with less than 5% of normal ankyrin expression. Using this model, we demonstrate that absence of ankyrin negatively impacts the reticulocyte expression of a variety of proteins, including band 3, glycophorin A, spectrin, adducin and, more strikingly, protein 4.2, CD44, CD47 and Rh/RhAG. Loss of band 3, which fails to form tetrameric complexes in the absence of ankyrin, alongside GPA, occurs due to reduced retention within the reticulocyte membrane during erythroblast enucleation. However, loss of RhAG is temporally and mechanistically distinct, occurring predominantly as a result of instability at the plasma membrane and lysosomal degradation prior to enucleation. Loss of Rh/RhAG was identified as common to erythrocytes with naturally occurring ankyrin deficiency and demonstrated to occur prior to enucleation in cultures of erythroblasts from a hereditary spherocytosis patient with severe ankyrin deficiency but not in those exhibiting milder reductions in expression. The identification of prominently reduced surface expression of Rh/RhAG in combination with direct evaluation of ankyrin expression using flow cytometry provides an efficient and rapid approach for the categorization of hereditary spherocytosis arising from ankyrin deficiency. PMID:27247322

  10. Actin cytoskeleton-dependent Rab GTPase-regulated angiotensin type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Sun, Yuansheng; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic regulation of the cellular trafficking of human angiotensin (Ang) type 1 receptor (AT1R) is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the cellular trafficking of AT1R-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (AT1R-EGFP) heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells by determining the change in donor lifetime (AT1R-EGFP) in the presence or absence of acceptor(s) using fluorescence lifetime imaging-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy. The average lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in our donor-alone samples was ~2.33 ns. The basal state lifetime was shortened slightly in the presence of Rab5 (2.01+/-0.10 ns) or Rab7 (2.11+/-0.11 ns) labeled with Alexa 555, as the acceptor fluorophore. A 5-min Ang II treatment markedly shortened the lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in the presence of Rab5-Alexa 555 (1.78+/-0.31 ns) but was affected minimally in the presence of Rab7-Alexa 555 (2.09+/-0.37 ns). A 30-min Ang II treatment further decreased the AT1R-EGFP lifetime in the presence of both Rab5- and Rab7-Alexa 555. Latrunculin A but not nocodazole pretreatment blocked the ability of Ang II to shorten the AT1R-EGFP lifetime. The occurrence of FRET between AT1R-EGFP (donor) and LAMP1-Alexa 555 (acceptor) with Ang II stimulation was impaired by photobleaching the acceptor. These studies demonstrate that Ang II-induced AT1R lysosomal degradation through its association with LAMP1 is regulated by Rab5/7 via mechanisms that are dependent on intact actin cytoskeletons.

  11. The translocation of fullerenic nanoparticles into lysosome via the pathway of clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Wei; Chen Chunying; Ye Chang; Zhao Yuliang; Chen Zhen; Meng Huan; Gao Yuxi; Yuan Hui; Xing Genmei; Zhao Feng; Chai Zhifang [Laboratory for Bio-Environmental Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology of China and Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Yuquan Road 19B, Beijing 100049 (China); Wei Taotao; Zhang Xujia; Yang Fuyu [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Lao Fang; Han Dong [National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, No 2, Ist North Street Zhongguancun, Beijing 100080 (China); Tang Xianhua; Zhang Yingge [Chinese Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)], E-mail: chenchy@nanoctr.cn, E-mail: weitt@moon.ibp.ac.cn, E-mail: zhaoyuliang@ihep.ac.cn

    2008-04-09

    Manufactured fullerene nanoparticles easily enter into cells and hence have been rapidly developed for biomedical uses. However, it is generally unknown which route the nanoparticles undergo when crossing cell membranes and where they localize to the intracellular compartments. Herein we have used both microscopic imaging and biological techniques to explore the processes of [C{sub 60}(C(COOH){sub 2}){sub 2}]{sub n} nanoparticles across cellular membranes and their intracellular translocation in 3T3 L1 and RH-35 living cells. The fullerene nanoparticles are quickly internalized by the cells and then routed to the cytoplasm with punctate localization. Upon entering the cell, they are synchronized to lysosome-like vesicles. The [C{sub 60}(C(COOH){sub 2}){sub 2}]{sub n} nanoparticles entering cells are mainly via endocytosis with time-, temperature- and energy-dependent manners. The cellular uptake of [C{sub 60}(C(COOH){sub 2}){sub 2}]{sub n} nanoparticles was found to be clathrin-mediated but not caveolae-mediated endocytosis. The endocytosis mechanism and the subcellular target location provide key information for the better understanding and predicting of the biomedical function of fullerene nanoparticles inside cells.

  12. The Inactivation of RabGAP Function of AS160 Promotes Lysosomal Degradation of GLUT4 and Causes Postprandial Hyperglycemia and Hyperinsulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bingxian; Chen, Qiaoli; Chen, Liang; Sheng, Yang; Wang, Hong Yu; Chen, Shuai

    2016-11-01

    The AS160 (Akt substrate of 160 kDa) is a Rab-GTPase activating protein (RabGAP) with several other functional domains, and its deficiency in mice or human patients lowers GLUT4 protein levels and causes severe insulin resistance. How its deficiency causes diminished GLUT4 proteins remains unknown. We found that the deletion of AS160 decreased GLUT4 levels in a cell/tissue-autonomous manner. Consequently, skeletal muscle-specific deletion of AS160 caused postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The pathogenic effects of AS160 deletion are mainly, if not exclusively, due to the loss of its RabGAP function since the RabGAP-inactive AS160(R917K) mutant mice phenocopied the AS160 knockout mice. The inactivation of RabGAP of AS160 promotes lysosomal degradation of GLUT4, and the inhibition of lysosome function could restore GLUT4 protein levels. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that the RabGAP activity of AS160 maintains GLUT4 protein levels in a cell/tissue-autonomous manner and its inactivation causes lysosomal degradation of GLUT4 and postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia.

  13. Two pore channel 2 (TPC2) inhibits autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion by alkalinizing lysosomal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingying; Hao, Bai-Xia; Graeff, Richard; Wong, Connie W M; Wu, Wu-Tian; Yue, Jianbo

    2013-08-16

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation pathway, yet the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), one of the most potent Ca(2+) mobilizing messengers, elicits Ca(2+) release from lysosomes via the two pore channel 2 (TPC2) in many cell types. Here we found that overexpression of TPC2 in HeLa or mouse embryonic stem cells inhibited autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion, thereby resulting in the accumulation of autophagosomes. Treatment of TPC2 expressing cells with a cell permeant-NAADP agonist, NAADP-AM, further induced autophagosome accumulation. On the other hand, TPC2 knockdown or treatment of cells with Ned-19, a NAADP antagonist, markedly decreased the accumulation of autophagosomes. TPC2-induced accumulation of autophagosomes was also markedly blocked by ATG5 knockdown. Interestingly, inhibiting mTOR activity failed to increase TPC2-induced autophagosome accumulation. Instead, we found that overexpression of TPC2 alkalinized lysosomal pH, and lysosomal re-acidification abolished TPC2-induced autophagosome accumulation. In addition, TPC2 overexpression had no effect on general endosomal-lysosomal degradation but prevented the recruitment of Rab-7 to autophagosomes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TPC2/NAADP/Ca(2+) signaling alkalinizes lysosomal pH to specifically inhibit the later stage of basal autophagy progression.

  14. Lysosomal cell death at a glance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomes serve as the cellular recycling centre and are filled with numerous hydrolases that can degrade most cellular macromolecules. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the consequent leakage of the lysosomal content into the cytosol leads to so-called "lysosomal cell death". This form...... of cell death is mainly carried out by the lysosomal cathepsin proteases and can have necrotic, apoptotic or apoptosis-like features depending on the extent of the leakage and the cellular context. This article summarizes our current knowledge on lysosomal cell death with an emphasis on the upstream...... mechanisms that lead to lysosomal membrane permeabilization....

  15. Cationic liposomes promote antigen cross-presentation in dendritic cells by alkalizing the lysosomal pH and limiting the degradation of antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Ochyl, Lukasz J; Yang, Ellen; Moon, James J

    2017-01-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) have been widely examined as vaccine delivery nanoparticles since they can form complexes with biomacromolecules, promote delivery of antigens and adjuvant molecules to antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and mediate cellular uptake of vaccine components. CLs are also known to trigger antigen cross-presentation – the process by which APCs internalize extracellular protein antigens, degrade them into minimal CD8+ T-cell epitopes, and present them in the context of major histocompatibility complex-I (MHC-I). However, the precise mechanisms behind CL-mediated induction of cross-presentation and cross-priming of CD8+ T-cells remain to be elucidated. In this study, we have developed two distinct CL systems and examined their impact on the lysosomal pH in dendritic cells (DCs), antigen degradation, and presentation of peptide:MHC-I complexes to antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells. To achieve this, we have used 3β-[N-(N′,N′-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol (DC-Chol) and 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) as the prototypical components of CLs with tertiary amine groups and compared the effect of CLs and anionic liposomes on lysosomal pH, antigen degradation, and cross-presentation by DCs. Our results showed that CLs, but not anionic liposomes, elevated the lysosomal pH in DCs and reduced antigen degradation, thereby promoting cross-presentation and cross-priming of CD8+ T-cell responses. These studies shed new light on CL-mediated cross-presentation and suggest that intracellular fate of vaccine components and subsequent immunological responses can be controlled by rational design of nanomaterials. PMID:28243087

  16. Cationic liposomes promote antigen cross-presentation in dendritic cells by alkalizing the lysosomal pH and limiting the degradation of antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Ochyl, Lukasz J; Yang, Ellen; Moon, James J

    2017-01-01

    Cationic liposomes (CLs) have been widely examined as vaccine delivery nanoparticles since they can form complexes with biomacromolecules, promote delivery of antigens and adjuvant molecules to antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and mediate cellular uptake of vaccine components. CLs are also known to trigger antigen cross-presentation - the process by which APCs internalize extracellular protein antigens, degrade them into minimal CD8(+) T-cell epitopes, and present them in the context of major histocompatibility complex-I (MHC-I). However, the precise mechanisms behind CL-mediated induction of cross-presentation and cross-priming of CD8(+) T-cells remain to be elucidated. In this study, we have developed two distinct CL systems and examined their impact on the lysosomal pH in dendritic cells (DCs), antigen degradation, and presentation of peptide:MHC-I complexes to antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cells. To achieve this, we have used 3β-[N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol (DC-Chol) and 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) as the prototypical components of CLs with tertiary amine groups and compared the effect of CLs and anionic liposomes on lysosomal pH, antigen degradation, and cross-presentation by DCs. Our results showed that CLs, but not anionic liposomes, elevated the lysosomal pH in DCs and reduced antigen degradation, thereby promoting cross-presentation and cross-priming of CD8(+) T-cell responses. These studies shed new light on CL-mediated cross-presentation and suggest that intracellular fate of vaccine components and subsequent immunological responses can be controlled by rational design of nanomaterials.

  17. TFEB and TFE3: Linking Lysosomes to Cellular Adaptation to Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raben, Nina; Puertollano, Rosa

    2016-10-06

    In recent years, our vision of lysosomes has drastically changed. Formerly considered to be mere degradative compartments, they are now recognized as key players in many cellular processes. The ability of lysosomes to respond to different stimuli revealed a complex and coordinated regulation of lysosomal gene expression. This review discusses the participation of the transcription factors TFEB and TFE3 in the regulation of lysosomal function and biogenesis, as well as the role of the lysosomal pathway in cellular adaptation to a variety of stress conditions, including nutrient deprivation, mitochondrial dysfunction, protein misfolding, and pathogen infection. We also describe how cancer cells make use of TFEB and TFE3 to promote their own survival and highlight the potential of these transcription factors as therapeutic targets for the treatment of neurological and lysosomal diseases.

  18. Microbial PAH-Degradation in Soil: Degradation Pathways and Contributing Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu-Xiang; CHENG Shu-Pei; ZHU Cheng-Jun; SUN Shi-Lei

    2006-01-01

    Adverse effects on the environment and high persistence in the microbial degradation and environmental fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are motivating interest. Many soil microorganisms can degrade PAHs and use various metabolic pathways to do so. However, both the physio-chemical characteristics of compounds as well as the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils can drastically influence the degradation capacity of naturally occurring microorganisms for field bioremediation. Modern biological techniques have been widely used to promote the efficiency of microbial PAH-degradation and make the biodegradation metabolic pathways more clear. In this review microbial degradation of PAHs in soil is discussed, with emphasis placed on the main degradation pathways and the environmental factors affecting biodegradation.

  19. The lysosome and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lisha Zhang; Rui Sheng; Zhenghong Qin

    2009-01-01

    It has long been believed that the lysosome is an important digestive organelle. There is increasing evidence that the lysosome is also involved in pathogenesis of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Abnormal protein degradation and deposition induced by lysosoreal dysfunction may be the primary contributor to age-related neurodegeneration. In this review, the possible relationship between lysosome and various neurodegenerative diseases is described.

  20. Ordered bulk degradation via autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Jörn; Kristensen, Anders Riis; Andersen, Jens S

    2008-01-01

    at proteasomal and lysosomal degradation ample cross-talk between the two degradation pathways became evident. Degradation via autophagy appeared to be ordered and regulated at the protein complex/organelle level. This raises several important questions such as: can macroautophagy itself be specific and what...

  1. Cathepsin inhibition-induced lysosomal dysfunction enhances pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis in high glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minjeong; Lee, Jaemeun; Seo, Hye-Young; Lim, Ji Sun; Kim, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway that plays an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. We previously showed that the inhibition of autophagy causes pancreatic β-cell apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy is a protective mechanism for the survival of pancreatic β-cells. The current study demonstrates that treatment with inhibitors and knockdown of the lysosomal cysteine proteases such as cathepsins B and L impair autophagy, enhancing the caspase-dependent apoptosis of INS-1 cells and islets upon exposure to high concentration of glucose. Interestingly, treatment with cathepsin B and L inhibitors prevented the proteolytic processing of cathepsins B, D and L, as evidenced by gradual accumulation of the respective pro-forms. Of note, inhibition of aspartic cathepsins had no effect on autophagy and cell viability, suggesting the selective role of cathepsins B and L in the regulation of β-cell autophagy and apoptosis. Lysosomal localization of accumulated pro-cathepsins in the presence of cathepsin B and L inhibitors was verified via immunocytochemistry and lysosomal fractionation. Lysotracker staining indicated that cathepsin B and L inhibitors led to the formation of severely enlarged lysosomes in a time-dependent manner. The abnormal accumulation of pro-cathepsins following treatment with inhibitors of cathepsins B and L suppressed normal lysosomal degradation and the processing of lysosomal enzymes, leading to lysosomal dysfunction. Collectively, our findings suggest that cathepsin defects following the inhibition of cathepsin B and L result in lysosomal dysfunction and consequent cell death in pancreatic β-cells.

  2. The phytoestrogen genistein modulates lysosomal metabolism and transcription factor EB (TFEB) activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskot, Marta; Montefusco, Sandro; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Mozolewski, Paweł; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Di Bernardo, Diego; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Medina, Diego L; Ballabio, Andrea; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena

    2014-06-13

    Genistein (5,7-dihydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one) has been previously proposed as a potential drug for use in substrate reduction therapy for mucopolysaccharidoses, a group of inherited metabolic diseases caused by mutations leading to inefficient degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in lysosomes. It was demonstrated that this isoflavone can cross the blood-brain barrier, making it an especially desirable potential drug for the treatment of neurological symptoms present in most lysosomal storage diseases. So far, no comprehensive genomic analyses have been performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect elicited by genistein. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify the genistein-modulated gene network regulating GAG biosynthesis and degradation, taking into consideration the entire lysosomal metabolism. Our analyses identified over 60 genes with known roles in lysosomal biogenesis and/or function whose expression was enhanced by genistein. Moreover, 19 genes whose products are involved in both GAG synthesis and degradation pathways were found to be remarkably differentially regulated by genistein treatment. We found a regulatory network linking genistein-mediated control of transcription factor EB (TFEB) gene expression, TFEB nuclear translocation, and activation of TFEB-dependent lysosome biogenesis to lysosomal metabolism. Our data indicate that the molecular mechanism of genistein action involves not only impairment of GAG synthesis but more importantly lysosomal enhancement via TFEB. These findings contribute to explaining the beneficial effects of genistein in lysosomal storage diseases as well as envisage new therapeutic approaches to treat these devastating diseases.

  3. Phenanthrene-degrading pathway of Agrobacterium sp. Phx1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Lei; YUAN; Hongli; WANG; Shuangqing; HUANG; Huaize

    2005-01-01

    The metabolic pathway of phenanthrene-degrading strain Agrobacterium sp. Phx1 was investigated. Phx1 almost was able to transform 100 υg/mL of phenanthrene completely in 1 day in broth media of beef extract-peptone (BP), Luria-Bertani (LB) and mineral salts media (MS), and LB and BP could promote the growth and degradation efficiency of Phx1. The GC-MS was employed to analyze the metabolites of the 1st, 3rd, 7th days of phenanthrene degradation in MS. As a result, the 1-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (1H2N) and 1-naphthol (NOL) were detected in the metabolites of the 1st day. Only NOL was observed on the 3rd day and it disappeared on the 7th day. The accumulated NOL did not pertain to the defined pathway of phenanthrene degradation by bacteria. The further HPLC study confirmed the finding in GC-MS analysis and found the production of catechol (CAT) from o-phthalic acid (OPA) in the phenanthrene metabolizing, which has never been reported in the defined degrading pathways. This production was also evidenced by the production of CAT using OPA as substrate. All of our results showed that the Agrobacterium sp. Phx1 had a novel phenanthrene-degrading pathway.

  4. When RNA and protein degradation pathways meet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eGENSCHIK

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing has become a major focus of molecular and biomedical research in the last decade. This mechanism, which is conserved in most eukaryotes, has been extensively studied and is associated to various pathways implicated in the regulation of development, in the control of transposition events, heterochromatin maintenance and also playing a role in defense against viruses. Despite of its importance, the regulation of the RNA silencing machinery itself remains still poorly explored. Recently several reports in both plants and metazoans revealed that key components of RNA silencing, such as RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC component ARGONAUTE proteins, but also the endonuclease Dicer are subjected to proteasomal and autophagic pathways. Here we will review these post-translational proteolytic regulations with a special emphasis on plant research and also discuss their functional relevance.

  5. Lysosomal cell death mechanisms in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sintes, Raquel; Ledesma, María Dolores; Boya, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    Lysosomes are degradative organelles essential for cell homeostasis that regulate a variety of processes, from calcium signaling and nutrient responses to autophagic degradation of intracellular components. Lysosomal cell death is mediated by the lethal effects of cathepsins, which are released into the cytoplasm following lysosomal damage. This process of lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin release is observed in several physiopathological conditions and plays a role in tissue remodeling, the immune response to intracellular pathogens and neurodegenerative diseases. Many evidences indicate that aging strongly influences lysosomal activity by altering the physical and chemical properties of these organelles, rendering them more sensitive to stress. In this review we focus on how aging alters lysosomal function and increases cell sensitivity to lysosomal membrane permeabilization and lysosomal cell death, both in physiological conditions and age-related pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cathodic degradation of antibiotics: characterization and pathway analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Deyong; Liang, Bin; Yun, Hui; Cheng, Haoyi; Ma, Jincai; Cui, Minhua; Wang, Aijie; Ren, Nanqi

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotics in wastewaters must be degraded to eliminate their antibacterial activity before discharging into the environment. A cathode can provide continuous electrons for the degradation of refractory pollutants, however the cathodic degradation feasibility, efficiency and pathway for different kinds of antibiotics is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the degradation of four antibiotics, namely nitrofurazone (NFZ), metronidazole (MNZ), chloramphenicol (CAP), and florfenicol (FLO) by a poised cathode in a dual chamber electrochemical reactor. The cyclic voltammetry preliminarily proved the feasibility of the cathodic degradation of these antibiotics. The cathodic reducibility of these antibiotics followed the order of NFZ > MNZ > CAP > FLO. A decreased phosphate buffered solution (PBS) concentration as low as 2 mM or utilization of NaCl buffer solution as catholyte had significant influence on antibiotics degradation rate and efficiency for CAP and FLO but not for NFZ and MNZ. PBS could be replaced by Na2CO3-NaHCO3 buffer solution as catholyte for the degradation of these antibiotics. Reductive dechlorination of CAP proceeded only after the reduction of the nitro group to aromatic amine. The composition of the degradation products depended on the cathode potential except for MNZ. The cathodic degradation process could eliminate the antibacterial activity of these antibiotics. The current study suggests that the electrochemical reduction could serve as a potential pretreatment or advanced treatment unit for the treatment of antibiotics containing wastewaters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of high glucose and AGEs on cultured kidney-derived cells. Effects on cell viability, lysosomal enzymes and effectors of cell signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, Giovani B; Schor, Nestor; Michelacci, Yara M

    2017-04-01

    We have previously reported decreased expression and activities of lysosomal cathepsins B and L in diabetic kidney. Relevant morphological changes were observed in proximal tubules, suggesting that these cells are implicated in the early stages of the disease. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms that lead to these changes. The effects of high glucose (HG) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on cell viability, lysosomal enzymes and other effectors of cell signaling of cultured kidney cells were studied. HG increased viable mesangial cells (ihMC) in 48 h, while epithelial tubular cells were not affected (LLC-PK1 and MDCK). In contrast, the number of viable cells was markedly decreased, for all cell lines, by AGE-BSA. Concerning lysosomal enzymes, the main cysteine-protease expressed by these cells was cathepsin B, and its concentration was much higher in epithelial than in mesangial cells. Exposure to HG had no effect on the cathepsin B activity, but AGE-BSA caused a marked decrease in LLC-PK1, and increased the enzyme activities in the other cell lines. The levels of nitric oxide (NO) was increased by AGE-BSA in all cell lines, suggesting oxidative stress, and Western blotting has shown that, among the investigated proteins, cathepsin B, mTOR and transcription factor EB (TFEB) were the most significantly affected by exposure to AGE-BSA. As mTOR induces anabolism and inhibits autophagy, and TFEB is a master transcription factor for lysosomal enzymes, it is possible that this pathway plays a role in the inhibition of lysosomal enzymes in proximal tubule cells.

  8. Olaquindox induces DNA damage via the lysosomal and mitochondrial pathway involving ROS production and p53 activation in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Jiang, Liping; She, Yan; Chen, Min; Li, Qiujuan; Yang, Guang; Geng, Chengyan; Tang, Liyun; Zhong, Laifu; Jiang, Lijie; Liu, Xiaofang

    2015-11-01

    Olaquindox (OLA) is a potent antibacterial agent used as a feed additive and growth promoter. In this study, the genotoxic potential of OLA was investigated in the human embryonic kidney cell line 293 (HEK293). Results showed that OLA caused significant increases of DNA migration. Lysosomal membrane permeability and mitochondrial membrane potential were reduced after treatment with OLA. OLA was shown to induce ROS production and GSH depletion. The expression of p53 protein is increased in cells incubated with OLA. The activation of p53 and ATM gene was assessed by exposure to OLA. Furthermore, NAC reduced DNA migration, ROS formation, GSH depletion and the expression of the p53 protein and gene. And desipramine significantly decreased AO fluorescence intensity and the expression of the p53 protein and gene. These results support the assumption that OLA exerted genotoxic effects and induced DNA strand breaks in HEK293 cells, possibly through lysosomal-mitochondrial pathway involving ROS production and p53 activation.

  9. Expression of HIV-1 Vpu leads to loss of the viral restriction factor CD317/Tetherin from lipid rafts and its enhanced lysosomal degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Rollason

    Full Text Available CD317/tetherin (aka BST2 or HM1.24 antigen is an interferon inducible membrane protein present in regions of the lipid bilayer enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol (often termed lipid rafts. It has been implicated in an eclectic mix of cellular processes including, most notably, the retention of fully formed viral particles at the surface of cells infected with HIV and other enveloped viruses. Expression of the HIV viral accessory protein Vpu has been shown to lead to intracellular sequestration and degradation of tetherin, thereby counteracting the inhibition of viral release. There is evidence that tetherin interacts directly with Vpu, but it remains unclear where in the cell this interaction occurs or if Vpu expression affects the lipid raft localisation of tetherin. We have addressed these points using biochemical and cell imaging approaches focused on endogenous rather than ectopically over-expressed tetherin. We find i no evidence for an interaction between Vpu and endogenous tetherin at the cell surface, ii the vast majority of endogenous tetherin that is at the cell surface in control cells is in lipid rafts, iii internalised tetherin is present in non-raft fractions, iv expression of Vpu in cells expressing endogenous tetherin leads to the loss of tetherin from lipid rafts, v internalised tetherin enters early endosomes, and late endosomes, in both control cells and cells expressing Vpu, but the proportion of tetherin molecules destined for degradation rather than recycling is increased in cells expressing Vpu vi lysosomes are the primary site for degradation of endogenous tetherin in cells expressing Vpu. Our studies underlie the importance of studying endogenous tetherin and let us propose a model in which Vpu intercepts newly internalised tetherin and diverts it for lysosomal destruction rather than recycling to the cell surface.

  10. Slow degradation in phagocytic astrocytes can be enhanced by lysosomal acidification%溶酶体酸化可增强吞噬性星形胶质细胞的消化功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kelly R. Monk; M. Laura Feltri; Carla Taveggia; Camilla Lööv; Claire H. Mitchell; Martin Simonsson; Anna Erlandsson1

    2015-01-01

    Inefficient lysosomal degradation is central in the development of various brain disorders, but the un-derlying mechanisms and the involvement of different cell types remains elusive. We have previously shown that astrocytes effectively engulf dead cells, but then store, rather than degrade the ingested material. In the present study we identify reasons for the slow digestion and ways to accelerate degradation in primary astrocytes. Our re-sults show that actin-rings surround the phagosomes for long periods of time, which physically inhibit the pha-go-lysosome fusion. Furthermore, astrocytes express high levels of Rab27a, a protein known to reduce the acidity of lysosomes by Nox2 recruitment, in order to preserve antigens for presentation. We found that Nox2 colocalizes with the ingested material, indicating that it may influence antigen processing also in astrocytes, as they express MHC class II. By inducing long-time acidification of astrocytic lysosomes using acidic nanoparticles, we could increase the digestion of astrocyte-ingested, dead cells. The degradation was, however, normalized over time, in-dicating that inhibitory pathways are up-regulated in response to the enhanced acidification.%低效的溶酶体降解是多种脑部疾病发展的中心环节,但其具体机制及参与的细胞种类仍不清楚。既往研究显示,星形胶质细胞大量吞噬死亡的细胞,但将这些吞噬的物质储存在细胞内而不是进行降解。本研究对星形胶质细胞降解消化功能减弱的原因进行研究,并探索增强星形胶质细胞降解消化功能的方法。结果显示,长期存在于吞噬泡周围的肌动环阻碍了溶酶体的吞噬溶解作用。此外,Rab27a 蛋白可以通过Nox2减少溶酶体的酸化,而星形胶质细胞高表达 Rab27a 蛋白,阻碍抗原呈递。本研究还发现,Nox2与星形胶质细胞摄取的物质共定位,且表达主要组织相容性复合体 II,提示这可能影响星形

  11. Ubiquitin trafficking to the lysosome: keeping the house tidy and getting rid of unwanted guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Georgiana E; Russell, David G

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial killing by autophagic delivery to the lysosomal compartment has been shown for Mycobacteria, Streptococcus, Shigella, Legionella and Salmonella, indicating an important role for this conserved trafficking pathway for the control of intracellular bacterial pathogens.(1-5) In a recent study we found that solubilized lysosomes isolated from bone marrow-derived macrophages had potent antibacterial properties against M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis that were associated with ubiquitin and ubiquitin-derived peptides. We propose that ubiquitinated proteins are delivered to the lysosomal compartment, where degradation by lysosomal proteinases generates ubiquitin-derived peptides with antimycobacterial properties. This surprising finding provokes a number of questions regarding the nature and trafficking of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-modified proteins in mammalian cells. We discuss the possible role(s) that the multivesicular body (MVB), the late endosome and the autophagosome may play in trafficking of ubiquitinated proteins to the lysosome.

  12. Epoxy Coenzyme A Thioester pathways for degradation of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Wael; Gescher, Johannes

    2012-08-01

    Aromatic compounds (biogenic and anthropogenic) are abundant in the biosphere. Some of them are well-known environmental pollutants. Although the aromatic nucleus is relatively recalcitrant, microorganisms have developed various catabolic routes that enable complete biodegradation of aromatic compounds. The adopted degradation pathways depend on the availability of oxygen. Under oxic conditions, microorganisms utilize oxygen as a cosubstrate to activate and cleave the aromatic ring. In contrast, under anoxic conditions, the aromatic compounds are transformed to coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters followed by energy-consuming reduction of the ring. Eventually, the dearomatized ring is opened via a hydrolytic mechanism. Recently, novel catabolic pathways for the aerobic degradation of aromatic compounds were elucidated that differ significantly from the established catabolic routes. The new pathways were investigated in detail for the aerobic bacterial degradation of benzoate and phenylacetate. In both cases, the pathway is initiated by transforming the substrate to a CoA thioester and all the intermediates are bound by CoA. The subsequent reactions involve epoxidation of the aromatic ring followed by hydrolytic ring cleavage. Here we discuss the novel pathways, with a particular focus on their unique features and occurrence as well as ecological significance.

  13. Degradation of aromatic compounds and degradative pathway of 4-nitrocatechol by Ochrobactrum sp. B2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Qiuzan; Zhang, Haiyan; Bai, Wenqin; Li, Mei; Li, Baotong; Qiu, Xinghui

    2007-12-01

    The potential capacity of a soil methyl parathion-degrading bacterium strain, Ochrobactrum sp. B2, for degrading various aromatic compounds were investigated. The results showed B2 was capable of degrading diverse aromatic compounds, but amino-substituted benzene compounds, at a concentration up to 100 mg L(-1) in 4 days. B2 could use 4-nitrocatechol (4-NC) as a sole carbon and energy source with release of nitrite ion. The pathway for 4-NC degradation via 1,2,4-benzenetriol (BT) and hydroquinone (HQ) formation in B2 was proposed based on the identification and quantification of intermediates by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Degradation studies carried out on a plasmid-cured derivative showed that the genes for 4-NC degradative pathway was plasmid-borne in B2, suggesting that B2 degrades both p-nitrophenol and 4-NC by enzymes encoded by genes on the same plasmid.

  14. Ubiquitin initiates sorting of Golgi and plasma membrane proteins into the vacuolar degradation pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheuring David

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In yeast and mammals, many plasma membrane (PM proteins destined for degradation are tagged with ubiquitin. These ubiquitinated proteins are internalized into clathrin-coated vesicles and are transported to early endosomal compartments. There, ubiquitinated proteins are sorted by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT machinery into the intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes. Degradation of these proteins occurs after endosomes fuse with lysosomes/lytic vacuoles to release their content into the lumen. In plants, some PM proteins, which cycle between the PM and endosomal compartments, have been found to be ubiquitinated, but it is unclear whether ubiquitin is sufficient to mediate internalization and thus acts as a primary sorting signal for the endocytic pathway. To test whether plants use ubiquitin as a signal for the degradation of membrane proteins, we have translationally fused ubiquitin to different fluorescent reporters for the plasma membrane and analyzed their transport. Results Ubiquitin-tagged PM reporters localized to endosomes and to the lumen of the lytic vacuole in tobacco mesophyll protoplasts and in tobacco epidermal cells. The internalization of these reporters was significantly reduced if clathrin-mediated endocytosis was inhibited by the coexpression of a mutant of the clathrin heavy chain, the clathrin hub. Surprisingly, a ubiquitin-tagged reporter for the Golgi was also transported into the lumen of the vacuole. Vacuolar delivery of the reporters was abolished upon inhibition of the ESCRT machinery, indicating that the vacuolar delivery of these reporters occurs via the endocytic transport route. Conclusions Ubiquitin acts as a sorting signal at different compartments in the endomembrane system to target membrane proteins into the vacuolar degradation pathway: If displayed at the PM, ubiquitin triggers internalization of PM reporters into the endocytic transport route

  15. Salinomycin co-treatment enhances tamoxifen cytotoxicity in luminal A breast tumor cells by facilitating lysosomal degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Ann-Katrin; Hermawan, Adam; Mickler, Frauke Martina; Ljepoja, Bojan; Knyazev, Pjotr; Bräuchle, Christoph; Ullrich, Axel; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2016-08-02

    Luminal A breast cancer is the most common breast cancer subtype which is usually treated with selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMS) like tamoxifen. Nevertheless, one third of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer patients initially do not respond to endocrine therapy and about 40% of luminal A breast tumors recur in five years. In this study, we investigated an alternative treatment approach by combining tamoxifen and salinomycin in luminal A breast cancer cell lines. We have found that salinomycin induces an additional cytotoxic effect by inhibiting the ligand independent activation of ERα. Thereby salinomycin increases the intracellular calcium level. This leads to a premature fusion of endosomes with lysosomes and thus to the degradation of Egfr family members. Since this process is essential for luminal A breast cancer cells to circumvent tamoxifen treatment, the combination of both drugs induces cytotoxicity in tamoxifen sensitive as well as resistant luminal A breast cancer cell lines.

  16. Redistribution of cathepsin B activity from the endosomal-lysosomal pathway in chick intestine within 3 min of calcium absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemere, I; Norman, A W

    1991-06-01

    Earlier work has suggested that calcium-containing lysosomes are involved in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3)-stimulated intestinal absorption of the divalent cation. In the present report immunofluorescent labelling studies on fixed frozen sections of chick intestine were undertaken to determine whether lysosomes could respond to calcium transport conditions in less than 5 min. Tissue prepared from vitamin D-deficient chicks dosed with vehicle or 1.3 nmol of 1,25(OH)2D3 15 h prior to use was immunofluorescently labelled for cathepsin B, a lysosomal protease. In the absence of calcium absorption, punctate staining was found in the region below the terminal web, and more diffusely in the cytoplasm. The intensity of staining was noticeably greater in sections from 1,25(OH)2D3-treated than control chicks. In sections prepared after 3 min of calcium absorption, cathepsin B staining was localized near the basal and lateral membranes of the epithelial cells. After 30 min of transport, the protease was found in the villus core regardless of vitamin D status; however, immunoreactivity within the epithelial cells of 1,25(OH)2D3-treated chick intestine had returned to pretransport intensity, whereas that of controls had not. To further investigate the specificity of the cathepsin B antibody, the intracellular compartmentalization of the protease was determined by biochemical methods. Using dosing procedures and calcium transport times equivalent to those for the immunofluorescent studies mucosae were collected by scraping, homogenized, and subcellular fractions prepared by a combination of differential and Percoll gradient centrifugation. In the absence of calcium transport, cathepsin B-specific activity was enhanced in whole homogenates, endocytic vesicles, and a lysosomal fraction prepared from intestinal epithelium of 1,25(OH)2D3-treated chicks, relative to vitamin D-deficient controls. After 3 min of calcium absorption, a profound (approximately 4-fold) decrease in

  17. Oncogenic activation of the Met receptor tyrosine kinase fusion protein, Tpr-Met, involves exclusion from the endocytic degradative pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, H H L; Peschard, P; Lin, T; Naujokas, M A; Zuo, D; Park, M

    2007-11-01

    Multiple mechanisms of dysregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are observed in human cancers. In addition to gain-of-function, loss of negative regulation also contributes to oncogenic activation of RTKs. Negative regulation of many RTKs involves their internalization and degradation in the lysosome, a process regulated through ubiquitination. RTK oncoproteins activated following chromosomal translocation, are no longer transmembrane proteins, and are predicted to escape lysosomal degradation. To test this, we used the Tpr-Met oncogene, generated following chromosomal translocation of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (Met). Unlike Met, Tpr-Met is localized in the cytoplasm and also lacks the binding site for Cbl ubiquitin ligases. We determined whether subcellular localization of Tpr-Met, and/or loss of its Cbl-binding site, is important for oncogenic activity. Presence of a Cbl-binding site and ubiquitination of cytosolic Tpr-Met oncoproteins does not alter their transforming activity. In contrast, plasma membrane targeting allows Tpr-Met to enter the endocytic pathway, and Tpr-Met transforming activity as well as protein stability are decreased in a Cbl-dependent manner. We show that transformation by Tpr-Met is in part dependent on its ability to escape normal downregulatory mechanisms. This provides a paradigm for many RTK oncoproteins activated following chromosomal translocation.

  18. Vacuole import and degradation pathway:Insights into a specialized autophagy pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abbas; A; Alibhoy; Hui-Ling; Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Glucose deprivation induces the synthesis of pivotagluconeogenic enzymes such as fructose-1,6-bisphos-phatase, malate dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxykinase and isocitrate lyase in Saccharomycescerevisiae. However, following glucose replenishment,these gluconeogenic enzymes are inactivated and de-graded. Studies have characterized the mechanismsby which these enzymes are inactivated in response toglucose. The site of degradation of these proteins hasalso been ascertained to be dependent on the dura-tion of starvation. Glucose replenishment of short-termstarved cells results in these proteins being degradedin the proteasome. In contrast, addition of glucose tocells starved for a prolonged period results in theseproteins being degraded in the vacuole. In the vacuoledependent pathway, these proteins are sequestered inspecialized vesicles termed vacuole import and degra-dation (Vid). These vesicles converge with the endo-cytic pathway and deliver their cargo to the vacuolefor degradation. Recent studies have identified thatinternalization, as mediated by actin polymerization, isessential for delivery of cargo proteins to the vacuolefor degradation. In addition, components of the targetof rapamycin complex 1 interact with cargo proteins during glucose starvation. Furthermore, Tor1p dissoci-ates from cargo proteins following glucose replenish-ment. Future studies will be needed to elaborate on the importance of internalization at the plasma membrane and the subsequent import of cargo proteins into Vid vesicles in the vacuole dependent degradation pathway.

  19. Enzymatic description of the anhydrofructose pathway of glycogen degradation. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Shukun; Refdahl, Charlotte; Lundt, Inge

    2004-01-01

    The anhydrofructose pathway describes the degradation of glycogen and starch to metabolites via 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose (1,5AnFru). The enzyme catalyzing the first reaction step of this pathway, i.e., a-1,4-glucan lyase (EC 4.2.1.13), has been purified, cloned and characterized from fungi and red...... algae in our laboratory earlier. In the present study, two 1,5AnFru metabolizing enzymes were discovered in the fungus Anthracobia melaloma for the formation of ascopyrone P (APP), a fungal secondary metabolite exhibiting antibacterial and antioxidant activity. These are 1,5AnFru dehydratase (AFDH...

  20. MiR-153 Regulates Amelogenesis by Targeting Endocytotic and Endosomal/lysosomal Pathways-Novel Insight into the Origins of Enamel Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kaifeng; Lin, Wenting; Guo, Jing; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Snead, Malcolm L; Hacia, Joseph G; Paine, Michael L

    2017-03-13

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is group of inherited disorders resulting in enamel pathologies. The involvement of epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis of AI is yet to be clarified due to a lack of knowledge about amelogenesis. Our previous genome-wide microRNA and mRNA transcriptome analyses suggest a key role for miR-153 in endosome/lysosome-related pathways during amelogenesis. Here we show that miR-153 is significantly downregulated in maturation ameloblasts compared with secretory ameloblasts. Within ameloblast-like cells, upregulation of miR-153 results in the downregulation of its predicted targets including Cltc, Lamp1, Clcn4 and Slc4a4, and a number of miRNAs implicated in endocytotic pathways. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed the predicted interactions between miR-153 and the 3'-UTRs of Cltc, Lamp1 (in a prior study), Clcn4 and Slc4a4. In an enamel protein intake assay, enamel cells transfected with miR-153 show a decreased ability to endocytose enamel proteins. Finally, microinjection of miR-153 in the region of mouse first mandibular molar at postnatal day 8 (PN8) induced AI-like pathologies when the enamel development reached maturity (PN12). In conclusion, miR-153 regulates maturation-stage amelogenesis by targeting key genes involved in the endocytotic and endosomal/lysosomal pathways, and disruption of miR-153 expression is a potential candidate etiologic factor contributing to the occurrence of AI.

  1. Kynurenine pathway in psychosis: evidence of increased tryptophan degradation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Sandra

    2009-05-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan degradation may serve to integrate disparate abnormalities heretofore identified in research aiming to elucidate the complex aetiopathogenesis of psychotic disorders. Post-mortem brain tissue studies have reported elevated kynurenine and kynurenic acid in the frontal cortex and upregulation of the first step of the pathway in the anterior cingulate cortex of individuals with schizophrenia. In this study, we examined kynurenine pathway activity by measuring tryptophan breakdown, a number of pathway metabolites and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), which is the preferential activator of the first-step enzyme, indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO), in the plasma of patients with major psychotic disorder. Plasma tryptophan, kynurenine pathway metabolites were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 34 patients with a diagnosis on the psychotic spectrum (schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder) and in 36 healthy control subjects. IFN-gamma was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The mean tryptophan breakdown index (kynurenine\\/tryptophan) was significantly higher in the patient group compared with controls (P < 0.05). IFN-gamma measures did not differ between groups (P = 0.23). No relationship was found between measures of psychopathology, symptom severity and activity in the first step in the pathway. A modest correlation was established between the tryptophan breakdown index and illness duration. These results provide evidence for kynurenine pathway upregulation, specifically involving the first enzymatic step, in patients with major psychotic disorder. Increased tryptophan degradation in psychoses may have potential consequences for the treatment of these disorders by informing the development of novel therapeutic compounds.

  2. Salinomycin kills cancer stem cells by sequestering iron in lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Trang Thi; Hamaï, Ahmed; Hienzsch, Antje; Cañeque, Tatiana; Müller, Sebastian; Wicinski, Julien; Cabaud, Olivier; Leroy, Christine; David, Amandine; Acevedo, Verónica; Ryo, Akihide; Ginestier, Christophe; Birnbaum, Daniel; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Codogno, Patrice; Mehrpour, Maryam; Rodriguez, Raphaël

    2017-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subset of cells within tumours that exhibit self-renewal properties and the capacity to seed tumours. CSCs are typically refractory to conventional treatments and have been associated to metastasis and relapse. Salinomycin operates as a selective agent against CSCs through mechanisms that remain elusive. Here, we provide evidence that a synthetic derivative of salinomycin, which we named ironomycin (AM5), exhibits a more potent and selective activity against breast CSCs in vitro and in vivo, by accumulating and sequestering iron in lysosomes. In response to the ensuing cytoplasmic depletion of iron, cells triggered the degradation of ferritin in lysosomes, leading to further iron loading in this organelle. Iron-mediated production of reactive oxygen species promoted lysosomal membrane permeabilization, activating a cell death pathway consistent with ferroptosis. These findings reveal the prevalence of iron homeostasis in breast CSCs, pointing towards iron and iron-mediated processes as potential targets against these cells.

  3. Neuroinflammatory paradigms in lysosomal storage diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Elizabeth Bosch

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs include approximately 70 distinct disorders that collectively account for 14% of all inherited metabolic diseases. LSDs are caused by mutations in various enzymes/proteins that disrupt lysosomal function, which impairs macromolecule degradation following endosome-lysosome and phagosome-lysosome fusion and autophagy, ultimately disrupting cellular homeostasis. LSDs are pathologically typified by lysosomal inclusions composed of a heterogeneous mixture of various proteins and lipids that can be found throughout the body. However, in many cases the CNS is dramatically affected, which may result from heightened neuronal vulnerability based on their post-mitotic state. Besides intrinsic neuronal defects, another emerging factor common to many LSDs is neuroinflammation, which may negatively impact neuronal survival and contribute to neurodegeneration. Microglial and astrocyte activation is a hallmark of many LSDs that affect the CNS, which often precedes and predicts regions where eventual neuron loss will occur. However, the timing, intensity, and duration of neuroinflammation may ultimately dictate the impact on CNS homeostasis. For example, a transient inflammatory response following CNS insult/injury can be neuroprotective, as glial cells attempt to remove the insult and provide trophic support to neurons. However, chronic inflammation, as seen in several LSDs, can promote neurodegeneration by creating a neurotoxic environment due to elevated levels of cytokines, chemokines, and pro-apoptotic molecules. Although neuroinflammation has been reported in several LSDs, the cellular basis and mechanisms responsible for eliciting neuroinflammatory pathways are just beginning to be defined. This review highlights the role of neuroinflammation in select LSDs and its potential contribution to neuron loss.

  4. Degradation of toluene-2,4-diamine by persulphate: kinetics, intermediates and degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong-hai; Zhang, Jin-bao; Xi, Bei-dou; An, Da; Yang, Yu; Li, Ming-xiao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the degradation of toluene-2,4-diamine (TDA) by persulphate (PS) in an aqueous solution at near-neutral pH was examined. The result showed that the degradation rate of TDA increased with increasing PS concentrations. The optimal dosage of PS in the reaction system was determined by efficiency indicator (I) coupling in the consumption of PS and decay half-life of TDA. Calculation showed that 0.74 mM of PS was the most effective dosage for TDA degradation, at that level the maximum I of 24.51 was obtained. PS can oxidize TDA for an extended reaction time period. Under neutral condition without activation, four degradation intermediates, 2,4-diamino-3-hydroxy-5-sulfonicacidtoluene, 2,4-diaminobenzaldehyde, 2,4-bis(vinylamino)benzaldehyde and 3,5-diamino-4-hydroxy-2-pentene, were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The tentative degradation pathway of TDA was proposed as well. It was found that hydroxyl radical played an important role in degradation of TDA with the activation of Fe2+, whereas PS anion and sulphate radicals were responsible for the degradation without activation of Fe2+.

  5. Degradation of phenazone in aqueous solution with ozone: influencing factors and degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Heng-Feng; Cao, Meng; Xu, Dan-Yao; Ren, Hong-Yan; Zhao, Ming-Xing; Huang, Zhen-Xing; Ruan, Wen-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation kinetics and degradation pathways of phenazone (an analgesic and antipyretic drug) upon reaction with O3 were investigated. Kinetic studies on degradation of phenazone were carried out under different operating conditions such as temperature, pH, anions and H2O2 addition. Results showed that the degradation followed the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The reaction rate constant (kobs) of phenazone reached the maximum at 20 °C (9.653×10(-3) s(-1)). The presence of NO3(-) could enhance the degradation rate, while the addition of HCO3(-), SO4(2)(-), Cl(-) and the rise of pH showed negative effects on the ozonation of phenazone. H2O2 addition increased the phenazone degradation efficiency by 45.9% with the optimal concentration of 0.135 mM. Reaction by-products were evaluated by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS, which allowed the identification of a total of 10 by-products. The transformation pathways of phenazone ozonation consisted mainly of electrophilic addition and substitution, pyrazole ring opening, hydroxylation, dephenylization and coupling. The toxicity of these intermediate products showed that they are expected not to be more toxic than phenazone, with the exception of P7 (aniline) and P10 (1,5-dimethyl-4-((1-methyl-2-phenylhydrazinyl)methoxy)-2-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-3(2H)-one).

  6. Deficiency of Neuronal p38α MAPK Attenuates Amyloid Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Mouse and Cell Models through Facilitating Lysosomal Degradation of BACE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnöder, Laura; Hao, Wenlin; Qin, Yiren; Liu, Shirong; Tomic, Inge; Liu, Xu; Fassbender, Klaus; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-29

    Amyloid β (Aβ) damages neurons and triggers microglial inflammatory activation in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. BACE1 is the primary enzyme in Aβ generation. Neuroinflammation potentially up-regulates BACE1 expression and increases Aβ production. In Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein-transgenic mice and SH-SY5Y cell models, we specifically knocked out or knocked down gene expression of mapk14, which encodes p38α MAPK, a kinase sensitive to inflammatory and oxidative stimuli. Using immunological and biochemical methods, we observed that reduction of p38α MAPK expression facilitated the lysosomal degradation of BACE1, decreased BACE1 protein and activity, and subsequently attenuated Aβ generation in the AD mouse brain. Inhibition of p38α MAPK also enhanced autophagy. Blocking autophagy by treating cells with 3-methyladenine or overexpressing dominant-negative ATG5 abolished the deficiency of the p38α MAPK-induced BACE1 protein reduction in cultured cells. Thus, our study demonstrates that p38α MAPK plays a critical role in the regulation of BACE1 degradation and Aβ generation in AD pathogenesis.

  7. Lysosomal stress: a new player in perturbed lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriel, T.L.

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes are involved in many different essential cellular processes, among others organelle and molecule degradation, exocytosis, cell energy metabolism, cholesterol and sphingolipid level regulation. Lysosomal stress has a strong impact on the immune system, affecting specially macrophages as the

  8. Lysosomal stress: a new player in perturbed lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriel, T.L.

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes are involved in many different essential cellular processes, among others organelle and molecule degradation, exocytosis, cell energy metabolism, cholesterol and sphingolipid level regulation. Lysosomal stress has a strong impact on the immune system, affecting specially macrophages as the

  9. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 7 is required for TNFα-induced Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation and promotes cell death by regulating polyubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of c-FLIP protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudiero, Ivan; Zotti, Tiziana; Ferravante, Angela; Vessichelli, Mariangela; Reale, Carla; Masone, Maria C; Leonardi, Antonio; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2012-02-17

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α signals both cell survival and death. The biological outcome of TNFα treatment is determined by the balance between survival factors and Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, which promotes cell death. Here, we show that TRAF7, the most recently identified member of the TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) family of proteins, is essential for activation of JNK following TNFα stimulation. We also show that TRAF6 and TRAF7 promote unconventional polyubiquitination of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIP(L) and demonstrate that degradation of c-FLIP(L) also occurs through a lysosomal pathway. RNA interference-mediated depletion of TRAF7 correlates with increased c-FLIP(L) expression level, which, in turn, results in resistance to TNFα cytotoxicity. Collectively, our results indicate an important role for TRAF7 in the activation of JNK following TNFα stimulation and clearly point to an involvement of this protein in regulating the turnover of c-FLIP and, consequently, cell death.

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor-associated Factor 7 Is Required for TNFα-induced Jun NH2-terminal Kinase Activation and Promotes Cell Death by Regulating Polyubiquitination and Lysosomal Degradation of c-FLIP Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudiero, Ivan; Zotti, Tiziana; Ferravante, Angela; Vessichelli, Mariangela; Reale, Carla; Masone, Maria C.; Leonardi, Antonio; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2012-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α signals both cell survival and death. The biological outcome of TNFα treatment is determined by the balance between survival factors and Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling, which promotes cell death. Here, we show that TRAF7, the most recently identified member of the TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) family of proteins, is essential for activation of JNK following TNFα stimulation. We also show that TRAF6 and TRAF7 promote unconventional polyubiquitination of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIPL and demonstrate that degradation of c-FLIPL also occurs through a lysosomal pathway. RNA interference-mediated depletion of TRAF7 correlates with increased c-FLIPL expression level, which, in turn, results in resistance to TNFα cytotoxicity. Collectively, our results indicate an important role for TRAF7 in the activation of JNK following TNFα stimulation and clearly point to an involvement of this protein in regulating the turnover of c-FLIP and, consequently, cell death. PMID:22219201

  11. A non-conserved miRNA regulates lysosomal function and impacts on a human lysosomal storage disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa B; Di Malta, Chiara; Wen, Jiayu

    2014-01-01

    Sulfatases are key enzymatic regulators of sulfate homeostasis with several biological functions including degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and other macromolecules in lysosomes. In a severe lysosomal storage disorder, multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), global sulfatase activity...

  12. Effects of rapid or slow body weight reduction on intramuscular protein degradation pathways during equivalent weight loss on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Y; Urashima, S; Inai, M; Nishimura, S; Higashida, K; Terada, S

    2017-07-18

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of short-term fasting-induced rapid weight loss with those of slower but equivalent body weight loss induced by daily calorie restriction on muscle protein degradation pathways and muscle protein content. Male Fischer rats were subjected to either 30 % calorie restriction for 2 weeks to slowly decrease body weight (Slow) or 3-day fasting to rapidly decrease body weight by a comparable level of that of the Slow group (Rapid). The final body weights were about 15 % lower in both the Slow and Rapid groups than in the Con group (pweight of fast-twitch plantaris muscle, but not slow-twitch soleus muscle, were significantly lower in the Rapid group compared with the control rats fed ad libitum. Substantial increases in the expression ratio of autophagosomal membrane proteins (LC3-II/-I ratio) and polyubiquitinated protein concentration, used as biomarkers of autophagy-lysosome and ubiquitin-proteasome activities, respectively, were observed in the plantaris muscle of the Rapid group. Moreover, the LC3-II/-I ratio and polyubiquitinated protein concentration were negatively correlated with the total protein content and wet weight of plantaris muscle. These results suggest that short-term fasting-induced rapid body weight loss activates autophagy-lysosome and ubiquitin-proteasome systems more strongly than calorie restriction-induced slower weight reduction, resulting in muscular atrophy in fast-twitch muscle.

  13. DRAM1 regulates apoptosis through increasing protein levels and lysosomal localization of BAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, J-J; Zhang, X-D; Sun, W; Qi, L; Wu, J-C; Qin, Z-H

    2015-01-01

    DRAM1 (DNA damage-regulated autophagy modulator 1) is a TP53 target gene that modulates autophagy and apoptosis. We previously found that DRAM1 increased autophagy flux by promoting lysosomal acidification and protease activation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which DRAM1 regulates apoptosis are not clearly defined. Here we report a novel pathway by which DRAM1 regulates apoptosis involving BAX and lysosomes. A549 or HeLa cells were treated with the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor, 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP), or an anticancer drug, doxorubicin. Changes in the protein and mRNA levels of BAX and DRAM1 and the role of DRAM1 in BAX induction were determined. The interaction between DRAM1 and BAX and its effect on BAX degradation, BAX lysosomal localization, the release of cathepsin B and cytochrome c by BAX and the role of BAX in 3NP- or doxorubicin-induced cell death were studied. The results showed that BAX, a proapoptotic protein, was induced by DRAM1 in a transcription-independent manner. BAX was degraded by autophagy under basal conditions; however, its degradation was inhibited when DRAM1 expression was induced. There was a protein interaction between DRAM1 and BAX and this interaction prolonged the half-life of BAX. Furthermore, upregulated DRAM1 recruited BAX to lysosomes, leading to the release of lysosomal cathepsin B and cleavage of BID (BH3-interacting domain death agonist). BAX mediated the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, activation of caspase-3 and cell death partially through the lysosome-cathepsin B-tBid pathway. These results indicate that DRAM1 regulates apoptosis by inhibiting BAX degradation. In addition to mitochondria, lysosomes may also be involved in BAX-initiated apoptosis. PMID:25633293

  14. Docetaxel-induced prostate cancer cell death involves concomitant activation of caspase and lysosomal pathways and is attenuated by LEDGF/p75

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoh Lai

    2009-08-01

    , suggesting selectivity in its pro-survival activity. Conclusion These results underscore the ability of docetaxel to induce concomitantly caspase-dependent and independent death pathways in prostate cancer cells. The results also point to LEDGF/p75 as a potential contributor to cellular resistance to docetaxel-induced lysosomal destabilization and cell death, and an attractive candidate for molecular targeting in HRPC.

  15. Proteogenomic Characterization of Monocyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Aniline-Degrading Bacterium Burkholderia sp. K24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Yeop Lee

    Full Text Available Burkholderia sp. K24, formerly known as Acinetobacter lwoffii K24, is a soil bacterium capable of utilizing aniline as its sole carbon and nitrogen source. Genomic sequence analysis revealed that this bacterium possesses putative gene clusters for biodegradation of various monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs, including benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX, as well as aniline. We verified the proposed MAH biodegradation pathways by dioxygenase activity assays, RT-PCR, and LC/MS-based quantitative proteomic analyses. This proteogenomic approach revealed four independent degradation pathways, all converging into the citric acid cycle. Aniline and p-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathways converged into the β-ketoadipate pathway. Benzoate and toluene were degraded through the benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway. The xylene isomers, i.e., o-, m-, and p-xylene, were degraded via the extradiol cleavage pathways. Salicylate was degraded through the gentisate degradation pathway. Our results show that Burkholderia sp. K24 possesses versatile biodegradation pathways, which may be employed for efficient bioremediation of aniline and BTX.

