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Sample records for lysosomal acidification inhibitors

  1. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

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    Lyanna O. L.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic analogs.

  2. Cytosolic chloride ion is a key factor in lysosomal acidification and function of autophagy in human gastric cancer cell.

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    Hosogi, Shigekuni; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Inui, Toshio; Wang, Xiangdong; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify roles of cytosolic chloride ion (Cl(-) ) in regulation of lysosomal acidification [intra-lysosomal pH (pHlys )] and autophagy function in human gastric cancer cell line (MKN28). The MKN28 cells cultured under a low Cl(-) condition elevated pHlys and reduced the intra-lysosomal Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-) ]lys ) via reduction of cytosolic Cl(-) concentration ([Cl(-) ]c ), showing abnormal accumulation of LC3II and p62 participating in autophagy function (dysfunction of autophagy) accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation via G0 /G1 arrest without induction of apoptosis. We also studied effects of direct modification of H(+) transport on lysosomal acidification and autophagy. Application of bafilomycin A1 (an inhibitor of V-type H(+) -ATPase) or ethyl isopropyl amiloride [EIPA; an inhibitor of Na(+) /H(+) exchanger (NHE)] elevated pHlys and decreased [Cl(-) ]lys associated with inhibition of cell proliferation via induction of G0 /G1 arrest similar to the culture under a low Cl(-) condition. However, unlike low Cl(-) condition, application of the compound, bafilomycin A1 or EIPA, induced apoptosis associated with increases in caspase 3 and 9 without large reduction in [Cl(-) ]c compared with low Cl(-) condition. These observations suggest that the lowered [Cl(-) ]c primarily causes dysfunction of autophagy without apoptosis via dysfunction of lysosome induced by disturbance of intra-lysosomal acidification. This is the first study showing that cytosolic Cl(-) is a key factor of lysosome acidification and autophagy.

  3. Presenilin 1 maintains lysosomal Ca2+ homeostasis by regulating vATPase-mediated lysosome acidification

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    Lee, Ju-Hyun; McBrayer, Mary Kate; Wolfe, Devin M.; Haslett, Luke J.; Kumar, Asok; Sato, Yutaka; Lie, Pearl P. Y.; Mohan, Panaiyur; Coffey, Erin E.; Kompella, Uday; Mitchell, Claire H.; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Presenilin-1 (PS1) deletion or Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)-linked mutations disrupt lysosomal acidification and proteolysis, which inhibits autophagy. Here, we establish that this phenotype stems from impaired glycosylation and instability of vATPase V0a1 subunit causing deficient lysosomal vATPase assembly and function. We further demonstrate that elevated lysosomal pH in PS1KO cells induces abnormal Ca2+ efflux from lysosomes mediated by TRPML1 and elevates cytosolic Ca2+. In WT cells, blocking vATPase activity or knockdown of either PS1 or the V0a1 subunit of vATPase reproduces all of these abnormalities. Normalizing lysosomal pH in PS1KO cells using acidic nanoparticles restores normal lysosomal proteolysis, autophagy, and Ca2+ homeostasis, but correcting lysosomal Ca2+ deficits alone neither re-acidifies lysosomes nor reverses proteolytic and autophagic deficits. Our results indicate that vATPase deficiency in PS1 loss of function states causes lysosomal/autophagy deficits and contributes to abnormal cellular Ca2+ homeostasis, thus linking two AD-related pathogenic processes through a common molecular mechanism. PMID:26299959

  4. Doxorubicin Blocks Cardiomyocyte Autophagic Flux by Inhibiting Lysosome Acidification.

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    Li, Dan L; Wang, Zhao V; Ding, Guanqiao; Tan, Wei; Luo, Xiang; Criollo, Alfredo; Xie, Min; Jiang, Nan; May, Herman; Kyrychenko, Viktoriia; Schneider, Jay W; Gillette, Thomas G; Hill, Joseph A

    2016-04-26

    The clinical use of doxorubicin is limited by cardiotoxicity. Histopathological changes include interstitial myocardial fibrosis and the appearance of vacuolated cardiomyocytes. Whereas dysregulation of autophagy in the myocardium has been implicated in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, the role of autophagy in doxorubicin cardiomyopathy remains poorly defined. Most models of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity involve intraperitoneal injection of high-dose drug, which elicits lethargy, anorexia, weight loss, and peritoneal fibrosis, all of which confound the interpretation of autophagy. Given this, we first established a model that provokes modest and progressive cardiotoxicity without constitutional symptoms, reminiscent of the effects seen in patients. We report that doxorubicin blocks cardiomyocyte autophagic flux in vivo and in cardiomyocytes in culture. This block was accompanied by robust accumulation of undegraded autolysosomes. We go on to localize the site of block as a defect in lysosome acidification. To test the functional relevance of doxorubicin-triggered autolysosome accumulation, we studied animals with diminished autophagic activity resulting from haploinsufficiency for Beclin 1. Beclin 1(+/-) mice exposed to doxorubicin were protected in terms of structural and functional changes within the myocardium. Conversely, animals overexpressing Beclin 1 manifested an amplified cardiotoxic response. Doxorubicin blocks autophagic flux in cardiomyocytes by impairing lysosome acidification and lysosomal function. Reducing autophagy initiation protects against doxorubicin cardiotoxicity. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Presenilin 1 Maintains Lysosomal Ca2+ Homeostasis via TRPML1 by Regulating vATPase-Mediated Lysosome Acidification

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    Ju-Hyun Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Presenilin 1 (PS1 deletion or Alzheimer’s disease (AD-linked mutations disrupt lysosomal acidification and proteolysis, which inhibits autophagy. Here, we establish that this phenotype stems from impaired glycosylation and instability of vATPase V0a1 subunit, causing deficient lysosomal vATPase assembly and function. We further demonstrate that elevated lysosomal pH in Presenilin 1 knockout (PS1KO cells induces abnormal Ca2+ efflux from lysosomes mediated by TRPML1 and elevates cytosolic Ca2+. In WT cells, blocking vATPase activity or knockdown of either PS1 or the V0a1 subunit of vATPase reproduces all of these abnormalities. Normalizing lysosomal pH in PS1KO cells using acidic nanoparticles restores normal lysosomal proteolysis, autophagy, and Ca2+ homeostasis, but correcting lysosomal Ca2+ deficits alone neither re-acidifies lysosomes nor reverses proteolytic and autophagic deficits. Our results indicate that vATPase deficiency in PS1 loss-of-function states causes lysosomal/autophagy deficits and contributes to abnormal cellular Ca2+ homeostasis, thus linking two AD-related pathogenic processes through a common molecular mechanism.

  6. Presenilin 1 Maintains Lysosomal Ca(2+) Homeostasis via TRPML1 by Regulating vATPase-Mediated Lysosome Acidification.

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    Lee, Ju-Hyun; McBrayer, Mary Kate; Wolfe, Devin M; Haslett, Luke J; Kumar, Asok; Sato, Yutaka; Lie, Pearl P Y; Mohan, Panaiyur; Coffey, Erin E; Kompella, Uday; Mitchell, Claire H; Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Nixon, Ralph A

    2015-09-01

    Presenilin 1 (PS1) deletion or Alzheimer's disease (AD)-linked mutations disrupt lysosomal acidification and proteolysis, which inhibits autophagy. Here, we establish that this phenotype stems from impaired glycosylation and instability of vATPase V0a1 subunit, causing deficient lysosomal vATPase assembly and function. We further demonstrate that elevated lysosomal pH in Presenilin 1 knockout (PS1KO) cells induces abnormal Ca(2+) efflux from lysosomes mediated by TRPML1 and elevates cytosolic Ca(2+). In WT cells, blocking vATPase activity or knockdown of either PS1 or the V0a1 subunit of vATPase reproduces all of these abnormalities. Normalizing lysosomal pH in PS1KO cells using acidic nanoparticles restores normal lysosomal proteolysis, autophagy, and Ca(2+) homeostasis, but correcting lysosomal Ca(2+) deficits alone neither re-acidifies lysosomes nor reverses proteolytic and autophagic deficits. Our results indicate that vATPase deficiency in PS1 loss-of-function states causes lysosomal/autophagy deficits and contributes to abnormal cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, thus linking two AD-related pathogenic processes through a common molecular mechanism.

  7. A quantitative assay for lysosomal acidification rates in human osteoclasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vicki Kaiser; Nosjean, Olivier; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld;

    2011-01-01

    lacunae. The electroneutrality of the lacunae is maintained by chloride transport through the chloride-proton antiporter chloride channel 7. Inhibition of either proton or chloride transport prevents bone resorption. The aims of this study were to validate the human osteoclastic microsome- based influx......, the effect of valinomycin, inhibitor sensitivity, and the ion profile of the human osteoclast microsomes. The expression level of chloride channel 7 was increased in the human osteoclastic microsomes compared with whole osteoclasts. Acid influx was induced by 1.25 mM adenosine triphosphate. Further 1.1 μ......M valinomycin increased the acid influx by 129%. Total abrogation of acid influx was observed using both H(+) and Cl(-) ionophores. Finally, investigation of the anion profile demonstrated that Cl(-) and Br(-) are the preferred anions for the transporter. In conclusion, the acid influx assay based on microsomes...

  8. Decoupling internalization, acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion during phagocytosis of InlA coated beads in epithelial cells.

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    Craig D Blanchette

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phagocytosis has been extensively examined in 'professional' phagocytic cells using pH sensitive dyes. However, in many of the previous studies, a separation between the end of internalization, beginning of acidification and completion of phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion was not clearly established. In addition, very little work has been done to systematically examine phagosomal maturation in 'non-professional' phagocytic cells. Therefore, in this study, we developed a simple method to measure and decouple particle internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK and Caco-2 epithelial cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our method was developed using a pathogen mimetic system consisting of polystyrene beads coated with Internalin A (InlA, a membrane surface protein from Listeria monocytogenes known to trigger receptor-mediated phagocytosis. We were able to independently measure the rates of internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in epithelial cells by combining the InlA-coated beads (InlA-beads with antibody quenching, a pH sensitive dye and an endosomal/lysosomal dye. By performing these independent measurements under identical experimental conditions, we were able to decouple the three processes and establish time scales for each. In a separate set of experiments, we exploited the phagosomal acidification process to demonstrate an additional, real-time method for tracking bead binding, internalization and phagosomal acidification. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using this method, we found that the time scales for internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion ranged from 23-32 min, 3-4 min and 74-120 min, respectively, for MDCK and Caco-2 epithelial cells. Both the static and real-time methods developed here are expected to be readily and broadly applicable, as they simply

  9. Lysosome

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    Ursula Matte BSc, PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Christian de Duve first described the lysosome in the 1950s, it has been generally presented as a membrane-bound compartment containing acid hydrolases that enables the cell to degrade molecules without being digested by autolysis. For those working on the field of lysosomal storage disorders, the lack of one such hydrolase would lead to undegraded or partially degraded substrate storage inside engorged organelles disturbing cellular function by yet poorly explored mechanisms. However, in recent years, a much more complex scenario of lysosomal function has emerged, beyond and above the cellular “digestive” system. Knowledge on how the impairment of this organelle affects cell functioning may shed light on signs and symptoms of lysosomal disorders and open new roads for therapy.

  10. Lysosome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ursula Matte BSc, PhD; Gabriela Pasqualim BSc, MSc

    2016-01-01

    Since Christian de Duve first described the lysosome in the 1950s, it has been generally presented as a membrane-bound compartment containing acid hydrolases that enables the cell to degrade molecules...

  11. A Novel High Content Imaging-Based Screen Identifies the Anti-Helminthic Niclosamide as an Inhibitor of Lysosome Anterograde Trafficking and Prostate Cancer Cell Invasion.

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    Magdalena L Circu

    Full Text Available Lysosome trafficking plays a significant role in tumor invasion, a key event for the development of metastasis. Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that the anterograde (outward movement of lysosomes to the cell surface in response to certain tumor microenvironment stimulus, such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF or acidic extracellular pH (pHe, increases cathepsin B secretion and tumor cell invasion. Anterograde lysosome trafficking depends on sodium-proton exchanger activity and can be reversed by blocking these ion pumps with Troglitazone or EIPA. Since these drugs cannot be advanced into the clinic due to toxicity, we have designed a high-content assay to discover drugs that block peripheral lysosome trafficking with the goal of identifying novel drugs that inhibit tumor cell invasion. An automated high-content imaging system (Cellomics was used to measure the position of lysosomes relative to the nucleus. Among a total of 2210 repurposed and natural product drugs screened, 18 "hits" were identified. One of the compounds identified as an anterograde lysosome trafficking inhibitor was niclosamide, a marketed human anti-helminthic drug. Further studies revealed that niclosamide blocked acidic pHe, HGF, and epidermal growth factor (EGF-induced anterograde lysosome redistribution, protease secretion, motility, and invasion of DU145 castrate resistant prostate cancer cells at clinically relevant concentrations. In an effort to identify the mechanism by which niclosamide prevented anterograde lysosome movement, we found that this drug exhibited no significant effect on the level of ATP, microtubules or actin filaments, and had minimal effect on the PI3K and MAPK pathways. Niclosamide collapsed intralysosomal pH without disruption of the lysosome membrane, while bafilomycin, an agent that impairs lysosome acidification, was also found to induce JLA in our model. Taken together, these data suggest that niclosamide promotes

  12. Transformation-associated changes in sphingolipid metabolism sensitize cells to lysosomal cell death induced by inhibitors of acid sphingomyelinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Olsen, Ole D; Groth-Pedersen, Line

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and subsequent cell death may prove useful in cancer treatment, provided that cancer cell lysosomes can be specifically targeted. Here, we identify acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) inhibition as a selective means to destabilize cancer cell lysosomes. Lysosome......-destabilizing experimental anticancer agent siramesine inhibits ASM by interfering with the binding of ASM to its essential lysosomal cofactor, bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate. Like siramesine, several clinically relevant ASM inhibitors trigger cancer-specific lysosomal cell death, reduce tumor growth in vivo, and revert...

  13. Disorders of lysosomal acidification-The emerging role of v-ATPase in aging and neurodegenerative disease.

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    Colacurcio, Daniel J; Nixon, Ralph A

    2016-12-01

    Autophagy and endocytosis deliver unneeded cellular materials to lysosomes for degradation. Beyond processing cellular waste, lysosomes release metabolites and ions that serve signaling and nutrient sensing roles, linking the functions of the lysosome to various pathways for intracellular metabolism and nutrient homeostasis. Each of these lysosomal behaviors is influenced by the intraluminal pH of the lysosome, which is maintained in the low acidic range by a proton pump, the vacuolar ATPase (v-ATPase). New reports implicate altered v-ATPase activity and lysosomal pH dysregulation in cellular aging, longevity, and adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases, including forms of Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease. Genetic defects of subunits composing the v-ATPase or v-ATPase-related proteins occur in an increasingly recognized group of familial neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review the expanding roles of the v-ATPase complex as a platform regulating lysosomal hydrolysis and cellular homeostasis. We discuss the unique vulnerability of neurons to persistent low level lysosomal dysfunction and review recent clinical and experimental studies that link dysfunction of the v-ATPase complex to neurodegenerative diseases across the age spectrum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Acidification of blood is superior to sodium fluoride alone as an inhibitor of glycolysis.

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    Gambino, Raymond; Piscitelli, Janet; Ackattupathil, Tomy A; Theriault, Judy L; Andrin, Reynaldo D; Sanfilippo, Michael L; Etienne, Monina

    2009-05-01

    Sodium fluoride is the preferred agent to inhibit glycolysis. Its action is not immediate, however, and complete inhibition is delayed for up to 4 hours. A more effective method is needed. Acidification of blood combined with the addition of NaF and EDTA appears to be such a method. We studied whether acidification was indeed more effective than NaF. We conducted 6 independent studies over a 10-month period at 3 Quest Diagnostics laboratory sites. In each study, we drew venous blood from 6-24 nonfasting employee volunteers into 3 or 4 different serum- or plasma-collection tubes, which were stored under different conditions and aliquoted at different times. We analyzed the aliquots in duplicate by means of a hexokinase-based enzymatic method. The mean glucose concentration decreased by 0.3% at 2 h and by 1.2% at 24 h when blood was drawn into tubes containing citrate buffer, NaF, and EDTA. In contrast, the mean glucose concentration decreased by 4.6% at 2 h and by 7.0% at 24 h when blood was drawn into tubes containing NaF and sodium oxalate. Acidification should replace NaF alone as the recommended method for obtaining an accurate glucose concentration. Diagnostic cut points based on blood samples collected into tubes containing NaF as the only inhibitor of glycolysis are likely to be too low.

  15. Chlamydia species-dependent differences in the growth requirement for lysosomes.

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    Scot P Ouellette

    Full Text Available Genome reduction is a hallmark of obligate intracellular pathogens such as Chlamydia, where adaptation to intracellular growth has resulted in the elimination of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Accordingly, chlamydiae rely heavily on the host cell for nutrients yet their specific source is unclear. Interestingly, chlamydiae grow within a pathogen-defined vacuole that is in close apposition to lysosomes. Metabolically-labeled uninfected host cell proteins were provided as an exogenous nutrient source to chlamydiae-infected cells, and uptake and subsequent labeling of chlamydiae suggested lysosomal degradation as a source of amino acids for the pathogen. Indeed, Bafilomycin A1 (BafA1, an inhibitor of the vacuolar H(+/ATPase that blocks lysosomal acidification and functions, impairs the growth of C. trachomatis and C. pneumoniae, and these effects are especially profound in C. pneumoniae. BafA1 induced the marked accumulation of material within the lysosomal lumen, which was due to the inhibition of proteolytic activities, and this response inhibits chlamydiae rather than changes in lysosomal acidification per se, as cathepsin inhibitors also inhibit the growth of chlamydiae. Finally, the addition of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of eukaryotic protein synthesis, compromises the ability of lysosomal inhibitors to block chlamydial growth, suggesting chlamydiae directly access free amino acids in the host cytosol as a preferred source of these nutrients. Thus, chlamydiae co-opt the functions of lysosomes to acquire essential amino acids.

  16. Diphyllin, a novel and naturally potent V-ATPase inhibitor, abrogates acidification of the osteoclastic resorption lacunae and bone resorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette G; Henriksen, Kim; Neutzsky-Wulff, Anita V

    2007-01-01

    Dissolution of the inorganic phase of bone by the osteoclasts mediated by V-ATPase and ClC-7 is a prerequisite for bone resorption. Inhibitors of osteoclastic V-ATPase or ClC-7 are novel approaches for inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption. By testing natural compounds in acidification assay......, diphyllin was identified. We characterized diphyllin with respect to the pharmacological effects on osteoclasts....

  17. Lysosomal degradation of receptor-bound urokinase-type plasminogen activator is enhanced by its inhibitors in human trophoblastic choriocarcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Poul Henning; Christensen, Erik Ilsø; Ebbesen, P.

    1990-01-01

    in an apparently intact form in the medium or was still cell associated. The degradation could be inhibited by inhibitors of vesicle transport and lysosomal hydrolases. By electron microscopic autoradiography, both 125I-u-PA and 125I-u-PA-inhibitor complexes were located over the cell membrane at 4 degrees C......, with the highest density of grains over the membrane at cell-cell interphases, but, after incubation at 37 degrees C, 17 and 27% of the grains for u-PA and u-PA-PAI-1 complexes, respectively, appeared over lysosomal-like bodies. These findings suggest that the u-PA receptor possesses a clearance function...

  18. Screening of protein kinase inhibitors identifies PKC inhibitors as inhibitors of osteoclastic acid secretion and bone resorption

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    Boutin Jean A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone resorption is initiated by osteoclastic acidification of the resorption lacunae. This process is mediated by secretion of protons through the V-ATPase and chloride through the chloride antiporter ClC-7. To shed light on the intracellular signalling controlling extracellular acidification, we screened a protein kinase inhibitor library in human osteoclasts. Methods Human osteoclasts were generated from CD14+ monocytes. The effect of different kinase inhibitors on lysosomal acidification in human osteoclasts was investigated using acridine orange for different incubation times (45 minutes, 4 and 24 hours. The inhibitors were tested in an acid influx assay using microsomes isolated from human osteoclasts. Bone resorption by human osteoclasts on bone slices was measured by calcium release. Cell viability was measured using AlamarBlue. Results Of the 51 compounds investigated only few inhibitors were positive in both acidification and resorption assays. Rottlerin, GF109203X, Hypericin and Ro31-8220 inhibited acid influx in microsomes and bone resorption, while Sphingosine and Palmitoyl-DL-carnitine-Cl showed low levels of inhibition. Rottlerin inhibited lysosomal acidification in human osteoclasts potently. Conclusions In conclusion, a group of inhibitors all indicated to inhibit PKC reduced acidification in human osteoclasts, and thereby bone resorption, indicating that acid secretion by osteoclasts may be specifically regulated by PKC in osteoclasts.

  19. Molecular characterization of aspartylglucosaminidase, a lysosomal hydrolase upregulated during strobilation in the moon jellyfish, Aurelia aurita.

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    Tsujita, Natsumi; Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Hiroki; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Arakawa, Kenji; Kuniyoshi, Hisato

    2017-05-01

    The life cycle of the moon jellyfish, Aurelia aurita, alternates between a benthic asexual polyp stage and a planktonic sexual medusa (jellyfish) stage. Transition from polyp to medusa is called strobilation. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of strobilation, we screened for genes that are upregulated during strobilation using the differential display method and we identified aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA), which encodes a lysosomal hydrolase. Similar to AGAs from other species, Aurelia AGA possessed an N-terminal signal peptide and potential N-glycosylation sites. The genomic region of Aurelia AGA was approximately 9.8 kb in length and contained 12 exons and 11 introns. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that AGA expression increased during strobilation, and was then decreased in medusae. To inhibit AGA function, we administered the lysosomal acidification inhibitors, chloroquine or bafilomycin A1, to animals during strobilation. Both inhibitors disturbed medusa morphogenesis at the oral end, suggesting involvement of lysosomal hydrolases in strobilation.

  20. Slow degradation in phagocytic astrocytes can be enhanced by lysosomal acidification%溶酶体酸化可增强吞噬性星形胶质细胞的消化功能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kelly R. Monk; M. Laura Feltri; Carla Taveggia; Camilla Lööv; Claire H. Mitchell; Martin Simonsson; Anna Erlandsson1

    2015-01-01

    Inefficient lysosomal degradation is central in the development of various brain disorders, but the un-derlying mechanisms and the involvement of different cell types remains elusive. We have previously shown that astrocytes effectively engulf dead cells, but then store, rather than degrade the ingested material. In the present study we identify reasons for the slow digestion and ways to accelerate degradation in primary astrocytes. Our re-sults show that actin-rings surround the phagosomes for long periods of time, which physically inhibit the pha-go-lysosome fusion. Furthermore, astrocytes express high levels of Rab27a, a protein known to reduce the acidity of lysosomes by Nox2 recruitment, in order to preserve antigens for presentation. We found that Nox2 colocalizes with the ingested material, indicating that it may influence antigen processing also in astrocytes, as they express MHC class II. By inducing long-time acidification of astrocytic lysosomes using acidic nanoparticles, we could increase the digestion of astrocyte-ingested, dead cells. The degradation was, however, normalized over time, in-dicating that inhibitory pathways are up-regulated in response to the enhanced acidification.%低效的溶酶体降解是多种脑部疾病发展的中心环节,但其具体机制及参与的细胞种类仍不清楚。既往研究显示,星形胶质细胞大量吞噬死亡的细胞,但将这些吞噬的物质储存在细胞内而不是进行降解。本研究对星形胶质细胞降解消化功能减弱的原因进行研究,并探索增强星形胶质细胞降解消化功能的方法。结果显示,长期存在于吞噬泡周围的肌动环阻碍了溶酶体的吞噬溶解作用。此外,Rab27a 蛋白可以通过Nox2减少溶酶体的酸化,而星形胶质细胞高表达 Rab27a 蛋白,阻碍抗原呈递。本研究还发现,Nox2与星形胶质细胞摄取的物质共定位,且表达主要组织相容性复合体 II,提示这可能影响星形

  1. Ion transporters involved in acidification of the resorption lacuna in osteoclasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Kim; Sørensen, Mette G; Jensen, Vicki K;

    2008-01-01

    is currently not well understood. We used a battery of ion channel inhibitors, human osteoclasts, and their subcellular compartments to perform an unbiased analysis of the importance of the different ion transporters for acidification of the resorption lacuna in osteoclasts. CD14(+) monocytes from human...... peripheral blood were isolated, and mature osteoclasts were generated using RANKL and M-CSF. The human osteoclasts were (1) used for acridine orange assays for evaluation of lysosomal acidification, (2) used for bone resorption assays, (3) used for generation of osteoclasts membranes for acid influx...

  2. A group-specific inhibitor of lysosomal cysteine proteinases selectively inhibits both proteolytic degradation and presentation of the antigen dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine by guinea pig accessory cells to T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Werdelin, O

    1986-01-01

    of antigens by guinea pig accessory cells. The proteinase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanylalanine-diazomethyl-ketone, which selectively inhibits cysteine proteinases, was used to block this set of enzymes in cultured cells. We demonstrate that the selective inhibition of the cysteine proteinases...... inhibitor. Another inhibitor, pepstatin A, which selectively blocks aspartic proteinases, did not block the presentation of dinitrophenyl-poly-L-lysine. The results identify cysteine proteinases, probably lysosomal, as one of the groups of enzymes involved in antigen processing....

  3. TRPML: transporters of metals in lysosomes essential for cell survival?

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    Kiselyov, Kirill; Colletti, Grace A; Terwilliger, Austen; Ketchum, Kathleen; Lyons, Christopher W P; Quinn, James; Muallem, Shmuel

    2011-09-01

    Key aspects of lysosomal function are affected by the ionic content of the lysosomal lumen and, therefore, by the ion permeability in the lysosomal membrane. Such functions include regulation of lysosomal acidification, a critical process in delivery and activation of the lysosomal enzymes, release of metals from lysosomes into the cytoplasm and the Ca(2+)-dependent component of membrane fusion events in the endocytic pathway. While the basic mechanisms of lysosomal acidification have been largely defined, the lysosomal metal transport system is not well understood. TRPML1 is a lysosomal ion channel whose malfunction is implicated in the lysosomal storage disease Mucolipidosis Type IV. Recent evidence suggests that TRPML1 is involved in Fe(2+), Ca(2+) and Zn(2+) transport across the lysosomal membrane, ascribing novel physiological roles to this ion channel, and perhaps to its relatives TRPML2 and TRPML3 and illuminating poorly understood aspects of lysosomal function. Further, alterations in metal transport by the TRPMLs due to mutations or environmental factors may contribute to their role in the disease phenotype and cell death.

  4. DRAM1 regulates apoptosis through increasing protein levels and lysosomal localization of BAX

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    Guan, J-J; Zhang, X-D; Sun, W; Qi, L; Wu, J-C; Qin, Z-H

    2015-01-01

    DRAM1 (DNA damage-regulated autophagy modulator 1) is a TP53 target gene that modulates autophagy and apoptosis. We previously found that DRAM1 increased autophagy flux by promoting lysosomal acidification and protease activation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which DRAM1 regulates apoptosis are not clearly defined. Here we report a novel pathway by which DRAM1 regulates apoptosis involving BAX and lysosomes. A549 or HeLa cells were treated with the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor, 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP), or an anticancer drug, doxorubicin. Changes in the protein and mRNA levels of BAX and DRAM1 and the role of DRAM1 in BAX induction were determined. The interaction between DRAM1 and BAX and its effect on BAX degradation, BAX lysosomal localization, the release of cathepsin B and cytochrome c by BAX and the role of BAX in 3NP- or doxorubicin-induced cell death were studied. The results showed that BAX, a proapoptotic protein, was induced by DRAM1 in a transcription-independent manner. BAX was degraded by autophagy under basal conditions; however, its degradation was inhibited when DRAM1 expression was induced. There was a protein interaction between DRAM1 and BAX and this interaction prolonged the half-life of BAX. Furthermore, upregulated DRAM1 recruited BAX to lysosomes, leading to the release of lysosomal cathepsin B and cleavage of BID (BH3-interacting domain death agonist). BAX mediated the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, activation of caspase-3 and cell death partially through the lysosome-cathepsin B-tBid pathway. These results indicate that DRAM1 regulates apoptosis by inhibiting BAX degradation. In addition to mitochondria, lysosomes may also be involved in BAX-initiated apoptosis. PMID:25633293

  5. Ion transporters involved in acidification of the resorption lacuna in osteoclasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, K.; Sorensen, M.G.; Jensen, V.K.;

    2008-01-01

    Osteoclasts possess a large amount of ion transporters, which participate in bone resorption; of these, the vacuolar-adenosine trisphosphatase (V-ATPase) and the chloride-proton antiporter ClC-7 acidify the resorption lacuna. However, whether other ion transporters participate in this process...... is currently not well understood. We used a battery of ion channel inhibitors, human osteoclasts, and their subcellular compartments to perform an unbiased analysis of the importance of the different ion transporters for acidification of the resorption lacuna in osteoclasts. CD14(+) monocytes from human...... peripheral blood were isolated, and mature osteoclasts were generated using RANKL and M-CSF. The human osteoclasts were (1) used for acridine orange assays for evaluation of lysosomal acidification, (2) used for bone resorption assays, (3) used for generation of osteoclasts membranes for acid influx...

  6. Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocean and coastal acidification is an emerging issue caused by increasing amounts of carbon dioxide being absorbed by seawater. Changing seawater chemistry impacts marine life, ecosystem services, and humans. Learn what EPA is doing and what you can do.

  7. The expression changes of Nicastrin in neuronal cells after lysosomal inhibitors treatment%溶酶体酶抑制剂对神经细胞内Nicastrin表达水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭雪华; 龙志敏; 骆世芳; 贺桂琼

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore whether the lysosomal pathway was involved in the degradation of Alzheimer' s disease ( AD ) -related protein Nicastrin( NCT). Methods Following generation of NCT stable cell lines, various methods such as Western blotting, double immunofluorescent staining and cell fractionation, combined with lysosomal inhibition were used to check NCT expression level in NCT stable cell line. Results Cell fractionation experiment showed that NCT distributed primarily in ER and Golgi apparatus, few NCT located in lyso-some. Treatment of cells with lysosomal inhibitors significantly increased both endogenous and exogenous mature NCT ( mNCT) in NCT stable cells or non-transfected neuronal cells, and the effect of lysosomal inhibitor on mNCT was time- and dose-dependent; however, lysosomal inhibitor had no effect on immature NCT (imNCT). Immunofluorescent microscopic analysis showed that lysosomal inhibition leaded to the accumulation of NCT in lysosomal apparatus. Conclusions The lysosomal pathway is involved in the degradation of mNCT in neuronal cells%目的 探讨溶酶体酶抑制剂对阿尔茨海默病(AD)相关蛋白Nicastrin(NCT)表达的影响,以期明确NCT的蛋白降解是否与溶酶体途径有关.方法 在用人神经母细胞瘤细胞SH-SY5Y建立稳定表达NCT细胞株的基础上,应用溶酶体酶抑制剂处理NCT细胞株,并结合Western印迹、亚细胞器的分级分离、免疫荧光双标等技术,检测溶酶体酶抑制剂处理后神经细胞内NCT的表达变化.结果 亚细胞器分级分离实验显示,正常情况下神经细胞内的NCT主要分布于内质网和高尔基复合体,少量NCT分布于溶酶体.Western印迹结果显示,溶酶体酶抑制剂处理后,神经细胞内源性和外源性成熟NCT(mNCT)的表达显著增强,且溶酶体酶抑制剂氯喹对mNCT蛋白表达的增强效应呈剂量依赖性和时间依赖性,但溶酶体抑制剂对非成熟NCT(imNCT)的表达无影响;免疫荧光双标结果显

  8. Activation of lysosomal function in the course of autophagy via mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Zhou; Shi-Hao Tan; Valérie Nicolas; Chantal Bauvy; Nai-Di Yang; Jianbin Zhang; Yuan Xue

    2013-01-01

    Lysosome is a key subcellular organelle in the execution of the autophagic process and at present little is known whether lysosomal function is controlled in the process of autophagy.In this study,we first found that suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity by starvation or two mTOR catalytic inhibitors (PP242 and Torinl),but not by an allosteric inhibitor (rapamycin),leads to activation of lysosomal function.Second,we provided evidence that activation of lysosomal function is associated with the suppression of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1),but not mTORC2,and the mTORC1 localization to lysosomes is not directly correlated to its regulatory role in lysosomal function.Third,we examined the involvement of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and demonstrated that TFEB activation following mTORC1 suppression is necessary but not sufficient for lysosomal activation.Finally,Atg5 or Atg7deletion or blockage of the autophagosome-lysosome fusion process effectively diminished lysosomal activation,suggesting that lysosomal activation occurring in the course of autophagy is dependent on antophagosome-lysosome fusion.Taken together,this study demonstrates that in the course of autophagy,lysosomal function is upregulated via a dual mechanism involving mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

  9. Activation of lysosomal function in the course of autophagy via mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Tan, Shi-Hao; Nicolas, Valérie; Bauvy, Chantal; Yang, Nai-Di; Zhang, Jianbin; Xue, Yuan; Codogno, Patrice; Shen, Han-Ming

    2013-04-01

    Lysosome is a key subcellular organelle in the execution of the autophagic process and at present little is known whether lysosomal function is controlled in the process of autophagy. In this study, we first found that suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity by starvation or two mTOR catalytic inhibitors (PP242 and Torin1), but not by an allosteric inhibitor (rapamycin), leads to activation of lysosomal function. Second, we provided evidence that activation of lysosomal function is associated with the suppression of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), but not mTORC2, and the mTORC1 localization to lysosomes is not directly correlated to its regulatory role in lysosomal function. Third, we examined the involvement of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and demonstrated that TFEB activation following mTORC1 suppression is necessary but not sufficient for lysosomal activation. Finally, Atg5 or Atg7 deletion or blockage of the autophagosome-lysosome fusion process effectively diminished lysosomal activation, suggesting that lysosomal activation occurring in the course of autophagy is dependent on autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Taken together, this study demonstrates that in the course of autophagy, lysosomal function is upregulated via a dual mechanism involving mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

  10. The endoplasmic reticulum, not the pH gradient, drives calcium refilling of lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, Abigail G; Wang, Wuyang; Collier, Crystal Md; Levey, Sara A; Gao, Qiong; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-05-23

    Impaired homeostasis of lysosomal Ca(2+) causes lysosome dysfunction and lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), but the mechanisms by which lysosomes acquire and refill Ca(2+) are not known. We developed a physiological assay to monitor lysosomal Ca(2+) store refilling using specific activators of lysosomal Ca(2+) channels to repeatedly induce lysosomal Ca(2+) release. In contrast to the prevailing view that lysosomal acidification drives Ca(2+) into the lysosome, inhibiting the V-ATPase H(+) pump did not prevent Ca(2+) refilling. Instead, pharmacological depletion or chelation of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) prevented lysosomal Ca(2+) stores from refilling. More specifically, antagonists of ER IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) rapidly and completely blocked Ca(2+) refilling of lysosomes, but not in cells lacking IP3Rs. Furthermore, reducing ER Ca(2+) or blocking IP3Rs caused a dramatic LSD-like lysosome storage phenotype. By closely apposing each other, the ER may serve as a direct and primary source of Ca(2+)for the lysosome.

  11. Photoaffinity labeling of the lysosomal neuraminidase from bovine testis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); U. Rose (Ursula); R. Brossmer (Reinhard); F.W. Verheijen (Frans)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract ASA-NeuAc2en, a photoreactive arylazide derivative of sialic acid, is shown to be a powerful competitive inhibitor of lysosomal neuraminidase from bovine testis (Ki ≈ 21 μM). Photoaffinity labeling and partial purification of preparations containing this lysosomal neuramin

  12. TRPML and lysosomal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevi, David A; Frumkin, Ayala; Bach, Gideon

    2007-08-01

    Mucolipin 1 (MLN1), also known as TRPML1, is a member of the mucolipin family. The mucolipins are the only lysosomal proteins within the TRP superfamily. Mutations in the gene coding for TRPML1 result in a lysosomal storage disorder (LSD). This review summarizes the current knowledge related to this protein and the rest of the mucolipin family.

  13. The proteome of lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Bernd A; Wrocklage, Christian; Hasilik, Andrej; Saftig, Paul

    2010-11-01

    Lysosomes are organelles of eukaryotic cells that are critically involved in the degradation of macromolecules mainly delivered by endocytosis and autophagocytosis. Degradation is achieved by more than 60 hydrolases sequestered by a single phospholipid bilayer. The lysosomal membrane facilitates interaction and fusion with other compartments and harbours transport proteins catalysing the export of catabolites, thereby allowing their recycling. Lysosomal proteins have been addressed in various proteomic studies that are compared in this review regarding the source of material, the organelle/protein purification scheme, the proteomic methodology applied and the proteins identified. Distinguishing true constituents of an organelle from co-purifying contaminants is a central issue in subcellular proteomics, with additional implications for lysosomes as being the site of degradation of many cellular and extracellular proteins. Although many of the lysosomal hydrolases were identified by classical biochemical approaches, the knowledge about the protein composition of the lysosomal membrane has remained fragmentary for a long time. Using proteomics many novel lysosomal candidate proteins have been discovered and it can be expected that their functional characterisation will help to understand functions of lysosomes at a molecular level that have been characterised only phenomenologically so far and to generally deepen our understanding of this indispensable organelle.

  14. Structure Dependence of Lysosomal Transit of Chitosan-Based Polyplexes for Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Marc; Lavertu, Marc; Astolfi, Mélina; Buschmann, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Chitosan-based polyplexes are known to traffic through lysosomes for a relatively long time, independent of the degree of deacetylation (DDA) and the number average molecular weight (Mn) of the polymer, even though both of these parameters have profound effects on polyplex stability and transfection efficiency. A better understanding of the lysosomal barrier is paramount to the rational design of vectors capable of overcoming obstacles to transgene expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate if lysosomal transit affects chitosan-based polyplex transfection efficiency in a structure-dependent (DDA, Mn) manner. Toward this end, we analyzed the effects of intracellular trafficking modifying agents on transfection efficiency and intracellular vesicular trafficking of polyplexes with different structural properties and stabilities or nucleic acid binding affinity. The use of agents that modify endosome/lysosome acidification and transit processes by distinct mechanisms and their effect on cell viability, polyplex uptake, vesicular trafficking, and transfection efficiency revealed novel and strong chitosan structure-dependent consequences of lysosomal transit. Inhibiting lysosomal transit using chloroquine significantly increased the efficiency of unstable polyplexes, while having minimal effects for polyplexes with intermediate or high stability. In parallel, specifically inhibiting the acidification of vesicles abrogated transfection for all formulations, suggesting that vesicular acidification is essential to promote transfection, most probably by facilitating lysosomal escape. These results provide novel insights into the structure-performance relationship of chitosan-based gene delivery systems.

  15. (5aR)-5a-C-Pentyl-4-epi-isofagomine: A powerful inhibitor of lysosomal β-galactosidase and a remarkable chaperone for mutations associated with GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio disease type B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Front, Sophie; Biela-Banaś, Anna; Burda, Patricie; Ballhausen, Diana; Higaki, Katsumi; Caciotti, Anna; Morrone, Amelia; Charollais-Thoenig, Julie; Gallienne, Estelle; Demotz, Stéphane; Martin, Olivier R

    2017-01-27

    This report is about the identification, synthesis and initial biological characterization of derivatives of 4-epi-isofagomine as pharmacological chaperones (PC) for human lysosomal β-galactosidase. The two epimers of 4-epi-isofagomine carrying a pentyl group at C-5a, namely (5aR)- and (5aS)-5a-C-pentyl-4-epi-isofagomine, were prepared by an innovative procedure involving in the key step the addition of nitrohexane to a keto-pentopyranoside. Both epimers were evaluated as inhibitors of the human β-galactosidase: the (5aR)-stereoisomer (compound 1) was found to be a very potent inhibitor of the enzyme (IC50 = 8 nM, 30× more potent than 4-epi-isofagomine at pH 7.3) with a high selectivity for this glycosidase whereas the (5aS) epimer was a much weaker inhibitor. In addition, compound 1 showed a remarkable activity as a PC. It significantly enhanced the residual activity of mutant β-galactosidase in 15 patient cell lines out of 23, with enhancement factors greater than 3.5 in 10 cell lines and activity restoration up to 91% of normal. Altogether, these results indicated that (5aR)-5a-C-pentyl-4-epi-isofagomine constitutes a promising PC-based drug candidate for the treatment of GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio disease type B.

  16. Two pore channel 2 (TPC2) inhibits autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion by alkalinizing lysosomal pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yingying; Hao, Bai-Xia; Graeff, Richard; Wong, Connie W M; Wu, Wu-Tian; Yue, Jianbo

    2013-08-16

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation pathway, yet the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), one of the most potent Ca(2+) mobilizing messengers, elicits Ca(2+) release from lysosomes via the two pore channel 2 (TPC2) in many cell types. Here we found that overexpression of TPC2 in HeLa or mouse embryonic stem cells inhibited autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion, thereby resulting in the accumulation of autophagosomes. Treatment of TPC2 expressing cells with a cell permeant-NAADP agonist, NAADP-AM, further induced autophagosome accumulation. On the other hand, TPC2 knockdown or treatment of cells with Ned-19, a NAADP antagonist, markedly decreased the accumulation of autophagosomes. TPC2-induced accumulation of autophagosomes was also markedly blocked by ATG5 knockdown. Interestingly, inhibiting mTOR activity failed to increase TPC2-induced autophagosome accumulation. Instead, we found that overexpression of TPC2 alkalinized lysosomal pH, and lysosomal re-acidification abolished TPC2-induced autophagosome accumulation. In addition, TPC2 overexpression had no effect on general endosomal-lysosomal degradation but prevented the recruitment of Rab-7 to autophagosomes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TPC2/NAADP/Ca(2+) signaling alkalinizes lysosomal pH to specifically inhibit the later stage of basal autophagy progression.

  17. Lysosome Biogenesis and Autophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reggiori, Fulvio; Klumperman, Judith|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097273

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes degrade biological components acquired by endocytosis, the major cellular pathway for internalization of extracellular material, and macroautophagy. This chapter presents an overview of these two major degradative intracellular pathways, and highlights the emerging cross talks between

  18. Endosomes and lysosomes are involved in early steps of Tl(III)-mediated apoptosis in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzel, Cecilia E; Almeira Gubiani, María F; Verstraeten, Sandra V

    2012-11-01

    The mechanisms that mediate thallium (Tl) toxicity are still not completely understood. The exposure of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells to Tl(I) or Tl(III) activates both mitochondrial (Tl(I) and Tl(III)) and extrinsic (Tl(III)) pathways of apoptosis. In this work we evaluated the hypothesis that the effects of Tl(III) may be mediated by the damage to lysosomes, where it might be incorporated following the route of iron uptake. PC12 cells exposed for 3 h to 100 μM Tl(III) presented marked endosomal acidification, effect that was absent when cells were incubated in a serum-free medium and that was fully recovered when the latter was supplemented with transferrin. After 6 h of incubation the colocalization of cathepsins D and B with the lysosomal marker Lamp-1 was decreased together with an increase in the total activity of the enzymes. A permanent damage to lysosomes after 18 h of exposure was evidenced from the impairment of acridine orange uptake. Cathepsin D caused the cleavage of pro-apoptotic protein BID that is involved in the activation of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Supporting that, BID cleavage and the activation of caspase 3 by Tl(III) were fully prevented when cells were preincubated with cathepsin D inhibitor (pepstatin A) and only partially prevented when cathepsin B inhibitor (E64d) was used. None of these inhibitors affected BID cleavage or caspase 3 activation in Tl(I)-treated cells. Together, experimental results support the role of Tl(III) uptake by the acidic cell compartments and their involvement in the early steps of Tl(III)-mediated PC12 cells apoptosis.

  19. The relationship between Cd-induced autophagy and lysosomal activation in WRL-68 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Su-Fang; Mao, Wei-Ping; Wang, Fang; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Shao, Luan-Luan

    2015-11-01

    This study shows that Cd induces autophagy in the human's embryonic normal liver cell line (WRL-68). The expression of LC3B-II and the mature cathepsin L were analyzed by Western blotting. The autophagosomes and lysosomes were directly visualized by electron microscopy and confocal microscopy analysis in Cd-exposed WRL-68 cells. In this study, we first found that autophagy induced the activation of lysosomal function in WRL-68 cells. The lysosomal activation was markedly decreased when the cells were co-treated with 3-MA (an inhibitor of autophagy). Secondly, we provided the evidence that the activation of lysosomal function depended on autophagosome-lysosome fusion. The colocalization of lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP2) and GFP-LC3 was significantly reduced, when they were treated with thapsigargin (an inhibitor of autophagosome-lysosome fusion). We demonstrated that deletion or blockage of the autophagosome-lysosome fusion process effectively diminished lysosomal activation, which suggests that lysosomal activation occurring in the course of autophagy is dependent on autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Thirdly, we provided evidence that the activation of lysosomal function was associated with lysosomal acid. We investigated the relationship between autophagosome-lysosome fusion and pH in acidic compartments by visualizing fusion process in WRL-68 cells. This suggests that increasing pH in acidic compartments in WRL-68 cells inhibits the autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Finally, we found that the activation of lysosomal function was associated with Ca(2+) stores and the intracellular Ca(2+) channels or pumps were possibly pH-dependent.

  20. Cathepsin inhibition-induced lysosomal dysfunction enhances pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis in high glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minjeong; Lee, Jaemeun; Seo, Hye-Young; Lim, Ji Sun; Kim, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway that plays an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. We previously showed that the inhibition of autophagy causes pancreatic β-cell apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy is a protective mechanism for the survival of pancreatic β-cells. The current study demonstrates that treatment with inhibitors and knockdown of the lysosomal cysteine proteases such as cathepsins B and L impair autophagy, enhancing the caspase-dependent apoptosis of INS-1 cells and islets upon exposure to high concentration of glucose. Interestingly, treatment with cathepsin B and L inhibitors prevented the proteolytic processing of cathepsins B, D and L, as evidenced by gradual accumulation of the respective pro-forms. Of note, inhibition of aspartic cathepsins had no effect on autophagy and cell viability, suggesting the selective role of cathepsins B and L in the regulation of β-cell autophagy and apoptosis. Lysosomal localization of accumulated pro-cathepsins in the presence of cathepsin B and L inhibitors was verified via immunocytochemistry and lysosomal fractionation. Lysotracker staining indicated that cathepsin B and L inhibitors led to the formation of severely enlarged lysosomes in a time-dependent manner. The abnormal accumulation of pro-cathepsins following treatment with inhibitors of cathepsins B and L suppressed normal lysosomal degradation and the processing of lysosomal enzymes, leading to lysosomal dysfunction. Collectively, our findings suggest that cathepsin defects following the inhibition of cathepsin B and L result in lysosomal dysfunction and consequent cell death in pancreatic β-cells.

  1. Study on the Synthesis and Performance of a Mannich Based Acidification Corrosion Inhibitor%曼尼希酸化缓蚀剂H-402的合成及其缓蚀性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张勇; 陆原; 张颖; 胡廷; 赵璐

    2013-01-01

    A oilfield acidification corrosion inhibitor was synthesized by Mannich reaction of secondary amine, acetophenone and formaldehyde. The effect of the synthetic technology, including molar ratio of reactant, reaction temperature and reaction time, on the inhibition performance of the inhibitor was evaluated by coupon corrosion tests. In addition, the inhibition mechanism of the inhibitor was investigated by electrochemical test and scanning electronic microscope observation. The results showed that the inhibitor exhibited the best inhibition efficiency when the molar ratio of primary amine, acetophenone and formaldehyde was 1:2:5 and the reaction were maintained at 80℃ for 10 h. After compounded with polyether and propargyl alcohol, the inhibitor could reach the first-class level at the dosage of 0.5%. The corrosion inhibitor was assigned as a mixed inhibitor mainly which inhibited the anode process through electrochemistry method. The scanning electronic microscope observation indicated that the corrosion forms of steels were improved significantly after adding 0.5% corrosion inhibitor.%本文采用仲胺、苯乙酮、甲醛为原料,通过曼尼希缩合反应,合成了一种油田酸化缓蚀剂H-402,研究了合成工艺对产物性能的影响及缓蚀机理.结果表明:在仲胺/苯乙酮/甲醛摩尔比1∶2∶5、反应温度80℃、反应时间10h条件下,所合成的H-402的缓蚀效果最佳.该缓蚀剂与聚醚、丙炔醇等具有增效作用,加剂量为0.5%时达到缓蚀剂一级水平.该缓蚀剂为抑制阳极过程为主的混合型缓蚀剂.扫描电镜显示,加入0.5%H-402后,Q235挂片表面的腐蚀形态得到极大的改善.

  2. Ocean acidification postcards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreppel, Heather A.; Cimitile, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting research on ocean acidification in polar, temperate, subtropical, and tropical regions including the Arctic, West Florida Shelf, and the Caribbean. Project activities include field assessment, experimental laboratory studies, and evaluation of existing data. The USGS is participating in international and interagency working groups to develop research strategies to increase understanding of the global implications of ocean acidification. Research strategies include new approaches for seawater chemistry observation and modeling, assessment of physiological effects on organisms, changes in marine ecosystem structure, new technologies, and information resources. These postcards highlight ongoing USGS research efforts in ocean acidification and carbon cycling in marine and coastal ecosystems in three different regions: polar, temperate, and tropical. To learn more about ocean acidification visit: http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/ocean-acidification/.

  3. The lysosome and neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lisha Zhang; Rui Sheng; Zhenghong Qin

    2009-01-01

    It has long been believed that the lysosome is an important digestive organelle. There is increasing evidence that the lysosome is also involved in pathogenesis of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Abnormal protein degradation and deposition induced by lysosoreal dysfunction may be the primary contributor to age-related neurodegeneration. In this review, the possible relationship between lysosome and various neurodegenerative diseases is described.

  4. Synthesis of N - Alkyl Benzimidazoles as Corrosion Inhibitors for Acidification in Hydrochloric Acid and Evaluation of Their Inhibition Performance%N-烷基苯并咪唑酸化缓蚀剂的合成及性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨鹏辉; 冀生辉

    2013-01-01

    Four kinds of N - alkyl benzimidazole corrosion inhibitors were synthesized by alkylation of 2 - methyl benzimidazole or 2 - ethyl benzimidazole. The corrosion inhibition performance of as - synthesized inhibitors was evaluated by static state weight loss test and dynamic potential scanning polarization curve measurement. It was found that properly extending carbon chain of benzimidazole helped to improve the anticorrosion ability of benzimidazoles, and corrosion inhibitor N - hexadecyl - 2 - ethyl benzimidazole showed the best corrosion inhibition performance. Besides, at 60 ℃ in 15% hydrochloric acid, the corrosion rate of N80 steel decreased with increasing concentration of the corrosion inhibitor; and the corrosion rate of the steel at a corrosion inhibitor concentration of 1.0% was 1.73g/(m2 · h) , which indicated that corrosion inhibitor N-hexadecyl-2-ethyl benzimidazole was advantageous over the first-class corrosion inhibitor for acidification. Moreover, as-synthesized corrosion inhibitors were a class of mixed-type inhibitors dominated by cathode inhibition, but their inhibition performance in HCl with a concentration of above 20 % or at a temperature of above 70 ℃ was undesirable.%苯并咪唑是一类环境友好的缓蚀剂,将其衍生物用作油气田酸化缓蚀剂的报道较少.通过烷基化反应在2-甲基苯并咪唑和2-乙基苯并咪唑的1-氮原子上分别引入十二烷基和十六烷基,合成了4种N-烷基苯并咪唑,并以其为主剂制成缓蚀剂,用静态失重法和动电位扫描极化曲线对4种复配缓蚀剂在盐酸溶液中的缓蚀性能进行了评价.结果表明:适当延长1位烷基碳链,有助于提高苯并咪唑衍生物的缓蚀能力;合成的4种N-烷基苯并咪唑中,以N-十六烷基-2-乙基苯并咪唑为主剂制成缓蚀剂d的缓蚀性能最好;在60℃,15%HCl中,N80钢的腐蚀速率随缓蚀剂d用量的增大而减小,其用量为1.0%时,N80钢腐蚀速率为1.73 g/(m2·h),优于

  5. Ocean Acidification Product Suite

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists within the ACCRETE (Acidification, Climate, and Coral Reef Ecosystems Team) Lab of AOML_s Ocean Chemistry and Ecosystems Division (OCED) have constructed...

  6. Nephrotoxicity of Bence-Jones proteins: interference in renal epithelial cell acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicastri A.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acidification of the endosome-lysosome system of renal epithelial cells after endocytosis of two human immunoglobulin lambda light chains (Bence-Jones proteins, BJP obtained from patients with multiple myeloma. Renal epithelial cell handling of two BJP (neutral and acidic BJP was evaluated by rhodamine fluorescence. Renal cells (MDCK were maintained in culture and, when confluent, were incubated with rhodamine-labeled BJP for different periods of time. Photos were obtained with a fluorescence microscope (Axiolab-Zeiss. Labeling density was determined on slides with a densitometer (Shimadzu Dual-Wavelength Flying-Spot Scanner CS9000. Endocytosis of neutral and acidic BJP was correlated with acidic intracellular compartment distribution using acridine orange labeling. We compared the pattern of distribution after incubation of native neutral and acidic BJP and after complete deglycosylation of BJP by periodate oxidation. The subsequent alteration of pI converted neutral BJP to acidic BJP. There was a significant accumulation of neutral BJP in endocytic structures, reduced lysosomal acidification, and a diffuse pattern of acidification. This pattern was reversed after total deglycosylation and subsequent alteration of the pI to an acidic BJP. We conclude that the physicochemical characteristics of BJP interfere with intracellular acidification, possibly explaining the strong nephrotoxicity of neutral BJP. Lysosomal acidification is fundamental for adequate protein processing and catabolism.

  7. Cancer-associated lysosomal changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallunki, T; Olsen, O D; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly dividing and invasive cancer cells are strongly dependent on effective lysosomal function. Accordingly, transformation and cancer progression are characterized by dramatic changes in lysosomal volume, composition and cellular distribution. Depending on one's point of view, the cancer-asso......:10.1038/onc.2012.292....

  8. LYSOSOMAL DISRUPTION BY BACTERIAL TOXINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernheimer, Alan W.; Schwartz, Lois L.

    1964-01-01

    Bernheimer, Alan W. (New York University School of Medicine, New York), and Lois L. Schwartz. Lysosomal disruption by bacterial toxins. J. Bacteriol. 87:1100–1104. 1964.—Seventeen bacterial toxins were examined for capacity (i) to disrupt rabbit leukocyte lysosomes as indicated by decrease in turbidity of lysosomal suspensions, and (ii) to alter rabbit liver lysosomes as measured by release of β-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase. Staphylococcal α-toxin, Clostridium perfringens α-toxin, and streptolysins O and S affected lysosomes in both systems. Staphylococcal β-toxin, leucocidin and enterotoxin, Shiga neurotoxin, Serratia endotoxin, diphtheria toxin, tetanus neurotoxin, C. botulinum type A toxin, and C. perfringens ε-toxin were not active in either system. Staphylococcal δ-toxin, C. histolyticum collagenase, crude C. perfringens β-toxin, and crude anthrax toxin caused lysosomal damage in only one of the test systems. There is a substantial correlation between the hemolytic property of a toxin and its capacity to disrupt lysosomes, lending support to the concept that erythrocytes and lysosomes are bounded by similar membranes. PMID:5874534

  9. Cancer-associated lysosomal changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallunki, T; Olsen, O D; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly dividing and invasive cancer cells are strongly dependent on effective lysosomal function. Accordingly, transformation and cancer progression are characterized by dramatic changes in lysosomal volume, composition and cellular distribution. Depending on one's point of view, the cancer-associated......-targeting anti-cancer drugs. In this review we compile our current knowledge on cancer-associated changes in lysosomal composition and discuss the consequences of these alterations to cancer progression and the possibilities they can bring to cancer therapy.Oncogene advance online publication, 9 July 2012; doi...

  10. Impacts of Ocean Acidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijma, Jelle (Alfred Wegener Inst., D-27570 Bremerhaven (Germany)) (and others)

    2009-08-15

    There is growing scientific evidence that, as a result of increasing anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions, absorption of CO{sub 2} by the oceans has already noticeably increased the average oceanic acidity from pre-industrial levels. This global threat requires a global response. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), continuing CO{sub 2} emissions in line with current trends could make the oceans up to 150% more acidic by 2100 than they were at the beginning of the Anthropocene. Acidification decreases the ability of the ocean to absorb additional atmospheric CO{sub 2}, which implies that future CO{sub 2} emissions are likely to lead to more rapid global warming. Ocean acidification is also problematic because of its negative effects on marine ecosystems, especially marine calcifying organisms, and marine resources and services upon which human societies largely depend such as energy, water, and fisheries. For example, it is predicted that by 2100 around 70% of all cold-water corals, especially those in the higher latitudes, will live in waters undersaturated in carbonate due to ocean acidification. Recent research indicates that ocean acidification might also result in increasing levels of jellyfish in some marine ecosystems. Aside from direct effects, ocean acidification together with other global change-induced impacts such as marine and coastal pollution and the introduction of invasive alien species are likely to result in more fragile marine ecosystems, making them more vulnerable to other environmental impacts resulting from, for example, coastal deforestation and widescale fisheries. The Marine Board-ESF Position Paper on the Impacts of Climate Change on the European Marine and Coastal Environment - Ecosystems indicated that presenting ocean acidification issues to policy makers is a key issue and challenge. Indeed, as the consequences of ocean acidification are expected to emerge rapidly and drastically, but are

  11. Lysosomal cell death at a glance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomes serve as the cellular recycling centre and are filled with numerous hydrolases that can degrade most cellular macromolecules. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the consequent leakage of the lysosomal content into the cytosol leads to so-called "lysosomal cell death". This form...... of cell death is mainly carried out by the lysosomal cathepsin proteases and can have necrotic, apoptotic or apoptosis-like features depending on the extent of the leakage and the cellular context. This article summarizes our current knowledge on lysosomal cell death with an emphasis on the upstream...... mechanisms that lead to lysosomal membrane permeabilization....

  12. The Octyl Ester of Ginsenoside Rh2 Induces Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization via Bax Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Zhang, Bing; Sun, Yong; Xiong, Zeng-Xing; Peng, Han; Deng, Ze-Yuan; Hu, Jiang-Ning

    2016-04-25

    Ginsenoside Rh2 is a potential pharmacologically active metabolite of ginseng. Previously, we have reported that an octyl ester derivative of ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2-O), has been confirmed to possess higher bioavailability and anticancer effect than Rh2 in vitro. In order to better assess the possibility that Rh2-O could be used as an anticancer compound, the underlying mechanism was investigated in this study. The present results revealed that lysosomal destabilization was involved in the early stage of cell apoptosis in HepG2 cells induced by Rh2-O. Rh2-O could induce an early lysosomal membrane permeabilization with the release of lysosomal protease cathepsins to the cytosol in HepG2 cells. The Cat B inhibitor (leu) and Cat D inhibitor (pepA) inhibited Rh2-O-induced HepG2 apoptosis as well as tBid production and Δφm depolarization, indicating that lysosomal permeabilization occurred upstream of mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, Rh2-O induced a significant increase in the protein levels of DRAM1 and Bax (p lysosomes of HepG2 cells. Knockdown of Bax partially inhibited Rh2-O-induced Cat D release from lysosomes. Thus it was concluded that Rh2-O induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells through activation of the lysosomal-mitochondrial apoptotic pathway involving the translocation of Bax to the lysosome.

  13. Communicating Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Aaron; Selna, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Participation in a study circle through the National Network of Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI) project enabled staff at the California Academy of Sciences to effectively engage visitors on climate change and ocean acidification topics. Strategic framing tactics were used as staff revised the scripted Coral Reef Dive program,…

  14. Communicating Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Aaron; Selna, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Participation in a study circle through the National Network of Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI) project enabled staff at the California Academy of Sciences to effectively engage visitors on climate change and ocean acidification topics. Strategic framing tactics were used as staff revised the scripted Coral Reef Dive program,…

  15. Acidification and Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  16. Identification of cytoskeleton-associated proteins essential for lysosomal stability and survival of human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth-Pedersen, Line; Aits, Sonja; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Nylandsted, Jesper; Jäättelä, Marja

    2012-01-01

    Microtubule-disturbing drugs inhibit lysosomal trafficking and induce lysosomal membrane permeabilization followed by cathepsin-dependent cell death. To identify specific trafficking-related proteins that control cell survival and lysosomal stability, we screened a molecular motor siRNA library in human MCF7 breast cancer cells. SiRNAs targeting four kinesins (KIF11/Eg5, KIF20A, KIF21A, KIF25), myosin 1G (MYO1G), myosin heavy chain 1 (MYH1) and tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) were identified as effective inducers of non-apoptotic cell death. The cell death induced by KIF11, KIF21A, KIF25, MYH1 or TPM2 siRNAs was preceded by lysosomal membrane permeabilization, and all identified siRNAs induced several changes in the endo-lysosomal compartment, i.e. increased lysosomal volume (KIF11, KIF20A, KIF25, MYO1G, MYH1), increased cysteine cathepsin activity (KIF20A, KIF25), altered lysosomal localization (KIF25, MYH1, TPM2), increased dextran accumulation (KIF20A), or reduced autophagic flux (MYO1G, MYH1). Importantly, all seven siRNAs also killed human cervix cancer (HeLa) and osteosarcoma (U-2-OS) cells and sensitized cancer cells to other lysosome-destabilizing treatments, i.e. photo-oxidation, siramesine, etoposide or cisplatin. Similarly to KIF11 siRNA, the KIF11 inhibitor monastrol induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and sensitized several cancer cell lines to siramesine. While KIF11 inhibitors are under clinical development as mitotic blockers, our data reveal a new function for KIF11 in controlling lysosomal stability and introduce six other molecular motors as putative cancer drug targets.