  16. Hydrolytic and oxidative degradation of electrospun supramolecular biomaterials: In vitro degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugmans, M C P; Sӧntjens, S H M; Cox, M A J; Nandakumar, A; Bosman, A W; Mes, T; Janssen, H M; Bouten, C V C; Baaijens, F P T; Driessen-Mol, A

    2015-11-01

    The emerging field of in situ tissue engineering (TE) of load bearing tissues places high demands on the implanted scaffolds, as these scaffolds should provide mechanical stability immediately upon implantation. The new class of synthetic supramolecular biomaterial polymers, which contain non-covalent interactions between the polymer chains, thereby forming complex 3D structures by self assembly. Here, we have aimed to map the degradation characteristics of promising (supramolecular) materials, by using a combination of in vitro tests. The selected biomaterials were all polycaprolactones (PCLs), either conventional and unmodified PCL, or PCL with supramolecular hydrogen bonding moieties (either 2-ureido-[1H]-pyrimidin-4-one or bis-urea units) incorporated into the backbone. As these materials are elastomeric, they are suitable candidates for cardiovascular TE applications. Electrospun scaffold strips of these materials were incubated with solutions containing enzymes that catalyze hydrolysis, or solutions containing oxidative species. At several time points, chemical, morphological, and mechanical properties were investigated. It was demonstrated that conventional and supramolecular PCL-based polymers respond differently to enzyme-accelerated hydrolytic or oxidative degradation, depending on the morphological and chemical composition of the material. Conventional PCL is more prone to hydrolytic enzymatic degradation as compared to the investigated supramolecular materials, while, in contrast, the latter materials are more susceptible to oxidative degradation. Given the observed degradation pathways of the examined materials, we are able to tailor degradation characteristics by combining selected PCL backbones with additional supramolecular moieties. The presented combination of in vitro test methods can be employed to screen, limit, and select biomaterials for pre-clinical in vivo studies targeted to different clinical applications.

  17. Advanced glycation end products receptor RAGE controls myocardial dysfunction and oxidative stress in high-fat fed mice by sustaining mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy-lysosome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yichi; Wang, Lei; Delguste, Florian; Durand, Arthur; Guilbaud, Axel; Rousselin, Clementine; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Tessier, Frédéric; Boulanger, Eric; Neviere, Remi

    2017-08-19

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are recognized as major contributors of cardiovascular damage in diabetes and high fat diet (HFD) fed mice. Blockade of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) attenuates vascular oxidative stress and development of atherosclerosis. We tested whether HFD-induced myocardial dysfunction would be reversed in RAGE deficiency mice, in association with changes in oxidative stress damage, mitochondrial respiration, mitochondrial fission and autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Cardiac antioxidant capacity was upregulated in RAGE(-)/(-) mice under normal diet as evidenced by increased superoxide dismutase and sirtuin mRNA expressions. Mitochondrial fragmentation and mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 and Fis1 expressions were increased in RAGE(-)/(-) mice. Autophagy-related protein expressions and cathepsin-L activity were increased in RAGE(-)/(-) mice suggesting sustained autophagy-lysosomal flux. HFD induced mitochondrial respiration defects, cardiac contractile dysfunction, disrupted mitochondrial dynamics and autophagy inhibition, which were partially prevented in RAGE(-)/(-) mice. Our results suggest that cardioprotection against HFD in RAGE(-)/(-) mice include reactivation of autophagy, as inhibition of autophagic flux by chloroquine fully abrogated beneficial myocardial effects and its stimulation by rapamycin improved myocardial function in HFD wild type mice. As mitochondrial fission is necessary to mitophagy, increased fragmentation of mitochondrial network in HFD RAGE(-)/(-) mice may have facilitated removal of damaged mitochondria leading to better mitochondrial quality control. In conclusion, modulation of RAGE pathway may improve mitochondrial damage and myocardial dysfunction in HFD mice. Attenuation of cardiac oxidative stress and maintenance of healthy mitochondria population ensuring adequate energy supply may be involved in myocardial protection against HFD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. ARTS and Siah Collaborate in a Pathway for XIAP Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Jason B.; Correa, Ricardo G.; Gerlic, Motti; Yip, Kenneth W.; Krieg, Andreas; Tamble, Craig M.; Shi, Ranxin; Welsh, Kate; Duggineni, Srinivas; Huang, Ziwei; Ren, Keqin; Du, Chunying; Reed, John C.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY ARTS (Apoptosis-Related protein in the TGF-β Signaling pathway) is a mitochondrial protein that binds XIAP (X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein) upon entering the cytosol, thus promoting cell death. Expression of ARTS is lost in some malignancies. Here we show that ARTS binds to XIAP at BIR1, a domain distinct from the caspase-binding sites. Furthermore, ARTS interacts with the E3 ligase Siah-1 (seven in absentia homolog 1) to induce ubiquitination and degradation of XIAP. Cells lacking either Siah or ARTS contain higher steady-state levels of XIAP. Thus, ARTS serves as an adapter to bridge Siah-1 to XIAP, targeting it for destruction. PMID:21185211

  19. Biotransformation of nitrobenzene by bacteria containing toluene degradative pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haigler, B.E.; Spain, J.C. (Air Force Civil Engineering Support Agency, Tyndall AFB, FL (United States))

    1991-11-01

    Nonpolar nitroaromatic compounds have been considered resistant to attack by oxygenases because of the electron withdrawing properties of the nitro group. The authors have investigate the ability of seven bacterial strains containing toluene degradative pathways to oxidize nitrobenzene. Cultures were induced with toluene vapor prior to incubation with nitrobenzene, and products were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pseudomonas cepacia G4 and a strain of Pseudomonas harboring the TOL plasmid (pTN2) did not transform nitrobenzene. Cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain JS150 converted nitrobenzene to 3-nitrocatechol. Transformation of nitrobenzene in the presence of {sup 18}O{sub 2} indicated that the reaction in JS150 involved the incorporation of both atoms of oxygen in the 3-nitrocatechol, which suggests a dioxygenase mechanism. P. putida 39/D, a mutant strain of P. putida F1, converted nitrobenzene to a compound tentatively identified as cis-1, 2-dihydroxy-3-nitrocyclohexa-3, 5-diene. This compound was rapidly converted to 3-nitrocatechol by cells of strain JS150. Cultures of Pseudomonas mendocina KR-1 converted nitrobenzene to a mixture of 3- and 4-nitrophenol (10 and 63%, respectively). Pseudomonas pickettii PKO1 converted nitrobenzene to 3- and 4-nitrocatechol via 3- and 4-nitrophenol. The nitrocatechols were slowly degraded to unidentified metabolites. Nitrobenzene did not serve as an inducer for the enzymes that catalyzed its oxidation.

  20. Interactions between autophagic and endo-lysosomal markers in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeste, Clara L; Seco, Esther; Patton, Wayne F; Boya, Patricia; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2013-05-01

    Autophagic and endo-lysosomal degradative pathways are essential for cell homeostasis. Availability of reliable tools to interrogate these pathways is critical to unveil their involvement in physiology and pathophysiology. Although several probes have been recently developed to monitor autophagic or lysosomal compartments, their specificity has not been validated through co-localization studies with well-known markers. Here, we evaluate the selectivity and interactions between one lysosomal (Lyso-ID) and one autophagosomal (Cyto-ID) probe under conditions modulating autophagy and/or endo-lysosomal function in live cells. The probe for acidic compartments Lyso-ID was fully localized inside vesicles positive for markers of late endosome-lysosomes, including Lamp1-GFP and GFP-CINCCKVL. Induction of autophagy by amino acid deprivation in bovine aortic endothelial cells caused an early and potent increase in the fluorescence of the proposed autophagy dye Cyto-ID. Cyto-ID-positive compartments extensively co-localized with the autophagosomal fluorescent reporter RFP-LC3, although the time and/or threshold for organelle detection was different for each probe. Interestingly, use of Cyto-ID in combination with Lysotracker Red or Lyso-ID allowed the observation of structures labeled with either one or both probes, the extent of co-localization increasing upon treatment with protease inhibitors. Inhibition of the endo-lysosomal pathway with chloroquine or U18666A resulted in the formation of large Cyto-ID and Lyso-ID-positive compartments. These results constitute the first assessment of the selectivity of Cyto-ID and Lyso-ID as probes for the autophagic and lysosomal pathways, respectively. Our observations show that these probes can be used in combination with protein-based markers for monitoring the interactions of both pathways in live cells.

  1. Disorders of lysosomal acidification-The emerging role of v-ATPase in aging and neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colacurcio, Daniel J; Nixon, Ralph A

    2016-12-01

    Autophagy and endocytosis deliver unneeded cellular materials to lysosomes for degradation. Beyond processing cellular waste, lysosomes release metabolites and ions that serve signaling and nutrient sensing roles, linking the functions of the lysosome to various pathways for intracellular metabolism and nutrient homeostasis. Each of these lysosomal behaviors is influenced by the intraluminal pH of the lysosome, which is maintained in the low acidic range by a proton pump, the vacuolar ATPase (v-ATPase). New reports implicate altered v-ATPase activity and lysosomal pH dysregulation in cellular aging, longevity, and adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases, including forms of Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease. Genetic defects of subunits composing the v-ATPase or v-ATPase-related proteins occur in an increasingly recognized group of familial neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review the expanding roles of the v-ATPase complex as a platform regulating lysosomal hydrolysis and cellular homeostasis. We discuss the unique vulnerability of neurons to persistent low level lysosomal dysfunction and review recent clinical and experimental studies that link dysfunction of the v-ATPase complex to neurodegenerative diseases across the age spectrum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Loss of β-glucocerebrosidase activity does not affect alpha-synuclein levels or lysosomal function in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermentzaki, Georgia; Dimitriou, Evangelia; Xilouri, Maria; Michelakakis, Helen; Stefanis, Leonidas

    2013-01-01

    To date, a plethora of studies have provided evidence favoring an association between Gaucher disease (GD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). GD, the most common lysosomal storage disorder, results from the diminished activity of the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase), caused by mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA). Alpha-synuclein (ASYN), a presynaptic protein, has been strongly implicated in PD pathogenesis. ASYN may in part be degraded by the lysosomes and may itself aberrantly impact lysosomal function. Therefore, a putative link between deficient GCase and ASYN, involving lysosomal dysfunction, has been proposed to be responsible for the risk for PD conferred by GBA mutations. In this current work, we aimed to investigate the effects of pharmacological inhibition of GCase on ASYN accumulation/aggregation, as well as on lysosomal function, in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells and in primary neuronal cultures. Following profound inhibition of the enzyme activity, we did not find significant alterations in ASYN levels, or any changes in the clearance or formation of its oligomeric species. We further observed no significant impairment of the lysosomal degradation machinery. These findings suggest that additional interaction pathways together with aberrant GCase and ASYN must govern this complex relation between GD and PD.

  3. CQ synergistically sensitizes human colorectal cancer cells to SN-38/CPT-11 through lysosomal and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway via p53-ROS cross-talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pinjia; Luo, Xiaoyong; Nie, Peipei; Wu, Baoyan; Xu, Wei; Shi, Xinpeng; Chang, Haocai; Li, Bing; Yu, Xiurong; Zou, Zhengzhi

    2017-03-01

    Autophagy plays a key role in supporting cell survival against chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. In this study, we found the chemotherapy agent SN-38 induced autophagy in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. However, inhibition of autophagy using a small molecular inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and ATG5 siRNA did not increase SN-38-induced cytotoxicity in CRC cells. Notably, another autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) synergistically enhanced the anti-tumor activity of SN-38 in CRC cells with wild type (WT) p53. Subsequently, we identified a potential mechanism of this cooperative interaction by showing that CQ and SN-38 acted together to trigger reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst, upregulate p53 expression, elicit the loss of lysosomal membrane potential (LMP) and mitochondrial membrane potential (∆ψm). In addition, ROS induced by CQ plus SN-38 upregulated p53 levels by activating p38, conversely, p53 stimulated ROS. These results suggested that ROS and p53 reciprocally promoted each other's production and cooperated to induce CRC cell death. Moreover, we showed induction of ROS and p53 by the two agents provoked the loss of LMP and ∆ψm. Altogether, all results suggested that CQ synergistically sensitized human CRC cells with WT p53 to SN-38 through lysosomal and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway via p53-ROS cross-talk. Lastly, we showed that CQ could enhance CRC cells response to CPT-11 (a prodrug of SN-38) in xenograft models. Thus the combined treatment might represent an attractive therapeutic strategy for the treatment of CRC.

  4. Effects of ammonia on processing and secretion of precursor and mature lysosomal enzyme from macrophages of normal and pale ear mice: evidence for two distinct pathways

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Lysosomal enzymes have been shown to be synthesized as microsomal precursors, which are processed to mature enzymes located in lysosomes. We examined the effect of ammonium chloride on the intracellular processing and secretion of two lysosomal enzymes, beta-glucuronidase and beta-galactosidase, in mouse macrophages. This lysosomotropic drug caused extensive secretion of both precursor and mature enzyme forms within a few hours, as documented by pulse radiolabeling and molecular weight analys...

  5. Fenton degradation of Cartap hydrochloride: identification of the main intermediates and the degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kaixun; Ming, Cuixiang; Dai, Youzhi; Honore Ake, Kouassi Marius

    2015-01-01

    The advanced oxidation of Cartap hydrochloride (Cartap) promoted by the Fenton system in an aqueous medium was investigated. Based on total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand and high-performance liquid chromatography, the oxidation of Cartap is quite efficient by the Fenton system. Its long chain is easily destroyed, but the reaction does not proceed to complete mineralization. Ion chromatography detection indicated the formation of acetic acid, propionic acid, formic acid, nitrous acid and sulfuric acid in the reaction mixtures. Further evidence of nitrogen monoxide and sulfur dioxide formation was obtained by using a flue gas analyzer. Monitoring by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer demonstrated the formation of oxalic acid, ethanol, carbon dioxide, and L-alanine ethylamide. Based on these experimental results, plausible degradation pathways for Cartap mineralization in an aqueous medium by the Fenton system are proposed.

  6. Mechanochemical degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A: Performance, products and pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kunlun; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Wang; Yu, Yunfei; Deng, Shubo [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), School of Environment, POPs Research Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu, Gang, E-mail: yg-den@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), School of Environment, POPs Research Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe + SiO{sub 2} shows better performance than CaO in mechanochemical destruction of TBBPA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nonhazardous inorganic carbon and soluble bromide were the final products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman and FTIR imply the generation of inorganic carbon and removal of bromine atom. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tri-BBPA, bi-BBPA, mono-BBPA, BPA were the main intermediates during ball milling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bromine was balanced and the degradation pathway was proposed. - Abstract: Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is the most widely used brominated flame retardant (BFR), which has received more and more concerns due to its high lipophilicity, persistency and endocrine disrupting property in the environment. Considering the possible need for the safe disposal of TBBPA containing wastes in the future, the potential of mechanochemical (MC) destruction as a promising non-combustion technology was investigated in this study. TBBPA was co-ground with calcium oxide (CaO) or the mixture of iron powder and quartz sand (Fe + SiO{sub 2}) in a planetary ball mill at room temperature. The method of Fe + SiO{sub 2} destructed over 98% of initial TBBPA after 3 h and acquired 95% debromination rate after 5 h, which showed a better performance than the CaO method. Raman spectra and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrated the generation of inorganic carbon with the disappearance of benzene ring and C-Br bond, indicating the carbonization and debromination process during mechanochemical reaction. LC-MS-MS screening showed that the intermediates of the treatment with Fe + SiO{sub 2} were tri-, bi-, mono-brominated BPA, BPA and other fragments. Finally all the intermediates were also destroyed after 5 h grinding. The bromine balance was calculated and a possible reaction pathway was proposed.

  7. Cross-talk between TRPML1 channel, lipids and lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Norbert

    2012-03-01

    Described by the Belgian cytologist Christian De Duve in 1949,(1) lysosomes (from the Greek "digestive bodies") are ubiquitous specialized intracellular organelles that ensure the degradation/recycling of macromolecules (proteins, lipids, membranes) through the activity of specific enzymes (i.e., acid hydrolases). They receive their substrates through different internalization pathways (i.e., endocytosis, phagocytosis and autophagy) and are involved in a wide range of physiological functions from cell death and signaling to cholesterol homeostasis and plasma membrane repair.(2) In Mammals, 50 soluble lysosomal hydrolases have been described, each targeting specific substrates. They are confined in the lumen of the lysosome and require an optimum pH (i.e., pH 4.5) to work. This acidic pH compared with the slightly alkaline pH of the cytosol (i.e., ~pH 7.2) is maintained by the activity of integral lysosomal membrane proteins (LMPs, that represent the second class of lysosomal proteins), including the V-type proton (H(+))-ATPase(3) and the chloride ion channel CLC7(4) that pumps protons from the cytosol across the lysosomal membrane.

  8. Eps8 is recruited to lysosomes and subjected to chaperone-mediated autophagy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Thilo; Younsi, Alexander; Disanza, Andrea; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Scita, Giorgio; Schmidt, Jan

    2010-07-15

    Eps8 controls actin dynamics directly through its barbed end capping and actin-bundling activity, and indirectly by regulating Rac-activation when engaged into a trimeric complex with Eps8-Abi1-Sos1. Recently, Eps8 has been associated with promotion of various solid malignancies, but neither its mechanisms of action nor its regulation in cancer cells have been elucidated. Here, we report a novel association of Eps8 with the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, which is independent from actin polymerization and specifically occurs in cancer cells. Endogenous Eps8 localized to large vesicular lysosomal structures in metastatic pancreatic cancer cell lines, such as AsPC-1 and Capan-1 that display high Eps8 levels. Additionally, ectopic expression of Eps8 increased the size of lysosomes. Structure-function analysis revealed that the region encompassing the amino acids 184-535 of Eps8 was sufficient to mediate lysosomal recruitment. Notably, this fragment harbors two KFERQ-like motifs required for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Furthermore, Eps8 co-immunoprecipitated with Hsc70 and LAMP-2, which are key elements for the CMA degradative pathway. Consistently, in vitro, a significant fraction of Eps8 bound to (11.9+/-5.1%) and was incorporated into (5.3+/-6.5%) lysosomes. Additionally, Eps8 binding to lysosomes was competed by other known CMA-substrates. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that Eps8 recruitment to the lysosomal membrane was highly dynamic. Collectively, these results indicate that Eps8 in certain human cancer cells specifically localizes to lysosomes, and is directed to CMA. These results open a new field for the investigation of how Eps8 is regulated and contributes to tumor promotion in human cancers.

  9. The Phosphoinositide-Gated Lysosomal Ca(2+) Channel, TRPML1, Is Required for Phagosome Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayam, Roya M; Saric, Amra; Shilliday, Ryan E; Botelho, Roberto J

    2015-09-01

    Macrophages internalize and sequester pathogens into a phagosome. Phagosomes then sequentially fuse with endosomes and lysosomes, converting into degradative phagolysosomes. Phagosome maturation is a complex process that requires regulators of the endosomal pathway including the phosphoinositide lipids. Phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2 ), which respectively control early endosomes and late endolysosomes, are both required for phagosome maturation. Inhibition of PIKfyve, which synthesizes PtdIns(3,5)P2 , blocked phagosome-lysosome fusion and abated the degradative capacity of phagosomes. However, it is not known how PIKfyve and PtdIns(3,5)P2 participate in phagosome maturation. TRPML1 is a PtdIns(3,5)P2 -gated lysosomal Ca(2+) channel. Because Ca(2+) triggers membrane fusion, we postulated that TRPML1 helps mediate phagosome-lysosome fusion. Using Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis as a model, we describe our research showing that silencing of TRPML1 hindered phagosome acquisition of lysosomal markers and reduced the bactericidal properties of phagosomes. Specifically, phagosomes isolated from TRPML1-silenced cells were decorated with lysosomes that docked but did not fuse. We could rescue phagosome maturation in TRPML1-silenced and PIKfyve-inhibited cells by forcible Ca(2+) release with ionomycin. We also provide evidence that cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration increases upon phagocytosis in a manner dependent on TRPML1 and PIKfyve. Overall, we propose a model where PIKfyve and PtdIns(3,5)P2 activate TRPML1 to induce phagosome-lysosome fusion.

  10. TPC1 has two variant isoforms, and their removal has different effects on endo-lysosomal functions compared to loss of TPC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruas, Margarida; Chuang, Kai-Ting; Davis, Lianne C; Al-Douri, Areej; Tynan, Patricia W; Tunn, Ruth; Teboul, Lydia; Galione, Antony; Parrington, John

    2014-11-01

    Organelle ion homeostasis within the endo-lysosomal system is critical for physiological functions. Two-pore channels (TPCs) are cation channels that reside in endo-lysosomal organelles, and overexpression results in endo-lysosomal trafficking defects. However, the impact of a lack of TPC expression on endo-lysosomal trafficking is unknown. Here, we characterize Tpcn1 expression in two transgenic mouse lines (Tpcn1(XG716) and Tpcn1(T159)) and show expression of a novel evolutionarily conserved Tpcn1B transcript from an alternative promoter, raising important questions regarding the status of Tpcn1 expression in mice recently described to be Tpcn1 knockouts. We show that the transgenic Tpcn1(T159) line lacks expression of both Tpcn1 isoforms in all tissues analyzed. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from Tpcn1(-/-) and Tpcn2(-/-) animals, we show that a lack of Tpcn1 or Tpcn2 expression has no significant impact on resting endo-lysosomal pH or morphology. However, differential effects in endo-lysosomal function were observed upon the loss of Tpcn1 or Tpcn2 expression; thus, while Tpcn1(-/-) MEFs have impaired trafficking of cholera toxin from the plasma membrane to the Golgi apparatus, Tpcn2(-/-) MEFs show slower kinetics of ligand-induced platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) degradation, which is dependent on trafficking to lysosomes. Our findings indicate that TPC1 and TPC2 have important but distinct roles in the endo-lysosomal pathway.

  11. Complementary roles of intracellular and pericellular collagen degradation pathways in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenaar-Miller, Rebecca A; Engelholm, Lars H; Gavard, Julie

    2007-01-01

    these two pathways is unclear and even controversial. Here we show that intracellular and pericellular collagen turnover pathways have complementary roles in vivo. Individual deficits in intracellular collagen degradation (urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein/Endo180 ablation......Collagen degradation is essential for cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Two key turnover pathways have been described for collagen: intracellular cathepsin-mediated degradation and pericellular collagenase-mediated degradation. However, the functional relationship between......) or pericellular collagen degradation (membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase ablation) were compatible with development and survival. Their combined deficits, however, synergized to cause postnatal death by severely impairing bone formation. Interestingly, this was mechanistically linked to the proliferative...

  12. Degradation pathway of 2-chloroethanol in Pseudomonas stutzeri strain JJ under denitrifying conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J.A.; Gerritse, J.; Schraa, G.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The pathway of 2-chloroethanol degradation in the denitrifying Pseudomonas stutzeri strain JJ was investigated. In cell-free extracts, activities of a phenazine methosulfate (PMS)-dependent chloroethanol dehydrogenase, an NAD-dependent chloroacetaldehyde dehydrogenase, and a chloroacetate dehalogena

  13. Modeling position-specific isotope fractionation of organic micropollutants degradation via different reaction pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    : dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model successfully reproduces the multi-element isotope data, and precisely captures the dual element isotope trends, characterizing the different degradation pathways. Besides illustrating the model capability of mechanistic evaluation...

  14. WNK4 kinase-mediated inhibitory effect on expression of BK channel via lysosomal pathway%WNK4激酶通过溶酶体途径抑制BK通道表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄捷秋; 王德选; 张益前; 牛伟辉; 陈方旋; 施珍; 潘殊方; 谷定英

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanism underlying the WNK4 kinasemediated inhibitory effect on BK channel. Methods Cos-7 cells were cotransfected with BK in combination with either CD4 (control group) or wild type WNK4 (WNK4-WT).Immunostaining and confocal microscopy,chemiluminescence,Western blotting analysis were then employed to determine the BK localization in cells,BK surface expression and total protein level,respectively.To further investigate whether the reduction of BK protein expression is due to an increase in degradation through a lysosomal pathway,BK protein level was determined after treated with bafilomycin A1(Baf A1),a proton pump inhibitor affecting lysosomal degradation. Results Immunostaining and confocal microscopic study showed that BK was localized both in plasma membrane and cytosol in the control group.After cells transfected with WNK4-WT,BK expression was markedly reduced.Chemiluminescent assay found that BK surface expression level was 299.9±18.6 in the control group,whereas it was significantly reduced (148.4±13.7,P<0.01) in the WNK4-WT group.Western blotting analysis showed that total BK protein level was markedly reduced in the presence of WNK4-WT compared to the control group.WNK4-WT was shown to significantly reduce the BK total protein level (42.3%±15.2%) compared to the control group (100%) (P<0.01).When the cells was treated with Bafilomycin A1 (Baf A1,0.5 μmol/L),WNK4-mediated reduction in BK protein was reversed (82.2%±12.1%,P<0.05). Conclusions WNK4 inhibits total and surface protein expression of BK in Cos-7 cells whick is likely due to an increase in BK degradation through a lysosomal pathway.%目的 研究WNK4激酶对BK通道的调节作用及机制.方法 将BK和WNK4野生型(WNK4-WT)或CD4(对照)质粒DNA共同转染进Cos-7细胞中,采用免疫染色-共聚焦激光显微镜、化学发光法、Western印迹法检测BK在细胞上的分布、细胞膜表面蛋白和总蛋

  15. Biochemical and physiological characterisation of the purine degradation pathway in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth is often limited by nitrogen availability in the soil. Not only do plants depend on efficient nitrogen uptake, they also require effective means to internally redistribute nitrogen during every stage of development. The purine degradation pathway contributes to this nitrogen recycling in plants. In tropical legumes it is also of central importance to the plants’ nitrogen supply under nitrogen-fixing conditions. This is the first time that the complete ureide degradation pathway h...

  16. Degradation of diclofenac by UV-activated persulfate process: Kinetic studies, degradation pathways and toxicity assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xian; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Chen, Juxiang; Zhang, Yansen; Xiang, Huiming; Guo, Youluo

    2017-03-21

    Diclofenac (DCF) is the frequently detected non-steroidal pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. In this study, the degradation of DCF was evaluated by UV-254nm activated persulfate (UV/PS). The degradation of DCF followed the pseudo first-order kinetics pattern. The degradation rate constant (kobs) was accelerated by UV/PS compared to UV alone and PS alone. Increasing the initial PS dosage or solution pH significantly enhanced the degradation efficiency. Presence of various natural water constituents had different effects on DCF degradation, with an enhancement or inhibition in the presence of inorganic anions (HCO3(-) or Cl(-)) and a significant inhibition in the presence of NOM. In addition, preliminary degradation mechanisms and major products were elucidated using LC-MS/MS. Hydroxylation, decarbonylation, ring-opening and cyclation reaction involving the attack of SO4(•)(-) or other substances, were the main degradation mechanism. TOC analyzer and Microtox bioassay were employed to evaluate the mineralization and cytotoxicity of solutions treated by UV/PS at different times, respectively. Limited elimination of TOC (32%) was observed during the mineralization of DCF. More toxic degradation products and their related intermediate species were formed, and the UV/PS process was suitable for removing the toxicity. Of note, longer degradation time may be considered for the final toxicity removal.

  17. Degradation Pathway for Eplerenone by Validated Stability Indicating UP-LC Method

    OpenAIRE

    Kondru Sudhakar Babu; Venkataramanna Madireddy; Venkata Somaraju Indukuri

    2012-01-01

    Degradation pathway for eplerenone is established as per ICH recommendations by validated and stability-indicating reverse phase liquid chromatographic method. Eplerenone is subjected to stress conditions of acid, base, oxidation, and thermal and photolysis. Significant degradation is observed in acid and base stress conditions. Four impurities are studied and the major degradant (RRT about 0.31) was identified by LC-MS and spectral analysis. The stress samples are assayed against a qualified...

  18. MAPKs are essential upstream signaling pathways in proteolytic cartilage degradation--divergence in pathways leading to aggrecanase and MMP-mediated articular cartilage degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, B-C; Schultz, N; Madsen, S H;

    2010-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and aggrecanases are essential players in cartilage degradation. However, the signaling pathways that results in MMP and/or aggrecanase synthesis and activation are not well understood. We investigated the molecular events leading to MMP- and aggrecanase-mediated ...

  19. Disulfiram/copper-disulfiram Damages Multiple Protein Degradation and Turnover Pathways and Cytotoxicity is Enhanced by Metformin in Oesophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jivan, Rupal; Damelin, Leonard Howard; Birkhead, Monica; Rousseau, Amanda Louise; Veale, Robin Bruce; Mavri-Damelin, Demetra

    2015-10-01

    Disulfiram (DSF), used since the 1950s in the treatment of alcoholism, is reductively activated to diethyldithiocarbamate and both compounds are thiol-reactive and readily complex copper. More recently DSF and copper-DSF (Cu-DSF) have been found to exhibit potent anticancer activity. We have previously shown that the anti-diabetic drug metformin is anti-proliferative and induces an intracellular reducing environment in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines. Based on these observations, we investigated the effects of Cu-DSF and DSF, with and without metformin, in this present study. We found that Cu-DSF and DSF caused considerable cytotoxicity across a panel of OSCC cells, and metformin significantly enhanced the effects of DSF. Elevated copper transport contributes to DSF and metformin-DSF-induced cytotoxicity since the cell-impermeable copper chelator, bathocuproinedisulfonic acid, partially reversed the cytotoxic effects of these drugs, and interestingly, metformin-treated OSCC cells contained higher intracellular copper levels. Furthermore, DSF may target cancer cells preferentially due to their high dependence on protein degradation/turnover pathways, and we found that metformin further enhances the role of DSF as a proteasome inhibitor. We hypothesized that the lysosome could be an additional, novel, target of DSF. Indeed, this acid-labile compound decreased lysosomal acidification, and DSF-metformin co-treatment interfered with the progression of autophagy in these cells. In summary, this is the first such report identifying the lysosome as a target of DSF and based on the considerable cytotoxic effects of DSF either alone or in the presence of metformin, in vitro, and we propose these as novel potential chemotherapeutic approaches for OSCC.

  20. TRPML: transporters of metals in lysosomes essential for cell survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselyov, Kirill; Colletti, Grace A; Terwilliger, Austen; Ketchum, Kathleen; Lyons, Christopher W P; Quinn, James; Muallem, Shmuel

    2011-09-01

    Key aspects of lysosomal function are affected by the ionic content of the lysosomal lumen and, therefore, by the ion permeability in the lysosomal membrane. Such functions include regulation of lysosomal acidification, a critical process in delivery and activation of the lysosomal enzymes, release of metals from lysosomes into the cytoplasm and the Ca(2+)-dependent component of membrane fusion events in the endocytic pathway. While the basic mechanisms of lysosomal acidification have been largely defined, the lysosomal metal transport system is not well understood. TRPML1 is a lysosomal ion channel whose malfunction is implicated in the lysosomal storage disease Mucolipidosis Type IV. Recent evidence suggests that TRPML1 is involved in Fe(2+), Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) transport across the lysosomal membrane, ascribing novel physiological roles to this ion channel, and perhaps to its relatives TRPML2 and TRPML3 and illuminating poorly understood aspects of lysosomal function. Further, alterations in metal transport by the TRPMLs due to mutations or environmental factors may contribute to their role in the disease phenotype and cell death.

  1. Bioenergetics and pathway of acid blue 113 degradation by Staphylococcus lentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Sudharshan; Mahadevan, Surianarayanan; Shanmugam, Bhuvanesh Kumar; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2012-01-01

    Bioreaction calorimetric studies of degradation of the dye acid blue 113 by Staphylococcus lentus are reported for the first time. The heat released during the dye degradation process can be successfully measured using reaction calorimeter. Power time and oxygen uptake rate (OUR) profile followed each other suggesting that heat profiles could monitor the progress of the dye degradation in biocalorimetry. The shifts observed in power-time profile indicated three distinct phases of the bioprocess indicating simultaneous utilization of glucose (primary) and dye (secondary carbon source). Secretion of azoreductase enzyme enhanced the degradation process. Optimization of aeration and agitation rates was observed to be vital to efficient dye degradation. The degradative pathway for acid blue 113 by S. lentus was delineated via high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses. Interestingly the products of degradation were found to have low toxicity, as per cytotoxicity measurements.

  2. Simvastatin promotes NPC1-mediated free cholesterol efflux from lysosomes through CYP7A1/LXRα signalling pathway in oxLDL-loaded macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Aolin; Halquist, Matthew S; Yuan, Xinxu; Henderson, Scott C; Dewey, William L; Li, Pin-Lan; Li, Ningjun; Zhang, Fan

    2017-02-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, are the first-line medications prescribed for the prevention and treatment of coronary artery diseases. The efficacy of statins has been attributed not only to their systemic cholesterol-lowering actions but also to their pleiotropic effects that are unrelated to cholesterol reduction. These pleiotropic effects have been increasingly recognized as essential in statins therapy. This study was designed to investigate the pleiotropic actions of simvastatin, one of the most commonly prescribed statins, on macrophage cholesterol homeostasis with a focus on lysosomal free cholesterol egression. With simultaneous nile red and filipin staining, analysis of confocal/multi-photon imaging demonstrated that simvastatin markedly attenuated unesterified (free) cholesterol buildup in macrophages loaded with oxidized low-density lipoprotein but had little effect in reducing the sizes of cholesteryl ester-containing lipid droplets; the reduction in free cholesterol was mainly attributed to decreases in lysosome-compartmentalized cholesterol. Functionally, the egression of free cholesterol from lysosomes attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. It was determined that the reduction of lysosomal free cholesterol buildup by simvastatin was due to the up-regulation of Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), a lysosomal residing cholesterol transporter. Moreover, the enhanced enzymatic production of 7-hydroxycholesterol by cytochrome P450 7A1 and the subsequent activation of liver X receptor α underscored the up-regulation of NPC1. These findings reveal a novel pleiotropic effect of simvastatin in affecting lysosomal cholesterol efflux in macrophages and the associated significance in the treatment of atherosclerosis. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  3. Factors and processes modulating phenotypes in neuronopathic lysosomal storage diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta; Banecki, Bogdan; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases are inherited metabolic disorders caused by genetic defects causing deficiency of various lysosomal proteins, and resultant accumulation of non-degraded compounds. They are multisystemic diseases, and in most of them (>70 %) severe brain dysfunctions are evident. However, expression of various phenotypes in particular diseases is extremely variable, from non-neuronopathic to severely neurodegenerative in the deficiency of the same enzyme. Although all lysosomal stor...

  4. Calciurn/lysosome pathway in the apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells induced by Wuxing soup%五行汤经钙离子/溶酶体途径介导的SGC-7901细胞凋亡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫非; 胡晶莹; 甘愉; 赵仰星; 朱明洁; 赵新泰; 段友容

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the mechanism of calcium/lysosome pathway in the apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells induced by Wuxing soup. Methods The integrity of lysosome membrane was detected by acridine orange (AO) staining,the key proteins in apoptotic pathway were tested by Western blot, and the effect of inhibitors on cell apoptotic rate and survival rate was analyzed by Annexin V-binding ELISA and CCK-8, respectively. Results The leakage of lysosome membrane was observed by AO staining. The lysosome associated apoptotic protein Cathepsin D and Cathepsin B were released into cytosol. The inhibitors of Cathepsin B, L and S exerted protection in the survival of SGC-7901 under Wuxing soup treatment in a dose-dependent manner. However, the inhibitor of Cathepsin D had no effects on apoptosis.Conclusion Wuxing soup could induce SGC-7901 cell apoptosis through calcium mediated and lysosome involved caspase-independent pathway.%目的 探索五行汤经钙离子/溶酶体途径介导的SGC-7901细胞凋亡机制.方法 吖啶橙染色检测溶酶体膜完整性,胞浆蛋白免疫印迹法检测凋亡途径蛋白变化,Annexin V结合实验和CCK-8法检测不同抑制剂对细胞凋亡和存活的影响.结果 凋亡细胞的溶酶体膜渗漏,溶酶休释放蛋白酶Cathepsin D和Cathepsin B至胞浆.天冬氨酸蛋白酶Cathepsin D抑制剂对五行汤诱导的细胞凋亡无影响;半胱氨酸蛋白酶Cathepsin B、L、S抑制荆可明显减少细胞凋亡(P<0.05),且对细胞的保护作用呈浓度依赖性.结论 五行汤经钙离子/溶酶体途径介导SGC-7901细胞凋亡.

  5. Degradation pathway of malachite green in a novel dual-tank photoelectrochemical catalytic reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diao, Zenghui [Department of Environmental Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510630 (China); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Li, Mingyu, E-mail: tlimy@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510630 (China); Zeng, Fanyin; Song, Lin [Department of Environmental Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510630 (China); Qiu, Rongliang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • A novel dual-tank photoelectrochemical catalytic reactor was designed. • Malachite green degraded in bipolar double-effect mode. • Salt bridge replaced by a cation exchange membrane in the reactor. • Degradation pathways of malachite green in the cathode and anode tanks were similar. -- Abstract: A novel dual-tank photoelectrochemical catalytic reactor was designed to investigate the degradation pathway of malachite green. A thermally formed TiO{sub 2}/Ti thin film electrode was used as photoanode, graphite was used as cathode, and a saturated calomel electrode was employed as the reference electrode in the reactor. In the reactor, the anode and cathode tanks were connected by a cation exchange membrane. Results showed that the decolorization ratio of malachite green in the anode and cathode was 98.5 and 96.5% after 120 min, respectively. Malachite green in the two anode and cathode tanks was oxidized, achieving the bipolar double effect. Malachite green in both the anode and cathode tanks exhibited similar catalytic degradation pathways. The double bond of the malachite green molecule was attacked by strong oxidative hydroxyl radicals, after which the organic compound was degraded by the two pathways into 4,4-bis(dimethylamino) benzophenone, 4-(dimethylamino) benzophenone, 4-(dimethylamino) phenol, and other intermediate products. Eventually, malachite green was degraded into oxalic acid as a small molecular organic acid, which was degraded by processes such as demethylation, deamination, nitration, substitution, addition, and other reactions.

  6. Characterization of the novel dimethyl sulfide-degrading bacterium Alcaligenes sp. SY1 and its biochemical degradation pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yiming; Qiu, Jiguo; Chen, Dongzhi; Ye, Jiexu; Chen, Jianmeng, E-mail: jchen@zjut.edu.cn

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • A novel efficient DMS-degrading bacterium Alcaligenes sp. SY1 was identified. • A RSM was applied to optimize incubation condition of Alcaligenes sp. SY1. • SIP was applied as C{sup 13} labelled DMS to trace intermediates during DMS degradation. • Kinetics of DMS degradation via batch experiment was revealed. • Carbon and sulfur balance were analyzed during DMS degradation process. - Abstract: Recently, the biodegradation of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) has become a burgeoning field, with a growing focus on the reduction of VOSCs. The reduction of VOSCs encompasses both organic emission control and odor control. Herein, Alcaligenes sp. SY1 was isolated from active sludge and found to utilize dimethyl sulfide (DMS) as a growth substrate in a mineral salt medium. Response surface methodology (RSM) analysis was applied to optimize the incubation conditions. The following conditions for optimal degradation were identified: temperature 27.03 °C; pH 7.80; inoculum salinity 0.84%; and initial DMS concentration 1585.39 μM. Under these conditions, approximately 99% of the DMS was degraded within 30 h of incubation. Two metabolic compounds were detected and identified by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS): dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS). The DMS degradation kinetics for different concentrations were evaluated using the Haldane–Andrews model and the pseudo first-order model. The maximum specific growth rate and degradation rate of Alcaligenes sp. SY1 were 0.17 h{sup −1} and 0.63 gs gx{sup −1} h{sup −1}. A possible degradation pathway is proposed, and the results suggest that Alcaligenes sp. SY1 has the potential to control odor emissions under aerobic conditions.

  7. Disruption of lysosome function promotes tumor growth and metastasis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Congwu; Zhu, Huanhu; Han, Min; Zhuang, Yuan; Wu, Xiaohui; Xu, Tian

    2010-07-09

    Lysosome function is essential to many physiological processes. It has been suggested that deregulation of lysosome function could contribute to cancer. Through a genetic screen in Drosophila, we have discovered that mutations disrupting lysosomal degradation pathway components contribute to tumor development and progression. Loss-of-function mutations in the Class C vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) gene, deep orange (dor), dramatically promote tumor overgrowth and invasion of the Ras(V12) cells. Knocking down either of the two other components of the Class C VPS complex, carnation (car) and vps16A, also renders Ras(V12) cells capable for uncontrolled growth and metastatic behavior. Finally, chemical disruption of the lysosomal function by feeding animals with antimalarial drugs, chloroquine or monensin, leads to malignant tumor growth of the Ras(V12) cells. Taken together, our data provide evidence for a causative role of lysosome dysfunction in tumor growth and invasion and indicate that members of the Class C VPS complex behave as tumor suppressors.

  8. Structural determinants allowing endolysosomal sorting and degradation of endosomal GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Ruth A; Oeste, Clara L; Stamatakis, Konstantinos; Ramos, Irene; Herrera, Mónica; Boya, Patricia; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2010-09-01

    Rapid control of protein degradation is usually achieved through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. We recently found that the short-lived GTPase RhoB is degraded in lysosomes. Moreover, the fusion of the RhoB C-terminal sequence CINCCKVL, containing the isoprenylation and palmitoylation sites, to other proteins directs their sorting into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and rapid lysosomal degradation. Here, we show that this process is highly specific for RhoB. Alteration of late endosome lipid dynamics produced the accumulation of RhoB, but not of other endosomal GTPases, including Rab5, Rab7, Rab9 or Rab11, into enlarged MVB. Other isoprenylated and bipalmitoylated GTPases, such as H-Ras, Rap2A, Rap2B and TC10, were not accumulated into MVB and were stable. Remarkably, although TC10, which is highly homologous to RhoB, was stable, a sequence derived from its C-terminus (CINCCLIT) elicited MVB sorting and degradation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-chimeric protein. This led us to identify a cluster of basic amino acids (KKH) in the TC10 hypervariable region, constituting a secondary signal potentially involved in electrostatic interactions with membrane lipids. Mutation of this cluster allowed TC10 MVB sorting and degradation, whereas inserting it into RhoB hypervariable region rescued this protein from its lysosomal degradation pathway. These findings define a highly specific structural module for entering the MVB pathway and rapid lysosomal degradation.

  9. Dysregulation of protein degradation pathways may mediate the liver injury and phospholipidosis associated with a cationic amphiphilic antibiotic drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosedale, Merrie [Hamner-University of North Carolina Institute for Drug Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Wu, Hong [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT06340 (United States); Kurtz, C. Lisa [Hamner-University of North Carolina Institute for Drug Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Schmidt, Stephen P. [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT06340 (United States); Adkins, Karissa, E-mail: Karissa.Adkins@pfizer.com [Drug Safety Research and Development, Pfizer Global Research and Development, Groton, CT06340 (United States); Harrill, Alison H. [Hamner-University of North Carolina Institute for Drug Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR72205 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    A large number of antibiotics are known to cause drug-induced liver injury in the clinic; however, interpreting clinical risk is not straightforward owing to a lack of predictivity of the toxicity by standard preclinical species and a poor understanding of the mechanisms of toxicity. An example is PF-04287881, a novel ketolide antibiotic that caused elevations in liver function tests in Phase I clinical studies. In this study, a mouse diversity panel (MDP), comprised of 34 genetically diverse, inbred mouse strains, was utilized to model the toxicity observed with PF-04287881 treatment and investigate potential mechanisms that may mediate the liver response. Significant elevations in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in PF-04287881-treated animals relative to vehicle-treated controls were observed in the majority (88%) of strains tested following a seven day exposure. The average fold elevation in ALT varied by genetic background and correlated with microscopic findings of hepatocellular hypertrophy, hepatocellular single cell necrosis, and Kupffer cell vacuolation (confirmed as phospholipidosis) in the liver. Global liver mRNA expression was evaluated in a subset of four strains to identify transcript and pathway differences that distinguish susceptible mice from resistant mice in the context of PF-04287881 treatment. The protein ubiquitination pathway was highly enriched among genes associated with PF-04287881-induced hepatocellular necrosis. Expression changes associated with PF-04287881-induced phospholipidosis included genes involved in drug transport, phospholipid metabolism, and lysosomal function. The findings suggest that perturbations in genes involved in protein degradation leading to accumulation of oxidized proteins may mediate the liver injury induced by this drug. - Highlights: • Identified susceptible and resistant mouse strains to liver injury induced by a CAD • Liver injury characterized by single cell necrosis, and phospholipidosis

  10. PHOSPHOLIPIDS OF FIVE PSEUDOMONAD ARCHETYPES FOR DIFFERENT TOLUENE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS) was used to determine phospholipid profiles for five reference pseudomonad strains harboring distinct toluene catabolic pathways: Pseudomonas putida mt-2, Pseudomonas putida F1, Burkholderia cepacia G4, B...

  11. Metabolic pathways for degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons by bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ladino-Orjuela, G.; Gomes, E.; da Silva, R.; Salt, C.; Parsons, J.R.; de Voogt, W.P.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this revision was to build an updated collection of information focused on the mechanisms and elements involved in metabolic pathways of aromatic hydrocarbons by bacteria. Enzymes as an expression of the genetic load and the type of electron acceptor available, as an environmental factor,

  12. Pathways for degradation of plastic polymers floating in the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewert, Berit; Plassmann, Merle M; MacLeod, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    Each year vast amounts of plastic are produced worldwide. When released to the environment, plastics accumulate, and plastic debris in the world's oceans is of particular environmental concern. More than 60% of all floating debris in the oceans is plastic and amounts are increasing each year. Plastic polymers in the marine environment are exposed to sunlight, oxidants and physical stress, and over time they weather and degrade. The degradation processes and products must be understood to detect and evaluate potential environmental hazards. Some attention has been drawn to additives and persistent organic pollutants that sorb to the plastic surface, but so far the chemicals generated by degradation of the plastic polymers themselves have not been well studied from an environmental perspective. In this paper we review available information about the degradation pathways and chemicals that are formed by degradation of the six plastic types that are most widely used in Europe. We extrapolate that information to likely pathways and possible degradation products under environmental conditions found on the oceans' surface. The potential degradation pathways and products depend on the polymer type. UV-radiation and oxygen are the most important factors that initiate degradation of polymers with a carbon-carbon backbone, leading to chain scission. Smaller polymer fragments formed by chain scission are more susceptible to biodegradation and therefore abiotic degradation is expected to precede biodegradation. When heteroatoms are present in the main chain of a polymer, degradation proceeds by photo-oxidation, hydrolysis, and biodegradation. Degradation of plastic polymers can lead to low molecular weight polymer fragments, like monomers and oligomers, and formation of new end groups, especially carboxylic acids.

  13. Lysosomal proteolysis: effects of aging and insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromakova, I A; Konovalenko, O A

    2003-07-01

    Age-related characteristics of the effect of insulin on the activity of lysosomal proteolytic enzymes were studied. The relationship between the insulin effect on protein degradation and insulin degradation was analyzed. The effect of insulin on the activities of lysosomal enzymes was opposite in young and old rats (inhibitory in 3-month-old and stimulatory in 24-month-old animals). The activities of proteolytic enzymes were regulated by insulin in a glucose-independent manner: similar hypoglycemic effects of insulin in animals of different ages were accompanied by opposite changes in the activities of lysosomal enzymes. The inhibition of lysosomal enzymes by insulin in 3-month-old rats is consistent with a notion on the inhibitory effect of insulin on protein degradation. An opposite insulin effect in 24-month-old rats (i.e., stimulation of proteolytic activity by insulin) may be partly associated with attenuation of the degradation of insulin, resulting in disturbances in signaling that mediates the regulatory effects of insulin on protein degradation.

  14. 3'-5' RNA degradation pathways in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubas, Michal Szymon

    RNA synthesis and degradation are key steps in the regulation of gene expression in all living organisms. During the course of his PhD studies, Michal Lubas centred his research on the nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA turnover of both noncoding and coding RNAs in human cells. His proteomic studies...... of the cytoplasmic 3'-5' exoribonuclease hDIS3L2. Using low throughout and high throughput techniques, both in vivo and in vitro, he characterised the nuclease and disclosed the role of hDIS3L2 in cytoplasmic mRNA metabolism....

  15. Evolutions of microbial degradation pathways for parent xenobiotic and for its metabolites follow different schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Nyuk-Min; Chang, Chun-Shuo; Tsai, Shiu-Ching

    2012-09-01

    The pathways used by microorganisms for the metabolism of every xenobiotic substrate are specific. The catabolism of a xenobiotic goes through a series of intermediate steps and lower intermediates (metabolites) appear in sequence. The structure of the metabolites can be similar to the parents due to kinship. The purposes of this study were to examine if the degradation pathways that were developed for a parent xenobiotic are effective to degrade the parent's lower metabolites, and if the reverse is true. The xenobiotic substrates, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D, the parent xenobiotic) and its metabolite 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), were independently subjected to acclimation and degradation tests by the biomasses of mixed-culture activated sludge and a pure culture of Arthrobacter sp. Activated sludge and Arthrobacter sp. that were acclimated to 2,4-D effectively degraded 2,4-D and the lower metabolites of 2,4-D, typically 2,4-DCP. During the degradation of 2,4-D, accumulations of the lower metabolites of 2,4-D were not found. The degradation pathways acquired from acclimation to 2,4-D are effective for all the metabolites of 2,4-D. However, pathways acquired from acclimation to 2,4-DCP are not effective in the degradation of the parent 2,4-D. Microorganisms acclimated to 2,4-D evolve their degradation pathways by a scheme that is different from the scheme the microorganisms employ when they are acclimated to the metabolites of 2,4-D.

  16. Deletion of the highly conserved N-glycan at Asn260 of HIV-1 gp120 affects folding and lysosomal degradation of gp120, and results in loss of viral infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leen Mathys

    Full Text Available N-linked glycans covering the surface of the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 are of major importance for the correct folding of this glycoprotein. Of the, on average, 24 N-linked glycans present on gp120, the glycan at Asn260 was reported to be essential for the correct expression of gp120 and gp41 in the virus particle and deletion of the N260 glycan in gp120 heavily compromised virus infectivity. We show here that gp160 containing the N260Q mutation reaches the Golgi apparatus during biosynthesis. Using pulse-chase experiments with [35S] methionine/cysteine, we show that oxidative folding was slightly delayed in case of mutant N260Q gp160 and that CD4 binding was markedly compromised compared to wild-type gp160. In the search of compensatory mutations, we found a mutation in the V1/V2 loop of gp120 (S128N that could partially restore the infectivity of mutant N260Q gp120 virus. However, the mutation S128N did not enhance any of the above-mentioned processes so its underlying compensatory mechanism must be a conformational effect that does not affect CD4 binding per se. Finally, we show that mutant N260Q gp160 was cleaved to gp120 and gp41 to a much lower extent than wild-type gp160, and that it was subject of lysosomal degradation to a higher extent than wild-type gp160 showing a prominent role of this process in the breakdown of N260-glycan-deleted gp160, which could not be counteracted by the S128N mutation. Moreover, at least part of the wild-type or mutant gp160 that is normally targeted for lysosomal degradation reached a conformation that enabled CD4 binding.

  17. Photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue with a nanocomposite system: synthesis, photocatalysis and degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shengjie; Zhang, Lianyang; Pan, Guoxiang; Qian, Pingping; Ni, Zheming

    2015-02-21

    Three different composites, including a calcined FeOOH supported ZnAl layered double hydroxide (FeOOH-LDO), a calcined ZnAl layered double hydroxide (ZnAl-LDO) and a calcined ZnFeAl layered double hydroxide (ZnFeAl-LDO), were synthesized via a sol-gel method, and their activity for the visible light photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) was studied. The composites were characterized by PXRD, SEM, and BET techniques, confirming the formation of highly crystalline structures. The activity performance of MB degradation was in the following order: FeOOH-LDO (∼95%) > ZnFeAl-LDO (∼60%) > ZnAl-LDO (∼23%). In addition, a possible photocatalytic degradation reaction mechanism for MB was also proposed. Moreover, the frontier electron densities on the atoms of MB were calculated, which were in satisfactory agreement with the postulated mechanism.

  18. Aerobic Degradation of Dinitrotoluenes and Pathway for Bacterial Degradation of 2,6-Dinitrotoluene

    OpenAIRE

    Nishino, Shirley F.; Paoli, George C.; Spain, Jim C.

    2000-01-01

    An oxidative pathway for the mineralization of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) by Burkholderia sp. strain DNT has been reported previously. We report here the isolation of additional strains with the ability to mineralize 2,4-DNT by the same pathway and the isolation and characterization of bacterial strains that mineralize 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT) by a different pathway. Burkholderia cepacia strain JS850 and Hydrogenophaga palleronii strain JS863 grew on 2,6-DNT as the sole source of carbon...

  19. TRPML and lysosomal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevi, David A; Frumkin, Ayala; Bach, Gideon

    2007-08-01

    Mucolipin 1 (MLN1), also known as TRPML1, is a member of the mucolipin family. The mucolipins are the only lysosomal proteins within the TRP superfamily. Mutations in the gene coding for TRPML1 result in a lysosomal storage disorder (LSD). This review summarizes the current knowledge related to this protein and the rest of the mucolipin family.

  20. Regulation of protein degradation pathways by amino acids and insulin in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Agus Suryawan; Teresa ADavis

    2014-01-01

    Background:The rapid gain in lean mass in neonates requires greater rates of protein synthesis than degradation. We previously delineated the molecular mechanisms by which insulin and amino acids, especially leucine, modulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis and how this changes with development. In the current study, we identified mechanisms involved in protein degradation regulation. In experiment 1, 6-and 26-d-old pigs were studied during 1) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic, 2) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-hyperaminoacidemic, and 3) hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic clamps for 2 h. In experiment 2, 5-d-old pigs were studied during 1) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic-euleucinemic, 2) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-hypoaminoacidemic-hyperleucinemic, and 3) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic-hyperleucinemic clamps for 24 h. We determined in muscle indices of ubiquitin-proteasome, i.e., atrogin-1 (MAFbx) and muscle RING-finger protein-1 (MuRF1) and autophagy-lysosome systems, i.e., unc51-like kinase 1 (UKL1), microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), and lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (Lamp-2). For comparison, we measured ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) activation, components of translation initiation. Results:Abundance of atrogin-1, but not MuRF1, was greater in 26-than 6-d-old pigs and was not affected by insulin, amino acids, or leucine. Abundance of ULK1 and LC3 was higher in younger pigs and not affected by treatment. The LC3-II/LC3-I ratio was reduced and ULK1 phosphorylation increased by insulin, amino acids, and leucine. These responses were more profound in younger pigs. Abundance of Lamp-2 was not affected by treatment or development. Abundance of eIF4E, but not rpS6, was higher in 6-than 26-d-old-pigs but unaffected by treatment. Phosphorylation of eIF4E was not affected by treatment, however, insulin, amino acids, and leucine stimulated rpS6 phosphorylation, and the

  1. Degradation of streptomycin in aquatic environment: kinetics, pathway, and antibacterial activity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanru; Zhao, Wenyan; Zhang, Chunling; Shan, Yujie; Shi, Junxian

    2017-06-01

    Streptomycin used in human and veterinary medicine is released into the environment mainly through excretions. As such, its elimination in water should be investigated to control pollution. In this study, the degradation of streptomycin in water was studied, and the influence of variables, including light exposure, solution pH, temperature, ionic strength, dissolved organic matter (DOM), and coexisting surfactants, on degradation was investigated. Streptomycin degradation was consistent with the first-order model in aquatic environments. Its degradation rate under light exposure was 2.6-fold faster than that in the dark. Streptomycin was stable under neutral conditions, but it was easily decomposed in acidic and basic environments. Streptomycin degradation was enhanced by high temperature, and its half-life decreased from 103.4 days at 15 °C to 30.9 days at 40 °C. This process was also accelerated by the presence of Ca(2+) and slightly improved by the addition of HA. Streptomycin degradation was suppressed by high levels of the cationic surfactant cetyltri- methylammonium bromide (CTAB), but was promoted by the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS). The main degradation intermediates/products were identified through liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the possible degradation pathway was proposed. The antibacterial activity of streptomycin solution was also determined during degradation. Results showed that STR degradation generated intermediates/products with weaker antibacterial activity than the parent compound.

  2. Unveiling New Degradation Intermediates/Pathways from the Photocatalytic Degradation of Microcystin-LR

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study focuses on the identification of reaction intermediates formed during the photocatalytic degradation of the cyanotoxin microcystin-LR with immobilized TiO2 Tphotocatalysts at neutral pH. To differentiate between impurities already existing in the MC-LR stand...

  3. Transcriptional control of the autophagy-lysosome system in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Rushika M.; Stoykova, Svetlana; Nicolay, Brandon N.; Ross, Kenneth N.; Fitamant, Julien; Boukhali, Myriam; Lengrand, Justine; Deshpande, Vikram; Selig, Martin K.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Settleman, Jeff; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Dyson, Nicholas J.; Zoncu, Roberto; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Haas, Wilhelm; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2016-01-01

    Activation of cellular stress response pathways to maintain metabolic homeostasis is emerging as a critical growth and survival mechanism in many cancers1. The pathogenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) requires high levels of autophagy2–4, a conserved self-degradative process5. However, the regulatory circuits that activate autophagy and reprogram PDA cell metabolism are unknown. We now show that autophagy induction in PDA occurs as part of a broader transcriptional program that coordinates activation of lysosome biogenesis and function, and nutrient scavenging, mediated by the MiT/TFE family transcription factors. In PDA cells, the MiT/TFE proteins6 – MITF, TFE3 and TFEB – are decoupled from regulatory mechanisms that control their cytoplasmic retention. Increased nuclear import in turn drives the expression of a coherent network of genes that induce high levels of lysosomal catabolic function essential for PDA growth. Unbiased global metabolite profiling reveals that MiT/TFE-dependent autophagy-lysosomal activation is specifically required to maintain intracellular amino acid (AA) pools. These results identify the MiT/TFE transcription factors as master regulators of metabolic reprogramming in pancreatic cancer and demonstrate activation of clearance pathways converging on the lysosome as a novel hallmark of aggressive malignancy. PMID:26168401

  4. Rapid reversal of translational silencing: Emerging role of microRNA degradation pathways in neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiuping; Shah, Aparna; Baraban, Jay M

    2016-09-01

    As microRNAs silence translation, rapid reversal of this process has emerged as an attractive mechanism for driving de novo protein synthesis mediating neuronal plasticity. Herein, we summarize recent studies identifying neuronal stimuli that trigger rapid decreases in microRNA levels and reverse translational silencing of plasticity transcripts. Although these findings indicate that neuronal stimulation elicits rapid degradation of selected microRNAs, we are only beginning to decipher the molecular pathways involved. Accordingly, we present an overview of several molecular pathways implicated in mediating microRNA degradation: Lin-28, translin/trax, and MCPIP1. As these degradation pathways target distinct subsets of microRNAs, they enable neurons to reverse silencing rapidly, yet selectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Campylobacter jejuni cell lysates differently target mitochondria and lysosomes on HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, B; Campana, R; Luchetti, F; Arcangeletti, M; Betti, M; Cesarini, E; Ciacci, C; Vittoria, E; Galli, L; Papa, S; Baffone, W

    2014-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. The synthesis of cytolethal distending toxin appears essential in the infection process. In this work we evaluated the sequence of lethal events in HeLa cells exposed to cell lysates of two distinct strains, C. jejuni ATCC 33291 and C. jejuni ISS3. C. jejuni cell lysates (CCLys) were added to HeLa cell monolayers which were analysed to detect DNA content, death features, bcl-2 and p53 status, mitochondria/lysosomes network and finally, CD54 and CD59 alterations, compared to cell lysates of C. jejuni 11168H cdtA mutant. We found mitochondria and lysosomes differently targeted by these bacterial lysates. Death, consistent with apoptosis for C. jejuni ATCC 33291 lysate, occurred in a slow way (>48 h); concomitantly HeLa cells increase their endolysosomal compartment, as a consequence of toxin internalization besides a simultaneous and partial lysosomal destabilization. C. jejuni CCLys induces death in HeLa cells mainly via a caspase-dependent mechanism although a p53 lysosomal pathway (also caspase-independent) seems to appear in addition. In C. jejuni ISS3-treated cells, the p53-mediated oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components seems to be lost, inducing the deepest lysosomal alterations. Furthermore, CD59 considerably decreases, suggesting both a degradation or internalisation pathway. CCLys-treated HeLa cells increase CD54 expression on their surface, because of the action of lysate as its double feature of toxin and bacterial peptide. In conclusion, we revealed that C. jejuni CCLys-treated HeLa cells displayed different features, depending on the particular strain.

  6. ASSAYING OF AUTOPHAGIC PROTEIN DEGRADATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Bauvy; A.J. Meijer; P. Codogno

    2009-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a three-step process: (1) autophagosomes form and mature, (2) the autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes, and (3) the autophagic cargo is degraded in the lysosomes. It is this lysosomal degradation of the autophagic cargo that constitutes the autophagic flux. As in the case of metaboli

  7. RNAi screening for characterisation of ER-associated degradation pathways in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Mats David Joakim

    It is estimated that one third of all synthesized proteins in mammalian cells traverse the secretory pathway. Folding of proteins in the ER on their way to secretion is highly regulated. Proteins that are unable to achieve their native conformation are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system...... fluorescence-based RNAi screens in mammalian cells on TCR-α-GFP and HANSκLC, for identification of ERAD pathways. By validating the obtained screening hits we concluded that UBE2J2 is involved in TCR-α-GFP degradation, possibly by ubiquitination of C-terminal serine residues in TCR-α-GFP. Additionally, we also...

  8. Elucidation of pathways of ribosomal RNA degradation: an essential role for RNase E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulthana, Shaheen; Basturea, Georgeta N.; Deutscher, Murray P.

    2016-01-01

    Although normally stable in growing cells, ribosomal RNAs are degraded under conditions of stress, such as starvation, and in response to misassembled or otherwise defective ribosomes in a process termed RNA quality control. Previously, our laboratory found that large fragments of 16S and 23S rRNA accumulate in strains lacking the processive exoribonucleases RNase II, RNase R, and PNPase, implicating these enzymes in the later steps of rRNA breakdown. Here, we define the pathways of rRNA degradation in the quality control process and during starvation, and show that the essential endoribonuclease, RNase E, is required to make the initial cleavages in both degradative processes. We also present evidence that explains why the exoribonuclease, RNase PH, is required to initiate the degradation of rRNA during starvation. The data presented here provide the first detailed description of rRNA degradation in bacterial cells. PMID:27298395

  9. Secondary Lysosomal Changes in Liver in Preclinical Drug Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincent P. Meador; D. V. M.; Ph. D.; Diplomate ACVP

    2005-01-01

    @@ Lysosomes are intracytoplasmic membrane-bound organelles that function to degrade intracellular substances by enzymatic digestion. They occur normally in all cells, being especially prominent in phagocytic cells of the reticuloendothelial system.

  10. Identification and characterization of process-related substances and degradation products in apremilast: Process optimization and degradation pathway elucidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuting; Shen, Xiaoyue; Hang, Taijun; Song, Min

    2017-07-15

    This study aims at investigating the separation, identification and characterization of related substances in apremilast by LC-MS hyphenated techniques, as well as the synthesis optimization and the degradation pathways elucidation. Forced degradation studies were conducted under the ICH prescribed stress conditions. The chromatographic separation was achieved on XBridge C18 column (4.6mm×150mm, 3.5μm) using a mobile phase consisting of water adjusted to pH 3.0 with formic acid as solvent A and acetonitrile as solvent B in linear gradient elution program. Twelve related substances were detected all together in apremilast and its stress samples. Their structures were identified mainly through positive ESI high-resolution TOF-MS analysis of the parent ions' accurate masses and elemental compositions, and the corresponding MS/MS spectra elucidation. There were three process-related substances and nine degradation products, seven of them were first reported. Two degradation products and one process-related substance were further verified by semi-preparation and NMR determination. Their origins and formation mechanisms were also discussed, based on which effective approaches for the synthesis optimization were conducted. Therefore, the related substances investigation are valuable for apremilast manufacturing process optimization and quality control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Terrestrial and marine perspectives on modeling organic matter degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Adrian B; Frey, Serita; Cabre, Anna; Ito, Takamitsu; Levine, Naomi M; Lønborg, Christian; Long, Matthew; Mauritz, Marguerite; Thomas, R Quinn; Stephens, Brandon M; Vanwalleghem, Tom; Zeng, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Organic matter (OM) plays a major role in both terrestrial and oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The amount of carbon stored in these systems is far greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in the atmosphere, and annual fluxes of CO2 from these pools to the atmosphere exceed those from fossil fuel combustion. Understanding the processes that determine the fate of detrital material is important for predicting the effects that climate change will have on feedbacks to the global carbon cycle. However, Earth System Models (ESMs) typically utilize very simple formulations of processes affecting the mineralization and storage of detrital OM. Recent changes in our view of the nature of this material and the factors controlling its transformation have yet to find their way into models. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the role and cycling of detrital OM in terrestrial and marine systems and examine how this pool of material is represented in ESMs. We include a discussion of the different mineralization pathways available as organic matter moves from soils, through inland waters to coastal systems and ultimately into open ocean environments. We argue that there is strong commonality between aspects of OM transformation in both terrestrial and marine systems and that our respective scientific communities would benefit from closer collaboration.

  12. Degradation pathway of malachite green in a novel dual-tank photoelectrochemical catalytic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Zenghui; Li, Mingyu; Zeng, Fanyin; Song, Lin; Qiu, Rongliang

    2013-09-15

    A novel dual-tank photoelectrochemical catalytic reactor was designed to investigate the degradation pathway of malachite green. A thermally formed TiO₂/Ti thin film electrode was used as photoanode, graphite was used as cathode, and a saturated calomel electrode was employed as the reference electrode in the reactor. In the reactor, the anode and cathode tanks were connected by a cation exchange membrane. Results showed that the decolorization ratio of malachite green in the anode and cathode was 98.5 and 96.5% after 120 min, respectively. Malachite green in the two anode and cathode tanks was oxidized, achieving the bipolar double effect. Malachite green in both the anode and cathode tanks exhibited similar catalytic degradation pathways. The double bond of the malachite green molecule was attacked by strong oxidative hydroxyl radicals, after which the organic compound was degraded by the two pathways into 4,4-bis(dimethylamino) benzophenone, 4-(dimethylamino) benzophenone, 4-(dimethylamino) phenol, and other intermediate products. Eventually, malachite green was degraded into oxalic acid as a small molecular organic acid, which was degraded by processes such as demethylation, deamination, nitration, substitution, addition, and other reactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Degradation of oxcarbazepine by UV-activated persulfate oxidation: kinetics, mechanisms, and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Lingjun; Zhou, Shiqing; Shi, Zhou; Deng, Lin; Li, Guangchao; Yi, Qihang; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-02-01

    The degradation kinetics and mechanism of the antiepileptic drug oxcarbazepine (OXC) by UV-activated persulfate oxidation were investigated in this study. Results showed that UV/persulfate (UV/PS) process appeared to be more effective in degrading OXC than UV or PS alone. The OXC degradation exhibited a pseudo-first order kinetics pattern and the degradation rate constants (k obs) were affected by initial OXC concentration, PS dosage, initial pH, and humic acid concentration to different degrees. It was found that low initial OXC concentration, high persulfate dosage, and initial pH enhanced the OXC degradation. Additionally, the presence of humic acid in the solution could greatly inhibit the degradation of OXC. Moreover, hydroxyl radical (OH•) and sulfate radical (SO4 (-)••) were identified to be responsible for OXC degradation and SO4 (-)• made the predominant contribution in this study. Finally, major intermediate products were identified and a preliminary degradation pathway was proposed. Results demonstrated that UV/PS system is a potential technology to control the water pollution caused by emerging contaminants such as OXC.

  14. A second pathway to degrade pyrimidine nucleic acid precursors in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gorm; Bjornberg, Olof; Polakova, Silvia;

    2008-01-01

    Pyrimidine bases are the central precursors for RNA and DNA, and their intracellular pools are determined by de novo, salvage and catabolic pathways. In eukaryotes, degradation of uracil has been believed to proceed only via the reduction to dihydrouracil. Using a yeast model, Saccharomyces kluyv...

  15. Kinetic models and pathways of ronidazole degradation by chlorination, UV irradiation and UV/chlorine processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lang; Lin, Yi-Li; Xu, Bin; Hu, Chen-Yan; Tian, Fu-Xiang; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Zhu, Wen-Qian; Huang, He; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2014-11-15

    Degradation kinetics and pathways of ronidazole (RNZ) by chlorination (Cl2), UV irradiation and combined UV/chlorine processes were investigated in this paper. The degradation kinetics of RNZ chlorination followed a second-order behavior with the rate constants calculated as (2.13 ± 0.15) × 10(2) M(-2) s(-1), (0.82 ± 0.52) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1) and (2.06 ± 0.09) × 10(-1) M(-1) s(-1) for the acid-catalyzed reaction, as well as the reactions of RNZ with HOCl and OCl(-), respectively. Although UV irradiation degraded RNZ more effectively than chlorination did, very low quantum yield of RNZ at 254 nm was obtained as 1.02 × 10(-3) mol E(-1). RNZ could be efficiently degraded and mineralized in the UV/chlorine process due to the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The second-order rate constant between RNZ and hydroxyl radical was determined as (2.92 ± 0.05) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The degradation intermediates of RNZ during the three processes were identified with Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography - Electrospray Ionization - mass spectrometry and the degradation pathways were then proposed. Moreover, the variation of chloropicrin (TCNM) and chloroform (CF) formation after the three processes were further evaluated. Enhanced formation of CF and TCNM precursors during UV/chlorine process deserves extensive attention in drinking water treatment.

  16. Modelling pathways to Rubisco degradation: a structural equation network modelling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Tétard-Jones

    Full Text Available 'Omics analysis (transcriptomics, proteomics quantifies changes in gene/protein expression, providing a snapshot of changes in biochemical pathways over time. Although tools such as modelling that are needed to investigate the relationships between genes/proteins already exist, they are rarely utilised. We consider the potential for using Structural Equation Modelling to investigate protein-protein interactions in a proposed Rubisco protein degradation pathway using previously published data from 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry proteome analysis. These informed the development of a prior model that hypothesised a pathway of Rubisco Large Subunit and Small Subunit degradation, producing both primary and secondary degradation products. While some of the putative pathways were confirmed by the modelling approach, the model also demonstrated features that had not been originally hypothesised. We used Bayesian analysis based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation to generate output statistics suggesting that the model had replicated the variation in the observed data due to protein-protein interactions. This study represents an early step in the development of approaches that seek to enable the full utilisation of information regarding the dynamics of biochemical pathways contained within proteomics data. As these approaches gain attention, they will guide the design and conduct of experiments that enable 'Omics modelling to become a common place practice within molecular biology.

  17. New hydrocarbon degradation pathways in the microbial metagenome from Brazilian petroleum reservoirs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Natalia Sierra-García

    Full Text Available Current knowledge of the microbial diversity and metabolic pathways involved in hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum reservoirs is still limited, mostly due to the difficulty in recovering the complex community from such an extreme environment. Metagenomics is a valuable tool to investigate the genetic and functional diversity of previously uncultured microorganisms in natural environments. Using a function-driven metagenomic approach, we investigated the metabolic abilities of microbial communities in oil reservoirs. Here, we describe novel functional metabolic pathways involved in the biodegradation of aromatic compounds in a metagenomic library obtained from an oil reservoir. Although many of the deduced proteins shared homology with known enzymes of different well-described aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways, the metagenomic fragments did not contain the complete clusters known to be involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Instead, the metagenomic fragments comprised genes belonging to different pathways, showing novel gene arrangements. These results reinforce the potential of the metagenomic approach for the identification and elucidation of new genes and pathways in poorly studied environments and contribute to a broader perspective on the hydrocarbon degradation processes in petroleum reservoirs.

  18. New Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Microbial Metagenome from Brazilian Petroleum Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-García, Isabel Natalia; Correa Alvarez, Javier; Pantaroto de Vasconcellos, Suzan; Pereira de Souza, Anete; dos Santos Neto, Eugenio Vaz; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial diversity and metabolic pathways involved in hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum reservoirs is still limited, mostly due to the difficulty in recovering the complex community from such an extreme environment. Metagenomics is a valuable tool to investigate the genetic and functional diversity of previously uncultured microorganisms in natural environments. Using a function-driven metagenomic approach, we investigated the metabolic abilities of microbial communities in oil reservoirs. Here, we describe novel functional metabolic pathways involved in the biodegradation of aromatic compounds in a metagenomic library obtained from an oil reservoir. Although many of the deduced proteins shared homology with known enzymes of different well-described aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways, the metagenomic fragments did not contain the complete clusters known to be involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Instead, the metagenomic fragments comprised genes belonging to different pathways, showing novel gene arrangements. These results reinforce the potential of the metagenomic approach for the identification and elucidation of new genes and pathways in poorly studied environments and contribute to a broader perspective on the hydrocarbon degradation processes in petroleum reservoirs. PMID:24587220

  19. Tissue factor pathway inhibitor relates to fibrin degradation in patients with acute deep venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidelmann, Johannes J; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Gram, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Reduced concentration of tissue factor pathway inhibitor is a risk factor for development of deep venous thrombosis, whereas elevated concentrations of tissue factor pathway inhibitor are observed in patients with acute myocardial infarction and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Presently, we...... studied the association between inflammation, endothelial cell perturbation, fibrin degradation and the concentration of tissue factor pathway inhibitor in patients suspected for acute deep venous thrombosis. We determined the tissue factor pathway inhibitor -33T/C polymorphism, free and total tissue...... factor pathway inhibitor, C-reactive protein, von Willebrand factor and D-Dimer in 160 consecutive patients admitted to hospital with a tentative diagnosis of acute deep venous thrombosis. Deep venous thrombosis was identified in 57 patients (18 distal and 39 proximal). The distribution of the tissue...

  20. Bacterial community structure and predicted alginate metabolic pathway in an alginate-degrading bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Akihisa; Miura, Toyokazu; Kawata, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Okamura, Yoshiko; Aki, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yukihiko; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Methane fermentation is one of the effective approaches for utilization of brown algae; however, this process is limited by the microbial capability to degrade alginate, a main polysaccharide found in these algae. Despite its potential, little is known about anaerobic microbial degradation of alginate. Here we constructed a bacterial consortium able to anaerobically degrade alginate. Taxonomic classification of 16S rRNA gene, based on high-throughput sequencing data, revealed that this consortium included two dominant strains, designated HUA-1 and HUA-2; these strains were related to Clostridiaceae bacterium SK082 (99%) and Dysgonomonas capnocytophagoides (95%), respectively. Alginate lyase activity and metagenomic analyses, based on high-throughput sequencing data, revealed that this bacterial consortium possessed putative genes related to a predicted alginate metabolic pathway. However, HUA-1 and 2 did not grow on agar medium with alginate by using roll-tube method, suggesting the existence of bacterial interactions like symbiosis for anaerobic alginate degradation.

  1. Degradation kinetics and pathway of phenol by Pseudomonas and Bacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Syed Adnan; Jabeen, Suraiya

    2015-01-02

    This article elucidates that strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa (IES-Ps-1) is a versatile toxic organic compound degrader. With the degradation of malathion and cypermethrin (studied by other researchers previously), this strain was able to degrade phenol. Two other indigenous soil flora (i.e., Pseudomonas sp. (IES-S) and Bacillus subtilis (IES-B)) were also found to be potential phenol degraders. Phenol was degraded with Monod kinetics during growth in nutrient broth and mineral salts medium. Before entering into the growth inhibition phase, strains IES-Ps-1, IES-S and IES-B could tolerate up to 400, 700 and 500 mg/L phenol, respectively, when contained in nutrient broth. However, according to the Luong-Levenspiel model, the growth of strains IES-Ps-1, IES-S and IES-B would cease at 2000, 2174 and 2190 mg/L phenol, respectively. Strain IES-Ps-1 degraded 700, 900 and 1050 mg/L phenol contained in mineral salts medium with the specific rates of 0.034, 0.075 and 0.021 h(-1), respectively. All these strains grew by making clusters when exposed to phenol in order to prevent damages due to high substrate concentration. These strains transformed phenol into catechol, which was then degraded via ortho-cleavage pathway.

  2. Nuclear mRNA degradation pathway(s are implicated in Xist regulation and X chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Ciaudo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical step in X-chromosome inactivation (XCI, which results in the dosage compensation of X-linked gene expression in mammals, is the coating of the presumptive inactive X chromosome by the large noncoding Xist RNA, which then leads to the recruitment of other factors essential for the heterochromatinisation of the inactive X and its transcriptional silencing. In an approach aimed at identifying genes implicated in the X-inactivation process by comparative transcriptional profiling of female and male mouse gastrula, we identified the Eif1 gene involved in translation initiation and RNA degradation. We show here that female embryonic stem cell lines, silenced by RNA interference for the Eif1 gene, are unable to form Xist RNA domains upon differentiation and fail to undergo X-inactivation. To probe further an effect involving RNA degradation pathways, the inhibition by RNA interference of Rent1, a factor essential for nonsense-mediated decay and Exosc10, a specific nuclear component of the exosome, was analysed and shown to similarly impair Xist upregulation and XCI. In Eif1-, Rent1-, and Exosc10-interfered clones, Xist spliced form(s are strongly downregulated, while the levels of unspliced form(s of Xist and the stability of Xist RNA remain comparable to that of the control cell lines. Our data suggests a role for mRNA nuclear degradation pathways in the critical regulation of spliced Xist mRNA levels and the onset of the X-inactivation process.

  3. Autophagy-Independent Lysosomal Targeting Regulated by ULK1/2-FIP200 and ATG9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Goodwin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron is vital for many homeostatic processes, and its liberation from ferritin nanocages occurs in the lysosome. Studies indicate that ferritin and its binding partner nuclear receptor coactivator-4 (NCOA4 are targeted to lysosomes by a form of selective autophagy. By using genome-scale functional screening, we identify an alternative lysosomal transport pathway for ferritin that requires FIP200, ATG9A, VPS34, and TAX1BP1 but lacks involvement of the ATG8 lipidation machinery that constitutes classical macroautophagy. TAX1BP1 binds directly to NCOA4 and is required for lysosomal trafficking of ferritin under basal and iron-depleted conditions. Under basal conditions ULK1/2-FIP200 controls ferritin turnover, but its deletion leads to TAX1BP1-dependent activation of TBK1 that regulates redistribution of ATG9A to the Golgi enabling continued trafficking of ferritin. Cells expressing an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-associated TBK1 allele are incapable of degrading ferritin suggesting a molecular mechanism that explains the presence of iron deposits in patient brain biopsies.

  4. Regulation of HIV-Gag expression and targeting to the endolysosomal/secretory pathway by the luminal domain of lysosomal-associated membrane protein (LAMP-1 enhance Gag-specific immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Maciel da Costa Godinho

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that a DNA vaccine encoding HIV-p55gag in association with the lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1 elicited a greater Gag-specific immune response, in comparison to a DNA encoding the native gag. In vitro studies have also demonstrated that LAMP/Gag was highly expressed and was present in MHCII containing compartments in transfected cells. In this study, the mechanisms involved in these processes and the relative contributions of the increased expression and altered traffic for the enhanced immune response were addressed. Cells transfected with plasmid DNA constructs containing p55gag attached to truncated sequences of LAMP-1 showed that the increased expression of gag mRNA required p55gag in frame with at least 741 bp of the LAMP-1 luminal domain. LAMP luminal domain also showed to be essential for Gag traffic through lysosomes and, in this case, the whole sequence was required. Further analysis of the trafficking pathway of the intact LAMP/Gag chimera demonstrated that it was secreted, at least in part, associated with exosome-like vesicles. Immunization of mice with LAMP/gag chimeric plasmids demonstrated that high expression level alone can induce a substantial transient antibody response, but targeting of the antigen to the endolysosomal/secretory pathways was required for establishment of cellular and memory response. The intact LAMP/gag construct induced polyfunctional CD4+ T cell response, which presence at the time of immunization was required for CD8+ T cell priming. LAMP-mediated targeting to endolysosomal/secretory pathway is an important new mechanistic element in LAMP-mediated enhanced immunity with applications to the development of novel anti-HIV vaccines and to general vaccinology field.

  5. Regulation of HIV-Gag expression and targeting to the endolysosomal/secretory pathway by the luminal domain of lysosomal-associated membrane protein (LAMP-1) enhance Gag-specific immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Rodrigo Maciel da Costa; Matassoli, Flavio Lemos; Lucas, Carolina Gonçalves de Oliveira; Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Gonçalves, Jorge Luiz Santos; Sato, Maria Notomi; Maciel, Milton; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; August, J Thomas; Marques, Ernesto Torres de Azevedo; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a DNA vaccine encoding HIV-p55gag in association with the lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) elicited a greater Gag-specific immune response, in comparison to a DNA encoding the native gag. In vitro studies have also demonstrated that LAMP/Gag was highly expressed and was present in MHCII containing compartments in transfected cells. In this study, the mechanisms involved in these processes and the relative contributions of the increased expression and altered traffic for the enhanced immune response were addressed. Cells transfected with plasmid DNA constructs containing p55gag attached to truncated sequences of LAMP-1 showed that the increased expression of gag mRNA required p55gag in frame with at least 741 bp of the LAMP-1 luminal domain. LAMP luminal domain also showed to be essential for Gag traffic through lysosomes and, in this case, the whole sequence was required. Further analysis of the trafficking pathway of the intact LAMP/Gag chimera demonstrated that it was secreted, at least in part, associated with exosome-like vesicles. Immunization of mice with LAMP/gag chimeric plasmids demonstrated that high expression level alone can induce a substantial transient antibody response, but targeting of the antigen to the endolysosomal/secretory pathways was required for establishment of cellular and memory response. The intact LAMP/gag construct induced polyfunctional CD4+ T cell response, which presence at the time of immunization was required for CD8+ T cell priming. LAMP-mediated targeting to endolysosomal/secretory pathway is an important new mechanistic element in LAMP-mediated enhanced immunity with applications to the development of novel anti-HIV vaccines and to general vaccinology field.

  6. Regulation of HIV-Gag Expression and Targeting to the Endolysosomal/Secretory Pathway by the Luminal Domain of Lysosomal-Associated Membrane Protein (LAMP-1) Enhance Gag-Specific Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Carolina Gonçalves de Oliveira; Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Gonçalves, Jorge Luiz Santos; Sato, Maria Notomi; Maciel, Milton; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; August, J. Thomas; de Azevedo Marques, Ernesto Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a DNA vaccine encoding HIV-p55gag in association with the lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) elicited a greater Gag-specific immune response, in comparison to a DNA encoding the native gag. In vitro studies have also demonstrated that LAMP/Gag was highly expressed and was present in MHCII containing compartments in transfected cells. In this study, the mechanisms involved in these processes and the relative contributions of the increased expression and altered traffic for the enhanced immune response were addressed. Cells transfected with plasmid DNA constructs containing p55gag attached to truncated sequences of LAMP-1 showed that the increased expression of gag mRNA required p55gag in frame with at least 741 bp of the LAMP-1 luminal domain. LAMP luminal domain also showed to be essential for Gag traffic through lysosomes and, in this case, the whole sequence was required. Further analysis of the trafficking pathway of the intact LAMP/Gag chimera demonstrated that it was secreted, at least in part, associated with exosome-like vesicles. Immunization of mice with LAMP/gag chimeric plasmids demonstrated that high expression level alone can induce a substantial transient antibody response, but targeting of the antigen to the endolysosomal/secretory pathways was required for establishment of cellular and memory response. The intact LAMP/gag construct induced polyfunctional CD4+ T cell response, which presence at the time of immunization was required for CD8+ T cell priming. LAMP-mediated targeting to endolysosomal/secretory pathway is an important new mechanistic element in LAMP-mediated enhanced immunity with applications to the development of novel anti-HIV vaccines and to general vaccinology field. PMID:24932692

  7. Metagenomic identification of bacterioplankton taxa and pathways involved in microcystin degradation in lake erie.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Mou

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial harmful blooms (CyanoHABs that produce microcystins are appearing in an increasing number of freshwater ecosystems worldwide, damaging quality of water for use by human and aquatic life. Heterotrophic bacteria assemblages are thought to be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments. However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge gap, we compared the metagenomes of Lake Erie free-living bacterioplankton assemblages in laboratory microcosms amended with microcystins relative to unamended controls. A diverse array of bacterial phyla were responsive to elevated supply of microcystins, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subdivisions and Verrucomicrobia. At more detailed taxonomic levels, Methylophilales (mainly in genus Methylotenera and Burkholderiales (mainly in genera Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Polaromonas, Ralstonia, Polynucleobacter and Variovorax of Betaproteobacteria were suggested to be more important in microcystin degradation than Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria. The latter taxa were previously thought to be major microcystin degraders. Homologs to known microcystin-degrading genes (mlr were not overrepresented in microcystin-amended metagenomes, indicating that Lake Erie bacterioplankton might employ alternative genes and/or pathways in microcystin degradation. Genes for xenobiotic metabolism were overrepresented in microcystin-amended microcosms, suggesting they are important in bacterial degradation of microcystin, a phenomenon that has been identified previously only in eukaryotic systems.

  8. Degradation kinetics and pathways of three calcium channel blockers under UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bing; Zonja, Bozo; Gonzalez, Oscar; Sans, Carme; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damia; Esplugas, Santiago; Xu, Ke; Qiang, Zhimin

    2015-12-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are a group of pharmaceuticals widely prescribed to lower blood pressure and treat heart diseases. They have been frequently detected in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents and downstream river waters, thus inducing a potential risk to aquatic ecosystems. However, little is known about the behavior and fate of CCBs under UV irradiation, which has been adopted as a primary disinfection method for WWTP effluents. This study investigated the degradation kinetics and pathways of three commonly-used CCBs, including amlodipine (AML), diltiazem (DIL), and verapamil (VER), under UV (254 nm) irradiation. The chemical structures of transformation byproducts (TBPs) were first identified to assess the potential ecological hazards. On that basis, a generic solid-phase extraction method, which simultaneously used four different cartridges, was adopted to extract and enrich the TBPs. Thereafter, the photo-degradation of target CCBs was performed under UV fluences typical for WWTP effluent disinfection. The degradation of all three CCBs conformed to the pseudo-first-order kinetics, with rate constants of 0.031, 0.044 and 0.011 min(-1) for AML, DIL and VER, respectively. By comparing the MS(2) fragments and the evolution (i.e., formation or decay) trends of identified TBPs, the degradation pathways were proposed. In the WWTP effluent, although the target CCBs could be degraded, several TBPs still contained the functional pharmacophores and reached peak concentrations under UV fluences of 40-100 mJ cm(-2).

  9. Metagenomic identification of bacterioplankton taxa and pathways involved in microcystin degradation in lake erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Xiaozhen; Lu, Xinxin; Jacob, Jisha; Sun, Shulei; Heath, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful blooms (CyanoHABs) that produce microcystins are appearing in an increasing number of freshwater ecosystems worldwide, damaging quality of water for use by human and aquatic life. Heterotrophic bacteria assemblages are thought to be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments. However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge gap, we compared the metagenomes of Lake Erie free-living bacterioplankton assemblages in laboratory microcosms amended with microcystins relative to unamended controls. A diverse array of bacterial phyla were responsive to elevated supply of microcystins, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subdivisions and Verrucomicrobia. At more detailed taxonomic levels, Methylophilales (mainly in genus Methylotenera) and Burkholderiales (mainly in genera Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Polaromonas, Ralstonia, Polynucleobacter and Variovorax) of Betaproteobacteria were suggested to be more important in microcystin degradation than Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria. The latter taxa were previously thought to be major microcystin degraders. Homologs to known microcystin-degrading genes (mlr) were not overrepresented in microcystin-amended metagenomes, indicating that Lake Erie bacterioplankton might employ alternative genes and/or pathways in microcystin degradation. Genes for xenobiotic metabolism were overrepresented in microcystin-amended microcosms, suggesting they are important in bacterial degradation of microcystin, a phenomenon that has been identified previously only in eukaryotic systems.

  10. Kinetics and pathways of cyanide degradation at high temperatures and pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulego, Paula; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2013-02-05

    The degradation of cyanide was performed in a 1-L semibatch reactor at temperatures between 393 and 473 K and at total pressures in the range of 2.0-8.0 MPa. The initial pH of the solution was set at 11, whereas initial concentrations ranged from 3.85 to 25 mM, which resemble the typical concentrations of cyanide-containing wastewater. The change with time of cyanide concentration, intermediates, and final products was analyzed in order to elucidate the reaction pathways. The experimental results suggest two parallel pathways of alkaline hydrolysis for the degradation of the pollutant. Formate and ammonia were identified as the final reaction products for one of the pathways, whereas carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and hydrogen were considered to be the final products for the other one. The degradation reaction results were fitted to first-order kinetic equations with respect to cyanide, giving respectively activation energies of 108.2 ± 3.3 and 77.6 ± 3.0 kJ/mol. Consequently, the formation of formate and ammonia is favored at high temperatures, whereas low temperatures favored the pathway leading to the formation of carbon dioxide and nitrogen.

  11. NIR is degraded by the anaphase-promoting complex proteasome pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Ho Myong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel INHAT Repressor (NIR is a histone acetylation inhibitor that can directly bind histone complexes and the tumor suppressors p53 and p63. Because NIR is mainly localized in the nucleolus and disappears from the nucleolus upon RNase treatment, it is thought to bind RNA or ribonucleoproteins. When NIR moves to the cytoplasm, it is immediately degraded; this degradation was blocked by MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. Furthermore, the central domain of NIR specifically bound APC-CCdh1. These data show that the stability of NIR is governed by the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway.

  12. Repetitive stimulation of autophagy-lysosome machinery by intermittent fasting preconditions the myocardium to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godar, Rebecca J; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Murphy, John T; Weinheimer, Carla J; Kovacs, Attila; Crosby, Seth D; Saftig, Paul; Diwan, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal degradative pathway, is potently stimulated in the myocardium by fasting and is essential for maintaining cardiac function during prolonged starvation. We tested the hypothesis that intermittent fasting protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury via transcriptional stimulation of the autophagy-lysosome machinery. Adult C57BL/6 mice subjected to 24-h periods of fasting, every other day, for 6 wk were protected from in-vivo ischemia-reperfusion injury on a fed day, with marked reduction in infarct size in both sexes as compared with nonfasted controls. This protection was lost in mice heterozygous null for Lamp2 (coding for lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2), which demonstrate impaired autophagy in response to fasting with accumulation of autophagosomes and SQSTM1, an autophagy substrate, in the heart. In lamp2 null mice, intermittent fasting provoked progressive left ventricular dilation, systolic dysfunction and hypertrophy; worsening cardiomyocyte autophagosome accumulation and lack of protection to ischemia-reperfusion injury, suggesting that intact autophagy-lysosome machinery is essential for myocardial homeostasis during intermittent fasting and consequent ischemic cardioprotection. Fasting and refeeding cycles resulted in transcriptional induction followed by downregulation of autophagy-lysosome genes in the myocardium. This was coupled with fasting-induced nuclear translocation of TFEB (transcription factor EB), a master regulator of autophagy-lysosome machinery; followed by rapid decline in nuclear TFEB levels with refeeding. Endogenous TFEB was essential for attenuation of hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced cell death by repetitive starvation, in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, in-vitro. Taken together, these data suggest that TFEB-mediated transcriptional priming of the autophagy-lysosome machinery mediates the beneficial effects of fasting-induced autophagy in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  13. [Degradation of L-phenylalanine and of aromatic carboxylic acids by chloridazon-degrading bacteria. Combination of side chain degradation and dioxygenase pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegst, W; Lingens, F

    1981-09-01

    Strain N of Chloridazon-degrading bacteria degrades phenylalanine via cis-2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyphenylalanine,2,3-dihydroxyphenylalanine aspartate and 4-hydroxy-2-oxovalerate [Hoppe-Seyler's Z. Physiol. Chem. 360, 957--969, (1979); Biochem. J. 194, 679--684 (1981)]. cis-2,3-Dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 2,3-dihydroxyphenylalanine as well as phenylpyruvate, cis-2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyphenylpyruvate, 2,3-dihydroxyphenylpyruvate, cis-2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyphenylacetate, 2,3-dihydroxyphenylacetate and 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde are detectable in the medium of strain E during growth on phenylalanine. Incubation with phenylacetate, 3-phenylpropionate or 4-phenylbutyrate leads to the accumulation of the corresponding cis-2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxyphenyl derivatives. These compounds are transformed with dihydrodiol dehydrogenase to 2,3-dihydroxyphenylacetate, 3-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)propionate and 4-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)-butyrate, 3-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)propionate is attacked by a catechol 2,3-dioxygenase and the meta-cleavage product is again cleaved by a hydrolase yielding succinate. In a similar reaction sequence the degradation of 4-phenylbutyrate leads to the formation of glutarate. From the growth medium of strain E on phenylacetate also small amounts of 2-, 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetate were isolated. Resting cells were shown to metabolize 3- and 4-hydroxyphenylacetate via homogentisate and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetate. In the culture medium of strain K2AP benzoate could be detected. Pathways for the degradation of phenylalanine and aromatic carboxylic acids in chloridazon degrading bacteria are proposed.

  14. Degradation of 4-nitrocatechol by Burkholderia cepacia: a plasmid-encoded novel pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, A; Samanta, S K; Jain, R K

    2000-05-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia RKJ200 (now described as Burkholderia cepacia) has been shown to utilize p-nitrophenol (PNP) as sole carbon and energy source. The present work demonstrates that RKJ200 utilizes 4-nitrocatechol (NC) as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen and energy, and is degraded with concomitant release of nitrite ions. Several lines of evidence, including thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, spectral analyses and quantification of intermediates by high performance liquid chromatography, have shown that NC is degraded via 1,2, 4-benzenetriol (BT) and hydroquinone (HQ) formation. Studies carried out on a PNP- derivative and a PNP+ transconjugant also demonstrate that the genes for the NC degradative pathway reside on the plasmid present in RKJ200; the same plasmid had earlier been shown to encode genes for PNP degradation, which is also degraded via HQ formation. It is likely, therefore, that the same sets of genes encode the further metabolism of HQ in NC and PNP degradation.

  15. New metabolic pathway for degradation of 2-nitrobenzoate by Arthrobacter sp. SPG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar Arora

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthrobacter sp. SPG utilized 2-nitrobenzoate as its sole source of carbon and energy and degraded it with accumulation of stoichiometric amounts of nitrite ions. Salicylate and catechol were detected as metabolites of the 2-nitrobenzoate degradation using high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Enzyme activities for 2-nitrobenzoate-2-monooxygenase, salicylate hydroxylase, and catechol-1,2-dioxygenase were detected in the crude extracts of the 2-nitrobenzoate-induced cells of strain SPG. The 2-nitrobenzoate-monooxygenase activity resulted in formation of salicylate and nitrite from 2-nitrobenzoate whereas salicylate hydroxylase catalyzed the conversion of salicylate to catechol. The ring-cleaving enzyme, catechol-1,2-dioxygenase cleaved catechol to cis, cis-muconic acid. Cells of strain SPG were able to degrade 2-nitrobenzoate in sterile as well as non-sterile soil microcosms. The results of microcosm studies showed that strain SPG degraded more than 90% of 2-nitrobenzoate within 10-12 days. This study clearly shows that Arthrobacter sp. SPG degraded 2-nitrobenzoate via a new pathway with formation of salicylate and catechol as metabolites. Arthrobacter sp. SPG may be used for bioremediation of 2-nitrobenzoate-contaminated sites due to its ability to degrade 2-nitrobenzoate in soil.

  16. New metabolic pathway for degradation of 2-nitrobenzoate by Arthrobacter sp. SPG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Pankaj K.; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. SPG utilized 2-nitrobenzoate as its sole source of carbon and energy and degraded it with accumulation of stoichiometric amounts of nitrite ions. Salicylate and catechol were detected as metabolites of the 2-nitrobenzoate degradation using high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Enzyme activities for 2-nitrobenzoate-2-monooxygenase, salicylate hydroxylase, and catechol-1,2-dioxygenase were detected in the crude extracts of the 2-nitrobenzoate-induced cells of strain SPG. The 2-nitrobenzoate-monooxygenase activity resulted in formation of salicylate and nitrite from 2-nitrobenzoate, whereas salicylate hydroxylase catalyzed the conversion of salicylate to catechol. The ring-cleaving enzyme, catechol-1,2-dioxygenase cleaved catechol to cis,cis-muconic acid. Cells of strain SPG were able to degrade 2-nitrobenzoate in sterile as well as non-sterile soil microcosms. The results of microcosm studies showed that strain SPG degraded more than 90% of 2-nitrobenzoate within 10–12 days. This study clearly shows that Arthrobacter sp. SPG degraded 2-nitrobenzoate via a new pathway with formation of salicylate and catechol as metabolites. Arthrobacter sp. SPG may be used for bioremediation of 2-nitrobenzoate-contaminated sites due to its ability to degrade 2-nitrobenzoate in soil. PMID:26082768

  17. Actin-binding protein coronin 1A controls osteoclastic bone resorption by regulating lysosomal secretion of cathepsin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmae, Saori; Noma, Naruto; Toyomoto, Masayasu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Takeiri, Masatoshi; Fuji, Hiroaki; Takemoto, Kenji; Iwaisako, Keiko; Fujita, Tomoko; Takeda, Norihiko; Kawatani, Makoto; Aoyama, Mineyoshi; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Ishihama, Yasushi; Asagiri, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Osteoclasts degrade bone matrix proteins via the secretion of lysosomal enzymes. However, the precise mechanisms by which lysosomal components are transported and fused to the bone-apposed plasma membrane, termed ruffled border membrane, remain elusive. Here, we identified coronin 1A as a negative regulator of exocytotic release of cathepsin K, one of the most important bone-degrading enzymes in osteoclasts. The modulation of coronin 1A expression did not alter osteoclast differentiation and extracellular acidification, but strongly affected the secretion of cathepsin K and osteoclast bone-resorption activity, suggesting the coronin 1A-mediated regulation of lysosomal trafficking and protease exocytosis. Further analyses suggested that coronin 1A prevented the lipidation-mediated sorting of the autophagy-related protein LC3 to the ruffled border and attenuated lysosome–plasma membrane fusion. In this process, the interactions between coronin 1A and actin were crucial. Collectively, our findings indicate that coronin 1A is a pivotal component that regulates lysosomal fusion and the secretion pathway in osteoclast-lineage cells and may provide a novel therapeutic target for bone diseases. PMID:28300073

  18. Lysosomal enzymes and their receptors in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nadimpalli Siva; Bhamidimarri, Poorna M

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal biogenesis is an important process in eukaryotic cells to maintain cellular homeostasis. The key components that are involved in the biogenesis such as the lysosomal enzymes, their modifications and the mannose 6-phosphate receptors have been well studied and their evolutionary conservation across mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates is clearly established. Invertebrate lysosomal biogenesis pathway on the other hand is not well studied. Although, details on mannose 6-phosphate receptors and enzymes involved in lysosomal enzyme modifications were reported earlier, a clear cut pathway has not been established. Recent research on the invertebrate species involving biogenesis of lysosomal enzymes suggests a possible conserved pathway in invertebrates. This review presents certain observations based on these processes that include biochemical, immunological and functional studies. Major conclusions include conservation of MPR-dependent pathway in higher invertebrates and recent evidence suggests that MPR-independent pathway might have been more prominent among lower invertebrates. The possible components of MPR-independent pathway that may play a role in lysosomal enzyme targeting are also discussed here.

  19. Novel degradation pathway and kinetic analysis for buprofezin removal by newly isolated Bacillus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangli; Xu, Dayong; Xiong, Minghua; Zhang, Hui; Li, Feng; Liu, Yuan

    2016-09-15

    Given the intensive and widespread application of the pesticide, buprofezin, its environmental residues potentially pose a problem; yet little is known about buprofezin's kinetic and metabolic behaviors. In this study, a novel gram-positive strain, designated BF-5, isolated from aerobic activated sludge, was found to be capable of metabolizing buprofezin as its sole energy, carbon, and nitrogen source. Based on its physiological and biochemical characteristics, other aspects of its phenotype, and a phylogenetic analysis, strain BF-5 was identified as Bacillus sp. This study investigated the effect of culture conditions on bacterial growth and substrate degradation, such as pH, temperature, initial concentration, different nitrogen source, and additional nitrogen sources as co-substrates. The degradation rate parameters, qmax, Ks, Ki and Sm were determined to be 0.6918 h(-1), 105.4 mg L(-1), 210.5 mg L(-1), and 148.95 mg L(-1) respectively. The capture of unpublished potential metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis has led to the proposal of a novel degradation pathway. Taken together, our results clarify buprofezin's biodegradation pathway(s) and highlight the promising potential of strain BF-5 in bioremediation of buprofezin-contaminated environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermally induced degradation pathways of three different antibody-based drug development candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincke, Anja; Winter, Jonas; Bunte, Thomas; Olbrich, Carsten

    2014-10-01

    Protein-based medicinal products are prone to undergo a variety of chemical and physical degradation pathways. One of the most important exogenous stress condition to consider during manufacturing, transport and storage processes is temperature, because antibody-based therapeutics are only stable in a limited temperature range. In this study, three different formats of antibody-based molecules (IgG1, a bispecific scFv and a fab fragment) were exposed to thermal stress conditions occurring during transport and storage. For evaluation, an analytical platform was developed for the detection and characterization of relevant degradation pathways of different antibody-based therapeutics. The effect of thermal stress conditions on the stability of the three antibody-based formats was therefore investigated using visual inspection, different spectroscopic measurements, dynamic light scattering (DLS), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), electrophoresis, asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and surface plasmon resonance technology (SPR). In summary, thermal stress led to heterogeneous chemical and physical degradation pathways of all three antibody-based formats used. In addition, identical exogenous stress conditions resulted in different kinds and levels of aggregates and fragmentation products. This knowledge is fundamental for a systematic and successful stabilization of protein-based therapeutics by the use of formulation additives.

  1. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α induces lysosomal biogenesis in brain cells: implications for lysosomal storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arunava; Jana, Malabendu; Modi, Khushbu; Gonzalez, Frank J; Sims, Katherine B; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-04-17

    Lysosomes are ubiquitous membrane-enclosed organelles filled with an acidic interior and are central to the autophagic, endocytic, or phagocytic pathway. In contrast to its classical function as the waste management machinery, lysosomes are now considered to be an integral part of various cellular signaling processes. The diverse functionality of this single organelle requires a very complex and coordinated regulation of its activity with transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, at its core. However, mechanisms by which TFEB is regulated are poorly understood. This study demonstrates that gemfibrozil, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α, alone and in conjunction with all-trans-retinoic acid is capable of enhancing TFEB in brain cells. We also observed that PPARα, but not PPARβ and PPARγ, is involved in gemfibrozil-mediated up-regulation of TFEB. Reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies confirmed the recruitment of retinoid X receptor α, PPARα, and PGC1α on the PPAR-binding site on the Tfeb promoter as well. Subsequently, the drug-mediated induction of TFEB caused an increase in lysosomal protein and the lysosomal abundance in cell. Collectively, this study reinforces the link between lysosomal biogenesis and lipid metabolism with TFEB at the crossroads. Furthermore, gemfibrozil may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders in which autophagy-lysosome pathway plays an important role.

  2. Endosome-lysosomes and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, R J; Tipler, C; Laszlo, L; Arnold, J; Lowe, J; Landon, M

    1994-01-01

    A number of the major human and animal neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and sheep scrapie, are characterised by deposits of amyloid, arising through incomplete breakdown of membrane proteins. Although our knowledge concerning these diseases is increasing, they remain largely untreatable. Recently, attention has focussed on the mechanisms of production of different types of amyloid and the likely involvement within cells of acid compartments called endosome-lysosomes. These organelles may be 'bioreactor' sites for the unfolding and partial degradation of membrane proteins to generate the amyloid materials. These subsequently become expelled from the cell, or are released from dead cells, and accumulate as pathological entities. Common features of the disease processes give new direction to therapeutic intervention.

  3. Activity, biomass and composition of microbial communities and their degradation pathways in exposed propazine soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chen; Lu, Yi Chen; Xu, Jiang Yan; Song, Yang; Song, Yue; Zhang, Shu Hao; Ma, Li Ya; Lu, Feng Fan; Wang, Ya Kun; Yang, Hong

    2017-11-01

    Propazine is a s-triazine herbicide widely used for controlling weeds for crop production. Its persistence and contamination in environment nagatively affect crop growth and food safety. Elimination of propazine residues in the environment is critical for safe crop production. This study identified a microbial community able to degrade propazine in a farmland soil. About 94% of the applied propazine was degraded within 11 days of incubation when soil was treated with 10mgkg(-1) propazine as the initial concentration. The process was accompanied by increased microbial biomass and activities of soil enzymes. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) revealed multiple bacterial strains in the community as well as dynamic change of the composition of microbial community with a reduced microbial diversity (H' from 3.325 to 2.78). Tracking the transcript level of degradative genes AtzB, AtzC and TrzN showed that these genes were induced by propazine and played important roles in the degradation process. The activities of catalase, dehydrogenase and phenol oxidase were stimulated by propazine exposure. Five degradation products (hydroxyl-, methylated-, dimeric-propazine, ammeline and ammelide) were characterized by UPLC-MS(2), revealing a biodegradation of propazine in soil. Several novel methylated and dimeric products of propazine were characterized in thepropazine-exposed soil. These data help understand the pathway, detailed mechanism and efficiency of propazine biodegradation in soil under realistic field condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. From ether to acid: A plausible degradation pathway of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Lei; Birgel, Daniel; Elling, Felix J.; Sutton, Paul A.; Lipp, Julius S.; Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chuanlun; Könneke, Martin; Peckmann, Jörn; Rowland, Steven J.; Summons, Roger E.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are ubiquitous microbial lipids with extensive demonstrated and potential roles as paleoenvironmental proxies. Despite the great attention they receive, comparatively little is known regarding their diagenetic fate. Putative degradation products of GDGTs, identified as hydroxyl and carboxyl derivatives, were detected in lipid extracts of marine sediment, seep carbonate, hot spring sediment and cells of the marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The distribution of GDGT degradation products in environmental samples suggests that both biotic and abiotic processes act as sinks for GDGTs. More than a hundred newly recognized degradation products afford a view of the stepwise degradation of GDGT via (1) ether bond hydrolysis yielding hydroxyl isoprenoids, namely, GDGTol (glycerol dialkyl glycerol triether alcohol), GMGD (glycerol monobiphytanyl glycerol diether), GDD (glycerol dibiphytanol diether), GMM (glycerol monobiphytanol monoether) and bpdiol (biphytanic diol); (2) oxidation of isoprenoidal alcohols into corresponding carboxyl derivatives and (3) chain shortening to yield C39 and smaller isoprenoids. This plausible GDGT degradation pathway from glycerol ethers to isoprenoidal fatty acids provides the link to commonly detected head-to-head linked long chain isoprenoidal hydrocarbons in petroleum and sediment samples. The problematic C80 to C82 tetraacids that cause naphthenate deposits in some oil production facilities can be generated from H-shaped glycerol monoalkyl glycerol tetraethers (GMGTs) following the same process, as indicated by the distribution of related derivatives in hydrothermally influenced sediments.

  5. Oxidative degradation of N-Nitrosopyrrolidine by the ozone/UV process: Kinetics and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi; Fang, Jingyun; Fan, Chihhao; Shang, Chii

    2016-05-01

    N-Nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) is an emerging contaminant in drinking water and wastewater. The degradation kinetics and mechanisms of NPYR degradation by the O3/UV process were investigated and compared with those of UV direct photolysis and ozonation. A synergistic effect of ozone and UV was observed in the degradation of NPYR due to the accelerated production of OH• by ozone photolysis. This effect was more pronounced at higher ozone dosages. The second-order rate constants of NPYR reacting with OH• and ozone was determined to be 1.38 (± 0.05) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) and 0.31 (± 0.02) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The quantum yield by direct UV photolysis was 0.3 (± 0.01). An empirical model using Rct (the ratio of the exposure of OH• to that of ozone) was established for NPYR degradation in treated drinking water and showed that the contributions of direct UV photolysis and OH• oxidation on NPYR degradation were both significant. As the reaction proceeded, the contribution by OH• became less important due to the exhausting of ozone. Nitrate was the major product in the O3/UV process by two possible pathways. One is through the cleavage of nitroso group to form NO• followed by hydrolysis, and the other is the oxidation of the intermediates of amines by ozonation.

  6. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  7. A novel sucrose synthase pathway for sucrose degradation in cultured sycamore cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, S C; Akazawa, T

    1986-08-01

    Enzymes of sucrose degradation and glycolysis in cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells were assayed and characterized in crude extracts and after partial purification, in an attempt to identify pathways for sucrose catabolism. Desalted cell extracts contained similar activities (20-40 nanomoles per milligram protein per minute) of sucrose synthase, neutral invertase, glucokinase, fructokinase, phosphofructokinase, and UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase (assayed with 2 micromolar pyrophosphate (PPi). PPi-linked phosphofructokinase activity was virtually dependent upon fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, and the maximum activity exceeded that of ATP-linked phosphofructokinase. Hexokinase activity, with glucose as substrate, was highly specific for ATP, whereas fructokinase activity was relatively nonspecific. At 1 millimolar nucleoside triphosphate, fructokinase activity decreased in the order: UTP > ATP > CTP > GTP. We propose two pathways for sucrose degradation. One involves invertase action, followed by classical glycolysis of hexose sugars, and the other is a novel pathway initiated by sucrose synthase. The K(m) for sucrose of sucrose synthase was severalfold lower than that of neutral invertase (15 versus 65 millimolar), which may determine carbon partitioning between the two pathways. The sucrose synthase pathway proposed involves cycling of uridylates and PPi. UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase, which is shown to be an effective ;PPi-scavenger,' would consume PPi and form UTP. The UTP could be then utilized in the UTP-linked fructokinase reaction, thereby forming UDP for sucrose synthase. The source of PPi is postulated to arise from the back reaction of PPi-linked phosphofructokinase. Sycamore cells contained a substantial endogenous pool of PPi (about 3 nanomoles per gram fresh weight, roughly 1/10 the amount of ATP in these cells), and sufficient fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (0.09 nanomole per gram fresh weight) to activate the PPi-linked phosphofructokinase. Possible

  8. PINK1-Parkin pathway activity is regulated by degradation of PINK1 in the mitochondrial matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth E Thomas

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in PINK1, which encodes a mitochondrially targeted serine/threonine kinase, result in an early-onset heritable form of Parkinson's disease. Previous work has shown that PINK1 is constitutively degraded in healthy cells, but selectively accumulates on the surface of depolarized mitochondria, thereby initiating their autophagic degradation. Although PINK1 is known to be a cleavage target of several mitochondrial proteases, whether these proteases account for the constitutive degradation of PINK1 in healthy mitochondria remains unclear. To explore the mechanism by which PINK1 is degraded, we performed a screen for mitochondrial proteases that influence PINK1 abundance in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. We found that genetic perturbations targeting the matrix-localized protease Lon caused dramatic accumulation of processed PINK1 species in several mitochondrial compartments, including the matrix. Knockdown of Lon did not decrease mitochondrial membrane potential or trigger activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein stress response (UPRmt, indicating that PINK1 accumulation in Lon-deficient animals is not a secondary consequence of mitochondrial depolarization or the UPRmt. Moreover, the influence of Lon on PINK1 abundance was highly specific, as Lon inactivation had little or no effect on the abundance of other mitochondrial proteins. Further studies indicated that the processed forms of PINK1 that accumulate upon Lon inactivation are capable of activating the PINK1-Parkin pathway in vivo. Our findings thus suggest that Lon plays an essential role in regulating the PINK1-Parkin pathway by promoting the degradation of PINK1 in the matrix of healthy mitochondria.