  17. Oxidant-induced autophagy and ferritin degradation contribute to epithelial–mesenchymal transition through lysosomal iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioutas, Apostolos; Vainikka, Linda K; Kentson, Magnus; Dam-Larsen, Sören; Wennerström, Urban; Jacobson, Petra; Persson, Hans Lennart

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 triggers epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) through autophagy, which is partly driven by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The aim of this study was to determine whether leaking lysosomes and enhanced degradation of H-ferritin could be involved in EMT and whether it could be possible to prevent EMT by iron chelation targeting of the lysosome. Materials and methods EMT, H-ferritin, and autophagy were evaluated in TGF-β1-stimulated A549 human lung epithelial cells cultured in vitro using Western blotting, with the additional morphological assessment of EMT. By using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, lysosomes and ROS were assessed by acridine orange and 6-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein acetate assays, respectively. Results TGF-β1-stimulated cells demonstrated a loss of H-ferritin, which was prevented by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and inhibitors of lysosomal degradation. TGF-β1 stimulation generated ROS and autophagosome formation and led to EMT, which was further promoted by the additional ROS-generating cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α. Lysosomes of TGF-β1-stimulated cells were sensitized to oxidants but also completely protected by lysosomal loading with dextran-bound deferoxamine (DFO). Autophagy and EMT were prevented by NAC, DFO, and inhibitors of autophagy and lysosomal degradation. Conclusion The findings of this study support the role of enhanced autophagic degradation of H-ferritin as a mechanism for increasing the vulnerability of lysosomes to iron-driven oxidant injury that triggers further autophagy during EMT. This study proposes that lysosomal leakage is a novel pathway of TGF-β1-induced EMT that may be prevented by iron-chelating drugs that target the lysosome.

  18. Calpains mediate epithelial-cell death during mammary gland involution: mitochondria and lysosomal destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnandis, T; Ferrer-Vicens, I; García-Trevijano, E R; Miralles, V J; García, C; Torres, L; Viña, J R; Zaragozá, R

    2012-09-01

    Our aim was to elucidate the physiological role of calpains (CAPN) in mammary gland involution. Both CAPN-1 and -2 were induced after weaning and its activity increased in isolated mitochondria and lysosomes. CAPN activation within the mitochondria could trigger the release of cytochrome c and other pro-apoptotic factors, whereas in lysosomes it might be essential for tissue remodeling by releasing cathepsins into the cytosol. Immunohistochemical analysis localized CAPNs mainly at the luminal side of alveoli. During weaning, CAPNs translocate to the lysosomes processing membrane proteins. To identify these substrates, lysosomal fractions were treated with recombinant CAPN and cleaved products were identified by 2D-DIGE. The subunit b(2) of the v-type H(+) ATPase is proteolyzed and so is the lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2a (LAMP2a). Both proteins are also cleaved in vivo. Furthermore, LAMP2a cleavage was confirmed in vitro by addition of CAPNs to isolated lysosomes and several CAPN inhibitors prevented it. Finally, in vivo inhibition of CAPN1 in 72-h-weaned mice decreased LAMP2a cleavage. Indeed, calpeptin-treated mice showed a substantial delay in tissue remodeling and involution of the mammary gland. These results suggest that CAPNs are responsible for mitochondrial and lysosomal membrane permeabilization, supporting the idea that lysosomal-mediated cell death is a new hallmark of mammary gland involution.

  19. Lysosomal cell death mechanisms in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sintes, Raquel; Ledesma, María Dolores; Boya, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    Lysosomes are degradative organelles essential for cell homeostasis that regulate a variety of processes, from calcium signaling and nutrient responses to autophagic degradation of intracellular components. Lysosomal cell death is mediated by the lethal effects of cathepsins, which are released into the cytoplasm following lysosomal damage. This process of lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin release is observed in several physiopathological conditions and plays a role in tissue remodeling, the immune response to intracellular pathogens and neurodegenerative diseases. Many evidences indicate that aging strongly influences lysosomal activity by altering the physical and chemical properties of these organelles, rendering them more sensitive to stress. In this review we focus on how aging alters lysosomal function and increases cell sensitivity to lysosomal membrane permeabilization and lysosomal cell death, both in physiological conditions and age-related pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biomarkers in Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin Bobillo Lobato

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A biomarker is generally an analyte that indicates the presence and/or extent of a biological process, which is in itself usually directly linked to the clinical manifestations and outcome of a particular disease. The biomarkers in the field of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs have particular relevance where spectacular therapeutic initiatives have been achieved, most notably with the introduction of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT. There are two main types of biomarkers. The first group is comprised of those molecules whose accumulation is directly enhanced as a result of defective lysosomal function. These molecules represent the storage of the principal macro-molecular substrate(s of a specific enzyme or protein, whose function is deficient in the given disease. In the second group of biomarkers, the relationship between the lysosomal defect and the biomarker is indirect. In this group, the biomarker reflects the effects of the primary lysosomal defect on cell, tissue, or organ functions. There is no “gold standard” among biomarkers used to diagnosis and/or monitor LSDs, but there are a number that exist that can be used to reasonably assess and monitor the state of certain organs or functions. A number of biomarkers have been proposed for the analysis of the most important LSDs. In this review, we will summarize the most promising biomarkers in major LSDs and discuss why these are the most promising candidates for screening systems.

  1. PIG7 promotes leukemia cell chemosensitivity via lysosomal membrane permeabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiazhuo; Peng, Leiwen; Niu, Ting; Wu, Yu; Li, Jianjun; Wang, Fangfang; Zheng, Yuhuan; Liu, Ting

    2016-01-26

    PIG7 localizes to lysosomal membrane in leukemia cells. Our previous work has shown that transduction of pig7 into a series of leukemia cell lines did not result in either apoptosis or differentiation of most tested cell lines. Interestingly, it did significantly sensitize these cell lines to chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we further investigated the mechanism underlying pig7-induced improved sensitivity of acute leukemia cells to chemotherapy. Our results demonstrated that the sensitization effect driven by exogenous pig7 was more effective in drug-resistant leukemia cell lines which had lower endogenous pig7 expression. Overexpression of pig7 did not directly activate the caspase apoptotic pathway, but decreased the lysosomal stability. The expression of pig7 resulted in lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and lysosomal protease (e.g. cathepsin B, D, L) release. Moreover, we also observed increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) induced by pig7. Some autophagy markers such as LC3I/II, ATG5 and Beclin-1, and necroptosis maker MLKL were also stimulated. However, intrinsic antagonism such as serine/cysteine protease inhibitors Spi2A and Cystatin C prevented downstream effectors from triggering leukemia cells, which were only on the "verge of apoptosis". When combined with chemotherapy, LMP increased and more proteases were released. Once this process was beyond the limit of intrinsic antagonism, it induced programmed cell death cooperatively via caspase-independent and caspase-dependent pathways.

  2. Chronic high glucose inhibits albumin reabsorption by lysosomal alkalinization in cultured porcine proximal tubular epithelial cells (LLC-PK1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Fukashi

    2006-06-01

    Lysosomal acidification is a key step of albumin reabsorption in proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs). This study was performed to examine the influence of chronic high glucose on lysosomal acidification in cultured PTECs. Porcine PTECs (LLC-PK(1) cells) were cultured in 16.7 mM (300 mg/dl) glucose (HG) alone or with 0.5 mM phlorizin for 24 weeks and subsequently for 12 weeks in 5.5 mM (100 mg/dl) glucose (NG). Chronic HG inhibited the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-albumin (A) uptake progressively, while phlorizin reversed the inhibition. NG for 12 weeks after HG normalized the uptake. The time-dependent uptake of FITC-A was inhibited by HG and bafilomycin A(1) (BafA(1)) after 15 min and by 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) and N-ethyl-N-isopropyl-amiloride (EIPA) after 3 min. Cellular ATP was depleted by HG and restored by NG. Lysosomal pH, assessed by an acidotropic fluorescent probe, was alkalinized (pH 4.5-7.8) with 5.5-27.8 mM glucose and normalized by subsequent NG. BafA(1) alkalinized lysosomes, and the concentration required to 50% change for the pH and 50% inhibition of FITC-A uptake was similar. EIPA inhibited FITC-A uptake, but did not influence lysosomal pH. DIDS inhibited FITC-A uptake, and unexpectedly lowered lysosomal pH. Real time PCR showed that HG reduced the mRNA level for vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, but did not alter those of chloride channel-5 and Na(+)-H(+)-exchanger-3. In conclusion, the chronic HG inhibits albumin reabsorption by lysosomal alkalinization in PTECs, probably due to ATP depletion and down-regulation of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase.

  3. Metallothionein-3 regulates lysosomal function in cultured astrocytes under both normal and oxidative conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Jeong; Park, Mi-Ha; Kim, Hyun-Jae; Koh, Jae-Young

    2010-08-01

    Cellular zinc plays a key role in lysosomal change and cell death in neurons and astrocytes under oxidative stress. Here, using astrocytes lacking metallothionein-3 (MT3), a potential source of labile zinc in the brain, we studied the role of MT3 in oxidative stress responses. H(2)O(2) induced a large increase in labile zinc in wild-type (WT) astrocytes, but stimulated only a modest rise in MT3-null astrocytes. In addition, H(2)O(2)-induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cell death were comparably attenuated in MT3-null astrocytes. Expression and glycosylation of Lamp1 (lysosome-associated membrane protein 1) and Lamp2 were increased in MT3-null astrocytes, and the activities of several lysosomal enzymes were significantly reduced, indicating an effect of MT3 on lysosomal components. Consistent with lysosomal dysfunction in MT3-null cells, the level of LC3-II (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3), a marker of early autophagy, was increased by oxidative stress in WT astrocytes, but not in MT3-null cells. Similar changes in Lamp1, LC3, and cathepsin-D were induced by the lysosomal inhibitors bafilomycin A1, chloroquine, and monensin, indicating that lysosomal dysfunction may lie upstream of changes observed in MT3-null astrocytes. Consistent with this idea, lysosomal accumulation of cholesterol and lipofuscin were augmented in MT3-null astrocytes. Similar to the results seen in MT3-null cells, MT3 knockdown by siRNA inhibited oxidative stress-induced increases in zinc and LMP. These results indicate that MT3 may play a key role in normal lysosomal function in cultured astrocytes.

  4. Brief exposure to copper activates lysosomal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Karina; Coblenz, Jessica; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    Copper (Cu) is essential mineral, but its toxicity necessitates existence of powerful machinery responsible for the extraction of excess Cu from the cell. Cu exposure was recently shown to induce the translocation of Cu pump ATP7B to the lysosomes followed by lysosomal exocytosis. Here we sought to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effect of Cu on lysosomal exocytosis. We found that brief exposure to Cu activates lysosomal exocytosis, which was measured as a release of the lysosomal digestive enzyme β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) into the extracellular medium and by the presence lysosomal protein LAMP1 at the plasma membrane. Such release depends on calcium (Ca) and on the lysosomal SNARE VAMP7. ATP7B knockdown using RNAi suppressed the basal lysosomal exocytosis, but did not affect the ability of Cu to activate it. ATP7B knockdown was associated with sustained oxidative stress. The removal of Ca from the extracellular medium suppressed the Cu-dependent component of the lysosomal exocytosis. We propose that Cu promotes lysosomal exocytosis by facilitating a Ca-dependent step of the lysosomal exocytosis.

  5. K63-Linked Ubiquitination Targets Toxoplasma gondii for Endo-lysosomal Destruction in IFNγ-Stimulated Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Barbara; Wright, Joseph D.; Pereira, Pedro M.; Johnston, Ashleigh C.; Frickel, Eva-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is the most common protozoan parasitic infection in man. Gamma interferon (IFNγ) activates haematopoietic and non-haematopoietic cells to kill the parasite and mediate host resistance. IFNγ-driven host resistance pathways and parasitic virulence factors are well described in mice, but a detailed understanding of pathways that kill Toxoplasma in human cells is lacking. Here we show, that contrary to the widely held belief that the Toxoplasma vacuole is non-fusogenic, in an immune-stimulated environment, the vacuole of type II Toxoplasma in human cells is able to fuse with the host endo-lysosomal machinery leading to parasite death by acidification. Similar to murine cells, we find that type II, but not type I Toxoplasma vacuoles are targeted by K63-linked ubiquitin in an IFNγ-dependent manner in non-haematopoetic primary-like human endothelial cells. Host defence proteins p62 and NDP52 are subsequently recruited to the type II vacuole in distinct, overlapping microdomains with a loss of IFNγ-dependent restriction in p62 knocked down cells. Autophagy proteins Atg16L1, GABARAP and LC3B are recruited to <10% of parasite vacuoles and show no parasite strain preference, which is consistent with inhibition and enhancement of autophagy showing no effect on parasite replication. We demonstrate that this differs from HeLa human epithelial cells, where type II Toxoplasma are restricted by non-canonical autophagy leading to growth stunting that is independent of lysosomal acidification. In contrast to mouse cells, human vacuoles do not break. In HUVEC, the ubiquitinated vacuoles are targeted for destruction in acidified LAMP1-positive endo-lysosomal compartments. Consequently, parasite death can be prevented by inhibiting host ubiquitination and endosomal acidification. Thus, K63-linked ubiquitin recognition leading to vacuolar endo-lysosomal fusion and acidification is an important, novel virulence-driven Toxoplasma human host defence pathway. PMID

  6. Eucommia ulmoides cortex, geniposide and aucubin regulate lipotoxicity through the inhibition of lysosomal BAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geum-Hwa; Lee, Mi-Rin; Lee, Hwa-Young; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2014-01-01

    In this study we examined the inhibition of hepatic dyslipidemia by Eucommia ulmoides extract (EUE). Using a screening assay for BAX inhibition we determined that EUE regulates BAX-induced cell death. Among various cell death stimuli tested EUE regulated palmitate-induced cell death, which involves lysosomal BAX translocation. EUE rescued palmitate-induced inhibition of lysosomal V-ATPase, α-galactosidase, α-mannosidase, and acid phosphatase, and this effect was reversed by bafilomycin, a lysosomal V-ATPase inhibitor. The active components of EUE, aucubin and geniposide, showed similar inhibition of palmitate-induced cell death to that of EUE through enhancement of lysosome activity. Consistent with these in vitro findings, EUE inhibited the dyslipidemic condition in a high-fat diet animal model by regulating the lysosomal localization of BAX. This study demonstrates that EUE regulates lipotoxicity through a novel mechanism of enhanced lysosomal activity leading to the regulation of lysosomal BAX activation and cell death. Our findings further indicate that geniposide and aucubin, active components of EUE, may be therapeutic candidates for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  7. Lysosome dysfunction enhances oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through ubiquitinated protein accumulation in Hela cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunyan; Huang, Xiaowei; Xu, Ye; Li, Hongyan; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jiateng; Kang, Jinsong; Liu, Yuhe; Sun, Liankun

    2013-01-01

    The role of lysosomal system in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cancer cells is not fully understood. Menadione is frequently used as oxidative stress model. It is indicated that menadione could induce autophagy in Hela cells. In the present study, we examined whether the lysosomal inhibitor, ammonium chloride (NH(4)Cl) could prevent the autophagy flux by inhibiting the fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes and enhance apoptosis induced by menadione via mitochondrial pathway. The results demonstrated generation and accumulation of reactive oxygen species and increased levels of ubiquitinated proteins and GRP78 in cells treated with both menadione and NH(4)Cl. Our data indicates that lysosomal system through autophagy plays an important role in preventing menadione-induced apoptosis in Hela cells by clearing misfolded proteins, which alleviates endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  8. uPARAP/endo180 directs lysosomal delivery and degradation of collagen IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Lars; Engelholm, Lars H; Høyer-Hansen, Maria

    2004-01-01

    transmembrane glycoprotein urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP/endo180) directs collagen IV for lysosomal delivery and degradation. In wild-type fibroblasts, fluorescently labeled collagen IV was first internalized into vesicular structures with diffuse fluorescence eventually...... appearing uniformly within the wild-type cells after longer incubation times. In these cells, some collagen-containing vesicles were identified as lysosomes by staining for LAMP-1. In contrast, collagen IV remained extracellular and associated with fiber-like structures on uPARAP/endo180-deficient...... fibroblasts. Blocking lysosomal cysteine proteases with the inhibitor E64d resulted in strong accumulation of collagen IV in lysosomes in wild-type cells, but only very weak intracellular fluorescence accumulation in uPARAP/endo180-deficient fibroblasts. We conclude that uPARAP/endo180 is critical...

  9. Artesunate Activates Mitochondrial Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells via Iron-catalyzed Lysosomal Reactive Oxygen Species Production*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher-Brady, Anne; Stein, Henning A.; Turschner, Simon; Toegel, Ina; Mora, Rodrigo; Jennewein, Nina; Efferth, Thomas; Eils, Roland; Brady, Nathan R.

    2011-01-01

    The antimalarial agent artesunate (ART) activates programmed cell death (PCD) in cancer cells in a manner dependent on the presence of iron and the generation of reactive oxygen species. In malaria parasites, ART cytotoxicity originates from interactions with heme-derived iron within the food vacuole. The analogous digestive compartment of mammalian cells, the lysosome, similarly contains high levels of redox-active iron and in response to specific stimuli can initiate mitochondrial apoptosis. We thus investigated the role of lysosomes in ART-induced PCD and determined that in MCF-7 breast cancer cells ART activates lysosome-dependent mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. ART impacted endolysosomal and autophagosomal compartments, inhibiting autophagosome turnover and causing perinuclear clustering of autophagosomes, early and late endosomes, and lysosomes. Lysosomal iron chelation blocked all measured parameters of ART-induced PCD, whereas lysosomal iron loading enhanced death, thus identifying lysosomal iron as the lethal source of reactive oxygen species upstream of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization. Moreover, lysosomal inhibitors chloroquine and bafilomycin A1 reduced ART-activated PCD, evidencing a requirement for lysosomal function during PCD signaling. ART killing did not involve activation of the BH3-only protein, Bid, yet ART enhanced TNF-mediated Bid cleavage. We additionally demonstrated the lysosomal PCD pathway in T47D and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Importantly, non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells resisted ART-induced PCD. Together, our data suggest that ART triggers PCD via engagement of distinct, interconnected PCD pathways, with hierarchical signaling from lysosomes to mitochondria, suggesting a potential clinical use of ART for targeting lysosomes in cancer treatment. PMID:21149439

  10. Coronavirus cell entry occurs through the endo-/lysosomal pathway in a proteolysis-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Burkard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Enveloped viruses need to fuse with a host cell membrane in order to deliver their genome into the host cell. While some viruses fuse with the plasma membrane, many viruses are endocytosed prior to fusion. Specific cues in the endosomal microenvironment induce conformational changes in the viral fusion proteins leading to viral and host membrane fusion. In the present study we investigated the entry of coronaviruses (CoVs. Using siRNA gene silencing, we found that proteins known to be important for late endosomal maturation and endosome-lysosome fusion profoundly promote infection of cells with mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV. Using recombinant MHVs expressing reporter genes as well as a novel, replication-independent fusion assay we confirmed the importance of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and demonstrated that trafficking of MHV to lysosomes is required for fusion and productive entry to occur. Nevertheless, MHV was shown to be less sensitive to perturbation of endosomal pH than vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus, which fuse in early and late endosomes, respectively. Our results indicate that entry of MHV depends on proteolytic processing of its fusion protein S by lysosomal proteases. Fusion of MHV was severely inhibited by a pan-lysosomal protease inhibitor, while trafficking of MHV to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases was no longer required when a furin cleavage site was introduced in the S protein immediately upstream of the fusion peptide. Also entry of feline CoV was shown to depend on trafficking to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases. In contrast, MERS-CoV, which contains a minimal furin cleavage site just upstream of the fusion peptide, was negatively affected by inhibition of furin, but not of lysosomal proteases. We conclude that a proteolytic cleavage site in the CoV S protein directly upstream of the fusion peptide is an essential determinant of the intracellular site of fusion.

  11. Coronavirus cell entry occurs through the endo-/lysosomal pathway in a proteolysis-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, Christine; Verheije, Monique H; Wicht, Oliver; van Kasteren, Sander I; van Kuppeveld, Frank J; Haagmans, Bart L; Pelkmans, Lucas; Rottier, Peter J M; Bosch, Berend Jan; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2014-11-01

    Enveloped viruses need to fuse with a host cell membrane in order to deliver their genome into the host cell. While some viruses fuse with the plasma membrane, many viruses are endocytosed prior to fusion. Specific cues in the endosomal microenvironment induce conformational changes in the viral fusion proteins leading to viral and host membrane fusion. In the present study we investigated the entry of coronaviruses (CoVs). Using siRNA gene silencing, we found that proteins known to be important for late endosomal maturation and endosome-lysosome fusion profoundly promote infection of cells with mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV). Using recombinant MHVs expressing reporter genes as well as a novel, replication-independent fusion assay we confirmed the importance of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and demonstrated that trafficking of MHV to lysosomes is required for fusion and productive entry to occur. Nevertheless, MHV was shown to be less sensitive to perturbation of endosomal pH than vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus, which fuse in early and late endosomes, respectively. Our results indicate that entry of MHV depends on proteolytic processing of its fusion protein S by lysosomal proteases. Fusion of MHV was severely inhibited by a pan-lysosomal protease inhibitor, while trafficking of MHV to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases was no longer required when a furin cleavage site was introduced in the S protein immediately upstream of the fusion peptide. Also entry of feline CoV was shown to depend on trafficking to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases. In contrast, MERS-CoV, which contains a minimal furin cleavage site just upstream of the fusion peptide, was negatively affected by inhibition of furin, but not of lysosomal proteases. We conclude that a proteolytic cleavage site in the CoV S protein directly upstream of the fusion peptide is an essential determinant of the intracellular site of fusion.

  12. GNeosomes: Highly Lysosomotropic Nanoassemblies for Lysosomal Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexselblatt, Ezequiel; Esko, Jeffrey D; Tor, Yitzhak

    2015-01-01

    GNeosomes, lysosomotropic lipid vesicles decorated with guanidinoneomycin, can encapsulate and facilitate the cellular internalization and lysosomal delivery of cargo ranging from small molecules to high molecular weight proteins, in a process that is exclusively dependent on cell surface glycosaminoglycans. Their cellular uptake mechanism and co-localization with lysosomes, as well as the delivery, release, and activity of internalized cargo, are quantified. GNeosomes are proposed as a universal platform for lysosomal delivery with potential as a basic research tool and a therapeutic vehicle.

  13. Lysosomal Enzyme Glucocerebrosidase Protects against Aβ1-42 Oligomer-Induced Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Tae-In; Yun, Seungpil; Kim, Sangjune; Park, Hyejin; Hwang, Heehong; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Ko, Han Seok

    2015-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase (GCase) functions as a lysosomal enzyme and its mutations are known to be related to many neurodegenerative diseases, including Gaucher’s disease (GD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). However, there is little information about the role of GCase in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we demonstrate that GCase protein levels and enzyme activity are significantly decreased in sporadic AD. Moreover, Aβ1–42 oligomer treatment results in neuronal cell death that is concomitant with decreased GCase protein levels and enzyme activity, as well as impairment in lysosomal biogenesis and acidification. Importantly, overexpression of GCase promotes the lysosomal degradation of Aβ1–42 oligomers, restores the lysosomal impairment, and protects against the toxicity in neurons treated with Aβ1–42 oligomers. Our findings indicate that a deficiency of GCase could be involved in progression of AD pathology and suggest that augmentation of GCase activity may be a potential therapeutic option for the treatment of AD. PMID:26629917

  14. Lysosomal Enzyme Glucocerebrosidase Protects against Aβ1-42 Oligomer-Induced Neurotoxicity.

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    Seulah Choi

    Full Text Available Glucocerebrosidase (GCase functions as a lysosomal enzyme and its mutations are known to be related to many neurodegenerative diseases, including Gaucher's disease (GD, Parkinson's disease (PD, and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB. However, there is little information about the role of GCase in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Here we demonstrate that GCase protein levels and enzyme activity are significantly decreased in sporadic AD. Moreover, Aβ1-42 oligomer treatment results in neuronal cell death that is concomitant with decreased GCase protein levels and enzyme activity, as well as impairment in lysosomal biogenesis and acidification. Importantly, overexpression of GCase promotes the lysosomal degradation of Aβ1-42 oligomers, restores the lysosomal impairment, and protects against the toxicity in neurons treated with Aβ1-42 oligomers. Our findings indicate that a deficiency of GCase could be involved in progression of AD pathology and suggest that augmentation of GCase activity may be a potential therapeutic option for the treatment of AD.

  15. Lysosomal-associated transmembrane protein 5 (LAPTM5 is a molecular partner of CD1e.

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    Catherine Angénieux

    Full Text Available The CD1e protein participates in the presentation of lipid antigens in dendritic cells. Its transmembrane precursor is transported to lysosomes where it is cleaved into an active soluble form. In the presence of bafilomycin, which inhibits vacuolar ATPase and consequently the acidification of endosomal compartments, CD1e associates with a 27 kD protein. In this work, we identified this molecular partner as LAPTM5. The latter protein and CD1e colocalize in trans-Golgi and late endosomal compartments. The quantity of LAPTM5/CD1e complexes increases when the cells are treated with bafilomycin, probably due to the protection of LAPTM5 from lysosomal proteases. Moreover, we could demonstrate that LAPTM5/CD1e association occurs under physiological conditions. Although LAPTM5 was previously shown to act as a platform recruiting ubiquitin ligases and facilitating the transport of receptors to lysosomes, we found no evidence that LATPM5 controls either CD1e ubiquitination or the generation of soluble lysosomal CD1e proteins. Notwithstanding these last observations, the interaction of LAPTM5 with CD1e and their colocalization in antigen processing compartments both suggest that LAPTM5 might influence the role of CD1e in the presentation of lipid antigens.

  16. Infection of XC cells by MLVs and Ebola virus is endosome-dependent but acidification-independent.

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    Kamiyama, Haruka; Kakoki, Katsura; Yoshii, Hiroaki; Iwao, Masatomo; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki; Hayashi, Hideki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitors of endosome acidification or cathepsin proteases attenuated infections mediated by envelope proteins of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and Ebola virus, as well as ecotropic, amphotropic, polytropic, and xenotropic murine leukemia viruses (MLVs), indicating that infections by these viruses occur through acidic endosomes and require cathepsin proteases in the susceptible cells such as TE671 cells. However, as previously shown, the endosome acidification inhibitors did not inhibit these viral infections in XC cells. It is generally accepted that the ecotropic MLV infection in XC cells occurs at the plasma membrane. Because cathepsin proteases are activated by low pH in acidic endosomes, the acidification inhibitors may inhibit the viral infections by suppressing cathepsin protease activation. The acidification inhibitors attenuated the activities of cathepsin proteases B and L in TE671 cells, but not in XC cells. Processing of cathepsin protease L was suppressed by the acidification inhibitor in NIH3T3 cells, but again not in XC cells. These results indicate that cathepsin proteases are activated without endosome acidification in XC cells. Treatment with an endocytosis inhibitor or knockdown of dynamin 2 expression by siRNAs suppressed MLV infections in all examined cells including XC cells. Furthermore, endosomal cathepsin proteases were required for these viral infections in XC cells as other susceptible cells. These results suggest that infections of XC cells by the MLVs and Ebola virus occur through endosomes and pH-independent cathepsin activation induces pH-independent infection in XC cells.

  17. Therapeutic effects of remediating autophagy failure in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease by enhancing lysosomal proteolysis.

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    Yang, Dun-Sheng; Stavrides, Philip; Mohan, Panaiyur S; Kaushik, Susmita; Kumar, Asok; Ohno, Masuo; Schmidt, Stephen D; Wesson, Daniel W; Bandyopadhyay, Urmi; Jiang, Ying; Pawlik, Monika; Peterhoff, Corrinne M; Yang, Austin J; Wilson, Donald A; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Westaway, David; Mathews, Paul M; Levy, Efrat; Cuervo, Ana M; Nixon, Ralph A

    2011-07-01

    The extensive autophagic-lysosomal pathology in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain has revealed a major defect: in the proteolytic clearance of autophagy substrates. Autophagy failure contributes on several levels to AD pathogenesis and has become an important therapeutic target for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. We recently observed broad therapeutic effects of stimulating autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in the TgCRND8 mouse model of AD that exhibits defective proteolytic clearance of autophagic substrates, robust intralysosomal amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation, extracellular β-amyloid deposition and cognitive deficits. By genetically deleting the lysosomal cysteine protease inhibitor, cystatin B (CstB), to selectively restore depressed cathepsin activities, we substantially cleared Aβ, ubiquitinated proteins and other autophagic substrates from autolysosomes/lysosomes and rescued autophagic-lysosomal pathology, as well as reduced total Aβ40/42 levels and extracellular amyloid deposition, highlighting the underappreciated importance of the lysosomal system for Aβ clearance. Most importantly, lysosomal remediation prevented the marked learning and memory deficits in TgCRND8 mice. Our findings underscore the pathogenic significance of autophagic-lysosomal dysfunction in AD and demonstrate the value of reversing this dysfunction as an innovative therapeautic strategy for AD.

  18. A molecular mechanism to regulate lysosome motility for lysosome positioning and tubulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinran; Rydzewski, Nicholas; Hider, Ahmad; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Junsheng; Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Cheng, Xiping; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-04-01

    To mediate the degradation of biomacromolecules, lysosomes must traffic towards cargo-carrying vesicles for subsequent membrane fusion or fission. Mutations of the lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 cause lysosomal storage disease (LSD) characterized by disordered lysosomal membrane trafficking in cells. Here we show that TRPML1 activity is required to promote Ca(2+)-dependent centripetal movement of lysosomes towards the perinuclear region (where autophagosomes accumulate) following autophagy induction. ALG-2, an EF-hand-containing protein, serves as a lysosomal Ca(2+) sensor that associates physically with the minus-end-directed dynactin-dynein motor, while PtdIns(3,5)P(2), a lysosome-localized phosphoinositide, acts upstream of TRPML1. Furthermore, the PtdIns(3,5)P(2)-TRPML1-ALG-2-dynein signalling is necessary for lysosome tubulation and reformation. In contrast, the TRPML1 pathway is not required for the perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes observed in many LSDs, which is instead likely to be caused by secondary cholesterol accumulation that constitutively activates Rab7-RILP-dependent retrograde transport. Ca(2+) release from lysosomes thus provides an on-demand mechanism regulating lysosome motility, positioning and tubulation.

  19. Up-regulation of lysosomal TRPML1 channels is essential for lysosomal adaptation to nutrient starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Yang, Meimei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Lu; Lawas, Maria; Li, Xinran; Bryant-Genevier, Marthe; Southall, Noel T; Marugan, Juan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2015-03-17

    Upon nutrient starvation, autophagy digests unwanted cellular components to generate catabolites that are required for housekeeping biosynthesis processes. A complete execution of autophagy demands an enhancement in lysosome function and biogenesis to match the increase in autophagosome formation. Here, we report that mucolipin-1 (also known as TRPML1 or ML1), a Ca(2+) channel in the lysosome that regulates many aspects of lysosomal trafficking, plays a central role in this quality-control process. By using Ca(2+) imaging and whole-lysosome patch clamping, lysosomal Ca(2+) release and ML1 currents were detected within hours of nutrient starvation and were potently up-regulated. In contrast, lysosomal Na(+)-selective currents were not up-regulated. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) or activation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) mimicked a starvation effect in fed cells. The starvation effect also included an increase in lysosomal proteostasis and enhanced clearance of lysosomal storage, including cholesterol accumulation in Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) cells. However, this effect was not observed when ML1 was pharmacologically inhibited or genetically deleted. Furthermore, overexpression of ML1 mimicked the starvation effect. Hence, lysosomal adaptation to environmental cues such as nutrient levels requires mTOR/TFEB-dependent, lysosome-to-nucleus regulation of lysosomal ML1 channels and Ca(2+) signaling.

  20. BK Channels Alleviate Lysosomal Storage Diseases by Providing Positive Feedback Regulation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qi; Zhong, Xi Zoë; Zou, Yuanjie; Zhang, Zhu; Toro, Ligia; Dong, Xian-Ping

    2015-05-26

    Promoting lysosomal trafficking represents a promising therapeutic approach for lysosome storage diseases. Efficient Ca(2+) mobilization from lysosomes is important for lysosomal trafficking. Ca(2+) release from lysosomes could generate a negative potential in the lumen to disturb subsequent Ca(2+) release in the absence of counter ion flux. Here we report that lysosomes express big-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels that form physical and functional coupling with the lysosomal Ca(2+) release channel, TRPML1. Ca(2+) release via TRPML1 causes BK activation, which in turn facilitates further lysosomal Ca(2+) release and membrane trafficking. Importantly, BK overexpression rescues the impaired TRPML1-mediated Ca(2+) release and abnormal lysosomal storage in cells from Niemann-Pick C1 patients. Therefore, we have identified a lysosomal K(+) channel that provides a positive feedback mechanism to facilitate TRPML1-mediated Ca(2+) release and membrane trafficking. Our findings suggest that upregulating BK may be a potential therapeutic strategy for certain lysosomal storage diseases and common neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Sensitivity to lysosome-dependent cell death is directly regulated by lysosomal cholesterol content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Appelqvist

    Full Text Available Alterations in lipid homeostasis are implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, although the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. We evaluated the impact of cholesterol accumulation, induced by U18666A, quinacrine or mutations in the cholesterol transporting Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1 protein, on lysosomal stability and sensitivity to lysosome-mediated cell death. We found that neurons with lysosomal cholesterol accumulation were protected from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. In addition, human fibroblasts with cholesterol-loaded lysosomes showed higher lysosomal membrane stability than controls. Previous studies have shown that cholesterol accumulation is accompanied by the storage of lipids such as sphingomyelin, glycosphingolipids and sphingosine and an up regulation of lysosomal associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2, which may also influence lysosomal stability. However, in this study the use of myriocin and LAMP deficient fibroblasts excluded these factors as responsible for the rescuing effect and instead suggested that primarily lysosomal cholesterol content determineD the cellular sensitivity to toxic insults. Further strengthening this concept, depletion of cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin or 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased the stability of lysosomes and cells became more prone to undergo apoptosis. In conclusion, cholesterol content regulated lysosomal membrane permeabilization and thereby influenced cell death sensitivity. Our data suggests that lysosomal cholesterol modulation might be used as a therapeutic strategy for conditions associated with accelerated or repressed apoptosis.

  2. Thrombin-induced lysosomal exocytosis in human platelets is dependent on secondary activation by ADP and regulated by endothelial-derived substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södergren, Anna L; Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B; Ramström, Sofia; Lindström, Eva G; Grenegård, Magnus; Öllinger, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Exocytosis of lysosomal contents from platelets has been speculated to participate in clearance of thrombi and vessel wall remodelling. The mechanisms that regulate lysosomal exocytosis in platelets are, however, still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the pathways underlying platelet lysosomal secretion and elucidate how this process is controlled by platelet inhibitors. We found that high concentrations of thrombin induced partial lysosomal exocytosis as assessed by analysis of the activity of released N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase (NAG) and by identifying the fraction of platelets exposing the lysosomal-associated membrane protein (LAMP)-1 on the cell surface by flow cytometry. Stimulation of thrombin receptors PAR1 or PAR4 with specific peptides was equally effective in inducing LAMP-1 surface expression. Notably, lysosomal exocytosis in response to thrombin was significantly reduced if the secondary activation by ADP was inhibited by the P2Y12 antagonist cangrelor, while inhibition of thromboxane A2 formation by treatment with acetylsalicylic acid was of minor importance in this regard. Moreover, the NO-releasing drug S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP) or the cyclic AMP-elevating eicosanoid prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) significantly suppressed lysosomal exocytosis. We conclude that platelet inhibitors that mimic functional endothelium such as PGI2 or NO efficiently counteract lysosomal exocytosis. Furthermore, we suggest that secondary release of ADP and concomitant signaling via PAR1/4- and P2Y12 receptors is important for efficient platelet lysosomal exocytosis by thrombin.

  3. Endosome-lysosomes and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, R J; Tipler, C; Laszlo, L; Arnold, J; Lowe, J; Landon, M

    1994-01-01

    A number of the major human and animal neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and sheep scrapie, are characterised by deposits of amyloid, arising through incomplete breakdown of membrane proteins. Although our knowledge concerning these diseases is increasing, they remain largely untreatable. Recently, attention has focussed on the mechanisms of production of different types of amyloid and the likely involvement within cells of acid compartments called endosome-lysosomes. These organelles may be 'bioreactor' sites for the unfolding and partial degradation of membrane proteins to generate the amyloid materials. These subsequently become expelled from the cell, or are released from dead cells, and accumulate as pathological entities. Common features of the disease processes give new direction to therapeutic intervention.

  4. Streptococcus oralis Induces Lysosomal Impairment of Macrophages via Bacterial Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Nakata, Masanobu; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus oralis, an oral commensal, belongs to the mitis group of streptococci and occasionally causes opportunistic infections, such as bacterial endocarditis and bacteremia. Recently, we found that the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by S. oralis is sufficient to kill human monocytes and epithelial cells, implying that streptococcal H2O2 is a cytotoxin. In the present study, we investigated whether streptococcal H2O2 impacts lysosomes, organelles of the intracellular digestive system, in relation to cell death. S. oralis infection induced the death of RAW 264 macrophages in an H2O2-dependent manner, which was exemplified by the fact that exogenous H2O2 also induced cell death. Infection with either a mutant lacking spxB, which encodes pyruvate oxidase responsible for H2O2 production, or Streptococcus mutans, which does not produce H2O2, showed less cytotoxicity. Visualization of lysosomes with LysoTracker revealed lysosome deacidification after infection with S. oralis or exposure to H2O2, which was corroborated by acridine orange staining. Similarly, fluorescent labeling of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 gradually disappeared during infection with S. oralis or exposure to H2O2 The deacidification and the following induction of cell death were inhibited by chelating iron in lysosomes. Moreover, fluorescent staining of cathepsin B indicated lysosomal destruction. However, treatment of infected cells with a specific inhibitor of cathepsin B had negligible effects on cell death; instead, it suppressed the detachment of dead cells from the culture plates. These results suggest that streptococcal H2O2 induces cell death with lysosomal destruction and then the released lysosomal cathepsins contribute to the detachment of the dead cells.

  5. Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates angiotensin II-induced lipid raft clustering in mesenteric endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei-Qing; Chen, Wen-Dong; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Jian-Jun; Wu, Yong-Jie; Gao, Ping-Jin

    2016-04-01

    It has been reported that intracellular Ca2+ is involved in lysosome fusion and membrane repair in skeletal cells. Given that angiotensin II (Ang II) elicits an increase in intracellular Ca2+ and that lysosome fusion is a crucial mediator of lipid raft (LR) clustering, we hypothesized that Ang II induces lysosome fusion and activates LR formation in rat mesenteric endothelial cells (MECs). We found that Ang II acutely increased intracellular Ca2+ content, an effect that was inhibited by the extracellular Ca2+ chelator ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca2+ release inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB). Further study showed that EGTA almost completely blocked Ang II-induced lysosome fusion, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to LR clusters, ASMase activation and NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase activation. In contrast, 2-APB had a slight inhibitory effect. Functionally, both the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and the ASMase inhibitor amitriptyline reversed Ang II-induced impairment of vasodilation. We conclude that Ca2+ -regulated lysosome fusion mediates the Ang II-induced regulation of the LR-redox signaling pathway and mesenteric endothelial dysfunction.

  6. Turning the gun on cancer: Utilizing lysosomal P-glycoprotein as a new strategy to overcome multi-drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebacher, Nicole; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R; Jansson, Patric J

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress plays a role in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells. Cancer cells must constantly and rapidly adapt to changes in the tumor microenvironment, due to alterations in the availability of nutrients, such as glucose, oxygen and key transition metals (e.g., iron and copper). This nutrient flux is typically a consequence of rapid growth, poor vascularization and necrosis. It has been demonstrated that stress factors, such as hypoxia and glucose deprivation up-regulate master transcription factors, namely hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which transcriptionally regulate the multi-drug resistance (MDR), transmembrane drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (Pgp). Interestingly, in addition to the established role of plasma membrane Pgp in MDR, a new paradigm of intracellular resistance has emerged that is premised on the ability of lysosomal Pgp to transport cytotoxic agents into this organelle. This mechanism is enabled by the topological inversion of Pgp via endocytosis resulting in the transporter actively pumping agents into the lysosome. In this way, classical Pgp substrates, such as doxorubicin (DOX), can be actively transported into this organelle. Within the lysosome, DOX becomes protonated upon acidification of the lysosomal lumen, causing its accumulation. This mechanism efficiently traps DOX, preventing its cytotoxic interaction with nuclear DNA. This review discusses these effects and highlights a novel mechanism by which redox-active and protonatable Pgp substrates can utilize lysosomal Pgp to gain access to this compartment, resulting in catastrophic lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cell death. Hence, a key MDR mechanism that utilizes Pgp (the "gun") to sequester protonatable drug substrates safely within lysosomes can be "turned on" MDR cancer cells to destroy them from within.

  7. Intracellular vesicle acidification promotes maturation of infectious poliovirus particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsia L Richards

    Full Text Available The autophagic pathway acts as part of the immune response against a variety of pathogens. However, several pathogens subvert autophagic signaling to promote their own replication. In many cases it has been demonstrated that these pathogens inhibit or delay the degradative aspect of autophagy. Here, using poliovirus as a model virus, we report for the first time bona fide autophagic degradation occurring during infection with a virus whose replication is promoted by autophagy. We found that this degradation is not required to promote poliovirus replication. However, vesicular acidification, which in the case of autophagy precedes delivery of cargo to lysosomes, is required for normal levels of virus production. We show that blocking autophagosome formation inhibits viral RNA synthesis and subsequent steps in the virus cycle, while inhibiting vesicle acidification only inhibits the final maturation cleavage of virus particles. We suggest that particle assembly, genome encapsidation, and virion maturation may occur in a cellular compartment, and we propose the acidic mature autophagosome as a candidate vesicle. We discuss the implications of our findings in understanding the late stages of poliovirus replication, including the formation and maturation of virions and egress of infectious virus from cells.

  8. Lysosomal enlargement and lysosomal membrane destabilisation in mussel digestive cells measured by an integrative index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izagirre, Urtzi [Cell Biology in Environmental Toxicology Research Group, Department of Zoology and Cell Biology, School of Sciences and Technology, University of the Basque Country, P.O. box 644, E-48080 Bilbo (Spain); Marigomez, Ionan, E-mail: ionan.marigomez@ehu.e [Cell Biology in Environmental Toxicology Research Group, Department of Zoology and Cell Biology, School of Sciences and Technology, University of the Basque Country, P.O. box 644, E-48080 Bilbo (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    Lysosomal responses (enlargement and membrane destabilisation) in mussel digestive cells are well-known environmental stress biomarkers in pollution effects monitoring in marine ecosystems. Presently, in laboratory and field studies, both responses were measured separately (in terms of lysosomal volume density - Vv - and labilisation period -LP) and combined (lysosomal response index - LRI) in order to contribute to their understanding and to develop an index useful for decisions makers. LRI integrates Vv and LP, which are not necessarily dependent lysosomal responses. It is unbiased and more sensitive than Vv and LP alone and diminishes background due to confounding factors. LRI provides a simple numerical index (consensus reference = 0; critical threshold = 1) directly related to the pollution impact degree. Moreover, LRI can be represented in a way that allows the interpretation of lysosomal responses, which is useful for environmental scientists. - Lysosomal responses to pollutants measured by an integrative index.

  9. Lysosomal exoglycosidases in nasal polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowska, Sylwia; Minarowska, Alina; Knaś, Małgorzata; Niemcunowicz-Janica, Anna; Kołodziejczyk, Paweł; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Kępka, Alina; Minarowski, Łukasz; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Nasal polyps are smooth outgrowths assuming a shape of grapes, formed from the nasal mucosa, limiting air flow by projecting into a lumen of a nasal cavity. Up to now the surgical resection is the best method of their treatment, but etiology and pathogenesis of the nasal polyps is not yet fully established. The aim of the study was the assessment of the selected lysosomal exoglycosidases activity in the nasal polyps. In this study the activity of β-galactosidase, α-mannosidase and α-fucosidase was determined in the tissue of the nasal polyps obtained from 40 patients (10F, 30M) and control tissues derived from mucosa of lower nasal conchas obtained during mucotomy from 20 patients (10F, 10M). We observed significant lower values of GAL, FUC and tendency to decrease of MAN and GLU concentration in nasal polyps (P) in comparison to control healthy nasal mucosa (C). In nasal polyp tissue (P) no differences of GAL, MAN and FUC specific activity in comparison to control mucosa (C) were found. Our research supports bioelectrical theory of the nasal polyps pathogenesis and directs attention at research on glycoconjugates and glycosidases of the nasal mucosa extracellular matrix. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  10. Lipid storage disorders block lysosomal trafficking by inhibiting a TRP channel and lysosomal calcium release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dongbiao; Wang, Xiang; Li, Xinran; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yao, Zepeng; Dibble, Shannon; Dong, Xian-ping; Yu, Ting; Lieberman, Andrew P; Showalter, Hollis D; Xu, Haoxing

    2012-03-13

    Lysosomal lipid accumulation, defects in membrane trafficking and altered Ca(2+) homoeostasis are common features in many lysosomal storage diseases. Mucolipin transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPML1) is the principle Ca(2+) channel in the lysosome. Here we show that TRPML1-mediated lysosomal Ca(2+) release, measured using a genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator (GCaMP3) attached directly to TRPML1 and elicited by a potent membrane-permeable synthetic agonist, is dramatically reduced in Niemann-Pick (NP) disease cells. Sphingomyelins (SMs) are plasma membrane lipids that undergo sphingomyelinase (SMase)-mediated hydrolysis in the lysosomes of normal cells, but accumulate distinctively in lysosomes of NP cells. Patch-clamp analyses revealed that TRPML1 channel activity is inhibited by SMs, but potentiated by SMases. In NP-type C cells, increasing TRPML1's expression or activity was sufficient to correct the trafficking defects and reduce lysosome storage and cholesterol accumulation. We propose that abnormal accumulation of luminal lipids causes secondary lysosome storage by blocking TRPML1- and Ca(2+)-dependent lysosomal trafficking.

  11. Abeta42-induced neurodegeneration via an age-dependent autophagic-lysosomal injury in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daijun Ling

    Full Text Available The mechanism of widespread neuronal death occurring in Alzheimer's disease (AD remains enigmatic even after extensive investigation during the last two decades. Amyloid beta 42 peptide (Abeta(1-42 is believed to play a causative role in the development of AD. Here we expressed human Abeta(1-42 and amyloid beta 40 (Abeta(1-40 in Drosophila neurons. Abeta(1-42 but not Abeta(1-40 causes an extensive accumulation of autophagic vesicles that become increasingly dysfunctional with age. Abeta(1-42-induced impairment of the degradative function, as well as the structural integrity, of post-lysosomal autophagic vesicles triggers a neurodegenerative cascade that can be enhanced by autophagy activation or partially rescued by autophagy inhibition. Compromise and leakage from post-lysosomal vesicles result in cytosolic acidification, additional damage to membranes and organelles, and erosive destruction of cytoplasm leading to eventual neuron death. Neuronal autophagy initially appears to play a pro-survival role that changes in an age-dependent way to a pro-death role in the context of Abeta(1-42 expression. Our in vivo observations provide a mechanistic understanding for the differential neurotoxicity of Abeta(1-42 and Abeta(1-40, and reveal an Abeta(1-42-induced death execution pathway mediated by an age-dependent autophagic-lysosomal injury.

  12. Acidification of the osteoclastic resorption compartment provides insight into the coupling of bone formation to bone resorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsdal, Morten A; Henriksen, Kim; Sørensen, Mette G

    2005-01-01

    investigated the effect of inhibition of osteoclastic acidification in vivo by using the rat ovariectomy model with twice daily oral dosing of NS3696 at 50 mg/kg for 6 weeks. We observed a 60% decrease in resorption (DPYR), increased tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase levels, and no effect on bone formation......Patients with defective osteoclastic acidification have increased numbers of osteoclasts, with decreased resorption, but bone formation that remains unchanged. We demonstrate that osteoclast survival is increased when acidification is impaired, and that impairment of acidification results...... in inhibition of bone resorption without inhibition of bone formation. We investigated the role of acidification in human osteoclastic resorption and life span in vitro using inhibitors of chloride channels (NS5818/NS3696), the proton pump (bafilomycin) and cathepsin K. We found that bafilomycin and NS5818 dose...

  13. Azadirachtin-induced apoptosis involves lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin L release in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Xingan; Meng, Qianqian; Wang, Peidan; Shu, Benshui; Hu, Qiongbo; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2015-07-01

    Azadirachtin as a kind of botanical insecticide has been widely used in pest control. We previously reported that azadirachtin could induce apoptosis of Spodoptera litura cultured cell line Sl-1, which involves in the up-regulation of P53 protein. However, the detailed mechanism of azadirachtin-induced apoptosis is not clearly understood in insect cultured cells. The aim of the present study was to address the involvement of lysosome and lysosomal protease in azadirachtin-induced apoptosis in Sf9 cells. The result confirmed that azadirachtin indeed inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis. The lysosomes were divided into different types as time-dependent manner, which suggested that changes of lysosomes were necessarily physiological processes in azadirachtin-induced apoptosis in Sf9 cells. Interestingly, we noticed that azadirachtin could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin L releasing to cytosol. Z-FF-FMK (a cathepsin L inhibitor), but not CA-074me (a cathepsin B inhibitor), could effectively hinder the apoptosis induced by azadirachtin in Sf9 cells. Meanwhile, the activity of caspase-3 could also be inactivated by the inhibition of cathepsin L enzymatic activity induced by Z-FF-FMK. Taken together, our findings suggest that azadirachtin could induce apoptosis in Sf9 cells in a lysosomal pathway, and cathepsin L plays a pro-apoptosis role in this process through releasing to cytosol and activating caspase-3.

  14. Interactions between autophagic and endo-lysosomal markers in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeste, Clara L; Seco, Esther; Patton, Wayne F; Boya, Patricia; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2013-05-01

    Autophagic and endo-lysosomal degradative pathways are essential for cell homeostasis. Availability of reliable tools to interrogate these pathways is critical to unveil their involvement in physiology and pathophysiology. Although several probes have been recently developed to monitor autophagic or lysosomal compartments, their specificity has not been validated through co-localization studies with well-known markers. Here, we evaluate the selectivity and interactions between one lysosomal (Lyso-ID) and one autophagosomal (Cyto-ID) probe under conditions modulating autophagy and/or endo-lysosomal function in live cells. The probe for acidic compartments Lyso-ID was fully localized inside vesicles positive for markers of late endosome-lysosomes, including Lamp1-GFP and GFP-CINCCKVL. Induction of autophagy by amino acid deprivation in bovine aortic endothelial cells caused an early and potent increase in the fluorescence of the proposed autophagy dye Cyto-ID. Cyto-ID-positive compartments extensively co-localized with the autophagosomal fluorescent reporter RFP-LC3, although the time and/or threshold for organelle detection was different for each probe. Interestingly, use of Cyto-ID in combination with Lysotracker Red or Lyso-ID allowed the observation of structures labeled with either one or both probes, the extent of co-localization increasing upon treatment with protease inhibitors. Inhibition of the endo-lysosomal pathway with chloroquine or U18666A resulted in the formation of large Cyto-ID and Lyso-ID-positive compartments. These results constitute the first assessment of the selectivity of Cyto-ID and Lyso-ID as probes for the autophagic and lysosomal pathways, respectively. Our observations show that these probes can be used in combination with protein-based markers for monitoring the interactions of both pathways in live cells.

  15. [Application of lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring: research progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, You-Zhu; Fang, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Lysosome is an important organelle existing in eukaryotic cells. With the development of the study on the structure and function of lysosome in recent years, lysosome is considered as a target of toxic substances on subcellular level, and has been widely applied abroad in marine pollution monitoring. This paper summarized the biological characteristics of lysosomal marker enzyme, lysosome-autophagy system, and lysosomal membrane, and introduced the principles and methods of applying lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring. Bivalve shellfish digestive gland and fish liver are the most sensitive organs for lysosomal detection. By adopting the lysosomal detection techniques such as lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) test, neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay, morphological measurement (MM) of lysosome, immunohistochemical (Ih) assay of lysosomal marker enzyme, and electron microscopy (EM), the status of marine pollution can be evaluated. It was suggested that the lysosome could be used as a biomarker for monitoring marine environmental pollution. The advantages and disadvantages of lysosomal detection and some problems worthy of attention were analyzed, and the application prospects of lysosomal detection were discussed.

  16. Lysosomal Storage Disorders and Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory M. Pastores

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs are infrequent to rare conditions caused by mutations that lead to a disruption in the usual sequential degradation of macromolecules or their transit within the cell. Gaucher disease (GD, a lipidosis, is among the most common LSD, with an estimated incidence of 1 in 40,000 among the Caucasian, non-Jewish population. Studies have indicated an increased frequency of polyclonal and monoclonal gammopathy among patients with GD. It has been shown that two major sphingolipids that accumulate in GD, namely, β-glucosylceramide 22:0 (βGL1-22 and glucosylsphingosine (LGL1, can be recognized by a distinct subset of CD1d-restricted human and murine type II natural killer T (NKT cells. Investigations undertaken in an affected mouse model revealed βGL1-22- and LGL1-specific NKT cells were present and constitutively promoted the expression of a T-follicular helper (TFH phenotype; injection of these lipids led to downstream induction of germinal center B cells, hypergammaglobulinemia, and the production of antilipid antibodies. Subsequent studies have found clonal immunoglobulin in 33% of sporadic human monoclonal gammopathies is also specific for the lysolipids LGL1 and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC. Furthermore, substrate reduction ameliorated GD-associated gammopathy in mice. It had been hypothesized that chronic antigenic stimulation by the abnormal lipid storage and associated immune dysregulation may be the underlying mechanism for the increased incidence of monoclonal and polyclonal gammopathies, as well as an increased incidence of multiple myeloma in patients with GD. Current observations support this proposition and illustrate the value of investigations into rare diseases, which as ‘experiments of nature’ may provide insights into conditions found in the general population that continue to remain incompletely understood.

  17. Hsp70 stabilizes lysosomes and reverts Niemann-Pick disease-associated lysosomal pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Thomas; Roth, Anke G; Petersen, Nikolaj H T

    2010-01-01

    inhibition of ASM, effectively revert the Hsp70-mediated stabilization of lysosomes. Notably, the reduced ASM activity in cells from patients with Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) A and B-severe lysosomal storage disorders caused by mutations in the sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 gene (SMPD1) encoding for ASM...

  18. Archazolid and apicularen: Novel specific V-ATPase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeck Axel

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background V-ATPases constitute a ubiquitous family of heteromultimeric, proton translocating proteins. According to their localization in a multitude of eukaryotic membranes, they energize many different transport processes. Since their malfunction is correlated with various diseases in humans, the elucidation of the properties of this enzyme for the development of selective inhibitors and drugs is one of the challenges in V-ATPase research. Results Archazolid A and B, two recently discovered cytotoxic macrolactones produced by the myxobacterium Archangium gephyra, and apicularen A and B, two novel benzolactone enamides produced by different species of the myxobacterium Chondromyces, exerted a similar inhibitory efficacy on a wide range of mammalian cell lines as the well established plecomacrolidic type V-ATPase inhibitors concanamycin and bafilomycin. Like the plecomacrolides both new macrolides also prevented the lysosomal acidification in cells and inhibited the V-ATPase purified from the midgut of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, with IC50 values of 20–60 nM. However, they did not influence the activity of mitochondrial F-ATPase or that of the Na+/K+-ATPase. To define the binding sites of these new inhibitors we used a semi-synthetic radioactively labelled derivative of concanamycin which exclusively binds to the membrane Vo subunit c. Whereas archazolid A prevented, like the plecomacrolides concanamycin A, bafilomycin A1 and B1, labelling of subunit c by the radioactive I-concanolide A, the benzolactone enamide apicularen A did not compete with the plecomacrolide derivative. Conclusion The myxobacterial antibiotics archazolid and apicularen are highly efficient and specific novel inhibitors of V-ATPases. While archazolid at least partly shares a common binding site with the plecomacrolides bafilomycin and concanamycin, apicularen adheres to an independent binding site.

  19. Some species tolerate ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-12-01

    Increasing carbon dioxide levels lead to rising ocean acidity, which can harm corals and many other species of ocean life. Acidification causes calcium carbonate, which corals usually need to build skeletons, to dissolve. “Every day, ocean acidification is taking up the weight of 6 million midsize cars' worth of carbon, said Nina Keul, a graduate student at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Germany during a 7 December press conference at the AGU Fall Meeting. Somewhat surprising, though, is that some species are more tolerant of acidic conditions than scientists had expected. For instance, Keul exposed a species of foraminifera, Ammonia tepida, to seawater with varying acidity and varying carbonate ion concentrations. Previous studies had found that foraminifera growth declined with decreasing carbonate levels, but Keul's foraminifera continued to grow in the acidic conditions. She said that the mechanism that allows this species to tolerate the low carbonate conditions is as yet unknown.

  20. ErbB2-associated changes in the lysosomal proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nylandsted, Jesper; Becker, Andrea C; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Late endosomes and lysosomes (hereafter referred to as lysosomes) play an essential role in the turnover of cellular macromolecules and organelles. Their biochemical characterization has so far depended on purification methods based on either density gradient centrifugations or magnetic...... purification of iron-loaded organelles. Owing to dramatic changes in lysosomal density and stability associated with lysosomal diseases and cancer, these methods are not optimal for the comparison of normal and pathological lysosomes. Here, we introduce an efficient method for the purification of intact...... lysosomes by magnetic immunoprecipitation with antibodies against the vacuolar-type H(+) -ATPase. Quantitative MS-based proteomics analysis of the obtained lysosomal membranes identified 60 proteins, most of which have previously been associated with the lysosomal compartment. Interestingly, the lysosomal...

  1. Actin-binding protein coronin 1A controls osteoclastic bone resorption by regulating lysosomal secretion of cathepsin K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmae, Saori; Noma, Naruto; Toyomoto, Masayasu; Shinohara, Masahiro; Takeiri, Masatoshi; Fuji, Hiroaki; Takemoto, Kenji; Iwaisako, Keiko; Fujita, Tomoko; Takeda, Norihiko; Kawatani, Makoto; Aoyama, Mineyoshi; Hagiwara, Masatoshi; Ishihama, Yasushi; Asagiri, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Osteoclasts degrade bone matrix proteins via the secretion of lysosomal enzymes. However, the precise mechanisms by which lysosomal components are transported and fused to the bone-apposed plasma membrane, termed ruffled border membrane, remain elusive. Here, we identified coronin 1A as a negative regulator of exocytotic release of cathepsin K, one of the most important bone-degrading enzymes in osteoclasts. The modulation of coronin 1A expression did not alter osteoclast differentiation and extracellular acidification, but strongly affected the secretion of cathepsin K and osteoclast bone-resorption activity, suggesting the coronin 1A-mediated regulation of lysosomal trafficking and protease exocytosis. Further analyses suggested that coronin 1A prevented the lipidation-mediated sorting of the autophagy-related protein LC3 to the ruffled border and attenuated lysosome–plasma membrane fusion. In this process, the interactions between coronin 1A and actin were crucial. Collectively, our findings indicate that coronin 1A is a pivotal component that regulates lysosomal fusion and the secretion pathway in osteoclast-lineage cells and may provide a novel therapeutic target for bone diseases. PMID:28300073

  2. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario de la Mata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs describe a heterogeneous group of rare inherited metabolic disorders that result from the absence or loss of function of lysosomal hydrolases or transporters, resulting in the progressive accumulation of undigested material in lysosomes. The accumulation of substances affects the function of lysosomes and other organelles, resulting in secondary alterations such as impairment of autophagy, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and apoptosis. LSDs frequently involve the central nervous system (CNS, where neuronal dysfunction or loss results in progressive neurodegeneration and premature death. Many LSDs exhibit signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, which include mitochondrial morphological changes, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, diminished ATP production and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, reduced autophagic flux may lead to the persistence of dysfunctional mitochondria. Gaucher disease (GD, the LSD with the highest prevalence, is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene that results in defective and insufficient activity of the enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase. Decreased catalytic activity and/or instability of GCase leads to accumulation of glucosylceramide (GlcCer and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph in the lysosomes of macrophage cells and visceral organs. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported to occur in numerous cellular and mouse models of GD. The aim of this manuscript is to review the current knowledge and implications of mitochondrial dysfunction in LSDs.

  3. Vinyl acetate induces intracellular acidification in mouse oral buccal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Tetsuji; Wagner, Mark; Melvin, James E; Bogdanffy, Matthew S

    2005-08-14

    Vinyl acetate exposure in drinking water has been associated with tumor formation in the upper gastrointestinal tract of rats and mice. One potential mechanism for inducing carcinogenesis involves acidification of the intracellular environment due to the metabolism of vinyl acetate to acetic acid. Prolonged intracellular acidification is thought to produce cytotoxic and/or mitogenic responses that are the sentinel pharmacodynamic steps toward cancer. To determine whether exposure to vinyl acetate affects the intracellular pH of intact oral cavity tissue, isolated mouse oral buccal epithelium was loaded with the pH-sensitive dye BCECF, and then exposed to vinyl acetate concentrations ranging from 10 to 1000 microM for up to 4 min. Extracellular vinyl acetate exposure induced a progressive intracellular acidification that was reversible upon removal of the vinyl acetate. The rate of the acidification was concentration-dependent and increased exponentially within the concentration range tested. The magnitude of the vinyl acetate-induced acidification was inhibited by pretreatment with the carboxylesterase inhibitor bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that vinyl acetate contributes to the generation and progression of oral cavity tumors via a process of intracellular acidification. Such a process has been proposed to have practical dose-response thresholds below which the intracellular environment can be maintained within homeostatic bounds and the contribution of exposure to carcinogenic risk is negligible.

  4. Exposure of Mediterranean Countries to Ocean Acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Hilmi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the potential effects of ocean acidification on countries and fisheries of the Mediterranean Sea. The implications for seafood security and supply are evaluated by examining the sensitivity of the Mediterranean to ocean acidification at chemical, biological, and macro-economic levels. The limited information available on impacts of ocean acidification on harvested (industrial, recreational, and artisanal fishing and cultured species (aquaculture prevents any biological impact assessment. However, it appears that non-developed nations around the Mediterranean, particularly those for which fisheries are increasing, yet rely heavily on artisanal fleets, are most greatly exposed to socioeconomic consequences from ocean acidification.

  5. Lysosomal Ca(2+) homeostasis: role in pathogenesis of lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Platt, Frances M

    2011-08-01

    Disrupted cellular Ca(2+) signaling is believed to play a role in a number of human diseases including lysosomal storage diseases (LSD). LSDs are a group of ∼50 diseases caused predominantly by mutations in lysosomal proteins that result in accumulation of macromolecules within the lysosome. We recently reported that Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) is the first human disease to be associated with defective lysosomal Ca(2+) uptake and defective NAADP-mediated lysosomal Ca(2+) release. These defects in NPC cells leads to the disruption in endocytosis and subsequent lipid storage that is a feature of this disease. In contrast, Chediak-Higashi Syndrome cells have been reported to have enhanced lysosomal Ca(2+) uptake whilst the TRPML1 protein defective in mucolipidosis type IV is believed to function as a Ca(2+) channel. In this review we provide a summary of the current knowledge on the role of lysosomal Ca(2+) signaling in the pathogenesis of this group of diseases.

  6. Endo-lysosomal dysfunction in human proximal tubular epithelial cells deficient for lysosomal cystine transporter cystinosin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A Ivanova

    Full Text Available Nephropathic cystinosis is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the CTNS gene encoding cystine transporter cystinosin that results in accumulation of amino acid cystine in the lysosomes throughout the body and especially affects kidneys. Early manifestations of the disease include renal Fanconi syndrome, a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction. Current therapy of cystinosis is based on cystine-lowering drug cysteamine that postpones the disease progression but offers no cure for the Fanconi syndrome. We studied the mechanisms of impaired reabsorption in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC deficient for cystinosin and investigated the endo-lysosomal compartments of cystinosin-deficient PTEC by means of light and electron microscopy. We demonstrate that cystinosin-deficient cells had abnormal shape and distribution of the endo-lysosomal compartments and impaired endocytosis, with decreased surface expression of multiligand receptors and delayed lysosomal cargo processing. Treatment with cysteamine improved surface expression and lysosomal cargo processing but did not lead to a complete restoration and had no effect on the abnormal morphology of endo-lysosomal compartments. The obtained results improve our understanding of the mechanism of proximal tubular dysfunction in cystinosis and indicate that impaired protein reabsorption can, at least partially, be explained by abnormal trafficking of endosomal vesicles.

  7. Decoupling Internalization, Acidification and Phagosmal-Endosomal/Iysosomal Phagocytosis of Internalin A coated Beads in epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchette, C D; Woo, Y; Thomas, C; Shen, N; Sulchek, T A; Hiddessen, A L

    2008-12-22

    Phagocytosis has been extensively examined in 'professional' phagocytic cells using pH sensitive dyes. However, in many of the previous studies, a separation between the end of internalization, beginning of acidification and completion of phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion was not clearly established, and in several cases, it was treated as a one-step process. In addition, very little work has been done to systematically examine phagosomal maturation in 'non-professional' phagocytic cells, such as epithelial cells. Therefore, in this study, we developed a simple and novel method to decouple and accurately measure particle internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and Caco-2 epithelial cells. Our method was developed using a pathogen mimetic system consisting of polystyrene beads coated with Internalin A (InlA), a membrane surface protein from Listeria monocytogenes known to trigger receptor-mediated internalization. We achieved independent measurements of the rates of internalization, phagosomal acidification and phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion in epithelial cells by combining the InlA-coated beads (InlA-beads) with antibody quenching, pH sensitive dyes and endosomal/lysosomal dyes, as follows: the rate of InlA bead internalization was measured via antibody quenching of a pH independent dye (Alexa488) conjugated to InlA-beads, the rate at which phagosomes containing internalized InlA beads became acidified was measured using a pH dependent dye (FITC) conjugated to the beads and the rate of phagosomal-endosomal/lysosomal fusion was measured using a combination of unlabeled InlA-beads and an endosomal/lysosomal dye. By performing these independent measurements under identical experimental conditions, we were able to decouple the three processes and establish time scales for each. In a separate set of experiments, we also exploited the phagosomal acidification

  8. Alkaloids from the poisonous plant Ipomoea carnea: effects on intracellular lysosomal glycosidase activities in human lymphoblast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Kyoko; Kato, Atsushi; Adachi, Isao; Haraguchi, Mitsue; Asano, Naoki

    2003-12-17

    There is natural intoxication of livestock by the ingestion of Ipomoea carnea (Convolvulaceae) in Brazil and other parts of the world. The alkaloidal glycosidase inhibitors swainsonine, 2-epi-lentiginosine, and calystegines B(1), B(2), B(3), and C(1) have been identified as constituents of this plant. Swainsonine is a potent inhibitor of rat lysosomal alpha-mannosidase, with an IC(50) value of 0.02 microM, whereas calystegines B(1), B(2), and C(1) are potent inhibitors of rat lysosomal beta-glucosidase, with IC(50) values of 2.1, 0.75, and 0.84 microM, respectively. The action of swainsonine results in a lysosomal storage disorder that closely mimics alpha-mannosidosis in humans. To determine whether the toxicity of I. carnea to livestock is due to purely swainsonine or due to a combination of effects by swainsonine and calystegines, intracellular lysosomal glycosidase activities in normal human lymphoblasts grown with inhibitors in the medium were examined. Incubation of lymphoblasts with 0.1 microM swainsonine for 3 days resulted in approximately 60% reduction of alpha-mannosidase activity. On the other hand, calystegines B(2) and C(1) showed no inhibition of beta-glucosidase up to 1 mM; instead inclusion of calystegines B(2) and C(1) at 100 microM in the culture medium increased its activity by 1.5- and 1.6-fold, respectively. Calystegines B(2) and C(1) seem to act as chemical chaperones, enhancing correct folding of the enzyme and enabling smooth trafficking to the lysosome. The lysosomal beta-glucosidase inhibitory calystegines seem to have little risk of inducing intoxication of livestock.

  9. Hepatic steatosis inhibits autophagic proteolysis via impairment of autophagosomal acidification and cathepsin expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inami, Yoshihiro [Department of Gastroenterology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Yamashina, Shunhei, E-mail: syamashi@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Izumi, Kousuke [Department of Gastroenterology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Ueno, Takashi [Department of Biochemistry, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Tanida, Isei [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Laboratory of Biomembranes, National Institute of Infectious Disease, Toyama 1-23-1, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8640 (Japan); Ikejima, Kenichi; Watanabe, Sumio [Department of Gastroenterology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Hongo 2-1-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Acidification of autophagosome was blunted in steatotic hepatocytes. {yields} Hepatic steatosis did not disturb fusion of isolated autophagosome and lysosome. {yields} Proteinase activity of cathepsin B and L in autolysosomes was inhibited by steatosis. {yields} Hepatic expression of cathepsin B and L was suppressed by steatosis. -- Abstract: Autophagy, one of protein degradation system, contributes to maintain cellular homeostasis and cell defense. Recently, some evidences indicated that autophagy and lipid metabolism are interrelated. Here, we demonstrate that hepatic steatosis impairs autophagic proteolysis. Though accumulation of autophagosome is observed in hepatocytes from ob/ob mice, expression of p62 was augmented in liver from ob/ob mice more than control mice. Moreover, degradation of the long-lived protein leucine was significantly suppressed in hepatocytes isolated from ob/ob mice. More than 80% of autophagosomes were stained by LysoTracker Red (LTR) in hepatocytes from control mice; however, rate of LTR-stained autophagosomes in hepatocytes were suppressed in ob/ob mice. On the other hand, clearance of autolysosomes loaded with LTR was blunted in hepatocytes from ob/ob mice. Although fusion of isolated autophagosome and lysosome was not disturbed, proteinase activity of cathepsin B and L in autolysosomes and cathepsin B and L expression of liver were suppressed in ob/ob mice. These results indicate that lipid accumulation blunts autophagic proteolysis via impairment of autophagosomal acidification and cathepsin expression.

  10. Revealing the fate of cell surface human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1): The lysosomal degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Kapoor, Khyati; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Patel, Atish; Swaim, William; Ambudkar, Indu S; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2015-10-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transports a variety of chemically dissimilar amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Although mechanisms of P-gp drug transport are widely studied, the pathways involving its internalization are poorly understood. The present study is aimed at elucidating the pathways involved in degradation of cell surface P-gp. The fate of P-gp at the cell surface was determined by biotinylating cell surface proteins followed by flow cytometry and Western blotting. Our data shows that the half-life of endogenously expressed P-gp is 26.7±1.1 h in human colorectal cancer HCT-15 cells. Treatment of cells with Bafilomycin A1 (BafA1) a vacuolar H+ ATPase inhibitor increased the half-life of P-gp at the cell surface to 36.1±0.5 h. Interestingly, treatment with the proteasomal inhibitors MG132, MG115 or lactacystin alone did not alter the half-life of the protein. When cells were treated with both lysosomal and proteasomal inhibitors (BafA1 and MG132), the half-life was further prolonged to 39-50 h. Functional assays done with rhodamine 123 or calcein-AM, fluorescent substrates of P-gp, indicated that the transport function of P-gp was not affected by either biotinylation or treatment with BafA1 or proteasomal inhibitors. Immunofluorescence studies done with the antibody against lysosomal marker LAMP1 and the P-gp-specific antibody UIC2 in permeabilized cells indicated that intracellular P-gp is primarily localized in the lysosomal compartment. Our results suggest that the lysosomal degradation system could be targeted to increase the sensitivity of P-gp- expressing cancer cells towards chemotherapeutic drugs.

  11. Revealing the fate of cell surface human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1): The Lysosomal Degradation Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Kapoor, Khyati; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Patel, Atish; Swaim, William; Ambudkar, Indu S.; Ambudkar, Suresh V.

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transports a variety of chemically dissimilar amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Although mechanisms of P-gp drug transport are widely studied, the pathways involving its internalization are poorly understood. The present study is aimed at elucidating the pathways involved in degradation of cell surface P-gp. The fate of P-gp at the cell surface was determined by biotinylating cell surface proteins followed by flow cytometry and Western blotting. Our data shows that the half-life of endogenously expressed P-gp is 26.7 ± 1.1 h in human colorectal cancer HCT-15 cells. Treatment of cells with Bafilomycin A1 (BafA1) a vacuolar H+ ATPase inhibitor increased the half-life of P-gp at the cell surface to 36.1± 0.5 h. Interestingly, treatment with the proteasomal inhibitors MG132, MG115 or lactacystin alone did not alter the half-life of the protein. When cells were treated with both lysosomal and proteasomal inhibitors (BafA1 and MG132), the half-life was further prolonged to 39-50 h. Functional assays done with rhodamine 123 or calcein-AM, fluorescent substrates of P-gp, indicated that the transport function of P-gp was not affected by either biotinylation or treatment with BafA1 or proteasomal inhibitors. Immunofluorescence studies done with the antibody against lysosomal marker LAMP1 and the P-gp-specific antibody UIC2 in permeabilized cells indicated that intracellular P-gp is primarily localized in the lysosomal compartment. Our results suggest that the lysosomal degradation system could be targeted to increase the sensitivity of P-gp expressing cancer cells towards chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26057472

  12. Lysosomal stress: a new player in perturbed lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriel, T.L.

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes are involved in many different essential cellular processes, among others organelle and molecule degradation, exocytosis, cell energy metabolism, cholesterol and sphingolipid level regulation. Lysosomal stress has a strong impact on the immune system, affecting specially macrophages as the

  13. Lysosomal stress: a new player in perturbed lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabriel, T.L.

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes are involved in many different essential cellular processes, among others organelle and molecule degradation, exocytosis, cell energy metabolism, cholesterol and sphingolipid level regulation. Lysosomal stress has a strong impact on the immune system, affecting specially macrophages as the

  14. Mucolipidosis type IV protein TRPML1-dependent lysosome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Austin; Schafer, Jessica; Upchurch, Cameron; Spooner, Ellen; Huynh, Julie; Hernandez, Sebastian; McLaughlin, Brooke; Oden, Liam; Fares, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomes are dynamic organelles that undergo cycles of fusion and fission with themselves and with other organelles. Following fusion with late endosomes to form hybrid organelles, lysosomes are reformed as discrete organelles. This lysosome reformation or formation is a poorly understood process that has not been systematically analyzed and that lacks known regulators. In this study, we quantitatively define the multiple steps of lysosome formation and identify the first regulator of this process.

  15. Effects of ethanol, acetaldehyde and cholesteryl esters on pancreatic lysosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, J S; Apte, M V; Thomas, M. C.; Haber, P S; Pirola, R C

    1992-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that altered lysosomal function may be involved in the early stages of pancreatic injury. Chronic consumption of ethanol increases rat pancreatic lysosomal fragility. The aim of this study is to determine whether the lysosomal fragility observed after chronic ethanol consumption is mediated by ethanol per se, its oxidative metabolite acetaldehyde or cholesteryl esters (substances which accumulate in the pancreas after ethanol consumption). Pancreatic lysosomes from cho...

  16. Lysosomal storage disease 2 - Pompe's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, Ans T.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.

    2008-01-01

    Pompe's disease, glycogen-storage disease type II, and acid maltase deficiency are alternative names for the same metabolic disorder. It is a pan-ethnic autosomal recessive trait characterised by acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency leading to lysosomal glycogen storage. Pompe's disease is also

  17. Transport of Lysosome-Related Organelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordens, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Many intracellular compartments, including (MHC class II-containing) lysosomes, melanosomes and phagosomes, move along microtubules in a bi-directional manner due to the alternating activities of the plus-end directed kinesin motor and the minus-end directed dynein-dynactin motor. However, it is lar

  18. Transport of Lysosome-Related Organelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jordens, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Many intracellular compartments, including (MHC class II-containing) lysosomes, melanosomes and phagosomes, move along microtubules in a bi-directional manner due to the alternating activities of the plus-end directed kinesin motor and the minus-end directed dynein-dynactin motor. However, it is

  19. Lysosomal proteolysis: effects of aging and insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromakova, I A; Konovalenko, O A

    2003-07-01

    Age-related characteristics of the effect of insulin on the activity of lysosomal proteolytic enzymes were studied. The relationship between the insulin effect on protein degradation and insulin degradation was analyzed. The effect of insulin on the activities of lysosomal enzymes was opposite in young and old rats (inhibitory in 3-month-old and stimulatory in 24-month-old animals). The activities of proteolytic enzymes were regulated by insulin in a glucose-independent manner: similar hypoglycemic effects of insulin in animals of different ages were accompanied by opposite changes in the activities of lysosomal enzymes. The inhibition of lysosomal enzymes by insulin in 3-month-old rats is consistent with a notion on the inhibitory effect of insulin on protein degradation. An opposite insulin effect in 24-month-old rats (i.e., stimulation of proteolytic activity by insulin) may be partly associated with attenuation of the degradation of insulin, resulting in disturbances in signaling that mediates the regulatory effects of insulin on protein degradation.

  20. Renal acidification defects in medullary sponge kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Hansen, A B; Røhl, H F

    1988-01-01

    patients had some form of renal acidification defect; 8 had the distal type of renal tubular acidosis, 2 the complete and 6 the incomplete form. One patient had proximal renal tubular acidosis. These findings, which suggest that renal acidification defects play an important role in the pathogenesis...

  1. A non-conserved miRNA regulates lysosomal function and impacts on a human lysosomal storage disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankel, Lisa B; Di Malta, Chiara; Wen, Jiayu

    2014-01-01

    Sulfatases are key enzymatic regulators of sulfate homeostasis with several biological functions including degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and other macromolecules in lysosomes. In a severe lysosomal storage disorder, multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), global sulfatase activity...

  2. Reactivation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Efflux Rescues Abnormal Lysosomal Storage in FIG4-Deficient Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jianlong; Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Yan, Qing; Hamilton, Audra; Zeng, Yuan-Shan; Vanoye, Carlos G; Li, Jun

    2015-04-29

    Loss of function of FIG4 leads to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 4J, Yunis-Varon syndrome, or an epilepsy syndrome. FIG4 is a phosphatase with its catalytic specificity toward 5'-phosphate of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-diphosphate (PI3,5P2). However, the loss of FIG4 decreases PI3,5P2 levels likely due to FIG4's dominant effect in scaffolding a PI3,5P2 synthetic protein complex. At the cellular level, all these diseases share similar pathology with abnormal lysosomal storage and neuronal degeneration. Mice with no FIG4 expression (Fig4(-/-)) recapitulate the pathology in humans with FIG4 deficiency. Using a flow cytometry technique that rapidly quantifies lysosome sizes, we detected an impaired lysosomal fission, but normal fusion, in Fig4(-/-) cells. The fission defect was associated with a robust increase of intralysosomal Ca(2+) in Fig4(-/-) cells, including FIG4-deficient neurons. This finding was consistent with a suppressed Ca(2+) efflux of lysosomes because the endogenous ligand of lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 is PI3,5P2 that is deficient in Fig4(-/-) cells. We reactivated the TRPML1 channels by application of TRPML1 synthetic ligand, ML-SA1. This treatment reduced the intralysosomal Ca(2+) level and rescued abnormal lysosomal storage in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and ex vivo DRGs. Furthermore, we found that the suppressed Ca(2+) efflux in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and Fig4(-/-) mouse brains profoundly downregulated the expression/activity of dynamin-1, a GTPase known to scissor organelle membranes during fission. This downregulation made dynamin-1 unavailable for lysosomal fission. Together, our study revealed a novel mechanism explaining abnormal lysosomal storage in FIG4 deficiency. Synthetic ligands of the TRPML1 may become a potential therapy against diseases with FIG4 deficiency.

  3. Neuroinflammatory paradigms in lysosomal storage diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Elizabeth Bosch

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs include approximately 70 distinct disorders that collectively account for 14% of all inherited metabolic diseases. LSDs are caused by mutations in various enzymes/proteins that disrupt lysosomal function, which impairs macromolecule degradation following endosome-lysosome and phagosome-lysosome fusion and autophagy, ultimately disrupting cellular homeostasis. LSDs are pathologically typified by lysosomal inclusions composed of a heterogeneous mixture of various proteins and lipids that can be found throughout the body. However, in many cases the CNS is dramatically affected, which may result from heightened neuronal vulnerability based on their post-mitotic state. Besides intrinsic neuronal defects, another emerging factor common to many LSDs is neuroinflammation, which may negatively impact neuronal survival and contribute to neurodegeneration. Microglial and astrocyte activation is a hallmark of many LSDs that affect the CNS, which often precedes and predicts regions where eventual neuron loss will occur. However, the timing, intensity, and duration of neuroinflammation may ultimately dictate the impact on CNS homeostasis. For example, a transient inflammatory response following CNS insult/injury can be neuroprotective, as glial cells attempt to remove the insult and provide trophic support to neurons. However, chronic inflammation, as seen in several LSDs, can promote neurodegeneration by creating a neurotoxic environment due to elevated levels of cytokines, chemokines, and pro-apoptotic molecules. Although neuroinflammation has been reported in several LSDs, the cellular basis and mechanisms responsible for eliciting neuroinflammatory pathways are just beginning to be defined. This review highlights the role of neuroinflammation in select LSDs and its potential contribution to neuron loss.

  4. Ammonia abatement by slurry acidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O.; Hutchings, Nicholas John; Hafner, Sasha

    2016-01-01

    Livestock production systems can be major sources of trace gases including ammonia (NH3), the greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), and odorous compounds such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Short-term campaigns have indicated that acidification of livestock slurry during in......-house storage can reduce NH3 emissions, and also may influence other emissions. In this study, emissions of NH3 were quantified by measuring continuously during three complete finishing pig production periods of about 10 weeks each, and emissions of CH4 and H2S less frequently. Emissions were determined from...... sections with 30-32 pigs with or without daily adjustment of slurry pH to below 6. Ammonia losses from reference sections with untreated slurry were between 9.5 and 12.4% of N excreted, and from sections with acidified slurry between 3.1 and 6.2%. Acidification reduced total emissions of NH3 by 66 and 71...

  5. Cytosolic acidification as a signal mediating hyperosmotic stress responses in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Gérard

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dictyostelium cells exhibit an unusual response to hyperosmolarity that is distinct from the response in other organisms investigated: instead of accumulating compatible osmolytes as it has been described for a wide range of organisms, Dictyostelium cells rearrange their cytoskeleton and thereby build up a rigid network which is believed to constitute the major osmoprotective mechanism in this organism. To gain more insight into the osmoregulation of this amoeba, we investigated physiological processes affected under hyperosmotic conditions in Dictyostelium. Results We determined pH changes in response to hyperosmotic stress using FACS or 31P-NMR. Hyperosmolarity was found to acidify the cytosol from pH 7.5 to 6.8 within 5 minutes, whereas the pH of the endo-lysosomal compartment remained constant. Fluid-phase endocytosis was identified as a possible target of cytosolic acidification, as the inhibition of endocytosis observed under hypertonic conditions can be fully attributed to cytosolic acidification. In addition, a deceleration of vesicle mobility and a decrease in the NTP pool was observed. Conclusion Together, these results indicate that hyperosmotic stress triggers pleiotropic effects, which are partially mediated by a pH signal and which all contribute to the downregulation of cellular activity. The comparison of our results with the effect of hyperosmolarity and intracellular acidification on receptor-mediated endocytosis in mammalian cells reveals striking similarities, suggesting the hypothesis of the same mechanism of inhibition by low internal pH.

  6. Ocean acidification impairs crab foraging behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Luke F; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Piehler, Michael F; Westfield, Isaac; Ries, Justin B

    2015-07-07

    Anthropogenic elevation of atmospheric CO2 is driving global-scale ocean acidification, which consequently influences calcification rates of many marine invertebrates and potentially alters their susceptibility to predation. Ocean acidification may also impair an organism's ability to process environmental and biological cues. These counteracting impacts make it challenging to predict how acidification will alter species interactions and community structure. To examine effects of acidification on consumptive and behavioural interactions between mud crabs (Panopeus herbstii) and oysters (Crassostrea virginica), oysters were reared with and without caged crabs for 71 days at three pCO2 levels. During subsequent predation trials, acidification reduced prey consumption, handling time and duration of unsuccessful predation attempt. These negative effects of ocean acidification on crab foraging behaviour more than offset any benefit to crabs resulting from a reduction in the net rate of oyster calcification. These findings reveal that efforts to evaluate how acidification will alter marine food webs should include quantifying impacts on both calcification rates and animal behaviour. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases in human gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgat, P; Walczuk, U; Szajda, S; Bień, M; Zimnoch, L; Mariak, Z; Zwierz, K

    2006-12-01

    There is a lot of data suggesting that modifications of cell glycoconjugates may be important in progression of cancer. In the present work we studied activities of lysosomal exoglycosidases: beta-hexosaminidase and its isoenzymes A and B, beta-galactosidase and alpha-mannosidase, in human gliomas. Enzyme activity was determined spectrophotometrically based on the release of p-nitrophenol from p-nitrophenyl-derivative of appropriate sugars. The activities of the exoglycosidases tested were significantly higher in malignant glial tumors than in control tissue (normal brain tissue) and non-glial tumors. The highest activities of exoglycosidases were observed in high-grade gliomas, and a positive correlation of enzyme activities and degree of malignancy was noted. Our results suggest that lysosomal exoglycosidases may participate in the progression and dynamical development of glial tumors.

  8. Disintegration of lysosomes mediated by GTPgammaS-treated cytosol: possible involvement of phospholipases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Y; Matsuda, T; Arai, K; Ohkuma, S

    1998-04-01

    We showed previously that cytosol treated with guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP-gammaS) disintegrated lysosomes in vitro [Sai, Y. et al. (1994) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 198, 869-877] in time-, temperature-, and dose-dependent manners. This also requires ATP, however, the latter can be substituted with deoxy-ATP, ADP, or ATPgammaS, suggesting no requirement of ATP hydrolysis. The lysis was inhibited by several chemical modifiers, including N-ethylmaleimide, 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole, and 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, and by various phospholipase inhibitors (trifluoperazine, p-bromophenacyl bromide, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, W-7, primaquine, compound 48/80, neomycin, and gentamicin), but not by ONO-RS-082, an inhibitor of phospholipase A2. The reaction was also inhibited by phospholipids (phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid, and phosphatidylcholine) and diacylglycerol. Among the phospholipase A2 hydrolysis products of phospholipids, unsaturated fatty acids (oleate, linoleate, and arachidonate) and lysophospholipid (lysophosphatidylcholine) by themselves broke lysosomes down directly, whereas saturated fatty acids (palmitate and stearate) had little effect. We found that GTPgammaS-stimulated cytosolic phospholipase A2 activity was highly sensitive to ONO-RS-082. These results suggest the participation of phospholipase(s), though not cytosolic phospholipase A2, in the GTPgammaS-dependent lysis of lysosomes.

  9. Endothelial Nlrp3 inflammasome activation associated with lysosomal destabilization during coronary arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Li, Xiang; Boini, Krishna M; Pitzer, Ashley L; Gulbins, Erich; Zhang, Yang; Li, Pin-Lan

    2015-02-01

    Inflammasomes play a critical role in the development of vascular diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms activating the inflammasome in endothelial cells and the relevance of this inflammasome activation is far from clear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which an Nlrp3 inflammasome is activated to result in endothelial dysfunction during coronary arteritis by Lactobacillus casei (L. casei) cell wall fragments (LCWE) in a mouse model for Kawasaki disease. Endothelial dysfunction associated with increased vascular cell adhesion protein 1 (VCAM-1) expression and endothelial-leukocyte adhesion was observed during coronary arteritis in mice treated with LCWE. Accompanied with these changes, the inflammasome activation was also shown in coronary arterial endothelium, which was characterized by a marked increase in caspase-1 activity and IL-1β production. In cultured endothelial cells, LCWE induced Nlrp3 inflammasome formation, caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production, which were blocked by Nlrp3 gene silencing or lysosome membrane stabilizing agents such as colchicine, dexamethasone, and ceramide. However, a potassium channel blocker glibenclamide or an oxygen free radical scavenger N-acetyl-l-cysteine had no effects on LCWE-induced inflammasome activation. LCWE also increased endothelial cell lysosomal membrane permeability and triggered lysosomal cathepsin B release into cytosol. Silencing cathepsin B blocked LCWE-induced Nlrp3 inflammasome formation and activation in endothelial cells. In vivo, treatment of mice with cathepsin B inhibitor also abolished LCWE-induced inflammasome activation in coronary arterial endothelium. It is concluded that LCWE enhanced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and consequent release of lysosomal cathepsin B, resulting in activation of the endothelial Nlrp3 inflammasome, which may contribute to the development of coronary arteritis.

  10. Regulation of lysosomal ion homeostasis by channels and transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomes are the major organelles that carry out degradation functions. They integrate and digest materials compartmentalized by endocytosis, phagocytosis or autophagy. In addition to more than 60 hydrolases residing in the lysosomes, there are also ion channels and transporters that mediate the flux or transport of H(+), Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) across the lysosomal membranes. Defects in ionic exchange can lead to abnormal lysosome morphology, defective vesicle trafficking, impaired autophagy, and diseases such as neurodegeneration and lysosomal storage disorders. The latter are characterized by incomplete lysosomal digestion and accumulation of toxic materials inside enlarged intracellular vacuoles. In addition to degradation, recent studies have revealed the roles of lysosomes in metabolic pathways through kinases such as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transcriptional regulation through calcium signaling molecules such as transcription factor EB (TFEB) and calcineurin. Owing to the development of new approaches including genetically encoded fluorescence probes and whole endolysosomal patch clamp recording techniques, studies on lysosomal ion channels have made remarkable progress in recent years. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge of lysosome-resident ion channels and transporters, discuss their roles in maintaining lysosomal function, and evaluate how their dysfunction can result in disease.

  11. Biphasic regulation of lysosomal exocytosis by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Sreeram; Peña, Karina A; Chu, Charleen T; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2016-11-01

    Oxidative stress drives cell death in a number of diseases including ischemic stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of how cells recover from oxidative stress is likely to lead to better treatments for stroke and other diseases. The recent evidence obtained in several models ties the process of lysosomal exocytosis to the clearance of protein aggregates and toxic metals. The mechanisms that regulate lysosomal exocytosis, under normal or pathological conditions, are only beginning to emerge. Here we provide evidence for the biphasic effect of oxidative stress on lysosomal exocytosis. Lysosomal exocytosis was measured using the extracellular levels of the lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase (ß-hex). Low levels or oxidative stress stimulated lysosomal exocytosis, but inhibited it at high levels. Deletion of the lysosomal ion channel TRPML1 eliminated the stimulatory effect of low levels of oxidative stress. The inhibitory effects of oxidative stress appear to target the component of lysosomal exocytosis that is driven by extracellular Ca(2+). We propose that while moderate oxidative stress promotes cellular repair by stimulating lysosomal exocytosis, at high levels oxidative stress has a dual pathological effect: it directly causes cell damage and impairs damage repair by inhibiting lysosomal exocytosis. Harnessing these adaptive mechanisms may point to pharmacological interventions for diseases involving oxidative proteotoxicity or metal toxicity.

  12. The geological record of ocean acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hönisch, B.; Ridgwell, A.; Schmidt, D.N.; Thomas, E.; Gibbs, S.J.; Sluijs, A.; Zeebe, R.; Kump, L.; Martindale, R.C.; Greene, S.E.; Kiessling, W.; Ries, J.; Zachos, J.C.; Royer, D.L.; Barker, S.; Marchitto Jr., T.M.; Moyer, R.; Pelejero, C.; Ziveri, P.; Foster, G.L.; Williams, B.

    2012-01-01

    Ocean acidification may have severe consequences for marine ecosystems; however, assessing its future impact is difficult because laboratory experiments and field observations are limited by their reduced ecologic complexity and sample period, respectively. In contrast, the geological record

  13. Effect factors for terrestrial acidification in Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crespo Mendes, Natalia; Laurent, Alexis; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    conditions, which is an essential approach considering countries like Brazil, with high biodiversity. Previous studies have assessed the impacts of terrestrial acidification from the estimations of the potential losses of vascular plants species richness as a result of exposure to acidifying substances...... for 13 biomes, with 2409 species addressed for whole world. In this context this work aims to provide spatially-differentiated effect factors (EF) for terrestrial acidification in Brazil and support the development of spatially-differentiated characterization factors for Brazil. In order to maintain...... for acidification described the behavior of plant species in a certain region when it is exposed to acidic conditions. From these curves it was possible to derive the effect factors for terrestrial acidification. The results of this work show that spatial differentiation is meaningful when it is possible to combine...

  14. A potentially dynamic lysosomal role for the endogenous TRPML proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeevi, David A; Frumkin, Ayala; Offen-Glasner, Vered; Kogot-Levin, Aviram; Bach, Gideon

    2009-10-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) constitute a diverse group of inherited diseases that result from lysosomal storage of compounds occurring in direct consequence to deficiencies of proteins implicated in proper lysosomal function. Pathology in the LSD mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV), is characterized by lysosomal storage of lipids together with water-soluble materials in cells from every tissue and organ of affected patients. Mutations in the mucolipin 1 (TRPML1) protein cause MLIV and TRPML1 has also been shown to interact with two of its paralogous proteins, mucolipin 2 (TRPML2) and mucolipin 3 (TRPML3), in heterologous expression systems. Heterogeneous lysosomal storage is readily identified in electron micrographs of MLIV patient cells, suggesting that proper TRPML1 function is essential for the maintenance of lysosomal integrity. In order to investigate whether TRPML2 and TRPML3 also play a role in the maintenance of lysosomal integrity, we conducted gene-specific knockdown assays against these protein targets. Ultrastructural analysis revealed lysosomal inclusions in both TRPML2 and TRPML3 knockdown cells, suggestive of a common mechanism for these proteins, in parallel with TRPML1, in the regulation of lysosomal integrity. However, co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that physical interactions between each of the endogenous TRPML proteins are quite limited. In addition, we found that all three endogenous proteins only partially co-localize with each other in lysosomal as well as extra-lysosomal compartments. This suggests that native TRPML2 and TRPML3 might participate with native TRPML1 in a dynamic form of lysosomal regulation. Given that depletion of TRPML2/3 led to lysosomal storage typical to an LSD, we propose that depletion of these proteins might also underlie novel LSD pathologies not described hitherto.

  15. BAX channel activity mediates lysosomal disruption linked to Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bové, Jordi; Martínez-Vicente, Marta; Dehay, Benjamin; Perier, Celine; Recasens, Ariadna; Bombrun, Agnes; Antonsson, Bruno; Vila, Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Lysosomal disruption is increasingly regarded as a major pathogenic event in Parkinson disease (PD). A reduced number of intraneuronal lysosomes, decreased levels of lysosomal-associated proteins and accumulation of undegraded autophagosomes (AP) are observed in PD-derived samples, including fibroblasts, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived dopaminergic neurons, and post-mortem brain tissue. Mechanistic studies in toxic and genetic rodent PD models attribute PD-related lysosomal breakdown to abnormal lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PD-linked LMP and subsequent lysosomal defects remain virtually unknown, thereby precluding their potential therapeutic targeting. Here we show that the pro-apoptotic protein BAX (BCL2-associated X protein), which permeabilizes mitochondrial membranes in PD models and is activated in PD patients, translocates and internalizes into lysosomal membranes early following treatment with the parkinsonian neurotoxin MPTP, both in vitro and in vivo, within a time-frame correlating with LMP, lysosomal disruption, and autophagosome accumulation and preceding mitochondrial permeabilization and dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Supporting a direct permeabilizing effect of BAX on lysosomal membranes, recombinant BAX is able to induce LMP in purified mouse brain lysosomes and the latter can be prevented by pharmacological blockade of BAX channel activity. Furthermore, pharmacological BAX channel inhibition is able to prevent LMP, restore lysosomal levels, reverse AP accumulation, and attenuate mitochondrial permeabilization and overall nigrostriatal degeneration caused by MPTP, both in vitro and in vivo. Overall, our results reveal that PD-linked lysosomal impairment relies on BAX-induced LMP, and point to small molecules able to block BAX channel activity as potentially beneficial to attenuate both lysosomal defects and neurodegeneration occurring in PD.

  16. Studying ocean acidification in the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard Ice Breaker Healey and its United Nations Convention Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) cruises has produced new synoptic data from samples collected in the Arctic Ocean and insights into the patterns and extent of ocean acidification. This framework of foundational geochemical information will help inform our understanding of potential risks to Arctic resources due to ocean acidification.

  17. Visualization of ceramide channels in lysosomes following endogenous palmitoyl-ceramide accumulation as an initial step in the induction of necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mototeru Yamane

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we showed that the dual addition of glucosyl ceramide synthase and ceramidase inhibitors to A549 cell culture led to the possibility of ceramide channel formation via endogenous palmitoyl-ceramide accumulation with an increase in cholesterol contents in the lysosome membrane as an initial step prior to initiation of necrotic cell death. In addition, the dual addition led to black circular structures of 10–20 nm, interpreted as stain-filled cylindrical channels on transmission electron microscopy. The formation of palmitoyl-ceramide channels in the lysosome membrane causes the liberation of cathepsin B from lysosomes for necrotic cell death. On the other hand, necrotic cell death in the dual addition was not caused by oxidative stress or cathepsin B activity, and the cell death was free from the contribution of the translation of Bax protein to the lysosome membrane.

  18. The spreading process of Ehrlichia canis in macrophages is dependent on actin cytoskeleton, calcium and iron influx and lysosomal evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, R N; Levenhagen, M A; Levenhagen, M M M D; Rieck, S E; Labruna, M B; Beletti, M E

    2014-01-31

    Ehrlichia canis is an obligate intracellular microorganism and the etiologic agent of canine monocytic ehrlichiosis. The invasion process has already been described for some bacteria in this genus, such as E. muris and E. chaffeensis, and consists of four stages: adhesion, internalisation, intracellular proliferation and intercellular spreading. However, little is known about the spreading process of E. canis. The aim of this study was to analyse the role of the actin cytoskeleton, calcium, iron and lysosomes from the host cell in the spreading of E. canis in dog macrophages in vitro. Different inhibitory drugs were used: cytochalasin D (actin polymerisation inhibitor), verapamil (calcium channel blocker) and deferoxamine (iron chelator). Our results showed a decrease in the number of bacteria in infected cells treated with all drugs when compared to controls. Lysosomes in infected cells were cytochemically labelled with acid phosphatase to allow the visualisation of phagosome-lysosome fusion and were further analysed by transmission electron microscopy. Phagosome-lysosome fusion was rarely observed in vacuoles containing viable E. canis. These data suggest that the spreading process of E. canis in vitro is dependent on cellular components analysed and lysosomal evasion.

  19. Citreoviridin Induces Autophagy-Dependent Apoptosis through Lysosomal-Mitochondrial Axis in Human Liver HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuexia; Liu, Yanan; Liu, Xiaofang; Jiang, Liping; Yang, Guang; Sun, Xiance; Geng, Chengyan; Li, Qiujuan; Yao, Xiaofeng; Chen, Min

    2015-08-06

    Citreoviridin (CIT) is a mycotoxin derived from fungal species in moldy cereals. In our previous study, we reported that CIT stimulated autophagosome formation in human liver HepG2 cells. Here, we aimed to explore the relationship of autophagy with lysosomal membrane permeabilization and apoptosis in CIT-treated cells. Our data showed that CIT increased the expression of LC3-II, an autophagosome biomarker, from the early stage of treatment (6 h). After treatment with CIT for 12 h, lysosomal membrane permeabilization occurred, followed by the release of cathepsin D in HepG2 cells. Inhibition of autophagosome formation with siRNA against Atg5 attenuated CIT-induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization. In addition, CIT induced collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential as assessed by JC-1 staining. Furthermore, caspase-3 activity assay showed that CIT induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Inhibition of autophagosome formation attenuated CIT-induced apoptosis, indicating that CIT-induced apoptosis was autophagy-dependent. Cathepsin D inhibitor, pepstatin A, relieved CIT-induced apoptosis as well, suggesting the involvement of the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis in CIT-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our data demonstrated that CIT induced autophagy-dependent apoptosis through the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis in HepG2 cells. The study thus provides essential mechanistic insight, and suggests clues for the effective management and treatment of CIT-related diseases.

  20. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibition promotes lysosomal biogenesis and autophagic degradation of the amyloid-β precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Callum; Carzaniga, Raffaela; Gentleman, Steve M; Van Leuven, Fred; Walter, Jochen; Sastre, Magdalena

    2012-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been associated with altered activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) isozymes, which are proposed to contribute to both neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaque formation. However, the molecular basis by which GSK3 affects the formation of Aβ remains unknown. Our aim was to identify the underlying mechanisms of GSK3-dependent effects on the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP). For this purpose, N2a cells stably expressing APP carrying the Swedish mutation were treated with specific GSK3 inhibitors or transfected with GSK3α/β short interfering RNA. We show that inhibition of GSK3 leads to decreased expression of APP by enhancing its degradation via an increase in the number of lysosomes. This induction of the lysosomal/autophagy pathway was associated with nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis. Our data indicate that GSK3 inhibition reduces Aβ through an increase of the degradation of APP and its carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF) by activation of the lysosomal/autophagy pathway. These results suggest that an increased propensity toward autophagic/lysosomal alterations in AD patients could have consequences for neuronal function.

  1. MDMA induces cardiac contractile dysfunction through autophagy upregulation and lysosome destabilization in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani-ishida, Kaori; Saka, Kanju; Yamaguchi, Koji; Hayashida, Makiko; Nagai, Hisashi; Takemura, Genzou; Yoshida, Ken-ichi

    2014-05-01

    The underlying mechanisms of cardiotoxicity of 3,4-methylenedioxymethylamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") abuse are unclear. Autophagy exerts either adaptive or maladaptive effects on cardiac function in various pathological settings, but nothing is known on the role of autophagy in the MDMA cardiotoxicity. Here, we investigated the mechanism through which autophagy may be involved in MDMA-induced cardiac contractile dysfunction. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with MDMA (20mg/kg) or saline. Left ventricular (LV) echocardiography and LV pressure measurement demonstrated reduction of LV systolic contractility 24h after MDMA administration. Western blot analysis showed a time-dependent increase in the levels of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II) and cathepsin-D after MDMA administration. Electron microscopy showed the presence of autophagic vacuoles in cardiomyocytes. MDMA upregulated phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) at Thr172, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at Thr2446, Raptor at Ser792, and Unc51-like kinase (ULK1) at Ser555, suggesting activation of autophagy through the AMPK-mTOR pathway. The effects of autophagic inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine (CQ) on LC3-II levels indicated that MDMA enhanced autophagosome formation, but attenuated autophagosome clearance. MDMA also induced release of cathepsins into cytosol, and western blotting and electron microscopy showed cardiac troponin I (cTnI) degradation and myofibril damage, respectively. 3-MA, CQ, and a lysosomal inhibitor, E64c, inhibited cTnI proteolysis and improved contractile dysfunction after MDMA administration. In conclusion, MDMA causes lysosome destabilization following activation of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, through which released lysosomal proteases damage myofibrils and induce LV systolic dysfunction in rat heart.

  2. Coral Carbonic Anhydrases: Regulation by Ocean Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccola, Didier; Innocenti, Alessio; Bertucci, Anthony; Tambutté, Eric; Supuran, Claudiu T; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2016-06-03

    Global change is a major threat to the oceans, as it implies temperature increase and acidification. Ocean acidification (OA) involving decreasing pH and changes in seawater carbonate chemistry challenges the capacity of corals to form their skeletons. Despite the large number of studies that have investigated how rates of calcification respond to ocean acidification scenarios, comparatively few studies tackle how ocean acidification impacts the physiological mechanisms that drive calcification itself. The aim of our paper was to determine how the carbonic anhydrases, which play a major role in calcification, are potentially regulated by ocean acidification. For this we measured the effect of pH on enzyme activity of two carbonic anhydrase isoforms that have been previously characterized in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. In addition we looked at gene expression of these enzymes in vivo. For both isoforms, our results show (1) a change in gene expression under OA (2) an effect of OA and temperature on carbonic anhydrase activity. We suggest that temperature increase could counterbalance the effect of OA on enzyme activity. Finally we point out that caution must, thus, be taken when interpreting transcriptomic data on carbonic anhydrases in ocean acidification and temperature stress experiments, as the effect of these stressors on the physiological function of CA will depend both on gene expression and enzyme activity.

  3. Coral Carbonic Anhydrases: Regulation by Ocean Acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Zoccola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Global change is a major threat to the oceans, as it implies temperature increase and acidification. Ocean acidification (OA involving decreasing pH and changes in seawater carbonate chemistry challenges the capacity of corals to form their skeletons. Despite the large number of studies that have investigated how rates of calcification respond to ocean acidification scenarios, comparatively few studies tackle how ocean acidification impacts the physiological mechanisms that drive calcification itself. The aim of our paper was to determine how the carbonic anhydrases, which play a major role in calcification, are potentially regulated by ocean acidification. For this we measured the effect of pH on enzyme activity of two carbonic anhydrase isoforms that have been previously characterized in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. In addition we looked at gene expression of these enzymes in vivo. For both isoforms, our results show (1 a change in gene expression under OA (2 an effect of OA and temperature on carbonic anhydrase activity. We suggest that temperature increase could counterbalance the effect of OA on enzyme activity. Finally we point out that caution must, thus, be taken when interpreting transcriptomic data on carbonic anhydrases in ocean acidification and temperature stress experiments, as the effect of these stressors on the physiological function of CA will depend both on gene expression and enzyme activity.

  4. Coral Carbonic Anhydrases: Regulation by Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccola, Didier; Innocenti, Alessio; Bertucci, Anthony; Tambutté, Eric; Supuran, Claudiu T.; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Global change is a major threat to the oceans, as it implies temperature increase and acidification. Ocean acidification (OA) involving decreasing pH and changes in seawater carbonate chemistry challenges the capacity of corals to form their skeletons. Despite the large number of studies that have investigated how rates of calcification respond to ocean acidification scenarios, comparatively few studies tackle how ocean acidification impacts the physiological mechanisms that drive calcification itself. The aim of our paper was to determine how the carbonic anhydrases, which play a major role in calcification, are potentially regulated by ocean acidification. For this we measured the effect of pH on enzyme activity of two carbonic anhydrase isoforms that have been previously characterized in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. In addition we looked at gene expression of these enzymes in vivo. For both isoforms, our results show (1) a change in gene expression under OA (2) an effect of OA and temperature on carbonic anhydrase activity. We suggest that temperature increase could counterbalance the effect of OA on enzyme activity. Finally we point out that caution must, thus, be taken when interpreting transcriptomic data on carbonic anhydrases in ocean acidification and temperature stress experiments, as the effect of these stressors on the physiological function of CA will depend both on gene expression and enzyme activity. PMID:27271641

  5. Ocean acidification challenges copepod phenotypic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehmaa, Anu; Almén, Anna-Karin; Brutemark, Andreas; Paul, Allanah; Riebesell, Ulf; Furuhagen, Sara; Engström-Öst, Jonna

    2016-11-01

    Ocean acidification is challenging phenotypic plasticity of individuals and populations. Calanoid copepods (zooplankton) are shown to be fairly plastic against altered pH conditions, and laboratory studies indicate that transgenerational effects are one mechanism behind this plasticity. We studied phenotypic plasticity of the copepod Acartia sp. in the course of a pelagic, large-volume mesocosm study that was conducted to investigate ecosystem and biogeochemical responses to ocean acidification. We measured copepod egg production rate, egg-hatching success, adult female size and adult female antioxidant capacity (ORAC) as a function of acidification (fCO2 ˜ 365-1231 µatm) and as a function of quantity and quality of their diet. We used an egg transplant experiment to reveal whether transgenerational effects can alleviate the possible negative effects of ocean acidification on offspring development. We found significant negative effects of ocean acidification on adult female size. In addition, we found signs of a possible threshold at high fCO2, above which adaptive maternal effects cannot alleviate the negative effects of acidification on egg-hatching and nauplii development. We did not find support for the hypothesis that insufficient food quantity (total particulate carbon < 55 µm) or quality (C : N) weakens the transgenerational effects. However, females with high-ORAC-produced eggs with high hatching success. Overall, these results indicate that Acartia sp. could be affected by projected near-future CO2 levels.

  6. Acidification in the mountains ?; Foersurning i fjaellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degerman, E. [National Board of Fisheries, Drottningholm (Sweden). Inst. of Freshwater Research; Engblom, E.; Lingdell, P.E. [Limnodata AB, Skinnskatteberg (Sweden); Melin, E.; Olofsson, E. [Haerjedalens Kommun, Sveg (Sweden)

    1992-12-31

    The present paper is a literature review dealing with the extent of acidification in the Swedish mountain range. The first effects of acidification were noted in the beginning of the 1960`s in the Fulufjaell area in the southernmost part of the mountain range. Since then many studies have been published indicating that the extent of acidification and the negative effects of biota were widespread. However, many scientists have claimed that there is no acidification in the area and that acid surges following snow melt have always been a problem to the fauna due to natural dilution of the water. This is contradicted by this paper. Acidification in this area is caused by anthropogenic emissions of acidifying substances. It is shown that the mountain area has a higher load of airborne pollutants than the surrounding lowland. Lakes are not as badly affected as streams, but an overall loss of alkalinity is found in the entire mountain range and several small ephemeral lakes in the southern part of the range have lost alkalinity completely. There are indications that acidification also affects lichens (Cladonia spp.) negatively, and it is suspected that the abundance of epilithic green algae has increased in streams. Relatively few objects have been limed so far. Re colonization of benthos, fish and birds has been noted after liming. It is recommended that the liming programme is extended. The ultimate goal should be to achieve a pH above 5 in snow to avoid harmful effects to the most sensitive water bodies. 307 refs

  7. Biochemical adaptation to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, Jonathon H; Paganini, Adam W

    2015-06-01

    The change in oceanic carbonate chemistry due to increased atmospheric PCO2  has caused pH to decline in marine surface waters, a phenomenon known as ocean acidification (OA). The effects of OA on organisms have been shown to be widespread among diverse taxa from a wide range of habitats. The majority of studies of organismal response to OA are in short-term exposures to future levels of PCO2 . From such studies, much information has been gathered on plastic responses organisms may make in the future that are beneficial or harmful to fitness. Relatively few studies have examined whether organisms can adapt to negative-fitness consequences of plastic responses to OA. We outline major approaches that have been used to study the adaptive potential for organisms to OA, which include comparative studies and experimental evolution. Organisms that inhabit a range of pH environments (e.g. pH gradients at volcanic CO2 seeps or in upwelling zones) have great potential for studies that identify adaptive shifts that have occurred through evolution. Comparative studies have advanced our understanding of adaptation to OA by linking whole-organism responses with cellular mechanisms. Such optimization of function provides a link between genetic variation and adaptive evolution in tuning optimal function of rate-limiting cellular processes in different pH conditions. For example, in experimental evolution studies of organisms with short generation times (e.g. phytoplankton), hundreds of generations of growth under future conditions has resulted in fixed differences in gene expression related to acid-base regulation. However, biochemical mechanisms for adaptive responses to OA have yet to be fully characterized, and are likely to be more complex than simply changes in gene expression or protein modification. Finally, we present a hypothesis regarding an unexplored area for biochemical adaptation to ocean acidification. In this hypothesis, proteins and membranes exposed to the

  8. The late endosome/lysosome-anchored p18-mTORC1 pathway controls terminal maturation of lysosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Nada, Shigeyuki; Mori, Shunsuke; Soma-Nagae, Taeko; Oneyama, Chitose [Department of Oncogene Research, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Okada, Masato, E-mail: okadam@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Oncogene Research, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p18 is a membrane adaptor that anchors mTORC1 to late endosomes/lysosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the role of the p18-mTORC1 pathway in lysosome biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The loss of p18 causes accumulation of intact late endosomes by arresting lysosome maturation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mTORC1 activity with rapamycin phenocopies the defects of p18 loss. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the terminal maturation of lysosomes. -- Abstract: The late endosome/lysosome membrane adaptor p18 (or LAMTOR1) serves as an anchor for the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for its activation on lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes severe defects in cell growth as well as endosome dynamics, including membrane protein transport and lysosome biogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects on lysosome biogenesis remain unknown. Here, we show that the p18-mTORC1 pathway is crucial for terminal maturation of lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes aberrant intracellular distribution and abnormal sizes of late endosomes/lysosomes and an accumulation of late endosome specific components, including Rab7, RagC, and LAMP1; this suggests that intact late endosomes accumulate in the absence of p18. These defects are phenocopied by inhibiting mTORC1 activity with rapamycin. Loss of p18 also suppresses the integration of late endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in the defective degradation of tracer proteins. These results suggest that the p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the late stages of lysosomal maturation, potentially in late endosome-lysosome fusion, which is required for processing of various macromolecules.

  9. Quantitative modeling of selective lysosomal targeting for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Rosania, G.; Horobin, R.W.;

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic organelles and are involved in various diseases, the most prominent is malaria. Accumulation of molecules in the cell by diffusion from the external solution into cytosol, lysosome and mitochondrium was calculated with the Fick–Nernst–Planck equation. The cell model considers....... This demonstrates that the cell model can be a useful tool for the design of effective lysosome-targeting drugs with minimal off-target interactions....

  10. Release and uptake of lysosomal enzymes : studied in cultured cells

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the experimental work described in this thesiswas to investigate some aspects of the release and uptake of lysosomal enzymes. The experiments involved the use of normal human and animal fibroblasts and some other cell types such as hepatocytes and hepatoma cells as sources of hydrolytic enzymes, and fibroblasts from patients with lysosomal storage diseases associated with a single lysosomal enzyme deficiency and with "1-cell" disease as recipient cells. In a number ...

  11. Factors and processes modulating phenotypes in neuronopathic lysosomal storage diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta; Banecki, Bogdan; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases are inherited metabolic disorders caused by genetic defects causing deficiency of various lysosomal proteins, and resultant accumulation of non-degraded compounds. They are multisystemic diseases, and in most of them (>70 %) severe brain dysfunctions are evident. However, expression of various phenotypes in particular diseases is extremely variable, from non-neuronopathic to severely neurodegenerative in the deficiency of the same enzyme. Although all lysosomal stor...

  12. Ocean acidification accelerates reef bioerosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisshak, Max; Schönberg, Christine H L; Form, Armin; Freiwald, André

    2012-01-01

    In the recent discussion how biotic systems may react to ocean acidification caused by the rapid rise in carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO(2)) in the marine realm, substantial research is devoted to calcifiers such as stony corals. The antagonistic process - biologically induced carbonate dissolution via bioerosion - has largely been neglected. Unlike skeletal growth, we expect bioerosion by chemical means to be facilitated in a high-CO(2) world. This study focuses on one of the most detrimental bioeroders, the sponge Cliona orientalis, which attacks and kills live corals on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Experimental exposure to lowered and elevated levels of pCO(2) confirms a significant enforcement of the sponges' bioerosion capacity with increasing pCO(2) under more acidic conditions. Considering the substantial contribution of sponges to carbonate bioerosion, this finding implies that tropical reef ecosystems are facing the combined effects of weakened coral calcification and accelerated bioerosion, resulting in critical pressure on the dynamic balance between biogenic carbonate build-up and degradation.

  13. Ocean acidification accelerates reef bioerosion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Wisshak

    Full Text Available In the recent discussion how biotic systems may react to ocean acidification caused by the rapid rise in carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO(2 in the marine realm, substantial research is devoted to calcifiers such as stony corals. The antagonistic process - biologically induced carbonate dissolution via bioerosion - has largely been neglected. Unlike skeletal growth, we expect bioerosion by chemical means to be facilitated in a high-CO(2 world. This study focuses on one of the most detrimental bioeroders, the sponge Cliona orientalis, which attacks and kills live corals on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Experimental exposure to lowered and elevated levels of pCO(2 confirms a significant enforcement of the sponges' bioerosion capacity with increasing pCO(2 under more acidic conditions. Considering the substantial contribution of sponges to carbonate bioerosion, this finding implies that tropical reef ecosystems are facing the combined effects of weakened coral calcification and accelerated bioerosion, resulting in critical pressure on the dynamic balance between biogenic carbonate build-up and degradation.

  14. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  15. A lysosome-centered view of nutrient homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mony, Vinod K; Benjamin, Shawna; O'Rourke, Eyleen J

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are highly acidic cellular organelles traditionally viewed as sacs of enzymes involved in digesting extracellular or intracellular macromolecules for the regeneration of basic building blocks, cellular housekeeping, or pathogen degradation. Bound by a single lipid bilayer, lysosomes receive their substrates by fusing with endosomes or autophagosomes, or through specialized translocation mechanisms such as chaperone-mediated autophagy or microautophagy. Lysosomes degrade their substrates using up to 60 different soluble hydrolases and release their products either to the cytosol through poorly defined exporting and efflux mechanisms or to the extracellular space by fusing with the plasma membrane. However, it is becoming evident that the role of the lysosome in nutrient homeostasis goes beyond the disposal of waste or the recycling of building blocks. The lysosome is emerging as a signaling hub that can integrate and relay external and internal nutritional information to promote cellular and organismal homeostasis, as well as a major contributor to the processing of energy-dense molecules like glycogen and triglycerides. Here we describe the current knowledge of the nutrient signaling pathways governing lysosomal function, the role of the lysosome in nutrient mobilization, and how lysosomes signal other organelles, distant tissues, and even themselves to ensure energy homeostasis in spite of fluctuations in energy intake. At the same time, we highlight the value of genomics approaches to the past and future discoveries of how the lysosome simultaneously executes and controls cellular homeostasis.

  16. Cell biology in China: Focusing on the lysosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chonglin; Wang, Xiaochen

    2017-06-01

    The view that lysosomes are merely the recycling bins of the cell has changed greatly during recent years. Lysosomes are now known to play a central role in signal transduction, cellular adaptation, plasma membrane repair, immune responses and many other fundamental cellular processes. In conjunction with the seminal discoveries made by international colleagues, many important questions regarding lysosomes are being addressed by Chinese scientists. In this review, we briefly summarize recent exciting findings in China on lysosomal signaling, biogenesis, integrity and physiological functions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Gaucher disease: a lysosomal neurodegenerative disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W J; Zhang, X; Chen, W W

    2015-04-01

    Gaucher disease is a multisystemic disorder that affects men and woman in equal numbers and occurs in all ethnic groups at any age with racial variations and an estimated worldwide incidence of 1/75,000. It is caused by a genetic deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase due to mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene, and resulting in lack of glucocerebroside degradation. The subsequent accumulation of glucocerebroside in lysosomes of tissue macrophages primarily in the liver, bone marrow and spleen, causes damage in haematological, skeletal and nervous systems. The clinical manifestations show a high degree of variability with symptoms that varies according to organs involved. In many cases, these disorders do not correlate with mutations in the β-glucocerebrosidase gene. Although several mutations have been identified as responsible for the deficient activity of glucocerebrosidase, mechanisms by which this enzymatic defect leads to Gaucher disease remain poorly understood. Recent reports indicate the implication of complex mechanisms, including enzyme deficiency, substrate accumulation, unfolded protein response, and macrophage activation. Further elucidating these mechanisms will advance understanding of Gaucher disease and related disorders.

  18. Enhanced lysosomal activity by overexpressed aminopeptidase Y in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihee; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains vacuoles corresponding to lysosomes in higher eukaryotes. Lysosomes are dynamic (not silent) organelles in which enzymes can be easily integrated or released when exposed to stressful conditions. Changes in lysosomal enzymes have been observed due to oxidative stress, resulting in an increased function of lysosomes. The protein profiles from H2O2- and NH4Cl-treated lysosomes showed different expression patterns, observed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The aminopeptidase Y protein (APE3) that conspicuously enhanced antimicrobial activity than other proteins was selected for further studies. The S. cerevisiae APE3 gene was isolated and inserted into pYES2.0 expression vector. The GFP gene was inserted downstream to the APE3 gene for confirmation of APE3 targeting to lysosomes, and S. cerevisiae was transformed to pYES2::APE3::GFP. The APE3 did not enter in lysosomes and formed an inclusion body at 30 °C, but it inserted to lysosomes as shown by the merger of GFP with lysosomes at 28 °C. Antimicrobial activity of the cloned S. cerevisiae increased about 5 to 10 % against eight strains, compared to normal cells, and galactose induction is increased more two folds than that of normal cells. Therefore, S. cerevisiae was transformed to pYES2::APE3::GFP, accumulating a large amount of APE3, resulting in increased lysosomal activity. Increase in endogenous levels of lysosomes and their activity following genetic modification can lead to its use in applications such as antimicrobial agents and apoptosis-inducing materials for cancer cells, and consequently, it may also be possible to use the organelles for improving in vitro functions.

  19. How ocean acidification can benefit calcifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Sean D; Doubleday, Zoë A; Hamlyn, Sarah B; Foster, Nicole R; Harley, Christopher D G; Helmuth, Brian; Kelaher, Brendan P; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Sarà, Gianluca; Russell, Bayden D

    2017-02-06

    Reduction in seawater pH due to rising levels of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) in the world's oceans is a major force set to shape the future of marine ecosystems and the ecological services they provide [1,2]. In particular, ocean acidification is predicted to have a detrimental effect on the physiology of calcifying organisms [3]. Yet, the indirect effects of ocean acidification on calcifying organisms, which may counter or exacerbate direct effects, is uncertain. Using volcanic CO2 vents, we tested the indirect effects of ocean acidification on a calcifying herbivore (gastropod) within the natural complexity of an ecological system. Contrary to predictions, the abundance of this calcifier was greater at vent sites (with near-future CO2 levels). Furthermore, translocation experiments demonstrated that ocean acidification did not drive increases in gastropod abundance directly, but indirectly as a function of increased habitat and food (algal biomass). We conclude that the effect of ocean acidification on algae (primary producers) can have a strong, indirect positive influence on the abundance of some calcifying herbivores, which can overwhelm any direct negative effects. This finding points to the need to understand ecological processes that buffer the negative effects of environmental change. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Projected climate change impact on oceanic acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNeil Ben I

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anthropogenic CO2 uptake by the ocean decreases the pH of seawater, leading to an 'acidification' which may have potential detrimental consequences on marine organisms 1. Ocean warming or circulation alterations induced by climate change has the potential to slowdown the rate of acidification of ocean waters by decreasing the amount of CO2 uptake by the ocean 2. However, a recent study showed that climate change affected the decrease in pH insignificantly 3. Here, we examine the sensitivity of future oceanic acidification to climate change feedbacks within a coupled atmosphere-ocean model and find that ocean warming dominates the climate change feedbacks. Results Our results show that the direct decrease in pH due to ocean warming is approximately equal to but opposite in magnitude to the indirect increase in pH associated with ocean warming (ie reduced DIC concentration of the upper ocean caused by lower solubility of CO2. Conclusion As climate change feedbacks on pH approximately cancel, future oceanic acidification will closely follow future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This suggests the only way to slowdown or mitigate the potential biological consequences of future ocean acidification is to significantly reduce fossil-fuel emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere.