  9. Interleukin-1 Acts via the JNK-2 Signaling Pathway to Induce Aggrecan Degradation by Human Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Heba M; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Vincent, Tonia L; Nagase, Hideaki; Troeberg, Linda; Saklatvala, Jeremy

    2015-07-01

    Aggrecan enables articular cartilage to bear load and resist compression. Aggrecan loss occurs early in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis and can be induced by inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1). IL-1 induces cleavage of specific aggrecans characteristic of the ADAMTS proteinases. The aim of this study was to identify the intracellular signaling pathways by which IL-1 causes aggrecan degradation by human chondrocytes and to investigate how aggrecanase activity is controlled by chondrocytes. We developed a cell-based assay combining small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced knockdown with aggrecan degradation assays. Human articular chondrocytes were overlaid with bovine aggrecan after transfection with siRNAs against molecules of the IL-1 signaling pathway. After IL-1 stimulation, released aggrecan fragments were detected with AGEG and ARGS neoepitope antibodies. Aggrecanase activity and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) shedding was analyzed by Western blotting. ADAMTS-5 is a major aggrecanase in human chondrocytes, regulating aggrecan degradation in response to IL-1. The tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated 6 (TRAF-6)/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK-1)/MKK-4 signaling axis is essential for IL-1-induced aggrecan degradation, while NF-κB is not. Of the 3 MAPKs (ERK, p38, and JNK), only JNK-2 showed a significant role in aggrecan degradation. Chondrocytes constitutively secreted aggrecanase, which was continuously endocytosed by LRP-1, keeping the extracellular level of aggrecanase low. IL-1 induced aggrecanase activity in the medium in a JNK-2-dependent manner, possibly by reducing aggrecanase endocytosis, because IL-1 caused JNK-2-dependent shedding of LRP-1. The signaling axis TRAF-6/TAK-1/MKK-4/JNK-2 mediates IL-1-induced aggrecanolysis. The level of aggrecanase is controlled by its

  10. Involvement of two latex-clearing proteins during rubber degradation and insights into the subsequent degradation pathway revealed by the genome sequence of Gordonia polyisoprenivorans strain VH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiessl, Sebastian; Schuldes, Jörg; Thürmer, Andrea; Halbsguth, Tobias; Bröker, Daniel; Angelov, Angel; Liebl, Wolfgang; Daniel, Rolf; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2012-04-01

    The increasing production of synthetic and natural poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) rubber leads to huge challenges in waste management. Only a few bacteria are known to degrade rubber, and little is known about the mechanism of microbial rubber degradation. The genome of Gordonia polyisoprenivorans strain VH2, which is one of the most effective rubber-degrading bacteria, was sequenced and annotated to elucidate the degradation pathway and other features of this actinomycete. The genome consists of a circular chromosome of 5,669,805 bp and a circular plasmid of 174,494 bp with average GC contents of 67.0% and 65.7%, respectively. It contains 5,110 putative protein-coding sequences, including many candidate genes responsible for rubber degradation and other biotechnically relevant pathways. Furthermore, we detected two homologues of a latex-clearing protein, which is supposed to be a key enzyme in rubber degradation. The deletion of these two genes for the first time revealed clear evidence that latex-clearing protein is essential for the microbial utilization of rubber. Based on the genome sequence, we predict a pathway for the microbial degradation of rubber which is supported by previous and current data on transposon mutagenesis, deletion mutants, applied comparative genomics, and literature search.

  11. KCTD1 suppresses canonical Wnt signaling pathway by enhancing β-catenin degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Li

    Full Text Available The canonical Wnt signaling pathway controls normal embryonic development, cellular proliferation and growth, and its aberrant activity results in human carcinogenesis. The core component in regulation of this pathway is β-catenin, but molecular regulation mechanisms of β-catenin stability are not completely known. Here, our recent studies have shown that KCTD1 strongly inhibits TCF/LEF reporter activity. Moreover, KCTD1 interacted with β-catenin both in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation as well as in vitro through GST pull-down assays. We further mapped the interaction regions to the 1-9 armadillo repeats of β-catenin and the BTB domain of KCTD1, especially Position Ala-30 and His-33. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that KCTD1 promotes the cytoplasmic accumulation of β-catenin. Furthermore, protein stability assays revealed that KCTD1 enhances the ubiquitination/degradation of β-catenin in a concentration-dependent manner in HeLa cells. And the degradation of β-catenin mediated by KCTD1 was alleviated by the proteasome inhibitor, MG132. In addition, KCTD1-mediated β-catenin degradation was dependent on casein kinase 1 (CK1- and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and enhanced by the E3 ubiquitin ligase β-transducin repeat-containing protein (β-TrCP. Moreover, KCTD1 suppressed the expression of endogenous Wnt downstream genes and transcription factor AP-2α. Finally, we found that Wnt pathway member APC and tumor suppressor p53 influence KCTD1-mediated downregulation of β-catenin. These results suggest that KCTD1 functions as a novel inhibitor of Wnt signaling pathway.

  12. Unraveling the Specific Regulation of the Central Pathway for Anaerobic Degradation of 3-Methylbenzoate*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Javier F.; Liu, Huixiang; Zamarro, María T.; McMahon, Stephen; Liu, Huanting; Naismith, James H.; Eberlein, Christian; Boll, Matthias; Carmona, Manuel; Díaz, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The mbd cluster encodes the anaerobic degradation of 3-methylbenzoate in the β-proteobacterium Azoarcus sp. CIB. The specific transcriptional regulation circuit that controls the expression of the mbd genes was investigated. The PO, PB1, and P3R promoters responsible for the expression of the mbd genes, their cognate MbdR transcriptional repressor, as well as the MbdR operator regions (ATACN10GTAT) have been characterized. The three-dimensional structure of MbdR has been solved revealing a conformation similar to that of other TetR family transcriptional regulators. The first intermediate of the catabolic pathway, i.e. 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA, was shown to act as the inducer molecule. An additional MbdR-dependent promoter, PA, which contributes to the expression of the CoA ligase that activates 3-methylbenzoate to 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA, was shown to be necessary for an efficient induction of the mbd genes. Our results suggest that the mbd cluster recruited a regulatory system based on the MbdR regulator and its target promoters to evolve a distinct central catabolic pathway that is only expressed for the anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds that generate 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA as the central metabolite. All these results highlight the importance of the regulatory systems in the evolution and adaptation of bacteria to the anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds. PMID:25795774

  13. Arginine deiminase pathway genes and arginine degradation variability in Oenococcus oeni strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araque, Isabel; Gil, Joana; Carreté, Ramon; Constantí, Magda; Bordons, Albert; Reguant, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Trace amounts of the carcinogenic ethyl carbamate can appear in wine as a result of a reaction between ethanol and citrulline, which is produced from arginine degradation by some bacteria used in winemaking. In this study, arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway genes were evaluated in 44 Oenococcus oeni strains from wines originating from several locations in order to establish the relationship between the ability of a strain to degrade arginine and the presence of related genes. To detect the presence of arc genes of the ADI pathway in O. oeni, pairs of primers were designed to amplify arcA, arcB, arcC and arcD1 sequences. All strains contained these four genes. The same primers were used to confirm the organization of these genes in an arcABCD1 operon. Nevertheless, considerable variability in the ability to degrade arginine among these O. oeni strains was observed. Therefore, despite the presence of the arc genes in all strains, the expression patterns of individual genes must be strain dependent and influenced by the different wine conditions. Additionally, the presence of arc genes was also determined in the 57 sequenced strains of O. oeni available in GenBank, and the complete operon was found in 83% of strains derived from wine. The other strains were found to lack the arcB, arcC and arcD genes, but all contained sequences homologous to arcA, and some of them had also ADI activity.

  14. Degradation pathways of low-ethoxylated nonylphenols by isolated bacteria using an improved method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Xin; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Min

    2014-01-01

    Nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEOs) with low ethoxylation degree (NPav₂EO; containing two ethoxy units on average) and estrogenic properties are the intermediate products of nonionic surfactant NPEOs. To better understand the environmental fate of low-ethoxylated NPEOs, phylogenetically diverse low-ethoxylated NPEO-degrading bacteria were isolated from activated sludge using gellan gum as the gelling reagent. Four isolates belonging to four genera, i.e., Pseudomonas sp. NP522b in γ-Proteobacteria, Variovorax sp. NP427b and Ralstonia sp. NP47a in β-Proteobacteria, and Sphingomonas sp. NP42a in α-Proteobacteria were acquired. Ralstonia sp. NP47a or Sphingomonas sp. NP42a, have not been reported for the degradation of low-ethoxylated NPEOs previously. The biotransformation pathways of these isolates were investigated. The first three strains (NP522b, NP427b, and NP47a) exhibited high NPav₂EO oxidation ability by oxidizing the polyethoxy (EO) chain to form low-ethoxylated nonylphenoxy carboxylates, and then further oxidizing the alkyl chain to form carboxyalkylphenol polyethoxycarboxylates. Furthermore, Sphingomonas sp. NP42a degraded NPav2EO through a nonoxidative pathway with nonylphenol monoethoxylate as the dominant product.

  15. Inhibition of lysosomal degradation rescues pentamidine-mediated decreases of K(IR)2.1 ion channel expression but not that of K(v)11.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalos, Lukas; de Boer, Teun P; Houtman, Marien J C; Rook, Martin B; Vos, Marc A; van der Heyden, Marcel A G

    2011-02-10

    The antiprotozoal drug pentamidine inhibits two types of cardiac rectifier potassium currents, which can precipitate life-threatening arrhythmias. Here, we use pentamidine as a tool to investigate whether a single drug affects trafficking of two structurally different potassium channels by identical or different mechanisms, and whether the adverse drug effect can be suppressed in a channel specific fashion. Whole cell patch clamp, Western blot, real time PCR, and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to determine potassium current density, ion channel protein levels, mRNA expression levels, and subcellular localization, respectively. We demonstrate that pentamidine inhibits delayed (I(Kr)) and inward (I(K1)) rectifier currents in cultured adult canine cardiomyocytes. In HEK293 cells, pentamidine inhibits functional K(v)11.1 channels, responsible for I(Kr), by interfering at the level of full glycosylation, yielding less mature form of K(v)11.1 at the plasma membrane. In contrast, total K(IR)2.1 expression levels, underlying I(K1), are strongly decreased, which cannot be explained from mRNA expression levels. No changes in molecular size of K(IR)2.1 protein were observed, excluding interference in overt glycosylation. Remaining K(IR)2.1 protein is mainly expressed at the plasma membrane. Inhibition of lysosomal protein degradation is able to partially rescue K(IR)2.1 levels, but not those of K(v)11.1. We conclude that 1) a single drug can interfere in cardiac potassium channel trafficking in a subtype specific mode and 2) adverse drug effects can be corrected in a channel specific manner.

  16. Genetic immunization based on the ubiquitin-fusion degradation pathway against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Bin [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Department of Parasitology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Hiromatsu, Kenji, E-mail: khiromatsu@fukuoka-u.ac.jp [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Fukuoka University, 7-45-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Hisaeda, Hajime; Duan, Xuefeng; Imai, Takashi [Department of Parasitology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Keiji [Department of Molecular Oncology, The Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo 113-8613 (Japan); Himeno, Kunisuke [Department of Parasitology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    Cytotoxic CD8{sup +} T cells are particularly important to the development of protective immunity against the intracellular protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. We have developed a new effective strategy of genetic immunization by activating CD8{sup +} T cells through the ubiquitin-fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. We constructed expression plasmids encoding the amastigote surface protein-2 (ASP-2) of T. cruzi. To induce the UFD pathway, a chimeric gene encoding ubiquitin fused to ASP-2 (pUB-ASP-2) was constructed. Mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 presented lower parasitemia and longer survival period, compared with mice immunized with pASP-2 alone. Depletion of CD8{sup +} T cells abolished protection against T. cruzi in mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 while depletion of CD4{sup +} T cells did not influence the effective immunity. Mice deficient in LMP2 or LMP7, subunits of immunoproteasomes, were not able to develop protective immunity induced. These results suggest that ubiquitin-fused antigens expressed in antigen-presenting cells were effectively degraded via the UFD pathway, and subsequently activated CD8{sup +} T cells. Consequently, immunization with pUB-ASP-2 was able to induce potent protective immunity against infection of T. cruzi.

  17. Chemical modification and degradation of atrazine in Medicago sativa through multiple pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing Jing; Lu, Yi Chen; Yang, Hong

    2014-10-08

    Atrazine is a member of the triazine herbicide family intensively used to control weeds for crop production. In this study, atrazine residues and its degraded products in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) were characterized using UPLC-TOF-MS/MS. Most of atrazine absorbed in plants was found as chemically modified derivatives like deisopropylated atrazine (DIA), dehydrogenated atrazine (DHA), or methylated atrazine (MEA), and some atrazine derivatives were conjugated through different functional groups such as sugar, glutathione, and amino acids. Interestingly, the specific conjugates DHA+hGSH (homoglutathione) and MEA-HCl+hGSH in alfalfa were detected. These results suggest that atrazine in alfalfa can be degraded through different pathways. The increased activities of glycosyltransferase and glutathione S-transferase were determined to support the atrazine degradation models. The outcome of the work uncovered the detailed mechanism for the residual atrazine accumulation and degradation in alfalfa and will help to evaluate whether the crop is suitable to be cultivated in the atrazine-polluted soil.

  18. Tyrosol degradation via the homogentisic acid pathway in a newly isolated Halomonas strain from olive processing effluents

    OpenAIRE

    Liebgott, Pierre-Pol; Labat, Marc; Amouric, Agnès; Tholozan, Jean-Luc; Lorquin, Jean

    2008-01-01

    To isolate a new Halomonas sp. strain capable of degrading tyrosol, a toxic compound present in olive mill wastewater, through the homogentisic acid (HGA) pathway. A moderately halophilic Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Halomonas genus and designated strain TYRC17 was isolated from olive processing effluents. This strain was able to completely degrade tyrosol (2-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-ethanol), a toxic compound found in such effluent. Tyrosol degradation begins by an oxidation to 4-hydrox...

  19. Insulin-degrading enzyme is exported via an unconventional protein secretion pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leissring Malcolm A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is a ubiquitously expressed zinc-metalloprotease that degrades several pathophysiologically significant extracellular substrates, including insulin and the amyloid β-protein (Aβ, and accumulating evidence suggests that IDE dysfunction may be operative in both type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer disease (AD. Although IDE is well known to be secreted by a variety of cell types, the underlying trafficking pathway(s remain poorly understood. To address this topic, we investigated the effects of known inhibitors or stimulators of protein secretion on the secretion of IDE from murine hepatocytes and HeLa cells. IDE secretion was found to be unaffected by the classical secretion inhibitors brefeldin A (BFA, monensin, or nocodazole, treatments that readily inhibited the secretion of α1-antitrypsin (AAT overexpressed in the same cells. Using a novel cell-based Aβ-degradation assay, we show further that IDE secretion was similarly unaffected by multiple stimulators of protein secretion, including glyburide and 3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl-ATP (Bz-ATP. The calcium ionophore, A23187, increased extracellular IDE activity, but only under conditions that also elicited cytotoxicity. Our results provide the first biochemical evidence that IDE export is not dependent upon the classical secretion pathway, thereby identifying IDE as a novel member of the select class of unconventionally secreted proteins. Further elucidation of the mechanisms underlying IDE secretion, which would be facilitated by the assays described herein, promises to uncover processes that might be defective in disease or manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  20. Electrochemical treatment of trypan blue synthetic wastewater and its degradation pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANANTHA N. SUBBA RAO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The trypan blue (TB dye synthetic wastewater was treated in presence of chloride ions by electrochemical method. The effect of current density, pH, initial concentration of dye and supporting electrolyte on color and COD removal were investigated. The UV-Vis ab­sorption intensity, chemical oxygen demand (COD, cyclic voltammetry (CV, Fourier transform- infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis were conducted to investigate the kinetics and degradation pathway of TB dye.

  1. The Branched-Chain Dodecylbenzene Sulfonate Degradation Pathway of Pseudomonas aeruginosa W51D Involves a Novel Route for Degradation of the Surfactant Lateral Alkyl Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Campos-García, Jesús; Esteve, Abraham; Vázquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Ramos, Juán Luis; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa W51D is able to grow by using branched-chain dodecylbenzene sulfonates (B-DBS) or the terpenic alcohol citronellol as a sole source of carbon. A mutant derived from this strain (W51M1) is unable to degrade citronellol but still grows on B-DBS, showing that the citronellol degradation route is not the main pathway involved in the degradation of the surfactant alkyl moiety. The structures of the main B-DBS isomers and of some intermediates were identified by gas chromatog...

  2. The Branched-Chain Dodecylbenzene Sulfonate Degradation Pathway of Pseudomonas aeruginosa W51D Involves a Novel Route for Degradation of the Surfactant Lateral Alkyl Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-García, Jesús; Esteve, Abraham; Vázquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Ramos, Juán Luis; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa W51D is able to grow by using branched-chain dodecylbenzene sulfonates (B-DBS) or the terpenic alcohol citronellol as a sole source of carbon. A mutant derived from this strain (W51M1) is unable to degrade citronellol but still grows on B-DBS, showing that the citronellol degradation route is not the main pathway involved in the degradation of the surfactant alkyl moiety. The structures of the main B-DBS isomers and of some intermediates were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis, and a possible catabolic route is proposed. PMID:10427075

  3. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D M; Pevsner, J; Scullion, M A; Vaughn, M; Kaplan, J

    2000-07-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome-lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome-lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome-lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages.

  4. MDMA induces cardiac contractile dysfunction through autophagy upregulation and lysosome destabilization in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani-ishida, Kaori; Saka, Kanju; Yamaguchi, Koji; Hayashida, Makiko; Nagai, Hisashi; Takemura, Genzou; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2014-05-01

    The underlying mechanisms of cardiotoxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") abuse are unclear. Autophagy exerts either adaptive or maladaptive effects on cardiac function in various pathological settings, but nothing is known on the role of autophagy in the MDMA cardiotoxicity. Here, we investigated the mechanism through which autophagy may be involved in MDMA-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with MDMA (20mg/kg) or saline. Left ventricular (LV) echocardiography and LV pressure measurement demonstrated reduction of LV systolic contractility 24h after MDMA administration. Western blot analysis showed a time-dependent increase in the levels of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II) and cathepsin-D after MDMA administration. Electron microscopy showed the presence of autophagic vacuoles in cardiomyocytes. MDMA upregulated phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) at Thr172, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at Thr2446, Raptor at Ser792, and Unc51-like kinase (ULK1) at Ser555, suggesting activation of autophagy through the AMPK-mTOR pathway. The effects of autophagic inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) on LC3-II levels indicated that MDMA enhanced autophagosome formation, but attenuated autophagosome clearance. MDMA also induced release of cathepsins into cytosol, and western blotting and electron microscopy showed cardiac troponin I (cTnI) degradation and myofibril damage, respectively. 3-MA, CQ, and a lysosomal inhibitor, E64c, inhibited cTnI proteolysis and improved contractile dysfunction after MDMA administration. In conclusion, MDMA causes lysosome destabilization following activation of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, through which released lysosomal proteases damage myofibrils and induce LV systolic dysfunction in rat heart.

  5. Molecular characterization of the Akt-TOR signaling pathway in rainbow trout: potential role in muscle growth/degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Akt-TOR signaling pathway plays a key role in cellular metabolism and muscle growth. Hormone, nutrition and stress factors affect the Akt-TOR pathway by regulating gene transcription, protein synthesis and degradation. In addition, we previously showed that energetic demands elevate during vit...

  6. Def defines a conserved nucleolar pathway that leads p53 to proteasome-independent degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Tao; Hui Shi; Yihong Guan; Delai Huang; Ye Chen; David P Lane; Jun Chen

    2013-01-01

    p53 protein turnover through the ubiquitination pathway is a vital mechanism in the regulation of its transcriptional activity; however,little is known about p53 turnover through proteasome-independent pathway(s).The digestive organ expansion factor (Def) protein is essential for the development of digestive organs.In zebrafish,loss of function of defselectively upregulates the expression of p53 response genes,which raises a question as to what is the relationship between Def and p53.We report here that Def is a nucleolar protein and that loss of function of defleads to the upregulation of p53 protein,which surprisingly accumulates in the nucleoli.Our extensive studies have demonstrated that Def can mediate the degradation of p53 protein and that this process is independent of the proteasome pathway,but dependent on the activity of Calpain3,a cysteine protease.Our findings define a novel nucleolar pathway that regulates the turnover function of p53,which will advance our understanding of p53's role in organogenesis and tumorigenesis.

  7. Kinetics and pathways of ibuprofen degradation by the UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yingying; Fang, Jingyun; Shang, Chii

    2016-03-01

    The UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process (AOP), which forms reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals (HO) and reactive chlorine species (RCS) such as chlorine atoms (Cl) and Cl2(-), is being considered as an alternative to the UV/H2O2 AOP for the degradation of emerging contaminants. This study investigated the kinetics and pathways of the degradation of a recalcitrant pharmaceutical and personal care product (PPCP)-ibuprofen (IBP)-by the UV/chlorine AOP. The degradation of IBP followed the pseudo first-order kinetics. The first-order rate constant was 3.3 times higher in the UV/chlorine AOP than in the UV/H2O2 AOP for a given chemical molar dosage at pH 6. The first-order rate constant decreased from 3.1 × 10(-3) s(-1) to 5.5 × 10(-4) s(-1) with increasing pH from 6 to 9. Both HO and RCS contributed to the degradation, and the contribution of RCS increased from 22% to 30% with increasing pH from 6 to 9. The degradation was initiated by HO-induced hydroxylation and Cl-induced chlorine substitution, and sustained through decarboxylation, demethylation, chlorination and ring cleavage to form more stable products. Significant amounts of chlorinated intermediates/byproducts were formed from the UV/chlorine AOP, and four chlorinated products were newly identified. The yield of total organic chlorine (TOCl) was 31.6 μM after 90% degradation of 50 μM IBP under the experimental conditions. The known disinfection by-products (DBPs) comprised 17.4% of the TOCl. The effects of water matrix in filtered drinking water on the degradation were not significant, demonstrating the practicality of the UV/chlorine AOP for the control of some refractory PPCPs. However, the toxicity of the chlorinated products should be further assessed.

  8. Kinetics and reaction pathways of formaldehyde degradation using the UV-fenton method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangxuan; Liang, Jiantao; Wang, Xuanjun

    2011-05-01

    This study was based on the purpose of investigating the reaction rules of formaldehyde (HCHO) as an intermediate product in the degradation of many other organic wastewaters. The process conditions of UV-Fenton method for the degradation of the low concentrations of HCHO were studied in a batch photochemical reactor. The results showed that, when the original HCHO concentration was 30 mg/L, at an operating temperature of 23 degrees C, pH = 3, an H202 dosage of 68 mg/L, and an H2O2-to-Fe2+ mole ratio (H2O2:Fe2+) of 5, 91.89% of the HCHO was removed after 30 minutes. The degradation of HCHO in the UV-Fenton system was basically in accordance with the exponential decay. The kinetic study results showed that the reaction orders of HCHO, Fe2+, and H2O2 in the system were 1.054, 0.510, and 0.728, respectively, and the activation energy (Ea) was 9.85 kJ/mol. The comparison of UV/H2O2, Fenton, and UV-Fenton systems for the degradation of HCHO, and the results of iron catalyst tests showed that the mechanism of UV-Fenton on the degradation of HCHO was through a synergistic effect of Fe2+ and UV light to catalyze the decomposition of H2O2. The introduction of UV irradiation to the Fenton system largely increased the degradation rate of HCHO, mainly as a result of the accelerating effect on the formation of the Fe2+/Fe3+ cycle. The reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and a chemical oxygen demand (COD) analyzer. The effluent gases also were analyzed by gas chromatography. Based on those results, the reaction pathways of HCHO in the UV-Fenton system were proposed. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of the reaction products and the COD showed that the main intermediate product of the reaction was formic acid, and the further oxidation of it was the rate-limiting step for the degradation of HCHO.

  9. Genomic organisation, activity and distribution analysis of the microbial putrescine oxidase degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Alexander; Barnes, Nicole; Speight, Robert; Keane, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    The catalytic action of putrescine specific amine oxidases acting in tandem with 4-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase is explored as a degradative pathway in Rhodococcus opacus. By limiting the nitrogen source, increased catalytic activity was induced leading to a coordinated response in the oxidative deamination of putrescine to 4-aminobutyraldehyde and subsequent dehydrogenation to 4-aminobutyrate. Isolating the dehydrogenase by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration revealed that the enzyme acts principally on linear aliphatic aldehydes possessing an amino moiety. Michaelis-Menten kinetic analysis delivered a Michaelis constant (K(M)=0.014 mM) and maximum rate (Vmax=11.2 μmol/min/mg) for the conversion of 4-aminobutyraldehyde to 4-aminobutyrate. The dehydrogenase identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis (E value=0.031, 23% coverage) belongs to a functionally related genomic cluster that includes the amine oxidase, suggesting their association in a directed cell response. Key regulatory, stress and transport encoding genes have been identified, along with candidate dehydrogenases and transaminases for the further conversion of 4-aminobutyrate to succinate. Genomic analysis has revealed highly similar metabolic gene clustering among members of Actinobacteria, providing insight into putrescine degradation notably among Micrococcaceae, Rhodococci and Corynebacterium by a pathway that was previously uncharacterised in bacteria.

  10. Pathways and Determinants of Early Spontaneous Vegetation Succession in Degraded Lowland of South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Jun Duan; Hai Ran; Sheng-Lei Fu; Qin-Feng Guo; Jun Wang

    2008-01-01

    Continuous and prolonged human disturbances have caused severe degradation of a large portion of lowland in South China, and how to restore such degraded ecosystems becomes an increasing concern. The process and mechanisms of spontaneous succession, which plays an important role in vegetation restoration, have not been adequately examined. To identify the pathways of early spontaneous vegetation succession, 41 plots representing plant communities abandoned over different times were established and Investigated. The communities and indicator species of the vegetation were classified by analyzing the important values of plant species using multivariate analyses. The reaults indicated that the plant species could be classified into nine plant communities repreaenting six succession staages. The pathway and species composition alao changed in the process of succession. We also meaeurad 13 environmental variables of microtopography, soil structure and soil nutrition in each plot to examine the driving forces of auccession and the vegetation-environment relationships. Our resulta ahowed that the environmental variables changed in diverse directions, and that aoil bulk density, soil water capacity and soU acidity were the most important factors.

  11. Degradation Pathway for Eplerenone by Validated Stability Indicating UP-LC Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar Babu, Kondru; Madireddy, Venkataramanna; Indukuri, Venkata Somaraju

    2012-01-01

    Degradation pathway for eplerenone is established as per ICH recommendations by validated and stability-indicating reverse phase liquid chromatographic method. Eplerenone is subjected to stress conditions of acid, base, oxidation, and thermal and photolysis. Significant degradation is observed in acid and base stress conditions. Four impurities are studied and the major degradant (RRT about 0.31) was identified by LC-MS and spectral analysis. The stress samples are assayed against a qualified reference standard and the mass balance is found close to 99.5%. Efficient chromatographic separation is achieved on a Waters symmetry C18 stationary phase with simple mobile phase combination delivered in gradient mode and quantification is carried at 240 nm at a flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1). In the developed LC method the resolution between eplerenone and four potential impurities (imp-1, imp-2, imp-3, and imp-4) is found to be greater than 4.0. Regression analysis shows an r value (correlation coefficient) of greater than 0.999 for eplerenone and four potential impurities. This method is capable to detect the impurities of eplerenone at a level of 0.020% with respect to test concentration of 1.0 mg mL(-1) for a 20 μL injection volume. The developed UPLC method is validated with respect to specificity, linearity and range, accuracy, precision, and robustness for impurities and assay determination.

  12. Photocatalytic transformation of sixteen substituted phenylurea herbicides in aqueous semiconductor suspensions: intermediates and degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoll, José; Sabater, Paula; Navarro, Gines; Pérez-Lucas, Gabriel; Navarro, Simón

    2013-01-15

    The photocatalytic degradation of sixteen substituted phenylurea herbicides (PUHs) in pure water has been studied using zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) as photocatalyst under artificial light irradiation. Photocatalytic experiments showed that the addition of these chalcogenide oxides in tandem with the oxidant (Na(2)S(2)O(8)) strongly enhances the degradation rate of these compounds in comparison with those carried out with ZnO and TiO(2) alone and photolytic tests. Comparison of catalysts showed that ZnO is the most efficient for the removal of such herbicides in optimal conditions and at constant volumetric rate of photon absorption in the photoreactor. Thus, the complete disappearance of all the studied compounds was achieved after 20 min of illumination in the ZnO/Na(2)S(2)O(8) system. The main photocatalytic intermediates detected during the degradation of PUHs were identified. The probable photodegradation pathways were proposed and discussed. The main steps involved: N-demethylation of the N,N-dimethylurea-substituted compounds followed of N-demethylation and N-demethoxylation of the N-methoxy-N-methyl-substituted ureas and hydroxylation of aromatic rings and their aliphatic side-chains of both, parent compounds and intermediates.

  13. PDT: loss of autophagic cytoprotection after lysosomal photodamage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David; Price, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy is known to evoke both autophagy and apoptosis. Apoptosis is an irreversible death pathway while autophagy can serve a cytoprotective function. In this study, we examined two photosensitizing agents that target lysosomes, although they differ in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed during irradiation. With both agents, the 'shoulder' on the PDT dose-response curve was substantially attenuated, consistent with loss of a cytoprotective pathway. In contrast, this 'shoulder' is commonly observed when PDT targets mitochondria or the ER. We propose that lysosomal targets may offer the possibility of promoting PDT efficacy by eliminating a potentially protective pathway.

  14. Unfolded protein response and activated degradative pathways regulation in GNE myopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghao Li

    Full Text Available Although intracellular beta amyloid (Aβ accumulation is known as an early upstream event in the degenerative course of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE myopathy, the process by which Aβdeposits initiate various degradative pathways, and their relationship have not been fully clarified. We studied the possible secondary responses after amyloid beta precursor protein (AβPP deposition including unfolded protein response (UPR, ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS activation and its correlation with autophagy system. Eight GNE myopathy patients and five individuals with normal muscle morphology were included in this study. We performed immunofluorescence and immunoblotting to investigate the expression of AβPP, phosphorylated tau (p-tau and endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperones. Proteasome activities were measured by cleavage of fluorogenic substrates. The expression of proteasome subunits and linkers between proteasomal and autophagy systems were also evaluated by immunoblotting and relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Four molecular chaperones, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94, glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, calreticulin and calnexin and valosin containing protein (VCP were highly expressed in GNE myopathy. 20S proteasome subunits, three main proteasome proteolytic activities, and the factors linking UPS and autophagy system were also increased. Our study suggests that AβPP deposition results in endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS and highly expressed VCP deliver unfolded proteins from endoplasmic reticulum to proteosomal system which is activated in endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD in GNE myopathy. Excessive ubiquitinated unfolded proteins are exported by proteins that connect UPS and autophagy to autophagy system, which is activated as an alternative pathway for degradation.

  15. Identification of genes and pathways related to phenol degradation in metagenomic libraries from petroleum refinery wastewater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia C Silva

    Full Text Available Two fosmid libraries, totaling 13,200 clones, were obtained from bioreactor sludge of petroleum refinery wastewater treatment system. The library screening based on PCR and biological activity assays revealed more than 400 positive clones for phenol degradation. From these, 100 clones were randomly selected for pyrosequencing in order to evaluate the genetic potential of the microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plant for biodegradation, focusing mainly on novel genes and pathways of phenol and aromatic compound degradation. The sequence analysis of selected clones yielded 129,635 reads at an estimated 17-fold coverage. The phylogenetic analysis showed Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales as the most abundant orders among the selected fosmid clones. The MG-RAST analysis revealed a broad metabolic profile with important functions for wastewater treatment, including metabolism of aromatic compounds, nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorus. The predicted 2,276 proteins included phenol hydroxylases and cathecol 2,3- dioxygenases, involved in the catabolism of aromatic compounds, such as phenol, byphenol, benzoate and phenylpropanoid. The sequencing of one fosmid insert of 33 kb unraveled the gene that permitted the host, Escherichia coli EPI300, to grow in the presence of aromatic compounds. Additionally, the comparison of the whole fosmid sequence against bacterial genomes deposited in GenBank showed that about 90% of sequence showed no identity to known sequences of Proteobacteria deposited in the NCBI database. This study surveyed the functional potential of fosmid clones for aromatic compound degradation and contributed to our knowledge of the biodegradative capacity and pathways of microbial assemblages present in refinery wastewater treatment system.

  16. Identification of genes and pathways related to phenol degradation in metagenomic libraries from petroleum refinery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cynthia C; Hayden, Helen; Sawbridge, Tim; Mele, Pauline; De Paula, Sérgio O; Silva, Lívia C F; Vidigal, Pedro M P; Vicentini, Renato; Sousa, Maíra P; Torres, Ana Paula R; Santiago, Vânia M J; Oliveira, Valéria M

    2013-01-01

    Two fosmid libraries, totaling 13,200 clones, were obtained from bioreactor sludge of petroleum refinery wastewater treatment system. The library screening based on PCR and biological activity assays revealed more than 400 positive clones for phenol degradation. From these, 100 clones were randomly selected for pyrosequencing in order to evaluate the genetic potential of the microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plant for biodegradation, focusing mainly on novel genes and pathways of phenol and aromatic compound degradation. The sequence analysis of selected clones yielded 129,635 reads at an estimated 17-fold coverage. The phylogenetic analysis showed Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales as the most abundant orders among the selected fosmid clones. The MG-RAST analysis revealed a broad metabolic profile with important functions for wastewater treatment, including metabolism of aromatic compounds, nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorus. The predicted 2,276 proteins included phenol hydroxylases and cathecol 2,3- dioxygenases, involved in the catabolism of aromatic compounds, such as phenol, byphenol, benzoate and phenylpropanoid. The sequencing of one fosmid insert of 33 kb unraveled the gene that permitted the host, Escherichia coli EPI300, to grow in the presence of aromatic compounds. Additionally, the comparison of the whole fosmid sequence against bacterial genomes deposited in GenBank showed that about 90% of sequence showed no identity to known sequences of Proteobacteria deposited in the NCBI database. This study surveyed the functional potential of fosmid clones for aromatic compound degradation and contributed to our knowledge of the biodegradative capacity and pathways of microbial assemblages present in refinery wastewater treatment system.

  17. Abeta42-induced neurodegeneration via an age-dependent autophagic-lysosomal injury in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daijun Ling

    Full Text Available The mechanism of widespread neuronal death occurring in Alzheimer's disease (AD remains enigmatic even after extensive investigation during the last two decades. Amyloid beta 42 peptide (Abeta(1-42 is believed to play a causative role in the development of AD. Here we expressed human Abeta(1-42 and amyloid beta 40 (Abeta(1-40 in Drosophila neurons. Abeta(1-42 but not Abeta(1-40 causes an extensive accumulation of autophagic vesicles that become increasingly dysfunctional with age. Abeta(1-42-induced impairment of the degradative function, as well as the structural integrity, of post-lysosomal autophagic vesicles triggers a neurodegenerative cascade that can be enhanced by autophagy activation or partially rescued by autophagy inhibition. Compromise and leakage from post-lysosomal vesicles result in cytosolic acidification, additional damage to membranes and organelles, and erosive destruction of cytoplasm leading to eventual neuron death. Neuronal autophagy initially appears to play a pro-survival role that changes in an age-dependent way to a pro-death role in the context of Abeta(1-42 expression. Our in vivo observations provide a mechanistic understanding for the differential neurotoxicity of Abeta(1-42 and Abeta(1-40, and reveal an Abeta(1-42-induced death execution pathway mediated by an age-dependent autophagic-lysosomal injury.

  18. Synthesis and degradation pathways, functions, and pathology of ceramides and epidermal acylceramides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Akio

    2016-07-01

    Ceramide (Cer) is a structural backbone of sphingolipids and is composed of a long-chain base and a fatty acid. Existence of a variety of Cer species, which differ in chain-length, hydroxylation status, and/or double bond number of either of their hydrophobic chains, has been reported. Ceramide is produced by Cer synthases. Mammals have six Cer synthases (CERS1-6), each of which exhibits characteristic substrate specificity toward acyl-CoAs with different chain-lengths. Knockout mice for each Cer synthase show corresponding, isozyme-specific phenotypes, revealing the functional differences of Cers with different chain-lengths. Cer diversity is especially prominent in epidermis. Changes in Cer levels, composition, and chain-lengths are associated with atopic dermatitis. Acylceramide (acyl-Cer) specifically exists in epidermis and plays an essential role in skin permeability barrier formation. Accordingly, defects in acyl-Cer synthesis cause the cutaneous disorder ichthyosis with accompanying severe skin barrier defects. Although the molecular mechanism by which acyl-Cer is generated was long unclear, most genes involved in its synthesis have been identified recently. In Cer degradation pathways, the long-chain base moiety of Cer is converted to acyl-CoA, which is then incorporated mainly into glycerophospholipids. This pathway generates the lipid mediator sphingosine 1-phosphate. This review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of the synthesis and degradation pathways, physiological functions, and pathology of Cers/acyl-Cers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Photodegradation of gemfibrozil in aqueous solution under UV irradiation: kinetics, mechanism, toxicity, and degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jingshuai; Lv, Wenying; Chen, Ping; Lu, Yida; Wang, Fengliang; Li, Fuhua; Yao, Kun; Liu, Guoguang

    2016-07-01

    The lipid regulator gemfibrozil (GEM) has been reported to be persistent in conventional wastewater treatment plants. This study investigated the photolytic behavior, toxicity of intermediate products, and degradation pathways of GEM in aqueous solutions under UV irradiation. The results demonstrated that the photodegradation of GEM followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, and the pseudo-first-order rate constant was decreased markedly with increasing initial concentrations of GEM and initial pH. The photodegradation of GEM included direct photolysis via (3)GEM(*) and self-sensitization via ROS, where the contribution rates of degradation were 0.52, 90.05, and 8.38 % for ·OH, (1)O2, and (3)GEM(*), respectively. Singlet oxygen ((1)O2) was evidenced by the molecular probe compound, furfuryl alcohol (FFA), and was identified as the primary reactive species in the photolytic process. The steady-state concentrations of (1)O2 increased from (0.324 ± 0.014) × 10(-12) to (1.021 ± 0.040) × 10(-12) mol L(-1), as the initial concentrations of GEM were increased from 5 to 20 mg L(-1). The second-order rate constant for the reaction of GEM with (1)O2 was calculated to be 2.55 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The primary transformation products were identified using HPLC-MS/MS, and possible photodegradation pathways were proposed by hydroxylation, aldehydes reactions, as well as the cleavage of ether side chains. The toxicity of phototransformation product evaluation revealed that photolysis potentially provides a critical pathway for GEM toxicity reduction in potable water and wastewater treatment facilities.

  20. Stress-induced nuclear RNA degradation pathways regulate yeast bromodomain factor 2 to promote cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Roy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bromodomain proteins are key regulators of gene expression. How the levels of these factors are regulated in specific environmental conditions is unknown. Previous work has established that expression of yeast Bromodomain factor 2 (BDF2 is limited by spliceosome-mediated decay (SMD. Here we show that BDF2 is subject to an additional layer of post-transcriptional control through RNase III-mediated decay (RMD. We found that the yeast RNase III Rnt1p cleaves a stem-loop structure within the BDF2 mRNA to down-regulate its expression. However, these two nuclear RNA degradation pathways play distinct roles in the regulation of BDF2 expression, as we show that the RMD and SMD pathways of the BDF2 mRNA are differentially activated or repressed in specific environmental conditions. RMD is hyper-activated by salt stress and repressed by hydroxyurea-induced DNA damage while SMD is inactivated by salt stress and predominates during DNA damage. Mutations of cis-acting signals that control SMD and RMD rescue numerous growth defects of cells lacking Bdf1p, and show that SMD plays an important role in the DNA damage response. These results demonstrate that specific environmental conditions modulate nuclear RNA degradation pathways to control BDF2 expression and Bdf2p-mediated gene regulation. Moreover, these results show that precise dosage of Bromodomain factors is essential for cell survival in specific environmental conditions, emphasizing their importance for controlling chromatin structure and gene expression in response to environmental stress.

  1. Aqueous photodegradation of 4-tert-butylphenol: By-products, degradation pathway and theoretical calculation assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yanlin [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shi, Jin; Chen, Hongche [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Particle Pollution and Prevention, Department of Environmental Science & Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhao, Jianfu [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dong, Wenbo, E-mail: wbdong@fudan.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Particle Pollution and Prevention, Department of Environmental Science & Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2016-10-01

    4-tert-butylphenol (4-t-BP), an endocrine disrupting chemical, is widely distributed in natural bodies of water but is difficult to biodegrade. In this study, we focused on the transformation of 4-t-BP in photo-initiated degradation processes. The steady-state photolysis and laser flash photolysis (LFP) experiments were conducted in order to elucidate its degradation mechanism. Identification of products was performed using the GC–MS, LC-MS and theoretical calculation techniques. The oxidation pathway of 4-t-BP by hydroxyl radical (HO·) was also studied and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was added to produce HO·. 4-tert-butylcatechol and 4-tert-butylphenol dimer were produced in 4-t-BP direct photolysis. 4-tert-butylcatechol and hydroquinone were produced by the oxidation of HO·. But the formation mechanism of 4-tert-butylcatechol in the two processes was different. The benzene ring was fractured in 4-t-BP oxidation process and 29% of TOC was degraded after 16 h irradiation. - Highlights: • Photodegradation of 4-t-BP, an endocrine disrupting chemical, has been investigated. • 3 stable byproducts were identified from photolysis and oxidation processes. • 5 transient by-products were concluded from LFP experiments. • The theoretical calculation was performed to confirm the byproducts. • 4-t-BP was degraded with increasing efficiency: 254 nm < H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/313 nm < H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/254 nm.

  2. Autophagic flux promotes cisplatin resistance in human ovarian carcinoma cells through ATP-mediated lysosomal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liwei; Xu, Ye; Su, Jing; Yu, Huimei; Kang, Jinsong; Li, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoning; Xie, Qi; Yu, Chunyan; Sun, Liankun; Li, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Lysosomes are involved in promoting resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. However, the mechanisms underlying lysosomal influence of cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer remain incompletely understood. We report that, compared with cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 cells, autophagy increases in cisplatin-resistant SKOV3/DDP cells treated with cisplatin. Inhibition of early-stage autophagy enhanced cisplatin-mediated cytotoxicity in SKOV3/DDP cells, but autophagy inhibition at a later stage by disturbing autophagosome-lysosome fusion is more effective. Notably, SKOV3/DDP cells contained more lysosomes than cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 cells. Abundant lysosomes and lysosomal cathepsin D activity were required for continued autolysosomal degradation and maintenance of autophagic flux in SKOV3/DDP cells. Furthermore, SKOV3/DDP cells contain abundant lysosomal ATP required for lysosomal function, and inhibition of lysosomal ATP accumulation impaired lysosomal function and blocked autophagic flux. Therefore, our findings suggest that lysosomes at least partially contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells through their role in cisplatin-induced autophagic processes, and provide insight into the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in tumors.

  3. Degradation of the synthetic dye amaranth by the fungus Bjerkandera adusta Dec 1: inference of the degradation pathway from an analysis of decolorized products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomi, Nichina; Yoshida, Shuji; Matsumoto, Kazutsugu; Okudomi, Masayuki; Konno, Hiroki; Hisabori, Toru; Sugano, Yasushi

    2011-11-01

    We examined the degradation of amaranth, a representative azo dye, by Bjerkandera adusta Dec 1. The degradation products were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), visible absorbance, and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (ESI-TOF-MS). At the primary culture stage (3 days), the probable reaction intermediates were 1-aminonaphthalene-2,3,6-triol, 4-(hydroxyamino) naphthalene-1-ol, and 2-hydroxy-3-[2-(4-sulfophenyl) hydrazinyl] benzenesulfonic acid. After 10 days, the reaction products detected were 4-nitrophenol, phenol, 2-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenesulfonic acid, 4-nitrobenzene sulfonic acid, and 3,4'-disulfonyl azo benzene, suggesting that no aromatic amines were created. Manganese-dependent peroxidase activity increased sharply after 3 days culture. Based on these results, we herein propose, for the first time, a degradation pathway for amaranth. Our results suggest that Dec 1 degrades amaranth via the combined activities of peroxidase and hydrolase and reductase action.

  4. Removal and Degradation Pathways of Sulfamethoxazole Present in Synthetic Municipal Wastewater via an Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor

    KAUST Repository

    Sanchez Huerta, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    The current global water crisis in addition to continues contamination of natural water bodies with harmful organic micropollutants (OMPs) have driven the development of new water treatment technologies that allow the efficient removal of such compounds. Among a long list of OMPs, antibiotics are considered as top priority pollutants to be treated due to their great resistance to biological treatments and their potential to develop bacterial resistance. Different approaches, such as membrane-based and advance oxidation processes have been proposed to alleviate or minimize antibiotics discharge into aquatic environments. However most of these processes are costly and generate either matrices with high concentration of OMPs or intermediate products with potentially greater toxicity or persistence. Therefore, this thesis proposes the study of an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for the treatment of synthetic municipal wastewater containing sulfamethoxazole (SMX), a world widely used antibiotic. Besides the general evaluation of AnMBR performance in the COD removal and biogas production, this research mainly focuses on the SMX removal and its degradation pathway. Thus 5 SMX quantification was performed through solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and the identification of its transformation products (TPs) was assessed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. The results achieved showed that, working under optimal conditions (35°C, pH 7 and ORP around -380 to -420 mV) and after a biomass adaptation period (maintaining 0.85 VSS/TSS ratio), the AnMBR process provided over 95% COD removal and 95-98% SMX removal, while allowing stable biogas composition and methane production (≈130 mL CH4/g CODremoved). Kinetic analysis through a batch test showed that after 24 h of biological reaction, AnMBR process achieved around 94% SMX removal, indicating a first order kinetic reaction with K= 0.119, which highlights the high degradation

  5. Physiology of deletion mutants in the anaerobic β-myrcene degradation pathway in Castellaniella defragrans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lüddeke Frauke

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monoterpenes present a large and versatile group of unsaturated hydrocarbons of plant origin with widespread use in the fragrance as well as food industry. The anaerobic β-myrcene degradation pathway in Castellaniella defragrans strain 65Phen differs from well known aerobic, monooxygenase-containing pathways. The initial enzyme linalool dehydratase-isomerase ldi/LDI catalyzes the hydration of β-myrcene to (S-(+-linalool and its isomerization to geraniol. A high-affinity geraniol dehydrogenase geoA/GeDH and a geranial dehydrogenase geoB/GaDH contribute to the formation of geranic acid. A genetic system was for the first time applied for the betaproteobacterium to prove in vivo the relevance of the linalool dehydratase-isomerase and the geraniol dehydrogenase. In-frame deletion cassettes were introduced by conjugation and two homologous recombination events. Results Polar effects were absent in the in-frame deletion mutants C. defragrans Δldi and C. defragrans ΔgeoA. The physiological characterization of the strains demonstrated a requirement of the linalool dehydratase-isomerase for growth on acyclic monoterpenes, but not on cyclic monoterpenes. The deletion of geoA resulted in a phenotype with hampered growth rate on monoterpenes as sole carbon and energy source as well as reduced biomass yields. Enzyme assays revealed the presence of a second geraniol dehydrogenase. The deletion mutants were in trans complemented with the broad-host range expression vector pBBR1MCS-4ldi and pBBR1MCS-2geoA, restoring in both cases the wild type phenotype. Conclusions In-frame deletion mutants of genes in the anaerobic β-myrcene degradation revealed novel insights in the in vivo function. The deletion of a high-affinity geraniol dehydrogenase hampered, but did not preclude growth on monoterpenes. A second geraniol dehydrogenase activity was present that contributes to the β-myrcene degradation pathway. Growth on cyclic monoterpenes

  6. Glycogenosis type II : cloning and characterization of the human lysosomal α-glucosidase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H. Hoefsloot (Lies)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractGlycogenosis type II is a lysosomal storage disorder. Characteristic features are heart failure and generalized muscle weakness. The disease is caused by the inherited deficiency of acid α-glucosidase, the enzyme responsible for the degradation of lysosomal glycogen. The aim of the work

  7. Early involvement of lysosome dysfunction in the degeneration of cerebral cortical neurons caused by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi; Eitan, Erez; Mattson, Mark P

    2017-03-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA occurs in neurons during acute brain injuries and in neurodegenerative disorders. Membrane lipid peroxidation contributes to neuronal dysfunction and death, in part by disrupting neuronal ion homeostasis and cellular bioenergetics. Emerging findings suggest that 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an aldehyde produced during lipid peroxidation, impairs the function of various proteins involved in neuronal homeostasis. Here we tested the hypothesis that HNE impairs the cellular system that removes damaged proteins and organelles, the autophagy-lysosome pathway in rat primary cortical neurons. We found that HNE, at a concentration that causes apoptosis over a 48-72 h period, increases protein levels of LC3 II and p62 and within 1 and 4 h of exposure, respectively; LC3 II and p62 immunoreactive puncta were observed in the cytoplasm of HNE-treated neurons at 6 h. The extent of up-regulation of p62 and LC3 II in response to HNE was not affected by co-treatment with the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1, suggesting that the effects of HNE on autophagy were secondary to lysosome inhibition. Indeed, we found that neurons exposed to HNE exhibit elevated pH levels, and decreased protein substrate hydrolysis and cathepsin B activity. Neurons exposed to HNE also exhibited the accumulation of K63-linked polyubiquitinated proteins, which are substrates targeted for lysosomal degradation. Moreover, we found that the levels of LAMP2a and constitutively active heat-shock protein 70, and numbers of LAMP2a-positive lysosomes, are decreased in neurons exposed to HNE. Our findings demonstrate that the lipid peroxidation product HNE causes early impairment of lysosomes which may contribute to the accumulation of damaged and dysfunctional proteins and organelles and consequent neuronal death. Because impaired lysosome function is increasingly recognized as an early event in the neuronal death that occurs in neurodegenerative

  8. Lysosomal-associated protein multispanning transmembrane 5 gene (LAPTM5 is associated with spontaneous regression of neuroblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Inoue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma (NB is the most frequently occurring solid tumor in children, and shows heterogeneous clinical behavior. Favorable tumors, which are usually detected by mass screening based on increased levels of catecholamines in urine, regress spontaneously via programmed cell death (PCD or mature through differentiation into benign ganglioneuroma (GN. In contrast, advanced-type NB tumors often grow aggressively, despite intensive chemotherapy. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of PCD during spontaneous regression in favorable NB tumors, as well as identifying genes with a pro-death role, is a matter of urgency for developing novel approaches to the treatment of advanced-type NB tumors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that the expression of lysosomal associated protein multispanning transmembrane 5 (LAPTM5 was usually down-regulated due to DNA methylation in an NB cell-specific manner, but up-regulated in degenerating NB cells within locally regressing areas of favorable tumors detected by mass-screening. Experiments in vitro showed that not only a restoration of its expression but also the accumulation of LAPTM5 protein, was required to induce non-apoptotic cell death with autophagic vacuoles and lysosomal destabilization with lysosomal-membrane permeabilization (LMP in a caspase-independent manner. While autophagy is a membrane-trafficking pathway to degrade the proteins in lysosomes, the LAPTM5-mediated lysosomal destabilization with LMP leads to an interruption of autophagic flux, resulting in the accumulation of immature autophagic vacuoles, p62/SQSTM1, and ubiqitinated proteins as substrates of autophagic degradation. In addition, ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies appeared in degenerating NB cells. CONCLUSIONS: We propose a novel molecular mechanism for PCD with the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles due to LAPTM5-mediated lysosomal destabilization. LAPTM5-induced cell death is lysosomal cell death with impaired autophagy

  9. Photocatalytic transformation of sixteen substituted phenylurea herbicides in aqueous semiconductor suspensions: Intermediates and degradation pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenoll, José, E-mail: jose.fenoll@carm.es [Departamento de Calidad y Garantía Alimentaria, Instituto Murciano de Investigación y Desarrollo Agrario y Alimentario (IMIDA), C/Mayor s/n, La Alberca, 30150 Murcia (Spain); Sabater, Paula [Departamento de Calidad y Garantía Alimentaria, Instituto Murciano de Investigación y Desarrollo Agrario y Alimentario (IMIDA), C/Mayor s/n, La Alberca, 30150 Murcia (Spain); Navarro, Gines; Pérez-Lucas, Gabriel; Navarro, Simón [Departamento de Química Agrícola, Geología y Edafología, Facultad de Química, Universidad de Murcia, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, 30100 Murcia (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► Photocatalytic oxidation of phenylurea herbicides (PUHs) in water. ► The study was performed using ZnO and TiO{sub 2} under artificial light irradiation. ► PUHs were totally degraded using ZnO/Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8}, ZnO, TiO{sub 2}/Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} and TiO{sub 2}. ► ZnO is the most efficient photocatalyst for the removal of these herbicides. ► 13 intermediates were identified and a mechanism of degradation has been proposed. -- Abstract: The photocatalytic degradation of sixteen substituted phenylurea herbicides (PUHs) in pure water has been studied using zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) as photocatalyst under artificial light irradiation. Photocatalytic experiments showed that the addition of these chalcogenide oxides in tandem with the oxidant (Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8}) strongly enhances the degradation rate of these compounds in comparison with those carried out with ZnO and TiO{sub 2} alone and photolytic tests. Comparison of catalysts showed that ZnO is the most efficient for the removal of such herbicides in optimal conditions and at constant volumetric rate of photon absorption in the photoreactor. Thus, the complete disappearance of all the studied compounds was achieved after 20 min of illumination in the ZnO/Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} system. The main photocatalytic intermediates detected during the degradation of PUHs were identified. The probable photodegradation pathways were proposed and discussed. The main steps involved: N-demethylation of the N,N-dimethylurea-substituted compounds followed of N-demethylation and N-demethoxylation of the N-methoxy-N-methyl-substituted ureas and hydroxylation of aromatic rings and their aliphatic side-chains of both, parent compounds and intermediates.

  10. The Degradation Pathway of the Mitophagy Receptor Atg32 Is Re-Routed by a Posttranslational Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, Mariia; Lorenzi, Isotta; Dudek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The outer mitochondrial membrane protein Atg32 is the central receptor for mitophagy, the mitochondria-specific form of autophagy. Atg32 is an unstable protein, and is rapidly degraded under conditions in which mitophagy is not induced. Here we show that Atg32 undergoes a posttranslational modification upon induction of mitophagy. The modification is dependent on the core autophagic machinery, including Atg8, and on the mitophagy-specific adaptor protein Atg11. The modified Atg32 is targeted to the vacuole where it becomes stabilized when vacuolar proteases are deficient. Interestingly, we find that this degradation pathway differs from the degradation pathway of non-modified Atg32, which neither involves vacuolar proteases, nor the proteasome. These analyses reveal that a posttranslational modification discriminates a form of Atg32 targeting mitochondria for mitophagy from that, which escapes mitophagy by rapid degradation.

  11. Photocatalytic degradation of metoprolol tartrate in suspensions of two TiO{sub 2}-based photocatalysts with different surface area. Identification of intermediates and proposal of degradation pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramovic, Biljana, E-mail: biljana.abramovic@dh.uns.ac.rs [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Kler, Sanja, E-mail: sanja.kler@dh.uns.ac.rs [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Sojic, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.sojic@dh.uns.ac.rs [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Lausevic, Mila, E-mail: milal@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Radovic, Tanja, E-mail: tradovic@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Vione, Davide, E-mail: davide.vione@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica Analitica, Universita di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2011-12-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinetics and efficiency of photocatalytic degradation of the {beta}{sub 1}-blocker metoprolol tartrate (MET). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two TiO{sub 2} specimens employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Faster degradation of MET, but slower mineralization, obtained with the TiO{sub 2} specimen having lower surface area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalytic transformation pathways of MET including mineralization. - Abstract: This study investigates the efficiency of the photocatalytic degradation of metoprolol tartrate (MET), a widely used {beta}{sub 1}-blocker, in TiO{sub 2} suspensions of Wackherr's 'Oxyde de titane standard' and Degussa P25. The study encompasses transformation kinetics and efficiency, identification of intermediates and reaction pathways. In the investigated range of initial concentrations (0.01-0.1 mM), the photocatalytic degradation of MET in the first stage of the reaction followed approximately a pseudo-first order kinetics. The TiO{sub 2} Wackherr induced a significantly faster MET degradation compared to TiO{sub 2} Degussa P25 when relatively high substrate concentrations were used. By examining the effect of ethanol as a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals ({center_dot}OH), it was shown that the reaction with {center_dot}OH played the main role in the photocatalytic degradation of MET. After 240 min of irradiation the reaction intermediates were almost completely mineralized to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, while the nitrogen was predominantly present as NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Reaction intermediates were studied in detail and a number of them were identified using LC-MS/MS (ESI+), which allowed the proposal of a tentative pathway for the photocatalytic transformation of MET as a function of the TiO{sub 2} specimen.

  12. Cycle Inhibiting Factors (Cifs): Cyclomodulins That Usurp the Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation Pathway of Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Frédéric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) are type III secreted effectors produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria. Cifs are “cyclomodulins” that inhibit the eukaryotic host cell cycle and also hijack other key cellular processes such as those controlling the actin network and apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge on Cif since its first characterization in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, the identification of several xenologues in distant pathogenic bacteria, to its structure elucidation and the recent deciphering of its mode of action. Cif impairs the host ubiquitin proteasome system through deamidation of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 that regulates Cullin-Ring-ubiquitin Ligase (CRL) complexes. The hijacking of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells results in the modulation of various cellular functions such as epithelium renewal, apoptosis and immune response. Cif is therefore a powerful weapon in the continuous arm race that characterizes host-bacteria interactions. PMID:22069713

  13. Cycle inhibiting factors (cifs): cyclomodulins that usurp the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taieb, Frédéric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric

    2011-04-01

    Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs) are type III secreted effectors produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria. Cifs are "cyclomodulins" that inhibit the eukaryotic host cell cycle and also hijack other key cellular processes such as those controlling the actin network and apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge on Cif since its first characterization in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, the identification of several xenologues in distant pathogenic bacteria, to its structure elucidation and the recent deciphering of its mode of action. Cif impairs the host ubiquitin proteasome system through deamidation of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 that regulates Cullin-Ring-ubiquitin Ligase (CRL) complexes. The hijacking of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells results in the modulation of various cellular functions such as epithelium renewal, apoptosis and immune response. Cif is therefore a powerful weapon in the continuous arm race that characterizes host-bacteria interactions.

  14. Cycle Inhibiting Factors (Cifs: Cyclomodulins That Usurp the Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation Pathway of Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Oswald

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cycle inhibiting factors (Cifs are type III secreted effectors produced by diverse pathogenic bacteria. Cifs are “cyclomodulins” that inhibit the eukaryotic host cell cycle and also hijack other key cellular processes such as those controlling the actin network and apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge on Cif since its first characterization in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, the identification of several xenologues in distant pathogenic bacteria, to its structure elucidation and the recent deciphering of its mode of action. Cif impairs the host ubiquitin proteasome system through deamidation of ubiquitin or the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 that regulates Cullin-Ring-ubiquitin Ligase (CRL complexes. The hijacking of the ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway of host cells results in the modulation of various cellular functions such as epithelium renewal, apoptosis and immune response. Cif is therefore a powerful weapon in the continuous arm race that characterizes host-bacteria interactions.

  15. M2-like macrophages are responsible for collagen degradation through a mannose receptor-mediated pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H; Leonard, Daniel; Masedunskas, Andrius

    2013-01-01

    of the collagen receptors mannose receptor (Mrc1) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (Endo180 and Mrc2) impaired this intracellular collagen degradation pathway. This study demonstrates the importance of receptor-mediated cellular uptake to collagen turnover in vivo and identifies......Tissue remodeling processes critically depend on the timely removal and remodeling of preexisting collagen scaffolds. Nevertheless, many aspects related to the turnover of this abundant extracellular matrix component in vivo are still incompletely understood. We therefore took advantage of recent...... advances in optical imaging to develop an assay to visualize collagen turnover in situ and identify cell types and molecules involved in this process. Collagen introduced into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis in a partially matrix metalloproteinase-dependent manner and was subsequently...

  16. Cancer-associated lysosomal changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallunki, T; Olsen, O D; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly dividing and invasive cancer cells are strongly dependent on effective lysosomal function. Accordingly, transformation and cancer progression are characterized by dramatic changes in lysosomal volume, composition and cellular distribution. Depending on one's point of view, the cancer-asso......:10.1038/onc.2012.292....

  17. LYSOSOMAL DISRUPTION BY BACTERIAL TOXINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernheimer, Alan W.; Schwartz, Lois L.

    1964-01-01

    Bernheimer, Alan W. (New York University School of Medicine, New York), and Lois L. Schwartz. Lysosomal disruption by bacterial toxins. J. Bacteriol. 87:1100–1104. 1964.—Seventeen bacterial toxins were examined for capacity (i) to disrupt rabbit leukocyte lysosomes as indicated by decrease in turbidity of lysosomal suspensions, and (ii) to alter rabbit liver lysosomes as measured by release of β-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase. Staphylococcal α-toxin, Clostridium perfringens α-toxin, and streptolysins O and S affected lysosomes in both systems. Staphylococcal β-toxin, leucocidin and enterotoxin, Shiga neurotoxin, Serratia endotoxin, diphtheria toxin, tetanus neurotoxin, C. botulinum type A toxin, and C. perfringens ε-toxin were not active in either system. Staphylococcal δ-toxin, C. histolyticum collagenase, crude C. perfringens β-toxin, and crude anthrax toxin caused lysosomal damage in only one of the test systems. There is a substantial correlation between the hemolytic property of a toxin and its capacity to disrupt lysosomes, lending support to the concept that erythrocytes and lysosomes are bounded by similar membranes. PMID:5874534

  18. Degradation pathways of lamotrigine under advanced treatment by direct UV photolysis, hydroxyl radicals, and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, Olya S; Ferrer, Imma; Michael Thurman, E; Linden, Karl G

    2014-12-01

    Lamotrigine is recently recognized as a persistent pharmaceutical in the water environment and wastewater effluents. Its degradation was studied under UV and ozone advanced oxidation treatments with reaction kinetics of lamotrigine with ozone (≈4 M(-1)s(-1)), hydroxyl radical [(2.1 ± 0.3) × 10(9)M(-1)s(-1)] and by UV photolysis with low and medium pressure mercury vapor lamps [quantum yields ≈0 and (2.7 ± 0.4)× 10(-4) respectively] determined. All constants were measured at pH 6 and at temperature ≈20°C. The results indicate that lamotrigine is slow to respond to direct photolysis or oxidation by ozone and no attenuation of the contaminant is expected in UV or ozone disinfection applications. The compound reacts rapidly with hydroxyl radicals indicating that advanced oxidation processes would be effective for its treatment. Degradation products were identified under each treatment process using accurate mass time-of-flight spectrometry and pathways of decay were proposed. The main transformation pathways in each process were: dechlorination of the benzene ring during direct photolysis; hydroxyl group addition to the benzene ring during the reaction with hydroxyl radicals; and triazine ring opening after reaction with ozone. Different products that form in each process may be to a varying degree less environmentally stable than the parent lamotrigine. In addition, a novel method of ozone quenching without addition of salts is presented. The new quenching method would allow subsequent mass spectrometry analysis without a solid phase extraction clean-up step. The method involves raising the pH of the sample to approximately 10 for a few seconds and lowering it back and is therefore limited to applications for which temporary pH change is not expected to affect the outcome of the analysis.

  19. The tumor suppressor p53 regulates autophagosomal and lysosomal biogenesis in lung cancer cells by targeting transcription factor EB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zengli; Wang, Hongfeng; Ding, Qifeng; Xing, Yufei; Xu, Delai; Xu, Zhonghua; Zhou, Tong; Qian, Bin; Ji, Chenghong; Pan, Xue; Zhong, Anyuan; Ying, Zheng; Zhou, Caicun; Shi, Minhua

    2017-03-10

    The cellular protein degradation system, such as proteasomal or autophagy-lysosomal system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases including cancer. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) is a master transcriptional factor in the regulation of autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP), and it has multiple biological functions including protein degradation, cell homeostasis and cell survival. In the present study we show that the tumor suppressor p53 can regulate TFEB nuclear translocation and activity in lung cancer cells. We found p53 deletion or chemical inhibition of p53 using pifithrin-α could promote the translocation of TFEB from cytoplasm to the nucleus, thus increased the TFEB-mediated lysosomal and autophagosomal biogenesis in lung cancer cells. Moreover, re-expression of p53 could decrease the expression levels of TFEB-targeting genes involved in ALP, and knockdown of TFEB could abolish the effect of p53 on the regulation of ALP gene expression. Taken together, our data indicate that p53 affects ALP through regulating TFEB nuclear translocation in lung cancer cells. Importantly, our study reveals a critical link between two keys factors in tumourigenesis and autophagy, and suggests a potential important role of p53-TFEB signaling axis in lung cancer.

  20. Involvement of PML nuclear bodies in CBP degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Germain, Jonathan R; Chen, Jihong; Li, Qiao

    2008-11-01

    Transcriptional coactivator CBP is involved in the regulation of an array of biological processes including cellular differentiation, proliferation and survival. The function of CBP is critical for proper embryonic development and is relevant in cancer biology. Although much is known about the functional roles of CBP in these cellular processes, fewer studies have assessed what in turn regulates CBP activity per se. It has been reported that CBP colocalizes with PML bodies which are nuclear structures disrupted in acute promyelocytic leukemia. However, the biological relevance of CBP localization to PML nuclear bodies is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that histone deacetylase inhibitors such as valproic acid, a therapeutically relevant compound used for the treatment of epilepsy, modulates CBP activity. Valproic acid reduces the steady-state level of CBP by inducing CBP degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, while increasing the colocalization of CBP with ubiquitin nuclear speckles and with PML nuclear bodies. Our results suggest that PML nuclear bodies are nuclear sites involved in the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of CBP, providing novel insights in the regulation of CBP function and highlighting the relevance of its localization to PML nuclear bodies.

  1. Characterization of the Complete Uric Acid Degradation Pathway in the Fungal Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I. Russel; Yang, Liting; Sebetso, Gaseene; Allen, Rebecca; Doan, Thi H. N.; Blundell, Ross; Lui, Edmund Y. L.; Morrow, Carl A.; Fraser, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of purines to uric acid is generally conserved among organisms, however, the end product of uric acid degradation varies from species to species depending on the presence of active catabolic enzymes. In humans, most higher primates and birds, the urate oxidase gene is non-functional and hence uric acid is not further broken down. Uric acid in human blood plasma serves as an antioxidant and an immune enhancer; conversely, excessive amounts cause the common affliction gout. In contrast, uric acid is completely degraded to ammonia in most fungi. Currently, relatively little is known about uric acid catabolism in the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans even though this yeast is commonly isolated from uric acid-rich pigeon guano. In addition, uric acid utilization enhances the production of the cryptococcal virulence factors capsule and urease, and may potentially modulate the host immune response during infection. Based on these important observations, we employed both Agrobacterium-mediated insertional mutagenesis and bioinformatics to predict all the uric acid catabolic enzyme-encoding genes in the H99 genome. The candidate C. neoformans uric acid catabolic genes identified were named: URO1 (urate oxidase), URO2 (HIU hydrolase), URO3 (OHCU decarboxylase), DAL1 (allantoinase), DAL2,3,3 (allantoicase-ureidoglycolate hydrolase fusion protein), and URE1 (urease). All six ORFs were then deleted via homologous recombination; assaying of the deletion mutants' ability to assimilate uric acid and its pathway intermediates as the sole nitrogen source validated their enzymatic functions. While Uro1, Uro2, Uro3, Dal1 and Dal2,3,3 were demonstrated to be dispensable for virulence, the significance of using a modified animal model system of cryptococcosis for improved mimicking of human pathogenicity is discussed. PMID:23667704

  2. Pathways for degrading TNT by Thu-Z: a Pantoea sp. strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Liangdong; Lu, Diannan; Liu, Zheng

    2012-12-01

    2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), an extensively used and versatile explosive, is harmful in soil and water. In the present study, four bacterial strains capable of degrading TNT have been isolated from contaminated sites and named as Thu-A, Thu-B, Thu-C, and Thu-Z. Thu-Z, which gave the highest degradation efficiency compared to the others, was assigned to the genus Pantoea according to its 16S rRNA gene. Similarities in both biochemical properties and morphology suggested that Thu-Z was a Pantoea sp. strain. Thu-Z was proved to be capable of using TNT as a sole nitrogen source by cleaving NO(2) from the nitroaromatic ring by direct aromatic ring reduction. Under nitrogen-limited conditions, 96.6 % N of TNT was consumed by Thu-Z for growth, which was determined in terms of NaNO(2). Trace nitro reduction metabolites such as 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene (24Dam) and 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene (26Dam) were identified in the presence of (NH(4))(2)SO(4). On the other hand, 4,4',6,6'-tetranitro-2,2'-azoxytoluene (22Azo) and 2,2',6,6'-tetranitro-4,4'-azoxytoluene (44Azo) were detected in the absence of (NH(4))(2)SO(4). These indicated the existence of a dual pathway for Thu-Z, while the direct aromatic ring reduction was predominant. Addition of a nitrogen source ((NH(4))(2)SO(4)) after inoculation stimulated the growth of Thu-Z and accelerated TNT degradation.

  3. Unusual starch degradation pathway via cyclodextrins in the hyperthermophilic sulfate-reducing archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain 7324.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labes, Antje; Schönheit, Peter

    2007-12-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus strain 7324 has been shown to grow on starch and sulfate and thus represents the first sulfate reducer able to degrade polymeric sugars. The enzymes involved in starch degradation to glucose 6-phosphate were studied. In extracts of starch-grown cells the activities of the classical starch degradation enzymes, alpha-amylase and amylopullulanase, could not be detected. Instead, evidence is presented here that A. fulgidus utilizes an unusual pathway of starch degradation involving cyclodextrins as intermediates. The pathway comprises the combined action of an extracellular cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase) converting starch to cyclodextrins and the intracellular conversion of cyclodextrins to glucose 6-phosphate via cyclodextrinase (CDase), maltodextrin phosphorylase (Mal-P), and phosphoglucomutase (PGM). These enzymes, which are all induced after growth on starch, were characterized. CGTase catalyzed the conversion of starch to mainly beta-cyclodextrin. The gene encoding CGTase was cloned and sequenced and showed highest similarity to a glucanotransferase from Thermococcus litoralis. After transport of the cyclodextrins into the cell by a transport system to be defined, these molecules are linearized via a CDase, catalyzing exclusively the ring opening of the cyclodextrins to the respective maltooligodextrins. These are degraded by a Mal-P to glucose 1-phosphate. Finally, PGM catalyzes the conversion of glucose 1-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate, which is further degraded to pyruvate via the modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway.

  4. Characterization of a novel β-cypermethrin-degrading Aspergillus niger YAT strain and the biochemical degradation pathway of β-cypermethrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Weiqin; Lin, Derong; Yao, Kai; Yuan, Huaiyu; Wang, Zhilong; Li, Jianlong; Zou, Likou; Han, Xinfeng; Zhou, Kang; He, Li; Hu, Xinjie; Liu, Shuliang

    2015-10-01

    Aspergillus niger YAT strain was obtained from Chinese brick tea (Collection number: CGMCC 10,568) and identified on the basis of morphological characteristics and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence. The strain could degrade 54.83 % of β-cypermethrin (β-CY; 50 mg L(-1)) in 7 days and 100 % of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA; 100 mg L(-1)) in 22 h. The half-lives of β-CY and 3-PBA range from 3.573 to 11.748 days and from 5.635 to 12.160 h, respectively. The degradation of β-CY and 3-PBA was further described using first-order kinetic models. The pathway and mechanism of β-CY degraded by YAT were investigated by analyzing the degraded metabolites through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Relevant enzymatic activities and substrate utilization were also investigated. β-CY degradation products were analyzed. Results indicated that YAT strain transformed β-CY into 3-PBA. 3-PBA was then gradually transformed into permethric acid, protocatechuic acid, 3-hydroxy-5-phenoxy benzoic acid, gallic acid, and phenol gradually. The YAT strain can also effectively degrade these metabolites. The results indicated that YAT strain has potential applications in bioremediation of pyrethroid insecticide (PI)-contaminated environments and fermented food.

  5. Effects of an autophagy/lysosomal pathway induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in PC12 cells%6-羟基多巴胺致PC12细胞损伤机制中自噬的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周生奎; 程言博; 耿润潼; 陈浩; 刘涵; 徐兴顺; 耿德勤

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigated the role of the autophagy lysosomal pathway in PD cells and the possible molecular mechanisms. Methods A dopaminergic neuronal injury model was induced by 6-OHDA in PC12 cells . Autophagosomes in PC12 cells were examined by transmission electronmicro-scopy( TEM ). The expression of LC3- Ⅱ , Cathepsin B were assayed by western blot analysis. Results TEM revealed that the autophagosomes were increased in PC12 cells after 6-OHDA treatment and appeared apoptosis. The LC3-Ⅱ (2h:52.57 ±2.27,4h:56.83 ±3.51,6h:73.43 ±5.41,12h:103.90 ±2.57,24h: 100.40 ±3.91 )and Cathepsin B expression ( model group: 113.80 ± 4.46; normal group 35.89 ± 3.40) were increased after 6-OH DA treatments (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01 ). Conclusion The results indicate that autophagy lysosome pathway is involved in 6-OHDA-induced cell death in PC12 cells.%目的 研究自噬在帕金森病(PD)细胞模型中的作用及可能的机制.方法 体外培养的PC12细胞加入6-羟基多巴(6-OHDA)诱导多巴胺能神经元损伤模型.利用透射电镜观察PC12细胞中自噬的激活,免疫印迹法检测LC3-Ⅱ、Cathepsin B蛋白的表达.结果 电镜下观察到6-OHDA可使PC12细胞内自噬体增多,并出现了凋亡特征.6-OHDA作用2h(灰度比:52.57±2.27),4h(灰度比:56.83±3.51),6h(灰度比:73.43±5.41),12h(灰度比:103.90±2.57),24h(灰度比:100.40±3.91)时LC3-Ⅱ表达逐渐升高,与正常对照组(42.10±2.05)比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),模型组Cathepsin B(113.80±4.46)表达与正常对照组(35.89±3.40)比较明显增加(P<0.01),与模型组相比,广谱蛋白酶抑制剂UTI组(57.69±4.24)降低Cathepsin B表达(P<0.01).结论 自噬/溶酶体途径参与PC12细胞的死亡过程:6-OHDA诱导自噬过度激活,LC3-Ⅱ与Cathepsin B表达增加,促进细胞死亡.

  6. EGFRvIII escapes down-regulation due to impaired internalization and sorting to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandal, Michael V; Zandi, Roza; Pedersen, Mikkel W; Willumsen, Berthe M; van Deurs, Bo; Poulsen, Hans S

    2007-07-01

    EGFRvIII is a mutant variant of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) found exclusively in various cancer types. EGFRvIII lacks a large part of the extracellular domain and is unable to bind ligands; however, the receptor is constitutively phosphorylated and able to activate downstream signaling pathways. Failure to attenuate signaling by receptor down-regulation could be one of the major mechanisms by which EGFRvIII becomes oncogenic. Using a cell system expressing either EGFR or EGFRvIII with no expression of other EGFR family members and with endogenous levels of key degradation proteins, we have investigated the down-regulation of EGFRvIII and compared it to that of EGFR. We show that, in contrast to EGFR, EGFRvIII is inefficiently degraded. EGFRvIII is internalized, but the internalization rate of the mutated receptor is significantly less than that of unstimulated EGFR. Moreover, internalized EGFRvIII is recycled rather than delivered to lysosomes. EGFRvIII binds the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl via Grb2, whereas binding via phosphorylated tyrosine residue 1045 seems to be limited. Despite c-Cbl binding, the receptor fails to become effectively ubiquitinylated. Thus, our results suggest that the long lifetime of EGFRvIII is caused by inefficient internalization and impaired sorting to lysosomes due to lack of effective ubiquitinylation.

  7. Cancer-associated lysosomal changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallunki, T; Olsen, O D; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly dividing and invasive cancer cells are strongly dependent on effective lysosomal function. Accordingly, transformation and cancer progression are characterized by dramatic changes in lysosomal volume, composition and cellular distribution. Depending on one's point of view, the cancer-associated......-targeting anti-cancer drugs. In this review we compile our current knowledge on cancer-associated changes in lysosomal composition and discuss the consequences of these alterations to cancer progression and the possibilities they can bring to cancer therapy.Oncogene advance online publication, 9 July 2012; doi...

  8. A group-specific inhibitor of lysosomal cysteine proteinases selectively inhibits both proteolytic degradation and presentation of the antigen dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine by guinea pig accessory cells to T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1986-01-01

    of antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. The proteinase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanylalanine-diazomethyl-ketone, which selectively inhibits cysteine proteinases, was used to block this set of enzymes in cultured cells. We demonstrate that the selective inhibition of the cysteine proteinases...... inhibitor. Another inhibitor, pepstatin A, which selectively blocks aspartic proteinases, did not block the presentation of dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine. The results identify cysteine proteinases, probably lysosomal, as one of the groups of enzymes involved in antigen processing....

  9. Connecting lignin-degradation pathway with pretreatment inhibitor sensitivity of Cupriavidus necator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eWang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To produce lignocellulosic biofuels economically, the complete release of monomers from the plant cell wall components, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, through pretreatment and hydrolysis (both enzymatic and chemical, and the efficient utilization of these monomers as carbon sources, is crucial. In addition, the identification and development of robust microbial biofuel production strains that can tolerate the toxic compounds generated during pretreatment and hydrolysis is also essential. In this work, Cupriavidus necator was selected due to its capabilities for utilizing lignin monomers and producing polyhydroxylbutyrate (PHB, a bioplastic as well as an advanced biofuel intermediate. We characterized the growth kinetics of C. necator in pretreated corn stover slurry as well as individually in the presence of 11 potentially toxic compounds in the saccharified slurry. We found that C. necator was sensitive to the saccharified slurry produced from dilute acid pretreated corn stover. Five out of 11 compounds within the slurry were characterized as toxic to C. necator, namely ammonium acetate, furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF, benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid. Aldehydes (e.g., furfural and HMF were more toxic than the acetate and the lignin degradation products benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid; furfural was identified as the most toxic compound. Although toxic to C. necator at high concentration, ammonium acetate, benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid could be utilized by C. necator with a stimulating effect on C. necator growth. Consequently, the lignin degradation pathway of C. necator was reconstructed based on genomic information and literature. The efficient conversion of intermediate catechol to downstream products of cis,cis-muconate or 2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde may help improve the robustness of C. necator to benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid as well as improve PHB productivity.

  10. Connecting lignin-degradation pathway with pre-treatment inhibitor sensitivity of Cupriavidus necator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Shihui; Hunsinger, Glendon B.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Johnson, David K.

    2014-01-01

    To produce lignocellulosic biofuels economically, the complete release of monomers from the plant cell wall components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, through pre-treatment and hydrolysis (both enzymatic and chemical), and the efficient utilization of these monomers as carbon sources, is crucial. In addition, the identification and development of robust microbial biofuel production strains that can tolerate the toxic compounds generated during pre-treatment and hydrolysis is also essential. In this work, Cupriavidus necator was selected due to its capabilities for utilizing lignin monomers and producing polyhydroxylbutyrate (PHB), a bioplastic as well as an advanced biofuel intermediate. We characterized the growth kinetics of C. necator in pre-treated corn stover slurry as well as individually in the pre-sence of 11 potentially toxic compounds in the saccharified slurry. We found that C. necator was sensitive to the saccharified slurry produced from dilute acid pre-treated corn stover. Five out of 11 compounds within the slurry were characterized as toxic to C. necator, namely ammonium acetate, furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid. Aldehydes (e.g., furfural and HMF) were more toxic than the acetate and the lignin degradation products benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid; furfural was identified as the most toxic compound. Although toxic to C. necator at high concentration, ammonium acetate, benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid could be utilized by C. necator with a stimulating effect on C. necator growth. Consequently, the lignin degradation pathway of C. necator was reconstructed based on genomic information and literature. The efficient conversion of intermediate catechol to downstream products of cis,cis-muconate or 2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde may help improve the robustness of C. necator to benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid as well as improve PHB productivity. PMID:24904560

  11. Connecting Lignin-Degradation Pathway with Pre-Treatment Inhibitor Sensitivity of Cupriavidus necator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yang, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hunsinger, G. B. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pienkos, P. T. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Johnson, D. K. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-05-27

    In order to produce lignocellulosic biofuels economically, the complete release of monomers from the plant cell wall components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, through pre-treatment and hydrolysis (both enzymatic and chemical), and the efficient utilization of these monomers as carbon sources, is crucial. In addition, the identification and development of robust microbial biofuel production strains that can tolerate the toxic compounds generated during pre-treatment and hydrolysis is also essential. In this work, Cupriavidus necator was selected due to its capabilities for utilizing lignin monomers and producing polyhydroxylbutyrate (PHB), a bioplastic as well as an advanced biofuel intermediate. We characterized the growth kinetics of C. necator in pre-treated corn stover slurry as well as individually in the pre-sence of 11 potentially toxic compounds in the saccharified slurry. We found that C. necator was sensitive to the saccharified slurry produced from dilute acid pre-treated corn stover. Five out of 11 compounds within the slurry were characterized as toxic to C. necator, namely ammonium acetate, furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid. Aldehydes (e.g., furfural and HMF) were more toxic than the acetate and the lignin degradation products benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid; furfural was identified as the most toxic compound. Although toxic to C. necator at high concentration, ammonium acetate, benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid could be utilized by C. necator with a stimulating effect on C. necator growth. Consequently, the lignin degradation pathway of C. necator was reconstructed based on genomic information and literature. The efficient conversion of intermediate catechol to downstream products of cis,cis-muconate or 2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde may help improve the robustness of C. necator to benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid as well as improve PHB productivity.

  12. Connecting lignin-degradation pathway with pre-treatment inhibitor sensitivity of Cupriavidus necator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Shihui; Hunsinger, Glendon B; Pienkos, Philip T; Johnson, David K

    2014-01-01

    To produce lignocellulosic biofuels economically, the complete release of monomers from the plant cell wall components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, through pre-treatment and hydrolysis (both enzymatic and chemical), and the efficient utilization of these monomers as carbon sources, is crucial. In addition, the identification and development of robust microbial biofuel production strains that can tolerate the toxic compounds generated during pre-treatment and hydrolysis is also essential. In this work, Cupriavidus necator was selected due to its capabilities for utilizing lignin monomers and producing polyhydroxylbutyrate (PHB), a bioplastic as well as an advanced biofuel intermediate. We characterized the growth kinetics of C. necator in pre-treated corn stover slurry as well as individually in the pre-sence of 11 potentially toxic compounds in the saccharified slurry. We found that C. necator was sensitive to the saccharified slurry produced from dilute acid pre-treated corn stover. Five out of 11 compounds within the slurry were characterized as toxic to C. necator, namely ammonium acetate, furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid. Aldehydes (e.g., furfural and HMF) were more toxic than the acetate and the lignin degradation products benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid; furfural was identified as the most toxic compound. Although toxic to C. necator at high concentration, ammonium acetate, benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid could be utilized by C. necator with a stimulating effect on C. necator growth. Consequently, the lignin degradation pathway of C. necator was reconstructed based on genomic information and literature. The efficient conversion of intermediate catechol to downstream products of cis,cis-muconate or 2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde may help improve the robustness of C. necator to benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid as well as improve PHB productivity.

  13. The Whole Genome Sequence of Sphingobium chlorophenolicum L-1: Insights into the Evolution of the Pentachlorophenol Degradation Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copley, Shelley D. [University of Colorado; Rokicki, Joseph [University of Colorado; Turner, Pernilla [University of Colorado; Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Sphingobium chlorophenolicum Strain L-1 can mineralize the toxic pesticide pentachlorophenol (PCP). We have sequenced the genome of S. chlorophenolicum Strain L-1. The genome consists of a primary chromosome that encodes most of the genes for core processes, a secondary chromosome that encodes primarily genes that appear to be involved in environmental adaptation, and a small plasmid. The genes responsible for degradation of PCP are found on chromosome 2. We have compared the genomes of S. chlorophenolicum Strain L-1 and Sphingobium japonicum, a closely related Sphingomonad that degrades lindane. Our analysis suggests that the genes encoding the first three enzymes in the PCP degradation pathway were acquired via two different horizontal gene transfer events, and the genes encoding the final two enzymes in the pathway were acquired from the most recent common ancestor of these two bacteria.

  14. Ubiquitin proteasome-dependent degradation of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1{alpha} via the N-terminal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trausch-Azar, Julie; Leone, Teresa C; Kelly, Daniel P; Schwartz, Alan L

    2010-12-17

    PGC-1α is a potent, inducible transcriptional coactivator that exerts control on mitochondrial biogenesis and multiple cellular energy metabolic pathways. PGC-1α levels are controlled in a highly dynamic manner reflecting regulation at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Here, we demonstrate that PGC-1α is rapidly degraded in the nucleus (t(½ 0.3 h) via the ubiquitin proteasome system. An N-terminal deletion mutant of 182 residues, PGC182, as well as a lysine-less mutant form, are nuclear and rapidly degraded (t(½) 0.5 h), consistent with degradation via the N terminus-dependent ubiquitin subpathway. Both PGC-1α and PGC182 degradation rates are increased in cells under low serum conditions. However, a naturally occurring N-terminal splice variant of 270 residues, NT-PGC-1α is cytoplasmic and stable (t(½>7 h), providing additional evidence that PGC-1α is degraded in the nucleus. These results strongly suggest that the nuclear N terminus-dependent ubiquitin proteasome pathway governs PGC-1α cellular degradation. In contrast, the cellular localization of NT-PCG-1α results in a longer-half-life and possible distinct temporal and potentially biological actions.

  15. Autophagy-mediated Regulation of BACE1 Protein Trafficking and Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tuancheng; Tammineni, Prasad; Agrawal, Chanchal; Jeong, Yu Young; Cai, Qian

    2017-02-03

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is the major neuronal β-secretase for amyloid-β generation and is degraded in lysosomes. The autophagy-lysosomal system plays a key role in the maintenance of cellular homeostasis in neurons. Recent studies established that nascent autophagosomes in distal axons move predominantly in the retrograde direction toward the soma, where mature lysosomes are mainly located. However, it remains unknown whether autophagy plays a critical role in regulation of BACE1 trafficking and degradation. Here, we report that induction of neuronal autophagy enhances BACE1 turnover, which is suppressed by lysosomal inhibition. A significant portion of BACE1 is recruited to the autophagy pathway and co-migrates robustly with autophagic vacuoles along axons. Moreover, we reveal that autophagic vacuole-associated BACE1 is accumulated in the distal axon of Alzheimer's disease-related mutant human APP transgenic neurons and mouse brains. Inducing autophagy in mutant human APP neurons augments autophagic retention of BACE1 in distal axons, leading to enhanced β-cleavage of APP. This phenotype can be reversed by Snapin-enhanced retrograde transport, which facilitates BACE1 trafficking to lysosomes for degradation. Therefore, our study provides new insights into autophagy-mediated regulation of BACE1 turnover and APP processing, thus building a foundation for future development of potential Alzheimer's disease therapeutic strategies.

  16. Insights from 14C into C loss pathways in degraded peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Martin; Evans, Chris; Allott, Tim; Stimson, Andrew; Goulsbra, Claire

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are important global stores of terrestrial carbon. Lowered water tables due to changing climate and direct or indirect human intervention produce a deeper aerobic zone and have the potential to enhance loss of stored carbon from the peat profile. The quasi continuous accumulation of organic matter in active peatlands means that the age of fluvial dissolved organic carbon exported from peatland systems is related to the source depth in the peat profile. Consequently 14C analysis of DOC in waters draining peatlands has the potential not only to tell us about the source of fluvial carbon and the stability of the peatland but also about the dominant hydrological pathways in the peatland system. This paper will present new radiocarbon determinations from peatland streams draining the heavily eroded peatlands of the southern Pennine uplands in the UK. These blanket peatland systems are highly degraded, with extensive bare peat and gully erosion resulting from air pollution during the industrial revolution, overgrazing, wildfire and climatic changes. Deep and extensive gullying has significantly modified the hydrology of these systems leading to local and more widespread drawdown of water table. 14C data from DOC in drainage waters are presented from two catchments; one with extensive gully erosion and the other with a combination of gully erosion and sheet erosion of the peat. At the gully eroded site DOC in drainage waters is as old as 160 BP but at the site with extensive sheet erosion dates of up to 1069 BP are amongst the oldest recorded from blanket peatland globally These data indicate significant degradation of stored carbon from the eroding peatlands. Initial comparisons of the 14C data with modelled water table for the catchments and depth-age curves for catchment peats suggests that erosion of the peat surface, allowing decomposition of exposed older organic material is a potential mechanism producing aged carbon from the eroded catchment. This

  17. Importance of lysosomal cysteine proteases in lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman Harold A

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human lysosomal cysteine proteases are a family of 11 proteases whose members include cathepsins B, C, H, L, and S. The biology of these proteases was largely ignored for decades because of their lysosomal location and the belief that their function was limited to the terminal degradation of proteins. In the past 10 years, this view has changed as these proteases have been found to have specific functions within cells. This review highlights some of these functions, specifically their roles in matrix remodeling and in regulating the immune response, and their relationship to lung diseases.

  18. Cytolethal distending toxins require components of the ER-associated degradation pathway for host cell entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aria Eshraghi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular acting protein exotoxins produced by bacteria and plants are important molecular determinants that drive numerous human diseases. A subset of these toxins, the cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs, are encoded by several Gram-negative pathogens and have been proposed to enhance virulence by allowing evasion of the immune system. CDTs are trafficked in a retrograde manner from the cell surface through the Golgi apparatus and into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER before ultimately reaching the host cell nucleus. However, the mechanism by which CDTs exit the ER is not known. Here we show that three central components of the host ER associated degradation (ERAD machinery, Derlin-2 (Derl2, the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Hrd1, and the AAA ATPase p97, are required for intoxication by some CDTs. Complementation of Derl2-deficient cells with Derl2:Derl1 chimeras identified two previously uncharacterized functional domains in Derl2, the N-terminal 88 amino acids and the second ER-luminal loop, as required for intoxication by the CDT encoded by Haemophilus ducreyi (Hd-CDT. In contrast, two motifs required for Derlin-dependent retrotranslocation of ERAD substrates, a conserved WR motif and an SHP box that mediates interaction with the AAA ATPase p97, were found to be dispensable for Hd-CDT intoxication. Interestingly, this previously undescribed mechanism is shared with the plant toxin ricin. These data reveal a requirement for multiple components of the ERAD pathway for CDT intoxication and provide insight into a Derl2-dependent pathway exploited by retrograde trafficking toxins.

  19. Cytolethal distending toxins require components of the ER-associated degradation pathway for host cell entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshraghi, Aria; Dixon, Shandee D; Tamilselvam, Batcha; Kim, Emily Jin-Kyung; Gargi, Amandeep; Kulik, Julia C; Damoiseaux, Robert; Blanke, Steven R; Bradley, Kenneth A

    2014-07-01

    Intracellular acting protein exotoxins produced by bacteria and plants are important molecular determinants that drive numerous human diseases. A subset of these toxins, the cytolethal distending toxins (CDTs), are encoded by several Gram-negative pathogens and have been proposed to enhance virulence by allowing evasion of the immune system. CDTs are trafficked in a retrograde manner from the cell surface through the Golgi apparatus and into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before ultimately reaching the host cell nucleus. However, the mechanism by which CDTs exit the ER is not known. Here we show that three central components of the host ER associated degradation (ERAD) machinery, Derlin-2 (Derl2), the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Hrd1, and the AAA ATPase p97, are required for intoxication by some CDTs. Complementation of Derl2-deficient cells with Derl2:Derl1 chimeras identified two previously uncharacterized functional domains in Derl2, the N-terminal 88 amino acids and the second ER-luminal loop, as required for intoxication by the CDT encoded by Haemophilus ducreyi (Hd-CDT). In contrast, two motifs required for Derlin-dependent retrotranslocation of ERAD substrates, a conserved WR motif and an SHP box that mediates interaction with the AAA ATPase p97, were found to be dispensable for Hd-CDT intoxication. Interestingly, this previously undescribed mechanism is shared with the plant toxin ricin. These data reveal a requirement for multiple components of the ERAD pathway for CDT intoxication and provide insight into a Derl2-dependent pathway exploited by retrograde trafficking toxins.

  20. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana T Antunes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA, a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene haploinsufficiency. While the mechanisms underlying the cytopenia phenotype of patients with these mutations are not completely understood, it is believed that stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor protein may induce apoptosis in the progenitor cells. In stark contrast, tumor cells from zebrafish with RP gene haploinsufficiency are unable to stabilize p53 even when exposed to acute DNA damage despite transcribing wild type p53 normally. In this work we demonstrate that p53 has a limited role in eliciting the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA. In fact, we find that RP-deficient embryos exhibit the same normal p53 transcription, absence of p53 protein, and impaired p53 response to DNA damage as RP haploinsufficient tumor cells. Recently we reported that RP mutations suppress activity of the AKT pathway, and we show here that this suppression results in proteasomal degradation of p53. By re-activating the AKT pathway or by inhibiting GSK-3, a downstream modifier that normally represses AKT signaling, we are able to restore the stabilization of p53. Our work indicates that the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA is dependent on factors other than p53, and may hold clinical significance for both DBA and the increasing number of cancers revealing spontaneous mutations in RP genes.

  1. Lysosomal Storage Disorders and Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M. Pastores

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs are infrequent to rare conditions caused by mutations that lead to a disruption in the usual sequential degradation of macromolecules or their transit within the cell. Gaucher disease (GD, a lipidosis, is among the most common LSD, with an estimated incidence of 1 in 40,000 among the Caucasian, non-Jewish population. Studies have indicated an increased frequency of polyclonal and monoclonal gammopathy among patients with GD. It has been shown that two major sphingolipids that accumulate in GD, namely, β-glucosylceramide 22:0 (βGL1-22 and glucosylsphingosine (LGL1, can be recognized by a distinct subset of CD1d-restricted human and murine type II natural killer T (NKT cells. Investigations undertaken in an affected mouse model revealed βGL1-22- and LGL1-specific NKT cells were present and constitutively promoted the expression of a T-follicular helper (TFH phenotype; injection of these lipids led to downstream induction of germinal center B cells, hypergammaglobulinemia, and the production of antilipid antibodies. Subsequent studies have found clonal immunoglobulin in 33% of sporadic human monoclonal gammopathies is also specific for the lysolipids LGL1 and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC. Furthermore, substrate reduction ameliorated GD-associated gammopathy in mice. It had been hypothesized that chronic antigenic stimulation by the abnormal lipid storage and associated immune dysregulation may be the underlying mechanism for the increased incidence of monoclonal and polyclonal gammopathies, as well as an increased incidence of multiple myeloma in patients with GD. Current observations support this proposition and illustrate the value of investigations into rare diseases, which as ‘experiments of nature’ may provide insights into conditions found in the general population that continue to remain incompletely understood.

  2. Ozonation degradation of microcystin-LR in aqueous solution: intermediates, byproducts and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jing; Chen, Zhong-lin; Wang, Zhe; Shen, Ji-min; Chen, Qian; Kang, Jing; Yang, Lei; Liu, Xiao-wei; Nie, Chang-xin

    2014-10-15

    The intermediates and byproducts formed during the ozonation of microcystin-LR (MC-LR, m/z = 995.5) and the probable degradation pathway were investigated at different initial molar ratios of ozone to MC-LR ([O3]0/[MC-LR]0). Seven reaction intermediates with m/z ≥ 795.4 were observed by LC/MS, and four of them (m/z = 815.4, 827.3, 853.3 and 855.3) have not been previously reported. Meanwhile, six aldehyde-based byproducts with molecular weights of 30-160 were detected for the first time. Intermediates structures demonstrated that ozone reacted with two sites of MC-LR: the diene bonds in the Adda side chain and the Mdha amino acid in the cyclic structure. The fragment from the Adda side chain oxidative cleavage could be further oxidized to an aldehyde with a molecular weight of 160 at low [O3]0/[MC-LR]0. Meanwhile, the polypeptide structure of MC-LR was difficult to be further oxidized, unless [O3]0/[MC-LR]0 > 10. After further oxidation of the intermediates, five other aldehyde-based byproducts were detected by GC/MS: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, isovaleraldehyde, glyoxal and methylglyoxal. Formaldehyde, isovaleraldehyde and methylglyoxal were the dominant species. The yields of the aldehydes varied greatly, depending on the value of [O3]0/[MC-LR]0.

  3. REGγ regulates ERα degradation via ubiquitin–proteasome pathway in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Fan; Liang, Yan [Breast Disease Center, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Bi, Jiong [Laboratory of General Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yet-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Chen, Li; Zhang, Fan [Breast Disease Center, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Cui, Youhong [Institute of Pathology and Southwest Cancer Center, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Jiang, Jun, E-mail: jcbd@medmail.com.cn [Breast Disease Center, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • High expression of REGγ is correlated with ERα status and poor clinical features. • Cell growth, mobility and invasion are significantly impaired by REGγ knockdown. • REGγ indirectly regulates ERα protein expression. - Abstract: REGγ is a proteasome coactivator which regulates proteolytic activity in eukaryotic cells. Abundant lines of evidence have showed that REGγ is over expressed in a number of human carcinomas. However, its precise role in the pathogenesis of cancer is still unclear. In this study, by examining 200 human breast cancer specimens, we demonstrated that REGγ was highly expressed in breast cancers, and the expression of REGγ was positively correlated with breast cancer patient estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) status. Moreover, the expression of REGγ was found positively associated with poor clinical features and low survival rates in ERα positive breast cancer patients. Further cell culture studies using MCF7 and BT474 breast cancer cell lines showed that cell proliferation, motility, and invasion capacities were decreased significantly by REGγ knockdown. Lastly, we demonstrated that REGγ indirectly regulates the degradation of ERα protein via ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. In conclusion, our findings provide the evidence that REGγ expression was positively correlated with ERα status and poor clinical prognosis in ERα positive breast cancer patients. As well, we disclose a new connection between the two molecules that are both highly expressed in most breast cancer cases.

  4. Evolutionary, computational, and biochemical studies of the salicylaldehyde dehydrogenases in the naphthalene degradation pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Baolei; Jia, Xiaomeng; Hyun Kim, Kyung; Ji Pu, Zhong; Kang, Myung-Suk; Ok Jeon, Che

    2017-01-01

    Salicylaldehyde (SAL) dehydrogenase (SALD) is responsible for the oxidation of SAL to salicylate using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as a cofactor in the naphthalene degradation pathway. We report the use of a protein sequence similarity network to make functional inferences about SALDs. Network and phylogenetic analyses indicated that SALDs and the homologues are present in bacteria and fungi. The key residues in SALDs were analyzed by evolutionary methods and a molecular simulation analysis. The results showed that the catalytic residue is most highly conserved, followed by the residues binding NAD+ and then the residues binding SAL. A molecular simulation analysis demonstrated the binding energies of the amino acids to NAD+ and/or SAL and showed that a conformational change is induced by binding. A SALD from Alteromonas naphthalenivorans (SALDan) that undergoes trimeric oligomerization was characterized enzymatically. The results showed that SALDan could catalyze the oxidation of a variety of aromatic aldehydes. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected residues binding NAD+ and/or SAL affected the enzyme’s catalytic efficiency, but did not eliminate catalysis. Finally, the relationships among the evolution, catalytic mechanism, and functions of SALD are discussed. Taken together, this study provides an expanded understanding of the evolution, functions, and catalytic mechanism of SALD. PMID:28233868

  5. α-Synuclein-induced lysosomal dysfunction occurs through disruptions in protein trafficking in human midbrain synucleinopathy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzulli, Joseph R; Zunke, Friederike; Isacson, Ole; Studer, Lorenz; Krainc, Dimitri

    2016-02-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates comprised of α-synuclein (α-syn). A major barrier in treatment discovery for PD is the lack of identifiable therapeutic pathways capable of reducing aggregates in human neuronal model systems. Mutations in key components of protein trafficking and cellular degradation machinery represent important risk factors for PD; however, their precise role in disease progression and interaction with α-syn remains unclear. Here, we find that α-syn accumulation reduced lysosomal degradation capacity in human midbrain dopamine models of synucleinopathies through disrupting hydrolase trafficking. Accumulation of α-syn at the cell body resulted in aberrant association with cis-Golgi-tethering factor GM130 and disrupted the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi localization of rab1a, a key mediator of vesicular transport. Overexpression of rab1a restored Golgi structure, improved hydrolase trafficking and activity, and reduced pathological α-syn in patient neurons. Our work suggests that enhancement of lysosomal hydrolase trafficking may prove beneficial in synucleinopathies and indicates that human midbrain disease models may be useful for identifying critical therapeutic pathways in PD and related disorders.

  6. Inhibitory effect of mTOR activator MHY1485 on autophagy: suppression of lysosomal fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Ja Choi

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a major degradative process responsible for the disposal of cytoplasmic proteins and dysfunctional organelles via the lysosomal pathway. During the autophagic process, cells form double-membraned vesicles called autophagosomes that sequester disposable materials in the cytoplasm and finally fuse with lysosomes. In the present study, we investigated the inhibition of autophagy by a synthesized compound, MHY1485, in a culture system by using Ac2F rat hepatocytes. Autophagic flux was measured to evaluate the autophagic activity. Autophagosomes were visualized in Ac2F cells transfected with AdGFP-LC3 by live-cell confocal microscopy. In addition, activity of mTOR, a major regulatory protein of autophagy, was assessed by western blot and docking simulation using AutoDock 4.2. In the result, treatment with MHY1485 suppressed the basal autophagic flux, and this inhibitory effect was clearly confirmed in cells under starvation, a strong physiological inducer of autophagy. The levels of p62 and beclin-1 did not show significant change after treatment with MHY1485. Decreased co-localization of autophagosomes and lysosomes in confocal microscopic images revealed the inhibitory effect of MHY1485 on lysosomal fusion during starvation-induced autophagy. These effects of MHY1485 led to the accumulation of LC3II and enlargement of the autophagosomes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, MHY1485 induced mTOR activation and correspondingly showed a higher docking score than PP242, a well-known ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, in docking simulation. In conclusion, MHY1485 has an inhibitory effect on the autophagic process by inhibition of fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes leading to the accumulation of LC3II protein and enlarged autophagosomes. MHY1485 also induces mTOR activity, providing a possibility for another regulatory mechanism of autophagy by the MHY compound. The significance of this study is the finding of a novel

  7. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide–sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptors Required for Late Endosome–Lysosome and Homotypic Lysosome Fusion in Alveolar Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Diane McVey; Pevsner, Jonathan; Scullion, Matthew A.; Vaughn, Michael; Kaplan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome–lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome–lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome–lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome–lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages. PMID:10888671

  8. A vacuolar carboxypeptidase mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is degraded by the ERAD pathway independently of its N-glycan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Masaya; Kawanabe, Mitsuyoshi; Hayashi, Yoko; Endo, Toshiya [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi, E-mail: shuh@biochem.chem.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2010-03-12

    Misfolded proteins produced in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are degraded by a mechanism, the ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here we report establishment of the experimental system to analyze the ERAD in plant cells. Carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) is a vacuolar enzyme and its mutant CPY* is degraded by the ERAD in yeast. Since Arabidopsis thaliana has AtCPY, an ortholog of yeast CPY, we constructed and expressed fusion proteins consisting of AtCPY and GFP and of AtCPY*, which carries a mutation homologous to yeast CPY*, and GFP in A. thaliana cells. While AtCPY-GFP was efficiently transported to the vacuole, AtCPY*-GFP was retained in the ER to be degraded in proteasome- and Cdc48-dependent manners. We also found that AtCPY*-GFP was degraded by the ERAD in yeast cells, but that its single N-glycan did not function as a degradation signal in yeast or plant cells. Therefore, AtCPY*-GFP can be used as a marker protein to analyze the ERAD pathway, likely for nonglycosylated substrates, in plant cells.

  9. Electrochemical treatment of iopromide under conditions of reverse osmosis concentrates--elucidation of the degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütke Eversloh, C; Henning, N; Schulz, M; Ternes, T A

    2014-01-01

    Application of reverse osmosis for the reuse of treated wastewater on the one hand offers a way to provide high quality effluent waters. On the other hand reverse osmosis concentrates exhibiting highly concentrated contaminants are produced simultaneously. Electrochemical treatment of those concentrates is regarded as one possible answer to the problem of their disposal into surface waters. Nevertheless, due to the diversity of direct and indirect degradation processes during electrolysis, special care has to be taken about the formation of toxic transformation products (TPs). In this study the electrochemical transformation of the X-ray contrast medium iopromide was investigated as a representative of biologically persistent compounds. For this purpose, anodic oxidation at boron doped diamond as well as cathodic reduction using a platinum electrode were considered. Kinetic analyses revealed a transformation of 100 μM iopromide with first order kinetic constants between 0.6 and 1.6 × 10(-4) s(-1) at the beginning and a subsequent increase of the reaction order due to the influence of secondary oxidants formed during electrolysis. Mineralization up to 96% was achieved after about 7.5 h. At shorter treatment times several oxidatively and reductively formed transformation products were detected, whereas deiodinated iopromide represented the major fraction. Nevertheless, the latter exhibited negligible toxicological relevance according to tests on vibrio fisheri. Additional experiments utilizing a divided cell setup enabled the elucidation of the transformation pathway, whereas emerging TPs could be identified by means of high resolution mass spectrometry and MS(n)-fragmentations. During electrolysis the iodine released from Iopromide was found to 90% as iodide and to 10% as iodate even in the open cell experiments, limiting the potential formation of toxic iodo-disinfection by-products. Chlorinated TPs were not found.

  10. Assessing degradation and recovery pathways in lakes impacted by eutrophication using the sediment record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen eBennion

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to restore enriched lakes have increased yet there remains uncertainty about whether restoration targets can be achieved and over what timescale. Paleoecological techniques, principally diatom analyses, were used to examine the degree of impact and recovery in 12 European lakes subject to eutrophication and subsequent reduction in nutrient loading. Dissimilarity scores showed that all sites experienced progressive deviation from the reference sample (core bottom prior to nutrient reduction, and principal curves indicated gradual compositional change with enrichment. When additive models were applied to the latter, the changes were statistically significant in 9 of the 12 sites. Shifts in diatom composition following reduction in nutrient loading were more equivocal, with a reversal towards the reference flora seen only in four of the deep lakes and one of the shallow lakes. Of these, only two were significant (Lake Bled and Mjøsa. Alternative nutrient sources seem to explain the lack of apparent recovery in the other deep lakes. In three shallow lakes diatom assemblages were replaced by a community associated with lower productivity but not the one seen prior to enrichment. Internal loading and top down control may influence recovery in shallow lakes and climate change may have confounded recovery in several of the study sites. Hence, ecosystem recovery is not simply a reversal of the degradation pathway and may take several decades to complete or, for some lakes, may not take place at all. By assessing ecological change over a decadal to centennial timescale, the study highlights the important role that paleolimnology can play in establishing a benchmark against which managers can evaluate the degree to which their restoration efforts are successful.

  11. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis : LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated memb

  12. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis : LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated

  13. Functional implications of lymsosomal pathways for cell autophagy%溶酶体途径在细胞自噬过程中的功能意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海杰; 谭玉珍

    2011-01-01

    Lysosome represents a high conserved heterogeneity and is a key organelle for cell autophagy. Cytoplasmic protein and cellular organdies are eventually degraded within lysosomes. Lymosome plays important physiological roles in maintaining equilibrium of cellular structures and functions. Lysosomal pathways of autophagy are effective for cells to eliminate some kinds of pathogens and involved in antigen presentation. Autophagic pathway is linked to heterophagic pathway in lysosomes. During autophagy processes, impairment of lysosomal functions is implicated in some diseases and aging. In this review, we highlight lysosomal pathways of cell autophagy and their functional implications.%溶酶体具有高度保守的异质性,是细胞自噬的关键细胞器.细胞质中的蛋白质和细胞器最终在溶酶体降解,故溶酶体在维持细胞结构和功能的平衡方面起着重要生理作用.通过自噬溶酶体途径,细胞可清除某些病原体并参与抗原呈递.细胞白噬与异噬经溶酶体密切联系.自噬过程中溶酶体功能障碍与某些疾病和衰老等相关.对细胞白噬的溶酶体途径及其功能意义作了概述.

  14. Electro-catalytic oxidation of phenacetin with a three-dimensional reactor: Degradation pathway and removal mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Mengshi; Zhang, Yonggang

    2016-06-01

    Phenacetin is a common analgesic, anti-arthritic and anti-rheumatic drug. This study dealt with the degradation of phenacetin in alkaline media using a three-dimensional reactor with particle electrodes. Particular attention was paid to the degradation pathway and the reaction mechanism in the system. Liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to identify the intermediates. The phenacetin was observed to be firstly cut off the branch chains main by direct oxidation, and then the intermediates further degraded to ring opening products by hydroxyl radical resulting from indirect oxidation and finally mineralized to CO2, H2O. A possible removal mechanism was proposed that direct and indirect oxidation together did effect on the pollutants with oxygen.

  15. Gaucher disease: a lysosomal neurodegenerative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W J; Zhang, X; Chen, W W

    2015-04-01

    Gaucher disease is a multisystemic disorder that affects men and woman in equal numbers and occurs in all ethnic groups at any age with racial variations and an estimated worldwide incidence of 1/75,000. It is caused by a genetic deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase due to mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene, and resulting in lack of glucocerebroside degradation. The subsequent accumulation of glucocerebroside in lysosomes of tissue macrophages primarily in the liver, bone marrow and spleen, causes damage in haematological, skeletal and nervous systems. The clinical manifestations show a high degree of variability with symptoms that varies according to organs involved. In many cases, these disorders do not correlate with mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene. Although several mutations have been identified as responsible for the deficient activity of glucocerebrosidase, mechanisms by which this enzymatic defect leads to Gaucher disease remain poorly understood. Recent reports indicate the implication of complex mechanisms, including enzyme deficiency, substrate accumulation, unfolded protein response, and macrophage activation. Further elucidating these mechanisms will advance understanding of Gaucher disease and related disorders.