  1. SIRT1 regulates accumulation of oxidized LDL in HUVEC via the autophagy-lysosomal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanlin; Sun, Juanjuan; Yu, Xiaoyan; Shi, Luyao; Du, Wenxiu; Hu, Lifang; Liu, Chunfeng; Cao, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in the degradation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Sirtuin1 (SIRT1), a new anti-atherosclerotic factor, can induce autophagy in cardiac myocytes. In the present study, we observed the effect of SIRT1 on the accumulation of ox-LDL in HUVECs, and elucidated whether its effect is relative with the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. The results showed that treatment with either SIRT1 siRNA or SIRT1 inhibitor nicotinamide (NAM) increased Dil-labelled-ox-LDL (Dil-ox-LDL) accumulation in HUVECs, and the SIRT1 inducer resveratrol (RSV) decreased it. Knockdown of autophagy-related protein 5 or inhibit the lysosomal degradation by chloroquine (CQ) decreased the effect of RSV. In HUVECs with ox-LDL, expression of LC3II and LC3 puncta was decreased by treatment with SIRT1 siRNA or NAM, but increased by RSV treatment; sequestosome 1 p62 expression showed the opposite effects. Moreover, Dil-ox-LDL combined with SIRT1 siRNA or NAM showed a much smaller degree of overlap of Lamp1 or Cathepsin D with Dil-ox-LDL than in cells with Dil-ox-LDL alone, and RSV treatment resulted in a greater degree of overlap. These results suggest that SIRT1 can decrease the accumulation of ox-LDL in HUVECs, and this effect is related to the autophagy-lysosomal pathway.

  2. Ethanol Induced Urine Acidification is Related with Early Acetaldehyde Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon Kil Kwon

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: In conclusion, urine acidification after ethanol ingestion is related with serum acetaldehyde concentration. Early elevation of acetaldhyde could induce urine acidification, but the urine pH was elevated after a few hours, that might make prolonged acidemia.

  3. Lysosome/lipid droplet interplay in metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugail, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes and lipid droplets are generally considered as intracellular compartments with divergent roles in cell metabolism, lipid droplets serving as lipid reservoirs in anabolic pathways, whereas lysosomes are specialized in the catabolism of intracellular components. During the last few years, new insights in the biology of lysosomes has challenged this view by providing evidence for the importance of lysosome recycling as a sparing mechanism to maintain cellular fitness. On the other hand the understanding of lipid droplets has evolved from an inert intracellular deposit toward the status of an intracellular organelle with dynamic roles in cellular homeostasis beyond storage. These unrelated aspects have also recently converged in the finding of unexpected lipid droplet/lysosome communication through autophagy, and the discovery of lysosome-mediated lipid droplet degradation called lipopagy. Furthermore, adipocytes which are professional cells for lipid droplet formation were also shown to be active in peptide antigen presentation a pathway requiring lysosomal activity. The potential importance of lipid droplet/lysosome interplay is discussed in the context of metabolic diseases and the setting of chronic inflammation.

  4. [The blood-brain barrier and neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urayama, Akihiko

    2013-02-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy has been a very effective treatment for several lysosomal storage diseases. However, correcting central nervous system (CNS) storage has been challenging due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which hampers the entry of circulating lysosomal enzymes into the brain. In our previous studies, we discovered that luminally expressed cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) receptor is a universal transporter for lysosomal enzymes that contain M6P moieties on the enzyme molecule. This receptor-mediated transport of lysosomal enzymes showed developmental down-regulation that resulted in a failure of delivery of lysosomal enzymes across the BBB in the adult brain. Conceptually, if one can re-induce M6P receptor-mediated transport of lysosomal enzymes in adult BBB, this could provide a novel brain targeting approach for treating abnormal storage in the CNS, regardless of the age of subjects. We found that systemic adrenergic stimuli restored functional transport of β-glucuronidase across the adult BBB. The concept of manipulating BBB transport activity by endogenous characteristics has also been demonstrated by another group who showed effective treatment in a Pompe disease model animal in vivo. It is intriguing that lysosomal enzymes utilize multiple mechanisms for their transport across the BBB. This review explores pharmacological manipulations for the delivery of lysosomal enzymes into the CNS, and the mechanisms of their transport across the BBB, based on existing evidence from studies of β-glucuronidase, sulfamidase, acid α-glucosidase, and arylsulfatase A.

  5. Artesunate induces cell death in human cancer cells via enhancing lysosomal function and lysosomal degradation of ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nai-Di; Tan, Shi-Hao; Ng, Shukie; Shi, Yin; Zhou, Jing; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei; Wong, Wai-Shiu Fred; Shen, Han-Ming

    2014-11-28

    Artesunate (ART) is an anti-malaria drug that has been shown to exhibit anti-tumor activity, and functional lysosomes are reported to be required for ART-induced cancer cell death, whereas the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely elusive. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying ART-induced cell death. We first confirmed that ART induces apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Interestingly, we found that ART preferably accumulates in the lysosomes and is able to activate lysosomal function via promotion of lysosomal V-ATPase assembly. Furthermore, we found that lysosomes function upstream of mitochondria in reactive oxygen species production. Importantly, we provided evidence showing that lysosomal iron is required for the lysosomal activation and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production induced by ART. Finally, we showed that ART-induced cell death is mediated by the release of iron in the lysosomes, which results from the lysosomal degradation of ferritin, an iron storage protein. Meanwhile, overexpression of ferritin heavy chain significantly protected cells from ART-induced cell death. In addition, knockdown of nuclear receptor coactivator 4, the adaptor protein for ferritin degradation, was able to block ART-mediated ferritin degradation and rescue the ART-induced cell death. In summary, our study demonstrates that ART treatment activates lysosomal function and then promotes ferritin degradation, subsequently leading to the increase of lysosomal iron that is utilized by ART for its cytotoxic effect on cancer cells. Thus, our data reveal a new mechanistic action underlying ART-induced cell death in cancer cells.

  6. Contribution of mitochondria and lysosomes to photodynamic therapy-induced death in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Anna-Liisa; Azizuddin, Kashif; Zhang, Ping; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Pediaditakis, Peter; Lemasters, John J.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2008-02-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), visible light activates a photosensitizing drug added to a tissue, resulting in singlet oxygen formation and cell death. Employing confocal microscopy, we previously found that the phthalocyanine Pc 4 localized primarily to mitochondrial membranes in various cancer cell lines, resulting in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, followed by inner membrane permeabilization (mitochondrial permeability transition) with mitochondrial depolarization and swelling, which in turn led to cytochrome c release and apoptotic death. Recently, derivatives of Pc 4 with OH groups added to one of the axial ligands were synthesized. These derivatives appeared to be taken up more avidly by cells and caused more cytotoxicity than the parent compound Pc 4. Using organelle-specific fluorophores, we found that one of these derivatives, Pc 181, accumulated into lysosomes and that PDT with Pc 181 caused rapid disintegration of lysosomes. We hypothesized that chelatable iron released from lysosomes during PDT contributes to mitochondrial damage and subsequent cell death. We monitored cytosolic Fe2+ concentrations after PDT with calcein. Fe2+ binds to calcein causing quenching of calcein fluorescence. After bafilomycin, an inhibitor of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase, calcein fluorescence became quenched, an effect prevented by starch desferal s-DFO, an iron chelator that enters cells by endocytosis. After Pc 181-PDT, cytosolic calcein fluorescence also decreased, indicating increased chelatable Fe2+ in the cytosol, and apoptosis occurred. s-DFO decreased Pc 181-PDT-induced apoptosis as measured by a decrease of caspase-3 activation. In isolated mitochondria preparations, Fe2+ induced mitochondrial swelling, which was prevented by Ru360, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. The data support a hypothesis of oxidative injury in which Pc 181-PDT disintegrates lysosomes and releases constituents that synergistically promote

  7. Inhibitory effect of mTOR activator MHY1485 on autophagy: suppression of lysosomal fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Ja Choi

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a major degradative process responsible for the disposal of cytoplasmic proteins and dysfunctional organelles via the lysosomal pathway. During the autophagic process, cells form double-membraned vesicles called autophagosomes that sequester disposable materials in the cytoplasm and finally fuse with lysosomes. In the present study, we investigated the inhibition of autophagy by a synthesized compound, MHY1485, in a culture system by using Ac2F rat hepatocytes. Autophagic flux was measured to evaluate the autophagic activity. Autophagosomes were visualized in Ac2F cells transfected with AdGFP-LC3 by live-cell confocal microscopy. In addition, activity of mTOR, a major regulatory protein of autophagy, was assessed by western blot and docking simulation using AutoDock 4.2. In the result, treatment with MHY1485 suppressed the basal autophagic flux, and this inhibitory effect was clearly confirmed in cells under starvation, a strong physiological inducer of autophagy. The levels of p62 and beclin-1 did not show significant change after treatment with MHY1485. Decreased co-localization of autophagosomes and lysosomes in confocal microscopic images revealed the inhibitory effect of MHY1485 on lysosomal fusion during starvation-induced autophagy. These effects of MHY1485 led to the accumulation of LC3II and enlargement of the autophagosomes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, MHY1485 induced mTOR activation and correspondingly showed a higher docking score than PP242, a well-known ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, in docking simulation. In conclusion, MHY1485 has an inhibitory effect on the autophagic process by inhibition of fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes leading to the accumulation of LC3II protein and enlarged autophagosomes. MHY1485 also induces mTOR activity, providing a possibility for another regulatory mechanism of autophagy by the MHY compound. The significance of this study is the finding of a novel

  8. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  9. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization is involved in oxidative stress-induced apoptotic cell death in LAMP2-deficient iPSCs-derived cerebral cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheuk-Yiu Law

    2016-03-01

    Our results from cellular fractionation and inhibitor blockade experiments further revealed that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in the LAMP2-deficient cortical neurons was caused by increased abundance of cytosolic cathepsin L. These results suggest the involvement of lysosomal membrane permeabilization in the LAMP2 deficiency associated neural injury.

  10. Lysosomal trafficking of {beta}-catenin induced by the tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashwood, Wan-Mohaiza [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States); Carter, Orianna [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States); Al-Fageeh, Mohamed [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States); Li, Qingjie [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States); Dashwood, Roderick H. [Linus Pauling Institute, 571 Weniger Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-6512 (United States)]. E-mail: Rod.Dashwood@oregonstate.edu

    2005-12-11

    {beta}-Catenin is a cadherin-binding protein involved in cell-cell adhesion, which also functions as a transcriptional activator when complexed in the nucleus with members of the T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) family of proteins. There is considerable interest in mechanisms that down-regulate {beta}-catenin, since this provides an avenue for the prevention of colorectal and other cancers in which {beta}-catenin is frequently over-expressed. We show here that physiologically relevant concentrations of the tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) inhibited {beta}-catenin/TCF-dependent reporter activity in human embryonic kidney 293 cells transfected with wild type or mutant {beta}-catenins, and there was a corresponding decrease in {beta}-catenin protein levels in the nuclear, cytosolic and membrane-associated fractions. However, {beta}-catenin accumulated as punctate aggregates in response to EGCG treatment, including in human colon cancer cells over-expressing {beta}-catenin endogenously. Confocal microscopy studies revealed that the aggregated {beta}-catenin in HEK293 cells was extra-nuclear and co-localized with lysosomes, suggesting that EGCG activated a pathway involving lysosomal trafficking of {beta}-catenin. Lysosomal inhibitors leupeptin and transepoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido(4-guanido)butane produced an increase in {beta}-catenin protein in total cell lysates, without a concomitant increase in {beta}-catenin transcriptional activity. These data provide the first evidence that EGCG facilitates the trafficking of {beta}-catenin into lysosomes, presumably as a mechanism for sequestering {beta}-catenin and circumventing further nuclear transport and activation of {beta}-catenin/TCF/LEF signaling.

  11. Site-dependent life-cycle impact assessment of acidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potting, Josepha Maria Barbara; Schöpp, W.; Blok, Kornelis;

    1998-01-01

    for acidification, eutrophication via air; and tropospheric ozone formation. The application of the acidification factors in LCIA is very straightforward. The only additional data required, the geographical site of the emission, is generally provided by current life-cycle inventory analysis. The acidification...

  12. Down-regulation of the P-glycoprotein relevant for multidrug resistance by intracellular acidification through the crosstalk of MAPK signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Weina; Lu, Ying; Li, Qinghua; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Hongju; Chang, Guoqiang; Lin, Yani; Pang, Tianxiang

    2014-09-01

    In our previous study, we have found that the tumor multidrug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein could be reversed by sustained intracellular acidification through down-regulating the multidrug resistance gene 1 mRNA and P-glycoprotein expression. However, the molecular events linking the intracellular acidification and the regulation of P-glycoprotein remain unclear. In the present study, the molecular pathways involved in the regulation of P-glycoprotein expression by the intracellular acidification were investigated. We found that the P-glycoprotein expression was down-regulated by the intracellular acidification through inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the resisitant K562/DOX cells. In the sensitive K562 and HL60 cell lines, the changes of the p38 MAPK expression after the acidification are not as obvious as that of K562/DOX cells, but the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is also observed, which indicates that the down-regulation of p38 MAPK by the intracellular acidification might be the resistant cell line specific. Blockade of ERK and JNK signaling by the inhibitors or RNA interference increased p38MAPK activities suggesting that cross-talk within MAPKs is also important for this response. Our study provides the first direct evidence that the reversal of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance by intracellular acidification is mediated by the crosstalk of MAPK signaling pathways.

  13. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α induces lysosomal biogenesis in brain cells: implications for lysosomal storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arunava; Jana, Malabendu; Modi, Khushbu; Gonzalez, Frank J; Sims, Katherine B; Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-04-17

    Lysosomes are ubiquitous membrane-enclosed organelles filled with an acidic interior and are central to the autophagic, endocytic, or phagocytic pathway. In contrast to its classical function as the waste management machinery, lysosomes are now considered to be an integral part of various cellular signaling processes. The diverse functionality of this single organelle requires a very complex and coordinated regulation of its activity with transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, at its core. However, mechanisms by which TFEB is regulated are poorly understood. This study demonstrates that gemfibrozil, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α, alone and in conjunction with all-trans-retinoic acid is capable of enhancing TFEB in brain cells. We also observed that PPARα, but not PPARβ and PPARγ, is involved in gemfibrozil-mediated up-regulation of TFEB. Reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies confirmed the recruitment of retinoid X receptor α, PPARα, and PGC1α on the PPAR-binding site on the Tfeb promoter as well. Subsequently, the drug-mediated induction of TFEB caused an increase in lysosomal protein and the lysosomal abundance in cell. Collectively, this study reinforces the link between lysosomal biogenesis and lipid metabolism with TFEB at the crossroads. Furthermore, gemfibrozil may be of therapeutic value in the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders in which autophagy-lysosome pathway plays an important role.

  14. Mucolipidosis type IV: the effect of increased lysosomal pH on the abnormal lysosomal storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogot-Levin, Aviram; Zeigler, Marsha; Ornoy, Asher; Bach, Gideon

    2009-06-01

    Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a neurodegenerative channelopathy that is caused by the deficiency of TRPML1 activity, a nonselective cation channel. TRPML1 is a lysosomal membrane protein, and thus, MLIV is a lysosomal storage disorder. The basic, specific function of TRPML1 has not been yet clarified. A recent report (Soyombo AA, Tjon-Kon-Sang S, Rbaibi Y, Bashllari E, Bisceglia J, Muallem S, Kiselyov K: J Biol Chem 281:7294-7301, 2006) indicated that TRPML1 functions as an outwardly proton channel whose function is the prevention of overacidification of these organelles. Thus, in MLIV the lysosomal pH is lower than normal. Furthermore, attempts by these investigators to increase slightly the lysososmal pH with either Nigericin or Chloroquine suggested corrective effect of the abnormal storage in MLIV cells. We investigated this approach using these agents with cultured fibroblasts from severely affected and milder patients. Our data indicated that there was no reduction in the total number of storage vesicles by either agent, although Nigericin resulted in a change in the nature of the storage materials, reducing the presence of lamellated substances (lipids) so that the storage vesicles contained predominantly granulated substances. On the other hand, transfection with the normal MCOLN1 cDNA (the gene coding for TRPML1) resulted in the removal of almost all the storage materials.

  15. Puget Sound ocean acidification model outputs - Modeling the impacts of ocean acidification on ecosystems and populations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NWFSC OA team will model the effects of ocean acidification on regional marine species and ecosystems using food web models, life-cycle models, and bioenvelope...

  16. Ocean acidification genetics - Genetics and genomics of response to ocean acidification

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — We are applying a variety of genetic tools to assess the response of our ocean resources to ocean acidification, including gene expression techniques, identification...

  17. Early involvement of lysosome dysfunction in the degeneration of cerebral cortical neurons caused by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi; Eitan, Erez; Mattson, Mark P

    2017-03-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA occurs in neurons during acute brain injuries and in neurodegenerative disorders. Membrane lipid peroxidation contributes to neuronal dysfunction and death, in part by disrupting neuronal ion homeostasis and cellular bioenergetics. Emerging findings suggest that 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), an aldehyde produced during lipid peroxidation, impairs the function of various proteins involved in neuronal homeostasis. Here we tested the hypothesis that HNE impairs the cellular system that removes damaged proteins and organelles, the autophagy-lysosome pathway in rat primary cortical neurons. We found that HNE, at a concentration that causes apoptosis over a 48-72 h period, increases protein levels of LC3 II and p62 and within 1 and 4 h of exposure, respectively; LC3 II and p62 immunoreactive puncta were observed in the cytoplasm of HNE-treated neurons at 6 h. The extent of up-regulation of p62 and LC3 II in response to HNE was not affected by co-treatment with the lysosome inhibitor bafilomycin A1, suggesting that the effects of HNE on autophagy were secondary to lysosome inhibition. Indeed, we found that neurons exposed to HNE exhibit elevated pH levels, and decreased protein substrate hydrolysis and cathepsin B activity. Neurons exposed to HNE also exhibited the accumulation of K63-linked polyubiquitinated proteins, which are substrates targeted for lysosomal degradation. Moreover, we found that the levels of LAMP2a and constitutively active heat-shock protein 70, and numbers of LAMP2a-positive lysosomes, are decreased in neurons exposed to HNE. Our findings demonstrate that the lipid peroxidation product HNE causes early impairment of lysosomes which may contribute to the accumulation of damaged and dysfunctional proteins and organelles and consequent neuronal death. Because impaired lysosome function is increasingly recognized as an early event in the neuronal death that occurs in neurodegenerative

  18. Energetic costs of calcification under ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Christopher; Finnegan, Seth; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic ocean acidification threatens to negatively impact marine organisms that precipitate calcium carbonate skeletons. Past geological events, such as the Permian-Triassic Mass Extinction, together with modern experiments generally support these concerns. However, the physiological costs of producing a calcium carbonate skeleton under different acidification scenarios remain poorly understood. Here we present an idealized mathematical model to quantify whole-skeleton costs, concluding that they rise only modestly (up to ˜10%) under acidification expected for 2100. The modest magnitude of this effect reflects in part the low energetic cost of inorganic, calcium carbonate relative to the proteinaceous organic matrix component of skeletons. Our analysis does, however, point to an important kinetic constraint that depends on seawater carbonate chemistry, and we hypothesize that the impact of acidification is more likely to cause extinctions within groups where the timescale of larval development is tightly constrained. The cheapness of carbonate skeletons compared to organic materials also helps explain the widespread evolutionary convergence upon calcification within the metazoa.

  19. Sampling depth confounds soil acidification outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the northern Great Plains (NGP) of North America, surface sampling depths of 0-15 or 0-20 cm are suggested for testing soil characteristics such as pH. However, acidification is often most pronounced near the soil surface. Thus, sampling deeper can potentially dilute (increase) pH measurements an...

  20. Renal acidification defects in medullary sponge kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Hansen, A B; Røhl, H F

    1988-01-01

    Thirteen patients with medullary sponge kidney underwent a short ammonium chloride loading test to investigate their renal acidification capacity. All but 1 presented with a history of recurrent renal calculi and showed bilateral widespread renal medullary calcification on X-ray examination. Nine...... of renal calculi in medullary sponge kidney, have considerable therapeutic implications....

  1. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Stephan T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  2. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Stephan T; Adiseshaiah, Pavan P; Crist, Rachael M

    2012-06-14

    The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy) pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  3. Eucommia ulmoides Oliver extract, aucubin, and geniposide enhance lysosomal activity to regulate ER stress and hepatic lipid accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa-Young Lee

    Full Text Available Eucommia ulmoides Oliver is a natural product widely used as a dietary supplement and medicinal plant. Here, we examined the potential regulatory effects of Eucommia ulmoides Oliver extracts (EUE on hepatic dyslipidemia and its related mechanisms by in vitro and in vivo studies. EUE and its two active constituents, aucubin and geniposide, inhibited palmitate-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, reducing hepatic lipid accumulation through secretion of apolipoprotein B and associated triglycerides and cholesterol in human HepG2 hepatocytes. To determine how EUE diminishes the ER stress response, lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation activities were analyzed. Although proteasomal activity was not affected, lysosomal enzyme activities including V-ATPase were significantly increased by EUE as well as aucubin and geniposide in HepG2 cells. Treatment with the V-ATPase inhibitor, bafilomycin, reversed the inhibition of ER stress, secretion of apolipoprotein B, and hepatic lipid accumulation induced by EUE or its component, aucubin or geniposide. In addition, EUE was determined to regulate hepatic dyslipidemia by enhancing lysosomal activity and to regulate ER stress in rats fed a high-fat diet. Together, these results suggest that EUE and its active components enhance lysosomal activity, resulting in decreased ER stress and hepatic dyslipidemia.

  4. Coral calcification and ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokiel, Paul L.; Jury, Christopher P.; Kuffner, Ilsa B.

    2016-01-01

    Over 60 years ago, the discovery that light increased calcification in the coral plant-animal symbiosis triggered interest in explaining the phenomenon and understanding the mechanisms involved. Major findings along the way include the observation that carbon fixed by photosynthesis in the zooxanthellae is translocated to animal cells throughout the colony and that corals can therefore live as autotrophs in many situations. Recent research has focused on explaining the observed reduction in calcification rate with increasing ocean acidification (OA). Experiments have shown a direct correlation between declining ocean pH, declining aragonite saturation state (Ωarag), declining [CO32_] and coral calcification. Nearly all previous reports on OA identify Ωarag or its surrogate [CO32] as the factor driving coral calcification. However, the alternate “Proton Flux Hypothesis” stated that coral calcification is controlled by diffusion limitation of net H+ transport through the boundary layer in relation to availability of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The “Two Compartment Proton Flux Model” expanded this explanation and synthesized diverse observations into a universal model that explains many paradoxes of coral metabolism, morphology and plasticity of growth form in addition to observed coral skeletal growth response to OA. It is now clear that irradiance is the main driver of net photosynthesis (Pnet), which in turn drives net calcification (Gnet), and alters pH in the bulk water surrounding the coral. Pnet controls [CO32] and thus Ωarag of the bulk water over the diel cycle. Changes in Ωarag and pH lag behind Gnet throughout the daily cycle by two or more hours. The flux rate Pnet, rather than concentration-based parameters (e.g., Ωarag, [CO3 2], pH and [DIC]:[H+] ratio) is the primary driver of Gnet. Daytime coral metabolism rapidly removes DIC from the bulk seawater. Photosynthesis increases the bulk seawater pH while providing the energy that drives

  5. Sulindac metabolites induce proteosomal and lysosomal degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangburn, Heather A; Ahnen, Dennis J; Rice, Pamela L

    2010-04-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases. In response to ligand, EGFR is internalized and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome/lysosome pathway. We previously reported that metabolites of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug sulindac downregulate the expression of EGFR and inhibit basal and EGF-induced EGFR signaling through extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. We now have evaluated the mechanisms of sulindac metabolite-induced downregulation of EGFR. EGF-induced downregulation of EGFR occurs within 10 minutes and lasts for 24 hours. By contrast, downregulation of EGFR by sulindac sulfide and sulindac sulfone was first evident at 4 and 24 hours, respectively, with maximal downregulation at 72 hours. Pretreatment with either the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine or the proteosomal inhibitor MG132 blocked sulindac metabolite-induced downregulation of EGFR. Sulindac metabolites also increased the ubiquitination of EGFR. Whereas sulindac metabolites inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR pY1068, they increased phosphorylation of EGFR pY1045, the docking site where c-Cbl binds, thereby enabling receptor ubiquitination and degradation. Immunofluorescence analysis of EGF and EGFR distribution confirmed the biochemical observations that sulindac metabolites alter EGFR localization and EGFR internalization in a manner similar to that seen with EGF treatment. Expression of ErbB family members HER2 and HER3 was also downregulated by sulindac metabolites. We conclude that downregulation of EGFR expression by sulindac metabolites is mediated via lysosomal and proteosomal degradation that may be due to drug-induced phosphorylation at pY1045 with resultant ubiquitination of EGFR. Thus, sulindac metabolite-induced downregulation of EGFR seems to be mediated through mechanism(s) similar, at least in part, to those involved in EGF-induced downregulation of EGFR.

  6. Evolutionary change during experimental ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pespeni, Melissa H; Sanford, Eric; Gaylord, Brian; Hill, Tessa M; Hosfelt, Jessica D; Jaris, Hannah K; LaVigne, Michèle; Lenz, Elizabeth A; Russell, Ann D; Young, Megan K; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2013-04-23

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) conditions are driving unprecedented changes in seawater chemistry, resulting in reduced pH and carbonate ion concentrations in the Earth's oceans. This ocean acidification has negative but variable impacts on individual performance in many marine species. However, little is known about the adaptive capacity of species to respond to an acidified ocean, and, as a result, predictions regarding future ecosystem responses remain incomplete. Here we demonstrate that ocean acidification generates striking patterns of genome-wide selection in purple sea urchins (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) cultured under different CO2 levels. We examined genetic change at 19,493 loci in larvae from seven adult populations cultured under realistic future CO2 levels. Although larval development and morphology showed little response to elevated CO2, we found substantial allelic change in 40 functional classes of proteins involving hundreds of loci. Pronounced genetic changes, including excess amino acid replacements, were detected in all populations and occurred in genes for biomineralization, lipid metabolism, and ion homeostasis--gene classes that build skeletons and interact in pH regulation. Such genetic change represents a neglected and important impact of ocean acidification that may influence populations that show few outward signs of response to acidification. Our results demonstrate the capacity for rapid evolution in the face of ocean acidification and show that standing genetic variation could be a reservoir of resilience to climate change in this coastal upwelling ecosystem. However, effective response to strong natural selection demands large population sizes and may be limited in species impacted by other environmental stressors.

  7. The positive relationship between ocean acidification and pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangfeng; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie

    2015-02-15

    Ocean acidification and pollution coexist to exert combined effects on the functions and services of marine ecosystems. Ocean acidification can increase the biotoxicity of heavy metals by altering their speciation and bioavailability. Marine pollutants, such as heavy metals and oils, could decrease the photosynthesis rate and increase the respiration rate of marine organisms as a result of biotoxicity and eutrophication, facilitating ocean acidification to varying degrees. Here we review the complex interactions between ocean acidification and pollution in the context of linkage of multiple stressors to marine ecosystems. The synthesized information shows that pollution-affected respiration acidifies coastal oceans more than the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Coastal regions are more vulnerable to the negative impact of ocean acidification due to large influxes of pollutants from terrestrial ecosystems. Ocean acidification and pollution facilitate each other, and thus coastal environmental protection from pollution has a large potential for mitigating acidification risk. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Developmental genetics of secretory vesicle acidification during Caenorhabditis elegans spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, Elizabeth J; Hartley, Paul D; Henderson, Melissa; Hill-Harfe, Katherine L; Price, Paul W; Weimer, Robby M; Kroft, Tim L; Zhu, Guang-Dan; Cordovado, Suzanne; L'Hernault, Steven W

    2012-06-01

    Secretory vesicles are used during spermatogenesis to deliver proteins to the cell surface. In Caenorhabditis elegans, secretory membranous organelles (MO) fuse with the plasma membrane to transform spermatids into fertilization-competent spermatozoa. We show that, like the acrosomal vesicle of mammalian sperm, MOs undergo acidification during development. Treatment of spermatids with the V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin blocks both MO acidification and formation of functional spermatozoa. There are several spermatogenesis-defective mutants that cause defects in MO morphogenesis, including spe-5. We determined that spe-5, which is on chromosome I, encodes one of two V-ATPase B paralogous subunits. The spe-5 null mutant is viable but sterile because it forms arrested, multi-nucleate spermatocytes. Immunofluorescence with a SPE-5-specific monoclonal antibody shows that SPE-5 expression begins in spermatocytes and is found in all subsequent stages of spermatogenesis. Most SPE-5 is discarded into the residual body during spermatid budding, but a small amount remains in budded spermatids where it localizes to MOs as a discrete dot. The other V-ATPase B subunit is encoded by vha-12, which is located on the X chromosome. Usually, spe-5 mutants are self-sterile in a wild-type vha-12 background. However, an extrachromosomal transgene containing wild-type vha-12 driven by its own promoter allows spe-5 mutant hermaphrodites to produce progeny, indicating that VHA-12 can at least partially substitute for SPE-5. Others have shown that the X chromosome is transcriptionally silent in the male germline, so expression of the autosomally located spe-5 gene ensures that a V-ATPase B subunit is present during spermatogenesis.

  9. Ocean acidification alleviates low-temperature effects on growth and photosynthesis of the red alga Neosiphonia harveyi (Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olischläger, Mark; Wiencke, Christian

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to examine interactive effects between ocean acidification and temperature on the photosynthetic and growth performance of Neosiphonia harveyi. N. harveyi was cultivated at 10 and 17.5 °C at present (~380 µatm), expected future (~800 µatm), and high (~1500 µatm) pCO2. Chlorophyll a fluorescence, net photosynthesis, and growth were measured. The state of the carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) was examined by pH-drift experiments (with algae cultivated at 10 °C only) using ethoxyzolamide, an inhibitor of external and internal carbonic anhydrases (exCA and intCA, respectively). Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of acetazolamide (an inhibitor of exCA) and Tris (an inhibitor of the acidification of the diffusive boundary layer) on net photosynthesis was measured at both temperatures. Temperature affected photosynthesis (in terms of photosynthetic efficiency, light saturation point, and net photosynthesis) and growth at present pCO2, but these effects decreased with increasing pCO2. The relevance of the CCM decreased at 10 °C. A pCO2 effect on the CCM could only be shown if intCA and exCA were inhibited. The experiments demonstrate for the first time interactions between ocean acidification and temperature on the performance of a non-calcifying macroalga and show that the effects of low temperature on photosynthesis can be alleviated by increasing pCO2. The findings indicate that the carbon acquisition mediated by exCA and acidification of the diffusive boundary layer decrease at low temperatures but are not affected by the cultivation level of pCO2, whereas the activity of intCA is affected by pCO2. Ecologically, the findings suggest that ocean acidification might affect the biogeographical distribution of N. harveyi.

  10. Cationic lipids delay the transfer of plasmid DNA to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattiaux, R; Jadot, M; Laurent, N; Dubois, F; Wattiaux-De Coninck, S

    1996-10-14

    Plasmid 35S DNA, naked or associated with different cationic lipid preparations was injected to rats. Subcellular distribution of radioactivity in the liver one hour after injection, was established by centrifugation methods. Results show that at that time, 35S DNA has reached lysosomes. On the contrary, when 35S DNA was complexed with lipids, radioactivity remains located in organelles whose distribution after differential and isopycnic centrifugation, is clearly distinct from that of arylsulfatase, lysosome marker enzyme. Injection of Triton WR 1339, a specific density perturbant of lysosomes, four days before 35S DNA injection causes a density decrease of radioactivity bearing structures, apparent one hour after naked 35S DNA injection but visible only after more than five hours, when 35S DNA associated with a cationic lipid is injected. These observations show that cationic lipids delay the transfer to lysosomes, of plasmid DNA taken up by the liver.

  11. Secondary Lysosomal Changes in Liver in Preclinical Drug Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincent P. Meador; D. V. M.; Ph. D.; Diplomate ACVP

    2005-01-01

    @@ Lysosomes are intracytoplasmic membrane-bound organelles that function to degrade intracellular substances by enzymatic digestion. They occur normally in all cells, being especially prominent in phagocytic cells of the reticuloendothelial system.

  12. Endosome-lysosomes, ubiquitin and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, R J; Tipler, C; Arnold, J; Laszlo, L; Al-Khedhairy, A; Lowe, J; Landon, M

    1996-01-01

    Before the advent of ubiquitin immunochemistry and immunogold electron microscopy, there was no known intracellular molecular commonality between neurodegenerative diseases. The application of antibodies which primarily detect ubiquitin protein conjugates has shown that all of the human and animal idiopathic and transmissible chronic neurodegenerative diseases, (including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Lewy body disease (LBD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and scrapie) are related by some form of intraneuronal inclusion which contains ubiquitin protein conjugates. In addition, disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, CJD and sheep scrapie, are characterised by deposits of amyloid, arising through incomplete breakdown of membrane proteins which may be associated with cytoskeletal reorganisation. Although our knowledge about these diseases is increasing, they remain largely untreatable. Recently, attention has focused on the mechanisms of production of different types of amyloid and the likely involvement within cells of the endosome-lysosome system, organelles which are immuno-positive for ubiquitin protein conjugates. These organelles may be 'bioreactor' sites for the unfolding and partial degradation of membrane proteins to generate the amyloid materials or their precursors which subsequently become expelled from the cell, or are released from dead cells, and accumulate as pathological entities. Such common features of the disease processes give new direction to therapeutic intervention.

  13. Lysosomal pH Decrease in Inflammatory Cells Used To Enable Activatable Imaging of Inflammation with a Sialic Acid Conjugated Profluorophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingzhu; Wu, Xuanjun; Lin, Bijuan; Han, Jiahuai; Yang, Liu; Han, Shoufa

    2015-07-07

    Inflammation causes significant morbidity and mortality, necessitating effective in vivo imaging of inflammation. Prior approaches often rely on combination of optical agents with entities specific for proteinaceous biomarkers overexpressed in inflammatory tissues. We herein report a fundamentally new approach to image inflammation by targeting lysosomes undergoing acidification in inflammatory cells with a sialic acid (Sia) conjugated near-infrared profluorophore (pNIR). Sia-pNIR contains a sialic acid domain for in vivo targeting of inflamed tissues and a pNIR domain which isomerizes into fluorescent and optoacoustic species in acidic lysosomes. Sia-pNIR displays high inflammation-to-healthy tissue signal contrasts in mice treated with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, or lipopolysaccharide. In addition, inflammation-associated fluorescence is switched off upon antibiotics treatment in mice. This report shows the potentials of Sia-pNIR for activatable dual-modality inflammation imaging, and particularly the use of lysosomes of inflamed cells as a previously unappreciated biomarker for inflammation imaging.

  14. Internalization, lysosomal degradation and new synthesis of surface membrane CD4 in phorbol ester-activated T-lymphocytes and U-937 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, C M; Christensen, E I; Andresen, B S

    1992-01-01

    degradation was low in resting cells. Endocytosis and/or degradation of anti-CD4 mAb was suppressed by H7, and by inhibitors of membrane traffic (Monensin) and lysosome function (methylamine, chloroquine). Immunocytochemistry localized CD4 to the surface of unstimulated T-cells. Upon PMA stimulation...... occasional labeling was seen in endosomes but whole cell CD4 decreased dramatically. However, methylamine-treated PMA blasts showed accumulation of CD4 in lysosomes and accordingly, pulse-chase experiments in biolabeled cell cultures suggested a manifest reduction of CD4 half-life in response to PMA. Despite...... in activated cells was further evidenced by metabolic labeling and Northern blot analysis demonstrating unaltered or slightly increased CD4 protein and mRNA levels resulting from PMA. Our findings demonstrate that phorbol esters downregulate the cellular CD4 pool by endocytosis and subsequent lysosomal...

  15. Lysosomal enzymes and their receptors in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nadimpalli Siva; Bhamidimarri, Poorna M

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal biogenesis is an important process in eukaryotic cells to maintain cellular homeostasis. The key components that are involved in the biogenesis such as the lysosomal enzymes, their modifications and the mannose 6-phosphate receptors have been well studied and their evolutionary conservation across mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates is clearly established. Invertebrate lysosomal biogenesis pathway on the other hand is not well studied. Although, details on mannose 6-phosphate receptors and enzymes involved in lysosomal enzyme modifications were reported earlier, a clear cut pathway has not been established. Recent research on the invertebrate species involving biogenesis of lysosomal enzymes suggests a possible conserved pathway in invertebrates. This review presents certain observations based on these processes that include biochemical, immunological and functional studies. Major conclusions include conservation of MPR-dependent pathway in higher invertebrates and recent evidence suggests that MPR-independent pathway might have been more prominent among lower invertebrates. The possible components of MPR-independent pathway that may play a role in lysosomal enzyme targeting are also discussed here.

  16. Subcellular Trafficking of Mammalian Lysosomal Proteins: An Extended View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Staudt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomes clear macromolecules, maintain nutrient and cholesterol homeostasis, participate in tissue repair, and in many other cellular functions. To assume these tasks, lysosomes rely on their large arsenal of acid hydrolases, transmembrane proteins and membrane-associated proteins. It is therefore imperative that, post-synthesis, these proteins are specifically recognized as lysosomal components and are correctly sorted to this organelle through the endosomes. Lysosomal transmembrane proteins contain consensus motifs in their cytosolic regions (tyrosine- or dileucine-based that serve as sorting signals to the endosomes, whereas most lysosomal acid hydrolases acquire mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P moieties that mediate binding to two membrane receptors with endosomal sorting motifs in their cytosolic tails. These tyrosine- and dileucine-based motifs are tickets for boarding in clathrin-coated carriers that transport their cargo from the trans-Golgi network and plasma membrane to the endosomes. However, increasing evidence points to additional mechanisms participating in the biogenesis of lysosomes. In some cell types, for example, there are alternatives to the Man-6-P receptors for the transport of some acid hydrolases. In addition, several “non-consensus” sorting motifs have been identified, and atypical transport routes to endolysosomes have been brought to light. These “unconventional” or “less known” transport mechanisms are the focus of this review.

  17. Lysosomal trafficking functions of mucolipin-1 in murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dang Hope

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucolipidosis Type IV is currently characterized as a lysosomal storage disorder with defects that include corneal clouding, achlorhydria and psychomotor retardation. MCOLN1, the gene responsible for this disease, encodes the protein mucolipin-1 that belongs to the "Transient Receptor Potential" family of proteins and has been shown to function as a non-selective cation channel whose activity is modulated by pH. Two cell biological defects that have been described in MLIV fibroblasts are a hyperacidification of lysosomes and a delay in the exit of lipids from lysosomes. Results We show that mucolipin-1 localizes to lysosomal compartments in RAW264.7 mouse macrophages that show subcompartmental accumulations of endocytosed molecules. Using stable RNAi clones, we show that mucolipin-1 is required for the exit of lipids from these compartments, for the transport of endocytosed molecules to terminal lysosomes, and for the transport of the Major Histocompatibility Complex II to the plasma membrane. Conclusion Mucolipin-1 functions in the efficient exit of molecules, destined for various cellular organelles, from lysosomal compartments.

  18. New perspectives in ocean acidification research: editor's introduction to the special feature on ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Philip L

    2017-09-01

    Ocean acidification, caused by the uptake of additional carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, will have far-reaching impacts on marine ecosystems (Gattuso & Hansson 2011 Ocean acidification Oxford University Press). The predicted changes in ocean chemistry will affect whole biological communities and will occur within the context of global warming and other anthropogenic stressors; yet much of the biological research conducted to date has tested the short-term responses of single species to ocean acidification conditions alone. While an important starting point, these studies may have limited predictive power because they do not account for possible interactive effects of multiple climate change drivers or for ecological interactions with other species. Furthermore, few studies have considered variation in responses among populations or the evolutionary potential within populations. Therefore, our knowledge about the potential for marine organisms to adapt to ocean acidification is extremely limited. In 2015, two of the pioneers in the field, Ulf Riebesell and Jean-Pierre Gattuso, noted that to move forward as a field of study, future research needed to address critical knowledge gaps in three major areas: (i) multiple environmental drivers, (ii) ecological interactions and (iii) acclimation and adaptation (Riebesell and Gattuso 2015 Nat. Clim. Change5, 12-14 (doi:10.1038/nclimate2456)). In May 2016, more than 350 researchers, students and stakeholders met at the 4th International Symposium on the Ocean in a High-CO2 World in Hobart, Tasmania, to discuss the latest advances in understanding ocean acidification and its biological consequences. Many of the papers presented at the symposium reflected this shift in focus from short-term, single species and single stressor experiments towards multi-stressor and multispecies experiments that address knowledge gaps about the ecological impacts of ocean acidification on marine communities. The nine papers in this

  19. Integrated Analysis of Acidification in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the interim status of the RAINS model developed at IIASA. The principle purpose of the model is to provide a tool to assist decision-makers in their evaluation of strategies to control acidification of Europe's environment. Model design emphasizes user comprehension and ease of use. The overall framework of RAINS consists of three linked compartments: "Pollutant Generation," "Atmospheric Processes" and "Environmental Impact." Each of these compartments can be filled by dif...

  20. Crystal structure of the conserved domain of the DC lysosomal associated membrane protein: implications for the lysosomal glycocalyx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Sonja

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The family of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP comprises the multifunctional, ubiquitous LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, and the cell type-specific proteins DC-LAMP (LAMP-3, BAD-LAMP (UNC-46, C20orf103 and macrosialin (CD68. LAMPs have been implicated in a multitude of cellular processes, including phagocytosis, autophagy, lipid transport and aging. LAMP-2 isoform A acts as a receptor in chaperone-mediated autophagy. LAMP-2 deficiency causes the fatal Danon disease. The abundant proteins LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 are major constituents of the glycoconjugate coat present on the inside of the lysosomal membrane, the 'lysosomal glycocalyx'. The LAMP family is characterized by a conserved domain of 150 to 200 amino acids with two disulfide bonds. Results The crystal structure of the conserved domain of human DC-LAMP was solved. It is the first high-resolution structure of a heavily glycosylated lysosomal membrane protein. The structure represents a novel β-prism fold formed by two β-sheets bent by β-bulges and connected by a disulfide bond. Flexible loops and a hydrophobic pocket represent possible sites of molecular interaction. Computational models of the glycosylated luminal regions of LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 indicate that the proteins adopt a compact conformation in close proximity to the lysosomal membrane. The models correspond to the thickness of the lysosomal glycoprotein coat of only 5 to 12 nm, according to electron microscopy. Conclusion The conserved luminal domain of lysosome-associated membrane proteins forms a previously unknown β-prism fold. Insights into the structure of the lysosomal glycoprotein coat were obtained by computational models of the LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 luminal regions.

  1. Symbiosis increases coral tolerance to ocean acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ohki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the acidity of ocean waters will directly threaten calcifying marine organisms such as reef-building scleractinian corals, and the myriad of species that rely on corals for protection and sustenance. Ocean pH has already decreased by around 0.1 pH units since the beginning of the industrial revolution, and is expected to decrease by another 0.2–0.4 pH units by 2100. This study mimicked the pre-industrial, present, and near-future levels of pCO2 using a precise control system (±5% pCO2, to assess the impact of ocean acidification on the calcification of recently-settled primary polyps of Acropora digitifera, both with and without symbionts, and adult fragments with symbionts. The increase in pCO2 of 100 μatm between the pre-industrial period and the present had more effect on the calcification rate of adult A. digitifera than the anticipated future increases of several hundreds of micro-atmospheres of pCO2. The primary polyps with symbionts showed higher calcification rates than primary polyps without symbionts, suggesting that (i primary polyps housing symbionts are more tolerant to near-future ocean acidification than organisms without symbionts, and (ii corals acquiring symbionts from the environment (i.e. broadcasting species will be more vulnerable to ocean acidification than corals that maternally acquire symbionts.

  2. Ocean acidification in the Western Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, W.; Chen, B.; Chen, L.

    2011-12-01

    We report carbonate chemistry and ocean acidification status in the western Arctic Ocean from 65-88οN based on data collected in summer 2008 and 2010. In the marginal seas, surface waters have high pH and high carbonate saturation state (Ω) due to intensive biological uptake of CO2. In the southern Canada Basin, surface waters have low pH and low Ω due to the uptake of atmospheric CO2 and sea-ice melt. In the northern Arctic Ocean basin, there is no serious ocean acidification in surface water due to heavy ice-coverage but pH and Ω in the subsurface waters at the oxygen minimum and nutrient maximum zone (at 100-150 m) are low due mostly to respiration-derived CO2 and an increased biological production and export in surface waters. Such multitude responses of ocean carbonate chemistry (northern vs. southern basin, basins vs. margins, and surface vs. subsurface) to climate changes are unique to the Arctic Ocean system. We will explore biogeochemical control mechanisms on carbonate chemistry and ocean acidification in the Arctic Ocean environments in the context of recent warming and sea-ice retreat.

  3. Ocean acidification in a geoengineering context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Phillip; Turley, Carol

    2012-09-13

    Fundamental changes to marine chemistry are occurring because of increasing carbon dioxide (CO(2)) in the atmosphere. Ocean acidity (H(+) concentration) and bicarbonate ion concentrations are increasing, whereas carbonate ion concentrations are decreasing. There has already been an average pH decrease of 0.1 in the upper ocean, and continued unconstrained carbon emissions would further reduce average upper ocean pH by approximately 0.3 by 2100. Laboratory experiments, observations and projections indicate that such ocean acidification may have ecological and biogeochemical impacts that last for many thousands of years. The future magnitude of such effects will be very closely linked to atmospheric CO(2); they will, therefore, depend on the success of emission reduction, and could also be constrained by geoengineering based on most carbon dioxide removal (CDR) techniques. However, some ocean-based CDR approaches would (if deployed on a climatically significant scale) re-locate acidification from the upper ocean to the seafloor or elsewhere in the ocean interior. If solar radiation management were to be the main policy response to counteract global warming, ocean acidification would continue to be driven by increases in atmospheric CO(2), although with additional temperature-related effects on CO(2) and CaCO(3) solubility and terrestrial carbon sequestration.

  4. Ocean acidification in a geoengineering context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Phillip; Turley, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental changes to marine chemistry are occurring because of increasing carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. Ocean acidity (H+ concentration) and bicarbonate ion concentrations are increasing, whereas carbonate ion concentrations are decreasing. There has already been an average pH decrease of 0.1 in the upper ocean, and continued unconstrained carbon emissions would further reduce average upper ocean pH by approximately 0.3 by 2100. Laboratory experiments, observations and projections indicate that such ocean acidification may have ecological and biogeochemical impacts that last for many thousands of years. The future magnitude of such effects will be very closely linked to atmospheric CO2; they will, therefore, depend on the success of emission reduction, and could also be constrained by geoengineering based on most carbon dioxide removal (CDR) techniques. However, some ocean-based CDR approaches would (if deployed on a climatically significant scale) re-locate acidification from the upper ocean to the seafloor or elsewhere in the ocean interior. If solar radiation management were to be the main policy response to counteract global warming, ocean acidification would continue to be driven by increases in atmospheric CO2, although with additional temperature-related effects on CO2 and CaCO3 solubility and terrestrial carbon sequestration. PMID:22869801

  5. Mussel byssus attachment weakened by ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Michael J.; George, Matthew N.; Carrington, Emily

    2013-06-01

    Biomaterials connect organisms to their environments. Their function depends on biological, chemical and environmental factors, both at the time of creation and throughout the life of the material. Shifts in the chemistry of the oceans driven by anthropogenic CO2 (termed ocean acidification) have profound implications for the function of critical materials formed under these altered conditions. Most ocean acidification studies have focused on one biomaterial (secreted calcium carbonate), frequently using a single assay (net rate of calcification) to quantify whether reductions in environmental pH alter how organisms create biomaterials. Here, we examine biological structures critical for the success of ecologically and economically important bivalve molluscs. One non-calcified material, the proteinaceous byssal threads that anchor mytilid mussels to hard substrates, exhibited reduced mechanical performance when secreted under elevated pCO2 conditions, whereas shell and tissue growth were unaffected. Threads made under high pCO2 (>1,200μatm) were weaker and less extensible owing to compromised attachment to the substratum. According to a mathematical model, this reduced byssal fibre performance, decreasing individual tenacity by 40%. In the face of ocean acidification, weakened attachment presents a potential challenge for suspension-culture mussel farms and for intertidal communities anchored by mussel beds.

  6. 15-Deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin-J(2) reveals a new pVHL-independent, lysosomal-dependent mechanism of HIF-1alpha degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, Gemma; Arenas, María I; Bienes, Raquel; Calzada, María Jose; Aragonés, Julián; Garcia-Bermejo, Maria Laura; Landazuri, Manuel O; Lucio-Cazaña, Javier

    2009-07-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) protein is degraded under normoxia by its association to von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL) and further proteasomal digestion. However, human renal cells HK-2 treated with 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin-J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) accumulate HIF-1alpha in normoxic conditions. Thus, we aimed to investigate the mechanism involved in this accumulation. We found that 15d-PGJ(2) induced an over-accumulation of HIF-1alpha in RCC4 cells, which lack pVHL and in HK-2 cells treated with inhibitors of the pVHL-proteasome pathway. These results indicated that pVHL-proteasome-independent mechanisms are involved, and therefore we aimed to ascertain them. We have identified a new lysosomal-dependent mechanism of HIF-1alpha degradation as a target for 15d-PGJ(2) based on: (1) HIF-1alpha colocalized with the specific lysosomal marker Lamp-2a, (2) 15d-PGJ(2) inhibited the activity of cathepsin B, a lysosomal protease, and (3) inhibition of lysosomal activity did not result in over-accumulation of HIF-1alpha in 15d-PGJ(2)-treated cells. Therefore, expression of HIF-1alpha is also modulated by lysosomal degradation.

  7. Investigating Undergraduate Science Students’ Conceptions and Misconceptions of Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Kathryn I.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific research exploring ocean acidification has grown significantly in past decades. However, little science education research has investigated the extent to which undergraduate science students understand this topic. Of all undergraduate students, one might predict science students to be best able to understand ocean acidification. What conceptions and misconceptions of ocean acidification do these students hold? How does their awareness and knowledge compare across disciplines? Undergraduate biology, chemistry/biochemistry, and environmental studies students, and science faculty for comparison, were assessed on their awareness and understanding. Results revealed low awareness and understanding of ocean acidification among students compared with faculty. Compared with biology or chemistry/biochemistry students, more environmental studies students demonstrated awareness of ocean acidification and identified the key role of carbon dioxide. Novel misconceptions were also identified. These findings raise the question of whether undergraduate science students are prepared to navigate socioenvironmental issues such as ocean acidification. PMID:26163563

  8. Iminosugar-based inhibitors of glucosylceramide synthase increase brain glycosphingolipids and survival in a mouse model of Sandhoff disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashe, K.M.; Bangari, D.; Li, L.; Cabrera-Salazar, M.A.; Bercury, S.D.; Nietupski, J.B.; Cooper, C.G.F.; Aerts, J.M.F.G.; Lee, E.R.; Copeland, D.P.; Cheng, S.H.; Scheule, R.K.; Marshall, J.

    2011-01-01

    The neuropathic glycosphingolipidoses are a subgroup of lysosomal storage disorders for which there are no effective therapies. A potential approach is substrate reduction therapy using inhibitors of glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) to decrease the synthesis of glucosylceramide and related glycosphin

  9. Lysosomal storage disorders: Molecular basis and laboratory testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filocamo Mirella

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs are a large group of more than 50 different inherited metabolic diseases which, in the great majority of cases, result from the defective function of specific lysosomal enzymes and, in cases, of non-enzymatic lysosomal proteins or non-lysosomal proteins involved in lysosomal biogenesis. The progressive lysosomal accumulation of undegraded metabolites results in generalised cell and tissue dysfunction, and, therefore, multi-systemic pathology. Storage may begin during early embryonic development, and the clinical presentation for LSDs can vary from an early and severe phenotype to late-onset mild disease. The diagnosis of most LSDs--after accurate clinical/paraclinical evaluation, including the analysis of some urinary metabolites--is based mainly on the detection of a specific enzymatic deficiency. In these cases, molecular genetic testing (MGT can refine the enzymatic diagnosis. Once the genotype of an individual LSD patient has been ascertained, genetic counselling should include prediction of the possible phenotype and the identification of carriers in the family at risk. MGT is essential for the identification of genetic disorders resulting from non-enzymatic lysosomal protein defects and is complementary to biochemical genetic testing (BGT in complex situations, such as in cases of enzymatic pseudodeficiencies. Prenatal diagnosis is performed on the most appropriate samples, which include fresh or cultured chorionic villus sampling or cultured amniotic fluid. The choice of the test--enzymatic and/or molecular--is based on the characteristics of the defect to be investigated. For prenatal MGT, the genotype of the family index case must be known. The availability of both tests, enzymatic and molecular, enormously increases the reliability of the entire prenatal diagnostic procedure. To conclude, BGT and MGT are mostly complementary for post- and prenatal diagnosis of LSDs. Whenever genotype

  10. Lysosomal membrane stability plays a major role in the cytotoxic activity of the anti-proliferative agent, di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Elaine M; Seebacher, Nicole A; Arzuman, Laila; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Vera; Merlot, Angelica M; Lok, Hiu; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Sahni, Sumit; Jansson, Patric J; Richardson, Des R

    2016-07-01

    The potent and selective anti-tumor agent, di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT), localizes in lysosomes and forms cytotoxic copper complexes that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cell death. Herein, the role of lysosomal membrane stability in the anti-tumor activity of Dp44mT was investigated. Studies were performed using molecules that protect lysosomal membranes against Dp44mT-induced LMP, namely heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and cholesterol. Up-regulation or silencing of HSP70 expression did not affect Dp44mT-induced LMP in MCF7 cells. In contrast, cholesterol accumulation in lysosomes induced by the well characterized cholesterol transport inhibitor, 3-β-[2-(diethyl-amino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one (U18666A), inhibited Dp44mT-induced LMP and markedly and significantly (peffect of U18666A in increasing lysosomal cholesterol and preventing the cytotoxic activity of Dp44mT was not due to induced autophagy. Instead, U18666A was found to decrease lysosomal turnover, resulting in autophagosome accumulation. Moreover, preincubation with U18666A did not prevent the ability of Dp44mT to induce autophagosome synthesis, indicating that autophagic initiation via Dp44mT occurs independently of LMP. These studies demonstrate the significance of lysosomal membrane stability in relation to the ability of Dp44mT to execute tumor cell death and overcome pro-survival autophagy. Hence, lysosomal-dependent cell death induced by Dp44mT serves as an important anti-tumor strategy. These results are important for comprehensively understanding the mechanism of action of Dp44mT.

  11. Detrimental effect of CO2-driven seawater acidification on a crustacean brine shrimp, Artemia sinica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chao-qun; Jeswin, Joseph; Shen, Kai-li; Lablche, Meghan; Wang, Ke-jian; Liu, Hai-peng

    2015-03-01

    The effects of the decline in ocean pH, termed as ocean acidification due to the elevated carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, on calcifying organisms such as marine crustacean are unclear. To understand the possible effects of ocean acidification on the physiological responses of a marine model crustacean brine shrimp, Artemia sinica, three groups of the cysts or animals were raised at different pH levels (8.2 as control; 7.8 and 7.6 as acidification stress according to the predictions for the end of this century and next century accordingly) for 24 h or two weeks, respectively, followed by examination of their hatching success, morphological appearance such as deformity and microstructure of animal body, growth (i.e. body length), survival rate, expression of selected genes (involved in development, immunity and cellular activity etc), and biological activity of several key enzymes (participated in antioxidant responses and physiological reactions etc). Our results clearly demonstrated that the cysts hatching rate, growth at late stage of acidification stress, and animal survival rate of brine shrimp were all reduced due to lower pH level (7.6 & 7.8) on comparison to the control group (pH 8.2), but no obvious change in deformity or microstructure of brine shrimp was present under these acidification stress by microscopy observation and section analysis. In addition, the animals subjected to a lower pH level of seawater underwent changes on their gene expressions, including Spätzle, MyD88, Notch, Gram-negative bacteria binding protein, prophenoloxidase, Apoptosis inhibitor 5, Trachealess, Caveolin-1 and Cyclin K. Meanwhile, several key enzyme activities, including superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase and acid phosphatase, were also affected by acidified seawater stress. Taken together, our findings supports the idea that CO2-driven seawater acidification indeed has a detrimental effect, in case of hatching success, growth and survival, on

  12. The Link Between Lysosomal Storage Disorders and More Common Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Beck MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, it has become more and more evident that lysosomal storage disorders and common neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases have clinical, neuropathological, and genetic features in common, including lysosomal dysfunction and impaired autophagy. Patients with Gaucher and even carriers of Gaucher disease have an increased risk to develop Parkinson disease. Likewise, individuals who are heterozygous for a mutation of a gene that causes an adult form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis are more likely to be affected by a form of frontotemporal dementia in their later life. A further example is the gene NAGLU encoding the enzyme α- N -acetylglucosaminidase, which is deficient in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB. Mutations of the NAGLU gene have been observed in patients affected by an axonal neuropathy. An interesting unexpected finding was the link between stuttering and genes that are essential for the function of all lysosomal enzymes. This review will present some example of the association of lysosomal storage disorders and neurodegenerative disease and discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms that are common to both conditions. The understanding of the pathophysiology of the endosomal–lysosomal–autophagic system may help to develop drugs, which might provide benefit not only for patients with rare lysosomal storage disorders but also for individuals affected by more common diseases.

  13. TRPML1: an ion channel in the lysosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wuyang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Gao, Qiong; Xu, Haoxing

    2014-01-01

    The first member of the mammalian mucolipin TRP channel subfamily (TRPML1) is a cation-permeable channel that is predominantly localized on the membranes of late endosomes and lysosomes (LELs) in all mammalian cell types. In response to the regulatory changes of LEL-specific phosphoinositides or other cellular cues, TRPML1 may mediate the release of Ca(2+) and heavy metal Fe(2+)/Zn(2+)ions into the cytosol from the LEL lumen, which in turn may regulate membrane trafficking events (fission and fusion), signal transduction, and ionic homeostasis in LELs. Human mutations in TRPML1 result in type IV mucolipidosis (ML-IV), a childhood neurodegenerative lysosome storage disease. At the cellular level, loss-of-function mutations of mammalian TRPML1 or its C. elegans or Drosophila homolog gene results in lysosomal trafficking defects and lysosome storage. In this chapter, we summarize recent advances in our understandings of the cell biological and channel functions of TRPML1. Studies on TRPML1's channel properties and its regulation by cellular activities may provide clues for developing new therapeutic strategies to delay neurodegeneration in ML-IV and other lysosome-related pediatric diseases.

  14. The Link Between Lysosomal Storage Disorders and More Common Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Beck MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, it has become more and more evident that lysosomal storage disorders and common neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases have clinical, neuropathological, and genetic features in common, including lysosomal dysfunction and impaired autophagy. Patients with Gaucher and even carriers of Gaucher disease have an increased risk to develop Parkinson disease. Likewise, individuals who are heterozygous for a mutation of a gene that causes an adult form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis are more likely to be affected by a form of frontotemporal dementia in their later life. A further example is the gene NAGLU encoding the enzyme α-N-acetylglucosaminidase, which is deficient in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB. Mutations of the NAGLU gene have been observed in patients affected by an axonal neuropathy. An interesting unexpected finding was the link between stuttering and genes that are essential for the function of all lysosomal enzymes. This review will present some example of the association of lysosomal storage disorders and neurodegenerative disease and discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms that are common to both conditions. The understanding of the pathophysiology of the endosomal–lysosomal–autophagic system may help to develop drugs, which might provide benefit not only for patients with rare lysosomal storage disorders but also for individuals affected by more common diseases.

  15. The role of autophagic and lysosomal pathways in ischemic brain injury******

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaohua Gu; Nan Shi; Qian Zhang; Wei Zhang; Meizhen Zhao; Xiaojiang Sun; Yinyi Sun; Kangyong Liu; Fen Wang; Ting Zhang; Qiang Li; Liwei Shen; Ling Zhou; Liang Dong

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is involved in neural cel death after cerebral ischemia. Our previous studies showed that rapamycin-induced autophagy decreased the rate of apoptosis, but the rate of apoptosis was creased after the autophagy inhibitor, 3-methyladenine, was used. In this study, a suture-occluded method was performed to generate a rat model of brain ischemia. Under a transmission electron microscope, autophagic bodies and autophagy lysosomes were markedly accumulated in neurons at 4 hours post brain ischemic injury, with their numbers gradual y reducing over time. Western blotting demonstrated that protein levels of light chain 3-II and cathepsin B were significantly in-creased within 4 hours of ischemic injury, but these levels were not persistently upregulated over time. Confocal microscopy showed that autophagy was mainly found in neurons with positive light chain 3 signal. Injection of rapamycin via tail vein promoted the occurrence of autophagy in rat brain tissue after cerebral ischemia and elevated light chain 3 and cathepsin B expression. However, in-jection of 3-methyladenine significantly diminished light chain 3-II and cathepsin B expression. Results verified that autophagic and lysosomal activity is increased in ischemic neurons. Abnormal components in cel s can be eliminated through upregulating cel autophagy or inhibiting autophagy after ischemic brain injury, resulting in a dynamic balance of substances in cel s. Moreover, drugs that interfere with autophagy may be potential therapies for the treatment of brain injury.

  16. Biogenic acidification reduces sea urchin gonad growth and increases susceptibility of aquaculture to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mos, Benjamin; Byrne, Maria; Dworjanyn, Symon A

    2016-02-01

    Decreasing oceanic pH (ocean acidification) has emphasised the influence of carbonate chemistry on growth of calcifying marine organisms. However, calcifiers can also change carbonate chemistry of surrounding seawater through respiration and calcification, a potential limitation for aquaculture. This study examined how seawater exchange rate and stocking density of the sea urchin Tripneustes gratilla that were reproductively mature affected carbonate system parameters of their culture water, which in turn influenced growth, gonad production and gonad condition. Growth, relative spine length, gonad production and consumption rates were reduced by up to 67% by increased density (9-43 individuals.m(-2)) and reduced exchange rates (3.0-0.3 exchanges.hr(-1)), but survival and food conversion efficiency were unaffected. Analysis of the influence of seawater parameters indicated that reduced pH and calcite saturation state (ΩCa) were the primary factors limiting gonad production and growth. Uptake of bicarbonate and release of respiratory CO2 by T. gratilla changed the carbonate chemistry of surrounding water. Importantly total alkalinity (AT) was reduced, likely due to calcification by the urchins. Low AT limits the capacity of culture water to buffer against acidification. Direct management to counter biogenic acidification will be required to maintain productivity and reproductive output of marine calcifiers, especially as the ocean carbonate system is altered by climate driven ocean acidification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Salinomycin kills cancer stem cells by sequestering iron in lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Trang Thi; Hamaï, Ahmed; Hienzsch, Antje; Cañeque, Tatiana; Müller, Sebastian; Wicinski, Julien; Cabaud, Olivier; Leroy, Christine; David, Amandine; Acevedo, Verónica; Ryo, Akihide; Ginestier, Christophe; Birnbaum, Daniel; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Codogno, Patrice; Mehrpour, Maryam; Rodriguez, Raphaël

    2017-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subset of cells within tumours that exhibit self-renewal properties and the capacity to seed tumours. CSCs are typically refractory to conventional treatments and have been associated to metastasis and relapse. Salinomycin operates as a selective agent against CSCs through mechanisms that remain elusive. Here, we provide evidence that a synthetic derivative of salinomycin, which we named ironomycin (AM5), exhibits a more potent and selective activity against breast CSCs in vitro and in vivo, by accumulating and sequestering iron in lysosomes. In response to the ensuing cytoplasmic depletion of iron, cells triggered the degradation of ferritin in lysosomes, leading to further iron loading in this organelle. Iron-mediated production of reactive oxygen species promoted lysosomal membrane permeabilization, activating a cell death pathway consistent with ferroptosis. These findings reveal the prevalence of iron homeostasis in breast CSCs, pointing towards iron and iron-mediated processes as potential targets against these cells.

  18. Rab2 promotes autophagic and endocytic lysosomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lőrincz, Péter; Tóth, Sarolta; Benkő, Péter; Lakatos, Zsolt; Boda, Attila; Glatz, Gábor; Zobel, Martina; Bisi, Sara; Hegedűs, Krisztina; Takáts, Szabolcs; Scita, Giorgio; Juhász, Gábor

    2017-07-03

    Rab7 promotes fusion of autophagosomes and late endosomes with lysosomes in yeast and metazoan cells, acting together with its effector, the tethering complex HOPS. Here we show that another small GTPase, Rab2, is also required for autophagosome and endosome maturation and proper lysosome function in Drosophila melanogaster We demonstrate that Rab2 binds to HOPS, and that its active, GTP-locked form associates with autolysosomes. Importantly, expression of active Rab2 promotes autolysosomal fusions unlike that of GTP-locked Rab7, suggesting that its amount is normally rate limiting. We also demonstrate that RAB2A is required for autophagosome clearance in human breast cancer cells. In conclusion, we identify Rab2 as a key factor for autophagic and endocytic cargo delivery to and degradation in lysosomes. © 2017 Lőrincz et al.

  19. Parkinson's Disease Shares the Lysosome with Gaucher's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The second most common neurodegenerative disorder, Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age dependent progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement. While many of the causes of PD remain unclear, a consistent finding in PD is the abnormal accumulation of α-synuclein that has lead to the widely held notion that PD is a synucleinopathy. In a recent Cell manuscript Mazzuli et al., provide a potential mechanistic link between Gaucher's disease, a glycolipid lysosomal storage disorder due to Glucocerebrocidase (GBA) deficiency and PD. The authors reveal a reciprocal connection between the loss of GBA activity and accumulation of α-synuclein in the lysosome establishing a bidirectional positive feed back loop with pathologic consequences. These findings should stimulate further work on role of the lysosome in PD pathogenesis and the identification of new treatment strategies for PD. PMID:21753118

  20. AMAP Assessment 2013: Arctic Ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This assessment report presents the results of the 2013 AMAP Assessment of Arctic Ocean Acidification (AOA). This is the first such assessment dealing with AOA from an Arctic-wide perspective, and complements several assessments that AMAP has delivered over the past ten years concerning the effects of climate change on Arctic ecosystems and people. The Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) is a group working under the Arctic Council. The Arctic Council Ministers have requested AMAP to: - produce integrated assessment reports on the status and trends of the conditions of the Arctic ecosystems;

  1. Investigating Undergraduate Science Students' Conceptions and Misconceptions of Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Kathryn I.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific research exploring ocean acidification has grown significantly in past decades. However, little science education research has investigated the extent to which undergraduate science students understand this topic. Of all undergraduate students, one might predict science students to be best able to understand ocean acidification. What…

  2. Investigating Undergraduate Science Students' Conceptions and Misconceptions of Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Kathryn I.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific research exploring ocean acidification has grown significantly in past decades. However, little science education research has investigated the extent to which undergraduate science students understand this topic. Of all undergraduate students, one might predict science students to be best able to understand ocean acidification. What…

  3. Importance of lysosomal cysteine proteases in lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman Harold A

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human lysosomal cysteine proteases are a family of 11 proteases whose members include cathepsins B, C, H, L, and S. The biology of these proteases was largely ignored for decades because of their lysosomal location and the belief that their function was limited to the terminal degradation of proteins. In the past 10 years, this view has changed as these proteases have been found to have specific functions within cells. This review highlights some of these functions, specifically their roles in matrix remodeling and in regulating the immune response, and their relationship to lung diseases.

  4. PDT: loss of autophagic cytoprotection after lysosomal photodamage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, David; Price, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy is known to evoke both autophagy and apoptosis. Apoptosis is an irreversible death pathway while autophagy can serve a cytoprotective function. In this study, we examined two photosensitizing agents that target lysosomes, although they differ in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formed during irradiation. With both agents, the 'shoulder' on the PDT dose-response curve was substantially attenuated, consistent with loss of a cytoprotective pathway. In contrast, this 'shoulder' is commonly observed when PDT targets mitochondria or the ER. We propose that lysosomal targets may offer the possibility of promoting PDT efficacy by eliminating a potentially protective pathway.

  5. Lysosome stability during lytic infection by simian virus 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einck, K H; Norkin, L C

    1979-01-01

    By 48 h postinfection, 40--80% of SV40-infected CV-1 cells have undergone irreversible injury as indicated by trypan blue staining. Nevertheless, at this time the lysosomes of these cells appear as discrete structures after vital staining with either acridine orange or neutral red. Lysosomes, vitally stained with neutral red at 24 h postinfection, were still intact in cells stained with trypan blue at 48 h. Acid phosphatase activity is localized in discrete cytoplasmic particles at 48 h, as indicated by histochemical staining of both fixed and unfixed cells.

  6. Analyzing Lysosome-Related Organelles by Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Hurbain, Ilse

    2017-04-29

    Intracellular organelles have a particular morphological signature that can only be appreciated by ultrastructural analysis at the electron microscopy level. Optical imaging and associated methodologies allow to explore organelle localization and their dynamics at the cellular level. Deciphering the biogenesis and functions of lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) and their dysfunctions requires their visualization and detailed characterization at high resolution by electron microscopy. Here, we provide detailed protocols for studying LROs by transmission electron microscopy. While conventional electron microscopy and its recent improvements is the method of choice to investigate organelle morphology, immunoelectron microscopy allows to localize organelle components and description of their molecular make up qualitatively and quantitatively.

  7. Cellular Anti-Melanogenic Effects of a Euryale ferox Seed Extract Ethyl Acetate Fraction via the Lysosomal Degradation Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hwa Baek

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ethyl acetate fraction of Euryale ferox seed extracts (Efse-EA on melanogenesis in immortalized mouse melanocyte cell line, melan-a. Efse-EA showed strong dose-dependent mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity. Treatment of melan-a cells with 30 μg/mL Efse-EA produced strong inhibition of cellular tyrosinase and melanin synthesis. Efse-EA significantly reduced the levels of melanogenesis-related proteins, such as tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related proteins 1 and 2, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Because Efse-EA treatment reduced tyrosinase protein levels without changing its mRNA expression, we investigated whether this decrease was related to proteasomal or lysosomal degradation of tyrosinase. We found that chloroquine, a lysosomal proteolysis inhibitor, almost completely abolished both the down-regulation of tyrosinase and the inhibition of melanin synthesis induced by Efse-EA. These results suggested that Efse-EA may contribute to the inhibition of melanogenesis by altering lysosomal degradation of tyrosinase, and that this extract may provide a new cosmetic skin-whitening agent.

  8. Cellular Anti-Melanogenic Effects of a Euryale ferox Seed Extract Ethyl Acetate Fraction via the Lysosomal Degradation Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-Hwa; Nam, In-Jeong; Kwak, Hyeong Seob; Kim, Ki-Chan; Lee, Sang-Han

    2015-04-23

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ethyl acetate fraction of Euryale ferox seed extracts (Efse-EA) on melanogenesis in immortalized mouse melanocyte cell line, melan-a. Efse-EA showed strong dose-dependent mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activity. Treatment of melan-a cells with 30 μg/mL Efse-EA produced strong inhibition of cellular tyrosinase and melanin synthesis. Efse-EA significantly reduced the levels of melanogenesis-related proteins, such as tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related proteins 1 and 2, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Because Efse-EA treatment reduced tyrosinase protein levels without changing its mRNA expression, we investigated whether this decrease was related to proteasomal or lysosomal degradation of tyrosinase. We found that chloroquine, a lysosomal proteolysis inhibitor, almost completely abolished both the down-regulation of tyrosinase and the inhibition of melanin synthesis induced by Efse-EA. These results suggested that Efse-EA may contribute to the inhibition of melanogenesis by altering lysosomal degradation of tyrosinase, and that this extract may provide a new cosmetic skin-whitening agent.

  9. Methods for monitoring Ca(2+) and ion channels in the lysosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xi Zoë; Yang, Yiming; Sun, Xue; Dong, Xian-Ping

    2016-12-09

    Lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles are emerging as intracellular Ca(2+) stores and play important roles in a variety of membrane trafficking processes, including endocytosis, exocytosis, phagocytosis and autophagy. Impairment of lysosomal Ca(2+) homeostasis and membrane trafficking has been implicated in many human diseases such as lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), neurodegeneration, myopathy and cancer. Lysosomal membrane proteins, in particular ion channels, are crucial for lysosomal Ca(2+) signaling. Compared with ion channels in the plasma membrane, lysosomal ion channels and their roles in lysosomal Ca(2+) signaling are less understood, largely due to their intracellular localization and the lack of feasible functional assays directly applied to the native environment. Recent advances in biomedical methodology have made it possible to directly investigate ion channels in the lysosomal membrane. In this review, we provide a summary of the newly developed methods for monitoring lysosomal Ca(2+) and ion channels, as well as the recent discovery of lysosomal ion channels and their significances in intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. These new techniques will expand our research scope and our understanding of the nature of lysosomes and lysosome-related diseases.

  10. Global Proteome Profiling of a Marine Copepod and the Mitigating Effect of Ocean Acidification on Mercury Toxicity after Multigenerational Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghua; Lee, Jae-Seong; Li, Yan

    2017-05-16

    Previously, we found that ocean acidification (OA) mitigates mercury (Hg) toxicity to marine copepod Tigriopus japonicus under multigenerational exposure (four generations, F0-F3). To determine the response mechanisms of T. japonicus against long-term exposure to OA and Hg pollution, we investigated the proteome of F3 copepods after multigenerational exposure to four conditions: pCO2 400 μatm + control; pCO2 1000 μatm + control; pCO2 400 μatm +1.0 μg/L Hg; and pCO2 1000 μatm +1.0 μg/L Hg. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that OA enhanced the copepod's energy production mainly by increasing protein assimilation and proteolysis as a compensatory strategy, which explained its physiological resilience to reduced pH. Conversely, Hg treatment decreased many critical processes, including ferric iron binding, antioxidant activity, cellular homeostasis, and glutathione metabolism, and these toxic events could translate into higher-level responses, i.e., restrained reproduction in copepods. Importantly, the mediation of Hg toxicity in T. japonicus by OA could be explained by the enhanced lysosome-autophagy pathway proteomes that are responsible for repairing and removing damaged proteins and enzymes under stress. Overall, this study provided molecular insights into the response of T. japonicus to long-term exposure of OA and Hg, with a particular emphasis on the mitigating impact of the CO2-driven acidification on Hg toxicity.

  11. The immune modulatory peptide FhHDM-1 secreted by the helminth Fasciola hepatica prevents NLRP3 inflammasome activation by inhibiting endolysosomal acidification in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Raquel; To, Joyce; Lund, Maria E; Pinar, Anita; Mansell, Ashley; Robinson, Mark W; O'Brien, Bronwyn A; Dalton, John P; Donnelly, Sheila

    2017-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is a multimeric protein complex that controls the production of IL-1β, a cytokine that influences the development of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Helminth parasites secrete molecules that interact with innate immune cells, modulating their activity to ultimately determine the phenotype of differentiated T cells, thus creating an immune environment that is conducive to sustaining chronic infection. We show that one of these molecules, FhHDM-1, a cathelicidin-like peptide secreted by the helminth parasite, Fasciola hepatica, inhibits the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome resulting in reduced secretion of IL-1β by macrophages. FhHDM-1 had no effect on the synthesis of pro-IL-1β. Rather, the inhibitory effect was associated with the capacity of the peptide to prevent acidification of the endolysosome. The activation of cathepsin B protease by lysosomal destabilization was prevented in FhHDM-1-treated macrophages. By contrast, peptide derivatives of FhHDM-1 that did not alter the lysosomal pH did not inhibit secretion of IL-1β. We propose a novel immune modulatory strategy used by F. hepatica, whereby secretion of the FhHDM-1 peptide impairs the activation of NLRP3 by lysosomal cathepsin B protease, which prevents the downstream production of IL-1β and the development of protective T helper 1 type immune responses that are detrimental to parasite survival.-Alvarado, R., To, J., Lund, M. E., Pinar, A., Mansell, A., Robinson, M. W., O'Brien, B. A., Dalton, J. P., Donnelly, S. The immune modulatory peptide FhHDM-1 secreted by the helminth Fasciola hepatica prevents NLRP3 inflammasome activation by inhibiting endolysosomal acidification in macrophages. © FASEB.

  12. Ouabain-induced internalization and lysosomal degradation of the Na+/K+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniavsky-Lev, Marina; Golani, Ofra; Karlish, Steven J D; Garty, Haim

    2014-01-10

    Internalization of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (the Na(+) pump) has been studied in the human lung carcinoma cell line H1299 that expresses YFP-tagged α1 from its normal genomic localization. Both real-time imaging and surface biotinylation have demonstrated internalization of α1 induced by ≥100 nm ouabain which occurs in a time scale of hours. Unlike previous studies in other systems, the ouabain-induced internalization was insensitive to Src or PI3K inhibitors. Accumulation of α1 in the cells could be augmented by inhibition of lysosomal degradation but not by proteosomal inhibitors. In agreement, the internalized α1 could be colocalized with the lysosomal marker LAMP1 but not with Golgi or nuclear markers. In principle, internalization could be triggered by a conformational change of the ouabain-bound Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase molecule or more generally by the disruption of cation homeostasis (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+)) due to the partial inhibition of active Na(+) and K(+) transport. Overexpression of ouabain-insensitive rat α1 failed to inhibit internalization of human α1 expressed in the same cells. In addition, incubating cells in a K(+)-free medium did not induce internalization of the pump or affect the response to ouabain. Thus, internalization is not the result of changes in the cellular cation balance but is likely to be triggered by a conformational change of the protein itself. In physiological conditions, internalization may serve to eliminate pumps that have been blocked by endogenous ouabain or other cardiac glycosides. This mechanism may be required due to the very slow dissociation of the ouabain·Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase complex.

  13. The autophagic- lysosomal pathway determines the fate of glial cells under manganese- induced oxidative stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorojod, R M; Alaimo, A; Porte Alcon, S; Pomilio, C; Saravia, F; Kotler, M L

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) overexposure is frequently associated with the development of a neurodegenerative disorder known as Manganism. The Mn-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) promotes cellular damage, finally leading to apoptotic cell death in rat astrocytoma C6 cells. In this scenario, the autophagic pathway could play an important role in preventing cytotoxicity. In the present study, we found that Mn induced an increase in the amount and total volume of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs), a process usually related to the activation of the autophagic pathway. Particularly, the generation of enlarged AVOs was a ROS- dependent event. In this report we demonstrated for the first time that Mn induces autophagy in glial cells. This conclusion emerged from the results obtained employing a battery of autophagy markers: a) the increase in LC3-II expression levels, b) the formation of autophagic vesicles labeled with monodansylcadaverine (MDC) or LC3 and, c) the increase in Beclin 1/ Bcl-2 and Beclin 1/ Bcl-X(L) ratio. Autophagy inhibition employing 3-MA and mAtg5(K130R) resulted in decreased cell viability indicating that this event plays a protective role in Mn- induced cell death. In addition, mitophagy was demonstrated by an increase in LC3 and TOM-20 colocalization. On the other hand, we proposed the occurrence of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) based in the fact that cathepsins B and D activities are essential for cell death. Both cathepsin B inhibitor (Ca-074 Me) or cathepsin D inhibitor (Pepstatin A) completely prevented Mn- induced cytotoxicity. In addition, low dose of Bafilomycin A1 showed a similar effect, a finding that adds evidence about the lysosomal role in Mn cytotoxicity. Finally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that Mn induces injury and alters LC3 expression levels in rat striatal astrocytes. In summary, our results demonstrated that autophagy is activated to counteract the harmful effect caused by Mn. These data is valuable to

  14. Ocean Acidification Impacts on Marine Carbon Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathesius, Sabine; Schartau, Markus; Oschlies, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    As the oceans take up about 30% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions, a variety of biogeochemical processes are affected by the seawater's increasing acidity. In this model study, we investigate the effect of ocean acidification on marine carbon export, focusing on the role of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP). These gel particles are formed from dissolved polysaccharides, mainly released by phytoplankton, and have an impact on the aggregation and sinking of organic particles. We test the hypothesis that a higher CO2 concentration in the water leads to an enhanced export of particulate organic carbon. We build on observed biogeochemical relationships and calibrate our model with data from ocean acidification mesocosm experiments (e.g., PeECE III, Bergen, 2005). A one-dimensional model is devised for our analysis, simulating a water column of up to 20 meters. The vertical mixing in the model is a function of density gradients, calculated from observed temperature and salinity fields. This approach provides a well-mixed surface layer and a weakly-mixed pycnocline at a realistic depth for each simulated experiment. Our model explores different biogeochemical mechanisms to explain observed correlations and helps to complete the picture given by measurements and statistical analyses.

  15. Substrate-favored lysosomal and proteasomal pathways participate in the normal balance control of insulin precursor maturation and disposal in β-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Zhang

    Full Text Available Our recent studies have uncovered that aggregation-prone proinsulin preserves a low relative folding rate and maintains a homeostatic balance of natively and non-natively folded states (i.e., proinsulin homeostasis, PIHO in β-cells as a result of the integration of maturation and disposal processes. Control of precursor maturation and disposal is thus an early regulative mechanism in the insulin production of β-cells. Herein, we show pathways involved in the disposal of endogenous proinsulin at the early secretory pathway. We conducted metabolic-labeling, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry studies to examine the effects of selective proteasome and lysosome or autophagy inhibitors on the kinetics of proinsulin and control proteins in various post-translational courses. Our metabolic-labeling studies found that the main lysosomal and ancillary proteasomal pathways participate in the heavy clearance of insulin precursor in mouse islets/β-cells cultured at the mimic physiological glucose concentrations. Further immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry studies in cloned β-cells validated that among secretory proteins, insulin precursor is heavily and preferentially removed. The rapid disposal of a large amount of insulin precursor after translation is achieved mainly through lysosomal autophagy and the subsequent basal disposals are carried out by both lysosomal and proteasomal pathways within a 30 to 60-minute post-translational process. The findings provide the first clear demonstration that lysosomal and proteasomal pathways both play roles in the normal maintenance of PIHO for insulin production, and defined the physiological participation of lysosomal autophagy in the protein quality control at the early secretory pathway of pancreatic β-cells.

  16. Simvastatin promotes NPC1-mediated free cholesterol efflux from lysosomes through CYP7A1/LXRα signalling pathway in oxLDL-loaded macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Aolin; Halquist, Matthew S; Yuan, Xinxu; Henderson, Scott C; Dewey, William L; Li, Pin-Lan; Li, Ningjun; Zhang, Fan

    2017-02-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, are the first-line medications prescribed for the prevention and treatment of coronary artery diseases. The efficacy of statins has been attributed not only to their systemic cholesterol-lowering actions but also to their pleiotropic effects that are unrelated to cholesterol reduction. These pleiotropic effects have been increasingly recognized as essential in statins therapy. This study was designed to investigate the pleiotropic actions of simvastatin, one of the most commonly prescribed statins, on macrophage cholesterol homeostasis with a focus on lysosomal free cholesterol egression. With simultaneous nile red and filipin staining, analysis of confocal/multi-photon imaging demonstrated that simvastatin markedly attenuated unesterified (free) cholesterol buildup in macrophages loaded with oxidized low-density lipoprotein but had little effect in reducing the sizes of cholesteryl ester-containing lipid droplets; the reduction in free cholesterol was mainly attributed to decreases in lysosome-compartmentalized cholesterol. Functionally, the egression of free cholesterol from lysosomes attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. It was determined that the reduction of lysosomal free cholesterol buildup by simvastatin was due to the up-regulation of Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1), a lysosomal residing cholesterol transporter. Moreover, the enhanced enzymatic production of 7-hydroxycholesterol by cytochrome P450 7A1 and the subsequent activation of liver X receptor α underscored the up-regulation of NPC1. These findings reveal a novel pleiotropic effect of simvastatin in affecting lysosomal cholesterol efflux in macrophages and the associated significance in the treatment of atherosclerosis. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  17. Genomic expression analyses reveal lysosomal, innate immunity proteins, as disease correlates in murine models of a lysosomal storage disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Suhail Alam

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC disease is a rare, genetic, lysosomal disorder with progressive neurodegeneration. Poor understanding of the pathophysiology and a lack of blood-based diagnostic markers are major hurdles in the treatment and management of NPC and several additional, neurological lysosomal disorders. To identify disease severity correlates, we undertook whole genome expression profiling of sentinel organs, brain, liver, and spleen of Balb/c Npc1(-/- mice relative to Npc1(+/- at an asymptomatic stage, as well as early- and late-symptomatic stages. Unexpectedly, we found prominent up regulation of innate immunity genes with age-dependent change in their expression, in all three organs. We shortlisted a set of 12 secretory genes whose expression steadily increased with age in both brain and liver, as potential plasma correlates of neurological and/or liver disease. Ten were innate immune genes with eight ascribed to lysosomes. Several are known to be elevated in diseased organs of murine models of other lysosomal diseases including Gaucher's disease, Sandhoff disease and MPSIIIB. We validated the top candidate lysozyme, in the plasma of Npc1(-/- as well as Balb/c Npc1(nmf164 mice (bearing a point mutation closer to human disease mutants and show its reduction in response to an emerging therapeutic. We further established elevation of innate immunity in Npc1(-/- mice through multiple functional assays including inhibition of bacterial infection as well as cellular analysis and immunohistochemistry. These data revealed neutrophil elevation in the Npc1(-/- spleen and liver (where large foci were detected proximal to damaged tissue. Together our results yield a set of lysosomal, secretory innate immunity genes that have potential to be developed as pan or specific plasma markers for neurological diseases associated with lysosomal storage and where diagnosis is a major problem. Further, the accumulation of neutrophils in diseased organs

  18. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D M; Pevsner, J; Scullion, M A; Vaughn, M; Kaplan, J

    2000-07-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome-lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome-lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome-lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome-lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages.

  19. Lysosomal acid phosphatase is internalized via clathrin-coated pits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperman, J.; Hille, A.; Geuze, H.J.; Peters, C.; Brodsky, F.M.; Figura, K. von

    1992-01-01

    The presence of lysosomal acid phosphatase (LAP) in coated pits at the plasma membrane was investigated by immunocytochemistry in thymidine kinase negative mouse L-cells (Ltk-) and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing human LAP (Ltk-LAP and BHK-LAP cells). Double immunogold labeling showed

  20. Recent advances in gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastall DP

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available David PW Rastall,1 Andrea Amalfitano1,2 1Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 2Department of Pediatrics, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA Abstract: Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs are a group of genetic diseases that result in metabolic derangements of the lysosome. Most LSDs are due to the genetic absence of a single catabolic enzyme, causing accumulation of the enzyme's substrate within the lysosome. Over time, tissue-specific substrate accumulations result in a spectrum of symptoms and disabilities that vary by LSD. LSDs are promising targets for gene therapy because delivery of a single gene into a small percentage of the appropriate target cells may be sufficient to impact the clinical course of the disease. Recently, there have been several significant advancements in the potential for gene therapy of these disorders, including the first human trials. Future clinical trials will build upon these initial attempts, with an improved understanding of immune system responses to gene therapy, the obstacle that the blood–brain barrier poses for neuropathic LSDs, as well other biological barriers that, when overcome, may facilitate gene therapy for LSDs. In this manuscript, we will highlight the recent innovations in gene therapy for LSDs and discuss the clinical limitations that remain to be overcome, with the goal of fostering an understanding and further development of this important field. Keywords: human trials, clinical trials, gene therapy, lysosomal storage disease, blood-brain barrier, adeno-associated virus, lentivirus, adenovirus 

  1. The frequency of lysosomal storage diseases in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, BJHM; Wevers, RA; Kleijer, WJ; Groener, JEM; de Jong, JGN; van Weely, S; Niezen-Koning, KE; van Diggelen, OP

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated the relative frequency and the birth prevalence of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) in The Netherlands based on all 963 enzymatically confirmed cases diagnosed during the period 1970-1996. The combined birth prevalence for all LSDs is 14 per 100,000 live births. Glycogenosis type

  2. Clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogeneity in lysosomal storage diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractThe history of lysosomal storage diseases dates back to the end of the last century when the first clinical reports appeared of patients suffering from these genetic, metabolic disorders (Tay, 1881; Gaucher, 1882; Sachs, 1887; Fabry, 1898). About seventy years wouid pass before the term

  3. The frequency of lysosomal storage diseases in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorthuis, BJHM; Wevers, RA; Kleijer, WJ; Groener, JEM; de Jong, JGN; van Weely, S; Niezen-Koning, KE; van Diggelen, OP

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated the relative frequency and the birth prevalence of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) in The Netherlands based on all 963 enzymatically confirmed cases diagnosed during the period 1970-1996. The combined birth prevalence for all LSDs is 14 per 100,000 live births. Glycogenosis type

  4. Release and uptake of lysosomal enzymes : studied in cultured cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J.J. Halley (Dicky)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the experimental work described in this thesiswas to investigate some aspects of the release and uptake of lysosomal enzymes. The experiments involved the use of normal human and animal fibroblasts and some other cell types such as hepatocytes and hepatoma cells as sources

  5. Neuronopathic Lysosomal Storage Diseases: Clinical and Pathologic Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Carlos E.; Grabowski, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The lysosomal--autophagocytic system diseases (LASDs) affect multiple body systems including the central nervous system (CNS). The progressive CNS pathology has its onset at different ages, leading to neurodegeneration and early death. Methods: Literature review provided insight into the current clinical neurological findings,…

  6. Extracellular acidification induces connective tissue growth factor production through proton-sensing receptor OGR1 in human airway smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, Shinichi [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Ishizuka, Tamotsu, E-mail: tamotsui@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Yamada, Hidenori; Kamide, Yosuke; Hisada, Takeshi; Ichimonji, Isao; Aoki, Haruka; Yatomi, Masakiyo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Komachi, Mayumi [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Ono, Akihiro; Koga, Yasuhiko [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Dobashi, Kunio [Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Mogi, Chihiro; Sato, Koichi; Tomura, Hideaki [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan); Mori, Masatomo [Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi 371-8511 (Japan); Okajima, Fumikazu [Laboratory of Signal Transduction, Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, Maebashi 371-8512 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} The involvement of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling was investigated. {yields} Extracellular acidification alone induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Extracellular acidification enhanced TGF-{beta}-induced CTGF production in human ASMCs. {yields} Proton-sensing receptor OGR1 was involved in acidic pH-stimulated CTGF production. {yields} OGR1 may play an important role in airway remodeling in asthma. -- Abstract: Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, hyper-responsiveness and remodeling. Extracellular acidification is known to be associated with severe asthma; however, the role of extracellular acidification in airway remodeling remains elusive. In the present study, the effects of acidification on the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a critical factor involved in the formation of extracellular matrix proteins and hence airway remodeling, were examined in human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Acidic pH alone induced a substantial production of CTGF, and enhanced transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta}-induced CTGF mRNA and protein expression. The extracellular acidic pH-induced effects were inhibited by knockdown of a proton-sensing ovarian cancer G-protein-coupled receptor (OGR1) with its specific small interfering RNA and by addition of the G{sub q/11} protein-specific inhibitor, YM-254890, or the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) receptor antagonist, 2-APB. In conclusion, extracellular acidification induces CTGF production through the OGR1/G{sub q/11} protein and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca{sup 2+} mobilization in human ASMCs.

  7. Glycolipid-dependent sorting of melanosomal from lysosomal membrane proteins by lumenal determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groux-Degroote, S.; Dijk, S.M. van; Wolthoorn, J.; Neumann, S.; Theos, A.C.; Mazière, A.M. de; Klumperman, J.; Meer, G. van; Sprong, H.

    2008-01-01

    Melanosomes are lysosome-related organelles that coexist with lysosomes in mammalian pigment cells. Melanosomal and lysosomal membrane proteins share similar sorting signals in their cytoplasmic tail, raising the question how they are segregated. We show that in control melanocytes, the melanosomal

  8. Glycolipid-dependent sorting of melanosomal from lysosomal membrane proteins by lumenal determinants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groux-Degroote, S.; Dijk, S.M. van; Wolthoorn, J.; Neumann, S.; Theos, A.C.; Mazière, A.M. de; Klumperman, J.; Meer, G. van; Sprong, H.

    2008-01-01

    Melanosomes are lysosome-related organelles that coexist with lysosomes in mammalian pigment cells. Melanosomal and lysosomal membrane proteins share similar sorting signals in their cytoplasmic tail, raising the question how they are segregated. We show that in control melanocytes, the melanosomal

  9. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Machado

    Full Text Available Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction

  10. Recognising ocean acidification in deep time: An evaluation of the evidence for acidification across the Triassic-Jurassic boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Sarah E.; Martindale, Rowan C.; Ritterbush, Kathleen A.; Bottjer, David J.; Corsetti, Frank A.; Berelson, William M.

    2012-06-01

    While demonstrating ocean acidification in the modern is relatively straightforward (measure increase in atmospheric CO2 and corresponding ocean chemistry change), identifying palaeo-ocean acidification is problematic. The crux of this problem is that the rock record is a constructive archive while ocean acidification is essentially a destructive (and/or inhibitory) phenomenon. This is exacerbated in deep time without the benefit of a deep ocean record. Here, we discuss the feasibility of, and potential criteria for, identifying an acidification event in deep time. Furthermore, we investigate the evidence for ocean acidification during the Triassic-Jurassic (T-J) boundary interval, an excellent test case because 1) it occurs in deep time, beyond the reach of deep sea drilling coverage; 2) a potential trigger for acidification is known; and 3) it is associated with one of the 'Big Five' mass extinctions which disproportionately affected modern-style invertebrates. Three main criteria suggest that acidification may have occurred across the T-J transition. 1) The eruption of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) and the associated massive and rapid release of CO2 coincident with the end-Triassic mass extinction provide a suitable trigger for an acidification event (full carbonate undersaturation in the surface ocean is possible but improbable). 2) Tentative evidence for a global paucity of carbonate across the end-Triassic mass extinction versus the adjacent stratigraphy is consistent with a predicted sedimentary response to acidification. 3) The end-Triassic mass extinction was particularly selective against acid-sensitive organisms (more so than perhaps any other extinction event) and temporarily eliminated coral reefs. Therefore multiple lines of evidence are consistent with a T-J ocean acidification event within our current resolution to recognise such events in deep time. The conclusion that the end-Triassic extinction was influenced by acidification

  11. Fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles leads to uncontrolled exocytosis in the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soonhong; Ahuja, Malini; Kim, Min Seuk; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Jha, Archana; Zeng, Mei; Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Ling-Gang; Wassif, Christopher A; Porter, Forbes D; Zerfas, Patricia M; Eckhaus, Michael A; Brailoiu, Eugen; Shin, Dong Min; Muallem, Shmuel

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in TRPML1 cause the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV). The role of TRPML1 in cell function and how the mutations cause the disease are not well understood. Most studies focus on the role of TRPML1 in constitutive membrane trafficking to and from the lysosomes. However, this cannot explain impaired neuromuscular and secretory cells' functions that mediate regulated exocytosis. Here, we analyzed several forms of regulated exocytosis in a mouse model of MLIV and, opposite to expectations, we found enhanced exocytosis in secretory glands due to enlargement of secretory granules in part due to fusion with lysosomes. Preliminary exploration of synaptic vesicle size, spontaneous mEPSCs, and glutamate secretion in neurons provided further evidence for enhanced exocytosis that was rescued by re-expression of TRPML1 in neurons. These features were not observed in Niemann-Pick type C1. These findings suggest that TRPML1 may guard against pathological fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles and suggest a new approach toward developing treatment for MLIV.

  12. Ocean acidification changes the male fitness landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Anna L.; Levitan, Don R.; Hosken, David J.; Lewis, Ceri

    2016-01-01

    Sperm competition is extremely common in many ecologically important marine taxa. Ocean acidification (OA) is driving rapid changes to the marine environments in which freely spawned sperm operate, yet the consequences of OA on sperm performance are poorly understood in the context of sperm competition. Here, we investigated the impacts of OA (+1000 μatm pCO2) on sperm competitiveness for the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. Males with faster sperm had greater competitive fertilisation success in both seawater conditions. Similarly, males with more motile sperm had greater sperm competitiveness, but only under current pCO2 levels. Under OA the strength of this association was significantly reduced and there were male sperm performance rank changes under OA, such that the best males in current conditions are not necessarily best under OA. Therefore OA will likely change the male fitness landscape, providing a mechanism by which environmental change alters the genetic landscape of marine species. PMID:27531458

  13. Ocean acidification changes the male fitness landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Anna L.; Levitan, Don R.; Hosken, David J.; Lewis, Ceri

    2016-08-01

    Sperm competition is extremely common in many ecologically important marine taxa. Ocean acidification (OA) is driving rapid changes to the marine environments in which freely spawned sperm operate, yet the consequences of OA on sperm performance are poorly understood in the context of sperm competition. Here, we investigated the impacts of OA (+1000 μatm pCO2) on sperm competitiveness for the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. Males with faster sperm had greater competitive fertilisation success in both seawater conditions. Similarly, males with more motile sperm had greater sperm competitiveness, but only under current pCO2 levels. Under OA the strength of this association was significantly reduced and there were male sperm performance rank changes under OA, such that the best males in current conditions are not necessarily best under OA. Therefore OA will likely change the male fitness landscape, providing a mechanism by which environmental change alters the genetic landscape of marine species.

  14. Ocean Acidification from space: recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabia, Roberto; Shutler, Jamie; Land, Peter; Fernandez-Prieto, Diego; Donlon, Craig; Reul, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon referred to as Ocean Acidification (OA) is gathering increasing attention as one of the major foci of climate-related research, for its profound impact at scientific and socio-economic level. To date, the majority of the scientific studies into the potential impacts of OA have focused on in-situ measurements, laboratory-controlled experiments and models simulations. Satellite remote sensing technology have yet to be fully exploited, despite it has been stressed it could play a significant role by providing synoptic and frequent measurements for investigating globally OA processes, also extending in-situ carbonate chemistry measurements on different spatial/temporal scales [1,2]. Within this context, the purpose of the recently completed ESA "Pathfinders - Ocean Acidification" project was to quantitatively and routinely estimate OA-related parameters by means of a blending of satellite observations and model outputs in five case-study regions (global ocean, Amazon plume, Barents sea, Greater Caribbean and Bay of Bengal). Satellite Ocean Colour, Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) have been exploited, with an emphasis on the latter being the latest addition to the portfolio of satellite measured parameters. A proper merging of these different satellites products allows computing at least two independent proxies among the seawater carbonate system parameters: the partial pressure of CO2 in surface seawater (pCO2); the total Dissolved Inorganic Carbon (DIC), the total alkalinity (TA) and the surface ocean pH. In the project, efforts have been devoted to a systematic characterization of TA and DIC from space in the mentioned case-study regions; in this paper, also through the knowledge of these parameters, the objective is to come up with the currently best educated guess of the surface ocean pH [3] and Aragonite saturation state. This will also include an estimation of the achievable accuracy by propagating the errors in the

  15. Calcifying species sensitivity distributions for ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Ligia B; De Schryver, An M; Hendriks, A Jan; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2015-02-01

    Increasing CO2 atmospheric levels lead to increasing ocean acidification, thereby enhancing calcium carbonate dissolution of calcifying species. We gathered peer-reviewed experimental data on the effects of acidified seawater on calcifying species growth, reproduction, and survival. The data were used to derive species-specific median effective concentrations, i.e., pH50, and pH10, via logistic regression. Subsequently, we developed species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) to assess the potentially affected fraction (PAF) of species exposed to pH declines. Effects on species growth were observed at higher pH than those on species reproduction (mean pH10 was 7.73 vs 7.63 and mean pH50 was 7.28 vs 7.11 for the two life processes, respectively) and the variability in the sensitivity of species increased with increasing number of species available for the PAF (pH10 standard deviation was 0.20, 0.21, and 0.33 for survival, reproduction, and growth, respectively). The SSDs were then applied to two climate change scenarios to estimate the increase in PAF (ΔPAF) by future ocean acidification. In a high CO2 emission scenario, ΔPAF was 3 to 10% (for pH50) and 21 to 32% (for pH10). In a low emission scenario, ΔPAF was 1 to 4% (for pH50) and 7 to 12% (for pH10). Our SSDs developed for the effect of decreasing ocean pH on calcifying marine species assemblages can also be used for comparison with other environmental stressors.

  16. Ocean acidification alters fish-jellyfish symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerken, Ivan; Pitt, Kylie A; Rutte, Melchior D; Geertsma, Robbert C

    2016-06-29

    Symbiotic relationships are common in nature, and are important for individual fitness and sustaining species populations. Global change is rapidly altering environmental conditions, but, with the exception of coral-microalgae interactions, we know little of how this will affect symbiotic relationships. We here test how the effects of ocean acidification, from rising anthropogenic CO2 emissions, may alter symbiotic interactions between juvenile fish and their jellyfish hosts. Fishes treated with elevated seawater CO2 concentrations, as forecast for the end of the century on a business-as-usual greenhouse gas emission scenario, were negatively affected in their behaviour. The total time that fish (yellowtail scad) spent close to their jellyfish host in a choice arena where they could see and smell their host was approximately three times shorter under future compared with ambient CO2 conditions. Likewise, the mean number of attempts to associate with jellyfish was almost three times lower in CO2-treated compared with control fish, while only 63% (high CO2) versus 86% (control) of all individuals tested initiated an association at all. By contrast, none of three fish species tested were attracted solely to jellyfish olfactory cues under present-day CO2 conditions, suggesting that the altered fish-jellyfish association is not driven by negative effects of ocean acidification on olfaction. Because shelter is not widely available in the open water column and larvae of many (and often commercially important) pelagic species associate with jellyfish for protection against predators, modification of the fish-jellyfish symbiosis might lead to higher mortality and alter species population dynamics, and potentially have flow-on effects for their fisheries.

  17. Coastal ocean acidification: The other eutrophication problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ryan B.; Baumann, Hannes; Grear, Jason S.; Aller, Robert C.; Gobler, Christopher J.

    2014-07-01

    Increased nutrient loading into estuaries causes the accumulation of algal biomass, and microbial degradation of this organic matter decreases oxygen levels and contributes towards hypoxia. A second, often overlooked consequence of microbial degradation of organic matter is the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and a lowering of seawater pH. To assess the potential for acidification in eutrophic estuaries, the levels of dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), and the saturation state for aragonite (Ωaragonite) were horizontally and vertically assessed during the onset, peak, and demise of low oxygen conditions in systems across the northeast US including Narragansett Bay (RI), Long Island Sound (CT-NY), Jamaica Bay (NY), and Hempstead Bay (NY). Low pH conditions (3000 μatm), were acidic pH (<7.0), and were undersaturated with regard to aragonite (Ωaragonite < 1), even near-normoxic but eutrophic regions of these estuaries were often relatively acidified (pH < 7.7) during late summer and/or early fall. The close spatial and temporal correspondence between DO and pH and the occurrence of extremes in these conditions in regions with the most intense nutrient loading indicated that they were primarily driven by microbial respiration. Given that coastal acidification is promoted by nutrient-enhanced organic matter loading and reaches levels that have previously been shown to negatively impact the growth and survival of marine organisms, it may be considered an additional symptom of eutrophication that warrants managerial attention.

  18. Megalin/Cubulin-Lysosome-mediated Albumin Reabsorption Is Involved in the Tubular Cell Activation of NLRP3 Inflammasome and Tubulointerstitial Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Wen, Yi; Tang, Tao-Tao; Lv, Lin-Li; Tang, Ri-Ning; Liu, Hong; Ma, Kun-Ling; Crowley, Steve D; Liu, Bi-Cheng

    2015-07-17

    Albuminuria contributes to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease by inducing tubulointerstitial inflammation (TI) and fibrosis. However, the exact mechanisms of TI in response to albuminuria are unresolved. We previously demonstrated that NLRP3 and inflammasomes mediate albumin-induced lesions in tubular cells. Here, we further investigated the role of endocytic receptors and lysosome rupture in NLRP3 inflammasome activation. A murine proteinuric nephropathy model was induced by albumin overload as described previously. The priming and activation signals for inflammasome complex formation were evoked simultaneously by albumin excess in tubular epithelial cells. The former signal was dependent on a albumin-triggered NF-κB pathway activation. This process is mediated by the endocytic receptor, megalin and cubilin. However, the silencing of megalin or cubilin inhibited the albumin-induced NLRP3 signal. Notably, subsequent lysosome rupture and the corresponding release of lysosomal hydrolases, especially cathepsin B, were observed in tubular epithelial cells exposed to albumin. Cathepsin B release and distribution are essential for NLRP3 signal activation, and inhibitors of cathepsin B suppressed the NLRP3 signal in tubular epithelial cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that megalin/cubilin and lysosome rupture are involved in albumin-triggered tubular injury and TI. This study provides novel insights into albuminuria-induced TI and implicates the active control of albuminuria as a critical strategy to halt the progression of chronic kidney disease.

  19. Acute effects of the sigma-2 receptor agonist siramesine on lysosomal and extra-lysosomal proteolytic systems in lens epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jonhede, S.; Petersen, A; Zetterberg, M.; Karlsson, J-O

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of the sigma-2 receptor agonist, siramesine, on morphology, growth, cell death, lysosomal function, and effects on extra-lysosomal proteolytic systems in human lens epithelial cells. Methods Human lens epithelial cells in culture were exposed to siramesine and examined for morphological changes using Nomarski optics or calcein. Lysosomes were evaluated using acridine orange and Magic Red (RR-cresyl violet). Nuclear morphology was...

  20. Autophagic flux promotes cisplatin resistance in human ovarian carcinoma cells through ATP-mediated lysosomal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liwei; Xu, Ye; Su, Jing; Yu, Huimei; Kang, Jinsong; Li, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoning; Xie, Qi; Yu, Chunyan; Sun, Liankun; Li, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Lysosomes are involved in promoting resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. However, the mechanisms underlying lysosomal influence of cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer remain incompletely understood. We report that, compared with cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 cells, autophagy increases in cisplatin-resistant SKOV3/DDP cells treated with cisplatin. Inhibition of early-stage autophagy enhanced cisplatin-mediated cytotoxicity in SKOV3/DDP cells, but autophagy inhibition at a later stage by disturbing autophagosome-lysosome fusion is more effective. Notably, SKOV3/DDP cells contained more lysosomes than cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 cells. Abundant lysosomes and lysosomal cathepsin D activity were required for continued autolysosomal degradation and maintenance of autophagic flux in SKOV3/DDP cells. Furthermore, SKOV3/DDP cells contain abundant lysosomal ATP required for lysosomal function, and inhibition of lysosomal ATP accumulation impaired lysosomal function and blocked autophagic flux. Therefore, our findings suggest that lysosomes at least partially contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells through their role in cisplatin-induced autophagic processes, and provide insight into the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in tumors.

  1. The Role of Oxidized Cholesterol in Diabetes-Induced Lysosomal Dysfunction in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Bakeman, Anna; Rosko, Andrew; Glasser, Rebecca; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-05-01

    Abnormalities in lysosomal function have been reported in diabetes, aging, and age-related degenerative diseases. These lysosomal abnormalities are an early manifestation of neurodegenerative diseases and often precede the onset of clinical symptoms such as learning and memory deficits; however, the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction is not known. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction in the cortex and hippocampi, key structures involved in learning and memory, of a type 2 diabetes (T2D) mouse model, the leptin receptor deficient db/db mouse. We demonstrate for the first time that diabetes leads to destabilization of lysosomes as well as alterations in the protein expression, activity, and/or trafficking of two lysosomal enzymes, hexosaminidase A and cathepsin D, in the hippocampus of db/db mice. Pioglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD) commonly used in the treatment of diabetes due to its ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reverse hyperglycemia, was ineffective in reversing the diabetes-induced changes on lysosomal enzymes. Our previous work revealed that pioglitazone does not reverse hypercholesterolemia; thus, we investigated whether cholesterol plays a role in diabetes-induced lysosomal changes. In vitro, cholesterol promoted the destabilization of lysosomes, suggesting that lysosomal-related changes associated with diabetes are due to elevated levels of cholesterol. Since lysosome dysfunction precedes neurodegeneration, cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer's disease neuropathology, our results may provide a potential mechanism that links diabetes with complications of the central nervous system.

  2. Ocean and Coastal Acidification off New England and Nova Scotia

    Science.gov (United States)

    New England coastal and adjacent Nova Scotia shelf waters have a reduced buffering capacity because of significant freshwater input, making the region’s waters potentially more vulnerable to coastal acidification. Nutrient loading and heavy precipitation events further acid...

  3. Climate change and ocean acidification-interactions with aquatic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2013-01-15

    The possibilities for interactions between toxicants and ocean acidification are reviewed from two angles. First, it is considered how toxicant responses may affect ocean acidification by influencing the carbon dioxide balance. Second, it is introduced, how the possible changes in environmental conditions (temperature, pH and oxygenation), expected to be associated with climate change and ocean acidification, may interact with the toxicant responses of organisms, especially fish. One significant weakness in available data is that toxicological research has seldom been connected with ecological and physiological/biochemical research evaluating the responses of organisms to temperature, pH or oxygenation changes occurring in the natural environment. As a result, although there are significant potential interactions between toxicants and natural environmental responses pertaining to climate change and ocean acidification, it is very poorly known if such interactions actually occur, and can be behind the observed disturbances in the function and distribution of organisms in our seas.

  4. Towards improved socio-economic assessments of ocean acidification's impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmi, Nathalie; Allemand, Denis; Dupont, Sam; Safa, Alain; Haraldsson, Gunnar; Nunes, Paulo A L D; Moore, Chris; Hattam, Caroline; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Fine, Maoz; Turley, Carol; Jeffree, Ross; Orr, James; Munday, Philip L; Cooley, Sarah R

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification is increasingly recognized as a component of global change that could have a wide range of impacts on marine organisms, the ecosystems they live in, and the goods and services they provide humankind. Assessment of these potential socio-economic impacts requires integrated efforts between biologists, chemists, oceanographers, economists and social scientists. But because ocean acidification is a new research area, significant knowledge gaps are preventing economists from estimating its welfare impacts. For instance, economic data on the impact of ocean acidification on significant markets such as fisheries, aquaculture and tourism are very limited (if not non-existent), and non-market valuation studies on this topic are not yet available. Our paper summarizes the current understanding of future OA impacts and sets out what further information is required for economists to assess socio-economic impacts of ocean acidification. Our aim is to provide clear directions for multidisciplinary collaborative research.

  5. Ocean and Coastal Acidification off New England and Nova Scotia

    Science.gov (United States)

    New England coastal and adjacent Nova Scotia shelf waters have a reduced buffering capacity because of significant freshwater input, making the region’s waters potentially more vulnerable to coastal acidification. Nutrient loading and heavy precipitation events further acid...

  6. Nitrogen deposition contributes to soil acidification in tropical ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiankai; Mao, Qinggong; Gilliam, Frank S; Luo, Yiqi; Mo, Jiangming

    2014-12-01

    Elevated anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition has greatly altered terrestrial ecosystem functioning, threatening ecosystem health via acidification and eutrophication in temperate and boreal forests across the northern hemisphere. However, response of forest soil acidification to N deposition has been less studied in humid tropics compared to other forest types. This study was designed to explore impacts of long-term N deposition on soil acidification processes in tropical forests. We have established a long-term N-deposition experiment in an N-rich lowland tropical forest of Southern China since 2002 with N addition as NH4 NO3 of 0, 50, 100 and 150 kg N ha(-1)  yr(-1) . We measured soil acidification status and element leaching in soil drainage solution after 6-year N addition. Results showed that our study site has been experiencing serious soil acidification and was quite acid-sensitive showing high acidification (pH(H2O) soil profiles. Long-term N addition significantly accelerated soil acidification, leading to depleted base cations and decreased BS, and further lowered ANC. However, N addition did not alter exchangeable Al(3+) , but increased cation exchange capacity (CEC). Nitrogen addition-induced increase in SOC is suggested to contribute to both higher CEC and lower pH. We further found that increased N addition greatly decreased soil solution pH at 20 cm depth, but not at 40 cm. Furthermore, there was no evidence that Al(3+) was leaching out from the deeper soils. These unique responses in tropical climate likely resulted from: exchangeable H(+) dominating changes of soil cation pool, an exhausted base cation pool, N-addition stimulating SOC production, and N saturation. Our results suggest that long-term N addition can contribute measurably to soil acidification, and that shortage of Ca and Mg should receive more attention than soil exchangeable Al in tropical forests with elevated N deposition in the future.

  7. Devising a Coral Reef Ocean Acidification Monitoring Portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, D. K.; Jewett, L.

    2012-12-01

    Coral reef monitoring has frequently been based only on descriptive science with limited capacity to assign specific attribution to agents of change. There is a requirement to engineer a diagnostic monitoring approach that can test predictions regarding the response of coral reef ecosystems to ocean acidification, and to identify potential areas of refugia or areas of particular concern. The approach should provide the means to detect not only changes in water chemistry but also changes in coral reef community structure and function which can be anticipated based upon our current understanding of paleo-OA events, experimental findings, process investigations, and modeling projections In August, 2012 a Coral Reef Ocean Acidification Monitoring Portfolio Workshop was hosted by the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program and the National Coral Reef Institute at the Nova Southeastern University Oceanographic Center. The workshop convened researchers and project managers from around the world engaged in coral reef ecosystems ocean acidification monitoring and research. The workshop sought to define a suite of metrics to include as part of long-term coral reef monitoring efforts that can contribute to discerning specific attribution of changes in coral reef ecosystems in response to ocean acidification. This portfolio of observations should leverage existing and proposed monitoring initiatives and would be derived from a suite of chemical, biogeochemical and ecological measurements. This talk will report out on the key findings from the workshop which should include identifying the most valuable that should be integrated into long-term coral reef ecosystem monitoring that will aid in discerning changes in coral reef ecosystems in response to ocean acidification. The outcomes should provide: recommendations of the most efficient and robust ways to monitor these metrics; identified augmentations that would be required to current ocean acidification monitoring necessary to achieve

  8. The Economic Impact of Ocean Acidification on Coral Reefs

    OpenAIRE

    Brander, Luke M.; Rehdanz, Katrin; Tol, Richard S. J.; van Beukering, Pieter J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Because ocean acidification has only recently been recognized as a problem caused by CO2 emissions, impact studies are still rare and estimates of the economic impact are absent. This paper estimates the economic impact of ocean acidification on coral reefs which are generally considered to be economically as well as ecologically important ecosystems. First, we conduct an impact assessment in which atmospheric concentration of CO2 is linked to ocean acidity causing coral reef area loss. Next,...

  9. Myelin lesions associated with lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Phyllis L; Kaye, Edward M; Powers, James M

    2010-09-01

    Abnormalities of myelin are common in lysosomal and peroxisomal disorders. Most display a primary loss of myelin in which the myelin sheath and/or oligodendrocytes are selectively targeted by diverse pathogenetic processes. The most severe and, hence, clinically relevant are heritable diseases predominantly of infants and children, the leukodystrophies: metachromatic, globoid cell (Krabbe disease) and adreno-leukodystrophy. Our still limited understanding of these diseases has derived from multiple sources: originally, neurological-neuropathologic-neurochemical correlative studies of the natural disease in humans or other mammals, which has been enhanced by more sophisticated and contemporary techniques of cell and molecular biology. Transgenic mouse models seem to be the most promising methodology, allowing the examination of the cellular role of lysosomes and peroxisomes for formation and maintenance of both myelin and axons, and providing initial platforms to evaluate therapies. Treatment options are woefully inadequate and in their nascent stages, but still inspire some hope for the future.

  10. Induced pluripotent stem cell models of lysosomal storage disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K. Borger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have provided new opportunities to explore the cell biology and pathophysiology of human diseases, and the lysosomal storage disorder research community has been quick to adopt this technology. Patient-derived iPSC models have been generated for a number of lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher disease, Pompe disease, Fabry disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, Niemann-Pick types A and C1, and several of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Here, we review the strategies employed for reprogramming and differentiation, as well as insights into disease etiology gleaned from the currently available models. Examples are provided to illustrate how iPSC-derived models can be employed to develop new therapeutic strategies for these disorders. We also discuss how models of these rare diseases could contribute to an enhanced understanding of more common neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, and discuss key challenges and opportunities in this area of research.

  11. Immune response hinders therapy for lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Katherine P

    2008-08-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for the lysosomal storage disease mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) involves i.v. injection of alpha-l-iduronidase, which can be taken up by cells throughout the body. While a significant immune response to ERT has been shown in patients with MPS I, little is known about what effect anti-enzyme antibodies have on treatment efficacy. In this issue of the JCI, Dickson et al. demonstrate that anti-enzyme antibodies inhibit enzyme uptake and substantially limit the therapeutic efficacy of ERT in canines with MPS I (see the related article beginning on page 2868). Furthermore, the induction of immune tolerance--via oral delivery of cyclosporine A and azathioprine for two months at the time of initiation of ERT with recombinant human alpha-L-iduronidase--improved enzyme uptake in organs. Therefore, transient immunosuppression may enhance ERT for lysosomal storage diseases.

  12. Targeting Androgen Receptor by Lysosomal Degradation in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    were done as described.13 Protein Sample Preparation and Mass Spectrometry Tandem Affinity Purification of FLAG-His-EWS-Fli-1- Interacting Proteins . Forty...incubated with Ni-NTA agarose (Qiagen), FLAG-His-EWS-Fli-1 and its interacting proteins were collected by centrifugation, washed three times with TN buffer...the lysosome fraction was loaded at 100x compared to the input. ■ RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Proteomic Analysis of the EWS-Fli-1- Interacting Proteins To

  13. Vamp-7 Mediates Vesicular Transport from Endosomes to Lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, Raj J.; Yang, Bin; Prekeris, Rytis; Lee, Kelly C.; Klumperman, Judith; Scheller, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    A more complete picture of the molecules that are critical for the organization of membrane compartments is beginning to emerge through the characterization of proteins in the vesicle-associated membrane protein (also called synaptobrevin) family of membrane trafficking proteins. To better understand the mechanisms of membrane trafficking within the endocytic pathway, we generated a series of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against the cytoplasmic domain of vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP-7). The antibodies recognize a 25-kD membrane-associated protein in multiple tissues and cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis reveals colocalization with a marker of late endosomes and lysosomes, lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1), but not with other membrane markers, including p115 and transferrin receptor. Treatment with nocodozole or brefeldin A does not disrupt the colocalization of VAMP-7 and LAMP-1. Immunoelectron microscopy analysis shows that VAMP-7 is most concentrated in the trans-Golgi network region of the cell as well as late endosomes and transport vesicles that do not contain the mannose-6 phosphate receptor. In streptolysin- O–permeabilized cells, antibodies against VAMP-7 inhibit the breakdown of epidermal growth factor but not the recycling of transferrin. These data are consistent with a role for VAMP-7 in the vesicular transport of proteins from the early endosome to the lysosome. PMID:10459012

  14. Discriminating lysosomal membrane protein types using dynamic neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Vijay; Gupta, Dwijendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a dynamic artificial neural network methodology, which classifies the proteins into their classes from their sequences alone: the lysosomal membrane protein classes and the various other membranes protein classes. In this paper, neural networks-based lysosomal-associated membrane protein type prediction system is proposed. Different protein sequence representations are fused to extract the features of a protein sequence, which includes seven feature sets; amino acid (AA) composition, sequence length, hydrophobic group, electronic group, sum of hydrophobicity, R-group, and dipeptide composition. To reduce the dimensionality of the large feature vector, we applied the principal component analysis. The probabilistic neural network, generalized regression neural network, and Elman regression neural network (RNN) are used as classifiers and compared with layer recurrent network (LRN), a dynamic network. The dynamic networks have memory, i.e. its output depends not only on the input but the previous outputs also. Thus, the accuracy of LRN classifier among all other artificial neural networks comes out to be the highest. The overall accuracy of jackknife cross-validation is 93.2% for the data-set. These predicted results suggest that the method can be effectively applied to discriminate lysosomal associated membrane proteins from other membrane proteins (Type-I, Outer membrane proteins, GPI-Anchored) and Globular proteins, and it also indicates that the protein sequence representation can better reflect the core feature of membrane proteins than the classical AA composition.

  15. Recent advances in gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastall, David Pw; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of genetic diseases that result in metabolic derangements of the lysosome. Most LSDs are due to the genetic absence of a single catabolic enzyme, causing accumulation of the enzyme's substrate within the lysosome. Over time, tissue-specific substrate accumulations result in a spectrum of symptoms and disabilities that vary by LSD. LSDs are promising targets for gene therapy because delivery of a single gene into a small percentage of the appropriate target cells may be sufficient to impact the clinical course of the disease. Recently, there have been several significant advancements in the potential for gene therapy of these disorders, including the first human trials. Future clinical trials will build upon these initial attempts, with an improved understanding of immune system responses to gene therapy, the obstacle that the blood-brain barrier poses for neuropathic LSDs, as well other biological barriers that, when overcome, may facilitate gene therapy for LSDs. In this manuscript, we will highlight the recent innovations in gene therapy for LSDs and discuss the clinical limitations that remain to be overcome, with the goal of fostering an understanding and further development of this important field.

  16. Anthrax lethal toxin induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cytosolic cathepsin release is Nlrp1b/Nalp1b-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M Averette

    Full Text Available NOD-like receptors (NLRs are a group of cytoplasmic molecules that recognize microbial invasion or 'danger signals'. Activation of NLRs can induce rapid caspase-1 dependent cell death termed pyroptosis, or a caspase-1 independent cell death termed pyronecrosis. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LT, is recognized by a subset of alleles of the NLR protein Nlrp1b, resulting in pyroptotic cell death of macrophages and dendritic cells. Here we show that LT induces lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP. The presentation of LMP requires expression of an LT-responsive allele of Nlrp1b, and is blocked by proteasome inhibitors and heat shock, both of which prevent LT-mediated pyroptosis. Further the lysosomal protease cathepsin B is released into the cell cytosol and cathepsin inhibitors block LT-mediated cell death. These data reveal a role for lysosomal membrane permeabilization in the cellular response to bacterial pathogens and demonstrate a shared requirement for cytosolic relocalization of cathepsins in pyroptosis and pyronecrosis.

  17. Epidermal Growth Factor Cytoplasmic Domain Affects ErbB Protein Degradation by the Lysosomal and Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Glogowska

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic domains of EGF-like ligands, including EGF cytoplasmic domain (EGFcyt, have important biological functions. Using specific constructs and peptides of human EGF cytoplasmic domain, we demonstrate that EGFcyt facilitates lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation, and this coincided with growth inhibition of human thyroid and glioma carcinoma cells. EGFcyt and exon 22–23-encoded peptide (EGF22.23 enhanced procathepsin B (procathB expression and procathB-mediated lysosomal degradation of EGFR/ErbB1 as determined by inhibitors for procathB and the lysosomal ATPase inhibitor BafA1. Presence of mbEGFctF, EGFcyt, EGF22.23, and exon 23-encoded peptides suppressed the expression of the deubiqitinating enzyme ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1. This coincided with hyperubiquitination of total cellular proteins and ErbB1/2 and reduced proteasome activity. Upon small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of endogenously expressed UCH-L1, a similar hyperubiquitinylation phenotype, reduced ErbB1/2 content, and attenuated growth was observed. The exon 23-encoded peptide region of EGFcyt was important for these biologic actions. Structural homology modeling of human EGFcyt showed that this molecular region formed an exposed surface loop. Peptides derived from this EGFcyt loop structure may aid in the design of novel peptide therapeutics aimed at inhibiting growth of cancer cells.