  16. Effect of surface chemistry of Fe-Ni nanoparticles on mechanistic pathways of azo dye degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokare, Alok D; Chikate, Rajeev C; Rode, Chandrashekhar V; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2007-11-01

    The degradation of Orange G, a monoazo dye, in aqueous solutions was investigated using as-synthesized and stored Fe-Ni bimetallic nanoparticles. Batch experiments with a nanocatalyst loading of 3 g/L showed complete dye degradation (150 mg/L) after 10 min of reaction time. HPLC-MS analysis of the degradation products showed that as-synthesized nanoparticles reductively cleaved the azo linkage to produce aniline as the major degradation product. However, 1-year-stored nanoparticles showed an oxidative degradation of Orange G through a hydroxyl-radical induced coupling of parent and/or product molecules. XPS analysis in corroboration with HPLC-MS data showed that the surface chemistry between Fe and Ni in as-synthesized and stored nanoparticles play a crucial role in directing the mode of degradation. Reductive dye degradation using as-synthesized nanoparticles proceeded through hydride transfer from nickel, whereas formation of a Fe2+ -Ni(0) galvanic cell in stored nanoparticles generated hydroxyl radicals from water in a nonFenton type reaction. The latter were responsible for the generation of radical centers on the dye molecule, which led to a coupling-mediated oxidative degradation of Orange G. The generation of hydroxyl radicals is further substantiated with radical quenching experiments using ascorbic acid indicating that stored nanoparticles degrade Orange G through a predominantly oxidative mechanism. HPLC-MS and XPS analysis of dye degradation using as-synthesized nanoparticles exposed to air and water confirmed that the reductive or oxidative degradation capability of Fe-Ni nanoparticles is decided by the time and type of catalyst aging process.

  17. [Metabolic pathways of OGCP and the influence of parkin protein on the metabolism of OGCP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-yu; Cao, Li; Tang, Bei-sha; Zhang, Hai-nan; Guo, Ji-feng; Liao, Shu-sheng; Tang, Jian-guang; Yan, Xin-riang; Tan, Li-ming

    2011-03-01

    To study the metabolic pathways of 2-oxoglutarate carrier protein (OGCP)and the influence of parkin protein on the metabolism of OGCP. The OGCP metabolic pathways were identified through inhibiting proteasome activities with specific proteasome inhibitors and protease inhibitors. The isotope pulse-chase experiments were performed to measure the turnover rate of OGCP and to study the influence of parkin protein on the metabolism of OGCP. Proteasome inhibitors and protease inhibitors inhibited OGCP degradation. The OGCP metabolism had a half-life of about 8-10 h. Overexpression of parkin protein accelerated the OGCP degradation. OGCP degrades through proteasome and lysosome degradation pathways. The degradation of parkin protein can promote the degradation of OGCP.

  18. TRIM22 Inhibits the TRAF6-stimulated NF-κB Pathway by Targeting TAB2 for Degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Qiu; Fang Huang; Han Xiao; Binlian Sun; Rongge Yang

    2013-01-01

    Tripartite motif containing 22 (TRIM22),a member of the TRIM/RBCC family,has been reported to activate the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway in unstimulated macrophage cell lines,but the detailed mechanisms governing this activation remains unclear.We investigated this mechanism in HEK293T cells.We found that overexpression of TRIM22 could activate the NF-κB pathway and conversely,could inhibit the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6)-stimulated NF-κB pathway in HEK293T cells.Further experiments showed that TRIM22 could decrease the self-ubiquitination of TRAF6,and interact with and degrade transforming growth factor-β activated kinase 1 binding protein 2 (TAB2),and that these effects could be partially rescued by a TRIM22 RING domain deletion mutant.Collectively,our data indicate that overexpression of TRIM22 may negatively regulate the TRAF6-stimulated NF-κB pathway by interacting with and degrading TAB2.

  19. WO3/Pt nanoparticles promote light-induced lipid peroxidation and lysosomal instability within tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrea J.; Petty, Howard R.

    2016-02-01

    Although metal-metal oxide nanoparticles have attracted considerable interest as catalysts, they have attracted little interest in nanomedicine. This is likely due to the fact that metal oxide semiconductors generally require biologically harmful ultraviolet excitation. In contrast, this study focuses upon WO3/Pt nanoparticles, which can be excited by visible light. To optimize the nanoparticles’ catalytic performance, platinization was performed at alkaline pH. These nanoparticles destroyed organic dyes, consumed dissolved oxygen and produced hydroxyl radicals. 4T1 breast cancer cells internalized WO3/Pt nanoparticles within the membrane-bound endo-lysosomal compartment as shown by electron and fluorescence microscopy. During visible light exposure, but not in darkness, WO3/Pt nanoparticles manufacture reactive oxygen species, promote lipid peroxidation, and trigger lysosomal membrane disruption. As cells of the immune system degrade organic molecules, produce reactive oxygen species, and activate the lipid peroxidation pathway within target cells, these nanoparticles mimic the chemical attributes of immune effector cells. These biomimetic nanoparticles should become useful in managing certain cancers, especially ocular cancer.

  20. Roles of CUP-5, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of human TRPML1, in lysosome and gut granule biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Hanna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CUP-5 is a Transient Receptor Potential protein in C. elegans that is the orthologue of mammalian TRPML1. Loss of TRPML1 results in the lysosomal storage disorder Mucolipidosis type IV. Loss of CUP-5 results in embryonic lethality and the accumulation of enlarged yolk granules in developing intestinal cells. The embryonic lethality of cup-5 mutants is rescued by mutations in mrp-4, which is required for gut granule differentiation. Gut granules are intestine-specific lysosome-related organelles that accumulate birefringent material. This link between CUP-5 and gut granules led us to determine the roles of CUP-5 in lysosome and gut granule biogenesis in developing intestinal cells. Results We show that CUP-5 protein localizes to lysosomes, but not to gut granules, in developing intestinal cells. Loss of CUP-5 results in defects in endo-lysosomal transport in developing intestinal cells of C. elegans embryos. This ultimately leads to the appearance of enlarged terminal vacuoles that show defective lysosomal degradation and that have lysosomal and endosomal markers. In contrast, gut granule biogenesis is normal in the absence of CUP-5. Furthermore, loss of CUP-5 does not result in inappropriate fusion or mixing of content between lysosomes and gut granules. Conclusions Using an in vivo model of MLIV, we show that there is a defect in lysosomal transport/biogenesis that is earlier than the presumed function of TRPML1 in terminal lysosomes. Our results indicate that CUP-5 is required for the biogenesis of lysosomes but not of gut granules. Thus, cellular phenotypes in Mucolipidosis type IV are likely not due to defects in lysosome-related organelle biogenesis, but due to progressive defects in lysosomal transport that lead to severe lysosomal dysfunction.

  1. Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways used by Coastal Sediment Microbial Communities exposed to Crude Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding-Astudillo, F.; Sharrar, A.; Orcutt, B.

    2016-02-01

    The site-specific microbial community response to crude oil exposure in marine environments is not well described. Moreover, the abundance of genes implicated in long-chain alkane (LCA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) degradation are not well understood. Coastal sediments from the Beaufort Sea, Gulf of Alaska, and Portland Harbor were treated with crude oil and incubated aerobically. Deep-sea sediments from the Gulf of Mexico were treated with the same crude oil and anaerobically incubated in situ for five months before recovery. Cycloclasticus, a known hydrocarbon-degrader, was abundant in all oiled, aerobic samples regardless of temperature, demonstrating a generalist oil-response strategy. Other hydrocarbon degrading bacteria showed differential response to either site or temperature. Primers for alkB, assA, bssA, and ncr, catabolic gene markers for aerobic LCA degradation, anaerobic LCA degradation, anaerobic LCA & PAH degradation, and anaerobic PAH degradation, respectively, were found in literature and tested on DNA extracts in a QPCR-based assay. Gene abundance was site and condition variable.

  2. Biomarkers in Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin Bobillo Lobato

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A biomarker is generally an analyte that indicates the presence and/or extent of a biological process, which is in itself usually directly linked to the clinical manifestations and outcome of a particular disease. The biomarkers in the field of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs have particular relevance where spectacular therapeutic initiatives have been achieved, most notably with the introduction of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT. There are two main types of biomarkers. The first group is comprised of those molecules whose accumulation is directly enhanced as a result of defective lysosomal function. These molecules represent the storage of the principal macro-molecular substrate(s of a specific enzyme or protein, whose function is deficient in the given disease. In the second group of biomarkers, the relationship between the lysosomal defect and the biomarker is indirect. In this group, the biomarker reflects the effects of the primary lysosomal defect on cell, tissue, or organ functions. There is no “gold standard” among biomarkers used to diagnosis and/or monitor LSDs, but there are a number that exist that can be used to reasonably assess and monitor the state of certain organs or functions. A number of biomarkers have been proposed for the analysis of the most important LSDs. In this review, we will summarize the most promising biomarkers in major LSDs and discuss why these are the most promising candidates for screening systems.

  3. PIG7 promotes leukemia cell chemosensitivity via lysosomal membrane permeabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiazhuo; Peng, Leiwen; Niu, Ting; Wu, Yu; Li, Jianjun; Wang, Fangfang; Zheng, Yuhuan; Liu, Ting

    2016-01-26

    PIG7 localizes to lysosomal membrane in leukemia cells. Our previous work has shown that transduction of pig7 into a series of leukemia cell lines did not result in either apoptosis or differentiation of most tested cell lines. Interestingly, it did significantly sensitize these cell lines to chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we further investigated the mechanism underlying pig7-induced improved sensitivity of acute leukemia cells to chemotherapy. Our results demonstrated that the sensitization effect driven by exogenous pig7 was more effective in drug-resistant leukemia cell lines which had lower endogenous pig7 expression. Overexpression of pig7 did not directly activate the caspase apoptotic pathway, but decreased the lysosomal stability. The expression of pig7 resulted in lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and lysosomal protease (e.g. cathepsin B, D, L) release. Moreover, we also observed increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) induced by pig7. Some autophagy markers such as LC3I/II, ATG5 and Beclin-1, and necroptosis maker MLKL were also stimulated. However, intrinsic antagonism such as serine/cysteine protease inhibitors Spi2A and Cystatin C prevented downstream effectors from triggering leukemia cells, which were only on the "verge of apoptosis". When combined with chemotherapy, LMP increased and more proteases were released. Once this process was beyond the limit of intrinsic antagonism, it induced programmed cell death cooperatively via caspase-independent and caspase-dependent pathways.

  4. Glutamine supplementation stimulates protein-synthetic and inhibits protein-degradative signaling pathways in skeletal muscle of diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana C Lambertucci

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effect of glutamine (Gln supplementation on the signaling pathways regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation in the skeletal muscle of rats with streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetes. The expression levels of key regulatory proteins in the synthetic pathways (Akt, mTOR, GSK3 and 4E-BP1 and the degradation pathways (MuRF-1 and MAFbx were determined using real-time PCR and Western blotting in four groups of male Wistar rats; 1 control, non-supplemented with glutamine; 2 control, supplemented with glutamine; 3 diabetic, non-supplemented with glutamine; and 4 diabetic, supplemented with glutamine. Diabetes was induced by the intravenous injection of 65 mg/kg bw STZ in citrate buffer (pH 4.2; the non-diabetic controls received only citrate buffer. After 48 hours, diabetes was confirmed in the STZ-treated animals by the determination of blood glucose levels above 200 mg/dL. Starting on that day, a solution of 1 g/kg bw Gln in phosphate buffered saline (PBS was administered daily via gavage for 15 days to groups 2 and 4. Groups 1 and 3 received only PBS for the same duration. The rats were euthanized, and the soleus muscles were removed and homogenized in extraction buffer for the subsequent measurement of protein and mRNA levels. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in the muscle Gln content in the diabetic rats, and this level increased toward the control value in the diabetic rats receiving Gln. In addition, the diabetic rats exhibited a reduced mRNA expression of regulatory proteins in the protein synthesis pathway and increased expression of those associated with protein degradation. A reduction in the skeletal muscle mass in the diabetic rats was observed and was alleviated partially with Gln supplementation. The data suggest that glutamine supplementation is potentially useful for slowing the progression of muscle atrophy in patients with diabetes.

  5. 阿米洛利通过自噬-溶酶体途径保护PC12细胞%Amiloride protects PC12 cells from MPP + induced injury via autophagy-lysosome pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张润娉; 李建平

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the neuroprotective effects of amiloride; a non-selective blockers of acid-sensing ion channels,on PC12 cells and to view the influence of autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP).Methods:PC12 cells were tested with methy-phenylpyridi(MPP+),while giving amiloride as interventiong:The cells viability was analyzed by MTT assay; The cells injury was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay;Flow cytometry was used to study the apoptotic;Western blot analysis was used to study the autophagic mechanisms.Results:MPP + medium treatment resulted in significantly lower survival rate,the supernatant of LDH leakage was significantly higher,the apoptosis rate increased,the expression of LC3-Ⅱ was inhibited while induced more expression of LAMP2a ; but amiloride effectively improved the cell survival rate,reduced LDH leakage rate,inhibited apoptosis,and upregulated LC3-Ⅱ protein,which is associated decrease expression of LAMP2a.Conclusion:Amiloride can protect PC12 cells against MPP +-induced cell death by autophagic,through inhibition of acid-sensing ion channels activity.%目的:研究酸敏感离子通道阻断剂阿米洛利对大鼠肾上腺嗜铬细胞瘤PC12细胞株的保护作用及其对自噬-溶酶体通路的影响.方法:在PC12细胞模型上,观察甲基苯基吡啶(methy-phenylpyridi,MPP+)处理对细胞存活率(MTT检测)、乳酸脱氢酶(LDH)漏出率、细胞凋亡率的影响,并观察阿米洛利对MPP+所致细胞死亡的影响;蛋白质印迹法检测大自噬通路标志蛋白LC3和分子伴侣介导的自噬通路标志蛋白LAMP2a表达水平的变化.结果:MPP+导致细胞存活率明显降低,上清液中LDH漏出率明显升高,细胞凋亡率升高,抑制大自噬通路标志蛋白LC3-Ⅱ的表达,同时上调了分子伴侣介导的自噬通路标志性蛋白LAMP2a的表达水平;而阿米洛利可提高细胞存活率,减少上清液中LDH漏出率,降低细胞凋亡率,并能在激活大自噬通路的同时下调分

  6. Reduction of mutant huntingtin accumulation and toxicity by lysosomal cathepsins D and B in neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang Xiaosen; Liang Qiuli; Schneider Lonnie; Zhang Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Huntington's disease is caused by aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHtt) protein containing more than a 36 polyQ repeat. Upregulation of macroautophagy was suggested as a neuroprotective strategy to degrade mutant huntingtin. However, macroautophagy initiation has been shown to be highly efficient in neurons whereas lysosomal activities are rate limiting. The role of the lysosomal and other proteases in Huntington is not clear. Some studies suggest that certain protease a...

  7. Observation of intracellular interactions between DNA origami and lysosomes by the fluorescence localization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Meifang; Dai, Luru; Jiang, Qiao; Tang, Yunqing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Ding, Baoquan; Li, Junbai

    2016-07-28

    We obtained the fluorescence localization images of tube DNA origami nanostructures in NIH 3T3 cells for the first time. The fluorescence localization images of tube DNA origami nanostructures and TIRF images of lysosomes were combined and they revealed the detailed interactions between the two structures. Quantitative analysis illustrated that the tube origami can be captured as well as degraded by lysosomes with time.

  8. Identification of dimethylamine monooxygenase in marine bacteria reveals a metabolic bottleneck in the methylated amine degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidbury, Ian; Mausz, Michaela A; Scanlan, David J; Chen, Yin

    2017-07-01

    Methylated amines (MAs) are ubiquitous in the marine environment and their subsequent flux into the atmosphere can result in the formation of aerosols and ultimately cloud condensation nuclei. Therefore, these compounds have a potentially important role in climate regulation. Using Ruegeria pomeroyi as a model, we identified the genes encoding dimethylamine (DMA) monooxygenase (dmmABC) and demonstrate that this enzyme degrades DMA to monomethylamine (MMA). Although only dmmABC are required for enzyme activity in recombinant Escherichia coli, we found that an additional gene, dmmD, was required for the growth of R. pomeroyi on MAs. The dmmDABC genes are absent from the genomes of multiple marine bacteria, including all representatives of the cosmopolitan SAR11 clade. Consequently, the abundance of dmmDABC in marine metagenomes was substantially lower than the genes required for other metabolic steps of the MA degradation pathway. Thus, there is a genetic and potential metabolic bottleneck in the marine MA degradation pathway. Our data provide an explanation for the observation that DMA-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) are among the most abundant SOAs detected in fine marine particles over the North and Tropical Atlantic Ocean.

  9. Alterations in ROS activity and lysosomal pH account for distinct patterns of macroautophagy in LINCL and JNCL fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Vidal-Donet

    Full Text Available Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL are lysosomal storage disorders characterized by the accumulation of lipofuscin within lysosomes. Late infantile (LINCL and juvenile (JNCL are their most common forms and are caused by loss-of-function mutations in tripeptidyl peptidase 1 (TPP1, a lysosomal endopeptidase, and CLN3 protein (CLN3p, whose location and function is still controversial. LINCL patients suffer more severely from NCL consequences than JNCL patients, in spite of having in common an abnormal accumulation of material with a similar composition in the lysosomes. To identify distinctive characteristics that could explain the differences in the severity of LINCL and JNCL pathologies, we compared the protein degradation mechanisms in patientś fibroblasts. Pulse-chase experiments show a significant decrease in protein degradation by macroautophagy in fibroblasts bearing TPP1 (CLN2 and CLN3p (CLN3 mutations. In CLN2 fibroblasts, LC3-II levels and other procedures indicate an impaired formation of autophagosomes, which confirms the pulse-chase experiments. This defect is linked to an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, an upregulation of the Akt-mTOR signalling pathway and increased activities of the p38α and ERK1/2 MAPKs. In CLN3 fibroblasts, LC3-II analysis indicates impairment in autophagosome maturation and there is also a defect in fluid phase endocytosis, two alterations that can be related to an observed increase of 0.5 units in lysosomal pH. CLN3 fibroblasts also accumulate ROS but to a lower extent than CLN2. TPP1 activity is completely abrogated in CLN2 and partially diminished in CLN3 fibroblasts. TPP1 cleaves small hydrophobic proteins like subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase and the lack or a lower activity of this enzyme can contribute to lipofuscin accumulation. These alterations in TPP1 activity lead to an increased ROS production, especially in CLN2 in which it is aggravated by a decrease in catalase activity

  10. A novel role for ATM in regulating proteasome-mediated protein degradation through suppression of the ISG15 conjugation pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence M Wood

    Full Text Available Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T is an inherited immunodeficiency disorder wherein mutation of the ATM kinase is responsible for the A-T pathogenesis. Although the precise role of ATM in A-T pathogenesis is still unclear, its function in responding to DNA damage has been well established. Here we demonstrate that in addition to its role in DNA repair, ATM also regulates proteasome-mediated protein turnover through suppression of the ISG15 pathway. This conclusion is based on three major pieces of evidence: First, we demonstrate that proteasome-mediated protein degradation is impaired in A-T cells. Second, we show that the reduced protein turnover is causally linked to the elevated expression of the ubiquitin-like protein ISG15 in A-T cells. Third, we show that expression of the ISG15 is elevated in A-T cells derived from various A-T patients, as well as in brain tissues derived from the ATM knockout mice and A-T patients, suggesting that ATM negatively regulates the ISG15 pathway. Our current findings suggest for the first time that proteasome-mediated protein degradation is impaired in A-T cells due to elevated expression of the ISG15 conjugation pathway, which could contribute to progressive neurodegeneration in A-T patients.

  11. Mechanism and Reaction Pathways for Microcystin-LR Degradation through UV/H2O2 Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yafeng; Ren, Jing; Wang, Xiangrong; Fan, Zhengqiu

    2016-01-01

    Microcystin-LR (MCLR) is the most common cyanotoxin in contaminated aquatic systems. MCLR inhibits protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, leading to liver damage and tumor formation. MCLR is relatively stable owing to its cyclic structures. The combined UV/H2O2 technology can degrade MCLR efficiently. The second-order rate constant of the reaction between MCLR and hydroxyl radical (·OH) is 2.79(±0.23)×1010 M-1 s-1 based on the competition kinetics model using nitrobenzene as reference compound. The probable degradation pathway was analyzed through liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Results suggested that the major destruction pathways of MCLR were initiated by ·OH attack on the benzene ring and diene of the Adda side chain. The corresponding aldehyde or ketone peptide residues were formed through further oxidation. Another minor destruction pathway involved ·OH attack on the methoxy group of the Adda side chain, followed by complete removal of the methoxy group. The combined UV/H2O2 system is a promising technology for MCLR removal in contaminated aquatic systems.

  12. Photochemical degradation of atrazine in UV and UV/H2O2 process: pathways and toxic effects of products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Jin; Kim, Daekeun; Lee, Tae-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of atrazine in aqueous solution by UV or UV/H2O2 processes, and the toxic effects of the degradation products were explored. The mineralization of atrazine was not observed in the UV irradiation process, resulting in the production of hydroxyatrazine (OIET) as the final product. In the UV/H2O2 process, the final product was ammeline (OAAT), which was obtained by two different pathways of reaction: dechlorination followed by hydroxylation, and the de-alkylation of atrazine. The by-products of the reaction of dechlorination followed by hydroxylation were OIET and hydroxydeethyl atrazine (OIAT), and those of de-alkylation were deisopropyl atrazine (CEAT), deethyl atrazine (CIAT), and deethyldeisopropyl atrazine (CAAT). OIAT and OAAT appeared to be quite stable in the degradation of atrazine by the UV/H2O2 process. In a toxicity test using Daphnia magna, the acute toxic unit (TUa) was less than 1 of TUa (100/EC50, %) in the UV/H2O2 process after 30 min of reaction time, while 1.2 to 1.3 of TUa was observed in the UV process. The TUa values of atrazine and the degradation products have the following decreasing order: OIET> Atrazine> CEAT≈CIAT> CAAT. OIAT and OAAT did not show any toxic effects.

  13. Photolytic and photocatalytic degradation of quinclorac in ultrapure and paddy field water: identification of transformation products and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Lucía; Pérez-Parada, Andrés; Agüera, Ana; Cesio, Verónica; Heinzen, Horacio; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2012-05-01

    Quinclorac (QNC) is an effective but rather persistent herbicide commonly used in rice production. This herbicide presents a mean persistence in the environment so its residues are considered of environmental relevance. However, few studies have been conducted to investigate its environmental behavior and degradation. In the present work, direct photolysis and TiO(2) photocatalysis of the target compound in ultrapure and paddy field water were investigated. After 10h photolysis in ultrapure water, the concentration of QNC declined 26% and 54% at 250 and 700 W m(-2), respectively. However, the amount of quinclorac in paddy field water remained almost constant under the same irradiation conditions. QNC dissipated completely after 40 min of TiO(2) photocatalysis in ultrapure water, whereas 130 min were necessary to degrade 98% of the initial concentration in paddy field water. Possible QNC photolytic and photocatalytic degradation pathways are proposed after structure elucidation of the main transformation products, through liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and exact mass measurements. Pyridine ring hydroxylation at C-9 followed by ring opening and/or oxidative dechlorination were the key steps of QNC degradation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cometabolic degradation of chloramphenicol via a meta-cleavage pathway in a microbial fuel cell and its microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Zhang, Yanyan; Li, Daping

    2017-04-01

    The performance of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) in terms of degradation of chloramphenicol (CAP) was investigated. Approximately 84% of 50mg/L CAP was degraded within 12h in the MFC. A significant interaction of pH, temperature, and initial CAP concentration was found on removal of CAP, and a maximum degradation rate of 96.53% could theoretically be achieved at 31.48°C, a pH of 7.12, and an initial CAP concentration of 106.37mg/L. Moreover, CAP was further degraded through a ring-cleavage pathway. The antibacterial activity of CAP towards Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was largely eliminated by MFC treatment. High-throughput sequencing analysis indicated that Azonexus, Comamonas, Nitrososphaera, Chryseobacterium, Azoarcus, Rhodococcus, and Dysgonomonas were the predominant genera in the MFC anode biofilm. In conclusion, the MFC shows potential for the treatment of antibiotic residue-containing wastewater due to its high rates of CAP removal and energy recovery.

  15. Gamma radiolytic eradication of methoxychlor in aqueous media. The degradation pathways using HPLC and SPME-GC-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, S.B.; Zafar, A. [PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan). Central Analytical Facility Div.; Riaz, M. [PINSTECH, Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan). Chemistry Div.

    2013-08-01

    The gamma radiation-induced degradation of environmental pollutant methoxychlor in water was investigated. A {sup 60}Co gamma radiation source with a dose rate of 372 Gy h{sup -1} was used for gamma irradiation of 1 mg L{sup -1} and 10 mg L{sup -1} methoxychlor in water with a varied absorbed dose of 1-5 kGy. A single step clean up and pre-concentration procedure based on solid phase micro-extraction was optimized. The extent of radiolytic degradation was monitored by reversed phase HPLC-UV and GC-ECD. The trace and ultra trace level degradation products were identified using GC-MS-SPME by comparing their mass spectra with the NIST 98 m mass spectral library. Most of the generated products for 4 kGy dose are substituted chlorophenols. The reaction pathways of these substituted chlorophenols and benzophenone formation are also proposed. However, generated chlorophenols disappeared along with methoxychlor for an absorbed dose of 5 kGy. The attained degradation of methoxychlor is {proportional_to} 95% that reflects the potential use of ionization radiation for wastewater treatment. (orig.)

  16. A TRP channel in the lysosome regulates large particle phagocytosis via focal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, Mohammad; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Goschka, Andrew; Li, Xinran; Cheng, Xiping; Gregg, Evan; Azar, Marlene; Zhuo, Yue; Garrity, Abigail G; Gao, Qiong; Slaugenhaupt, Susan; Pickel, Jim; Zolov, Sergey N; Weisman, Lois S; Lenk, Guy M; Titus, Steve; Bryant-Genevier, Marthe; Southall, Noel; Juan, Marugan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2013-09-16

    Phagocytosis of large extracellular particles such as apoptotic bodies requires delivery of the intracellular endosomal and lysosomal membranes to form plasmalemmal pseudopods. Here, we identified mucolipin TRP channel 1 (TRPML1) as the key lysosomal Ca2+ channel regulating focal exocytosis and phagosome biogenesis. Both particle ingestion and lysosomal exocytosis are inhibited by synthetic TRPML1 blockers and are defective in macrophages isolated from TRPML1 knockout mice. Furthermore, TRPML1 overexpression and TRPML1 agonists facilitate both lysosomal exocytosis and particle uptake. Using time-lapse confocal imaging and direct patch clamping of phagosomal membranes, we found that particle binding induces lysosomal PI(3,5)P2 elevation to trigger TRPML1-mediated lysosomal Ca2+ release specifically at the site of uptake, rapidly delivering TRPML1-resident lysosomal membranes to nascent phagosomes via lysosomal exocytosis. Thus phagocytic ingestion of large particles activates a phosphoinositide- and Ca2+-dependent exocytosis pathway to provide membranes necessary for pseudopod extension, leading to clearance of senescent and apoptotic cells in vivo.

  17. The Octyl Ester of Ginsenoside Rh2 Induces Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization via Bax Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Zhang, Bing; Sun, Yong; Xiong, Zeng-Xing; Peng, Han; Deng, Ze-Yuan; Hu, Jiang-Ning

    2016-04-25

    Ginsenoside Rh2 is a potential pharmacologically active metabolite of ginseng. Previously, we have reported that an octyl ester derivative of ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2-O), has been confirmed to possess higher bioavailability and anticancer effect than Rh2 in vitro. In order to better assess the possibility that Rh2-O could be used as an anticancer compound, the underlying mechanism was investigated in this study. The present results revealed that lysosomal destabilization was involved in the early stage of cell apoptosis in HepG2 cells induced by Rh2-O. Rh2-O could induce an early lysosomal membrane permeabilization with the release of lysosomal protease cathepsins to the cytosol in HepG2 cells. The Cat B inhibitor (leu) and Cat D inhibitor (pepA) inhibited Rh2-O-induced HepG2 apoptosis as well as tBid production and Δφm depolarization, indicating that lysosomal permeabilization occurred upstream of mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, Rh2-O induced a significant increase in the protein levels of DRAM1 and Bax (p lysosomes of HepG2 cells. Knockdown of Bax partially inhibited Rh2-O-induced Cat D release from lysosomes. Thus it was concluded that Rh2-O induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells through activation of the lysosomal-mitochondrial apoptotic pathway involving the translocation of Bax to the lysosome.

  18. Nicotine Dehydrogenase Complexed with 6-Hydroxypseudooxynicotine Oxidase Involved in the Hybrid Nicotine-Degrading Pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens S33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huili; Xie, Kebo; Yu, Wenjun; Hu, Liejie; Huang, Haiyan; Xie, Huijun; Wang, Shuning

    2016-01-04

    Nicotine, a major toxic alkaloid in tobacco wastes, is degraded by bacteria, mainly via pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways. Previously, we discovered a new hybrid of the pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways in Agrobacterium tumefaciens S33 and characterized its key enzyme 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine (HSP) hydroxylase. Here, we purified the nicotine dehydrogenase initializing the nicotine degradation from the strain and found that it forms a complex with a novel 6-hydroxypseudooxynicotine oxidase. The purified complex is composed of three different subunits encoded by ndhAB and pno, where ndhA and ndhB overlap by 4 bp and are ∼26 kb away from pno. As predicted from the gene sequences and from chemical analyses, NdhA (82.4 kDa) and NdhB (17.1 kDa) harbor a molybdopterin cofactor and two [2Fe-2S] clusters, respectively, whereas Pno (73.3 kDa) harbors an flavin mononucleotide and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Mutants with disrupted ndhA or ndhB genes did not grow on nicotine but grew well on 6-hydroxynicotine and HSP, whereas the pno mutant did not grow on nicotine or 6-hydroxynicotine but grew well on HSP, indicating that NdhA and NdhB are responsible for initialization of nicotine oxidation. We successfully expressed pno in Escherichia coli and found that the recombinant Pno presented 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol reduction activity when it was coupled with 6-hydroxynicotine oxidation. The determination of reaction products catalyzed by the purified enzymes or mutants indicated that NdhAB catalyzed nicotine oxidation to 6-hydroxynicotine, whereas Pno oxidized 6-hydroxypseudooxynicotine to 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylsemialdehyde pyridine. These results provide new insights into this novel hybrid pathway of nicotine degradation in A. tumefaciens S33.

  19. Brief exposure to copper activates lysosomal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Karina; Coblenz, Jessica; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    Copper (Cu) is essential mineral, but its toxicity necessitates existence of powerful machinery responsible for the extraction of excess Cu from the cell. Cu exposure was recently shown to induce the translocation of Cu pump ATP7B to the lysosomes followed by lysosomal exocytosis. Here we sought to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of Cu on lysosomal exocytosis. We found that brief exposure to Cu activates lysosomal exocytosis, which was measured as a release of the lysosomal digestive enzyme β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) into the extracellular medium and by the presence lysosomal protein LAMP1 at the plasma membrane. Such release depends on calcium (Ca) and on the lysosomal SNARE VAMP7. ATP7B knockdown using RNAi suppressed the basal lysosomal exocytosis, but did not affect the ability of Cu to activate it. ATP7B knockdown was associated with sustained oxidative stress. The removal of Ca from the extracellular medium suppressed the Cu-dependent component of the lysosomal exocytosis. We propose that Cu promotes lysosomal exocytosis by facilitating a Ca-dependent step of the lysosomal exocytosis.

  20. Novel patient cell-based HTS assay for identification of small molecules for a lysosomal storage disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Geng

    Full Text Available Small molecules have been identified as potential therapeutic agents for lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs, inherited metabolic disorders caused by defects in proteins that result in lysosome dysfunctional. Some small molecules function assisting the folding of mutant misfolded lysosomal enzymes that are otherwise degraded in ER-associated degradation. The ultimate result is the enhancement of the residual enzymatic activity of the deficient enzyme. Most of the high throughput screening (HTS assays developed to identify these molecules are single-target biochemical assays. Here we describe a cell-based assay using patient cell lines to identify small molecules that enhance the residual arylsulfatase A (ASA activity found in patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD, a progressive neurodegenerative LSD. In order to generate sufficient cell lines for a large scale HTS, primary cultured fibroblasts from MLD patients were transformed using SV40 large T antigen. These SV40 transformed (SV40t cells showed to conserve biochemical characteristics of the primary cells. Using a specific colorimetric substrate para-nitrocatechol sulfate (pNCS, detectable ASA residual activity were observed in primary and SV40t fibroblasts from a MLD patient (ASA-I179S cultured in multi-well plates. A robust fluorescence ASA assay was developed in high-density 1,536-well plates using the traditional colorimetric pNCS substrate, whose product (pNC acts as "plate fluorescence quencher" in white solid-bottom plates. The quantitative cell-based HTS assay for ASA generated strong statistical parameters when tested against a diverse small molecule collection. This cell-based assay approach can be used for several other LSDs and genetic disorders, especially those that rely on colorimetric substrates which traditionally present low sensitivity for assay-miniaturization. In addition, the quantitative cell-based HTS assay here developed using patient cells creates an

  1. Intracellular protein degradation: from a vague idea through the lysosome and the ubiquitin-proteasome system and onto human diseases and drug targeting La degradación intracelular de proteínas: Desde una vaga idea, a través del lisosoma y el sistema ubiquitina-proteosoma a las enfermedades humanas y el blanco de las drogas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Ciechanover

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Between the 1950s and 1980s, scientists were focusing mostly on how the genetic code is transcribed to RNA and translated to proteins, but how proteins are degraded has remained a neglected research area. With the discovery of the lysosome by Christian de Duve it was assumed that cellular proteins are degraded within this organelle. Yet, several independent lines of experimental evidence strongly suggested that intracellular proteolysis is largely non-lysosomal, but the mechanisms involved remained obscure. The discovery of the ubiquitin-proteasome system resolved the enigma. We now recognize that degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in regulation of a broad array of cellular processes, such as cell cycle and division, regulation of transcription factors, and assurance of the cellular quality control. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human disease, such as malignancies and neurodegenerative disorders, which led subsequently to an increasing effort to develop mechanism-based drugs.Entre los años 1950 y 1980 los científicos focalizaron sus estudios sobre la forma en que el código genético es transcripto al ARN y traducido a las proteínas, dejando de lado la forma en que éstas se degradan. Con el descubrimiento de los lisosomas por Christian de Duve se asumió que las proteínas se degradaban en el interior de esa organela. Sin embargo, varias líneas de trabajo independientes sugerían fuertemente que la proteólisis intracelular era en su mayor parte no lisosómica, aunque se desconocían sus mecanismos. El descubrimiento del sistema ubiquitina-proteosoma resolvió el enigma. Ahora sabemos que la degradación intracelular de proteínas participa en la regulación de un amplio espectro de procesos celulares como la división y el ciclo celular, la regulación de los factores de transcripción y el control de la calidad celular. No es sorpresa entonces que las aberraciones

  2. UV photolysis of diclofenac in water; kinetics, degradation pathway and environmental aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Marin; Juretic Perisic, Daria; Biosic, Martina; Kusic, Hrvoje; Babic, Sandra; Loncaric Bozic, Ana

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the photolysis behavior of commonly used anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac (DCF) was investigated using UV-C and UV-A irradiation. In that purpose, DCF conversion kinetics, mineralization of organic content, biodegradability, and toxicity were monitored and compared. The results showed different kinetics of DCF conversion regarding the type of UV source applied. However, in both cases, the mineralization extent reached upon complete DCF conversion is rather low (≤10 %), suggesting that the majority of DCF was transformed into by-products. Formation/degradation of main degradation by-products was monitored using high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS), whereas different profiles were obtained by UV-C and UV-A photolysis. The results of bioassays revealed that biodegradability of DCF solutions remained low through the applied treatments. The toxicity of irradiated DCF solutions was evaluated using Vibrio fischeri. A significant reduction of toxicity, especially in the case of UV-A radiation, was observed upon complete degradation of DCF. In addition to toxicity reduction, calculated Log K OW values of DCF degradation by-products indicate their low potential for bioaccumulation (Log K OW ≤ 3) in comparison to the parent substance.

  3. Peroxisome degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is dependent on machinery of macroautophagy and the Cvt pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutchins, Maria U.; Veenhuis, Marten; Klionsky, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis and turnover are necessary to maintain biochemical processes that are appropriate to the needs of the eukaryotic cell. Specific degradation of organelles in response to changing environmental cues is one aspect of achieving proper metabolic function. For example, the yeast Sacch

  4. Peroxisome degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is dependent on machinery of macroautophagy and the Cvt pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutchins, Maria U.; Veenhuis, Marten; Klionsky, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis and turnover are necessary to maintain biochemical processes that are appropriate to the needs of the eukaryotic cell. Specific degradation of organelles in response to changing environmental cues is one aspect of achieving proper metabolic function. For example, the yeast Sacch

  5. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyanna O. L.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic analogs.

  6. Understanding the degradation pathway of the pesticide, chlorpyrifos by noble metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bootharaju, M S; Pradeep, T

    2012-02-01

    Application of nanoparticles (NPs) in environmental remediation such as water purification requires a detailed understanding of the mechanistic aspects of the interaction between the species involved. Here, an attempt was made to understand the chemistry of noble metal nanoparticle-pesticide interaction, as these nanosystems are being used extensively for water purification. Our model pesticide, chlorpyrifos (CP), belonging to the organophosphorothioate group, is shown to decompose to 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP) and diethyl thiophosphate at room temperature over Ag and Au NPs, in supported and unsupported forms. The degradation products were characterized by absorption spectroscopy and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS). These were further confirmed by ESI tandem mass spectrometry. The interaction of CP with NP surfaces was investigated using transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive analysis of X-rays, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS reveals no change in the oxidation state of silver after the degradation of CP. It is proposed that the degradation of CP proceeds through the formation of AgNP-S surface complex, which is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. In this complex, the P-O bond cleaves to yield a stable aromatic species, TCP. The rate of degradation of CP increases with increase of temperature and pH. Complete degradation of 10 mL of 2 ppm CP solution is achieved in 3 h using 100 mg of supported Ag@citrate NPs on neutral alumina at room temperature at a loading of ∼0.5 wt %. The effect of alumina and monolayer protection of NPs on the degradation of CP is also investigated. The rate of degradation of CP by Ag NPs is greater than that of Au NPs. The results have implications to the application of noble metal NPs for drinking water purification, as pesticide contamination is prevalent in many parts of the world. Study shows that supported Ag and Au NPs may be employed in sustainable

  7. Stability of 6:2 fluorotelomer sulfonate in advanced oxidation processes: degradation kinetics and pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoling; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Kunlun; Yu, Gang; Deng, Shubo; Wang, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a widely used mist suppressant in hard chrome electroplating industry, has been listed in the Stockholm Convention for global ban. 6:2 Fluorotelomer sulfonate (6:2 FTS) acid and salts have been adopted as alternative products in the market, but no data about their abiotic degradation has been reported. In the present study, the degradability of 6:2 FTS potassium salt (6:2 FTS-K) was evaluated under various advanced oxidation processes, including ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, UV with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), alkaline ozonation (O3, pH = 11), peroxone (O3/H2O2), and Fenton reagent oxidation (Fe(2+)/H2O2). UV/H2O2 was found to be the most effective approach, where the degradation of 6:2 FTS-K followed the pseudo-first-order kinetics. The intermediates were mainly shorter chain perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acid (C7 to C2), while sulfate (SO4 (2-)) and fluoride (F(-)) were found to be the final products. The high yields of SO4 (2-) and F(-) indicate that 6:2 FTS-K can be nearly completely desulfonated and defluorinated under UV/H2O2 condition. The degradation should firstly begin with the substitution of hydrogen atom by hydroxyl radicals, followed by desulfonation, carboxylation, and sequential "flake off" of CF2 unit. Compared with PFOS which is inert in most advanced oxidation processes, 6:2 FTS-K is more degradable as the alternative.

  8. Artesunate Activates Mitochondrial Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells via Iron-catalyzed Lysosomal Reactive Oxygen Species Production*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher-Brady, Anne; Stein, Henning A.; Turschner, Simon; Toegel, Ina; Mora, Rodrigo; Jennewein, Nina; Efferth, Thomas; Eils, Roland; Brady, Nathan R.

    2011-01-01

    The antimalarial agent artesunate (ART) activates programmed cell death (PCD) in cancer cells in a manner dependent on the presence of iron and the generation of reactive oxygen species. In malaria parasites, ART cytotoxicity originates from interactions with heme-derived iron within the food vacuole. The analogous digestive compartment of mammalian cells, the lysosome, similarly contains high levels of redox-active iron and in response to specific stimuli can initiate mitochondrial apoptosis. We thus investigated the role of lysosomes in ART-induced PCD and determined that in MCF-7 breast cancer cells ART activates lysosome-dependent mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. ART impacted endolysosomal and autophagosomal compartments, inhibiting autophagosome turnover and causing perinuclear clustering of autophagosomes, early and late endosomes, and lysosomes. Lysosomal iron chelation blocked all measured parameters of ART-induced PCD, whereas lysosomal iron loading enhanced death, thus identifying lysosomal iron as the lethal source of reactive oxygen species upstream of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. Moreover, lysosomal inhibitors chloroquine and bafilomycin A1 reduced ART-activated PCD, evidencing a requirement for lysosomal function during PCD signaling. ART killing did not involve activation of the BH3-only protein, Bid, yet ART enhanced TNF-mediated Bid cleavage. We additionally demonstrated the lysosomal PCD pathway in T47D and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Importantly, non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells resisted ART-induced PCD. Together, our data suggest that ART triggers PCD via engagement of distinct, interconnected PCD pathways, with hierarchical signaling from lysosomes to mitochondria, suggesting a potential clinical use of ART for targeting lysosomes in cancer treatment. PMID:21149439

  9. 13C Tracers for Glucose Degrading Pathway Discrimination in Gluconobacter oxydans 621H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Ostermann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Gluconobacter oxydans 621H is used as an industrial production organism due to its exceptional ability to incompletely oxidize a great variety of carbohydrates in the periplasm. With glucose as the carbon source, up to 90% of the initial concentration is oxidized periplasmatically to gluconate and ketogluconates. Growth on glucose is biphasic and intracellular sugar catabolism proceeds via the Entner–Doudoroff pathway (EDP and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP. Here we studied the in vivo contributions of the two pathways to glucose catabolism on a microtiter scale. In our approach we applied specifically 13C labeled glucose, whereby a labeling pattern in alanine was generated intracellularly. This method revealed a dynamic growth phase-dependent pathway activity with increased activity of EDP in the first and PPP in the second growth phase, respectively. Evidence for a growth phase-independent decarboxylation-carboxylation cycle around the pyruvate node was obtained from 13C fragmentation patterns of alanine. For the first time, down-scaled microtiter plate cultivation together with 13C-labeled substrate was applied for G. oxydans to elucidate pathway operation, exhibiting reasonable labeling costs and allowing for sufficient replicate experiments.

  10. Pathways of nitrobenzene degradation in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: Effect of intermittent aeration and glucose addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirui, Wesley K; Wu, Shubiao; Kizito, Simon; Carvalho, Pedro N; Dong, Renjie

    2016-01-15

    Intermittent aeration and addition of glucose were applied to horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands in order to investigate the effect on pathways of nitrobenzene (NB) degradation and interactions with microbial nitrogen and sulphur transformations. The experiment was carried out in three phases A, B and C consisting of different NB loading and glucose dosing. For each phase, the effect of aeration was assessed by intermittently aerating one wetland and leaving one unaerated. Regardless of whether or not the wetland was aerated, at an influent NB concentration of 140 mg/L, both wetlands significantly reduced NB to less than 2 mg/L, a reduction efficiency of 98%. However, once the influent NB concentration was increased to 280 mg/L, the aerated wetland had a higher removal performance 82% compared to that of the unaerated wetland 71%. Addition of glucose further intensified the NB removal to 95% in the aerated wetlands and 92% in the unaerated. Aeration of wetlands enhanced NB degradation, but also resulted in higher NB volatilization of 6 mg m(-2) d(-1). The detected high concentration of sulphide 20-60 mg/L in the unaerated wetland gave a strong indication that NB may act as an electron donor to sulphate-reducing bacteria, but this should be further investigated. Aeration positively improved NB removal in constructed wetlands, but resulted in higher NB volatilization. Glucose addition induced co-metabolism to enhance NB degradation.

  11. Chlamydia species-dependent differences in the growth requirement for lysosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scot P Ouellette

    Full Text Available Genome reduction is a hallmark of obligate intracellular pathogens such as Chlamydia, where adaptation to intracellular growth has resulted in the elimination of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Accordingly, chlamydiae rely heavily on the host cell for nutrients yet their specific source is unclear. Interestingly, chlamydiae grow within a pathogen-defined vacuole that is in close apposition to lysosomes. Metabolically-labeled uninfected host cell proteins were provided as an exogenous nutrient source to chlamydiae-infected cells, and uptake and subsequent labeling of chlamydiae suggested lysosomal degradation as a source of amino acids for the pathogen. Indeed, Bafilomycin A1 (BafA1, an inhibitor of the vacuolar H(+/ATPase that blocks lysosomal acidification and functions, impairs the growth of C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae, and these effects are especially profound in C. pneumoniae. BafA1 induced the marked accumulation of material within the lysosomal lumen, which was due to the inhibition of proteolytic activities, and this response inhibits chlamydiae rather than changes in lysosomal acidification per se, as cathepsin inhibitors also inhibit the growth of chlamydiae. Finally, the addition of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of eukaryotic protein synthesis, compromises the ability of lysosomal inhibitors to block chlamydial growth, suggesting chlamydiae directly access free amino acids in the host cytosol as a preferred source of these nutrients. Thus, chlamydiae co-opt the functions of lysosomes to acquire essential amino acids.

  12. Electrochemical degradation of sulfonamides at BDD electrode: Kinetics, reaction pathway and eco-toxicity evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabiańska, Aleksandra; Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Stepnowski, Piotr [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, ul. Wita Stwosza 63, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Stolte, Stefan [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, ul. Wita Stwosza 63, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); UFT-Centre of Environmental Research and Sustainable Technology, University of Bremen, Leobener Straße UFT, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Siedlecka, Ewa Maria, E-mail: ewa.siedlecka@ug.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, ul. Wita Stwosza 63, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • SNs were electrochemically oxidized at BDD in one compartment reactor. • The efficiency of SN degradation was the highest in effluents from municipal WWTP. • The electro-degradation SNs based on oxidation but reduction was also possible. • Electrochemical oxidation of SNs led in some cases to mixtures toxic to L. minor. - Abstract: The investigation dealt with electrochemical oxidation of five sulfonamides (SNs): sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfathiazole (STZ), sulfamerazine (SMR), sulfamethazine (SMN) and sulfadimethoxine (SDM) in aqueous solution at boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. All studied sulfonamides were degraded according to a pseudo first order kinetics. The structure of SNs had no significant effect on the values of pseudo first order rate constants. Increased degradation efficiency was observed in higher temperature and in acidic pH. Due to the presence of chlorine and nitrate SNs were more effectively oxidized from municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents than from pure supporting electrolyte Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The intermediates identified by LC–MS and GC–MS analysis suggested that the hydroxyl radicals attack mainly the S-N bond, but also the aromatic ring systems (aniline, pyrimidine or triazole) of SNs. Finally, the toxicity of the SNs solutions and effluents after electrochemical treatment was assessed through the measurement of growth inhibition of green algae (Scenedesmus vacualatus) and duckweed (Lemna minor). Toxicity of SMR, STZ, SMN solutions before and after electrochemical oxidation and SDM solution after the process in L. minor test was observed. No significant toxicity of studied SNs was observed in algae test.

  13. Coupled Metabolic and Photolytic Pathway for Degradation of Pyridinedicarboxylic Acids, Especially Dipicolinic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Amador, José A.; Taylor, Barrie F.

    1990-01-01

    Three isomers of pyridinedicarboxylic acid (PDCA) (2,3-, 2,5-, and 2,6-PDCA) were partially oxidized by marine bacteria when grown aerobically on the corresponding phthalate analogs. The metabolites, unlike the parent PDCAs, absorbed light in the solar actinic range (wavelengths greater than 300 nm) and were readily degraded in sunlight. The principal product from 2,6-PDCA (dipicolinic acid) metabolism was extracted from a culture fluid, purified by column chromatography, and analyzed by UV-v...

  14. Enhanced catalytic degradation of ciprofloxacin with FeS2/SiO2 microspheres as heterogeneous Fenton catalyst: Kinetics, reaction pathways and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Zeng-Hui; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Jiang, Dan; Li, Gang; Liu, Jin-Jun; Kong, Ling-Jun; Zuo, Lin-Zi

    2017-04-05

    In this study, the application of FeS2/SiO2 microspheres as a catalyst to activate H2O2 for the degradation of ciprofloxacin (CIP) was systematically investigated. Results demonstrated that the presence of SiO2 microspheres on the surface of FeS2 could effectively make the reaction of aqueous Fe(2+) and H2O2 smoothly continuous by controlling the release of aqueous Fe(2+) from FeS2. Nearly 100% of CIP was degraded after 60min under the optimum conditions. A superior performance on the CIP degradation and high reusability of the catalyst was obtained in FeS2/SiO2 microspheres activated H2O2 system. A low concentration of ethylene diamine tetraacetie acid (EDTA) did positively affect the degradation rate of CIP. A synergetic effect between adsorption and oxidation processes contributed to the significant enhancement of CIP degradation. Seven oxidation intermediates were identified during the CIP degradation process, and the direct HO oxidation proved to be a main CIP degradation pathway. For degradation pathway of CIP, oxidation of piperazine ring would be its first step, followed by cleavage of the heterocyclic ring. Subsequently, the substitution, hydroxylation and decarboxylation processes occurred. This is the first report on the feasibility of FeS2/SiO2 microspheres activated H2O2 system for the enhanced degradation of CIP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Population sinks resulting from degraded habitats of an obligate life-history pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickford, Michael J H; Schiel, David R

    2011-05-01

    Many species traverse multiple habitats across ecosystems to complete their life histories. Degradation of critical, life stage-specific habitats can therefore lead to population bottlenecks and demographic deficits in sub-populations. The riparian zone of waterways is one of the most impacted areas of the coastal zone because of urbanisation, deforestation, farming and livestock grazing. We hypothesised that sink populations can result from alterations of habitats critical to the early life stages of diadromous fish that use this zone, and tested this with field-based sampling and experiments. We found that for Galaxias maculatus, one of the most widely distributed fishes of the southern hemisphere, obligate riparian spawning habitat was very limited and highly vulnerable to disturbance across 14 rivers in New Zealand. Eggs were laid only during spring tides, in the highest tidally influenced vegetation of waterways. Egg survival increased to >90% when laid in three riparian plant species and where stem densities were great enough to prevent desiccation, compared to no survival where vegetation was comprised of other species or was less dense. Experimental exclusion of livestock, one of the major sources of riparian degradation in rural waterways, resulted in quick regeneration, a tenfold increase in egg laying by fish and a threefold increase in survival, compared to adjacent controls. Overall, there was an inverse relationship between river size and egg production. Some of the largest rivers had little or no spawning habitat and very little egg production, effectively becoming sink populations despite supporting large adult populations, whereas some of the smallest pristine streams produced millions of eggs. We demonstrate that even a wide-ranging species with many robust adult populations can be compromised if a stage-specific habitat required to complete a life history is degraded by localised or more diffuse impacts.

  16. Pathways and substrate-specific regulation of amino acid degradation in Phaeobacter inhibens DSM 17395 (archetype of the marine Roseobacter clade).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drüppel, Katharina; Hensler, Michael; Trautwein, Kathleen; Koßmehl, Sebastian; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Schmidt-Hohagen, Kerstin; Ulbrich, Marcus; Bergen, Nils; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Schomburg, Dietmar; Rabus, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Combining omics and enzymatic approaches, catabolic routes of nine selected amino acids (tryptophan, phenylalanine, methionine, leucine, isoleucine, valine, histidine, lysine and threonine) were elucidated in substrate-adapted cells of Phaeobacter inhibens DSM 17395 (displaying conspicuous morphotypes). The catabolic network [excluding tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle] was reconstructed from 71 genes (scattered across the chromosome; one-third newly assigned), with 69 encoded proteins and 20 specific metabolites identified, and activities of 10 different enzymes determined. For example, Ph. inhibens DSM 17395 does not degrade lysine via the widespread saccharopine pathway but might rather employ two parallel pathways via 5-aminopentanoate or 2-aminoadipate. Tryptophan degradation proceeds via kynurenine and 2-aminobenzoate; the latter is metabolized as known from Azoarcus evansii. Histidine degradation is analogous to the Pseudomonas-type Hut pathway via N-formyl-l-glutamate. For threonine, only one of the three genome-predicted degradation pathways (employing threonine 3-dehydrogenase) is used. Proteins of the individual peripheral degradation sequences in Ph. inhibens DSM 17395 were apparently substrate-specifically formed contrasting the non-modulated TCA cycle enzymes. Comparison of genes for the reconstructed amino acid degradation network in Ph. inhibens DSM 17395 across 27 other complete genomes of Roseobacter clade members revealed most of them to be widespread among roseobacters.

  17. Insulin-degrading enzyme secretion from astrocytes is mediated by an autophagy-based unconventional secretory pathway in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sung Min; Cha, Moon-Yong; Choi, Heesun; Kang, Seokjo; Choi, Hyunjung; Lee, Myung-Shik; Park, Sun Ah; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-05-01

    The secretion of proteins that lack a signal sequence to the extracellular milieu is regulated by their transition through the unconventional secretory pathway. IDE (insulin-degrading enzyme) is one of the major proteases of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), a presumed causative molecule in Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis. IDE acts in the extracellular space despite having no signal sequence, but the underlying mechanism of IDE secretion extracellularly is still unknown. In this study, we found that IDE levels were reduced in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with AD and in pathology-bearing AD-model mice. Since astrocytes are the main cell types for IDE secretion, astrocytes were treated with Aβ. Aβ increased the IDE levels in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, IDE secretion was associated with an autophagy-based unconventional secretory pathway, and depended on the activity of RAB8A and GORASP (Golgi reassembly stacking protein). Finally, mice with global haploinsufficiency of an essential autophagy gene, showed decreased IDE levels in the CSF in response to an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of Aβ. These results indicate that IDE is secreted from astrocytes through an autophagy-based unconventional secretory pathway in AD conditions, and that the regulation of autophagy is a potential therapeutic target in addressing Aβ pathology.

  18. GNeosomes: Highly Lysosomotropic Nanoassemblies for Lysosomal Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexselblatt, Ezequiel; Esko, Jeffrey D; Tor, Yitzhak

    2015-01-01

    GNeosomes, lysosomotropic lipid vesicles decorated with guanidinoneomycin, can encapsulate and facilitate the cellular internalization and lysosomal delivery of cargo ranging from small molecules to high molecular weight proteins, in a process that is exclusively dependent on cell surface glycosaminoglycans. Their cellular uptake mechanism and co-localization with lysosomes, as well as the delivery, release, and activity of internalized cargo, are quantified. GNeosomes are proposed as a universal platform for lysosomal delivery with potential as a basic research tool and a therapeutic vehicle.

  19. Bacterial degradation of benzoate: cross-regulation between aerobic and anaerobic pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We have studied for the first time the transcriptional regulatory circuit that controls the expression of the box genes encoding the aerobic hybrid pathway used to assimilate benzoate via coenzyme A (CoA) derivatives in bacteria. The promoters responsible for the expression of the box cluster in the β-proteobacterium Azoarcus sp., their cognate transcriptional repressor, the BoxR protein, and the inducer molecule (benzoyl-CoA) have been characterized. The BoxR protein shows a significant sequ...