  18. Di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT) overcomes multidrug resistance by a novel mechanism involving the hijacking of lysosomal P-glycoprotein (Pgp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Patric J; Yamagishi, Tetsuo; Arvind, Akanksha; Seebacher, Nicole; Gutierrez, Elaine; Stacy, Alexandra; Maleki, Sanaz; Sharp, Danae; Sahni, Sumit; Richardson, Des R

    2015-04-10

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle in cancer treatment. More than half of human cancers express multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein (Pgp), which correlates with a poor prognosis. Intriguingly, through an unknown mechanism, some drugs have greater activity in drug-resistant tumor cells than their drug-sensitive counterparts. Herein, we investigate how the novel anti-tumor agent di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT) overcomes MDR. Four different cell types were utilized to evaluate the effect of Pgp-potentiated lysosomal targeting of drugs to overcome MDR. To assess the mechanism of how Dp44mT overcomes drug resistance, cellular studies utilized Pgp inhibitors, Pgp silencing, lysosomotropic agents, proliferation assays, immunoblotting, a Pgp-ATPase activity assay, radiolabeled drug uptake/efflux, a rhodamine 123 retention assay, lysosomal membrane permeability assessment, and DCF (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin) redox studies. Anti-tumor activity and selectivity of Dp44mT in Pgp-expressing, MDR cells versus drug-sensitive cells were studied using a BALB/c nu/nu xenograft mouse model. We demonstrate that Dp44mT is transported by the lysosomal Pgp drug pump, causing lysosomal targeting of Dp44mT and resulting in enhanced cytotoxicity in MDR cells. Lysosomal Pgp and pH were shown to be crucial for increasing Dp44mT-mediated lysosomal damage and subsequent cytotoxicity in drug-resistant cells, with Dp44mT being demonstrated to be a Pgp substrate. Indeed, Pgp-dependent lysosomal damage and cytotoxicity of Dp44mT were abrogated by Pgp inhibitors, Pgp silencing, or increasing lysosomal pH using lysosomotropic bases. In vivo, Dp44mT potently targeted chemotherapy-resistant human Pgp-expressing xenografted tumors relative to non-Pgp-expressing tumors in mice. This study highlights a novel Pgp hijacking strategy of the unique dipyridylthiosemicarbazone series of thiosemicarbazones that overcome MDR via utilization of lysosomal Pgp transport activity.

  19. Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization is an Early Event in Sigma-2 Receptor Ligand Mediated Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hornick John R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sigma-2 receptor ligands have been studied for treatment of pancreatic cancer because they are preferentially internalized by proliferating cells and induce apoptosis. This mechanism of apoptosis is poorly understood, with varying reports of caspase-3 dependence. We evaluated multiple sigma-2 receptor ligands in this study, each shown to decrease tumor burden in preclinical models of human pancreatic cancer. Results Fluorescently labeled sigma-2 receptor ligands of two classes (derivatives of SW43 and PB282 localize to cell membrane components in Bxpc3 and Aspc1 pancreatic cancer cells and accumulate in lysosomes. We found that interactions in the lysosome are critical for cell death following sigma-2 ligand treatment because selective inhibition of a protective lysosomal membrane glycoprotein, LAMP1, with shRNA greatly reduced the viability of cells following treatment. Sigma-2 ligands induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP and protease translocation triggering downstream effectors of apoptosis. Subsequently, cellular oxidative stress was greatly increased following treatment with SW43, and the hydrophilic antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC gave greater protection against this than a lipophilic antioxidant, α-tocopherol (α-toco. Conversely, PB282-mediated cytotoxicity relied less on cellular oxidation, even though α-toco did provide protection from this ligand. In addition, we found that caspase-3 induction was not as significantly inhibited by cathepsin inhibitors as by antioxidants. Both NAC and α-toco protected against caspase-3 induction following PB282 treatment, while only NAC offered protection following SW43 treatment. The caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-FMK offered significant protection from PB282, but not SW43. Conclusions Sigma-2 ligand SW43 commits pancreatic cancer cells to death by a caspase-independent process involving LMP and oxidative stress which is protected from by NAC. PB282 however undergoes a

  20. Inhibitors and pathways of hepatocytic protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seglen, P O; Gordon, P B; Grinde, B; Solheim, A; Kovács, A L; Poli, A

    1981-01-01

    On the basis of experiments using amino acids and various inhibitors (lysosomotropic amines, leupeptin, chymostatin, vanadate, vinblastine, anoxia, methylaminopurines), five different modes of endogenous protein degradation in isolated rat hepatocytes can be distinguished. The two non-lysosomal (amine-resistant) mechanisms preferentially degrade relatively labile (short-lived) proteins: one of these mechanisms is energy-dependent and chymostatin-sensitive, the other is not. Of the three lysosomal (amine-sensitive) mechanisms, one--quantitatively minor--is amino acid-resistant and preferentially degrades labile proteins. The two amino acid-sensitive mechanisms each seen account for about one-half of the degradation of relatively stable (long-lived) proteins; one of them is suppressed by leucine and apparently corresponds to the formation of electron microscopically visible autophagosomes; the other may represent a different type of autophagy, inhibited by asparagine and glutamine. A new class of inhibitors, the purine derivatives (methylated 6-aminopurines, and 6-mercaptopurines) appear to specifically suppress autophagic/lysosomal protein degradation, and may help to further elucidate the mechanisms of autophagy.

  1. xtraction and Characterization of Cathepsin Inhibitor from Milkfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tati Nurhayati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Proteolytic enzyme is distributed acros all organism including fish. Cysteine proteases are the largest group of proteolytic enzyme. Lysosomal cathepsin, one of cysteine protease enzyme, cause softening and degradation of myofibril protein and it’s activity is regulated by endogenous inhibitors. The purposes of this study were to optimize the extraction cathepsin inhibitors from the skin, muscles, and viscera of fish, to partially purify the cathepsin inhibitors of selected sources, and to study the characteristics of the cathepsin inhibitor. The cathepsin inhibitor could be extracted from muscle fish and partially purified using ammonium sulfate of 70%. The purified cathepsin inhibitor had optimum temperature at 40°C and the optimum at pH 8. Metal ions decreased the activity of the protease inhibitor, except 1 mM of metal ion Mn2+ and Na+.

  2. Changes in the morphology and lability of lysosomal subpopulations in caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Nancy; Sánchez-Yagüe, Jesús; Juanes, Pedro P; Pérez, Nieves; Ferreira, Laura; García-Hernández, Violeta; Mangas, Arturo; Calvo, José J; Sánchez-Bernal, Carmen

    2011-02-01

    Lysosomes play an important role in acute pancreatitis (AP). Here we developed a method for the isolation of lysosome subpopulations from rat pancreas and assessed the stability of lysosomal membranes. AP was induced by four subcutaneous injections of 20 μg caerulein/kg body weight at hourly intervals. The animals were killed 9h after the first injection. Marker enzymes [N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), cathepsin B and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)] were assayed in subcellular fractions from control pancreas and in pancreatitis. Lysosomal subpopulations were separated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation and observed by electron microscopy. NAG molecular forms were determined by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. AP was associated with: (i) increases in the specific activity of lysosomal enzymes in the soluble fraction, (ii) changes in the size and alterations in the morphology of the organelles from the lysosomal subpopulations, (iii) the appearance of large vacuoles in the primary and secondary lysosome subpopulations, (iv) the increase in the amount of the NAG form associated with the pancreatic lysosomal membrane as well as its release towards the soluble fraction. Lysosome subpopulations are separated by a combination of differential and Percoll density gradient centrifugations. Primary lysosome membrane stability decreases in AP. Copyright © 2010 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. MCOLN1 is a ROS sensor in lysosomes that regulates autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Cheng, Xiping; Yu, Lu; Yang, Junsheng; Calvo, Raul; Patnaik, Samarjit; Hu, Xin; Gao, Qiong; Yang, Meimei; Lawas, Maria; Delling, Markus; Marugan, Juan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-06-30

    Cellular stresses trigger autophagy to remove damaged macromolecules and organelles. Lysosomes 'host' multiple stress-sensing mechanisms that trigger the coordinated biogenesis of autophagosomes and lysosomes. For example, transcription factor (TF)EB, which regulates autophagy and lysosome biogenesis, is activated following the inhibition of mTOR, a lysosome-localized nutrient sensor. Here we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate TFEB via a lysosomal Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism independent of mTOR. Exogenous oxidants or increasing mitochondrial ROS levels directly and specifically activate lysosomal TRPML1 channels, inducing lysosomal Ca(2+) release. This activation triggers calcineurin-dependent TFEB-nuclear translocation, autophagy induction and lysosome biogenesis. When TRPML1 is genetically inactivated or pharmacologically inhibited, clearance of damaged mitochondria and removal of excess ROS are blocked. Furthermore, TRPML1's ROS sensitivity is specifically required for lysosome adaptation to mitochondrial damage. Hence, TRPML1 is a ROS sensor localized on the lysosomal membrane that orchestrates an autophagy-dependent negative-feedback programme to mitigate oxidative stress in the cell.

  4. Will ocean acidification affect marine microbes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joint, Ian; Doney, Scott C; Karl, David M

    2011-01-01

    The pH of the surface ocean is changing as a result of increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)), and there are concerns about potential impacts of lower pH and associated alterations in seawater carbonate chemistry on the biogeochemical processes in the ocean. However, it is important to place these changes within the context of pH in the present-day ocean, which is not constant; it varies systematically with season, depth and along productivity gradients. Yet this natural variability in pH has rarely been considered in assessments of the effect of ocean acidification on marine microbes. Surface pH can change as a consequence of microbial utilization and production of carbon dioxide, and to a lesser extent other microbially mediated processes such as nitrification. Useful comparisons can be made with microbes in other aquatic environments that readily accommodate very large and rapid pH change. For example, in many freshwater lakes, pH changes that are orders of magnitude greater than those projected for the twenty second century oceans can occur over periods of hours. Marine and freshwater assemblages have always experienced variable pH conditions. Therefore, an appropriate null hypothesis may be, until evidence is obtained to the contrary, that major biogeochemical processes in the oceans other than calcification will not be fundamentally different under future higher CO(2)/lower pH conditions.

  5. Population-dependent effects of ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Hannah L; Sundell, Kristina; Almroth, Bethanie Carney; Sköld, Helén Nilsson; Eriksson, Susanne P

    2016-04-13

    Elevated carbon dioxide levels and the resultant ocean acidification (OA) are changing the abiotic conditions of the oceans at a greater rate than ever before and placing pressure on marine species. Understanding the response of marine fauna to this change is critical for understanding the effects of OA. Population-level variation in OA tolerance is highly relevant and important in the determination of ecosystem resilience and persistence, but has received little focus to date. In this study, whether OA has the same biological consequences in high-salinity-acclimated population versus a low-salinity-acclimated population of the same species was investigated in the marine isopod Idotea balthica.The populations were found to have physiologically different responses to OA. While survival rate was similar between the two study populations at a future CO2 level of 1000 ppm, and both populations showed increased oxidative stress, the metabolic rate and osmoregulatory activity differed significantly between the two populations. The results of this study demonstrate that the physiological response to OA of populations from different salinities can vary. Population-level variation and the environment provenance of individuals used in OA experiments should be taken into account for the evaluation and prediction of climate change effects.

  6. The chloride channel inhibitor NS3736 [corrected] prevents bone resorption in ovariectomized rats without changing bone formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaller, Sophie; Henriksen, Kim; Sveigaard, Christina

    2004-01-01

    formation. This study indicates that chloride channel inhibitors are highly promising for treatment of osteoporosis. INTRODUCTION: The chloride channel inhibitor, NS3736, blocked osteoclastic acidification and resorption in vitro with an IC50 value of 30 microM. When tested in the rat ovariectomy model......: In conclusion, we show for the first time that chloride channel inhibitors can be used for prevention of ovariectomy-induced bone loss without impeding bone formation. We speculate that the coupling of bone resorption to bone formation is linked to the acidification of the resorption lacunae, thereby enabling...

  7. Syntaxin 7 and VAMP-7 are Soluble N-Ethylmaleimide–sensitive Factor Attachment Protein Receptors Required for Late Endosome–Lysosome and Homotypic Lysosome Fusion in Alveolar Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Diane McVey; Pevsner, Jonathan; Scullion, Matthew A.; Vaughn, Michael; Kaplan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    Endocytosis in alveolar macrophages can be reversibly inhibited, permitting the isolation of endocytic vesicles at defined stages of maturation. Using an in vitro fusion assay, we determined that each isolated endosome population was capable of homotypic fusion. All vesicle populations were also capable of heterotypic fusion in a temporally specific manner; early endosomes, isolated 4 min after internalization, could fuse with endosomes isolated 8 min after internalization but not with 12-min endosomes or lysosomes. Lysosomes fuse with 12-min endosomes but not with earlier endosomes. Using homogenous populations of endosomes, we have identified Syntaxin 7 as a soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) required for late endosome–lysosome and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. A bacterially expressed human Syntaxin 7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited homotypic late endosome and lysosome fusion as well as heterotypic late endosome–lysosome fusion. Affinity-purified antibodies directed against Syntaxin 7 also inhibited lysosome fusion in vitro but had no affect on homotypic early endosome fusion. Previous work suggested that human VAMP-7 (vesicle-associated membrane protein-7) was a SNARE required for late endosome–lysosome fusion. A bacterially expressed human VAMP-7 lacking the transmembrane domain inhibited both late endosome–lysosome fusion and homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro. These studies indicate that: 1) fusion along the endocytic pathway is a highly regulated process, and 2) two SNARE molecules, Syntaxin 7 and human VAMP-7, are involved in fusion of vesicles in the late endocytic pathway in alveolar macrophages. PMID:10888671

  8. Cytosolic access of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: critical impact of phagosomal acidification control and demonstration of occurrence in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxane Simeone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb uses efficient strategies to evade the eradication by professional phagocytes, involving--as recently confirmed--escape from phagosomal confinement. While Mtb determinants, such as the ESX-1 type VII secretion system, that contribute to this phenomenon are known, the host cell factors governing this important biological process are yet unexplored. Using a newly developed flow-cytometric approach for Mtb, we show that macrophages expressing the phagosomal bivalent cation transporter Nramp-1, are much less susceptible to phagosomal rupture. Together with results from the use of the phagosome acidification inhibitor bafilomycin, we demonstrate that restriction of phagosomal acidification is a prerequisite for mycobacterial phagosomal rupture and cytosolic contact. Using different in vivo approaches including an enrichment and screen for tracking rare infected phagocytes carrying the CD45.1 hematopoietic allelic marker, we here provide first and unique evidence of M. tuberculosis-mediated phagosomal rupture in mouse spleen and lungs and in numerous phagocyte types. Our results, linking the ability of restriction of phagosome acidification to cytosolic access, provide an important conceptual advance for our knowledge on host processes targeted by Mtb evasion strategies.

  9. Biochemical Activities of Three Pairs of Ehrlichia chaffeensis Two-Component Regulatory System Proteins Involved in Inhibition of Lysosomal Fusion†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yumi; Cheng, Zhihui; Lin, Mingqun; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2006-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis, the etiologic agent of human monocytic ehrlichiosis, replicates in early endosomes by avoiding lysosomal fusion in monocytes and macrophages. In E. chaffeensis we predicted three pairs of putative two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) designated PleC-PleD, NtrY-NtrX, and CckA-CtrA based on amino acid sequence homology. In the present study to determine biochemical pairs and specificities of the TCSs, the recombinant proteins of the three putative histidine kinase (HK) kinase domains (rPleCHKD, rNtrYHKD, and MBP-rCckAHKD) and the full-length forms of three putative response regulators (RRs) (rPleD, rNtrX, and rCtrA) as well as the respective mutant recombinant proteins (rPleCHKDH244A, rNtrYHKDH498A, MBP-rCckAHKDH449A, rPleDD53A, rNtrXD59A, and rCtrAD53A) were expressed and purified as soluble proteins. The in vitro HK activity, the specific His residue-dependent autophosphorylation of the kinase domain, was demonstrated in the three HKs. The specific Asp residue-dependent in vitro phosphotransfer from the kinase domain to the putative cognate RR was demonstrated in each of the three RRs. Western blot analysis of E. chaffeensis membrane and soluble fractions using antibodies specific for each recombinant protein detected PleC and CckA in the membrane fraction, whereas it detected NtrY, NtrX, and PleD in the soluble fraction. CtrA was found in the two fractions at similar levels. E. chaffeensis was sensitive to closantel, an HK inhibitor. Closantel treatment induced lysosomal fusion of the E. chaffeensis inclusion in a human monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1 cells, implying that functional TCSs are essential in preventing lysosomal fusion of the E. chaffeensis inclusion compartment. PMID:16926392

  10. Cathepsin B modulates lysosomal biogenesis and host defense against Francisella novicida infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaopeng; Man, Si Ming; Malireddi, R K Subbarao; Karki, Rajendra; Lupfer, Christopher; Gurung, Prajwal; Neale, Geoffrey; Guy, Clifford S; Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2016-09-19

    Lysosomal cathepsins regulate an exquisite range of biological functions, and their deregulation is associated with inflammatory, metabolic, and degenerative diseases in humans. In this study, we identified a key cell-intrinsic role for cathepsin B as a negative feedback regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy. Mice and macrophages lacking cathepsin B activity had increased resistance to the cytosolic bacterial pathogen Francisella novicida Genetic deletion or pharmacological inhibition of cathepsin B down-regulated mechanistic target of rapamycin activity and prevented cleavage of the lysosomal calcium channel TRPML1. These events drove transcription of lysosomal and autophagy genes via transcription factor EB, which increased lysosomal biogenesis and activation of autophagy initiation kinase ULK1 for clearance of the bacteria. Our results identified a fundamental biological function of cathepsin B in providing a checkpoint for homeostatic maintenance of lysosome populations and basic recycling functions in the cell.

  11. TFEB and TFE3: Linking Lysosomes to Cellular Adaptation to Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raben, Nina; Puertollano, Rosa

    2016-10-06

    In recent years, our vision of lysosomes has drastically changed. Formerly considered to be mere degradative compartments, they are now recognized as key players in many cellular processes. The ability of lysosomes to respond to different stimuli revealed a complex and coordinated regulation of lysosomal gene expression. This review discusses the participation of the transcription factors TFEB and TFE3 in the regulation of lysosomal function and biogenesis, as well as the role of the lysosomal pathway in cellular adaptation to a variety of stress conditions, including nutrient deprivation, mitochondrial dysfunction, protein misfolding, and pathogen infection. We also describe how cancer cells make use of TFEB and TFE3 to promote their own survival and highlight the potential of these transcription factors as therapeutic targets for the treatment of neurological and lysosomal diseases.

  12. Hydroxyapatite microparticles as feedback-active reservoirs of corrosion inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snihirova, D; Lamaka, S V; Taryba, M; Salak, A N; Kallip, S; Zheludkevich, M L; Ferreira, M G S; Montemor, M F

    2010-11-01

    This work contributes to the development of new feedback-active anticorrosion systems. Inhibitor-doped hydroxyapatite microparticles (HAP) are used as reservoirs, storing corrosion inhibitor to be released on demand. Release of the entrapped inhibitor is triggered by redox reactions associated with the corrosion process. HAP were used as reservoirs for several inhibiting species: cerium(III), lanthanum(III), salicylaldoxime, and 8-hydroxyquinoline. These species are effective corrosion inhibitors for a 2024 aluminum alloy (AA2024), used here as a model metallic substrate. Dissolution of the microparticles and release of the inhibitor are triggered by local acidification resulting from the anodic half-reaction during corrosion of AA2024. Calculated values and experimentally measured local acidification over the aluminum anode (down to pH = 3.65) are presented. The anticorrosion properties of inhibitor-doped HAP were assessed using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The microparticles impregnated with the corrosion inhibitors were introduced into a hybrid silica-zirconia sol-gel film, acting as a thin protective coating for AA2024, an alloy used for aeronautical applications. The protective properties of the sol-gel films were improved by the addition of HAP, proving their applicability as submicrometer-sized reservoirs of corrosion inhibitors for active anticorrosion coatings.

  13. Recovery from acidification in European surface waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Evans

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Water quality data for 56 long-term monitoring sites in eight European countries are used to assess freshwater responses to reductions in acid deposition at a large spatial scale. In a consistent analysis of trends from 1980 onwards, the majority of surface waters (38 of 56 showed significant (p ≤0.05 decreasing trends in pollution-derived sulphate. Only two sites showed a significant increase. Nitrate, on the other hand, had a much weaker and more varied pattern, with no significant trend at 35 of 56 sites, decreases at some sites in Scandinavia and Central Europe, and increases at some sites in Italy and the UK. The general reduction in surface water acid anion concentrations has led to increases in acid neutralising capacity (significant at 27 of 56 sites but has also been offset in part by decreases in base cations, particularly calcium (significant at 26 of 56 sites, indicating that much of the improvement in runoff quality to date has been the result of decreasing ionic strength. Increases in acid neutralising capacity have been accompanied by increases in pH and decreases in aluminium, although fewer trends were significant (pH 19 of 56, aluminium 13 of 53. Increases in pH appear to have been limited in some areas by rising concentrations of organic acids. Within a general trend towards recovery, some inter-regional variation is evident, with recovery strongest in the Czech Republic and Slovakia, moderate in Scandinavia and the United Kingdom, and apparently weakest in Germany. Keywords: acidification, recovery, European trends, sulphate, nitrate, acid neutralising capacity

  14. Individual and population-level responses to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ben P; McKeown, Niall J; Rastrick, Samuel P S; Bertolini, Camilla; Foggo, Andy; Graham, Helen; Hall-Spencer, Jason M; Milazzo, Marco; Shaw, Paul W; Small, Daniel P; Moore, Pippa J

    2016-01-29

    Ocean acidification is predicted to have detrimental effects on many marine organisms and ecological processes. Despite growing evidence for direct impacts on specific species, few studies have simultaneously considered the effects of ocean acidification on individuals (e.g. consequences for energy budgets and resource partitioning) and population level demographic processes. Here we show that ocean acidification increases energetic demands on gastropods resulting in altered energy allocation, i.e. reduced shell size but increased body mass. When scaled up to the population level, long-term exposure to ocean acidification altered population demography, with evidence of a reduction in the proportion of females in the population and genetic signatures of increased variance in reproductive success among individuals. Such increased variance enhances levels of short-term genetic drift which is predicted to inhibit adaptation. Our study indicates that even against a background of high gene flow, ocean acidification is driving individual- and population-level changes that will impact eco-evolutionary trajectories.

  15. A TRP Channel in the Lysosome Regulates Large Particle Phagocytosis via Focal Exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Phagocytosis of large extracellular particles such as apoptotic bodies requires delivery of the intracellular endosomal and lysosomal membranes to form plasmalemmal pseudopods. Here we identified Mucolipin TRP channel 1 (TRPML1) as the key lysosomal Ca2+ channel regulating focal exocytosis and phagosome biogenesis. Both particle ingestion and lysosomal exocytosis are inhibited by synthetic TRPML1 blockers, and are defective in macrophages isolated from TRPML1 knockout mice. Furthermore, TRPML...

  16. Disruption of Lysosome Function Promotes Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Drosophila *

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Congwu; Zhu, Huanhu; Han,Min; Zhuang, Yuan; Wu, Xiaohui; Xu, Tian

    2010-01-01

    Lysosome function is essential to many physiological processes. It has been suggested that deregulation of lysosome function could contribute to cancer. Through a genetic screen in Drosophila, we have discovered that mutations disrupting lysosomal degradation pathway components contribute to tumor development and progression. Loss-of-function mutations in the Class C vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) gene, deep orange (dor), dramatically promote tumor overgrowth and invasion of the RasV12 cells....

  17. A new lysosomal storage disorder resembling Morquio syndrome in sibs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Laurence; Fenneteau, Odile; Ilharreborde, Brice; Capri, Yline; Gérard, Marion; Quoc, Emmanuel Bui; Passemard, Sandrine; Ghoumid, Jamal; Caillaud, Catherine; Froissart, Roseline; Tabet, Anne-Claude; Lebon, Sophie; El Ghouzzi, Vincent; Mazda, Keyvan; Verloes, Alain

    2012-03-01

    We report two male sibs, born from unrelated French Caribbean parents, presenting with an unclassifiable storage disorder. Pregnancy and delivery were uneventful. Stunted growth was noted during the first year of life. Both children have short stature (below - 4SD) with short trunk, barrel chest, micromelia with rhizomelic shortening, severe kyphoscoliosis, pectus carinatum, short hands and feet with metatarsus adductus, and excessive joint laxity of the small joints. Learning difficulties with borderline intelligence quotient (IQ) were noted in one of them. They had no hepatomegaly, no splenomegaly, and no dysmorphism. Skeletal X-rays survey demonstrated generalized platyspondyly with tongue-like deformity of the anterior part of the vertebral bodies, hypoplasia of the odontoid process, generalized epiphyseal dysplasia and abnormally shaped metaphyses. The acetabular roofs had a trident aspect. Ophthalmologic and cardiac examinations were normal. Spine deformity required surgical correction in one of the patient at age 4 years. Lysosomal enzymes assays including N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase and β-galactosidase were normal, excluding mucopolysaccharidoses type IV A and IV B (Morquio syndrome), respectively. Qualitative analysis found traces of dermatan and chondroitin-sulfates in urine, but quantitative glycosaminoglycan excretion fell within normal limits. They were no vacuolated lymphocytes. Abnormal coarse inclusions were present in eosinophils. Mild Alder anomaly was observed in polymorphonuclears. Granulations were discretely metachromatic with toluidine blue. Those morphological anomalies are in favor of a lysosomal storage disease. No inclusions were found in skin fibroblasts. We hypothesize that these two boys have a distinct autosomal recessive or X-linked lysosomal storage disorder of unknown origin that shares clinical and radiological features with Morquio disease.

  18. Sub-lethal oxidative stress induces lysosome biogenesis via a lysosomal membrane permeabilization-cathepsin-caspase 3-transcription factor EB-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, San Min; Chua, Shu Xian Serene; Venkatachalam, Gireedhar; Shen, Liang; Luo, Le; Clement, Marie-Veronique

    2016-12-18

    Here we provide evidence to link sub-lethal oxidative stress to lysosomal biogenesis. Exposure of cells to sub-lethal concentrations of exogenously added hydrogen peroxide resulted in cytosol to nuclear translocation of the Transcription Factor EB (TFEB), the master controller of lysosome biogenesis and function. Nuclear translocation of TFEB was dependent upon the activation of a cathepsin-caspase 3 signaling pathway, downstream of a lysosomal membrane permeabilization and accompanied by a significant increase in lysosome numbers as well as induction of TFEB dependent lysosome-associated genes expression such as Ctsl, Lamp2 and its spliced variant Lamp2a, Neu1and Ctsb and Sqstm1 and Atg9b. The effects of sub-lethal oxidative stress on lysosomal gene expression and biogenesis were rescued upon gene silencing of caspase 3 and TFEB. Notably, caspase 3 activation was not associated with phenotypic hallmarks of apoptosis, evidenced by the absence of caspase 3 substrate cleavage, such as PARP, Lamin A/C or gelsolin. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time an unexpected and non-canonical role of a cathepsin-caspase 3 axis in the nuclear translocation of TFEB leading to lysosomes biogenesis under conditions of sub-lethal oxidative stress.

  19. Reporter Assay for Endo/Lysosomal Escape of Toxin-Based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Gilabert-Oriol

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-based therapeutics with cytosolic targets are capable of exhibiting their therapeutic effect once they have escaped from the endosomes or lysosomes. In this study, the reporters—horseradish peroxidase (HRP, Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa and ricin A-chain (RTA—were investigated for their capacity to monitor the endo/lysosomal escape of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. The conjugates—saporin-HRP, Alexasaporin and saporin-KQ-RTA—were constructed, and the endo/lysosomal escape of these conjugates alone (lack of endo/lysosomal release or in combination with certain structurally-specific triterpenoidal saponins (efficient endo/lysosomal escape was characterized. HRP failed in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of saporin. Contrastingly, Alexa Fluor 488 successfully allowed the report of the process at a toxin concentration of 1000 nM. In addition, single endo/lysosome analysis facilitated the determination of the amount of Alexasaporin released from each vesicle. RTA was also successful in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of the enzymatically inactive mutant, saporin-KQ, but in this case, the sensitivity of the method reached a toxin concentration of 10 nM. In conclusion, the simultaneous usage of Alexa Fluor 488 and RTA as reporters may provide the possibility of monitoring the endo/lysosomal escape of protein-based therapeutics in the concentration range of 10–1000 nM.

  20. Lysosomes serve as a platform for hepatitis A virus particle maturation and nonlytic release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seggewiß, Nicole; Paulmann, Dajana; Dotzauer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Early studies on hepatitis A virus (HAV) in cell culture demonstrated the inclusion of several viral particles in an intracellular lipid-bilayer membrane. However, the origin of these virus-associated membranes and the mechanism for the non-lytic release of HAV into bile are still unknown. Analyzing the association of this virus with cell organelles, we found that newly synthesized HAV particles accumulate in lysosomal organelles and that lysosomal enzymes are involved in the maturation cleavage of the virion. Furthermore, by inhibiting the processes of fusion of lysosomes with the plasma membrane, we found that the nonlytic release of HAV from infected cells occurs via lysosome-related organelles.

  1. Lipid Storage Disorders Block Lysosomal Trafficking By Inhibiting TRP Channel and Calcium Release

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Lysosomal lipid accumulation, defects in membrane trafficking, and altered Ca2+ homeostasis are common features in many lysosomal storage diseases. Mucolipin TRP channel 1 (TRPML1) is the principle Ca2+ channel in the lysosome. Here we show that TRPML1-mediated lysosomal Ca2+ release, measured using a genetically-encoded Ca2+ indicator (GCaMP3) attached directly to TRPML1 and elicited by a potent membrane-permeable synthetic agonist, is dramatically reduced in Niemann-Pick (NP) disease cells....

  2. Reporter assay for endo/lysosomal escape of toxin-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilabert-Oriol, Roger; Thakur, Mayank; von Mallinckrodt, Benedicta; Bhargava, Cheenu; Wiesner, Burkhard; Eichhorst, Jenny; Melzig, Matthias F; Fuchs, Hendrik; Weng, Alexander

    2014-05-22

    Protein-based therapeutics with cytosolic targets are capable of exhibiting their therapeutic effect once they have escaped from the endosomes or lysosomes. In this study, the reporters-horseradish peroxidase (HRP), Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa) and ricin A-chain (RTA)-were investigated for their capacity to monitor the endo/lysosomal escape of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. The conjugates-saporin-HRP, (Alexa)saporin and saporin-KQ-RTA-were constructed, and the endo/lysosomal escape of these conjugates alone (lack of endo/lysosomal release) or in combination with certain structurally-specific triterpenoidal saponins (efficient endo/lysosomal escape) was characterized. HRP failed in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of saporin. Contrastingly, Alexa Fluor 488 successfully allowed the report of the process at a toxin concentration of 1000 nM. In addition, single endo/lysosome analysis facilitated the determination of the amount of (Alexa)saporin released from each vesicle. RTA was also successful in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of the enzymatically inactive mutant, saporin-KQ, but in this case, the sensitivity of the method reached a toxin concentration of 10 nM. In conclusion, the simultaneous usage of Alexa Fluor 488 and RTA as reporters may provide the possibility of monitoring the endo/lysosomal escape of protein-based therapeutics in the concentration range of 10-1000 nM.

  3. hLGDB: a database of human lysosomal genes and their regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozzi, Alessandro; Urbanelli, Lorena; Germain, Pierre Luc; Magini, Alessandro; Emiliani, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomes are cytoplasmic organelles present in almost all eukaryotic cells, which play a fundamental role in key aspects of cellular homeostasis such as membrane repair, autophagy, endocitosis and protein metabolism. The characterization of the genes and enzymes constituting the lysosome represents a central issue to be addressed toward a better understanding of the biology of this organelle. In humans, mutations that cause lysosomal enzyme deficiencies result in >50 different disorders and severe pathologies. So far, many experimental efforts using different methodologies have been carried out to identity lysosomal genes. The Human Lysosome Gene Database (hLGDB) is the first resource that provides a comprehensive and accessible census of the human genes belonging to the lysosomal system. This database was developed by collecting and annotating gene lists from many different sources. References to the studies that have identified each gene are provided together with cross databases gene related information. Special attention has been given to the regulation of the genes through microRNAs and the transcription factor EB. The hLGDB can be easily queried to retrieve, combine and analyze information on different lists of lysosomal genes and their regulation by microRNA (binding sites predicted by five different algorithms). The hLGDB is an open access dynamic project that will permit in the future to collapse in a unique publicly accessible resource all the available biological information about lysosome genes and their regulation. Database URL: http://lysosome.unipg.it/.

  4. Role of receptor-mediated endocytosis, endosomal acidification and cathepsin D in cholera toxin cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hage, Tatiana; Merlen, Clémence; Fabrega, Sylvie; Authier, François

    2007-05-01

    Using the in situ liver model system, we have recently shown that, after cholera toxin binding to hepatic cells, cholera toxin accumulates in a low-density endosomal compartment, and then undergoes endosomal proteolysis by the aspartic acid protease cathepsin-D [Merlen C, Fayol-Messaoudi D, Fabrega S, El Hage T, Servin A, Authier F (2005) FEBS J272, 4385-4397]. Here, we have used a subcellular fractionation approach to address the in vivo compartmentalization and cytotoxic action of cholera toxin in rat liver parenchyma. Following administration of a saturating dose of cholera toxin to rats, rapid endocytosis of both cholera toxin subunits was observed, coincident with massive internalization of both the 45 kDa and 47 kDa Gsalpha proteins. These events coincided with the endosomal recruitment of ADP-ribosylation factor proteins, especially ADP-ribosylation factor-6, with a time course identical to that of toxin and the A subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsalpha) translocation. After an initial lag phase of 30 min, these constituents were linked to NAD-dependent ADP-ribosylation of endogenous Gsalpha, with maximum accumulation observed at 30-60 min postinjection. Assessment of the subsequent postendosomal fate of internalized Gsalpha revealed sustained endolysosomal transfer of the two Gsalpha isoforms. Concomitantly, cholera toxin increased in vivo endosome acidification rates driven by the ATP-dependent H(+)-ATPase pump and in vitro vacuolar acidification in hepatoma HepG2 cells. The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin and the cathepsin D inhibitor pepstatin A partially inhibited, both in vivo and in vitro, the cAMP response to cholera toxin. This cathepsin D-dependent action of cholera toxin under the control of endosomal acidity was confirmed using cellular systems in which modification of the expression levels of cathepsin D, either by transfection of the cathepsin D gene or small interfering RNA, was followed by parallel changes in the cytotoxic

  5. OA Experimental Results - Species response experiments on the effects of ocean acidification, climate change, and deoxygenation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NWFSC Ocean Acidification (OA) team will conduct a series of species-exposure experiments in the acidification research facility on N. Pacific species of...

  6. AFSC/RACE/SAP/Foy: Effects of ocean acidification on larval Tanner crab: Kodiak Island, Alaska.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To study the effects of ocean acidification we examined the effects of ocean acidification on the larval stages of the economically important southern Tanner crab,...

  7. Ocean acidification and the Permo-Triassic mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, M O; Kasemann, S A; Wood, R A; Lenton, T M; Daines, S J; Richoz, S; Ohnemueller, F; Meixner, A; Poulton, S W; Tipper, E T

    2015-04-10

    Ocean acidification triggered by Siberian Trap volcanism was a possible kill mechanism for the Permo-Triassic Boundary mass extinction, but direct evidence for an acidification event is lacking. We present a high-resolution seawater pH record across this interval, using boron isotope data combined with a quantitative modeling approach. In the latest Permian, increased ocean alkalinity primed the Earth system with a low level of atmospheric CO2 and a high ocean buffering capacity. The first phase of extinction was coincident with a slow injection of carbon into the atmosphere, and ocean pH remained stable. During the second extinction pulse, however, a rapid and large injection of carbon caused an abrupt acidification event that drove the preferential loss of heavily calcified marine biota.

  8. Ocean acidification and the Permo-Triassic mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, M. O.; Kasemann, S. A.; Wood, R. A.; Lenton, T. M.; Daines, S. J.; Richoz, S.; Ohnemueller, F.; Meixner, A.; Poulton, S. W.; Tipper, E. T.

    2015-04-01

    Ocean acidification triggered by Siberian Trap volcanism was a possible kill mechanism for the Permo-Triassic Boundary mass extinction, but direct evidence for an acidification event is lacking. We present a high-resolution seawater pH record across this interval, using boron isotope data combined with a quantitative modeling approach. In the latest Permian, increased ocean alkalinity primed the Earth system with a low level of atmospheric CO2 and a high ocean buffering capacity. The first phase of extinction was coincident with a slow injection of carbon into the atmosphere, and ocean pH remained stable. During the second extinction pulse, however, a rapid and large injection of carbon caused an abrupt acidification event that drove the preferential loss of heavily calcified marine biota.

  9. Combined ocean acidification and low temperature stressors cause coral mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavousi, Javid; Parkinson, John Everett; Nakamura, Takashi

    2016-09-01

    Oceans are predicted to become more acidic and experience more temperature variability—both hot and cold—as climate changes. Ocean acidification negatively impacts reef-building corals, especially when interacting with other stressors such as elevated temperature. However, the effects of combined acidification and low temperature stress have yet to be assessed. Here, we exposed nubbins of the scleractinian coral Montipora digitata to ecologically relevant acidic, cold, or combined stress for 2 weeks. Coral nubbins exhibited 100% survival in isolated acidic and cold treatments, but ~30% mortality under combined conditions. These results provide further evidence that coupled stressors have an interactive effect on coral physiology, and reveal that corals in colder environments are also susceptible to the deleterious impacts of coupled ocean acidification and thermal stress.

  10. Coral Calcification Across a Natural Gradient in Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, A. L.; Brainard, R. E.; Young, C.; Shamberger, K. E.; McCorkle, D. C.; Feely, R. A.; Mcleod, E.; Cantin, N.; Rose, K.; Lohmann, G. P.

    2011-12-01

    Much of our understanding of the impact of ocean acidification on coral calcification comes from laboratory manipulation experiments in which corals are reared under a range of seawater pH and aragonite saturation states (μar) equivalent to those projected for the next hundred years. In general, experiments show a consistently negative impact of acidification on coral calcification, leading to predictions of mass coral reef extinctions by dissolution as natural rates of carbonate erosion exceed the rates at which corals and other reef calcifiers can replace it. The tropical oceans provide a natural laboratory within which to test hypotheses about the longer term impact and adaptive potential of corals to acidification of the reef environment. Here we report results of a study in which 3-D CT scan and imaging techniques were used to quantify annual rates of calcification by conspecifics at 12 reefs sites spanning a natural gradient in ocean acidification. In situ μar calculated from alkalinity and DIC measurements of reef seawater ranged from less than 2.7 on an eastern Pacific Reef to greater than 4.0 in the central Red Sea. No correlation between μar and calcification was observed across this range. Corals living on low μar reefs appear to be calcifying as fast, sometimes faster than conspecifics living on high μar reefs. We used total lipid and tissue thickness to index the energetic status of colonies collected at each of our study sites. Our results support the hypothesis that energetics plays a key role in the coral calcification response to ocean acidification. Indeed, the true impact of acidification on coral reefs will likely be felt as temperatures rise and the ocean becomes more stratified, depleting coral energetic reserves through bleaching and reduced nutrient delivery to oceanic reefs.

  11. Experimental ocean acidification alters the allocation of metabolic energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, T-C Francis; Applebaum, Scott L; Manahan, Donal T

    2015-04-14

    Energy is required to maintain physiological homeostasis in response to environmental change. Although responses to environmental stressors frequently are assumed to involve high metabolic costs, the biochemical bases of actual energy demands are rarely quantified. We studied the impact of a near-future scenario of ocean acidification [800 µatm partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2)] during the development and growth of an important model organism in developmental and environmental biology, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Size, metabolic rate, biochemical content, and gene expression were not different in larvae growing under control and seawater acidification treatments. Measurements limited to those levels of biological analysis did not reveal the biochemical mechanisms of response to ocean acidification that occurred at the cellular level. In vivo rates of protein synthesis and ion transport increased ∼50% under acidification. Importantly, the in vivo physiological increases in ion transport were not predicted from total enzyme activity or gene expression. Under acidification, the increased rates of protein synthesis and ion transport that were sustained in growing larvae collectively accounted for the majority of available ATP (84%). In contrast, embryos and prefeeding and unfed larvae in control treatments allocated on average only 40% of ATP to these same two processes. Understanding the biochemical strategies for accommodating increases in metabolic energy demand and their biological limitations can serve as a quantitative basis for assessing sublethal effects of global change. Variation in the ability to allocate ATP differentially among essential functions may be a key basis of resilience to ocean acidification and other compounding environmental stressors.

  12. Effects of seawater acidification on a coral reef meiofauna community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, V. C.; Souza, T. P.; Esteves, A. M.; Santos, P. J. P.

    2015-09-01

    Despite the increasing risk that ocean acidification will modify benthic communities, great uncertainty remains about how this impact will affect the lower trophic levels, such as members of the meiofauna. A mesocosm experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of water acidification on a phytal meiofauna community from a coral reef. Community samples collected from the coral reef subtidal zone (Recife de Fora Municipal Marine Park, Porto Seguro, Bahia, Brazil), using artificial substrate units, were exposed to a control pH (ambient seawater) and to three levels of seawater acidification (pH reductions of 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 units below ambient) and collected after 15 and 30 d. After 30 d of exposure, major changes in the structure of the meiofauna community were observed in response to reduced pH. The major meiofauna groups showed divergent responses to acidification. Harpacticoida and Polychaeta densities did not show significant differences due to pH. Nematoda, Ostracoda, Turbellaria, and Tardigrada exhibited their highest densities in low-pH treatments (especially at the pH reduction of 0.6 units, pH 7.5), while harpacticoid nauplii were strongly negatively affected by low pH. This community-based mesocosm study supports previous suggestions that ocean acidification induces important changes in the structure of marine benthic communities. Considering the importance of meiofauna in the food web of coral reef ecosystems, the results presented here demonstrate that the trophic functioning of coral reefs is seriously threatened by ocean acidification.

  13. Crystal structure of the conserved domain of the DC lysosomal associated membrane protein: implications for the lysosomal glycocalyx

    OpenAIRE

    Wilke Sonja; Krausze Joern; Büssow Konrad

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The family of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP) comprises the multifunctional, ubiquitous LAMP-1 and LAMP-2, and the cell type-specific proteins DC-LAMP (LAMP-3), BAD-LAMP (UNC-46, C20orf103) and macrosialin (CD68). LAMPs have been implicated in a multitude of cellular processes, including phagocytosis, autophagy, lipid transport and aging. LAMP-2 isoform A acts as a receptor in chaperone-mediated autophagy. LAMP-2 deficiency causes the fatal Danon disease. The ...

  14. Continuous in-house acidification affecting animal slurry composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Maibritt; Cocolo, Giorgia; Jonassen, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    . A full-scale study was therefore performed, comparing pig slurry from normal in-house slurry management with pig slurry from housing with daily in-house acidification to pH 5.5. The effect on organic, inorganic and particles was evaluated. Increasing dissolved P, Mg and Ca contents indicated mineral...... dissolution in acidified slurry. Acceleration of carbohydrate hydrolysis was indicated, while deceleration of microbial acidogenesis, acetogenesis, methanogenesis and sulphate reduction was indicated. The particles were larger following acidification treatment causing a lower viscosity, likely due...

  15. Klebsiella pneumoniae survives within macrophages by avoiding delivery to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Victoria; March, Catalina; Insua, Jose Luis; Aguiló, Nacho; Llobet, Enrique; Moranta, David; Regueiro, Verónica; Brennan, Gerard P; Millán-Lou, Maria Isabel; Martín, Carlos; Garmendia, Junkal; Bengoechea, José A

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. Evidence indicates that Klebsiella might be able to persist intracellularly within a vacuolar compartment. This study was designed to investigate the interaction between Klebsiella and macrophages. Engulfment of K. pneumoniae was dependent on host cytoskeleton, cell plasma membrane lipid rafts and the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Microscopy studies revealed that K. pneumoniae resides within a vacuolar compartment, the Klebsiella-containing vacuole (KCV), which traffics within vacuoles associated with the endocytic pathway. In contrast to UV-killed bacteria, the majority of live bacteria did not co-localize with markers of the lysosomal compartment. Our data suggest that K. pneumoniae triggers a programmed cell death in macrophages displaying features of apoptosis. Our efforts to identify the mechanism(s) whereby K. pneumoniae prevents the fusion of the lysosomes to the KCV uncovered the central role of the PI3K-Akt-Rab14 axis to control the phagosome maturation. Our data revealed that the capsule is dispensable for Klebsiella intracellular survival if bacteria were not opsonized. Furthermore, the environment found by Klebsiella within the KCV triggered the down-regulation of the expression of cps. Altogether, this study proves evidence that K. pneumoniae survives killing by macrophages by manipulating phagosome maturation that may contribute to Klebsiella pathogenesis.

  16. From Lysosomal Storage Diseases to NKT Cell Activation and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cátia S.; Ribeiro, Helena; Macedo, M. Fatima

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are inherited metabolic disorders characterized by the accumulation of different types of substrates in the lysosome. With a multisystemic involvement, LSDs often present a very broad clinical spectrum. In many LSDs, alterations of the immune system were described. Special emphasis was given to Natural Killer T (NKT) cells, a population of lipid-specific T cells that is activated by lipid antigens bound to CD1d (cluster of differentiation 1 d) molecules at the surface of antigen-presenting cells. These cells have important functions in cancer, infection, and autoimmunity and were altered in a variety of LSDs’ mouse models. In some cases, the observed decrease was attributed to defects in either lipid antigen availability, trafficking, processing, or loading in CD1d. Here, we review the current knowledge about NKT cells in the context of LSDs, including the alterations detected, the proposed mechanisms to explain these defects, and the relevance of these findings for disease pathology. Furthermore, the effect of enzyme replacement therapy on NKT cells is also discussed. PMID:28245613

  17. Noxa couples lysosomal membrane permeabilization and apoptosis during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eno, Colins O; Zhao, Guoping; Venkatanarayan, Avinashnarayan; Wang, Bing; Flores, Elsa R; Li, Chi

    2013-12-01

    The exact roles of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) in oxidative stress-triggered apoptosis are not completely understood. Here, we first studied the temporal relation between LMP and mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) during the initial stage of apoptosis caused by the oxidative stress inducer H2O2. Despite its essential role in mediating apoptosis, the expression of the BH3-only Bcl-2 protein Noxa was dispensable for LMP. In contrast, MOMP was dependent on Noxa expression and occurred downstream of LMP. When lysosomal membranes were stabilized by the iron-chelating agent desferrioxamine, H2O2-induced increase in DNA damage, Noxa expression, and subsequent apoptosis were abolished by the inhibition of LMP. Importantly, LMP-induced Noxa expression increase was mediated by p53 and seems to be a unique feature of apoptosis caused by oxidative stress. Finally, exogenous iron loading recapitulated the effects of H2O2 on the expression of BH3-only Bcl-2 proteins. Overall, these data reveal a Noxa-mediated signaling pathway that couples LMP with MOMP and ultimate apoptosis during oxidative stress.

  18. From Lysosomal Storage Diseases to NKT Cell Activation and Back

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia S. Pereira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs are inherited metabolic disorders characterized by the accumulation of different types of substrates in the lysosome. With a multisystemic involvement, LSDs often present a very broad clinical spectrum. In many LSDs, alterations of the immune system were described. Special emphasis was given to Natural Killer T (NKT cells, a population of lipid-specific T cells that is activated by lipid antigens bound to CD1d (cluster of differentiation 1 d molecules at the surface of antigen-presenting cells. These cells have important functions in cancer, infection, and autoimmunity and were altered in a variety of LSDs’ mouse models. In some cases, the observed decrease was attributed to defects in either lipid antigen availability, trafficking, processing, or loading in CD1d. Here, we review the current knowledge about NKT cells in the context of LSDs, including the alterations detected, the proposed mechanisms to explain these defects, and the relevance of these findings for disease pathology. Furthermore, the effect of enzyme replacement therapy on NKT cells is also discussed.

  19. Frustrated phagocytosis on micro-patterned immune complexes to characterize lysosome movements in live macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud M. Labrousse

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosome mobilization is a key cellular process in phagocytes for bactericidal activities and trans-matrix migration. The molecular mechanisms that regulate lysosome mobilization are still poorly known. Lysosomes are hard to track as they move towards phagosomes throughout the cell volume. In order to anticipate cell regions where lysosomes are recruited to, human and RAW264.7 macrophages were seeded on surfaces that were micro-patterned with immune complexes (ICs as 4 µm-side squares. Distances between IC patterns were adapted to optimize cell spreading in order to constrain lysosome movements mostly in 2 dimensions. Fc receptors triggered local frustrated phagocytosis, frustrated phagosomes appeared as rings of F-actin dots around the IC patterns as early as 5 minutes after cells made contact with the substratum. Frustrated phagosomes recruited actin-associated proteins (vinculin, paxillin and gelsolin. The fusion of lysosomes with frustrated phagosomes was shown by the release of beta-hexosaminidase and the recruitment of Lamp-1 to frustrated phagosomes. Lysosomes of RAW264.7 macrophages were labeled with cathepsinD-mCherry to visualize their movements towards frustrated phagosomes. Lysosomes saltatory movements were markedly slowed down compared to cells layered on non-opsonized patterns. In addition, the linearity of the trajectories and the frequency and duration of contacts of lysosomes with frustrated phagosomes were measured.¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬ Using PP2 we showed that instant velocity, pauses and frequency of lysosome/phagosome contacts were at least in part dependent on Src tyrosine kinases. This experimental set-up is the first step towards deciphering molecular mechanisms which are involved in lysosome movements in the cytoplasm (directionality, docking and fusion using RNA interference, pharmacological inhibition or mutant expression.

  20. 77 FR 40860 - Strategic Plan for Federal Research and Monitoring of Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... Monitoring of Ocean Acidification AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and... Ocean Acidification is being made available for public review and comment. The Draft Research Plan... section 12405 of the Federal Ocean Acidification Research And Monitoring Act of 2009, 33 U.S.C. 3701-3708...

  1. Alternative germ cell death pathway in Drosophila involves HtrA2/Omi, lysosomes, and a caspase-9 counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacobi-Sharon, Keren; Namdar, Yuval; Arama, Eli

    2013-04-15

    In both flies and mammals, almost one-third of the newly emerging male germ cells are spontaneously eliminated before entering meiosis. Here, we show that in Drosophila, germ cell death (GCD) involves the initiator caspase Dronc independently of the apoptosome and the main executioner caspases. Electron microscopy of dying germ cells revealed mixed morphologies of apoptosis and necrosis. We further show that the lysosomes and their catabolic enzymes, but not macroautophagy, are involved in the execution of GCD. We then identified, in a screen, the Parkinson's disease-associated mitochondrial protease, HtrA2/Omi, as an important mediator of GCD, acting mainly through its catalytic activity rather than by antagonizing inhibitor of apoptosis proteins. Concomitantly, other mitochondrial-associated factors were also implicated in GCD, including Pink1 (but not Parkin), the Bcl-2-related proteins, and endonuclease G, which establish the mitochondria as central mediators of GCD. These findings uncover an alternative developmental cell death pathway in metazoans.

  2. A Drosophila Model of Neuronopathic Gaucher Disease Demonstrates Lysosomal-Autophagic Defects and Altered mTOR Signalling and Is Functionally Rescued by Rapamycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönke, Sebastian; Castillo-Quan, Jorge Iván; Woodling, Nathaniel S.; Li, Li; Sirka, Ernestas; Gegg, Matthew; Mills, Kevin; Hardy, John; Bjedov, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) mutations are associated with Gaucher disease (GD), an autosomal recessive disorder caused by functional deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (GBA), a lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes glucosylceramide to ceramide and glucose. Neuronopathic forms of GD can be associated with rapid neurological decline (Type II) or manifest as a chronic form (Type III) with a wide spectrum of neurological signs. Furthermore, there is now a well-established link between GBA1 mutations and Parkinson's disease (PD), with heterozygote mutations in GBA1 considered the commonest genetic defect in PD. Here we describe a novel Drosophila model of GD that lacks the two fly GBA1 orthologs. This knock-out model recapitulates the main features of GD at the cellular level with severe lysosomal defects and accumulation of glucosylceramide in the fly brain. We also demonstrate a block in autophagy flux in association with reduced lifespan, age-dependent locomotor deficits and accumulation of autophagy substrates in dGBA-deficient fly brains. Furthermore, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is downregulated in dGBA knock-out flies, with a concomitant upregulation of Mitf gene expression, the fly ortholog of mammalian TFEB, likely as a compensatory response to the autophagy block. Moreover, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin is able to partially ameliorate the lifespan, locomotor, and oxidative stress phenotypes. Together, our results demonstrate that this dGBA1-deficient fly model is a useful platform for the further study of the role of lysosomal-autophagic impairment and the potential therapeutic benefits of rapamycin in neuronopathic GD. These results also have important implications for the role of autophagy and mTOR signaling in GBA1-associated PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We developed a Drosophila model of neuronopathic GD by knocking-out the fly orthologs of the GBA1 gene, demonstrating abnormal lysosomal pathology in the fly brain. Functioning lysosomes are

  3. Characterization of storage material in cultured fibroblasts by specific lectin binding in lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, I; Ekblom, P; Laurila, P; Nordling, S; Raivio, K O; Aula, P

    1980-11-01

    The lysosomal storage material in cultured fibroblasts from patients with various lysosomal storage diseases was characterized by fluorescence microscopy using lectins specific for different saccharide moieties. In normal fibroblasts and cultured amniotic fluid cells lectins specific for mannosyl and glucosyl moieties, Con A and LcA gave a bright perinuclear cytoplasmic staining corresponding to the localization of endoplasmic reticulum in the cells. All other lectins stained the Golgi apparatus as a juxtanuclear reticular structure. In fucosidosis fibroblasts, only lectins specific for fucosyl groups LTA and UEA, distinctly stained the lysosomal inclusions. The lysosomes in mannosidosis fibroblasts did not react with Con A and LcA, both specific for mannosyl moieties of glycoconjugates, but were brightly labeled with WGA, a lectin specific for N-acetyl glucosaminyl moieties. In I-cell fibroblasts, the numerous perinuclear phase-dense granules, representing abnormal lysosomes, were labeled with every lectin used. In fibroblasts from patients with Salla disease, a newly discovered lysosomal storage disorder, the lysosomes were brightly stained only with LPA, indicating the presence of increased amounts of sialic acid residues in the lysosomal inclusions.

  4. A TRP channel in the lysosome regulates large particle phagocytosis via focal exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, Mohammad; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Goschka, Andrew; Li, Xinran; Cheng, Xiping; Gregg, Evan; Azar, Marlene; Zhuo, Yue; Garrity, Abigail G; Gao, Qiong; Slaugenhaupt, Susan; Pickel, Jim; Zolov, Sergey N; Weisman, Lois S; Lenk, Guy M; Titus, Steve; Bryant-Genevier, Marthe; Southall, Noel; Juan, Marugan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2013-09-16

    Phagocytosis of large extracellular particles such as apoptotic bodies requires delivery of the intracellular endosomal and lysosomal membranes to form plasmalemmal pseudopods. Here, we identified mucolipin TRP channel 1 (TRPML1) as the key lysosomal Ca2+ channel regulating focal exocytosis and phagosome biogenesis. Both particle ingestion and lysosomal exocytosis are inhibited by synthetic TRPML1 blockers and are defective in macrophages isolated from TRPML1 knockout mice. Furthermore, TRPML1 overexpression and TRPML1 agonists facilitate both lysosomal exocytosis and particle uptake. Using time-lapse confocal imaging and direct patch clamping of phagosomal membranes, we found that particle binding induces lysosomal PI(3,5)P2 elevation to trigger TRPML1-mediated lysosomal Ca2+ release specifically at the site of uptake, rapidly delivering TRPML1-resident lysosomal membranes to nascent phagosomes via lysosomal exocytosis. Thus phagocytic ingestion of large particles activates a phosphoinositide- and Ca2+-dependent exocytosis pathway to provide membranes necessary for pseudopod extension, leading to clearance of senescent and apoptotic cells in vivo.

  5. Autophagy-lysosomal pathway is involved in lipid degradation in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skop, V; Cahová, M; Papáčková, Z; Páleníčková, E; Daňková, H; Baranowski, M; Zabielski, P; Zdychová, J; Zídková, J; Kazdová, L

    2012-01-01

    We present data supporting the hypothesis that the lysosomal-autophagy pathway is involved in the degradation of intracellular triacylglycerols in the liver. In primary hepatocytes cultivated in the absence of exogenous fatty acids (FFA), both inhibition of autophagy flux (asparagine) or lysosomal activity (chloroquine) decreased secretion of VLDL (very low density lipoproteins) and formation of FFA oxidative products while the stimulation of autophagy by rapamycine increased some of these parameters. Effect of rapamycine was completely abolished by inactivation of lysosomes. Similarly, when autophagic activity was influenced by cultivating the hepatocytes in "starving" (amino-acid poor medium) or "fed" (serum-supplemented medium) conditions, VLDL secretion and FFA oxidation mirrored the changes in autophagy being higher in starvation and lower in fed state. Autophagy inhibition as well as lysosomal inactivation depressed FFA and DAG (diacylglycerol) formation in liver slices in vitro. In vivo, intensity of lysosomal lipid degradation depends on the formation of autophagolysosomes, i.e. structures bringing the substrate for degradation and lysosomal enzymes into contact. We demonstrated that lysosomal lipase (LAL) activity in liver autophagolysosomal fraction was up-regulated in fasting and down-regulated in fed state together with the increased translocation of LAL and LAMP2 proteins from lysosomal pool to this fraction. Changes in autophagy intensity (LC3-II/LC3-I ratio) followed a similar pattern.

  6. The phytoestrogen genistein modulates lysosomal metabolism and transcription factor EB (TFEB) activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskot, Marta; Montefusco, Sandro; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Mozolewski, Paweł; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Di Bernardo, Diego; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Medina, Diego L; Ballabio, Andrea; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena

    2014-06-13

    Genistein (5,7-dihydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one) has been previously proposed as a potential drug for use in substrate reduction therapy for mucopolysaccharidoses, a group of inherited metabolic diseases caused by mutations leading to inefficient degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in lysosomes. It was demonstrated that this isoflavone can cross the blood-brain barrier, making it an especially desirable potential drug for the treatment of neurological symptoms present in most lysosomal storage diseases. So far, no comprehensive genomic analyses have been performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect elicited by genistein. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify the genistein-modulated gene network regulating GAG biosynthesis and degradation, taking into consideration the entire lysosomal metabolism. Our analyses identified over 60 genes with known roles in lysosomal biogenesis and/or function whose expression was enhanced by genistein. Moreover, 19 genes whose products are involved in both GAG synthesis and degradation pathways were found to be remarkably differentially regulated by genistein treatment. We found a regulatory network linking genistein-mediated control of transcription factor EB (TFEB) gene expression, TFEB nuclear translocation, and activation of TFEB-dependent lysosome biogenesis to lysosomal metabolism. Our data indicate that the molecular mechanism of genistein action involves not only impairment of GAG synthesis but more importantly lysosomal enhancement via TFEB. These findings contribute to explaining the beneficial effects of genistein in lysosomal storage diseases as well as envisage new therapeutic approaches to treat these devastating diseases.

  7. Protective effects of sinapic acid on lysosomal dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Subhro Jyoti; Stanely Mainzen Prince, Ponnian

    2012-11-01

    In the pathology of myocardial infarction, lysosomal lipid peroxidation and resulting enzyme release play an important role. We evaluated the protective effects of sinapic acid on lysosomal dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats. Male Wistar rats were treated with sinapic acid (12 mg/kg body weight) orally daily for 10 days and isoproterenol (100 mg/kg body weight) was injected twice at an interval of 24 h (9th and 10th day). Then, lysosomal lipid peroxidation, lysosomal enzymes in serum, heart homogenate, lysosomal fraction and myocardial infarct size were measured. Isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats showed a significant increase in serum creatine kinase-MB and lysosomal lipid peroxidation. The activities of β-glucuronidase, β-galactosidase, cathepsin-B and D were significantly increased in serum, heart and the activities of β-glucuronidase and cathepsin-D were significantly decreased in lysosomal fraction of myocardial infarcted rats. Pre-and-co-treatment with sinapic acid normalized all the biochemical parameters and reduced myocardial infarct size in myocardial infarcted rats. In vitro studies confirmed the free radical scavenging effects of sinapic acid. The possible mechanisms for the observed effects are attributed to sinapic acid's free radical scavenging and membrane stabilizing properties. Thus, sinapic acid has protective effects on lysosomal dysfunction in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats.

  8. Expression Pattern of Lysosomal Protective Protein/Cathepsin A: Implications for the analysis of hnman galactosialidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Rottier (Robbert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe lysosome represents a well characterized, membrane-contained intracellular digestive system. Iu this important organelle a battery of lysosomal hydro lases and accessory proteins work in concert on the step-wise conversion of macromolecular substrates into small biological building b

  9. Vps33B is required for delivery of endocytosed cargo to lysosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galmes, Romain; ten Brink, Corlinda; Oorschot, Viola; Veenendaal, Tineke; Jonker, Caspar; van der Sluijs, Peter; Klumperman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells Vps33B forms a complex with VIPAS-39 that is recruited to recycling endosomes. Here we show that when Vps33B is expressed together with Rab7-interacting lysosomal protein (RILP) it is recruited to late endosomes-lysosomes and that depletion of Vps33B impairs late

  10. Glycogenosis type II : cloning and characterization of the human lysosomal α-glucosidase gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H. Hoefsloot (Lies)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractGlycogenosis type II is a lysosomal storage disorder. Characteristic features are heart failure and generalized muscle weakness. The disease is caused by the inherited deficiency of acid α-glucosidase, the enzyme responsible for the degradation of lysosomal glycogen. The aim of the work

  11. Lysosomal cholesterol accumulation : driver on the road to inflammation during atherosclerosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikx, T.; Walenbergh, S. M. A.; Hofker, M. H.; Shiri-Sverdlov, R.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies show an association between the accumulation of cholesterol inside lysosomes and the progression towards inflammatory disease states that are closely related to obesity. While in the past, the knowledge regarding lysosomal cholesterol accumulation was limited to its association with pla

  12. Effects of near-future ocean acidification, fishing, and marine protection on a temperate coastal ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, Christopher E; Eddy, Tyler D

    2015-02-01

    Understanding ecosystem responses to global and local anthropogenic impacts is paramount to predicting future ecosystem states. We used an ecosystem modeling approach to investigate the independent and cumulative effects of fishing, marine protection, and ocean acidification on a coastal ecosystem. To quantify the effects of ocean acidification at the ecosystem level, we used information from the peer-reviewed literature on the effects of ocean acidification. Using an Ecopath with Ecosim ecosystem model for the Wellington south coast, including the Taputeranga Marine Reserve (MR), New Zealand, we predicted ecosystem responses under 4 scenarios: ocean acidification + fishing; ocean acidification + MR (no fishing); no ocean acidification + fishing; no ocean acidification + MR for the year 2050. Fishing had a larger effect on trophic group biomasses and trophic structure than ocean acidification, whereas the effects of ocean acidification were only large in the absence of fishing. Mortality by fishing had large, negative effects on trophic group biomasses. These effects were similar regardless of the presence of ocean acidification. Ocean acidification was predicted to indirectly benefit certain species in the MR scenario. This was because lobster (Jasus edwardsii) only recovered to 58% of the MR biomass in the ocean acidification + MR scenario, a situation that benefited the trophic groups lobsters prey on. Most trophic groups responded antagonistically to the interactive effects of ocean acidification and marine protection (46%; reduced response); however, many groups responded synergistically (33%; amplified response). Conservation and fisheries management strategies need to account for the reduced recovery potential of some exploited species under ocean acidification, nonadditive interactions of multiple factors, and indirect responses of species to ocean acidification caused by declines in calcareous predators. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  13. Ocean acidification reduces growth and calcification in a marine dinoflagellate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, D.B. van de; John, U.; Ziveri, P.; Reichart, G.-J.; Hoins, M.; Sluijs, A.; Rost, B.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification is considered a major threat to marine ecosystems and may particularly affect calcifying organisms such as corals, foraminifera and coccolithophores. Here we investigate the impact of elevated pCO2 and lowered pH on growth and calcification in the common calcareous

  14. Seagrass ecophysiological performance under ocean warming and acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repolho, Tiago; Duarte, Bernardo; Dionísio, Gisela; Paula, José Ricardo; Lopes, Ana R; Rosa, Inês C; Grilo, Tiago F; Caçador, Isabel; Calado, Ricardo; Rosa, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Seagrasses play an essential ecological role within coastal habitats and their worldwide population decline has been linked to different types of anthropogenic forces. We investigated, for the first time, the combined effects of future ocean warming and acidification on fundamental biological processes of Zostera noltii, including shoot density, leaf coloration, photophysiology (electron transport rate, ETR; maximum PSII quantum yield, Fv/Fm) and photosynthetic pigments. Shoot density was severely affected under warming conditions, with a concomitant increase in the frequency of brownish colored leaves (seagrass die-off). Warming was responsible for a significant decrease in ETR and Fv/Fm (particularly under control pH conditions), while promoting the highest ETR variability (among experimental treatments). Warming also elicited a significant increase in pheophytin and carotenoid levels, alongside an increase in carotenoid/chlorophyll ratio and De-Epoxidation State (DES). Acidification significantly affected photosynthetic pigments content (antheraxanthin, β-carotene, violaxanthin and zeaxanthin), with a significant decrease being recorded under the warming scenario. No significant interaction between ocean acidification and warming was observed. Our findings suggest that future ocean warming will be a foremost determinant stressor influencing Z. noltii survival and physiological performance. Additionally, acidification conditions to occur in the future will be unable to counteract deleterious effects posed by ocean warming.

  15. Ocean acidification: One potential driver of phosphorus eutrophication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Changzi; Chai, Yanchao; Wang, Haiqing; Kan, Manman

    2017-02-15

    Harmful algal blooms which may be limited by phosphorus outbreak increases currently and ocean acidification worsens presently, which implies that ocean acidification might lead to phosphorus eutrophication. To verify the hypothesis, oxic sediments were exposed to seawater with different pH 30days. If pH was 8.1 and 7.7, the total phosphorus (TP) content in sediments was 1.52±0.50 and 1.29±0.40mg/g. The inorganic phosphorus (IP) content in sediments exposed to seawater with pH8.1 and 7.7 was 1.39±0.10 and 1.06±0.20mg/g, respectively. The exchangeable phosphorus (Ex-P) content in sediments was 4.40±0.45 and 2.82±0.15μg/g, if seawater pH was 8.1 and 7.7. Ex-P and IP contents in oxic sediments were reduced by ocean acidification significantly (pocean acidification was one potential facilitator of phosphorus eutrophication in oxic conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mitigating Local Causes of Ocean Acidification with Existing Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    The oceans continue to absorb CO2 in step with the increasing atmospheric concentration of CO2. The dissolved CO2 reacts with seawater to form carbonic acid (H2CO3) and liberate hydrogen ions, causing the pH of the oceans to decrease. Ocean acidification is thus an inevitable a...

  17. Millennial-scale ocean acidification and late Quaternary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riding, Dr Robert E [University of Tennessee (UT); Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Braga, Dr Juan Carlos [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Estratigrafıa y Paleontologıa, Granada, Spain

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification by atmospheric carbon dioxide has increased almost continuously since the last glacial maximum (LGM), 21 000 years ago. It is expected to impair tropical reef development, but effects on reefs at the present day and in the recent past have proved difficult to evaluate. We present evidence that acidification has already significantly reduced the formation of calcified bacterial crusts in tropical reefs. Unlike major reef builders such as coralline algae and corals that more closely control their calcification, bacterial calcification is very sensitive to ambient changes in carbonate chemistry. Bacterial crusts in reef cavities have declined in thickness over the past 14 000 years with largest reduction occurring 12 000 10 000 years ago. We interpret this as an early effect of deglacial ocean acidification on reef calcification and infer that similar crusts were likely to have been thicker when seawater carbonate saturation was increased during earlier glacial intervals, and thinner during interglacials. These changes in crust thickness could have substantially affected reef development over glacial cycles, as rigid crusts significantly strengthen framework and their reduction would have increased the susceptibility of reefs to biological and physical erosion. Bacterial crust decline reveals previously unrecognized millennial-scale acidification effects on tropical reefs. This directs attention to the role of crusts in reef formation and the ability of bioinduced calcification to reflect changes in seawater chemistry. It also provides a long-term context for assessing anticipated anthropogenic effects.

  18. Evaluation of existing ecosystem models with regard to ocean acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Engeland, T.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J.J.; Schartau, M.; Hohn, S.; Oschlies, A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the carbonate chemistry and physical aspects of ocean acidification are well constrained, its biological effects are not fully understood. Experimental research has shown large variability in responses to increased atmospheric CO2 input into the ocean, ranging from positive to zero and

  19. Ocean acidification reduces growth and calcification in a marine dinoflagellate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Waal, D.B.; John, U.; Ziveri, P.; Reichart, G.J.; Hoins, M.; Sluijs, A.; Rost, B.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification is considered a major threat to marine ecosystems and may particularly affect calcifying organisms such as corals, foraminifera and coccolithophores. Here we investigate the impact of elevated pCO2 and lowered pH on growth and calcification in the common calcareous dinoflagellate

  20. Ocean acidification alters predator behaviour and reduces predation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Sue-Ann; Fields, Jennifer B; Munday, Philip L

    2017-02-01

    Ocean acidification poses a range of threats to marine invertebrates; however, the emerging and likely widespread effects of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) levels on marine invertebrate behaviour are still little understood. Here, we show that ocean acidification alters and impairs key ecological behaviours of the predatory cone snail Conus marmoreus Projected near-future seawater CO2 levels (975 µatm) increased activity in this coral reef molluscivore more than threefold (from less than 4 to more than 12 mm min(-1)) and decreased the time spent buried to less than one-third when compared with the present-day control conditions (390 µatm). Despite increasing activity, elevated CO2 reduced predation rate during predator-prey interactions with control-treated humpbacked conch, Gibberulus gibberulus gibbosus; 60% of control predators successfully captured and consumed their prey, compared with only 10% of elevated CO2 predators. The alteration of key ecological behaviours of predatory invertebrates by near-future ocean acidification could have potentially far-reaching implications for predator-prey interactions and trophic dynamics in marine ecosystems. Combined evidence that the behaviours of both species in this predator-prey relationship are altered by elevated CO2 suggests food web interactions and ecosystem structure will become increasingly difficult to predict as ocean acidification advances over coming decades. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Response of halocarbons to ocean acidification in the Arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.E. Hopkins; S.A. Kimmance; J.A. Stephens; R.G.J. Bellerby; C.P.D. Brussaard; J. Czerny; K.G. Schulz; S.D. Archer

    2013-01-01

    The potential effect of ocean acidification (OA) on seawater halocarbons in the Arctic was investigated during a mesocosm experiment in Spitsbergen in June-July 2010. Over a period of 5 weeks, natural phytoplankton communities in nine ~ 50 m3 mesocosms were studied under a range of pCO2 treatments f

  2. Ocean acidification through the lens of ecological theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylord, Brian; Kroeker, Kristy J; Sunday, Jennifer M; Anderson, Kathryn M; Barry, James P; Brown, Norah E; Connell, Sean D; Dupont, Sam; Fabricius, Katharina E; Hall-Spencer, Jason Hall; Klinger, Terrie; Milazzo, Marco; Munday, Philip L; Russell, Bayden D; Sanford, Eric; Schreiber, Sebastian J; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen; Vaughan, Megan L H; Widdicombe, Steven; Harley, Christopher D G

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification, chemical changes to the carbonate system of seawater, is emerging as a key environmental challenge accompanying global warming and other human-induced perturbations. Considerable research seeks to define the scope and character of potential outcomes from this phenomenon, but a crucial impediment persists. Ecological theory, despite its power and utility, has been only peripherally applied to the problem. Here we sketch in broad strokes several areas where fundamental principles of ecology have the capacity to generate insight into ocean acidification's consequences. We focus on conceptual models that, when considered in the context of acidification, yield explicit predictions regarding a spectrum of population- and community-level effects, from narrowing of species ranges and shifts in patterns of demographic connectivity, to modified consumer-resource relationships, to ascendance of weedy taxa and loss of species diversity. Although our coverage represents only a small fraction of the breadth of possible insights achievable from the application of theory, our hope is that this initial foray will spur expanded efforts to blend experiments with theoretical approaches. The result promises to be a deeper and more nuanced understanding of ocean acidification'and the ecological changes it portends.

  3. Acidification of subsurface coastal waters enhanced by eutrophication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uptake of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere has acidified the surface ocean by ~0.1 pH units and driven down the carbonate saturation state. Ocean acidification is a threat to marine ecosystems and may alter key biogeochemical cycles. Coastal oceans have also b...

  4. Predicting Effects of Coastal Acidification on Marine Bivalve Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) is increasing in the oceans and causing changes in seawater pH commonly described as ocean or coastal acidification. It is now well-established that, when reproduced in laboratory experiments, these increases in pCO2 can reduce survi...

  5. Urbanization in China drives soil acidification of Pinus massoniana forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juan; Zhang, Wei; Mo, Jiangming; Wang, Shizhong; Liu, Juxiu; Chen, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Soil acidification instead of alkalization has become a new environmental issue caused by urbanization. However, it remains unclear the characters and main contributors of this acidification. We investigated the effects of an urbanization gradient on soil acidity of Pinus massoniana forests in Pearl River Delta, South China. The soil pH of pine forests at 20-cm depth had significantly positive linear correlations with the distance from the urban core of Guangzhou. Soil pH reduced by 0.44 unit at the 0-10 cm layer in urbanized areas compared to that in non-urbanized areas. Nitrogen deposition, mean annual temperature and mean annual precipitation were key factors influencing soil acidification based on a principal component analysis. Nitrogen deposition showed significant linear relationships with soil pH at the 0-10 cm (for ammonium N (-N), P deposition particularly under the climate of high temperature and rainfall, greatly contributed to a significant soil acidification occurred in the urbanized environment.

  6. Does ocean acidification induce an upward flux of marine aggregates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Mari

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The absorption of anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 by the ocean provokes its acidification. This acidification may alter several oceanic processes, including the export of biogenic carbon from the upper layer of the ocean, hence providing a feedback on rising atmospheric carbon concentrations. The effect of seawater acidification on transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP driven aggregation and sedimentation processes were investigated by studying the interactions between latex beads and TEP precursors collected in the lagoon of New Caledonia. A suspension of TEP and beads was prepared and the formation of mixed aggregates was monitored as a function of pH under increasing turbulence intensities. The pH was controlled by addition of sulfuric acid. Aggregation and sedimentation processes driven by TEP were drastically reduced when the pH of seawater decreases within the expected limits imposed by increased anthropogenic CO2 emissions. In addition to the diminution of TEP sticking properties, the diminution of seawater pH led to a significant increase of the TEP pool, most likely due to swollen structures. A diminution of seawater pH by 0.2 units or more led to a stop or a reversal of the downward flux of particles. If applicable to oceanic conditions, the sedimentation of marine aggregates may slow down or even stop as the pH decreases, and the vertical flux of organic carbon may reverse. This would enhance both rising atmospheric carbon and ocean acidification.

  7. Gas hydrate dissociation prolongs acidification of the Anthropocene oceans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boudreau, B.P.; Luo, Y.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Middelburg, J

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic warming of the oceans can release methane (CH4) currently stored in sediments as gas hydrates. This CH4 will be oxidized to CO2, thus increasing the acidification of the oceans. We employ a biogeochemical model of the multimillennial carbon cycle to determine the evolution of the ocean

  8. Effect of ocean acidification on the benthic foraminifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keul, N.; Langer, G.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Bijma, J.

    2013-01-01

    About 30% of the anthropogenically released CO2 is taken up by the oceans; such uptake causes surface ocean pH to decrease and is commonly referred to as ocean acidification (OA). Foraminifera are one of the most abundant groups of marine calcifiers, estimated to precipitate ca. 50 % of biogenic

  9. Ocean acidification reduces growth and calcification in a marine dinoflagellate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Waal, D.B.; John, U.; Ziveri, P.; Reichart, G.-J.; Hoins, M.; Sluijs, A.; Rost, B.

    2013-01-01

    Ocean acidification is considered a major threat to marine ecosystems and may particularly affect calcifying organisms such as corals, foraminifera and coccolithophores. Here we investigate the impact of elevated pCO2 and lowered pH on growth and calcification in the common calcareous dinoflagellate

  10. Mitigating Local Causes of Ocean Acidification with Existing Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    The oceans continue to absorb CO2 in step with the increasing atmospheric concentration of CO2. The dissolved CO2 reacts with seawater to form carbonic acid (H2CO3) and liberate hydrogen ions, causing the pH of the oceans to decrease. Ocean acidification is thus an inevitable a...

  11. Why is acidification of slurry a success only in Denmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    . Several technologies have been used in the buildings, in the storage and when applying manure. One technology now used widely in Denmark (20% of all slurry) is acidification of slurry where the application of sulphuric acid reduces the ammonia emission. However, the technology has hardly been used...

  12. Response of halocarbons to ocean acidification in the Arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopkins, F.E.; Kimmance, S.A.; Stephens, J.A.; Bellerby, R.G.J.; Brussaard, C.P.D.; Czerny, J.; Schulz, K.G.; Archer, S.D.

    2013-01-01

    The potential effect of ocean acidification (OA) on seawater halocarbons in the Arctic was investigated during a mesocosm experiment in Spitsbergen in June-July 2010. Over a period of 5 weeks, natural phytoplankton communities in nine similar to 50 m(3) mesocosms were studied under a range of pCO(2)

  13. Effect of ocean acidification on the benthic foraminifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keul, N.; Langer, G.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Bijma, J.

    2013-01-01

    About 30% of the anthropogenically released CO2 is taken up by the oceans; such uptake causes surface ocean pH to decrease and is commonly referred to as ocean acidification (OA). Foraminifera are one of the most abundant groups of marine calcifiers, estimated to precipitate ca. 50 % of biogenic cal

  14. Soil acidification by atmospheric pollution and forest growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengt Jonsson

    1976-01-01

    In recent years concern has been expressed about the danger of harmful pollution deposits which affect areas at great distances from the emission sources. The investigation was so designed that a possible reaction in growth resulting from a supposed acidification could be observed as far as possible. A poorer growth development was observed in regions, which are...

  15. Effect of ocean acidification on the benthic foraminifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keul, N.; Langer, G.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Bijma, J.

    2013-01-01

    About 30% of the anthropogenically released CO2 is taken up by the oceans; such uptake causes surface ocean pH to decrease and is commonly referred to as ocean acidification (OA). Foraminifera are one of the most abundant groups of marine calcifiers, estimated to precipitate ca. 50 % of biogenic cal

  16. Seagrass ecophysiological performance under ocean warming and acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repolho, Tiago; Duarte, Bernardo; Dionísio, Gisela; Paula, José Ricardo; Lopes, Ana R.; Rosa, Inês C.; Grilo, Tiago F.; Caçador, Isabel; Calado, Ricardo; Rosa, Rui

    2017-01-01

    Seagrasses play an essential ecological role within coastal habitats and their worldwide population decline has been linked to different types of anthropogenic forces. We investigated, for the first time, the combined effects of future ocean warming and acidification on fundamental biological processes of Zostera noltii, including shoot density, leaf coloration, photophysiology (electron transport rate, ETR; maximum PSII quantum yield, Fv/Fm) and photosynthetic pigments. Shoot density was severely affected under warming conditions, with a concomitant increase in the frequency of brownish colored leaves (seagrass die-off). Warming was responsible for a significant decrease in ETR and Fv/Fm (particularly under control pH conditions), while promoting the highest ETR variability (among experimental treatments). Warming also elicited a significant increase in pheophytin and carotenoid levels, alongside an increase in carotenoid/chlorophyll ratio and De-Epoxidation State (DES). Acidification significantly affected photosynthetic pigments content (antheraxanthin, β-carotene, violaxanthin and zeaxanthin), with a significant decrease being recorded under the warming scenario. No significant interaction between ocean acidification and warming was observed. Our findings suggest that future ocean warming will be a foremost determinant stressor influencing Z. noltii survival and physiological performance. Additionally, acidification conditions to occur in the future will be unable to counteract deleterious effects posed by ocean warming. PMID:28145531

  17. Seagrass ecophysiological performance under ocean warming and acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repolho, Tiago; Duarte, Bernardo; Dionísio, Gisela; Paula, José Ricardo; Lopes, Ana R.; Rosa, Inês C.; Grilo, Tiago F.; Caçador, Isabel; Calado, Ricardo; Rosa, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Seagrasses play an essential ecological role within coastal habitats and their worldwide population decline has been linked to different types of anthropogenic forces. We investigated, for the first time, the combined effects of future ocean warming and acidification on fundamental biological processes of Zostera noltii, including shoot density, leaf coloration, photophysiology (electron transport rate, ETR; maximum PSII quantum yield, Fv/Fm) and photosynthetic pigments. Shoot density was severely affected under warming conditions, with a concomitant increase in the frequency of brownish colored leaves (seagrass die-off). Warming was responsible for a significant decrease in ETR and Fv/Fm (particularly under control pH conditions), while promoting the highest ETR variability (among experimental treatments). Warming also elicited a significant increase in pheophytin and carotenoid levels, alongside an increase in carotenoid/chlorophyll ratio and De-Epoxidation State (DES). Acidification significantly affected photosynthetic pigments content (antheraxanthin, β-carotene, violaxanthin and zeaxanthin), with a significant decrease being recorded under the warming scenario. No significant interaction between ocean acidification and warming was observed. Our findings suggest that future ocean warming will be a foremost determinant stressor influencing Z. noltii survival and physiological performance. Additionally, acidification conditions to occur in the future will be unable to counteract deleterious effects posed by ocean warming.

  18. Terrestrial acidification during the end-Permian biosphere crisis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sephton, Mark A.; Jiao, Dan; Engel, Michael H.; Looy, Cindy V.; Visscher, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Excessive acid rainfall associated with emplacement of the Siberian Traps magmatic province is increasingly accepted as a major contributing factor to the end-Permian biosphere crisis. However, direct proxy evidence of terrestrial acidification is so far not available. In this paper, we seek to dete

  19. Understanding feedbacks between ocean acidification and coral reef metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Yuichiro

    2017-03-01

    Biogeochemical feedbacks from benthic metabolism have been hypothesized as a potential mechanism to buffer some effects of ocean acidification on coral reefs. The article in JGR-Oceans by DeCarlo et al. demonstrates the importance of benthic community health on this feedback from Dongsha Atoll in the South China Sea.

  20. Cephalopod Susceptibility to Asphyxiation via Ocean Incalescence, Deoxygenation, and Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, Brad A

    2016-11-01

    Squids are powerful swimmers with high metabolic rates despite constrained oxygen uptake and transport. They have evolved novel physiological strategies for survival in extreme environments that provide insight into their susceptibility to asphyxiation under anthropogenic ocean incalescence (warming), deoxygenation, and acidification. Plasticity of ecological and physiological traits, in conjunction with vertical and latitudinal mobility, may explain their evolutionary persistence and ensure their future survival.

  1. Does ocean acidification induce an upward flux of marine aggregates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Mari

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 by the ocean provokes its acidification. This acidification may alter several oceanic processes, including the export of biogenic carbon from the upper layer of the ocean, hence providing a feedback on rising atmospheric carbon concentrations. The effect of seawater acidification on transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP driven aggregation and sedimentation processes were investigated by studying the interactions between latex beads and TEP precursors collected in the lagoon of New Caledonia. A suspension of TEP and beads was prepared and the formation of mixed aggregates was monitored as a function of pH under increasing turbulence intensities. The pH was controlled by addition of sulfuric acid. Aggregation and sedimentation processes driven by TEP were drastically reduced when the pH of seawater decreases within the expected limits imposed by increased anthropogenic CO2 emissions. In addition to the diminution of TEP sticking properties, the diminution of seawater pH led to a significant increase of the TEP pool, most likely due to swollen structures. A diminution of seawater pH by 0.2 units or more led to a stop or a reversal of the downward flux of particles. If applicable to oceanic conditions, the sedimentation of marine aggregates may slow down or even stop as the pH decreases, and the vertical flux of organic carbon may reverse. This would enhance both rising atmospheric carbon and ocean acidification.

  2. Ocean acidification alters fish populations indirectly through habitat modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerken, Ivan; Russell, Bayden D.; Gillanders, Bronwyn M.; Connell, Sean D.

    2016-01-01

    Ocean ecosystems are predicted to lose biodiversity and productivity from increasing ocean acidification. Although laboratory experiments reveal negative effects of acidification on the behaviour and performance of species, more comprehensive predictions have been hampered by a lack of in situ studies that incorporate the complexity of interactions between species and their environment. We studied CO2 vents from both Northern and Southern hemispheres, using such natural laboratories to investigate the effect of ocean acidification on plant-animal associations embedded within all their natural complexity. Although we substantiate simple direct effects of reduced predator-avoidance behaviour by fishes, as observed in laboratory experiments, we here show that this negative effect is naturally dampened when fish reside in shelter-rich habitats. Importantly, elevated CO2 drove strong increases in the abundance of some fish species through major habitat shifts, associated increases in resources such as habitat and prey availability, and reduced predator abundances. The indirect effects of acidification via resource and predator alterations may have far-reaching consequences for population abundances, and its study provides a framework for a more comprehensive understanding of increasing CO2 emissions as a driver of ecological change.

  3. High sphingomyelin levels induce lysosomal damage and autophagy dysfunction in Niemann Pick disease type A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabandé-Rodríguez, E; Boya, P; Labrador, V; Dotti, C G; Ledesma, M D

    2014-01-01

    Niemann Pick disease type A (NPA), which is caused by loss of function mutations in the acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) gene, is a lysosomal storage disorder leading to neurodegeneration. Yet, lysosomal dysfunction and its consequences in the disease are poorly characterized. Here we show that undegraded molecules build up in neurons of acid sphingomyelinase knockout mice and in fibroblasts from NPA patients in which autophagolysosomes accumulate. The latter is not due to alterations in autophagy initiation or autophagosome–lysosome fusion but because of inefficient autophago–lysosomal clearance. This, in turn, can be explained by lysosomal membrane permeabilization leading to cytosolic release of Cathepsin B. High sphingomyelin (SM) levels account for these effects as they can be induced in control cells on addition of the lipid and reverted on SM-lowering strategies in ASM-deficient cells. These results unveil a relevant role for SM in autophagy modulation and characterize autophagy anomalies in NPA, opening new perspectives for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24488099

  4. Ubiquitin trafficking to the lysosome: keeping the house tidy and getting rid of unwanted guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Georgiana E; Russell, David G

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial killing by autophagic delivery to the lysosomal compartment has been shown for Mycobacteria, Streptococcus, Shigella, Legionella and Salmonella, indicating an important role for this conserved trafficking pathway for the control of intracellular bacterial pathogens.(1-5) In a recent study we found that solubilized lysosomes isolated from bone marrow-derived macrophages had potent antibacterial properties against M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis that were associated with ubiquitin and ubiquitin-derived peptides. We propose that ubiquitinated proteins are delivered to the lysosomal compartment, where degradation by lysosomal proteinases generates ubiquitin-derived peptides with antimycobacterial properties. This surprising finding provokes a number of questions regarding the nature and trafficking of ubiquitin and ubiquitin-modified proteins in mammalian cells. We discuss the possible role(s) that the multivesicular body (MVB), the late endosome and the autophagosome may play in trafficking of ubiquitinated proteins to the lysosome.

  5. The effects of hydrocortisone and glycyrrhizine on the enzyme releases of arylsulfatase and hyaluronidase from lysosomes of liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, T; Tokawa, Y; Ogasawara, T; Sato, K; Kan, M

    1978-03-15

    Hydrocortisone and glycyrrhizine act as both stabilizers and labilizers of the lysosomes of liver. The effect of both agents on the lysosomes is changeable according to the duration of their administration.

  6. Acid soils of western Serbia and their further acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrvic, Vesna

    2010-05-01

    Acid soils cause many unfavorable soil characteristics from the plant nutrition point of view. Because of increased soil acidity the violation of buffering soil properties due to leaching of Ca and Mg ions is taking place that also can cause soil physical degradation via peptization of colloids. Together with increasing of soil acidity the content of mobile Al increases that can be toxic for plants. Easily available nutritive elements transforms into hardly avaialble froms. The process of deactivation is especially expressed for phosphorous that under such conditions forms non-soluble compounds with sesqui-oxides. From the other hand the higher solubility of some microelements (Zn and B) can cause their accelerated leaching from root zone and therefore, result in their deficiency for plant nutrition. Dangerous and toxic matters transforms into easly-available forms for plants, especially, Cd and Ni under the lower soil pH. The studied soil occupies 36675 hectare in the municipality of Krupan in Serbia, and are characterized with very unfavorable chemical properties: 26% of the territory belongs to the cathegory of very acidic, and 44 % belongs to the cathegory of acidic. The results showed that the soil of the territory of Krupan is limited for agricultural land use due to their high acidity. Beside the statement of negative soil properties determined by acidity, there is a necessity for determination of soil sensitivity for acidification processes toward soil protection from ecological aspect and its prevention from further acidification. Based on such data and categorization of soils it is possible to undertake proper measures for soil protection and melioration of the most endangered soil cover, where the economic aspect of these measures is very important. One of the methods of soil classification based on sensitivity for acidification classification the determination of soil categories is based on the values of soil CEC and pH in water. By combination of these

  7. Mild MPP(+) exposure impairs autophagic degradation through a novel lysosomal acidity-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyara, Masatsugu; Kotake, Yaichiro; Tokunaga, Wataru; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, but its underlying cause remains unknown. Although recent studies using PD-related neurotoxin MPP(+) suggest autophagy involvement in the pathogenesis of PD, the effect of MPP(+) on autophagic processes under mild exposure, which mimics the slow progressive nature of PD, remains largely unclear. We examined the effect of mild MPP(+) exposure (10 and 200 μM for 48 h), which induces a more slowly developing cell death, on autophagic processes and the mechanistic differences with acute MPP(+) toxicity (2.5 and 5 mM for 24 h). In SH-SY5Y cells, mild MPP(+) exposure predominantly inhibited autophagosome degradation, whereas acute MPP(+) exposure inhibited both autophagosome degradation and basal autophagy. Mild MPP(+) exposure reduced lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D activity without changing lysosomal acidity, whereas acute exposure decreased lysosomal density. Lysosome biogenesis enhancers trehalose and rapamycin partially alleviated mild MPP(+) exposure induced impaired autophagosome degradation and cell death, but did not prevent the pathogenic response to acute MPP(+) exposure, suggesting irreversible lysosomal damage. We demonstrated impaired autophagic degradation by MPP(+) exposure and mechanistic differences between mild and acute MPP(+) toxicities. Mild MPP(+) toxicity impaired autophagosome degradation through novel lysosomal acidity-independent mechanisms. Sustained mild lysosomal damage may contribute to PD. We examined the effects of MPP(+) on autophagic processes under mild exposure, which mimics the slow progressive nature of Parkinson's disease, in SH-SY5Y cells. This study demonstrated impaired autophagic degradation through a reduction in lysosomal cathepsin D activity without altering lysosomal acidity by mild MPP(+) exposure. Mechanistic differences between acute and mild MPP(+) toxicity were also observed. Sustained mild damage of lysosome may be an underlying cause

  8. A novel role for Stat1 in phagosome acidification and natural host resistance to intracellular infection by Leishmania major.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald F Späth

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular parasites of the genus Leishmania generate severe diseases in humans, which are associated with a failure of the infected host to induce a protective interferon gamma (IFNgamma-mediated immune response. We tested the role of the JAK/STAT1 signaling pathway in Leishmania pathogenesis by utilizing knockout mice lacking the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (Stat1 and derived macrophages. Unexpectedly, infection of Stat1-deficient macrophages in vitro with promastigotes from Leishmania major and attenuated LPG1 knockout mutants (lpg(- specifically lacking lipophosphoglycan (LPG resulted in a twofold increased intracellular growth, which was independent of IFNgamma and associated with a substantial increase in phagosomal pH. Phagosomes in Stat1-/- macrophages showed normal maturation as judged by the accumulation of the lysosomal marker protein rab7, and provided normal vATPase activity, but were defective in the anion conductive pathway required for full vesicular acidification. Our results suggest a role of acidic pH in the control of intracellular Leishmania growth early during infection and identify for the first time an unexpected role of Stat1 in natural anti-microbial resistance independent from its function as IFNgamma-induced signal transducer. This novel Stat1 function may have important implications to studies of other pathogens, as the acidic phagolysosomal pH plays an important role in antigen processing and the uncoating process of many viruses.

  9. Reversal of ocean acidification enhances net coral reef calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Rebecca; Caldeira, Lilian; Hosfelt, Jessica; Kwiatkowski, Lester; Maclaren, Jana K; Mason, Benjamin M; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Pongratz, Julia; Ricke, Katharine L; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider, Kenneth; Sesboüé, Marine; Shamberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Jacob; Wolfe, Kennedy; Zhu, Kai; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-03-17

    Approximately one-quarter of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere each year is absorbed by the global oceans, causing measurable declines in surface ocean pH, carbonate ion concentration ([CO3(2-)]), and saturation state of carbonate minerals (Ω). This process, referred to as ocean acidification, represents a major threat to marine ecosystems, in particular marine calcifiers such as oysters, crabs, and corals. Laboratory and field studies have shown that calcification rates of many organisms decrease with declining pH, [CO3(2-)], and Ω. Coral reefs are widely regarded as one of the most vulnerable marine ecosystems to ocean acidification, in part because the very architecture of the ecosystem is reliant on carbonate-secreting organisms. Acidification-induced reductions in calcification are projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale declines in coral, and community, calcification over recent decades, determining the contribution of ocean acidification to these changes is difficult, if not impossible, owing to the confounding effects of other environmental factors such as temperature. Here we quantify the net calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment, and show that, when ocean chemistry is restored closer to pre-industrial conditions, net community calcification increases. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment of a natural coral reef community, we provide evidence that net community calcification is depressed compared with values expected for pre-industrial conditions, indicating that ocean acidification may already be impairing coral reef growth.

  10. Reversal of ocean acidification enhances net coral reef calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Rebecca; Caldeira, Lilian; Hosfelt, Jessica; Kwiatkowski, Lester; MacLaren, Jana K.; Mason, Benjamin M.; Nebuchina, Yana; Ninokawa, Aaron; Pongratz, Julia; Ricke, Katharine L.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider, Kenneth; Sesboüé, Marine; Shamberger, Kathryn; Silverman, Jacob; Wolfe, Kennedy; Zhu, Kai; Caldeira, Ken

    2016-03-01

    Approximately one-quarter of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere each year is absorbed by the global oceans, causing measurable declines in surface ocean pH, carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]), and saturation state of carbonate minerals (Ω). This process, referred to as ocean acidification, represents a major threat to marine ecosystems, in particular marine calcifiers such as oysters, crabs, and corals. Laboratory and field studies have shown that calcification rates of many organisms decrease with declining pH, [CO32-], and Ω. Coral reefs are widely regarded as one of the most vulnerable marine ecosystems to ocean acidification, in part because the very architecture of the ecosystem is reliant on carbonate-secreting organisms. Acidification-induced reductions in calcification are projected to shift coral reefs from a state of net accretion to one of net dissolution this century. While retrospective studies show large-scale declines in coral, and community, calcification over recent decades, determining the contribution of ocean acidification to these changes is difficult, if not impossible, owing to the confounding effects of other environmental factors such as temperature. Here we quantify the net calcification response of a coral reef flat to alkalinity enrichment, and show that, when ocean chemistry is restored closer to pre-industrial conditions, net community calcification increases. In providing results from the first seawater chemistry manipulation experiment of a natural coral reef community, we provide evidence that net community calcification is depressed compared with values expected for pre-industrial conditions, indicating that ocean acidification may already be impairing coral reef growth.

  11. Ocean acidification alters temperature and salinity preferences in larval fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistevos, Jennifer C A; Nagelkerken, Ivan; Rossi, Tullio; Connell, Sean D

    2017-02-01

    Ocean acidification alters the way in which animals perceive and respond to their world by affecting a variety of senses such as audition, olfaction, vision and pH sensing. Marine species rely on other senses as well, but we know little of how these might be affected by ocean acidification. We tested whether ocean acidification can alter the preference for physicochemical cues used for dispersal between ocean and estuarine environments. We experimentally assessed the behavioural response of a larval fish (Lates calcarifer) to elevated temperature and reduced salinity, including estuarine water of multiple cues for detecting settlement habitat. Larval fish raised under elevated CO2 concentrations were attracted by warmer water, but temperature had no effect on fish raised in contemporary CO2 concentrations. In contrast, contemporary larvae were deterred by lower salinity water, where CO2-treated fish showed no such response. Natural estuarine water-of higher temperature, lower salinity, and containing estuarine olfactory cues-was only preferred by fish treated under forecasted high CO2 conditions. We show for the first time that attraction by larval fish towards physicochemical cues can be altered by ocean acidification. Such alterations to perception and evaluation of environmental cues during the critical process of dispersal can potentially have implications for ensuing recruitment and population replenishment. Our study not only shows that freshwater species that spend part of their life cycle in the ocean might also be affected by ocean acidification, but that behavioural responses towards key physicochemical cues can also be negated through elevated CO2 from human emissions.

  12. Observed trends of anthropogenic acidification in North Atlantic water masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vázquez-Rodríguez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of observational pH data has made difficult assessing recent rates of ocean acidification, particularly in the high latitudes. Here we present a time series of high-quality carbon system measurements in the North Atlantic, comprising fourteen cruises spanning over 27 yr (1981–2008 and covering important water mass formation areas like the Irminger and Iceland basins. We provide direct quantification of anthropogenic acidification rates in upper and intermediate North Atlantic waters by removing the natural variability of pH from the observations. Bottle data were normalised to basin-average conditions using climatological data and further condensed into averages per water mass and year to examine the temporal trends. The highest acidification rates of all inspected water masses were associated with surface waters in the Irminger Sea (−0.0018 ± 0.0001 yr−1 and the Iceland Basin (−0.0012 ± 0.0002 yr−1 and, unexpectedly, with Labrador Seawater (LSW which experienced an unprecedented pH drop of −0.0015 ± 0.001 yr−1. The latter stems from the formation by deep convection and the rapid propagation in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre of this well-ventilated water mass. The high concentrations of anthropogenic CO2 are effectively transported from the surface into intermediate waters faster than via downward diffusion, thus accelerating the acidification rates of LSW. An extrapolation of the observed lineal trends of acidification suggests that the pH of LSW could drop 0.45 units with respect to pre-industrial levels by the time atmospheric CO2 concentrations double the present ones.

  13. Cloning and expression of mouse legumain, a lysosomal endopeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J M; Dando, P M; Stevens, R A; Fortunato, M; Barrett, A J

    1998-01-01

    Legumain, a recently discovered mammalian cysteine endopeptidase, was found in all mouse tissues examined, but was particularly abundant in kidney and placenta. The distribution in subcellular fractions of mouse and rat kidney showed a lysosomal localization, and activity was detectable only after the organelles were disrupted. Nevertheless, ratios of legumain activity to that of cathepsin B differed considerably between mouse tissues. cDNA encoding mouse legumain was cloned and sequenced, the deduced amino acid sequence proving to be 83% identical to that of the human protein [Chen, Dando, Rawlings, Brown, Young, Stevens, Hewitt, Watts and Barrett (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8090-8098]. Recombinant mouse legumain was expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells by use of a vector containing a cytomegalovirus promoter. The recombinant enzyme was partially purified and found to be an asparagine-specific endopeptidase closely similar to naturally occurring pig kidney legumain. PMID:9742219

  14. Septins as modulators of endo-lysosomal membrane traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungyeun Song

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins constitute a family of GTP-binding proteins, which assemble into non-polar filaments in a nucleotide-dependent manner. These filaments can be recruited to negatively charged membrane surfaces. When associated with membranes septin filaments can act as diffusion barriers, which confine subdomains of distinct biological functions. In addition, they serve scaffolding roles by recruiting cytosolic proteins and other cytoskeletal elements. Septins have been implicated in a large variety of membrane-dependent processes, including cytokinesis, signaling, cell migration, and membrane traffic, and several family members have been implicated in disease. However, surprisingly little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying their biological functions. This review summarizes evidence in support of regulatory roles of septins during endo-lysosomal sorting, with a particular focus on phosphoinositides, which serve as spatial landmarks guiding septin recruitment to distinct subcellular localizations.

  15. Lysosomal exoglycosidases and cathepsin D in colon adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Szajda, Sławomir D; Kępka, Alina; Waszkiewicz, Magdalena; Roszkowska-Jakimiec, Wiesława; Wojewódzka-Żeleźniakowicz, Marzena; Milewska, Anna J; Dadan, Jacek; Szulc, Agata; Zwierz, Krzysztof; Ladny, Jerzy R

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the structure of membrane glycoconjugates and activity of glycosidases and proteases are important in tumor formation. The aim of the study was to compare the specific activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases: N-acetyl-β-D-hexosaminidase (HEX), its isoenzymes A (HEX A) and B (HEX B), β-D-galactosidase (GAL), α-fucosidase (FUC), and α-mannosidase (MAN) with the activity of cathepsin D (CD) in serum, urine, and carcinoma tissue of patients with colon adenocarcinoma. The specific activity of HEX, HEX A, HEX B, GAL, FUC, MAN, and CD was assayed in serum, urine, and carcinoma tissue of 12 patients with colon adenocarcinoma. Lysosomal exoglycosidases and CD have similar specific activity in colon adenocarcinoma tissue and urine, which is higher than their activity in serum (with the exception of the highest specific activity of CD in urine). A positive correlation was observed between the specific activity of CD and that of HEX, HEX A, FUC, and MAN in the carcinoma tissue and urine as well as between CD and GAL in the urine of patients with colon adenocarcinoma. Negative correlations were observed between protein levels and the specific activity of HEX, HEX A, FUC, MAN, and CD in the carcinoma tissue and urine, and between protein levels and GAL in urine. Increased degradation and remodeling of glycoconjugates in the colon adenocarcinoma tissue is reflected by increased specific activity of exoglycosidases and CD. The results suggest a strong effect of exoglycosidase action on tissue degradation and a potential role of exoglycosidases in the initiation of proteolysis.

  16. ATP6V0C knockdown in neuroblastoma cells alters autophagy-lysosome pathway function and metabolism of proteins that accumulate in neurodegenerative disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandra R Mangieri

    Full Text Available ATP6V0C is the bafilomycin A1-binding subunit of vacuolar ATPase, an enzyme complex that critically regulates vesicular acidification. We and others have shown previously that bafilomycin A1 regulates cell viability, autophagic flux and metabolism of proteins that accumulate in neurodegenerative disease. To determine the importance of ATP6V0C for autophagy-lysosome pathway function, SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells differentiated to a neuronal phenotype were nucleofected with non-target or ATP6V0C siRNA and following recovery were treated with either vehicle or bafilomycin A1 (0.3-100 nM for 48 h. ATP6V0C knockdown was validated by quantitative RT-PCR and by a significant decrease in Lysostracker Red staining. ATP6V0C knockdown significantly increased basal levels of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II, α-synuclein high molecular weight species and APP C-terminal fragments, and inhibited autophagic flux. Enhanced LC3 and LAMP-1 co-localization following knockdown suggests that autophagic flux was inhibited in part due to lysosomal degradation and not by a block in vesicular fusion. Knockdown of ATP6V0C also sensitized cells to the accumulation of autophagy substrates and a reduction in neurite length following treatment with 1 nM bafilomycin A1, a concentration that did not produce such alterations in non-target control cells. Reduced neurite length and the percentage of propidium iodide-positive dead cells were also significantly greater following treatment with 3 nM bafilomycin A1. Together these results indicate a role for ATP6V0C in maintaining constitutive and stress-induced ALP function, in particular the metabolism of substrates that accumulate in age-related neurodegenerative disease and may contribute to disease pathogenesis.

  17. Reviews and syntheses: Ice acidification, the effects of ocean acidification on sea ice microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMinn, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Sea ice algae, like some coastal and estuarine phytoplankton, are naturally exposed to a wider range of pH and CO2 concentrations than those in open marine seas. While climate change and ocean acidification (OA) will impact pelagic communities, their effects on sea ice microbial communities remain unclear. Sea ice contains several distinct microbial communities, which are exposed to differing environmental conditions depending on their depth within the ice. Bottom communities mostly experience relatively benign bulk ocean properties, while interior brine and surface (infiltration) communities experience much greater extremes. Most OA studies have examined the impacts on single sea ice algae species in culture. Although some studies examined the effects of OA alone, most examined the effects of OA and either light, nutrients or temperature. With few exceptions, increased CO2 concentration caused either no change or an increase in growth and/or photosynthesis. In situ studies on brine and surface algae also demonstrated a wide tolerance to increased and decreased pH and showed increased growth at higher CO2 concentrations. The short time period of most experiments (changing distribution of nutrients and declining pH forecast for the water column over the next centuries.

  18. Ocean acidification in the Meso- vs. Cenozoic: lessons from modeling about the geological expression of paleo-ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S. E.; Ridgwell, A.; Kirtland Turner, S.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid climatic and biotic events putatively associated with ocean acidification are scattered throughout the Meso-Cenozoic. Many of these rapid perturbations, variably referred to as hyperthermals (Paleogene) and oceanic anoxic events or mass extinction events (Mesozoic), share a number of characteristic features, including some combination of negative carbon isotopic excursion, global warming, and a rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration. Comparisons between ocean acidification events over the last ~250 Ma are, however, problematic because the types of marine geological archives and carbon reservoirs that can be interrogated are fundamentally different for early Mesozoic vs. late Mesozoic-Cenozoic events. Many Mesozoic events are known primarily or exclusively from geological outcrops of relatively shallow water deposits, whereas the more recent Paleogene hyperthermal events have been chiefly identified from deep sea records. In addition, these earlier events are superimposed on an ocean with a fundamentally different carbonate buffering capacity, as calcifying plankton (which created the deep-sea carbonate sink) originate in the mid-Mesozoic. Here, we use both Earth system modeling and reaction transport sediment modeling to explore the ways in which comparable ocean acidification-inducing climate perturbations might manifest in the Mesozoic vs. the Cenozoic geological record. We examine the role of the deep-sea carbonate sink in the expression of ocean acidification, as well as the spatial heterogeneity of surface ocean pH and carbonate saturation state. These results critically inform interpretations of ocean acidification prior to the mid-Mesozoic advent of calcifying plankton and expectations about the recording of these events in geological outcrop.

  19. COOH-terminal isoleucine of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 is optimal for its efficient targeting to dense secondary lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaki, Kenji; Suenobu, Michihisa; Mukaida, Maki; Michihara, Akihiro; Wada, Ikuo

    2010-12-01

    Lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) consists of a highly glycosylated luminal domain, a single-transmembrane domain and a short cytoplasmic tail that possesses a lysosome-targeting signal (GYQTI(382)) at the COOH terminus. It is hypothesized that the COOH-terminal isoleucine, I(382), could be substituted with any other bulky hydrophobic amino acid residue for LAMP-1 to exclusively localize in lysosomes. In order to test this hypothesis, we compared subcellular distribution of four substitution mutants with phenylalanine, leucine, methionine and valine at the COOH-terminus (termed I382F, I382L, I382M and I382V, respectively) with that of wild-type (WT)-LAMP-1. Double-labelled immunofluorescence analyses showed that these substitution mutants were localized as significantly to late endocytic organelles as WT-LAMP-1. However, the quantitative subcellular fractionation study revealed different distribution of WT-LAMP-1 and these four COOH-terminal mutants in late endosomes and dense secondary lysosomes. WT-LAMP-1 was accumulated three to six times more in the dense lysosomal fraction than the four mutants. The level of WT-LAMP-1 in late endosomal fraction was comparable to those of I382F, I382M and I382V. Conversely, I382L in the late endosomal fraction was approximately three times more abundant than WT-LAMP-1. These findings define the presence of isoleucine residue at the COOH-terminus of LAMP-1 as critical in governing its efficient delivery to secondary lysosomes and its ratio of lysosomes to late endosomes.

  20. Combined effects of thermal stress and Cd on lysosomal biomarkers and transcription of genes encoding lysosomal enzymes and HSP70 in mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izagirre, Urtzi; Errasti, Aitzpea; Bilbao, Eider; Múgica, María; Marigómez, Ionan

    2014-04-01

    In estuaries and coastal areas, intertidal organisms may be subject to thermal stress resulting from global warming, together with pollution. In the present study, the combined effects of thermal stress and exposure to Cd were investigated in the endo-lysosomal system of digestive cells in mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis. Mussels were maintained for 24h at 18°C and 26°C seawater temperature in absence and presence of 50 μg Cd/L seawater. Cadmium accumulation in digestive gland tissue, lysosomal structural changes and membrane stability were determined. Semi-quantitative PCR was applied to reveal the changes elicited by the different experimental conditions in hexosaminidase (hex), β-glucuronidase (gusb), cathepsin L (ctsl) and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene transcription levels. Thermal stress provoked lysosomal enlargement whilst Cd-exposure led to fusion of lysosomes. Both thermal stress and Cd-exposure caused lysosomal membrane destabilisation. hex, gusb and ctsl genes but not hsp70 gene were transcriptionally up-regulated as a result of thermal stress. In contrast, all the studied genes were transcriptionally down-regulated in response to Cd-exposure. Cd bioaccumulation was comparable at 18°C and 26°C seawater temperatures but interactions between thermal stress and Cd-exposure were remarkable both in lysosomal biomarkers and in gene transcription. hex, gusb and ctsl genes, reacted to elevated temperature in absence of Cd but not in Cd-exposed mussels. Therefore, thermal stress resulting from global warming might influence the use and interpretation of lysosomal biomarkers in marine pollution monitoring programmes and, vice versa, the presence of pollutants may condition the capacity of mussels to respond against thermal stress in a climate change scenario.

  1. Antimicrobial Properties of Lysosomal Enzymes Immobilized on NH₂Functionalized Silica-Encapsulated Magnetite Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Seung Hyuck; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kim, So Jeong; Le, Thai-Hoang; Kim, Pil; Ahn, Ji-Young; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-01-01

    The immobilization efficiency, antimicrobial activity and recovery of lysosomal enzymes on NH2 functionalized magnetite nanoparticles have been studied under various conditions. The immobi- lization efficiency depends upon the ratio of the amount of enzyme and magnetite and it shows an increase with magnetite concentration which is due to the presence of amine group at the magnetite surface that leads to a strong attraction. The optimized reaction time to immobilize the lysosomal enzymes on magnetite was determined by using a rolling method. The immobilization efficiency increases with reaction time and reached a plateau after 5 minutes and then remained constant for 10 minutes. However, after 30 minutes the immobilization efficiency decreased to 85%, which is due to the weaker electrostatic interactions between magnetite and detached lysosomal enzymes. The recovery and stability of immobilized lysosomal enzymes has also been studied. The antimicrobial activity was almost 100% but it decreased upon reuse and no activity was observed after its reuse for seven times. The storage stability of lysosomal enzymes as an antimicrobial agent was about 88%, which decreased to 53% after one day and all activity of immobilized lysosomal enzymes was maintained after five days. Thus, the lysosomal enzymes immobilized on magnetite nanoparticles could potentially be used as antimicrobial agents to remove bacteria.

  2. Involvement of lysosomes in the uptake of macromolecular material by bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opperdoes, F R; Van Roy, J

    1982-09-01

    To investigate whether the lysosomes of Trypanosoma brucei are capable of uptake of macromolecules after internalization by the cell, we used Triton WR-1339, a non-digestible macromolecular compound, which is known to cause a marked decrease in the density of hepatic lysosomes due to massive intralysosomal storage. Intraperitoneal administration of 0.4 g/kg Triton WR-1339 to rats infected with T. brucei led to the development of a large vacuole in the trypanosomes between nucleus and kinetoplast within 22 h. Higher doses (2 g/kg) led to the disappearance of the trypanosomes from the blood and resulted in permanent cures (greater than 100 days). Lysosomes isolated from the trypanosomes of animals treated with a sub-curative dose showed a decrease in equilibrium density of 0.03 g/cm3 in sucrose gradients. These lysosomes were partly damaged as evidenced by a reduction in latency and an increase in the non-sedimentable part of lysosomal enzymes. We conclude that acid proteinase and alpha-mannosidase-containing organelles of T. brucei take up exogenous macromolecules and must therefore be considered as true lysosomes and that Triton WR-1339 acts in T. brucei as a true lysosomotropic drug. Its trypanocidal action probably results from an interference with lysosomal function.

  3. TRPML cation channels regulate the specialized lysosomal compartment of vertebrate B-lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yumei; Dayalu, Rashmi; Matthews, Sharon A; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2006-12-01

    B-lymphocytes possess a specialized lysosomal compartment, the regulated transformation of which has been implicated in B-cell antigen presentation. Members of the mucolipin (TRPML) family of cation channels have been implicated in regulated vesicular transport in several tissues, but a role for TRPML function in lymphocyte vesicular transport physiology has not been previously described. To address the role of TRPML proteins in lymphocyte vesicular transport, we analyzed the lysosomal compartment in cultured B-lymphocytes engineered to lack TRPML1 or after expression of N- or C-terminal GFP fusion proteins of TRPML1 or TRPML2. Consistent with previous analyses of lymphocytes derived from human patients with mutations in TRPML1, we were not able to detect abnormalities in the lysosomes of TRPML1-deficient DT40 B-lymphocytes. However, while N-terminal GFP fusions of TRPML2 localized to normal appearing lysosomes, C-terminal GFP fusions of either TRPML1 or TRPML2 acted to antagonize endogenous TRPML function, localizing to large vesicular structures, the histological properties of which were indistinguishable from the enlarged lysosomes observed in affected tissues of TRPML1-deficient humans. Endocytosed B-cell receptors were delivered to these enlarged lysosomes, demonstrating that a TRPML-dependent process is required for normal regulation of the specialized lysosome compartment of vertebrate B-lymphocytes.

  4. Action of low-energy monochromatic coherent light on the stability of retinal lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelitsina, Irina P.; Leus, N. F.

    1995-05-01

    The data had been obtained during the experiment in vitro by irradiation of solubilized lysosomal enzymes, retinal homogenates and native lysosomes enabled us to conclude that the laser beam ((lambda) equals 632.8 nm, power density from 0.1 to 15.0 mWt/cm2) acts on the level of membranous structures of lysosomes. During irradiation of rabbits eyes in vitro with an unfocused laser beam (power density on the cornea aur face from 0.01 to 15.0 mWt/cm2 was shown, that low-energy, ranged from 0.01 to 1.0 mWt/cm2 promotes stabilization of lysosomal membranes. Irradiation with laser beam of 8.0 mWt/cm2 and more power induces destabilization of lysosomal membranes. We have also shown that vitamins A and E effecting membranotropic on lysosomes may be corrected by low-energy radiation of helium-neon laser. It is substantiated experimentally that the stabilizing effect of vitamin E may be intensified in case of the combined action of laser radiation on lysosomes. The labilizing effect of vitamin A on membranes of organelles, as was studied, may be weakened by application of laser radiation of low intensities.

  5. Lysosomal cholesterol accumulation: driver on the road to inflammation during atherosclerosis and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikx, T; Walenbergh, S M A; Hofker, M H; Shiri-Sverdlov, R

    2014-05-01

    Many studies show an association between the accumulation of cholesterol inside lysosomes and the progression towards inflammatory disease states that are closely related to obesity. While in the past, the knowledge regarding lysosomal cholesterol accumulation was limited to its association with plaque severity during atherosclerosis, recently, a growing body of evidence indicates a causal link between lysosomal cholesterol accumulation and inflammation. These findings make lysosomal cholesterol accumulation an important target for intervention in metabolic diseases that are characterized by the presence of an inflammatory response. In this review, we aim to show the importance of cholesterol trapping inside lysosomes to the development of inflammation by focusing upon cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in particular. We summarize current data supporting the hypothesis that lysosomal cholesterol accumulation plays a key role in the development of inflammation during atherosclerosis and NASH. In addition, potential mechanisms by which disturbed lysosomal function can trigger the inflammatory response, the challenges in improving cholesterol trafficking in macrophages and recent successful research directions will be discussed.

  6. Ocean acidification and its impacts: an expert survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattuso, J.; Mach, K.; Morgan, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    The number of scientists investigating ocean acidification as well as the number of papers published on this issue have increased considerably in the past few years. On the one hand, the advances are welcome for the assessment of ocean acidification and its impacts. On the other hand, the volume and rapidity of the scientific developments as well as some contradictory results have created challenges for assessing the current state of knowledge and informing policy makers. Two tools are being used to synthesize the current information: meta-analysis and expert survey. In January this year, Working Groups I and II of the IPCC organized an expert meeting on ocean acidification in Okinawa. Following this meeting, we built a set of 22 statements, in consultation with several of the meeting participants. An expert survey was then conducted. It involved 52 experts who provided a considerable amount of information. The statements covered a broad array of research fields and were grouped in 3 categories: chemical aspects, biological and biogeochemical responses, and policy and socio-economic aspects. The survey results indicate a relatively strong consensus for most statements related to the past, present and future chemical aspects. Examples of consensual issues are: non-anthropogenic ocean acidification events have occurred in the geological past, anthropogenic CO2 emissions is the main (but not the only) mechanism generating the current ocean acidification event, and ocean acidification will be felt for centuries. The experts generally agreed that there will be impacts on biological and ecological processes and biogeochemical feedbacks, but for such statements, the levels of agreement were lower overall, with more variability across responses. Levels of agreements among experts surveyed were comparatively higher for statements regarding calcification, primary production and nitrogen fixation, as compared to impacts on food-webs. The levels of agreement for statements

  7. Autophagic lysosome reformation dysfunction in glucocerebrosidase deficient cells: relevance to Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Joana; Gegg, Matthew E; Migdalska-Richards, Anna; Doherty, Mary K; Whitfield, Phillip D; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2016-08-15

    Glucocerebrosidase (GBA1) gene mutations increase the risk of Parkinson disease (PD). While the cellular mechanisms associating GBA1 mutations and PD are unknown, loss of the glucocerebrosidase enzyme (GCase) activity, inhibition of autophagy and increased α-synuclein levels have been implicated. Here we show that autophagy lysosomal reformation (ALR) is compromised in cells lacking functional GCase. ALR is a cellular process controlled by mTOR which regenerates functional lysosomes from autolysosomes formed during macroautophagy. A decrease in phopho-S6K levels, a marker of mTOR activity, was observed in models of GCase deficiency, including primary mouse neurons and the PD patient derived fibroblasts with GBA1 mutations, suggesting that ALR is compromised. Importantly Rab7, a GTPase crucial for endosome-lysosome trafficking and ALR, accumulated in GCase deficient cells, supporting the notion that lysosomal recycling is impaired. Recombinant GCase treatment reversed ALR inhibition and lysosomal dysfunction. Moreover, ALR dysfunction was accompanied by impairment of macroautophagy and chaperone-mediated autophagy, increased levels of total and phosphorylated (S129) monomeric α-synuclein, evidence of amyloid oligomers and increased α-synuclein release. Concurrently, we found increased cholesterol and altered glucosylceramide homeostasis which could compromise ALR. We propose that GCase deficiency in PD inhibits lysosomal recycling. Consequently neurons are unable to maintain the pool of mature and functional lysosomes required for the autophagic clearance of α-synuclein, leading to the accumulation and spread of pathogenic α-synuclein species in the brain. Since GCase deficiency and lysosomal dysfunction occur with ageing and sporadic PD pathology, the decrease in lysosomal reformation may be a common feature in PD. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Combined effects of thermal stress and Cd on lysosomal biomarkers and transcription of genes encoding lysosomal enzymes and HSP70 in mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izagirre, Urtzi; Errasti, Aitzpea; Bilbao, Eider; Múgica, María; Marigómez, Ionan, E-mail: ionan.marigomez@ehu.es

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Thermal stress and Cd caused lysosomal enlargement and membrane destabilisation. • hex, gusb and ctsl but not hsp70 were up-regulated at elevated temperature but down-regulated by Cd. • Thermal stress influenced lysosomal responses to Cd exposure. • The presence of Cd jeopardised responsiveness against thermal stress. - Abstract: In estuaries and coastal areas, intertidal organisms may be subject to thermal stress resulting from global warming, together with pollution. In the present study, the combined effects of thermal stress and exposure to Cd were investigated in the endo-lysosomal system of digestive cells in mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis. Mussels were maintained for 24 h at 18 °C and 26 °C seawater temperature in absence and presence of 50 μg Cd/L seawater. Cadmium accumulation in digestive gland tissue, lysosomal structural changes and membrane stability were determined. Semi-quantitative PCR was applied to reveal the changes elicited by the different experimental conditions in hexosaminidase (hex), β-glucuronidase (gusb), cathepsin L (ctsl) and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene transcription levels. Thermal stress provoked lysosomal enlargement whilst Cd-exposure led to fusion of lysosomes. Both thermal stress and Cd-exposure caused lysosomal membrane destabilisation. hex, gusb and ctsl genes but not hsp70 gene were transcriptionally up-regulated as a result of thermal stress. In contrast, all the studied genes were transcriptionally down-regulated in response to Cd-exposure. Cd bioaccumulation was comparable at 18 °C and 26 °C seawater temperatures but interactions between thermal stress and Cd-exposure were remarkable both in lysosomal biomarkers and in gene transcription. hex, gusb and ctsl genes, reacted to elevated temperature in absence of Cd but not in Cd-exposed mussels. Therefore, thermal stress resulting from global warming might influence the use and interpretation of lysosomal biomarkers in marine pollution

  9. Ocean Acidification and the End-Permian Mass Extinction: To What Extent does Evidence Support Hypothesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Béatrice Forel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification in modern oceans is linked to rapid increase in atmospheric CO2, raising concern about marine diversity, food security and ecosystem services. Proxy evidence for acidification during past crises may help predict future change, but three issues limit confidence of comparisons between modern and ancient ocean acidification, illustrated from the end-Permian extinction, 252 million years ago: (1 problems with evidence for ocean acidification preserved in sedimentary rocks, where proposed marine dissolution surfaces may be subaerial. Sedimentary evidence that the extinction was partly due to ocean acidification is therefore inconclusive; (2 Fossils of marine animals potentially affected by ocean acidification are imperfect records of past conditions; selective extinction of hypercalcifying organisms is uncertain evidence for acidification; (3 The current high rates of acidification may not reflect past rates, which cannot be measured directly, and whose temporal resolution decreases in older rocks. Thus large increases in CO2 in the past may have occurred over a long enough time to have allowed assimilation into the oceans, and acidification may not have stressed ocean biota to the present extent. Although we acknowledge the very likely occurrence of past ocean acidification, obtaining support presents a continuing challenge for the Earth science community.