  20. Impact of the NGF maturation and degradation pathway on the cortical cholinergic system phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Simon; Leon, Wanda C; Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Bruno, Martin A; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Cuello, A Claudio

    2012-02-08

    Cortical cholinergic atrophy plays a significant role in the cognitive loss seen with aging and in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the mechanisms leading to it remain unresolved. Nerve growth factor (NGF) is the neurotrophin responsible for the phenotypic maintenance of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in the mature and fully differentiated CNS. In consequence, its implication in cholinergic atrophy has been suspected; however, no mechanistic explanation has been provided. We have previously shown that the precursor of NGF (proNGF) is cleaved extracellularly by plasmin to form mature NGF (mNGF) and that mNGF is degraded by matrix metalloproteinase 9. Using cognitive-behavioral tests, Western blotting, and confocal and electron microscopy, this study demonstrates that a pharmacologically induced chronic failure in extracellular NGF maturation leads to a reduction in mNGF levels, proNGF accumulation, cholinergic degeneration, and cognitive impairment in rats. It also shows that inhibiting NGF degradation increases endogenous levels of the mature neurotrophin and increases the density of cortical cholinergic boutons. Together, the data point to a mechanism explaining cholinergic loss in neurodegenerative conditions such as AD and provide a potential therapeutic target for the protection or restoration of this CNS transmitter system in aging and AD.

  1. Bioremediation of soil polluted with crude oil and its derivatives: Microorganisms, degradation pathways, technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beškoski Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of soil and water with petroleum and its products occurs due to accidental spills during exploitation, transport, processing, storing and use. In order to control the environmental risks caused by petroleum products a variety of techniques based on physical, chemical and biological methods have been used. Biological methods are considered to have a comparative advantage as cost effective and environmentally friendly technologies. Bioremediation, defined as the use of biological systems to destroy and reduce the concentrations of hazardous waste from contaminated sites, is an evolving technology for the removal and degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons as well as industrial solvents, phenols and pesticides. Microorganisms are the main bioremediation agents due to their diverse metabolic capacities. In order to enhance the rate of pollutant degradation the technology optimizes the conditions for the growth of microorganisms present in soil by aeration, nutrient addition and, if necessary, by adding separately prepared microorganisms cultures. The other factors that influence the efficiency of process are temperature, humidity, presence of surfactants, soil pH, mineral composition, content of organic substance of soil as well as type and concentration of contaminant. This paper presents a review of our ex situ bioremediation procedures successfully implemented on the industrial level. This technology was used for treatment of soils contaminated by crude oil and its derivatives originated from refinery as well as soils polluted with oil fuel and transformer oil.

  2. Electrochemical degradation of sulfonamides at BDD electrode: kinetics, reaction pathway and eco-toxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiańska, Aleksandra; Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Stepnowski, Piotr; Stolte, Stefan; Siedlecka, Ewa Maria

    2014-09-15

    The investigation dealt with electrochemical oxidation of five sulfonamides (SNs): sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfathiazole (STZ), sulfamerazine (SMR), sulfamethazine (SMN) and sulfadimethoxine (SDM) in aqueous solution at boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. All studied sulfonamides were degraded according to a pseudo first order kinetics. The structure of SNs had no significant effect on the values of pseudo first order rate constants. Increased degradation efficiency was observed in higher temperature and in acidic pH. Due to the presence of chlorine and nitrate SNs were more effectively oxidized from municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents than from pure supporting electrolyte Na2SO4. The intermediates identified by LC-MS and GC-MS analysis suggested that the hydroxyl radicals attack mainly the SN bond, but also the aromatic ring systems (aniline, pyrimidine or triazole) of SNs. Finally, the toxicity of the SNs solutions and effluents after electrochemical treatment was assessed through the measurement of growth inhibition of green algae (Scenedesmus vacualatus) and duckweed (Lemna minor). Toxicity of SMR, STZ, SMN solutions before and after electrochemical oxidation and SDM solution after the process in L. minor test was observed. No significant toxicity of studied SNs was observed in algae test. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta-cells from Death by Increasing Autophagic Flux and Restoring Lysosomal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zummo, Francesco P; Cullen, Kirsty S; Honkanen-Scott, Minna; Shaw, James Am; Lovat, Penny E; Arden, Catherine

    2017-02-23

    Studies in animal models of type 2 diabetes have shown that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists prevent β-cell loss. Whether GLP-1 mediates β-cell survival via the key lysosomal-mediated process of autophagy is unknown.Here we report that treatment of INS-1E β-cells and primary islets with glucolipotoxicity (0.5mmol/l palmitate, 25mmol/l glucose) increases LC3 II, a marker of autophagy. Further analysis indicates a blockage in autophagic flux associated with lysosomal dysfunction. Accumulation of defective lysosomes leads to lysosomal membrane permeabilisation (LMP) and release of Cathepsin D, which contributes to cell death. Our data further demonstrated defects in autophagic flux and lysosomal staining in human samples of type 2 diabetes. Co-treatment with the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 reversed the lysosomal dysfunction, relieving the impairment in autophagic flux and further stimulated autophagy. siRNA knockdown showed the restoration of autophagic flux is also essential for the protective effects of exendin-4.Collectively, our data highlights lysosomal dysfunction as a critical mediator of β-cell loss and shows that exendin-4 improves cell survival via restoration of lysosomal function and autophagic flux. Modulation of autophagy / lysosomal homeostasis may thus define a novel therapeutic strategy for type 2 diabetes, with the GLP-1 signalling pathway as a potential focus.

  4. The Parkinson's disease-associated genes ATP13A2 and SYT11 regulate autophagy via a common pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Carla F; Ashkenazi, Avraham; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Rubinsztein, David C

    2016-06-09

    Forms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are associated with lysosomal and autophagic dysfunction. ATP13A2, which is mutated in some types of early-onset Parkinsonism, has been suggested as a regulator of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. However, little is known about the ATP13A2 effectors and how they regulate this pathway. Here we show that ATP13A2 depletion negatively regulates another PD-associated gene (SYT11) at both transcriptional and post-translational levels. Decreased SYT11 transcription is controlled by a mechanism dependent on MYCBP2-induced ubiquitination of TSC2, which leads to mTORC1 activation and decreased TFEB-mediated transcription of SYT11, while increased protein turnover is regulated by SYT11 ubiquitination and degradation. Both mechanisms account for a decrease in the levels of SYT11, which, in turn, induces lysosomal dysfunction and impaired degradation of autophagosomes. Thus, we propose that ATP13A2 and SYT11 form a new functional network in the regulation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway, which is likely to contribute to forms of PD-associated neurodegeneration.

  5. Time evolution and competing pathways in photodegradation of trifluralin and three of its major degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Martín G Sarmiento; Laura Salum, María; Buján, Elba I; Argüello, Gustavo A

    2005-11-01

    The herbicide trifluralin (I)(N,N-di-n-propyl-2,6-dinitro-4-trifluoromethylaniline) decomposes, by the action of UV-Vis light (lambda > 300 nm), to several products, the most important (because they give subsequent photochemical reactions) being N-n-propyl-2,6-dinitro-4-trifluoromethylaniline (VI), 2-ethyl-7-nitro-5-trifluoromethyl-1H-benzimidazole 3-oxide (VII) and 2,6-dinitro-4-trifluoromethylaniline (XII). The time evolution of degradation of trifluralin (I) and the aforementioned three main photoproducts was studied in water and acetonitrile as solvents. The pseudo-first order rate constants allow one to calculate the branching ratios for some of the reactions involved. The preference for either N-dealkylation or cyclization depends on the solvent employed. Dissolved oxygen accelerates the photodegradation, especially the dealkylation.

  6. Biochemical and structural characterization of Klebsiella pneumoniae oxamate amidohydrolase in the uric acid degradation pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, Katherine A.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2016-05-25

    HpxW from the ubiquitous pathogenKlebsiella pneumoniaeis involved in a novel uric acid degradation pathway downstream from the formation of oxalurate. Specifically, HpxW is an oxamate amidohydrolase which catalyzes the conversion of oxamate to oxalate and is a member of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily. HpxW is autoprocessed from an inactive precursor to form a heterodimer, resulting in a 35.5 kDa α subunit and a 20 kDa β subunit. Here, the structure of HpxW is presented and the substrate complex is modeled. In addition, the steady-state kinetics of this enzyme and two active-site variants were characterized. These structural and biochemical studies provide further insight into this class of enzymes and allow a mechanism for catalysis consistent with other members of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily to be proposed.

  7. Trafficking and degradation pathways in pathogenic conversion of prions and prion-like proteins in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria, Guiliana Soraya; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2015-09-02

    Several neurodegenerative diseases such as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases are caused by the conversion of cellular proteins to a pathogenic conformer. Despite differences in the primary structure and subcellular localization of these proteins, which include the prion protein, α-synuclein and amyloid precursor protein (APP), striking similarity has been observed in their ability to seed and convert naïve protein molecules as well as transfer between cells. This review aims to cover what is known about the intracellular trafficking of these proteins as well as their degradation mechanisms and highlight similarities in their movement through the endocytic pathway that could contribute to the pathogenic conversion and seeding of these proteins which underlies the basis of these diseases.

  8. Degradation Pathways for Geogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Soil Gases from the Solfatara Crater (Campi Flegrei, Southern Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, F.; Venturi, S.; Cabassi, J.; Capecchiacci, F.; Nisi, B., Sr.; Vaselli, O.

    2014-12-01

    The chemical composition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil gases from the Solfatara crater (Campi Flegrei, Southern Italy) was analyzed to investigate the effects of biogeochemical processes occurring within the crater soil on gases discharged from the hydrothermal reservoir and released into the atmosphere through diffuse degassing. In this system, two fumarolic vents (namely Bocca Grande and Bocca Nuova) are the preferential pathways for hydrothermal fluid uprising. For our goal, the chemistry of VOCs discharged from these sites were compared to that of soil gases. Our results highlighted that C4-C9 alkanes, alkenes, S-bearing compounds and alkylated aromatics produced at depth were the most prone to degradation processes, such as oxidation-reduction and hydration-dehydration reactions, as well as to microbial activity. Secondary products, which were enriched in sites characterized by low soil gas fluxes, mostly consisted of aldheydes, ketons, esters, ethers, organic acids and, subordinately, alcohols. Benzene, phenol and hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs) produced at depth were able to transit through the soil almost undisturbed, independently on the emission rate of diffuse degassing. The presence of cyclics was possibly related to an independent low-temperature VOC source, likely within sedimentary formations overlying the hydrothermal reservoir. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were possibly due to air contamination. This study demonstrated the strict control of biogeochemical processes on the behaviour of hydrothermal VOCs that, at least at a local scale, may have a significant impact on air quality. Laboratory experiments conducted at specific chemical-physical conditions and in presence of different microbial populations may provide useful information for the reconstruction of the degradation pathways controlling fate and behaviour of VOCs in the soil.

  9. Key enzymes of the protocatechuate branch of the β-ketoadipate pathway for aromatic degradation in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN; Xihui; LIU; Shuangjiang

    2005-01-01

    Although the protocatechuate branch of the β-ketoadipate pathway in Gram bacteria has been well studied, this branch is less understood in Gram+ bacteria. In this study,Corynebacterium glutamicum was cultivated with protocatechuate, p-cresol, vanillate and 4-hydroxybenzoate as sole carbon and energy sources for growth. Enzymatic assays indicated that growing cells on these aromatic compounds exhibited protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activities. Data-mining of the genome of this bacterium revealed that the genetic locus ncg12314-ncg12315 encoded a putative protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase. The genes,ncg12314 and ncg12315, were amplified by PCR technique and were cloned into plasmid (pET21aP34D). Recombinant Escherichia coli strain harboring this plasmid actively expressed protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity. Further, when this locus was disrupted in C. glutamicum, the ability to degrade and assimilate protocatechuate, p-cresol, vanillate or 4-hydroxybenzoate was lost and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity was disappeared. The ability to grow with these aromatic compounds and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity of C.glutamicum mutant could be restored by gene complementation. Thus, it is clear that the key enzyme for ring-cleavage, protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase, was encoded by ncg12314 and ncg12315. The additional genes involved in the protocatechuate branch of the β-ketoadipate pathway were identified by mining the genome data publically available in the GenBank. The functional identification of genes and their unique organization in C. glutamicum provided new insight into the genetic diversity of aromatic compound degradation.

  10. Biochemical, transcriptional and translational evidences of the phenol-meta-degradation pathway by the hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia Comte

    Full Text Available Phenol is a widespread pollutant and a model molecule to study the biodegradation of monoaromatic compounds. After a first oxidation step leading to catechol in mesophilic and thermophilic microorganisms, two main routes have been identified depending on the cleavage of the aromatic ring: ortho involving a catechol 1,2 dioxygenase (C12D and meta involving a catechol 2,3 dioxygenase (C23D. Our work aimed at elucidating the phenol-degradation pathway in the hyperthermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2. For this purpose, the strain was cultivated in a fermentor under different substrate and oxygenation conditions. Indeed, reducing dissolved-oxygen concentration allowed slowing down phenol catabolism (specific growth and phenol-consumption rates dropped 55% and 39%, respectively and thus, evidencing intermediate accumulations in the broth. HPLC/Diode Array Detector and LC-MS analyses on culture samples at low dissolved-oxygen concentration (DOC  =  0.06 mg x L(-1 suggested, apart for catechol, the presence of 2-hydroxymuconic acid, 4-oxalocrotonate and 4-hydroxy-2-oxovalerate, three intermediates of the meta route. RT-PCR analysis on oxygenase-coding genes of S. solfataricus 98/2 showed that the gene coding for the C23D was expressed only on phenol. In 2D-DIGE/MALDI-TOF analysis, the C23D was found and identified only on phenol. This set of results allowed us concluding that S. solfataricus 98/2 degrade phenol through the meta route.

  11. Relative Contribution of Prolyl Hydroxylase-Dependent and -Independent Degradation of HIF-1alpha by Proteasomal Pathways in Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomna Badawi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is a key regulator in hypoxia and can determine the fate of brain cells during ischemia. However, the mechanism of HIF-1 regulation is still not fully understood in ischemic brains. We tested a hypothesis that both the 26S and the 20S proteasomal pathways were involved in HIF-1α degradation under ischemic conditions. Using in vitro ischemic model (oxygen and glucose deprivation and a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion, we tested effects of inhibitors of proteasomes and prolyl hydroxylase (PHD on HIF-1α stability and brain injury in cerebral ischemia. We observed that 30 and 60 min of oxygen-glucose deprivation significantly increased the 20S proteasomal activity. We demonstrated that proteasome inhibitors increased HIF-1α stabilization and cell viability and were more effective than PHD inhibitors in primary cultured cortical neurons exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation. Furthermore, the administration of the proteasome inhibitor, epoxomicin, to mice resulted in smaller infarct size and brain edema than a PHD inhibitor. Our results indicate that 20S proteasomes are involved in HIF-1α degradation in ischemic neurons and that proteasomal inhibition provides more HIF-1α stabilization and neuroprotection than PHD inhibition in cerebral ischemia.

  12. Lysosome dysfunction enhances oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through ubiquitinated protein accumulation in Hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunyan; Huang, Xiaowei; Xu, Ye; Li, Hongyan; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jiateng; Kang, Jinsong; Liu, Yuhe; Sun, Liankun

    2013-01-01

    The role of lysosomal system in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cancer cells is not fully understood. Menadione is frequently used as oxidative stress model. It is indicated that menadione could induce autophagy in Hela cells. In the present study, we examined whether the lysosomal inhibitor, ammonium chloride (NH(4)Cl) could prevent the autophagy flux by inhibiting the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes and enhance apoptosis induced by menadione via mitochondrial pathway. The results demonstrated generation and accumulation of reactive oxygen species and increased levels of ubiquitinated proteins and GRP78 in cells treated with both menadione and NH(4)Cl. Our data indicates that lysosomal system through autophagy plays an important role in preventing menadione-induced apoptosis in Hela cells by clearing misfolded proteins, which alleviates endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  13. Sources and Input Pathways of Glyphosate and its Degradation Product AMPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischofberger, S.; Hanke, I.; Wittmer, I.; Singer, H.; Stamm, C.

    2009-04-01

    Despite being the pesticide used in the largest quantities worldwide, the environmental relevance of glyphosate has been considered low for many years. Reasons for this assessment were the observations that glyphosate degrades quickly into its degradation product AMPA and that it sorbs strongly to soil particles. Hence, little losses to water bodies had been expected. Research during the last few years however contradicts this expectation. Although glyphosate is a dominant pesticide used in agriculture, recent studies on other pesticides revealed that urban sources may play a significant role for water quality. Therefore this study compares glyphosate input into streams from agricultural and urban sources. For that purpose, a catchment of an area of 25 km2 was selected. It has by about 12'000 inhabitants and about 15 % of the area is used as arable land. Four sampling sites were selected in the river system in order to reflect different urban and agricultural sources. Additionally, we sampled a combined sewer overflow, a rain sewer and the outflow of a waste water treatment plant. At each site discharge was measured continuously from March to November 2007. During 16 rain events samples were taken by automatic devices at a high temporal resolution. To analyze the concentration of glyphosate and its degradation product AMPA, the samples were derivatized with FMOC-Cl at low pH conditions and then filtrated. The solid phase extraction was conducted with Strata-X sorbent cartridge. Glyphosate and AMPA were detected with API 4000 after the chromatography with X bridge column C18. To assure the data quality, interne standards of Glyphosate and AMPA were added to every sample. The limit of detection and quantification for glyphosate and AMPA are bellow 1ng/l. We analyzed two rain events at a high resolution for all stations and several events at the outlet of the catchment. We measured high glyphosate concentration in urban and agriculture dominated catchments with up to

  14. Endosome-lysosomes, ubiquitin and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, R J; Tipler, C; Arnold, J; Laszlo, L; Al-Khedhairy, A; Lowe, J; Landon, M

    1996-01-01

    Before the advent of ubiquitin immunochemistry and immunogold electron microscopy, there was no known intracellular molecular commonality between neurodegenerative diseases. The application of antibodies which primarily detect ubiquitin protein conjugates has shown that all of the human and animal idiopathic and transmissible chronic neurodegenerative diseases, (including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Lewy body disease (LBD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and scrapie) are related by some form of intraneuronal inclusion which contains ubiquitin protein conjugates. In addition, disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, CJD and sheep scrapie, are characterised by deposits of amyloid, arising through incomplete breakdown of membrane proteins which may be associated with cytoskeletal reorganisation. Although our knowledge about these diseases is increasing, they remain largely untreatable. Recently, attention has focused on the mechanisms of production of different types of amyloid and the likely involvement within cells of the endosome-lysosome system, organelles which are immuno-positive for ubiquitin protein conjugates. These organelles may be 'bioreactor' sites for the unfolding and partial degradation of membrane proteins to generate the amyloid materials or their precursors which subsequently become expelled from the cell, or are released from dead cells, and accumulate as pathological entities. Such common features of the disease processes give new direction to therapeutic intervention.

  15. Abatement and degradation pathways of toluene in indoor air by positive corona discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Durme, J; Dewulf, J; Sysmans, W; Leys, C; Van Langenhove, H

    2007-08-01

    Indoor air concentrations of volatile organic compounds often exceed outdoor levels by a factor of 5. There is much interest in developing new technologies in order to improve indoor air quality. In this work non-thermal plasma (DC positive corona discharge) is explored as an innovative technology for indoor air purification. An inlet gas stream of 10 l min(-1) containing 0.50+/-0.02 ppm toluene was treated by the plasma reactor in atmospheric conditions. Toluene removal proved to be achievable with a characteristic energy density epsilon(0) of 50 J l(-1). Removal efficiencies were higher for 26% relative humidity (epsilon(0)=35 J l(-1)), compared with those at increased humidities (50% relative humidity, epsilon(0)=49 J l(-1)). Reaction products such as formic acid, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol, 4-methyl-2-nitrophenol, 4-methyl-2-propyl furan, 5-methyl-2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2-methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol are identified by means of mass spectrometry. Based on these by-products a toluene degradation mechanism is proposed.

  16. Microbial oil-degradation under mild hydrostatic pressure (10 MPa): which pathways are impacted in piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoma, Alberto; Barbato, Marta; Hernandez-Sanabria, Emma; Mapelli, Francesca; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara; Boon, Nico

    2016-03-01

    Oil spills represent an overwhelming carbon input to the marine environment that immediately impacts the sea surface ecosystem. Microbial communities degrading the oil fraction that eventually sinks to the seafloor must also deal with hydrostatic pressure, which linearly increases with depth. Piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria are ideal candidates to elucidate impaired pathways following oil spills at low depth. In the present paper, we tested two strains of the ubiquitous Alcanivorax genus, namely A. jadensis KS_339 and A. dieselolei KS_293, which is known to rapidly grow after oil spills. Strains were subjected to atmospheric and mild pressure (0.1, 5 and 10 MPa, corresponding to a depth of 0, 500 and 1000 m, respectively) providing n-dodecane as sole carbon source. Pressures equal to 5 and 10 MPa significantly lowered growth yields of both strains. However, in strain KS_293 grown at 10 MPa CO2 production per cell was not affected, cell integrity was preserved and PO43- uptake increased. Analysis of its transcriptome revealed that 95% of its genes were downregulated. Increased transcription involved protein synthesis, energy generation and respiration pathways. Interplay between these factors may play a key role in shaping the structure of microbial communities developed after oil spills at low depth and limit their bioremediation potential.

  17. Microbial oil-degradation under mild hydrostatic pressure (10 MPa): which pathways are impacted in piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria?

    KAUST Repository

    Scoma, Alberto

    2016-03-29

    Oil spills represent an overwhelming carbon input to the marine environment that immediately impacts the sea surface ecosystem. Microbial communities degrading the oil fraction that eventually sinks to the seafloor must also deal with hydrostatic pressure, which linearly increases with depth. Piezosensitive hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria are ideal candidates to elucidate impaired pathways following oil spills at low depth. In the present paper, we tested two strains of the ubiquitous Alcanivorax genus, namely A. jadensis KS_339 and A. dieselolei KS_293, which is known to rapidly grow after oil spills. Strains were subjected to atmospheric and mild pressure (0.1, 5 and 10 MPa, corresponding to a depth of 0, 500 and 1000 m, respectively) providing n-dodecane as sole carbon source. Pressures equal to 5 and 10 MPa significantly lowered growth yields of both strains. However, in strain KS_293 grown at 10 MPa CO2 production per cell was not affected, cell integrity was preserved and PO43− uptake increased. Analysis of its transcriptome revealed that 95% of its genes were downregulated. Increased transcription involved protein synthesis, energy generation and respiration pathways. Interplay between these factors may play a key role in shaping the structure of microbial communities developed after oil spills at low depth and limit their bioremediation potential.

  18. Sulfoacetate is degraded via a novel pathway involving sulfoacetyl-CoA and sulfoacetaldehyde in Cupriavidus necator H16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinitschke, Sonja; Hollemeyer, Klaus; Kusian, Bernhard; Bowien, Botho; Smits, Theo H M; Cook, Alasdair M

    2010-11-12

    Bacterial degradation of sulfoacetate, a widespread natural product, proceeds via sulfoacetaldehyde and requires a considerable initial energy input. Whereas the fate of sulfoacetaldehyde in Cupriavidus necator (Ralstonia eutropha) H16 is known, the pathway from sulfoacetate to sulfoacetaldehyde is not. The genome sequence of the organism enabled us to hypothesize that the inducible pathway, which initiates sau (sulfoacetate utilization), involved a four-gene cluster (sauRSTU; H16_A2746 to H16_A2749). The sauR gene, divergently orientated to the other three genes, probably encodes the transcriptional regulator of the presumed sauSTU operon, which is subject to inducible transcription. SauU was tentatively identified as a transporter of the major facilitator superfamily, and SauT was deduced to be a sulfoacetate-CoA ligase. SauT was a labile protein, but it could be separated and shown to generate AMP and an unknown, labile CoA-derivative from sulfoacetate, CoA, and ATP. This unknown compound, analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS, had a relative molecular mass of 889.7, which identified it as protonated sulfoacetyl-CoA (calculated 889.6). SauS was deduced to be sulfoacetaldehyde dehydrogenase (acylating). The enzyme was purified 175-fold to homogeneity and characterized. Peptide mass fingerprinting confirmed the sauS locus (H16_A2747). SauS converted sulfoacetyl-CoA and NADPH to sulfoacetaldehyde, CoA, and NADP(+), thus confirming the hypothesis.

  19. Up-regulation of lysosomal TRPML1 channels is essential for lysosomal adaptation to nutrient starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Yang, Meimei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Lu; Lawas, Maria; Li, Xinran; Bryant-Genevier, Marthe; Southall, Noel T; Marugan, Juan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2015-03-17

    Upon nutrient starvation, autophagy digests unwanted cellular components to generate catabolites that are required for housekeeping biosynthesis processes. A complete execution of autophagy demands an enhancement in lysosome function and biogenesis to match the increase in autophagosome formation. Here, we report that mucolipin-1 (also known as TRPML1 or ML1), a Ca(2+) channel in the lysosome that regulates many aspects of lysosomal trafficking, plays a central role in this quality-control process. By using Ca(2+) imaging and whole-lysosome patch clamping, lysosomal Ca(2+) release and ML1 currents were detected within hours of nutrient starvation and were potently up-regulated. In contrast, lysosomal Na(+)-selective currents were not up-regulated. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) or activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) mimicked a starvation effect in fed cells. The starvation effect also included an increase in lysosomal proteostasis and enhanced clearance of lysosomal storage, including cholesterol accumulation in Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) cells. However, this effect was not observed when ML1 was pharmacologically inhibited or genetically deleted. Furthermore, overexpression of ML1 mimicked the starvation effect. Hence, lysosomal adaptation to environmental cues such as nutrient levels requires mTOR/TFEB-dependent, lysosome-to-nucleus regulation of lysosomal ML1 channels and Ca(2+) signaling.

  20. BK Channels Alleviate Lysosomal Storage Diseases by Providing Positive Feedback Regulation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi; Zhong, Xi Zoë; Zou, Yuanjie; Zhang, Zhu; Toro, Ligia; Dong, Xian-Ping

    2015-05-26

    Promoting lysosomal trafficking represents a promising therapeutic approach for lysosome storage diseases. Efficient Ca(2+) mobilization from lysosomes is important for lysosomal trafficking. Ca(2+) release from lysosomes could generate a negative potential in the lumen to disturb subsequent Ca(2+) release in the absence of counter ion flux. Here we report that lysosomes express big-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels that form physical and functional coupling with the lysosomal Ca(2+) release channel, TRPML1. Ca(2+) release via TRPML1 causes BK activation, which in turn facilitates further lysosomal Ca(2+) release and membrane trafficking. Importantly, BK overexpression rescues the impaired TRPML1-mediated Ca(2+) release and abnormal lysosomal storage in cells from Niemann-Pick C1 patients. Therefore, we have identified a lysosomal K(+) channel that provides a positive feedback mechanism to facilitate TRPML1-mediated Ca(2+) release and membrane trafficking. Our findings suggest that upregulating BK may be a potential therapeutic strategy for certain lysosomal storage diseases and common neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Sensitivity to lysosome-dependent cell death is directly regulated by lysosomal cholesterol content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Appelqvist

    Full Text Available Alterations in lipid homeostasis are implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, although the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. We evaluated the impact of cholesterol accumulation, induced by U18666A, quinacrine or mutations in the cholesterol transporting Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1 protein, on lysosomal stability and sensitivity to lysosome-mediated cell death. We found that neurons with lysosomal cholesterol accumulation were protected from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. In addition, human fibroblasts with cholesterol-loaded lysosomes showed higher lysosomal membrane stability than controls. Previous studies have shown that cholesterol accumulation is accompanied by the storage of lipids such as sphingomyelin, glycosphingolipids and sphingosine and an up regulation of lysosomal associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2, which may also influence lysosomal stability. However, in this study the use of myriocin and LAMP deficient fibroblasts excluded these factors as responsible for the rescuing effect and instead suggested that primarily lysosomal cholesterol content determineD the cellular sensitivity to toxic insults. Further strengthening this concept, depletion of cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin or 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased the stability of lysosomes and cells became more prone to undergo apoptosis. In conclusion, cholesterol content regulated lysosomal membrane permeabilization and thereby influenced cell death sensitivity. Our data suggests that lysosomal cholesterol modulation might be used as a therapeutic strategy for conditions associated with accelerated or repressed apoptosis.

  2. Reduction of mutant huntingtin accumulation and toxicity by lysosomal cathepsins D and B in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouyang Xiaosen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease is caused by aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHtt protein containing more than a 36 polyQ repeat. Upregulation of macroautophagy was suggested as a neuroprotective strategy to degrade mutant huntingtin. However, macroautophagy initiation has been shown to be highly efficient in neurons whereas lysosomal activities are rate limiting. The role of the lysosomal and other proteases in Huntington is not clear. Some studies suggest that certain protease activities may contribute to toxicity whereas others are consistent with protection. These discrepancies may be due to a number of mechanisms including distinct effects of the specific intermediate digestion products of mutant huntingtin generated by different proteases. These observations suggested a critical need to investigate the consequence of upregulation of individual lysosomal enzyme in mutant huntingtin accumulation and toxicity. Results In this study, we used molecular approaches to enhance lysosomal protease activities and examined their effects on mutant huntingtin level and toxicity. We found that enhanced expression of lysosomal cathepsins D and B resulted in their increased enzymatic activities and reduced both full-length and fragmented huntingtin in transfected HEK cells. Furthermore, enhanced expression of cathepsin D or B protected against mutant huntingtin toxicity in primary neurons, and their neuroprotection is dependent on macroautophagy. Conclusions These observations demonstrate a neuroprotective effect of enhancing lysosomal cathepsins in reducing mutant huntingtin level and toxicity in transfected cells. They highlight the potential importance of neuroprotection mediated by cathepsin D or B through macroautophagy.

  3. The Endosome-associated Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP8 Regulates BACE1 Enzyme Ubiquitination and Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Eniola Funmilayo Aduke; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-07-22

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of amyloid-β, the toxic peptide that accumulates in the brain of subjects affected by Alzheimer disease. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that that depletion of the trafficking molecule Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF-binding protein 3 (GGA3) results in increased BACE1 levels and activity because of impaired lysosomal degradation. We also determined that GGA3 regulation of BACE1 levels requires its ability to bind ubiquitin. Accordingly, we reported that BACE1 is ubiquitinated at lysine 501 and that lack of ubiquitination at lysine 501 produces BACE1 stabilization. Ubiquitin conjugation is a reversible process mediated by deubiquitinating enzymes. The ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8), an endosome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, regulates the ubiquitination, trafficking, and lysosomal degradation of several plasma membrane proteins. Here, we report that RNAi-mediated depletion of USP8 reduced levels of both ectopically expressed and endogenous BACE1 in H4 human neuroglioma cells. Moreover, USP8 depletion increased BACE1 ubiquitination, promoted BACE1 accumulation in the early endosomes and late endosomes/lysosomes, and decreased levels of BACE1 in the recycling endosomes. We also found that decreased BACE1 protein levels were accompanied by a decrease in BACE1-mediated amyloid precursor protein cleavage and amyloid-β levels. Our findings demonstrate that USP8 plays a key role in the trafficking and degradation of BACE1 by deubiquitinating lysine 501. These studies suggest that therapies able to accelerate BACE1 degradation (e.g. by increasing BACE1 ubiquitination) may represent a potential treatment for Alzheimer disease.

  4. Streptococcus pyogenes malate degradation pathway links pH regulation and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluscio, Elyse; Caparon, Michael G

    2015-03-01

    The ability of Streptococcus pyogenes to infect different niches within its human host most likely relies on its ability to utilize alternative carbon sources. In examining this question, we discovered that all sequenced S. pyogenes strains possess the genes for the malic enzyme (ME) pathway, which allows malate to be used as a supplemental carbon source for growth. ME is comprised of four genes in two adjacent operons, with the regulatory two-component MaeKR required for expression of genes encoding a malate permease (maeP) and malic enzyme (maeE). Analysis of transcription indicated that expression of maeP and maeE is induced by both malate and low pH, and induction in response to both cues is dependent on the MaeK sensor kinase. Furthermore, both maePE and maeKR are repressed by glucose, which occurs via a CcpA-independent mechanism. Additionally, malate utilization requires the PTS transporter EI enzyme (PtsI), as a PtsI(-) mutant fails to express the ME genes and is unable to utilize malate. Virulence of selected ME mutants was assessed in a murine model of soft tissue infection. MaeP(-), MaeK(-), and MaeR(-) mutants were attenuated for virulence, whereas a MaeE(-) mutant showed enhanced virulence compared to that of the wild type. Taken together, these data show that ME contributes to S. pyogenes' carbon source repertory, that malate utilization is a highly regulated process, and that a single regulator controls ME expression in response to diverse signals. Furthermore, malate uptake and utilization contribute to the adaptive pH response, and ME can influence the outcome of infection.

  5. Degradation of {gamma}-HCH spiked soil using stabilized Pd/Fe{sup 0} bimetallic nanoparticles: Pathways, kinetics and effect of reaction conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ritu [Ecotoxicology Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001, UP (India); Department of Environmental Science, Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University, Raebareli Road, Lucknow 226 025, UP (India); Misra, Virendra, E-mail: virendra_misra2001@yahoo.co.in [Ecotoxicology Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001, UP (India); Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy [Analytical Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001, UP (India); Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh [Petroleum Toxicology Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001, UP (India); Singh, Rana Pratap [Department of Environmental Science, Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University, Raebareli Road, Lucknow 226 025, UP (India)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study explores the potential of CMC-Pd/nFe{sup 0} to degrade {gamma}-HCH in spiked soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sorption-desorption characteristics and partitioning of {gamma}-HCH is investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three degradation pathways has been proposed and discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma}-HCH degradation mechanism and kinetics is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation energy reveals that {gamma}-HCH degradation is a surface mediated reaction. - Abstract: This study investigates the degradation pathway of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH) in spiked soil using carboxymethyl cellulose stabilized Pd/Fe{sup 0} bimetallic nanoparticles (CMC-Pd/nFe{sup 0}). GC-MS analysis of {gamma}-HCH degradation products showed the formation of pentachlorocyclohexene, tri- and di-chlorobenzene as intermediate products while benzene was formed as the most stable end product. On the basis of identified intermediates and final products, degradation pathway of {gamma}-HCH has been proposed. Batch studies showed complete {gamma}-HCH degradation at a loading of 0.20 g/L CMC-Pd/nFe{sup 0} within 6 h of incubation. The surface area normalized rate constant (k{sub SA}) was found to be 7.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} L min{sup -1} m{sup -2}. CMC-Pd/nFe{sup 0} displayed {approx}7-fold greater efficiency for {gamma}-HCH degradation in comparison to Fe{sup 0} nanoparticles (nFe{sup 0}), synthesized without CMC and Pd. Further studies showed that increase in CMC-Pd/nFe{sup 0} loading and reaction temperature facilitates {gamma}-HCH degradation, whereas a declining trend in degradation was noticed with the increase in pH, initial {gamma}-HCH concentration and in the presence of cations. The data on activation energy (33.7 kJ/mol) suggests that {gamma}-HCH degradation is a surface mediated reaction. The significance of the study with respect to remediation of {gamma}-HCH contaminated soil using

  6. Vamp-7 Mediates Vesicular Transport from Endosomes to Lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, Raj J.; Yang, Bin; Prekeris, Rytis; Lee, Kelly C.; Klumperman, Judith; Scheller, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    A more complete picture of the molecules that are critical for the organization of membrane compartments is beginning to emerge through the characterization of proteins in the vesicle-associated membrane protein (also called synaptobrevin) family of membrane trafficking proteins. To better understand the mechanisms of membrane trafficking within the endocytic pathway, we generated a series of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against the cytoplasmic domain of vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP-7). The antibodies recognize a 25-kD membrane-associated protein in multiple tissues and cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis reveals colocalization with a marker of late endosomes and lysosomes, lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1), but not with other membrane markers, including p115 and transferrin receptor. Treatment with nocodozole or brefeldin A does not disrupt the colocalization of VAMP-7 and LAMP-1. Immunoelectron microscopy analysis shows that VAMP-7 is most concentrated in the trans-Golgi network region of the cell as well as late endosomes and transport vesicles that do not contain the mannose-6 phosphate receptor. In streptolysin- O–permeabilized cells, antibodies against VAMP-7 inhibit the breakdown of epidermal growth factor but not the recycling of transferrin. These data are consistent with a role for VAMP-7 in the vesicular transport of proteins from the early endosome to the lysosome. PMID:10459012

  7. Metagenomic Analysis of Hot Springs in Central India Reveals Hydrocarbon Degrading Thermophiles and Pathways Essential for Survival in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Rituja; Dhakan, Darshan B.; Mittal, Parul; Waiker, Prashant; Chowdhury, Anirban; Ghatak, Arundhuti; Sharma, Vineet K.

    2017-01-01

    Extreme ecosystems such as hot springs are of great interest as a source of novel extremophilic species, enzymes, metabolic functions for survival and biotechnological products. India harbors hundreds of hot springs, the majority of which are not yet explored and require comprehensive studies to unravel their unknown and untapped phylogenetic and functional diversity. The aim of this study was to perform a large-scale metagenomic analysis of three major hot springs located in central India namely, Badi Anhoni, Chhoti Anhoni, and Tattapani at two geographically distinct regions (Anhoni and Tattapani), to uncover the resident microbial community and their metabolic traits. Samples were collected from seven distinct sites of the three hot spring locations with temperature ranging from 43.5 to 98°C. The 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of V3 hypervariable region and shotgun metagenome sequencing uncovered a unique taxonomic and metabolic diversity of the resident thermophilic microbial community in these hot springs. Genes associated with hydrocarbon degradation pathways, such as benzoate, xylene, toluene, and benzene were observed to be abundant in the Anhoni hot springs (43.5–55°C), dominated by Pseudomonas stutzeri and Acidovorax sp., suggesting the presence of chemoorganotrophic thermophilic community with the ability to utilize complex hydrocarbons as a source of energy. A high abundance of genes belonging to methane metabolism pathway was observed at Chhoti Anhoni hot spring, where methane is reported to constitute >80% of all the emitted gases, which was marked by the high abundance of Methylococcus capsulatus. The Tattapani hot spring, with a high-temperature range (61.5–98°C), displayed a lower microbial diversity and was primarily dominated by a nitrate-reducing archaeal species Pyrobaculum aerophilum. A higher abundance of cell metabolism pathways essential for the microbial survival in extreme conditions was observed at Tattapani. Taken together

  8. Aqueous photochemical degradation of hydroxylated PAHs: Kinetics, pathways, and multivariate effects of main water constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Linke; Na, Guangshui [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Chen, Chang-Er [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Li, Jun [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); College of Marine Science, Shanghai Ocean University, Shanghai 201306 (China); Ju, Maowei; Wang, Ying; Li, Kai [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Zhang, Peng, E-mail: pzhang@nmemc.org.cn [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China); Yao, Ziwei [Key Laboratory for Ecological Environment in Coastal Areas (SOA), National Marine Environmental Monitoring Center, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2016-03-15

    PAHs. • Hydroxylated PAHs intrinsically photodegrade fast in sunlit surface waters. • Reaction types and transformation pathways of 9-Hydroxyfluorene were clarified. • Photolysis kinetics was affected by multivariate effects of main water constituents. • The photomodified toxicity of 9-Hydroxyfluorene was examined using Vibrio fischeri.

  9. Isolation of Alcaligenes sp strain L6 at low oxygen concentrations and degradation of 3-chlorobenzoate via a pathway not involving (chloro)catechols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krooneman, J; Wieringa, EBA; Moore, ERB; Gerritse, J; Prins, RA; Gottschal, JC

    1996-01-01

    Isolations of 3-chlorobenzoate (3CBA)-degrading aerobic bacteria under reduced O-2, partial pressures yielded organisms which metabolized 3CBA via the gentisate or the protocatechuate pathway rather than via the catechol route. The 3CBA metabolism of one of these isolates, L6, which,vas identified a

  10. Lysosomal interaction of Akt with Phafin2: a critical step in the induction of autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami Matsuda-Lennikov

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for the gross disposal of intracellular proteins in mammalian cells and dysfunction in this pathway has been associated with human disease. Although the serine threonine kinase Akt is suggested to play a role in this process, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Akt induces autophagy. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, Phafin2 (EAPF or PLEKHF2, a lysosomal protein with a unique structure of N-terminal PH (pleckstrin homology domain and C-terminal FYVE (Fab 1, YOTB, Vac 1, and EEA1 domain was found to interact with Akt. A sucrose gradient fractionation experiment revealed that both Akt and Phafin2 co-existed in the same lysosome enriched fraction after autophagy induction. Confocal microscopic analysis and BiFC analysis demonstrated that both Akt and Phafin2 accumulate in the lysosome after induction of autophagy. BiFC analysis using PtdIns (3P interaction defective mutant of Phafin2 demonstrated that lysosomal accumulation of the Akt-Phafin2 complex and subsequent induction of autophagy were lysosomal PtdIns (3P dependent events. Furthermore, in murine macrophages, both Akt and Phafin2 were required for digestion of fluorescent bacteria and/or LPS-induced autophagy. Taken together, these findings establish that lysosomal accumulation of Akt and Phafin2 is a critical step in the induction of autophagy via an interaction with PtdIns (3P.

  11. Activation of the transcription factor EB rescues lysosomal abnormalities in cystinotic kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rega, Laura R; Polishchuk, Elena; Montefusco, Sandro; Napolitano, Gennaro; Tozzi, Giulia; Zhang, Jinzhong; Bellomo, Francesco; Taranta, Anna; Pastore, Anna; Polishchuk, Roman; Piemonte, Fiorella; Medina, Diego L; Catz, Sergio D; Ballabio, Andrea; Emma, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease characterized by accumulation of cystine into lysosomes secondary to mutations in the cystine lysosomal transporter, cystinosin. The defect initially causes proximal tubular dysfunction (Fanconi syndrome) which in time progresses to end-stage renal disease. Cystinotic patients treated with the cystine-depleting agent, cysteamine, have improved life expectancy, delayed progression to chronic renal failure, but persistence of Fanconi syndrome. Here, we have investigated the role of the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, in conditionally immortalized proximal tubular epithelial cells derived from the urine of a healthy volunteer or a cystinotic patient. Lack of cystinosin reduced TFEB expression and induced TFEB nuclear translocation. Stimulation of endogenous TFEB activity by genistein, or overexpression of exogenous TFEB lowered cystine levels within 24 hours in cystinotic cells. Overexpression of TFEB also stimulated delayed endocytic cargo processing within 24 hours. Rescue of other abnormalities of the lysosomal compartment was observed but required prolonged expression of TFEB. These abnormalities could not be corrected with cysteamine. Thus, these data show that the consequences of cystinosin deficiency are not restricted to cystine accumulation and support the role of TFEB as a therapeutic target for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases, in particular of cystinosis. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Lysosomal enlargement and lysosomal membrane destabilisation in mussel digestive cells measured by an integrative index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izagirre, Urtzi [Cell Biology in Environmental Toxicology Research Group, Department of Zoology and Cell Biology, School of Sciences and Technology, University of the Basque Country, P.O. box 644, E-48080 Bilbo (Spain); Marigomez, Ionan, E-mail: ionan.marigomez@ehu.e [Cell Biology in Environmental Toxicology Research Group, Department of Zoology and Cell Biology, School of Sciences and Technology, University of the Basque Country, P.O. box 644, E-48080 Bilbo (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    Lysosomal responses (enlargement and membrane destabilisation) in mussel digestive cells are well-known environmental stress biomarkers in pollution effects monitoring in marine ecosystems. Presently, in laboratory and field studies, both responses were measured separately (in terms of lysosomal volume density - Vv - and labilisation period -LP) and combined (lysosomal response index - LRI) in order to contribute to their understanding and to develop an index useful for decisions makers. LRI integrates Vv and LP, which are not necessarily dependent lysosomal responses. It is unbiased and more sensitive than Vv and LP alone and diminishes background due to confounding factors. LRI provides a simple numerical index (consensus reference = 0; critical threshold = 1) directly related to the pollution impact degree. Moreover, LRI can be represented in a way that allows the interpretation of lysosomal responses, which is useful for environmental scientists. - Lysosomal responses to pollutants measured by an integrative index.

  13. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Rita-Eva; Khundadze, Mukhran; Damme, Markus; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hoffmann, Birgit; Stauber, Tobias; Koch, Nicole; Hennings, J Christopher; Franzka, Patricia; Huebner, Antje K; Kessels, Michael M; Biskup, Christoph; Jentsch, Thomas J; Qualmann, Britta; Braulke, Thomas; Kurth, Ingo; Beetz, Christian; Hübner, Christian A

    2015-08-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs). Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice.

  14. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita-Eva Varga

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs. Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice.

  15. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita-Eva Varga

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs. Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice.

  16. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Rita-Eva; Khundadze, Mukhran; Damme, Markus; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hoffmann, Birgit; Stauber, Tobias; Koch, Nicole; Hennings, J. Christopher; Franzka, Patricia; Huebner, Antje K.; Kessels, Michael M.; Biskup, Christoph; Jentsch, Thomas J.; Qualmann, Britta; Braulke, Thomas; Kurth, Ingo; Beetz, Christian; Hübner, Christian A.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs). Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice. PMID:26284655

  17. Amyloid-β secretion, generation, and lysosomal sequestration in response to proteasome inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agholme, Lotta; Hallbeck, Martin; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2012-01-01

    that proteasome inhibition resulted in autophagy-dependent accumulation of Aβ in lysosomes, and increased levels of intracellular and secreted Aβ. The enhanced levels of Aβ could not be explained by increased amounts of AβPP. Instead, reduced degradation of the C-terminal fragment of AβPP (C99) by the proteasome....... Furthermore, proteasome inhibition caused a reduction in cellular viability, which was reverted by inhibition of autophagy. Dysfunction of the proteasome could cause lysosomal accumulation of Aβ, as well as increased generation and secretion of Aβ, which is partly facilitated by autophagy. As a decrease...

  18. Experimental Priapism is Associated with Increased Oxidative Stress and Activation of Protein Degradation Pathways in Corporal Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanika, Nirmala D.; Melman, Arnold; Davies, Kelvin P.

    2010-01-01

    Priapism is a debilitating disease for which there is at present no clinically accepted pharmacologic intervention. It has been estimated that priapism lasting more than 24 hours in patients is associated with a 44–90% rate of erectile dysfunction (ED). In this investigation we determined in two animal models of priapism (opiorpin-induced priapism in the rat and priapism in a mouse model of sickle cell disease) if there is evidence for an increase in markers of oxidative stress in corporal tissue. In both animal models we demonstrate that priapism results in increased levels of lipid peroxidation, glutathione S-transferase activity, and oxidatively damaged proteins in corporal tissue. Using Western blot analysis we demonstrated there is up regulation of the ubiquitination ligase proteins, Nedd-4 and Mdm-2, and the lysososomal autophage protein, LC3. The anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, was also up regulated. Overall, we demonstrate that priapism is associated with increased oxidative stress in corporal tissue and the activation of protein degradation pathways. Since oxidative stress is known to mediate the development of ED resulting from several etiologies (for example ED resulting from diabetes and aging) we suggest that damage to erectile tissue resulting from priapism might be prevented by treatments targeting oxidative stress. PMID:21085184

  19. RINL, guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rab5-subfamily, is involved in the EphA8-degradation pathway with odin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Kajiho

    Full Text Available The Rab family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases plays a vital role in membrane trafficking. Its active GTP-bound state is driven by guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs. Ras and Rab interactor (or Ras interaction/interference-like (RINL, which contains a conserved VPS9 domain critical for GEF action, was recently identified as a new Rab5 subfamily GEF in vitro. However, its detailed function and interacting molecules have not yet been fully elucidated. Here we found that RINL has GEF activity for the Rab5 subfamily proteins by measuring their GTP-bound forms in cultured cells. We also found that RINL interacts with odin, a member of the ankyrin-repeat and sterile-alpha motif (SAM domain-containing (Anks protein family. In addition, the Eph tyrosine kinase receptor EphA8 formed a ternary complex with both RINL and odin. Interestingly, RINL expression in cultured cells reduced EphA8 levels in a manner dependent on both its GEF activity and interaction with odin. In addition, knockdown of RINL increased EphA8 level in HeLa cells. Our findings suggest that RINL, as a GEF for Rab5 subfamily, is implicated in the EphA8-degradation pathway via its interaction with odin.

  20. Degradation of ethyl paraben by heat-activated persulfate oxidation: statistical evaluation of operating factors and transformation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontistis, Zacharias; Antonopoulou, Maria; Konstantinou, Ioannis; Mantzavinos, Dionissios

    2017-01-01

    A factorial design methodology was implemented to evaluate the importance of ethyl paraben (EP) concentration (500-1500 μg/L), sodium persulfate concentration (400-500 mg/L), temperature (40-60 °C), reaction time (2-30 min), water matrix (pure water or secondary treated wastewater), and initial solution pH (3-9) on EP removal by heat-activated persulfate oxidation. All individual effects, except the solution pH, were statistically significant and so were the second-order interactions of ethyl paraben concentration with temperature or the reaction time. The influence of the water matrix was crucial, and the efficiency of the process was lower in secondary treated wastewater due to the presence of natural organic matter and inorganic salts that compete with ethyl paraben for the reactive oxygen species. Liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) was employed to identify major transformation by-products (TBPs); 13 compounds were detected as TBPs of EP. Degradation occurred through (i) hydroxylation, (ii) dealkylation, and (iii) oligomerization reactions leading to TBPs with ether and biphenyl structures. Oligomerization reactions were found to be the dominant pathway during the first steps of the reaction. The toxicity of 500 μg/L EP in secondary treated wastewater was tested against marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri; toxicity increased during the first minutes due to the production of several TBPs, but it consistently decreased thereafter.

  1. Lysosomal exoglycosidases in nasal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowska, Sylwia; Minarowska, Alina; Knaś, Małgorzata; Niemcunowicz-Janica, Anna; Kołodziejczyk, Paweł; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Kępka, Alina; Minarowski, Łukasz; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Nasal polyps are smooth outgrowths assuming a shape of grapes, formed from the nasal mucosa, limiting air flow by projecting into a lumen of a nasal cavity. Up to now the surgical resection is the best method of their treatment, but etiology and pathogenesis of the nasal polyps is not yet fully established. The aim of the study was the assessment of the selected lysosomal exoglycosidases activity in the nasal polyps. In this study the activity of β-galactosidase, α-mannosidase and α-fucosidase was determined in the tissue of the nasal polyps obtained from 40 patients (10F, 30M) and control tissues derived from mucosa of lower nasal conchas obtained during mucotomy from 20 patients (10F, 10M). We observed significant lower values of GAL, FUC and tendency to decrease of MAN and GLU concentration in nasal polyps (P) in comparison to control healthy nasal mucosa (C). In nasal polyp tissue (P) no differences of GAL, MAN and FUC specific activity in comparison to control mucosa (C) were found. Our research supports bioelectrical theory of the nasal polyps pathogenesis and directs attention at research on glycoconjugates and glycosidases of the nasal mucosa extracellular matrix. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  2. Presenilin 1 maintains lysosomal Ca2+ homeostasis by regulating vATPase-mediated lysosome acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Hyun; McBrayer, Mary Kate; Wolfe, Devin M.; Haslett, Luke J.; Kumar, Asok; Sato, Yutaka; Lie, Pearl P. Y.; Mohan, Panaiyur; Coffey, Erin E.; Kompella, Uday; Mitchell, Claire H.; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Presenilin-1 (PS1) deletion or Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)-linked mutations disrupt lysosomal acidification and proteolysis, which inhibits autophagy. Here, we establish that this phenotype stems from impaired glycosylation and instability of vATPase V0a1 subunit causing deficient lysosomal vATPase assembly and function. We further demonstrate that elevated lysosomal pH in PS1KO cells induces abnormal Ca2+ efflux from lysosomes mediated by TRPML1 and elevates cytosolic Ca2+. In WT cells, blocking vATPase activity or knockdown of either PS1 or the V0a1 subunit of vATPase reproduces all of these abnormalities. Normalizing lysosomal pH in PS1KO cells using acidic nanoparticles restores normal lysosomal proteolysis, autophagy, and Ca2+ homeostasis, but correcting lysosomal Ca2+ deficits alone neither re-acidifies lysosomes nor reverses proteolytic and autophagic deficits. Our results indicate that vATPase deficiency in PS1 loss of function states causes lysosomal/autophagy deficits and contributes to abnormal cellular Ca2+ homeostasis, thus linking two AD-related pathogenic processes through a common molecular mechanism. PMID:26299959

  3. Lipid storage disorders block lysosomal trafficking by inhibiting a TRP channel and lysosomal calcium release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dongbiao; Wang, Xiang; Li, Xinran; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yao, Zepeng; Dibble, Shannon; Dong, Xian-ping; Yu, Ting; Lieberman, Andrew P; Showalter, Hollis D; Xu, Haoxing

    2012-03-13

    Lysosomal lipid accumulation, defects in membrane trafficking and altered Ca(2+) homoeostasis are common features in many lysosomal storage diseases. Mucolipin transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPML1) is the principle Ca(2+) channel in the lysosome. Here we show that TRPML1-mediated lysosomal Ca(2+) release, measured using a genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator (GCaMP3) attached directly to TRPML1 and elicited by a potent membrane-permeable synthetic agonist, is dramatically reduced in Niemann-Pick (NP) disease cells. Sphingomyelins (SMs) are plasma membrane lipids that undergo sphingomyelinase (SMase)-mediated hydrolysis in the lysosomes of normal cells, but accumulate distinctively in lysosomes of NP cells. Patch-clamp analyses revealed that TRPML1 channel activity is inhibited by SMs, but potentiated by SMases. In NP-type C cells, increasing TRPML1's expression or activity was sufficient to correct the trafficking defects and reduce lysosome storage and cholesterol accumulation. We propose that abnormal accumulation of luminal lipids causes secondary lysosome storage by blocking TRPML1- and Ca(2+)-dependent lysosomal trafficking.

  4. Biodegradability of HCH in agricultural soils from Guadeloupe (French West Indies): identification of the lin genes involved in the HCH degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laquitaine, L; Durimel, A; de Alencastro, L F; Jean-Marius, C; Gros, O; Gaspard, S

    2016-01-01

    Banana has been a main agricultural product in the French West Indies (Guadeloupe and Martinique) since the 1960s. This crop requires the intensive use of pesticides to prevent attacks by insect pests. Chlorinated pesticides, such as hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), chlordecone and dieldrin, were used until the beginning of the 1990s, resulting in a generalized diffuse contamination of the soil and water in the areas of banana production, hence the need to develop solutions for cleanup of the polluted sites. The aims of this work were (i) to assess lindane degradation in soil slurry microcosms treated with lindane at 10 mg/L and (ii) to detect the catabolic genes involved in the HCH degradation pathway. The soil slurry microcosm system showed a 40% lindane degradation efficiency at the end of a 30-day experiment. Lower lindane removal was also detected in the abiotic controls, probably caused by pesticide adsorption to soil particles. Indeed, the lindane concentration decreased from 6000 to 1330 ng/mL and from 800 to 340 ng/mL for the biotic and abiotic soils, respectively. Nevertheless, some of the genes involved in the HCH degradation pathway were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from crude deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from the Guadeloupe agricultural soil, suggesting that HCH degradation is probably mediated by bacteria closely related to the family Sphingomonadaceae.

  5. The expression changes of Nicastrin in neuronal cells after lysosomal inhibitors treatment%溶酶体酶抑制剂对神经细胞内Nicastrin表达水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭雪华; 龙志敏; 骆世芳; 贺桂琼

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore whether the lysosomal pathway was involved in the degradation of Alzheimer' s disease ( AD ) -related protein Nicastrin( NCT). Methods Following generation of NCT stable cell lines, various methods such as Western blotting, double immunofluorescent staining and cell fractionation, combined with lysosomal inhibition were used to check NCT expression level in NCT stable cell line. Results Cell fractionation experiment showed that NCT distributed primarily in ER and Golgi apparatus, few NCT located in lyso-some. Treatment of cells with lysosomal inhibitors significantly increased both endogenous and exogenous mature NCT ( mNCT) in NCT stable cells or non-transfected neuronal cells, and the effect of lysosomal inhibitor on mNCT was time- and dose-dependent; however, lysosomal inhibitor had no effect on immature NCT (imNCT). Immunofluorescent microscopic analysis showed that lysosomal inhibition leaded to the accumulation of NCT in lysosomal apparatus. Conclusions The lysosomal pathway is involved in the degradation of mNCT in neuronal cells%目的 探讨溶酶体酶抑制剂对阿尔茨海默病(AD)相关蛋白Nicastrin(NCT)表达的影响,以期明确NCT的蛋白降解是否与溶酶体途径有关.方法 在用人神经母细胞瘤细胞SH-SY5Y建立稳定表达NCT细胞株的基础上,应用溶酶体酶抑制剂处理NCT细胞株,并结合Western印迹、亚细胞器的分级分离、免疫荧光双标等技术,检测溶酶体酶抑制剂处理后神经细胞内NCT的表达变化.结果 亚细胞器分级分离实验显示,正常情况下神经细胞内的NCT主要分布于内质网和高尔基复合体,少量NCT分布于溶酶体.Western印迹结果显示,溶酶体酶抑制剂处理后,神经细胞内源性和外源性成熟NCT(mNCT)的表达显著增强,且溶酶体酶抑制剂氯喹对mNCT蛋白表达的增强效应呈剂量依赖性和时间依赖性,但溶酶体抑制剂对非成熟NCT(imNCT)的表达无影响;免疫荧光双标结果显

  6. Genetic associations of type 2 diabetes with islet amyloid polypeptide processing and degrading pathways in asian populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Kwok Lim Lam

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is a complex disease characterized by beta cell dysfunctions. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP is highly conserved and co-secreted with insulin with over 40% of autopsy cases of T2D showing islet amyloid formation due to IAPP aggregation. Dysregulation in IAPP processing, stabilization and degradation can cause excessive oligomerization with beta cell toxicity. Previous studies examining genetic associations of pathways implicated in IAPP metabolism have yielded conflicting results due to small sample size, insufficient interrogation of gene structure and gene-gene interactions. In this multi-staged study, we screened 89 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 6 candidate genes implicated in IAPP metabolism and tested for independent and joint associations with T2D and beta cell dysfunctions. Positive signals in the stage-1 were confirmed by de novo and in silico analysis in a multi-centre unrelated case-control cohort. We examined the association of significant SNPs with quantitative traits in a subset of controls and performed bioinformatics and relevant functional analyses. Amongst the tag SNPs, rs1583645 in carboxypeptidase E (CPE and rs6583813 in insulin degrading enzyme (IDE were associated with 1.09 to 1.28 fold increased risk of T2D (P Meta = 9.4×10(-3 and 0.02 respectively in a meta-analysis of East Asians. Using genetic risk scores (GRS with each risk variant scoring 1, subjects with GRS≥3 (8.2% of the cohort had 56% higher risk of T2D than those with GRS = 0 (P = 0.01. In a subcohort of control subjects, plasma IAPP increased and beta cell function index declined with GRS (P = 0.008 and 0.03 respectively. Bioinformatics and functional analyses of CPE rs1583645 predicted regulatory elements for chromatin modification and transcription factors, suggesting differential DNA-protein interactions and gene expression. Taken together, these results support the importance of dysregulation of IAPP

  7. Genetic Associations of Type 2 Diabetes with Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Processing and Degrading Pathways in Asian Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Vincent Kwok Lim; Ma, Ronald Ching Wan; Lee, Heung Man; Hu, Cheng; Park, Kyong Soo; Furuta, Hiroto; Wang, Ying; Tam, Claudia Ha Ting; Sim, Xueling; Ng, Daniel Peng-Keat; Liu, Jianjun; Wong, Tien-Yin; Tai, E. Shyong; Morris, Andrew P.; Tang, Nelson Leung Sang; Woo, Jean; Leung, Ping Chung; Kong, Alice Pik Shan; Ozaki, Risa; Jia, Wei Ping; Lee, Hong Kyu; Nanjo, Kishio; Xu, Gang; Ng, Maggie Chor Yin; So, Wing-Yee; Chan, Juliana Chung Ngor

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex disease characterized by beta cell dysfunctions. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is highly conserved and co-secreted with insulin with over 40% of autopsy cases of T2D showing islet amyloid formation due to IAPP aggregation. Dysregulation in IAPP processing, stabilization and degradation can cause excessive oligomerization with beta cell toxicity. Previous studies examining genetic associations of pathways implicated in IAPP metabolism have yielded conflicting results due to small sample size, insufficient interrogation of gene structure and gene-gene interactions. In this multi-staged study, we screened 89 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6 candidate genes implicated in IAPP metabolism and tested for independent and joint associations with T2D and beta cell dysfunctions. Positive signals in the stage-1 were confirmed by de novo and in silico analysis in a multi-centre unrelated case-control cohort. We examined the association of significant SNPs with quantitative traits in a subset of controls and performed bioinformatics and relevant functional analyses. Amongst the tag SNPs, rs1583645 in carboxypeptidase E (CPE) and rs6583813 in insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) were associated with 1.09 to 1.28 fold increased risk of T2D (PMeta = 9.4×10−3 and 0.02 respectively) in a meta-analysis of East Asians. Using genetic risk scores (GRS) with each risk variant scoring 1, subjects with GRS≥3 (8.2% of the cohort) had 56% higher risk of T2D than those with GRS = 0 (P = 0.01). In a subcohort of control subjects, plasma IAPP increased and beta cell function index declined with GRS (P = 0.008 and 0.03 respectively). Bioinformatics and functional analyses of CPE rs1583645 predicted regulatory elements for chromatin modification and transcription factors, suggesting differential DNA-protein interactions and gene expression. Taken together, these results support the importance of dysregulation of IAPP metabolism in

  8. Small heat shock proteins target mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator for degradation via a small ubiquitin-like modifier-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahner, Annette; Gong, Xiaoyan; Schmidt, Bela Z; Peters, Kathryn W; Rabeh, Wael M; Thibodeau, Patrick H; Lukacs, Gergely L; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2013-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHsps) bind destabilized proteins during cell stress and disease, but their physiological functions are less clear. We evaluated the impact of Hsp27, an sHsp expressed in airway epithelial cells, on the common protein misfolding mutant that is responsible for most cystic fibrosis. F508del cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a well-studied protein that is subject to cytosolic quality control, selectively associated with Hsp27, whose overexpression preferentially targeted mutant CFTR to proteasomal degradation. Hsp27 interacted physically with Ubc9, the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E2 conjugating enzyme, implying that F508del SUMOylation leads to its sHsp-mediated degradation. Enhancing or disabling the SUMO pathway increased or blocked Hsp27's ability to degrade mutant CFTR. Hsp27 promoted selective SUMOylation of F508del NBD1 in vitro and of full-length F508del CFTR in vivo, which preferred endogenous SUMO-2/3 paralogues that form poly-chains. The SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) RNF4 recognizes poly-SUMO chains to facilitate nuclear protein degradation. RNF4 overexpression elicited F508del degradation, whereas Hsp27 knockdown blocked RNF4's impact on mutant CFTR. Similarly, the ability of Hsp27 to degrade F508del CFTR was lost during overexpression of dominant-negative RNF4. These findings link sHsp-mediated F508del CFTR degradation to its SUMOylation and to STUbL-mediated targeting to the ubiquitin-proteasome system and thereby implicate this pathway in the disposal of an integral membrane protein.

  9. [Application of lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring: research progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, You-Zhu; Fang, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Lysosome is an important organelle existing in eukaryotic cells. With the development of the study on the structure and function of lysosome in recent years, lysosome is considered as a target of toxic substances on subcellular level, and has been widely applied abroad in marine pollution monitoring. This paper summarized the biological characteristics of lysosomal marker enzyme, lysosome-autophagy system, and lysosomal membrane, and introduced the principles and methods of applying lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring. Bivalve shellfish digestive gland and fish liver are the most sensitive organs for lysosomal detection. By adopting the lysosomal detection techniques such as lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) test, neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay, morphological measurement (MM) of lysosome, immunohistochemical (Ih) assay of lysosomal marker enzyme, and electron microscopy (EM), the status of marine pollution can be evaluated. It was suggested that the lysosome could be used as a biomarker for monitoring marine environmental pollution. The advantages and disadvantages of lysosomal detection and some problems worthy of attention were analyzed, and the application prospects of lysosomal detection were discussed.

  10. scyllo-Inositol promotes robust mutant Huntingtin protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Aaron Y; Lan, Cynthia P; Hasan, Salwa; Brown, Mary E; McLaurin, Joanne

    2014-02-07

    Huntington disease is characterized by neuronal aggregates and inclusions containing polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin protein and peptide fragments (polyQ-Htt). We have used an established cell-based assay employing a PC12 cell line overexpressing truncated exon 1 of Htt with a 103-residue polyQ expansion that yields polyQ-Htt aggregates to investigate the fate of polyQ-Htt-drug complexes. scyllo-Inositol is an endogenous inositol stereoisomer known to inhibit accumulation and toxicity of the amyloid-β peptide and α-synuclein. In light of these properties, we investigated the effect of scyllo-inositol on polyQ-Htt accumulation. We show that scyllo-inositol lowered the number of visible polyQ-Htt aggregates and robustly decreased polyQ-Htt protein abundance without concomitant cellular toxicity. We found that scyllo-inositol-induced polyQ-Htt reduction was by rescue of degradation pathways mediated by the lysosome and by the proteasome but not autophagosomes. The rescue of degradation pathways was not a direct result of scyllo-inositol on the lysosome or proteasome but due to scyllo-inositol-induced reduction in mutant polyQ-Htt protein levels.

  11. Lysosomal and mitochondrial permeabilization mediates zinc(II) cationic phthalocyanine phototoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Julieta; García Vior, María C; Furmento, Verónica A; Blank, Viviana C; Awruch, Josefina; Roguin, Leonor P

    2013-11-01

    In order to find a novel photosensitizer to be used in photodynamic therapy for cancer treatment, we have previously showed that the cationic zinc(II) phthalocyanine named Pc13, the sulfur-linked dye 2,9(10),16(17),23(24)-tetrakis[(2-trimethylammonium) ethylsulfanyl]phthalocyaninatozinc(II) tetraiodide, exerts a selective phototoxic effect on human nasopharynx KB carcinoma cells and induces an apoptotic response characterized by an increase in the activity of caspase-3. Since the activation of an apoptotic pathway by chemotherapeutic agents contributes to the elimination of malignant cells, in this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the antitumor action of Pc13. We found that after light exposure, Pc13 induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are mediating the resultant cytotoxic action on KB cells. ROS led to an early permeabilization of lysosomal membranes as demonstrated by the reduction of lysosome fluorescence with acridine orange and the release of lysosomal proteases to cytosol. Treatment with antioxidants inhibited ROS generation, preserved the integrity of lysosomal membrane and increased cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Lysosome disruption was followed by mitochondrial depolarization, cytosolic release of cytochrome C and caspases activation. Although no change in the total amount of Bax was observed, the translocation of Bax from cytosol to mitochondria, the cleavage of the pro-apoptotic protein Bid, together with the decrease of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-XL and Bcl-2 indicated the involvement of Bcl-2 family proteins in the induction of the mitochondrial pathway. It was also demonstrated that cathepsin D, but not caspase-8, contributed to Bid cleavage. In conclusion, Pc13-induced cell photodamage is triggered by ROS generation and activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway through the release of lysosomal proteases. In addition, our results also indicated that Pc13 induced

  12. Lysosomal exoglycosidases in serum and urine of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Stypułkowska

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal exoglycosidases: N-acetyl-β-D-hexosaminidase (HEX, β-D-galactosidase (GAL, ι-L-fucosidase (FUC and ι-D-mannosidase (MAN modify oligosaccharide chains of glycoconjugates in endoplasmatic reticulum and/or Golgi apparatus and degrade them in lysosomes. In acid environment of lysosome, exoglycosidases degrade oligosaccharide chains of glycoproteins, glycolipids and glycosaminoglycans by eliminating single sugars from the edges of oligosaccharide chains. Neoplasms change biochemical processes in tissues and may significantly change the activity of many enzymes including the activity of lysosomal exoglycosidasses in serum and urine of persons with neoplasmatic diseases. The aim of the present paper was evaluation the activity of HEX, GAL, FUC and MAN in serum and urine of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Serum and urine samples were collected from 15 patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas and 15 healthy persons. The activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases was determined by the method of Marciniak et al. adapted to serum and urine of patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Our results indicate significant decrease in activity of GAL (p=0.037 in serum of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, significant increase in activity of HEX (p<0.001 and FUC (p=0.027 in serum, and HEX (p=0.003 in urine, as well as significant decrease of FUC (p=0.016 and MAN (p=0.029 in urine o patients with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, in comparison to the control group. Increase in activity of some lysosomal enzymes in serum and urine of pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients, may indicate on destruction of pancreatic tissue by pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Determination of the HEX, GAL, FUC and MAN in serum and urine may be useful in diagnostics of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  13. Activation of Notch in lgd mutant cells requires the fusion of late endosomes with the lysosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Markus; Troost, Tobias; Grawe, Ferdi; Martinez-Arias, Alfonso; Klein, Thomas

    2013-01-15

    The tumour suppressor Lethal (2) giant discs (Lgd) is a regulator of endosomal trafficking of the Notch signalling receptor as well as other transmembrane proteins in Drosophila. The loss of its function results in an uncontrolled ligand-independent activation of the Notch signalling receptor. Here, we investigated the consequences of loss of lgd function and the requirements for the activation of Notch. We show that the activation of Notch in lgd cells is independent of Kuz and dependent on γ-secretase. We found that the lgd cells have a defect that delays degradation of transmembrane proteins, which are residents of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, our results show that the activation of Notch in lgd cells occurs in the lysosome. By contrast, the pathway is activated at an earlier phase in mutants of the gene that encodes the ESCRT-III component Shrub, which is an interaction partner of Lgd. We further show that activation of Notch appears to be a general consequence of loss of lgd function. In addition, electron microscopy of lgd cells revealed that they contain enlarged multi-vesicular bodies. The presented results further elucidate the mechanism of uncontrolled Notch activation upon derailed endocytosis.

  14. Autophagy in microglia degrades extracellular β-amyloid fibrils and regulates the NLRP3 inflammasome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mi-Hyang; Cho, Kwangmin; Kang, Hoe-Jin; Jeon, Eun-Young; Kim, Hun-Sik; Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Hong-Mi; Kim, Dong-Hou; Yoon, Seung-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) and resultant inflammation are critical pathological features of Alzheimer disease (AD). Microglia, a primary immune cell in brain, ingests and degrades extracellular Aβ fibrils via the lysosomal system. Autophagy is a catabolic process that degrades native cellular components, however, the role of autophagy in Aβ degradation by microglia and its effects on AD are unknown. Here we demonstrate a novel role for autophagy in the clearance of extracellular Aβ fibrils by microglia and in the regulation of the Aβ-induced NLRP3 (NLR family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome using microglia specific atg7 knockout mice and cell cultures. We found in microglial cultures that Aβ interacts with MAP1LC3B-II via OPTN/optineurin and is degraded by an autophagic process mediated by the PRKAA1 pathway. We anticipate that enhancing microglial autophagy may be a promising new therapeutic strategy for AD. PMID:25126727

  15. The ubiquitin+proteasome protein degradation pathway as a therapeutic strategy in the treatment of solid tumor malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, James J; Minter, Alex; Driscoll, Daniel A; Burris, Jason K

    2011-02-01

    A concept that currently steers the development of cancer therapies has been that agents directed against specific proteins that facilitate tumorigenesis or maintain a malignant phenotype will have greater efficacy, less toxicity and a more sustained response relative to traditional cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents. The clinical success of the targeted agent Imatinib mesylate as an inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase associated with the breakpoint cluster region-Abelson oncogene locus (BCR-ABL) in the treatment of Philadelphia-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) has served as a paradigm. While intellectually gratifying, the selective targeting of a single driver event by a small molecule, e.g., kinase inhibitor, to dampen a tumor-promoting pathway in the treatment of solid tumors is limited by many factors. Focus can alternatively be placed on targeting fundamental cellular processes that regulate multiple events, e.g., protein degradation, through the Ubiquitin (Ub)+Proteasome System (UPS). The UPS plays a critical role in modulating numerous cellular proteins to regulate cellular processes such as signal transduction, growth, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Clinical success with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib revolutionized treatment of B-cell lineage malignancies such as Multiple Myeloma (MM). However, many patients harbor primary resistance and do not respond to bortezomib and those that do respond inevitably develop resistance (secondary resistance). The lack of clinical efficacy of proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of solid tumors may be linked mechanistically to the resistance detected during treatment of hematologic malignancies. Potential mechanisms of resistance and means to improve the response to proteasome inhibitors in solid tumors are discussed.

  16. Photolysis of model emerging contaminants in ultra-pure water: kinetics, by-products formation and degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, F Javier; Acero, Juan L; Real, Francisco J; Roldan, Gloria; Rodriguez, Elena

    2013-02-01

    The photolysis of five frequent emerging contaminants (Benzotriazole, Chlorophene, N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide or DEET, Methylindole, and Nortriptyline HCl) was investigated in ultrapure water under monochromatic ultraviolet radiation at 254 nm and by a combination of UV and hydrogen peroxide. The results revealed that the photolysis rates followed first-order kinetics, with rate constant values depending on the nature of the specific compound, the pH, and the presence or absence of the scavenger tert-butanol. Quantum yields were also determined and values in the range of 53.8 × 10⁻³ - 9.4 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for Benzotriazole, 525 × 10⁻³ - 469 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for Chlorophene, 2.8 × 10⁻³ - 0.9 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for DEET, 108 × 10⁻³ - 165 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for Methylindole, and 13.8 × 10⁻³ - 15.0 × 10⁻³ mol E⁻¹ for Nortriptyline were obtained. The study also found that the UV/H₂O₂ process enhanced the oxidation rate in comparison to direct photolysis. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS) technique was applied to the concentrations evaluation and further identification of the parent compounds and their by-products, which allowed the proposal of the degradation pathways for each compound. Finally, in order to assess the aquatic toxicity in the photodegradation of these compounds, the Vibrio fischeri acute toxicity test was used, and the results indicated an initial increase of this parameter in all cases, followed by a decrease in the specific case of Benzotriazole, DEET, Methylindole, and Chlorophene.

  17. LAMP-2 is required for incorporating syntaxin-17 into autophagosomes and for their fusion with lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Virginie; Peschel, Andrea; Langer, Brigitte; Gröger, Marion; Rees, Andrew; Kain, Renate

    2016-10-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process used for removing surplus and damaged proteins and organelles from the cytoplasm. The unwanted material is incorporated into autophagosomes that eventually fuse with lysosomes, leading to the degradation of their cargo. The fusion event is mediated by the interaction between the Qa-SNARE syntaxin-17 (STX17) on autophagosomes and the R-SNARE VAMP8 on lysosomes. Cells deficient in lysosome membrane-associated protein-2 (LAMP-2) have increased numbers of autophagosomes but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. By transfecting LAMP-2-deficient and LAMP-1/2--double-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with a tandem fluorescent-tagged LC3 we observed a failure of fusion between the autophagosomes and the lysosomes that could be rescued by complementation with LAMP-2A. Although we observed no change in expression and localization of VAMP8, its interacting partner STX17 was absent from autophagosomes of LAMP-2-deficient cells. Thus, LAMP-2 is essential for STX17 expression by the autophagosomes and this absence is sufficient to explain their failure to fuse with lysosomes. The results have clear implications for situations associated with a reduction of LAMP-2 expression.

  18. Color reduction of melanin by lysosomal and peroxisomal enzymes isolated from mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Jun; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Yoon, Jihee; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-02-01

    Lysosomes and peroxisomes are organelles with many functions in all eukaryotic cells. Lysosomes contain hydrolytic enzymes (lysozyme) that degrade molecules, whereas peroxisomes contain enzymes such as catalase that convert hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to water and oxygen and neutralize toxicity. In contrast, melanin is known as a helpful element to protect the skin against harmful ultraviolet rays. However, a high quantity of melanin leads to hyperpigmentation or skin cancer in human. New materials have already been discovered to inhibit tyrosinase in melanogenesis; however, melanin reduction does not suggest their preparation. In this study, we report that the color intensity because of melanin decreased by the cellular activation of lysosomes and peroxisomes. An increase in the superficial intensity of lysosome and peroxisome activities of HeLa cells was observed. In addition, a decrease in the amount of melanin has also been observed in mammalian cells without using any other chemical, showing that the process can work in vivo for treating melanin. Therefore, the results of this study indicate that the amount of melanin decreases by the lysosome and peroxisome activity after entering the cells, and functional organelles are effective in color reduction. This mechanism can be used in vivo for treating melanin.

  19. Targeting Androgen Receptor by Lysosomal Degradation in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    of the sample was reduced by passing it through an 18 gauge needle followed by sonication. Triton X 100 was added to 2% final concentration, and the...Enrichment Kit for Tissue and Cultured Cells ( #89839, Pierce/ Thermo Scientific) following the manufacturer’s protocol. Briefly, cells were lysed by...A L; AebeJSOld, R A guided tour of the Trans Proteomic Pipeline. Prokomics 2010, 10 (6), 1150- 9. 3790 i@tiM ( 15) Keller, A; Nesviiliskii, A L

  20. Hsp70 stabilizes lysosomes and reverts Niemann-Pick disease-associated lysosomal pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Thomas; Roth, Anke G; Petersen, Nikolaj H T

    2010-01-01

    inhibition of ASM, effectively revert the Hsp70-mediated stabilization of lysosomes. Notably, the reduced ASM activity in cells from patients with Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) A and B-severe lysosomal storage disorders caused by mutations in the sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 gene (SMPD1) encoding for ASM...

  1. GABA shunt and polyamine degradation pathway on γ-aminobutyric acid accumulation in germinating fava bean (Vicia faba L.) under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Runqiang; Guo, Qianghui; Gu, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    GABA shunt and polyamine degradation pathway on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation in germinating fava bean under hypoxia was investigated. GABA content, GAD and DAO activity were significantly increased under hypoxia treatment. Glu and polyamine contents enhanced largely and thus supplied as sufficient substrates for GABA formation. In contrast, GABA content decreased, mainly in the embryo, after removing the hypoxia stress. DAO activity, Glu and polyamines contents decreased, while an increment of GAD activity was observed. This indicated that GAD activity can be not only regulated by hypoxia, but by the rapid growth of embryo after the recovery from hypoxia stress. When treated with AG, DAO activity was almost inhibited completely, and the GABA content decreased by 32.96% and 32.07% after treated for 3 and 5 days, respectively. Hence, it can be inferred that about 30% of GABA formed in germinating fava bean under hypoxia was supplied by polyamine degradation pathway.

  2. ErbB2-associated changes in the lysosomal proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nylandsted, Jesper; Becker, Andrea C; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Late endosomes and lysosomes (hereafter referred to as lysosomes) play an essential role in the turnover of cellular macromolecules and organelles. Their biochemical characterization has so far depended on purification methods based on either density gradient centrifugations or magnetic...... purification of iron-loaded organelles. Owing to dramatic changes in lysosomal density and stability associated with lysosomal diseases and cancer, these methods are not optimal for the comparison of normal and pathological lysosomes. Here, we introduce an efficient method for the purification of intact...... lysosomes by magnetic immunoprecipitation with antibodies against the vacuolar-type H(+) -ATPase. Quantitative MS-based proteomics analysis of the obtained lysosomal membranes identified 60 proteins, most of which have previously been associated with the lysosomal compartment. Interestingly, the lysosomal...

  3. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario de la Mata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs describe a heterogeneous group of rare inherited metabolic disorders that result from the absence or loss of function of lysosomal hydrolases or transporters, resulting in the progressive accumulation of undigested material in lysosomes. The accumulation of substances affects the function of lysosomes and other organelles, resulting in secondary alterations such as impairment of autophagy, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and apoptosis. LSDs frequently involve the central nervous system (CNS, where neuronal dysfunction or loss results in progressive neurodegeneration and premature death. Many LSDs exhibit signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, which include mitochondrial morphological changes, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, diminished ATP production and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, reduced autophagic flux may lead to the persistence of dysfunctional mitochondria. Gaucher disease (GD, the LSD with the highest prevalence, is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene that results in defective and insufficient activity of the enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase. Decreased catalytic activity and/or instability of GCase leads to accumulation of glucosylceramide (GlcCer and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph in the lysosomes of macrophage cells and visceral organs. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported to occur in numerous cellular and mouse models of GD. The aim of this manuscript is to review the current knowledge and implications of mitochondrial dysfunction in LSDs.

  4. Discovery of Small Molecules That Induce Lysosomal Cell Death in Cancer Cell Lines Using an Image-Based Screening Platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pagliero, Romina J; D'Astolfo, Diego S; Lelieveld, Daphne; Pratiwi, Riyona D; Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja; Martin, Nathaniel I; Klumperman, Judith; Egan, David A

    2016-01-01

    The lysosomal cell death (LCD) pathway is a caspase 3-independent cell death pathway that has been suggested as a possible target for cancer therapy, making the development of sensitive and specific high-throughput (HT) assays to identify LCD inducers highly desirable. In this study, we report a two

  5. Thrombin-induced lysosomal exocytosis in human platelets is dependent on secondary activation by ADP and regulated by endothelial-derived substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södergren, Anna L; Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B; Ramström, Sofia; Lindström, Eva G; Grenegård, Magnus; Öllinger, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Exocytosis of lysosomal contents from platelets has been speculated to participate in clearance of thrombi and vessel wall remodelling. The mechanisms that regulate lysosomal exocytosis in platelets are, however, still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the pathways underlying platelet lysosomal secretion and elucidate how this process is controlled by platelet inhibitors. We found that high concentrations of thrombin induced partial lysosomal exocytosis as assessed by analysis of the activity of released N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase (NAG) and by identifying the fraction of platelets exposing the lysosomal-associated membrane protein (LAMP)-1 on the cell surface by flow cytometry. Stimulation of thrombin receptors PAR1 or PAR4 with specific peptides was equally effective in inducing LAMP-1 surface expression. Notably, lysosomal exocytosis in response to thrombin was significantly reduced if the secondary activation by ADP was inhibited by the P2Y12 antagonist cangrelor, while inhibition of thromboxane A2 formation by treatment with acetylsalicylic acid was of minor importance in this regard. Moreover, the NO-releasing drug S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP) or the cyclic AMP-elevating eicosanoid prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) significantly suppressed lysosomal exocytosis. We conclude that platelet inhibitors that mimic functional endothelium such as PGI2 or NO efficiently counteract lysosomal exocytosis. Furthermore, we suggest that secondary release of ADP and concomitant signaling via PAR1/4- and P2Y12 receptors is important for efficient platelet lysosomal exocytosis by thrombin.

  6. Autophagy as a pro-death pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Donna; Xu, Tianqi; Kumar, Sharad

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved catabolic process of autophagy involves the degradation of cytoplasmic components through lysosomal enzymes. Basal levels of autophagy maintain cellular homeostasis and under stress conditions high levels of autophagy are induced. It is often under such stress conditions that high levels of autophagy and cell death have been observed, leading to the idea that autophagy may act as an executioner of cell death. However the notion of autophagy as a cell death mechanism has been controversial and remains mechanistically undefined. There is now growing evidence that in specific contexts autophagy can indeed facilitate cell death. The pro-death role of autophagy is however complicated due to the extensive cross-talk between different signalling pathways. This review summarises the examples of where autophagy acts as a means of cell death and discusses the association of autophagy with the different cell death pathways.

  7. Cloning and expression of meta-cleavage enzyme (CarB of carbazole degradation pathway from Pseudomonas stutzeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Leites Larentis

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the 1082bp PCR product corresponding to carBaBb genes that encode the heterotetrameric enzyme 2'-aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol 1,2-dioxygenase (CarB, involved in the Pseudomonas stutzeri ATCC 31258 carbazole degradation pathway, was cloned using the site-specific recombination system. Recombinant clones were confirmed by PCR, restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. CarB dioxygenase was expressed in high levels and in active form in Escherichia coli BL21-SI using the His-tagged expression vector pDEST TM17 and salt induction for 4h.Carbazol e seus derivados são compostos nitrogenados aromáticos, presentes comumente em petróleo e potencialmente poluentes. A rota de biodegradação de carbazol a ácido antranílico em Pseudomonas sp. é composta por três enzimas responsáveis, respectivamente, pelas reações de dioxigenação angular, meta-clivagem e hidrólise. A segunda enzima da rota, 2'-aminobifenil-2,3-diol 1,2-dioxigenase (CarB, codificada por dois genes (carBa e carBb, é um heterotetrâmero com atividade catalítica na quebra do anel catecol do susbtrato na posição meta. Neste trabalho, foi clonado o produto de PCR de 1082pb correspondente aos genes carBaBb da bactéria degradadora de carbazol Pseudomonas stutzeri ATCC 31258. A estratégia de clonagem empregada foi a de recombinação sítio-específica e a construção dos plasmídeos foi confirmada por PCR, digestão com enzima de restrição e seqüenciamento. A enzima ativa foi expressa em altas concentrações em vetor pDEST TM17 com cauda de histidina e promotor T7 em Escherichia coli BL21-SI com indução por NaCl durante 4h.

  8. Lysosomal Ca(2+) homeostasis: role in pathogenesis of lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Platt, Frances M

    2011-08-01

    Disrupted cellular Ca(2+) signaling is believed to play a role in a number of human diseases including lysosomal storage diseases (LSD). LSDs are a group of ∼50 diseases caused predominantly by mutations in lysosomal proteins that result in accumulation of macromolecules within the lysosome. We recently reported that Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) is the first human disease to be associated with defective lysosomal Ca(2+) uptake and defective NAADP-mediated lysosomal Ca(2+) release. These defects in NPC cells leads to the disruption in endocytosis and subsequent lipid storage that is a feature of this disease. In contrast, Chediak-Higashi Syndrome cells have been reported to have enhanced lysosomal Ca(2+) uptake whilst the TRPML1 protein defective in mucolipidosis type IV is believed to function as a Ca(2+) channel. In this review we provide a summary of the current knowledge on the role of lysosomal Ca(2+) signaling in the pathogenesis of this group of diseases.

  9. Endo-lysosomal dysfunction in human proximal tubular epithelial cells deficient for lysosomal cystine transporter cystinosin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A Ivanova

    Full Text Available Nephropathic cystinosis is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the CTNS gene encoding cystine transporter cystinosin that results in accumulation of amino acid cystine in the lysosomes throughout the body and especially affects kidneys. Early manifestations of the disease include renal Fanconi syndrome, a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction. Current therapy of cystinosis is based on cystine-lowering drug cysteamine that postpones the disease progression but offers no cure for the Fanconi syndrome. We studied the mechanisms of impaired reabsorption in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC deficient for cystinosin and investigated the endo-lysosomal compartments of cystinosin-deficient PTEC by means of light and electron microscopy. We demonstrate that cystinosin-deficient cells had abnormal shape and distribution of the endo-lysosomal compartments and impaired endocytosis, with decreased surface expression of multiligand receptors and delayed lysosomal cargo processing. Treatment with cysteamine improved surface expression and lysosomal cargo processing but did not lead to a complete restoration and had no effect on the abnormal morphology of endo-lysosomal compartments. The obtained results improve our understanding of the mechanism of proximal tubular dysfunction in cystinosis and indicate that impaired protein reabsorption can, at least partially, be explained by abnormal trafficking of endosomal vesicles.

  10. α-Amino acid containing degradable polymers as functional biomaterials: rational design, synthetic pathway, and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huanli; Meng, Fenghua; Dias, Aylvin A; Hendriks, Marc; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2011-06-13

    Currently, biomedical engineering is rapidly expanding, especially in the areas of drug delivery, gene transfer, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. A prerequisite for further development is the design and synthesis of novel multifunctional biomaterials that are biocompatible and biologically active, are biodegradable with a controlled degradation rate, and have tunable mechanical properties. In the past decades, different types of α-amino acid-containing degradable polymers have been actively developed with the aim to obtain biomimicking functional biomaterials. The use of α-amino acids as building units for degradable polymers may offer several advantages: (i) imparting chemical functionality, such as hydroxyl, amine, carboxyl, and thiol groups, which not only results in improved hydrophilicity and possible interactions with proteins and genes, but also facilitates further modification with bioactive molecules (e.g., drugs or biological cues); (ii) possibly improving materials biological properties, including cell-materials interactions (e.g., cell adhesion, migration) and degradability; (iii) enhancing thermal and mechanical properties; and (iv) providing metabolizable building units/blocks. In this paper, recent developments in the field of α-amino acid-containing degradable polymers are reviewed. First, synthetic approaches to prepare α-amino acid-containing degradable polymers will be discussed. Subsequently, the biomedical applications of these polymers in areas such as drug delivery, gene delivery and tissue engineering will be reviewed. Finally, the future perspectives of α-amino acid-containing degradable polymers will be evaluated.

  11. Degradation of ciprofloxacin by 280 nm ultraviolet-activated persulfate: Degradation pathway and intermediate impact on proteome of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jin-Shao; Liu, Juan; Ou, Hua-Se; Wang, Lin-Lin

    2016-12-01

    In this study, the degradation of ciprofloxacin (CIP) was explored using ultraviolet activated persulfate (UV/PS) with 280 nm ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), and the toxicological assessment of degrading intermediates was performed using iTRAQ labeling quantitative proteomic technology. The quantitative mass spectrum results showed that 280 nm UV/PS treatment had a high transformation efficiency of CIP ([CIP] = 3 μM, [S2O8(2-)] = 210 μM, apparent rate constants 0.2413 min(-1)). The high resolution mass spectrum analyses demonstrated that the primary intermediates included C15H16FN3O3 (m/z 306.1248) and C17H18FN3O4 (m/z 348.1354). The former one was formed by the cleavage of piperazine ring, while the later one was generated by the addition of a hydroxyl on the quinolone backbone. The toxicological assessment demonstrated that 56 and 110 proteins had significant up regulations and down regulations, respectively, in the Escherichia coli exposed to degraded CIP compared to untreated CIP. The majority of up-regulated proteins, such as GapA, SodC, were associated with primary metabolic process rather than responses to stress and toxic substance, inferring that the moderate UV/PS treatment can reduce the antibacterial activity of CIP by incomplete mineralization. Consequently, these results provided a novel insight into the application of UV-LED/PS treatment as a promising removal methodology for quinolones. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fucoidan inhibition of lung cancer in vivo and in vitro : role of the Smurf2-dependent ubiquitin proteasome pathway in TGFβ receptor degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Lin, Tung-Yi; Wu, Yu-Chung; Tsao, Shu-Ming; Hwang, Pai-An; Shih, Yu-Wei; Hsu, Jason

    2014-09-15

    Fucoidan, a polysaccharide extracted from brown seaweeds, reduces tumor cell proliferation. In this study, we demonstrate that fucoidan reduces tumor size in LLC1-xenograft male C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, we found that LLC1-bearing mice continuously fed fucoidan showed greater antitumor activity than mice with discontinuous feeding. Fucoidan inhibited the in vitro growth of lung cancer cells. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) receptors (TGFRs) play important roles in the regulation of proliferation and progression, and high TGFRI expression in lung cancer specimens is associated with a worse prognosis. Herein, using lung cancer cells, we found that fucoidan effectively reduces TGFRI and TGFRII protein levels in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, fucoidan reduces TGFR downstream signaling events, including those in Smad2/3 and non-Smad pathways: Akt, Erk1/2, and FAK phosphorylation. Furthermore, fucoidan suppresses lung cancer cell mobility upon TGFβ stimulation. To elucidate how fucoidan decreases TGFR proteins in lung cancer cells, we found that fucoidan enhances the ubiquitination proteasome pathway (UPP)-mediated degradation of TGFRs in A549 and CL1-5 cells. Mechanistically, fucoidan promotes Smurf2 and Smad7 to conjugate TGFRs, resulting in TGF degradation; however, Smurf2-shRNA abolishes fucoidan-enhanced UPP-mediated TGFR degradation. Our study is the first to identify a novel mechanism for the antitumor activity of fucoidan, namely decreasing tumor growth by modulating the TGFR/Smad7/Smurf2-dependent axis, leading to TGFR protein degradation and inhibition of lung cancer cell progression in vitro and in vivo. Our current findings indicate that fucoidan is a potential therapeutic agent or dietary supplementation for lung cancer, acting via the Smurf2-dependent ubiquitin degradation of TGFβ receptors.

  13. Reaction pathways of dimethyl phthalate degradation in TiO2-UV-O2 and TiO2-UV-Fe(VI) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bao-ling; Li, Xiang-zhong; Graham, Nigel

    2008-05-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) in aqueous TiO2 suspension under UV illumination has been investigated using oxygen (O2) and ferrate (Fe(VI)) as electron acceptors. The experiments demonstrated that Fe(VI) was a more effective electron acceptor than O2 for scavenging the conduction band electrons from the surface of the catalyst. Some major intermediate products from DMP degradation were identified by HPLC and GC/MS analyses. The analytical results identified dimethyl 3-hydroxyphthalate and dimethyl 2-hydroxyphthalate as the two main intermediate products from the DMP degradation in the TiO2-UV-O2 system, while in contrast phthalic acid was found to be the main intermediate product in the TiO2-UV-Fe(VI) system. These findings indicate that DMP degradation in the TiO2-UV-O2 and TiO2-UV-Fe(VI) systems followed different reaction pathways. An electron spin resonance analysis confirmed that hydroxyl radicals existed in the TiO2-UV-O2 reaction system and an unknown radical species (most likely an iron-oxo species) is suspected to exist in the TiO2-UV-Fe(VI) reaction system. Two pathway schemes of DMP degradation in the TiO2-UV-O2 and TiO2-UV-Fe(VI) reaction systems are proposed. It is believed that the radicals formed in the TiO2-UV-O2 reaction system preferably attack the aromatic ring of the DMP, while in contrast the radicals formed in the TiO2-UV-Fe(VI) reaction systems attack the alkyl chain of DMP.

  14. Protein degradation in a LAMP-2-deficient B-lymphoblastoid cell line from a patient with Danon disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lanzas, Raul; Alvarez-Castelao, Beatriz; Bermejo, Teresa; Ayuso, Teresa; Tuñón, Teresa; Castaño, José G

    2016-08-01

    Danon disease, a condition characterized by cardiomyopathy, myopathy, and intellectual disability, is caused by mutations in the LAMP-2 gene. Lamp-2A protein, generated by alternative splicing from the Lamp-2 pre-mRNA, is reported to be the lysosomal membrane receptor essential for the chaperone-mediated autophagic pathway (CMA) aimed to selective protein targeting and translocation into the lysosomal lumen for degradation. To study the relevance of Lamp-2 in protein degradation, a lymphoblastoid cell line was obtained by EBV transformation of B-cells from a Danon patient. The derived cell line showed no significant expression of Lamp-2 protein. The steady-state mRNA and protein levels of alpha-synuclein, IΚBα, Rcan1, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, four proteins reported to be selective substrates of the CMA pathway, were similar in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis showed that the half-life of alpha-synuclein, IΚBα, and Rcan1 was similar in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells, and its degradation prevented by proteasome inhibitors. Both in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells, induction of CMA and macroautophagy by serum and aminoacid starvation of cells for 8h produced a similar decrease in IΚBα and Rcan1 protein levels and was prevented by the addition of lysosome and autophagy inhibitors. In conclusion, the results presented here showed that Lamp-2 deficiency in human lymphoblastoid cells did not modify the steady-state levels or the degradation of several protein substrates reported as selective substrates of the CMA pathway.

  15. Lysosomal exoglycosidases and cathepsin D in colon adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Szajda, Sławomir D; Kępka, Alina; Waszkiewicz, Magdalena; Roszkowska-Jakimiec, Wiesława; Wojewódzka-Żeleźniakowicz, Marzena; Milewska, Anna J; Dadan, Jacek; Szulc, Agata; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Ladny, Jerzy R

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the structure of membrane glycoconjugates and activity of glycosidases and proteases are important in tumor formation. The aim of the study was to compare the specific activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases: N-acetyl-β-D-hexosaminidase (HEX), its isoenzymes A (HEX A) and B (HEX B), β-D-galactosidase (GAL), α-fucosidase (FUC), and α-mannosidase (MAN) with the activity of cathepsin D (CD) in serum, urine, and carcinoma tissue of patients with colon adenocarcinoma. The specific activity of HEX, HEX A, HEX B, GAL, FUC, MAN, and CD was assayed in serum, urine, and carcinoma tissue of 12 patients with colon adenocarcinoma. Lysosomal exoglycosidases and CD have similar specific activity in colon adenocarcinoma tissue and urine, which is higher than their activity in serum (with the exception of the highest specific activity of CD in urine). A positive correlation was observed between the specific activity of CD and that of HEX, HEX A, FUC, and MAN in the carcinoma tissue and urine as well as between CD and GAL in the urine of patients with colon adenocarcinoma. Negative correlations were observed between protein levels and the specific activity of HEX, HEX A, FUC, MAN, and CD in the carcinoma tissue and urine, and between protein levels and GAL in urine. Increased degradation and remodeling of glycoconjugates in the colon adenocarcinoma tissue is reflected by increased specific activity of exoglycosidases and CD. The results suggest a strong effect of exoglycosidase action on tissue degradation and a potential role of exoglycosidases in the initiation of proteolysis.

  16. Activation of lysosomal function in the course of autophagy via mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Zhou; Shi-Hao Tan; Valérie Nicolas; Chantal Bauvy; Nai-Di Yang; Jianbin Zhang; Yuan Xue

    2013-01-01

    Lysosome is a key subcellular organelle in the execution of the autophagic process and at present little is known whether lysosomal function is controlled in the process of autophagy.In this study,we first found that suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity by starvation or two mTOR catalytic inhibitors (PP242 and Torinl),but not by an allosteric inhibitor (rapamycin),leads to activation of lysosomal function.Second,we provided evidence that activation of lysosomal function is associated with the suppression of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1),but not mTORC2,and the mTORC1 localization to lysosomes is not directly correlated to its regulatory role in lysosomal function.Third,we examined the involvement of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and demonstrated that TFEB activation following mTORC1 suppression is necessary but not sufficient for lysosomal activation.Finally,Atg5 or Atg7deletion or blockage of the autophagosome-lysosome fusion process effectively diminished lysosomal activation,suggesting that lysosomal activation occurring in the course of autophagy is dependent on antophagosome-lysosome fusion.Taken together,this study demonstrates that in the course of autophagy,lysosomal function is upregulated via a dual mechanism involving mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

  17. Activation of lysosomal function in the course of autophagy via mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Tan, Shi-Hao; Nicolas, Valérie; Bauvy, Chantal; Yang, Nai-Di; Zhang, Jianbin; Xue, Yuan; Codogno, Patrice; Shen, Han-Ming

    2013-04-01

    Lysosome is a key subcellular organelle in the execution of the autophagic process and at present little is known whether lysosomal function is controlled in the process of autophagy. In this study, we first found that suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity by starvation or two mTOR catalytic inhibitors (PP242 and Torin1), but not by an allosteric inhibitor (rapamycin), leads to activation of lysosomal function. Second, we provided evidence that activation of lysosomal function is associated with the suppression of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), but not mTORC2, and the mTORC1 localization to lysosomes is not directly correlated to its regulatory role in lysosomal function. Third, we examined the involvement of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and demonstrated that TFEB activation following mTORC1 suppression is necessary but not sufficient for lysosomal activation. Finally, Atg5 or Atg7 deletion or blockage of the autophagosome-lysosome fusion process effectively diminished lysosomal activation, suggesting that lysosomal activation occurring in the course of autophagy is dependent on autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Taken together, this study demonstrates that in the course of autophagy, lysosomal function is upregulated via a dual mechanism involving mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

  18. Klebsiella pneumoniae survives within macrophages by avoiding delivery to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Victoria; March, Catalina; Insua, Jose Luis; Aguiló, Nacho; Llobet, Enrique; Moranta, David; Regueiro, Verónica; Brennan, Gerard P; Millán-Lou, Maria Isabel; Martín, Carlos; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. Evidence indicates that Klebsiella might be able to persist intracellularly within a vacuolar compartment. This study was designed to investigate the interaction between Klebsiella and macrophages. Engulfment of K. pneumoniae was dependent on host cytoskeleton, cell plasma membrane lipid rafts and the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Microscopy studies revealed that K. pneumoniae resides within a vacuolar compartment, the Klebsiella-containing vacuole (KCV), which traffics within vacuoles associated with the endocytic pathway. In contrast to UV-killed bacteria, the majority of live bacteria did not co-localize with markers of the lysosomal compartment. Our data suggest that K. pneumoniae triggers a programmed cell death in macrophages displaying features of apoptosis. Our efforts to identify the mechanism(s) whereby K. pneumoniae prevents the fusion of the lysosomes to the KCV uncovered the central role of the PI3K-Akt-Rab14 axis to control the phagosome maturation. Our data revealed that the capsule is dispensable for Klebsiella intracellular survival if bacteria were not opsonized. Furthermore, the environment found by Klebsiella within the KCV triggered the down-regulation of the expression of cps. Altogether, this study proves evidence that K. pneumoniae survives killing by macrophages by manipulating phagosome maturation that may contribute to Klebsiella pathogenesis.

  19. Noxa couples lysosomal membrane permeabilization and apoptosis during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eno, Colins O; Zhao, Guoping; Venkatanarayan, Avinashnarayan; Wang, Bing; Flores, Elsa R; Li, Chi

    2013-12-01

    The exact roles of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) in oxidative stress-triggered apoptosis are not completely understood. Here, we first studied the temporal relation between LMP and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) during the initial stage of apoptosis caused by the oxidative stress inducer H2O2. Despite its essential role in mediating apoptosis, the expression of the BH3-only Bcl-2 protein Noxa was dispensable for LMP. In contrast, MOMP was dependent on Noxa expression and occurred downstream of LMP. When lysosomal membranes were stabilized by the iron-chelating agent desferrioxamine, H2O2-induced increase in DNA damage, Noxa expression, and subsequent apoptosis were abolished by the inhibition of LMP. Importantly, LMP-induced Noxa expression increase was mediated by p53 and seems to be a unique feature of apoptosis caused by oxidative stress. Finally, exogenous iron loading recapitulated the effects of H2O2 on the expression of BH3-only Bcl-2 proteins. Overall, these data reveal a Noxa-mediated signaling pathway that couples LMP with MOMP and ultimate apoptosis during oxidative stress.

  20. Polyketide synthase (PKS) reduces fusion of Legionella pneumophila-containing vacuoles with lysosomes and contributes to bacterial competitiveness during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, Olga; Pägelow, Dennis; Rasch, Janine; Döhrmann, Simon; Günther, Gabriele; Hoppe, Julia; Ünal, Can Murat; Bronietzki, Marc; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel; Steinert, Michael

    2014-11-01

    L. pneumophila-containing vacuoles (LCVs) exclude endocytic and lysosomal markers in human macrophages and protozoa. We screened a L. pneumophila mini-Tn10 transposon library for mutants, which fail to inhibit the fusion of LCVs with lysosomes by loading of the lysosomal compartment with colloidal iron dextran, mechanical lysis of infected host cells, and magnetic isolation of LCVs that have fused with lysosomes. In silico analysis of the mutated genes, D. discoideum plaque assays and infection assays in protozoa and U937 macrophage-like cells identified well established as well as novel putative L. pneumophila virulence factors. Promising candidates were further analyzed for their co-localization with lysosomes in host cells using fluorescence microscopy. This approach corroborated that the O-methyltransferase, PilY1, TPR-containing protein and polyketide synthase (PKS) of L. pneumophila interfere with lysosomal degradation. Competitive infections in protozoa and macrophages revealed that the identified PKS contributes to the biological fitness of pneumophila strains and may explain their prevalence in the epidemiology of Legionnaires' disease.

  1. Differentiation of norm and pathology during selective biochemical skreening of lysosomal storage diseases with increased excretion of oligosaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Y. Mytsyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Oligosaccharides are a class of polymeric carbohydrates, which are constituents of a glycoside portion of glycoprotein and glycolipid molecules. The lysosomal hydrolase dysfunction due to lysosomal storage disorders results in partial or complete failure of degradation of some glycoproteins and glycolipids, causing the accumulation of specific undegraded substrates in the lysosomes of cells, the formation of the great number of oligosaccharide chains and their increased excretion with urine. Our work was aimed at detailed study of the specificities of interpreting the results of thin-layer chromatography (TLC of urine oligosaccharides in healthy persons of different age groups with the purpose of further application of these data while differentiating the norm and pathology in the course of primary selective screening of lysosomal storage disorders. The results obtained demonstrated that TLC plates for the majority of healthy persons had insignificant excretion of a number of oligosaccharides (from monosaccharides to hexasaccharides with Rlac > 0.15, which can be characterized as physiological oligosacchariduria, conditioned by the metabolism specificities in lysosomes. Therefore while interpreting the urine samples of patients with the suspected lysosomal storage disorder it is diagnostically reasonable to examine the TLC plates for the presence of both oligosaccharide groups, absent in the samples of healthy persons, and all the fractions with Rlac < 0.15.

  2. Mucolipidosis type IV protein TRPML1-dependent lysosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Austin; Schafer, Jessica; Upchurch, Cameron; Spooner, Ellen; Huynh, Julie; Hernandez, Sebastian; McLaughlin, Brooke; Oden, Liam; Fares, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomes are dynamic organelles that undergo cycles of fusion and fission with themselves and with other organelles. Following fusion with late endosomes to form hybrid organelles, lysosomes are reformed as discrete organelles. This lysosome reformation or formation is a poorly understood process that has not been systematically analyzed and that lacks known regulators. In this study, we quantitatively define the multiple steps of lysosome formation and identify the first regulator of this process.

  3. Effects of ethanol, acetaldehyde and cholesteryl esters on pancreatic lysosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, J S; Apte, M V; Thomas, M. C.; Haber, P S; Pirola, R C

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that altered lysosomal function may be involved in the early stages of pancreatic injury. Chronic consumption of ethanol increases rat pancreatic lysosomal fragility. The aim of this study is to determine whether the lysosomal fragility observed after chronic ethanol consumption is mediated by ethanol per se, its oxidative metabolite acetaldehyde or cholesteryl esters (substances which accumulate in the pancreas after ethanol consumption). Pancreatic lysosomes from cho...

  4. Lysosomal storage disease 2 - Pompe's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.

    2008-01-01

    Pompe's disease, glycogen-storage disease type II, and acid maltase deficiency are alternative names for the same metabolic disorder. It is a pan-ethnic autosomal recessive trait characterised by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency leading to lysosomal glycogen storage. Pompe's disease is also

  5. Transport of Lysosome-Related Organelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordens, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Many intracellular compartments, including (MHC class II-containing) lysosomes, melanosomes and phagosomes, move along microtubules in a bi-directional manner due to the alternating activities of the plus-end directed kinesin motor and the minus-end directed dynein-dynactin motor. However, it is lar

  6. Transport of Lysosome-Related Organelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordens, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Many intracellular compartments, including (MHC class II-containing) lysosomes, melanosomes and phagosomes, move along microtubules in a bi-directional manner due to the alternating activities of the plus-end directed kinesin motor and the minus-end directed dynein-dynactin motor. However, it is

  7. Glucolipotoxicity diminishes cardiomyocyte TFEB and inhibits lysosomal autophagy during obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Purvi C; Bartlett, Jordan J; Perez, Lester J; Brunt, Keith R; Legare, Jean Francois; Hassan, Ansar; Kienesberger, Petra C; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Impaired cardiac metabolism in the obese and diabetic heart leads to glucolipotoxicity and ensuing cardiomyopathy. Glucolipotoxicity causes cardiomyocyte injury by increasing energy insufficiency, impairing proteasomal-mediated protein degradation and inducing apoptosis. Proteasome-evading proteins are degraded by autophagy in the lysosome, whose metabolism and function are regulated by master regulator transcription factor EB (TFEB). Limited studies have examined the impact of glucolipotoxicity on intra-lysosomal signaling proteins and their regulators. By utilizing a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, type-1 diabetes (Akita) and ex-vivo model of glucolipotoxicity (H9C2 cells and NRCM, neonatal rat cardiomyocyte), we examined whether glucolipotoxicity negatively targets TFEB and lysosomal proteins to dysregulate autophagy and cause cardiac injury. Despite differential effects of obesity and diabetes on LC3B-II, expression of proteins facilitating autophagosomal clearance such as TFEB, LAMP-2A, Hsc70 and Hsp90 were decreased in the obese and diabetic heart. In-vivo data was recapitulated in H9C2 and NRCM cells, which exhibited impaired autophagic flux and reduced TFEB content when exposed to a glucolipotoxic milieu. Notably, overloading myocytes with a saturated fatty acid (palmitate) but not an unsaturated fatty acid (oleate) depleted cellular TFEB and suppressed autophagy, suggesting a fatty acid specific regulation of TFEB and autophagy in the cardiomyocyte. The effect of glucolipotoxicity to reduce TFEB content was also confirmed in heart tissue from patients with Class-I obesity. Therefore, during glucolipotoxicity, suppression of lysosomal autophagy was associated with reduced lysosomal content, decreased cathepsin-B activity and diminished cellular TFEB content likely rendering myocytes susceptible to cardiac injury.

  8. Phosphate Shifted Oxygen Reduction Pathway on Fe@Fe2O3 Core-Shell Nanowires for Enhanced Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Aerobic 4-Chlorophenol Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Yi; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2017-07-18

    Phosphate ions widely exist in the environment. Previous studies revealed that the adsorption of phosphate ions on nanoscale zerovalent iron would generate a passivating oxide shell to block reactive sites and thus decrease the direct pollutant reduction reactivity of zerovalent iron. Given that molecular oxygen activation process is different from direct pollutant reduction with nanoscale zerovalent iron, it is still unclear how phosphate ions will affect molecular oxygen activation and reactive oxygen species generation with nanoscale zerovalent iron. In this study, we systematically studied the effect of phosphate ions on molecular oxygen activation with Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires, a special nanoscale zerovalent iron, taking advantages of rotating ring disk electrochemical analysis. It was interesting to find that the oxygen reduction pathway on Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires was gradually shifted from a four-electron reduction pathway to a sequential one-electron reduction one, along with increasing the phosphate ions concentration from 0 to 10 mmol·L(-1). This oxygen reduction pathway change greatly enhanced the molecular oxygen activation and reactive oxygen species generation performances of Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires, and thus increased their aerobic 4-chlorophenol degradation rate by 10 times. These findings shed insight into the possible roles of widely existed phosphate ions in molecular oxygen activation and organic pollutants degradation with nanoscale zerovalent iron.

  9. Non-degradative ubiquitination of the Notch1 receptor by the E3 ligase MDM2 activates the Notch signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Susanne; Sczaniecka, Matylda; McLaren, Lorna; Russell, Fiona; Gladstone, Karen; Hupp, Ted; Wallace, Maura

    2013-03-15

    The Notch receptor is necessary for modulating cell fate decisions throughout development, and aberrant activation of Notch signalling has been associated with many diseases, including tumorigenesis. The E3 ligase MDM2 (murine double minute 2) plays a role in regulating the Notch signalling pathway through its interaction with NUMB. In the present study we report that MDM2 can also exert its oncogenic effects on the Notch signalling pathway by directly interacting with the Notch 1 receptor through dual-site binding. This involves both the N-terminal and acidic domains of MDM2 and the RAM [RBP-Jκ (recombination signal-binding protein 1 for Jκ)-associated molecule] and ANK (ankyrin) domains of Notch 1. Although the interaction between Notch1 and MDM2 results in ubiquitination of Notch1, this does not result in degradation of Notch1, but instead leads to activation of the intracellular domain of Notch1. Furthermore, MDM2 can synergize with Notch1 to inhibit apoptosis and promote proliferation. This highlights yet another target for MDM2-mediated ubiquitination that results in activation of the protein rather than degradation and makes MDM2 an attractive target for drug discovery for both the p53 and Notch signalling pathways.

    <