  10. Lysosomal glycosphingolipid catabolism by acid ceramidase: formation of glycosphingoid bases during deficiency of glycosidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Maria J; Marques, André R A; Appelman, Monique D; Verhoek, Marri; Strijland, Anneke; Mirzaian, Mina; Scheij, Saskia; Ouairy, Cécile M; Lahav, Daniel; Wisse, Patrick; Overkleeft, Herman S; Boot, Rolf G; Aerts, Johannes M

    2016-03-01

    Glycosphingoid bases are elevated in inherited lysosomal storage disorders with deficient activity of glycosphingolipid catabolizing glycosidases. We investigated the molecular basis of the formation of glucosylsphingosine and globotriaosylsphingosine during deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (Gaucher disease) and α-galactosidase A (Fabry disease). Independent genetic and pharmacological evidence is presented pointing to an active role of acid ceramidase in both processes through deacylation of lysosomal glycosphingolipids. The potential pathophysiological relevance of elevated glycosphingoid bases generated through this alternative metabolism in patients suffering from lysosomal glycosidase defects is discussed.

  11. DNA damage, lysosomal degradation and Bcl-xL deamidation in doxycycline- and minocycline-induced cell death in the K562 leukemic cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Mona; Abedi-Valugerdi, Manuchehr; Hassan, Moustapha; Potácová, Zuzana

    2015-07-31

    We investigated mechanisms of cytotoxicity induced by doxycycline (doxy) and minocycline (mino) in the chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cell line. Doxy and mino induced cell death in exposure-dependent manner. While annexin V/propidium iodide staining was consistent with apoptosis, the morphological changes in Giemsa staining were more equivocal. A pancaspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK partially reverted cell death morphology, but concurrently completely prevented PARP cleavage. Mitochondrial involvement was detected as dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome C release. DNA double strand breaks detected with γH2AX antibody and caspase-2 activation were found early after the treatment start, but caspase-3 activation was a late event. Decrement of Bcl-xL protein levels and electrophoretic shift of Bcl-xL molecule were induced by both drugs. Phosphorylation of Bcl-xL at serine 62 was ruled out. Similarly, Bcr/Abl tyrosine kinase levels were decreased. Lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine restored Bcl-xL and Bcr/Abl protein levels and inhibited caspase-3 activation. Thus, the cytotoxicity of doxy and mino in K562 cells is mediated by DNA damage, Bcl-xL deamidation and lysosomal degradation with activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An Ocean Acidification Acclimatised Green Tide Alga Is Robust to Changes of Seawater Carbon Chemistry but Vulnerable to Light Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guang; Liu, Yameng; Li, Xinshu; Feng, Zhihua; Xu, Juntian

    2016-01-01

    Ulva is the dominant genus in the green tide events and is considered to have efficient CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). However, little is understood regarding the impacts of ocean acidification on the CCMs of Ulva and the consequences of thalli's acclimation to ocean acidification in terms of responding to environmental factors. Here, we grew a cosmopolitan green alga, Ulva linza at ambient (LC) and elevated (HC) CO2 levels and investigated the alteration of CCMs in U. linza grown at HC and its responses to the changed seawater carbon chemistry and light intensity. The inhibitors experiment for photosynthetic inorganic carbon utilization demonstrated that acidic compartments, extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA) and intracellular CA worked together in the thalli grown at LC and the acquisition of exogenous carbon source in the thalli could be attributed to the collaboration of acidic compartments and extracellular CA. Contrastingly, when U. linza was grown at HC, extracellular CA was completely inhibited, acidic compartments and intracellular CA were also down-regulated to different extents and thus the acquisition of exogenous carbon source solely relied on acidic compartments. The down-regulated CCMs in U. linza did not affect its responses to changes of seawater carbon chemistry but led to a decrease of net photosynthetic rate when thalli were exposed to increased light intensity. This decrease could be attributed to photodamage caused by the combination of the saved energy due to the down-regulated CCMs and high light intensity. Our findings suggest future ocean acidification might impose depressing effects on green tide events when combined with increased light exposure.

  13. Red coral extinction risk enhanced by ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrano, Carlo; Cardini, Ulisse; Bianchelli, Silvia; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Pusceddu, Antonio; Danovaro, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The red coral Corallium rubrum is a habitat-forming species with a prominent and structural role in mesophotic habitats, which sustains biodiversity hotspots. This precious coral is threatened by both over-exploitation and temperature driven mass mortality events. We report here that biocalcification, growth rates and polyps' (feeding) activity of Corallium rubrum are significantly reduced at pCO2 scenarios predicted for the end of this century (0.2 pH decrease). Since C. rubrum is a long-living species (>200 years), our results suggest that ocean acidification predicted for 2100 will significantly increases the risk of extinction of present populations. Given the functional role of these corals in the mesophotic zone, we predict that ocean acidification might have cascading effects on the functioning of these habitats worldwide.

  14. Projecting coral reef futures under global warming and ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, John M; Connolly, Sean R; Marshall, Dustin J; Cohen, Anne L

    2011-07-22

    Many physiological responses in present-day coral reefs to climate change are interpreted as consistent with the imminent disappearance of modern reefs globally because of annual mass bleaching events, carbonate dissolution, and insufficient time for substantial evolutionary responses. Emerging evidence for variability in the coral calcification response to acidification, geographical variation in bleaching susceptibility and recovery, responses to past climate change, and potential rates of adaptation to rapid warming supports an alternative scenario in which reef degradation occurs with greater temporal and spatial heterogeneity than current projections suggest. Reducing uncertainty in projecting coral reef futures requires improved understanding of past responses to rapid climate change; physiological responses to interacting factors, such as temperature, acidification, and nutrients; and the costs and constraints imposed by acclimation and adaptation.

  15. Matrix acidification in carbonate reservoirs; Acidificacoes matriciais em reservatorios carbonaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Marcio de Oliveira [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Carbonate reservoirs are characterized by great diversity of its properties, including permeability and porosity. When submitted to matrix acidification, if no effort is employed, acid will tend to consume carbonates where permeability and porosity are higher, further increasing conductivity of these sites and also increasing permeability and porosity contrast existing before acid effects on formation. That would give limited production as result of small effective producer zone extent, with probable underutilization of potential reservoirs productivity. To overcome this effect and to achieve greater coverage of treatments, divergence techniques should be applied, including associations of them. This paper presents divergence techniques performed in matrix acidification of Campos and Espirito Santo basins wells, which represent great structural diversity and, as consequence, a significant range of situations. Formations tests results are analyzed to verify diversion systems effectiveness, and how they contribute to the growth of productive potential. (author)

  16. Food supply confers calcifiers resistance to ocean acidification

    KAUST Repository

    Ramajo, Laura

    2016-01-18

    Invasion of ocean surface waters by anthropogenic CO2 emitted to the atmosphere is expected to reduce surface seawater pH to 7.8 by the end of this century compromising marine calcifiers. A broad range of biological and mineralogical mechanisms allow marine calcifiers to cope with ocean acidification, however these mechanisms are energetically demanding which affect other biological processes (trade-offs) with important implications for the resilience of the organisms against stressful conditions. Hence, food availability may play a critical role in determining the resistance of calcifiers to OA. Here we show, based on a meta-analysis of existing experimental results assessing the role of food supply in the response of organisms to OA, that food supply consistently confers calcifiers resistance to ocean acidification.

  17. Acidification and Nitrogen Eutrophication of Austrian Forest Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Jandl; Stefan Smidt; Franz Mutsch; Alfred Fürst; Harald Zechmeister; Heidi Bauer; Thomas Dirnböck

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of acidic deposition and nitrogen on Austrian forests soils. Until thirty years ago air pollution had led to soil acidification, and concerns on the future productivity of forests were raised. Elevated rates of nitrogen deposition were believed to cause nitrate leaching and imbalanced forest nutrition. We used data from a soil monitoring network to evaluate the trends and current status of the pH and the C : N ratio of Austrian forest soils. Deposition measurements and...

  18. Effects of Ocean Acidification on Primary Production of Marine Macroalgae

    OpenAIRE

    Sarker, Yusuf

    2010-01-01

    Currently global warming and increase in atmospheric CO2 levels are major concerns for our ecosystems. The ocean acidification, the consequence of rising atmospheric CO2, is occurring in synergy with ocean temperature increase and their cumulative impacts or interactive effects may have very significant consequences for marine life and still are virtually unknown. This will not only change the ecosystem structure but very importantly the basis of the food web, namely the primary production. M...

  19. Cascading effects of ocean acidification in a rocky subtidal community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Asnaghi

    Full Text Available Temperate marine rocky habitats may be alternatively characterized by well vegetated macroalgal assemblages or barren grounds, as a consequence of direct and indirect human impacts (e.g. overfishing and grazing pressure by herbivorous organisms. In future scenarios of ocean acidification, calcifying organisms are expected to be less competitive: among these two key elements of the rocky subtidal food web, coralline algae and sea urchins. In order to highlight how the effects of increased pCO2 on individual calcifying species will be exacerbated by interactions with other trophic levels, we performed an experiment simultaneously testing ocean acidification effects on primary producers (calcifying and non-calcifying algae and their grazers (sea urchins. Artificial communities, composed by juveniles of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and calcifying (Corallina elongata and non-calcifying (Cystoseira amentacea var stricta, Dictyota dichotoma macroalgae, were subjected to pCO2 levels of 390, 550, 750 and 1000 µatm in the laboratory. Our study highlighted a direct pCO2 effect on coralline algae and on sea urchin defense from predation (test robustness. There was no direct effect on the non-calcifying macroalgae. More interestingly, we highlighted diet-mediated effects on test robustness and on the Aristotle's lantern size. In a future scenario of ocean acidification a decrease of sea urchins' density is expected, due to lower defense from predation, as a direct consequence of pH decrease, and to a reduced availability of calcifying macroalgae, important component of urchins' diet. The effects of ocean acidification may therefore be contrasting on well vegetated macroalgal assemblages and barren grounds: in the absence of other human impacts, a decrease of biodiversity can be predicted in vegetated macroalgal assemblages, whereas a lower density of sea urchin could help the recovery of shallow subtidal rocky areas affected by overfishing from

  20. Including high frequency variability in coastal ocean acidification projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Takeshita

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the impacts of anthropogenic ocean acidification requires knowledge of present-day and future environmental conditions. Here, we present a simple model for upwelling margins that projects anthropogenic acidification trajectories by combining high-temporal resolution sensor data, hydrographic surveys for source water characterization, empirical relationships of the CO2 system, and the atmospheric CO2 record. This model characterizes CO2 variability on timescales ranging from hours (e.g. tidal to months (e.g. seasonal, bridging a critical knowledge gap in ocean acidification research. The amount of anthropogenic carbon in a given water mass is dependent on the age, therefore a density–age relationship was derived for the study region, and was combined with the 2013 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change CO2 emission scenarios to add density-dependent anthropogenic carbon to the sensor time series. The model was applied to time series from four autonomous pH sensors, each deployed in the surf zone, kelp forest, submarine canyon edge, and shelf break in the upper 100 m of the Southern California Bight. All habitats were within 5 km of one another, and exhibited unique, habitat-specific CO2 variability signatures and acidification trajectories, demonstrating the importance of making projections in the context of habitat-specific CO2 signatures. In general, both the mean and range of pCO2 increase in the future, with the greatest increases in both magnitude and range occurring in the deeper habitats due to reduced buffering capacity. On the other hand, the saturation state of aragonite (ΩAr decreased in both magnitude and range. This approach can be applied to the entire California Current System, and upwelling margins in general, where sensor and complementary hydrographic data are available.

  1. Anticipating ocean acidification's economic consequences for commercial fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Sarah R.; Doney, Scott C.

    2009-06-01

    Ocean acidification, a consequence of rising anthropogenic CO2 emissions, is poised to change marine ecosystems profoundly by increasing dissolved CO2 and decreasing ocean pH, carbonate ion concentration, and calcium carbonate mineral saturation state worldwide. These conditions hinder growth of calcium carbonate shells and skeletons by many marine plants and animals. The first direct impact on humans may be through declining harvests and fishery revenues from shellfish, their predators, and coral reef habitats. In a case study of US commercial fishery revenues, we begin to constrain the economic effects of ocean acidification over the next 50 years using atmospheric CO2 trajectories and laboratory studies of its effects, focusing especially on mollusks. In 2007, the 3.8 billion US annual domestic ex-vessel commercial harvest ultimately contributed 34 billion to the US gross national product. Mollusks contributed 19%, or 748 million, of the ex-vessel revenues that year. Substantial revenue declines, job losses, and indirect economic costs may occur if ocean acidification broadly damages marine habitats, alters marine resource availability, and disrupts other ecosystem services. We review the implications for marine resource management and propose possible adaptation strategies designed to support fisheries and marine-resource-dependent communities, many of which already possess little economic resilience.

  2. Risk maps for Antarctic krill under projected Southern Ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, S.; Ishida, A.; King, R.; Raymond, B.; Waller, N.; Constable, A.; Nicol, S.; Wakita, M.; Ishimatsu, A.

    2013-09-01

    Marine ecosystems of the Southern Ocean are particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification. Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba; hereafter krill) is the key pelagic species of the region and its largest fishery resource. There is therefore concern about the combined effects of climate change, ocean acidification and an expanding fishery on krill and ultimately, their dependent predators--whales, seals and penguins. However, little is known about the sensitivity of krill to ocean acidification. Juvenile and adult krill are already exposed to variable seawater carbonate chemistry because they occupy a range of habitats and migrate both vertically and horizontally on a daily and seasonal basis. Moreover, krill eggs sink from the surface to hatch at 700-1,000m (ref. ), where the carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) in sea water is already greater than it is in the atmosphere. Krill eggs sink passively and so cannot avoid these conditions. Here we describe the sensitivity of krill egg hatch rates to increased CO2, and present a circumpolar risk map of krill hatching success under projected pCO2 levels. We find that important krill habitats of the Weddell Sea and the Haakon VII Sea to the east are likely to become high-risk areas for krill recruitment within a century. Furthermore, unless CO2 emissions are mitigated, the Southern Ocean krill population could collapse by 2300 with dire consequences for the entire ecosystem.

  3. Ocean acidification and warming scenarios increase microbioerosion of coral skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Nivia, Catalina; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Kline, David; Guldberg, Ove-Hoegh; Dove, Sophie

    2013-06-01

    Biological mediation of carbonate dissolution represents a fundamental component of the destructive forces acting on coral reef ecosystems. Whereas ocean acidification can increase dissolution of carbonate substrates, the combined impact of ocean acidification and warming on the microbioerosion of coral skeletons remains unknown. Here, we exposed skeletons of the reef-building corals, Porites cylindrica and Isopora cuneata, to present-day (Control: 400 μatm - 24 °C) and future pCO2 -temperature scenarios projected for the end of the century (Medium: +230 μatm - +2 °C; High: +610 μatm - +4 °C). Skeletons were also subjected to permanent darkness with initial sodium hypochlorite incubation, and natural light without sodium hypochlorite incubation to isolate the environmental effect of acidic seawater (i.e., Ωaragonite ocean acidification and warming will lead to increased rates of microbioerosion. However, the magnitude of bioerosion responses may depend on the structural properties of coral skeletons, with a range of implications for reef carbonate losses under warmer and more acidic oceans.

  4. Quantifying rates of evolutionary adaptation in response to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunday, Jennifer M; Crim, Ryan N; Harley, Christopher D G; Hart, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    The global acidification of the earth's oceans is predicted to impact biodiversity via physiological effects impacting growth, survival, reproduction, and immunology, leading to changes in species abundances and global distributions. However, the degree to which these changes will play out critically depends on the evolutionary rate at which populations will respond to natural selection imposed by ocean acidification, which remains largely unquantified. Here we measure the potential for an evolutionary response to ocean acidification in larval development rate in two coastal invertebrates using a full-factorial breeding design. We show that the sea urchin species Strongylocentrotus franciscanus has vastly greater levels of phenotypic and genetic variation for larval size in future CO(2) conditions compared to the mussel species Mytilus trossulus. Using these measures we demonstrate that S. franciscanus may have faster evolutionary responses within 50 years of the onset of predicted year-2100 CO(2) conditions despite having lower population turnover rates. Our comparisons suggest that information on genetic variation, phenotypic variation, and key demographic parameters, may lend valuable insight into relative evolutionary potentials across a large number of species.

  5. Sensitivities of extant animal taxa to ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Astrid C.; Pörtner, Hans-O.

    2013-11-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 emitted to the atmosphere is absorbed by the oceans, causing a progressive increase in ocean inorganic carbon concentrations and resulting in decreased water pH and calcium carbonate saturation. This phenomenon, called ocean acidification, is in addition to the warming effects of CO2 emissions. Ocean acidification has been reported to affect ocean biota, but the severity of this threat to ocean ecosystems (and humans depending on these ecosystems) is poorly understood. Here we evaluate the scale of this threat in the context of widely used representative concentration pathways (RCPs) by analysing the sensitivities of five animal taxa (corals, echinoderms, molluscs, crustaceans and fishes) to a wide range of CO2 concentrations. Corals, echinoderms and molluscs are more sensitive to RCP8.5 (936 ppm in 2100) than are crustaceans. Larval fishes may be even more sensitive than the lower invertebrates, but taxon sensitivity on evolutionary timescales remains obscure. The variety of responses within and between taxa, together with observations in mesocosms and palaeo-analogues, suggest that ocean acidification is a driver for substantial change in ocean ecosystems this century, potentially leading to long-term shifts in species composition.

  6. Decreased abundance of crustose coralline algae due to ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Andersson, Andreas J; Jokiel, Paul L.; Rodgers, Ku'ulei S.; Mackenzie, Fred T.

    2008-01-01

    Owing to anthropogenic emissions, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide could almost double between 2006 and 2100 according to business-as-usual carbon dioxide emission scenarios1. Because the ocean absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere2, 3, 4, increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations will lead to increasing dissolved inorganic carbon and carbon dioxide in surface ocean waters, and hence acidification and lower carbonate saturation states2, 5. As a consequence, it has been suggested that marine calcifying organisms, for example corals, coralline algae, molluscs and foraminifera, will have difficulties producing their skeletons and shells at current rates6, 7, with potentially severe implications for marine ecosystems, including coral reefs6, 8, 9, 10, 11. Here we report a seven-week experiment exploring the effects of ocean acidification on crustose coralline algae, a cosmopolitan group of calcifying algae that is ecologically important in most shallow-water habitats12, 13, 14. Six outdoor mesocosms were continuously supplied with sea water from the adjacent reef and manipulated to simulate conditions of either ambient or elevated seawater carbon dioxide concentrations. The recruitment rate and growth of crustose coralline algae were severely inhibited in the elevated carbon dioxide mesocosms. Our findings suggest that ocean acidification due to human activities could cause significant change to benthic community structure in shallow-warm-water carbonate ecosystems.

  7. Soil Acidification due to Acid Deposition in Southern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Bohan

    1998-12-31

    Anthropogenic emission of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} to the atmosphere has made acid deposition one of the most serious environmental problems. In China, acid deposition research started in the late 1970s. The present thesis is part of a joint Chinese-Norwegian research project. The main goal of the thesis was to investigate the mechanism of soil acidification, to estimate soil responses to acid deposition, and to compare relative soil sensitivity to acidification in southern China. Laboratory experiments and modelling simulations were included. Specifically, the thesis (1) studies the characteristics of anion adsorption and cation release of the soils from southern China, (2) examines the effects of increased ionic strength in the precipitation and the effects of anion adsorption on cation release from the soils, (3) compares the relative sensitivity of these soils to acidification and the potentially harmful effects of acid deposition, (4) estimates likely soil responses to different deposition scenarios, including changes in soil waters and soil properties, and (5) investigates long-term changes in soils and soil waters in the Guiyang catchment due to acid deposition. 218 refs., 31 figs., 23 tabs.

  8. Marine oxygen holes as a consequence of oceanic acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, M.; Schellnhuber, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    An increase of atmospheric CO2 levels will not only drive future global mean temperatures towards values unprecedented during the whole Quaternary, but will also lead to an acidification of sea water which could harm the marine biota. Here we assess possible impacts of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on the marine biological carbon pump by utilizing a business-as-usual emission scenario of anthropogenic CO2. A corresponding release of 4075 Petagrams of Carbon in total has been applied to simulate the current millennium by employing an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC). This work is focused on studying the implications of reduced biogenic calcification caused by an increasing degree of oceanic acidification on the marine biological carbon pump. The attenuation of biogenic calcification imposes a small negative feedback on rising atmospheric pCO2 levels, tending to stabilize the Earth's climate. Since mineral ballast, notably particulate CaCO3, plays a dominant role in carrying organic matter through the water column, a reduction of its export fluxes weakens the strength of the biological carbon pump. There is, however, a dramatic effect discovered in our model world with severe consequences: since organic matter is oxidized in shallow waters when mineral-ballast fluxes weaken, oxygen holes (hypoxic zones) start to expand considerably in the oceans with potentially harmful impacts on a variety of marine ecosystems. Our study indicates that unbridled ocean acidification would exacerbate the observed hypoxia trends due to various environmental factors as reported in recent empirical studies.

  9. Decreased abundance of crustose coralline algae due to ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffner, Ilsa B.; Andersson, Andreas J.; Jokiel, Paul L.; Rodgers, Ku`Ulei S.; MacKenzie, Fred T.

    2008-02-01

    Owing to anthropogenic emissions, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide could almost double between 2006 and 2100 according to business-as-usual carbon dioxide emission scenarios. Because the ocean absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations will lead to increasing dissolved inorganic carbon and carbon dioxide in surface ocean waters, and hence acidification and lower carbonate saturation states. As a consequence, it has been suggested that marine calcifying organisms, for example corals, coralline algae, molluscs and foraminifera, will have difficulties producing their skeletons and shells at current rates, with potentially severe implications for marine ecosystems, including coral reefs. Here we report a seven-week experiment exploring the effects of ocean acidification on crustose coralline algae, a cosmopolitan group of calcifying algae that is ecologically important in most shallow-water habitats. Six outdoor mesocosms were continuously supplied with sea water from the adjacent reef and manipulated to simulate conditions of either ambient or elevated seawater carbon dioxide concentrations. The recruitment rate and growth of crustose coralline algae were severely inhibited in the elevated carbon dioxide mesocosms. Our findings suggest that ocean acidification due to human activities could cause significant change to benthic community structure in shallow-warm-water carbonate ecosystems.

  10. Study of urinary acidification in patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.C. Araújo

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypocitraturia (HCit is one of the most remarkable features of renal tubular acidosis, but an acidification defect is not seen in the majority of hypocitraturic patients, whose disease is denoted idiopathic hypocitraturia. In order to assess the integrity of urinary acidification mechanisms in hypocitraturic idiopathic calcium stone formers, we studied two groups of patients, hypocitraturic (HCit, N = 21, 39.5 ± 11.5 years, 11 females and 10 males and normocitraturic (NCit, N = 23, 40.2 ± 11.7 years, 16 females and 7 males subjects, during a short ammonium chloride loading test lasting 8 h. During the baseline period HCit patients showed significantly higher levels of titratable acid (TA. After the administration of ammonium chloride, mean urinary pH (3rd to 8th hour and TA and ammonium excretion did not differ significantly between groups. Conversely, during the first hour mean urinary pH was lower and TA and ammonium excretion was higher in HCit. The enhanced TA excretion by HCit during the baseline period and during the first hour suggests that the phosphate buffer mechanism is activated. The earlier response in ammonium excretion by HCit further supports other evidence that acidification mechanisms react promptly. The present results suggest that in the course of lithiasic disease, hypocitraturia coexists with subtle changes in the excretion of hydrogen ions in basal situations.

  11. Transgenerational acclimation of fishes to climate change and ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Philip L

    2014-01-01

    There is growing concern about the impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on marine organisms and ecosystems, yet the potential for acclimation and adaptation to these threats is poorly understood. Whereas many short-term experiments report negative biological effects of ocean warming and acidification, new studies show that some marine species have the capacity to acclimate to warmer and more acidic environments across generations. Consequently, transgenerational plasticity may be a powerful mechanism by which populations of some species will be able to adjust to projected climate change. Here, I review recent advances in understanding transgenerational acclimation in fishes. Research over the past 2 to 3 years shows that transgenerational acclimation can partially or fully ameliorate negative effects of warming, acidification, and hypoxia in a range of different species. The molecular and cellular pathways underpinning transgenerational acclimation are currently unknown, but modern genetic methods provide the tools to explore these mechanisms. Despite the potential benefits of transgenerational acclimation, there could be limitations to the phenotypic traits that respond transgenerationally, and trade-offs between life stages, that need to be investigated. Future studies should also test the potential interactions between transgenerational plasticity and genetic evolution to determine how these two processes will shape adaptive responses to environmental change over coming decades.

  12. Roles of CUP-5, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of human TRPML1, in lysosome and gut granule biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Hanna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CUP-5 is a Transient Receptor Potential protein in C. elegans that is the orthologue of mammalian TRPML1. Loss of TRPML1 results in the lysosomal storage disorder Mucolipidosis type IV. Loss of CUP-5 results in embryonic lethality and the accumulation of enlarged yolk granules in developing intestinal cells. The embryonic lethality of cup-5 mutants is rescued by mutations in mrp-4, which is required for gut granule differentiation. Gut granules are intestine-specific lysosome-related organelles that accumulate birefringent material. This link between CUP-5 and gut granules led us to determine the roles of CUP-5 in lysosome and gut granule biogenesis in developing intestinal cells. Results We show that CUP-5 protein localizes to lysosomes, but not to gut granules, in developing intestinal cells. Loss of CUP-5 results in defects in endo-lysosomal transport in developing intestinal cells of C. elegans embryos. This ultimately leads to the appearance of enlarged terminal vacuoles that show defective lysosomal degradation and that have lysosomal and endosomal markers. In contrast, gut granule biogenesis is normal in the absence of CUP-5. Furthermore, loss of CUP-5 does not result in inappropriate fusion or mixing of content between lysosomes and gut granules. Conclusions Using an in vivo model of MLIV, we show that there is a defect in lysosomal transport/biogenesis that is earlier than the presumed function of TRPML1 in terminal lysosomes. Our results indicate that CUP-5 is required for the biogenesis of lysosomes but not of gut granules. Thus, cellular phenotypes in Mucolipidosis type IV are likely not due to defects in lysosome-related organelle biogenesis, but due to progressive defects in lysosomal transport that lead to severe lysosomal dysfunction.

  13. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis : LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated memb

  14. Lysosomal acid lipase: At the crossroads of normal and atherogenic cholesterol metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A Dubland

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Unregulated cellular uptake of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the arterial intima leads to the formation of foam cells in atherosclerosis. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL plays a crucial role in both lipoprotein lipid catabolism and excess lipid accumulation as it is the primary enzyme that hydrolyzes cholesteryl esters derived from both low density lipoprotein (LDL and modified forms of LDL. Evidence suggests that as atherosclerosis progresses, accumulation of excess free cholesterol in lysosomes leads to impairment of LAL activity, resulting in accumulation of cholesteryl esters in the lysosome as well as the cytosol in foam cells. Impaired metabolism and release of cholesterol from lysosomes can lead to downstream defects in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 regulation, needed to offload excess cholesterol from plaque foam cells. This review focuses on the role LAL plays in normal cholesterol metabolism and how the associated changes in its enzymatic activity may ultimately contribute to atherosclerosis progression.

  15. Enantioselective effects of methamidophos on the coelomocytes lysosomal membrane stability of Eisenia fetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linhua; Lu, Xianting; Ma, Yun

    2012-12-01

    Many of organophosphorous insecticides are chiral compounds. In this study, the enantioselective effects of organophosphate insecticide methamidophos on the coelomocytes lysosomal membrane stability of earthworm Eisenia fetida were studied: (1) The enantiomers of methamidophos were absolutely separated by high-performance liquid chromatography with a commercial chiral column; (2) The neutral red retention assay was used to judge the lysosomal membrane stability. The results showed that with the concentration increasing, lysosomal membranes have been significantly destroyed by individual stereoisomers and racemate of methamidophos. The neutral red retention times were significantly descended from 76.88 to 29.78 min. Both (+)- and (-)-methamidophos showed more prone to destroy the integrity of the lysosomal membrane than the racemate. However, the different effect between stereoisomers is slight.

  16. High resolution crystal structure of human β-glucuronidase reveals structural basis of lysosome targeting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Waheed, Abdul; Grubb, Jeffery H; Klei, Herbert E; Korolev, Sergey; Sly, William S

    2013-01-01

    ...). Here we report a high resolution crystal structure of human GUS at 1.7 Å resolution and present an extensive analysis of the structural features, unifying recent findings in the field of lysosome targeting and glycosyl hydrolases...

  17. High Resolution Crystal Structure of Human [beta]-Glucuronidase Reveals Structural Basis of Lysosome Targeting

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassan, Md; Waheed, Abdul; Grubb, Jeffery; Klei, Herbert; Korolev, Sergey; Sly, William

    2013-01-01

    ...). Here we report a high resolution crystal structure of human GUS at 1.7 Å resolution and present an extensive analysis of the structural features, unifying recent findings in the field of lysosome targeting and glycosyl hydrolases...

  18. Expression of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) in astrocytomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Christensen, Karina; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte

    Targeting lysosomes is a novel approach in cancer therapy providing a possible way of killing the otherwise apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. Recent research has thus shown that lysosome targeting compounds induce cell death in a cervix cancer cell line. Tumor stem cells in glioblastomas have...... recently been suggested to possess innate resistance mechanisms against radiation and chemotherapy possibly explaining the high level of therapeutic resistance of these tumors. Since the presence and distribution of lysosomes in tumor cells and especially in tumor stem cells in astrocytomas is unknown......, the aim of this study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of LAMP-1, a membrane bound protein in lysosomes, in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tumor tissue from 23 diffuse astrocytomas, 17 anaplastic astrocytomas and 72 glioblastomas. The LAMP-1 expression was scored and compared...

  19. Lysosome associated membrane proteins maintain pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis : LAMP-2 deficient mice develop pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mareninova, Olga A; Sendler, Matthias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; Yakubov, Iskandar; French, Samuel W; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Vagin, Olga; Oorschot, Viola; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Blanz, Judith; Dawson, David; Klumperman, Judith; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Gukovsky, Ilya; Gukovskaya, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The pathogenic mechanism of pancreatitis is poorly understood. Recent evidence implicates defective autophagy in pancreatitis responses; however, the pathways mediating impaired autophagy in pancreas remain largely unknown. Here, we investigate the role of lysosome associated

  20. Emerging therapies for neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorders - from concept to reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Kim M; Hopwood, John J

    2011-10-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders are inherited metabolic diseases in which a mutation in a gene encoding a lysosomal enzyme or lysosome-related protein results in the intra-cellular accumulation of substrate and reduced cell/tissue function. Few patients with neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorders have access to safe and effective treatments although many therapeutic strategies have been or are presently being studied in vivo thanks to the availability of a large number of animal models. This review will describe the comparative advancement of a variety of therapeutic strategies through the 'research pipeline'. Our goal is to provide information for clinicians, researchers and patients/families alike on the leading therapeutic candidates at this point in time, and also to provide information on emerging approaches that may provide a safe and effective treatment in the future. The length of the pipeline represents the significant and sustained effort required to move a novel concept from the laboratory into the clinic.

  1. Magnesium Modulates Doxorubicin Activity through Drug Lysosomal Sequestration and Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapani, Valentina; Luongo, Francesca; Arduini, Daniela; Wolf, Federica I

    2016-03-21

    Magnesium is directly involved in the control of cell growth and survival, but its role in cancer biology and therapy is multifaceted; in particular, it is highly controversial whether magnesium levels can affect therapy outcomes. Here we investigated whether magnesium availability can modulate cellular responses to the widely used chemotherapeutic doxorubicin. We used an in vitro model consisting of mammary epithelial HC11 cells and found that high magnesium availability was correlated with diminished sensitivity both in cells chronically adapted to high magnesium concentrations and in acutely magnesium-supplemented cells. This decrease in sensitivity resulted from reduced intracellular doxorubicin accumulation in the face of a similar drug uptake rate. We observed that high-magnesium conditions caused a decrease in intracellular drug retention by altering drug lysosomal sequestration and trafficking. In our model, magnesium supplementation correspondingly modulated expression of the TRPM7 channel, which is known to control cytoskeletal organization and dynamics and may be involved in the proposed mechanism. Our findings suggest that magnesium supplementation in hypomagnesemic cancer patients may hinder response to therapy.

  2. Less Is More: Substrate Reduction Therapy for Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francisca Coutinho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs are a group of rare, life-threatening genetic disorders, usually caused by a dysfunction in one of the many enzymes responsible for intralysosomal digestion. Even though no cure is available for any LSD, a few treatment strategies do exist. Traditionally, efforts have been mainly targeting the functional loss of the enzyme, by injection of a recombinant formulation, in a process called enzyme replacement therapy (ERT, with no impact on neuropathology. This ineffectiveness, together with its high cost and lifelong dependence is amongst the main reasons why additional therapeutic approaches are being (and have to be investigated: chaperone therapy; gene enhancement; gene therapy; and, alternatively, substrate reduction therapy (SRT, whose aim is to prevent storage not by correcting the original enzymatic defect but, instead, by decreasing the levels of biosynthesis of the accumulating substrate(s. Here we review the concept of substrate reduction, highlighting the major breakthroughs in the field and discussing the future of SRT, not only as a monotherapy but also, especially, as complementary approach for LSDs.

  3. Coral calcifying fluid pH dictates response to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, M; Venn, A A; Tambutté, E; Tambutté, S; Allemand, D; Trotter, J; McCulloch, M

    2014-06-06

    Ocean acidification driven by rising levels of CO2 impairs calcification, threatening coral reef growth. Predicting how corals respond to CO2 requires a better understanding of how calcification is controlled. Here we show how spatial variations in the pH of the internal calcifying fluid (pHcf) in coral (Stylophora pistillata) colonies correlates with differential sensitivity of calcification to acidification. Coral apexes had the highest pHcf and experienced the smallest changes in pHcf in response to acidification. Lateral growth was associated with lower pHcf and greater changes with acidification. Calcification showed a pattern similar to pHcf, with lateral growth being more strongly affected by acidification than apical. Regulation of pHcf is therefore spatially variable within a coral and critical to determining the sensitivity of calcification to ocean acidification.

  4. Disruption of the vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase complex in liver causes MTORC1-independent accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissing, Sandra; Rudnik, Sönke; Damme, Markus; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Kornak, Uwe; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Jabs, Sabrina; Heeren, Jörg; De Brabander, Jef K; Haas, Albert; Saftig, Paul

    2017-04-03

    The vacuolar-type H(+)-translocating ATPase (v-H(+)-ATPase) has been implicated in the amino acid-dependent activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1), an important regulator of macroautophagy. To reveal the mechanistic links between the v-H(+)-ATPase and MTORC1, we destablilized v-H(+)-ATPase complexes in mouse liver cells by induced deletion of the essential chaperone ATP6AP2. ATP6AP2-mutants are characterized by massive accumulation of endocytic and autophagic vacuoles in hepatocytes. This cellular phenotype was not caused by a block in endocytic maturation or an impaired acidification. However, the degradation of LC3-II in the knockout hepatocytes appeared to be reduced. When v-H(+)-ATPase levels were decreased, we observed lysosome association of MTOR and normal signaling of MTORC1 despite an increase in autophagic marker proteins. To better understand why MTORC1 can be active when v-H(+)-ATPase is depleted, the activation of MTORC1 was analyzed in ATP6AP2-deficient fibroblasts. In these cells, very little amino acid-elicited activation of MTORC1 was observed. In contrast, insulin did induce MTORC1 activation, which still required intracellular amino acid stores. These results suggest that in vivo the regulation of macroautophagy depends not only on v-H(+)-ATPase-mediated regulation of MTORC1.

  5. Acidification of formula with citric acid is equally effective and better tolerated than acidification with hydrochloric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehall, John R; Saltzman, Daniel A; Jackson, Richard J; Smith, Samuel D

    2002-08-01

    To determine whether acidification of formula with citric acid is equally protective against bacterial translocation and gut colonization but better tolerated than acidification with hydrochloric acid in neonatal rabbits. Paired animal model with control. Animal laboratory. Premature neonatal New Zealand rabbit pups. A standard neonatal rabbit model in two versions, a bacterial challenge and a no bacterial challenge model, was used to assess bacterial translocation and gut colonization. Two hundred forty-six rabbit pups were delivered by cesarean section 1 day premature and randomly placed into two groups sorted by type of formula acidification (hydrochloric acid or citric acid). Pups were gavage fed pH 3 kitten formula every 12 hrs. Ranitidine hydrochloride at 20 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1) was added to all formula. Bacterial challenge animals were given 1 x 10(6) colony-forming units/mL of Enterobacter cloacae with the third feeding. Animals in the no bacterial challenge group received no bacterial challenge. Animals were killed on day of life 3, and the liver, spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, and cecum were sequentially harvested and cultured. Organs were qualitatively judged for growth, whereas cecal cultures were quantified as colony-forming units/gram. Stomach biopsies were performed to look for mucosal damage. Long-term tolerance was assessed in 48 pups fed formula acidified to pH 3 with either hydrochloric acid or citric acid and 20 animals fed pH 7 formula without ranitidine. Weight gain and mortality rate were followed for 14 days. Gut colonization and bacterial translocation to liver, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes were equivalent between citric acid and hydrochloric acid in both bacterial challenge and no bacterial challenge models. Long term, citric acid animals exceeded hydrochloric acid animals in daily weight gain and survival (p formula with citric acid is equally protective against bacteria but better tolerated than acidification with hydrochloric

  6. Symbiotic Chlorella variabilis incubated under constant dark conditions for 24 hours loses the ability to avoid digestion by host lysosomal enzymes in digestive vacuoles of host ciliate Paramecium bursaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Endosymbiosis between symbiotic Chlorella and alga-free Paramecium bursaria cells can be induced by mixing them. To establish the endosymbiosis, algae must acquire temporary resistance to the host lysosomal enzymes in the digestive vacuoles (DVs). When symbiotic algae isolated from the alga-bearing paramecia are kept under a constant dark conditions for 24 h before mixing with the alga-free paramecia, almost all algae are digested in the host DVs. To examine the cause of algal acquisition to the host lysosomal enzymes, the isolated algae were kept under a constant light conditions with or without a photosynthesis inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea for 24 h, and were mixed with alga-free paramecia. Unexpectedly, most of the algae were not digested in the DVs irrespective of the presence of the inhibitor. Addition of 1 mM maltose, a main photosynthetic product of the symbiotic algae or of a supernatant of the isolated algae kept for 24 h under a constant light conditions, did not rescue the algal digestion in the DVs. These observations reveal that unknown factors induced by light are a prerequisite for algal resistance to the host lysosomal enzymes.

  7. Cellular acidification as a new approach to cancer treatment and to the understanding and therapeutics of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harguindey, Salvador; Stanciu, Daniel; Devesa, Jesús; Alfarouk, Khalid; Cardone, Rosa Angela; Polo Orozco, Julian David; Devesa, Pablo; Rauch, Cyril; Orive, Gorka; Anitua, Eduardo; Roger, Sébastien; Reshkin, Stephan J

    2017-04-01

    During the last few years, the understanding of the dysregulated hydrogen ion dynamics and reversed proton gradient of cancer cells has resulted in a new and integral pH-centric paradigm in oncology, a translational model embracing from cancer etiopathogenesis to treatment. The abnormalities of intracellular alkalinization along with extracellular acidification of all types of solid tumors and leukemic cells have never been described in any other disease and now appear to be a specific hallmark of malignancy. As a consequence of this intracellular acid-base homeostatic failure, the attempt to induce cellular acidification using proton transport inhibitors and other intracellular acidifiers of different origins is becoming a new therapeutic concept and selective target of cancer treatment, both as a metabolic mediator of apoptosis and in the overcoming of multiple drug resistance (MDR). Importantly, there is increasing data showing that different ion channels contribute to mediate significant aspects of cancer pH regulation and etiopathogenesis. Finally, we discuss the extension of this new pH-centric oncological paradigm into the opposite metabolic and homeostatic acid-base situation found in human neurodegenerative diseases (HNDDs), which opens novel concepts in the prevention and treatment of HNDDs through the utilization of a cohort of neural and non-neural derived hormones and human growth factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Benthic buffers and boosters of ocean acidification on coral reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. N. Anthony

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is a threat to marine ecosystems globally. In shallow-water systems, however, ocean acidification can be masked by benthic carbon fluxes, depending on community composition, seawater residence time, and the magnitude and balance of net community production (pn and calcification (gn. Here, we examine how six benthic groups from a coral reef environment on Heron Reef (Great Barrier Reef, Australia contribute to changes in seawater aragonite saturation state (Ωa. Results of flume studies showed a hierarchy of responses across groups, depending on CO2 level, time of day and water flow. At low CO2 (350–450 μatm, macroalgae (Chnoospora implexa, turfs and sand elevated Ωa of the flume water by around 0.10 to 1.20 h−1 – normalised to contributions from 1 m2 of benthos to a 1 m deep water column. The rate of Ωa increase in these groups was doubled under acidification (560–700 μatm and high flow (35 compared to 8 cm s−1. In contrast, branching corals (Acropora aspera increased Ωa by 0.25 h−1 at ambient CO2 (350–450 μatm during the day, but reduced Ωa under acidification and high flow. Nighttime changes in Ωa by corals were highly negative (0.6–0.8 h−1 and exacerbated by acidification. Calcifying macroalgae (Halimeda spp. raised Ωa by day (by around 0.13 h−1, but lowered Ωa by a similar or higher amount at night. Analyses of carbon flux contributions from four different benthic compositions to the reef water carbon chemistry across Heron Reef flat and lagoon indicated that the net lowering of Ωa by coral-dominated areas can to some extent be countered by long water residence times in neighbouring areas dominated by turfs, macroalgae and potentially sand.

  9. Benthic buffers and boosters of ocean acidification on coral reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. N. Anthony

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is a threat to marine ecosystems globally. In shallow-water systems, however, ocean acidification can be masked by benthic carbon fluxes, depending on community composition, seawater residence time, and the magnitude and balance of net community production (NCP and calcification (NCC. Here, we examine how six benthic groups from a coral reef environment on Heron Reef (Great Barrier Reef, Australia contribute to changes in the seawater aragonite saturation state (Ωa. Results of flume studies using intact reef habitats (1.2 m by 0.4 m, showed a hierarchy of responses across groups, depending on CO2 level, time of day and water flow. At low CO2 (350–450 μatm, macroalgae (Chnoospora implexa, turfs and sand elevated Ωa of the flume water by around 0.10 to 1.20 h−1 – normalised to contributions from 1 m2 of benthos to a 1 m deep water column. The rate of Ωa increase in these groups was doubled under acidification (560–700 μatm and high flow (35 compared to 8 cm s−1. In contrast, branching corals (Acropora aspera increased Ωa by 0.25 h−1 at ambient CO2 (350–450 μatm during the day, but reduced Ωa under acidification and high flow. Nighttime changes in Ωa by corals were highly negative (0.6–0.8 h−1 and exacerbated by acidification. Calcifying macroalgae (Halimeda spp. raised Ωa by day (by around 0.13 h−1, but lowered Ωa by a similar or higher amount at night. Analyses of carbon flux contributions from benthic communities with four different compositions to the reef water carbon chemistry across Heron Reef flat and lagoon indicated that the net lowering of Ωa by coral-dominated areas can to some extent be countered by long water-residence times in neighbouring areas dominated by turfs, macroalgae and carbonate sand.

  10. Lysosomal Changes in Renal Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells of Male Sprague Dawley Rats Following Decalin Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    decalin-treated animal. Note large, pale, rcd-staining lysosome (-). An exfoliated epithelial cell can iu- seen in the tubular lumen containing large...photomicrograph contains an exfoliated epithelial cell (-) with enlarged, intact lysosomes. The tubule on the left half of the photomicrograph contains an...metabolism of proteins. In: Cytology , GH Bourne and JF Danielli (eds). Academ- The Kidney: Physiology and Pathophysiology, DW ic Press, NY, pp. 251-300. - ~- i :- d .L n .- 2

  11. The BH3 Mimetic Obatoclax Accumulates in Lysosomes and Causes Their Alkalinization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasileios A Stamelos

    Full Text Available Obatoclax belongs to a class of compounds known as BH3 mimetics which function as antagonists of Bcl-2 family apoptosis regulators. It has undergone extensive preclinical and clinical evaluation as a cancer therapeutic. Despite this, it is clear that obatoclax has additional pharmacological effects that contribute to its cytotoxic activity. It has been claimed that obatoclax, either alone or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapeutics, induces an autophagic form of cell death. In addition, obatoclax has been shown to inhibit lysosomal function, but the mechanism of this has not been elucidated. We have evaluated the mechanism of action of obatoclax in eight ovarian cancer cell lines. Consistent with its function as a BH3 mimetic, obatoclax induced apoptosis in three cell lines. However, in the remaining cell lines another form of cell death was evident because caspase activation and PARP cleavage were not observed. Obatoclax also failed to show synergy with carboplatin and paclitaxel, chemotherapeutic agents which we have previously shown to be synergistic with authentic Bcl-2 family antagonists. Obatoclax induced a profound accumulation of LC-3 but knockdown of Atg-5 or beclin had only minor effects on the activity of obatoclax in cell growth assays suggesting that the inhibition of lysosomal function rather than stimulation of autophagy may play a more prominent role in these cells. To evaluate how obatoclax inhibits lysosomal function, confocal microscopy studies were conducted which demonstrated that obatoclax, which contains two basic pyrrole groups, accumulates in lysosomes. Studies using pH sensitive dyes demonstrated that obatoclax induced lysosomal alkalinization. Furthermore, obatoclax was synergistic in cell growth/survival assays with bafilomycin and chloroquine, two other drugs which cause lysosomal alkalinization. These studies explain, for the first time, how obatoclax inhibits lysosomal function and suggest that

  12. Reduction of mutant huntingtin accumulation and toxicity by lysosomal cathepsins D and B in neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang Xiaosen; Liang Qiuli; Schneider Lonnie; Zhang Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Huntington's disease is caused by aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHtt) protein containing more than a 36 polyQ repeat. Upregulation of macroautophagy was suggested as a neuroprotective strategy to degrade mutant huntingtin. However, macroautophagy initiation has been shown to be highly efficient in neurons whereas lysosomal activities are rate limiting. The role of the lysosomal and other proteases in Huntington is not clear. Some studies suggest that certain protease a...

  13. Action of polystyrene nanoparticles of different sizes on lysosomal function and integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Fröhlich Eleonore; Meindl Claudia; Roblegg Eva; Ebner Birgit; Absenger Markus; Pieber Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Data from environmental exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) suggest that chronic exposure may increase the incidence of lung, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Impairment of cell function by intracellular accumulation of NPs is also suspected. Many types of NPs have been detected in the endosomal-lysosomal system and, upon repeated exposure, alterations of the endosomal-lysosomal system may occur. To identify such effects we compared the effect of carboxyl polysty...

  14. Lysosomal responses to heat-shock of seasonal temperature extremes in Cd-exposed mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múgica, M; Izagirre, U; Marigómez, I

    2015-07-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the effect of temperature extremes on lysosomal biomarkers in mussels exposed to a model toxic pollutant (Cd) at different seasons. For this purpose, temperature was elevated 10°C (from 12°C to 22°C in winter and from 18°C to 28°C in summer) for a period of 6h (heat-shock) in control and Cd-exposed mussels, and then returned back to initial one. Lysosomal membrane stability and lysosomal structural changes in digestive gland were investigated. In winter, heat-shock reduced the labilisation period (LP) of the lysosomal membrane, especially in Cd-exposed mussels, and provoked transient lysosomal enlargement. LP values recovered after the heat-shock cessation but lysosomal enlargement prevailed in both experimental groups. In summer, heat-shock induced remarkable reduction in LP and lysosomal enlargement (more markedly in Cd-exposed mussels), which recovered within 3 days. Besides, whilst heat-shock effects on LP were practically identical for Cd-exposed mussels in winter and summer, the effects were longer-lasting in summer than in winter for control mussels. Thus, lysosomal responsiveness after heat-shock was higher in summer than in winter but recovery was faster as well, and therefore the consequences of the heat shock seem to be more decisive in winter. In contrast, inter-season differences were attenuated in the presence of Cd. Consequently, mussels seem to be better prepared in summer than in winter to stand short periods of abrupt temperature change; this is, however, compromised when mussels are exposed to pollutants such as Cd.

  15. EGFRvIII escapes down-regulation due to impaired internalization and sorting to lysosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandal, Michael V; Zandi, Roza; Pedersen, Mikkel W

    2007-01-01

    . Moreover, internalized EGFRvIII is recycled rather than delivered to lysosomes. EGFRvIII binds the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl via Grb2, whereas binding via phosphorylated tyrosine residue 1045 seems to be limited. Despite c-Cbl binding, the receptor fails to become effectively ubiquitinylated. Thus, our...... results suggest that the long lifetime of EGFRvIII is caused by inefficient internalization and impaired sorting to lysosomes due to lack of effective ubiquitinylation....

  16. Observation of intracellular interactions between DNA origami and lysosomes by the fluorescence localization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Meifang; Dai, Luru; Jiang, Qiao; Tang, Yunqing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Ding, Baoquan; Li, Junbai

    2016-07-28

    We obtained the fluorescence localization images of tube DNA origami nanostructures in NIH 3T3 cells for the first time. The fluorescence localization images of tube DNA origami nanostructures and TIRF images of lysosomes were combined and they revealed the detailed interactions between the two structures. Quantitative analysis illustrated that the tube origami can be captured as well as degraded by lysosomes with time.

  17. Eps8 is recruited to lysosomes and subjected to chaperone-mediated autophagy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Thilo; Younsi, Alexander; Disanza, Andrea; Rodriguez, Jose Antonio; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Scita, Giorgio; Schmidt, Jan

    2010-07-15

    Eps8 controls actin dynamics directly through its barbed end capping and actin-bundling activity, and indirectly by regulating Rac-activation when engaged into a trimeric complex with Eps8-Abi1-Sos1. Recently, Eps8 has been associated with promotion of various solid malignancies, but neither its mechanisms of action nor its regulation in cancer cells have been elucidated. Here, we report a novel association of Eps8 with the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment, which is independent from actin polymerization and specifically occurs in cancer cells. Endogenous Eps8 localized to large vesicular lysosomal structures in metastatic pancreatic cancer cell lines, such as AsPC-1 and Capan-1 that display high Eps8 levels. Additionally, ectopic expression of Eps8 increased the size of lysosomes. Structure-function analysis revealed that the region encompassing the amino acids 184-535 of Eps8 was sufficient to mediate lysosomal recruitment. Notably, this fragment harbors two KFERQ-like motifs required for chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Furthermore, Eps8 co-immunoprecipitated with Hsc70 and LAMP-2, which are key elements for the CMA degradative pathway. Consistently, in vitro, a significant fraction of Eps8 bound to (11.9+/-5.1%) and was incorporated into (5.3+/-6.5%) lysosomes. Additionally, Eps8 binding to lysosomes was competed by other known CMA-substrates. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed that Eps8 recruitment to the lysosomal membrane was highly dynamic. Collectively, these results indicate that Eps8 in certain human cancer cells specifically localizes to lysosomes, and is directed to CMA. These results open a new field for the investigation of how Eps8 is regulated and contributes to tumor promotion in human cancers.

  18. Responses of Two Scleractinian Corals to Cobalt Pollution and Ocean Acidification

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Biscéré; Riccardo Rodolfo-Metalpa; Anne Lorrain; Laurent Chauvaud; Julien Thébault; Jacques Clavier; Fanny Houlbrèque

    2015-01-01

    The effects of ocean acidification alone or in combination with warming on coral metabolism have been extensively investigated, whereas none of these studies consider that most coral reefs near shore are already impacted by other natural anthropogenic inputs such as metal pollution. It is likely that projected ocean acidification levels will aggravate coral reef health. We first investigated how ocean acidification interacts with one near shore locally abundant metal on the physiology of two ...

  19. Ocean Acidification and Coral Reefs: An Emerging Big Picture

    OpenAIRE

    John E. N. Veron

    2011-01-01

    This article summarises the sometimes controversial contributions made by the different sciences to predict the path of ocean acidification impacts on the diversity of coral reefs during the present century. Although the seawater carbonate system has been known for a long time, the understanding of acidification impacts on marine biota is in its infancy. Most publications about ocean acidification are less than a decade old and over half are about coral reefs. Contributions from physiological...

  20. Interaction of arylsulfatase A with UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:Lysosomal enzyme-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierau, A; Dietz, F; Lange, H; Schestag, F; Parastar, A; Gieselmann, V

    1999-02-05

    The critical step in lysosomal targeting of soluble lysosomal enzymes is the recognition by an UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:lysosomal enzyme-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase. The structure of the determinant common to all lysosomal enzymes for proper recognition by the phosphotransferase is not completely understood. Our current knowledge is largely based on the introduction of targeted amino acid substitutions into lysosomal enzymes and analysis of their effects on phosphotransferase recognition. We have investigated the effect of eight anti-arylsulfatase A monoclonal antibodies on the interaction of arylsulfatase A with the lysosomal enzyme phosphotransferase in vitro. We also show that a lysine-rich surface area of arylsulfatases A and B is essential for proper recognition by the phosphotransferase. Monoclonal antibodies bind to at least six different epitopes at different locations on the surface of arylsulfatase A. All antibodies bind outside the lysine-rich recognition area, but nevertheless Fab fragments of these antibodies prevent interaction of arylsulfatase A with the phosphotransferase. Our data support a model in which binding of arylsulfatase A to the phosphotransferase is not restricted to a limited surface area but involves the simultaneous recognition of large parts of arylsulfatase A.

  1. Cross-talk between TRPML1 channel, lipids and lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Norbert

    2012-03-01

    Described by the Belgian cytologist Christian De Duve in 1949,(1) lysosomes (from the Greek "digestive bodies") are ubiquitous specialized intracellular organelles that ensure the degradation/recycling of macromolecules (proteins, lipids, membranes) through the activity of specific enzymes (i.e., acid hydrolases). They receive their substrates through different internalization pathways (i.e., endocytosis, phagocytosis and autophagy) and are involved in a wide range of physiological functions from cell death and signaling to cholesterol homeostasis and plasma membrane repair.(2) In Mammals, 50 soluble lysosomal hydrolases have been described, each targeting specific substrates. They are confined in the lumen of the lysosome and require an optimum pH (i.e., pH 4.5) to work. This acidic pH compared with the slightly alkaline pH of the cytosol (i.e., ~pH 7.2) is maintained by the activity of integral lysosomal membrane proteins (LMPs, that represent the second class of lysosomal proteins), including the V-type proton (H(+))-ATPase(3) and the chloride ion channel CLC7(4) that pumps protons from the cytosol across the lysosomal membrane.

  2. TMEM175 deficiency impairs lysosomal and mitochondrial function and increases α-synuclein aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinn, Sarah; Drolet, Robert E.; Cramer, Paige E.; Wong, Andus Hon-Kit; Toolan, Dawn M.; Gretzula, Cheryl A.; Voleti, Bhavya; Vassileva, Galya; Disa, Jyoti; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; Stone, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder pathologically characterized by nigrostriatal dopamine neuron loss and the postmortem presence of Lewy bodies, depositions of insoluble α-synuclein, and other proteins that likely contribute to cellular toxicity and death during the disease. Genetic and biochemical studies have implicated impaired lysosomal and mitochondrial function in the pathogenesis of PD. Transmembrane protein 175 (TMEM175), the lysosomal K+ channel, is centered under a major genome-wide association studies peak for PD, making it a potential candidate risk factor for the disease. To address the possibility that variation in TMEM175 could play a role in PD pathogenesis, TMEM175 function was investigated in a neuronal model system. Studies confirmed that TMEM175 deficiency results in unstable lysosomal pH, which led to decreased lysosomal catalytic activity, decreased glucocerebrosidase activity, impaired autophagosome clearance by the lysosome, and decreased mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, TMEM175 deficiency in rat primary neurons resulted in increased susceptibility to exogenous α-synuclein fibrils. Following α-synuclein fibril treatment, neurons deficient in TMEM175 were found to have increased phosphorylated and detergent-insoluble α-synuclein deposits. Taken together, data from these studies suggest that TMEM175 plays a direct and critical role in lysosomal and mitochondrial function and PD pathogenesis and highlight this ion channel as a potential therapeutic target for treating PD. PMID:28193887

  3. Reduction of mutant huntingtin accumulation and toxicity by lysosomal cathepsins D and B in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouyang Xiaosen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington's disease is caused by aggregation of mutant huntingtin (mHtt protein containing more than a 36 polyQ repeat. Upregulation of macroautophagy was suggested as a neuroprotective strategy to degrade mutant huntingtin. However, macroautophagy initiation has been shown to be highly efficient in neurons whereas lysosomal activities are rate limiting. The role of the lysosomal and other proteases in Huntington is not clear. Some studies suggest that certain protease activities may contribute to toxicity whereas others are consistent with protection. These discrepancies may be due to a number of mechanisms including distinct effects of the specific intermediate digestion products of mutant huntingtin generated by different proteases. These observations suggested a critical need to investigate the consequence of upregulation of individual lysosomal enzyme in mutant huntingtin accumulation and toxicity. Results In this study, we used molecular approaches to enhance lysosomal protease activities and examined their effects on mutant huntingtin level and toxicity. We found that enhanced expression of lysosomal cathepsins D and B resulted in their increased enzymatic activities and reduced both full-length and fragmented huntingtin in transfected HEK cells. Furthermore, enhanced expression of cathepsin D or B protected against mutant huntingtin toxicity in primary neurons, and their neuroprotection is dependent on macroautophagy. Conclusions These observations demonstrate a neuroprotective effect of enhancing lysosomal cathepsins in reducing mutant huntingtin level and toxicity in transfected cells. They highlight the potential importance of neuroprotection mediated by cathepsin D or B through macroautophagy.

  4. Para-toluenesulfonamide induces tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell death through disturbing lysosomal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Liang, Chenyuan; Zhang, Zhuoyuan; Pan, Jian; Xia, Hui; Zhong, Nanshan; Li, Longjiang

    2015-11-01

    Para-toluenesulfonamide (PTS) has been implicated with anticancer effects against a variety of tumors. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of PTS on tongue squamous cell carcinoma (Tca-8113) and explored the lysosomal and mitochondrial changes after PTS treatment in vitro. High-performance liquid chromatography showed that PTS selectively accumulated in Tca-8113 cells with a relatively low concentration in normal fibroblasts. Next, the effects of PTS on cell viability, invasion, and cell death were determined. PTS significantly inhibited Tca-8113 cells' viability and invasive ability with increased cancer cell death. Flow cytometric analysis and the lactate dehydrogenase release assay showed that PTS induced cancer cell death by activating apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Morphological changes, such as cellular shrinkage, nuclear condensation as well as formation of apoptotic body and secondary lysosomes, were observed, indicating that PTS might induce cell death through disturbing lysosomal stability. Lysosomal integrity assay and western blot showed that PTS increased lysosomal membrane permeabilization associated with activation of lysosomal cathepsin B. Finally, PTS was shown to inhibit ATP biosynthesis and induce the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c. Therefore, our findings provide a novel insight into the use of PTS in cancer therapy.

  5. Lysosomal interaction of Akt with Phafin2: a critical step in the induction of autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami Matsuda-Lennikov

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for the gross disposal of intracellular proteins in mammalian cells and dysfunction in this pathway has been associated with human disease. Although the serine threonine kinase Akt is suggested to play a role in this process, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Akt induces autophagy. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, Phafin2 (EAPF or PLEKHF2, a lysosomal protein with a unique structure of N-terminal PH (pleckstrin homology domain and C-terminal FYVE (Fab 1, YOTB, Vac 1, and EEA1 domain was found to interact with Akt. A sucrose gradient fractionation experiment revealed that both Akt and Phafin2 co-existed in the same lysosome enriched fraction after autophagy induction. Confocal microscopic analysis and BiFC analysis demonstrated that both Akt and Phafin2 accumulate in the lysosome after induction of autophagy. BiFC analysis using PtdIns (3P interaction defective mutant of Phafin2 demonstrated that lysosomal accumulation of the Akt-Phafin2 complex and subsequent induction of autophagy were lysosomal PtdIns (3P dependent events. Furthermore, in murine macrophages, both Akt and Phafin2 were required for digestion of fluorescent bacteria and/or LPS-induced autophagy. Taken together, these findings establish that lysosomal accumulation of Akt and Phafin2 is a critical step in the induction of autophagy via an interaction with PtdIns (3P.

  6. Activation of the transcription factor EB rescues lysosomal abnormalities in cystinotic kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rega, Laura R; Polishchuk, Elena; Montefusco, Sandro; Napolitano, Gennaro; Tozzi, Giulia; Zhang, Jinzhong; Bellomo, Francesco; Taranta, Anna; Pastore, Anna; Polishchuk, Roman; Piemonte, Fiorella; Medina, Diego L; Catz, Sergio D; Ballabio, Andrea; Emma, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Nephropathic cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease characterized by accumulation of cystine into lysosomes secondary to mutations in the cystine lysosomal transporter, cystinosin. The defect initially causes proximal tubular dysfunction (Fanconi syndrome) which in time progresses to end-stage renal disease. Cystinotic patients treated with the cystine-depleting agent, cysteamine, have improved life expectancy, delayed progression to chronic renal failure, but persistence of Fanconi syndrome. Here, we have investigated the role of the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway, in conditionally immortalized proximal tubular epithelial cells derived from the urine of a healthy volunteer or a cystinotic patient. Lack of cystinosin reduced TFEB expression and induced TFEB nuclear translocation. Stimulation of endogenous TFEB activity by genistein, or overexpression of exogenous TFEB lowered cystine levels within 24 hours in cystinotic cells. Overexpression of TFEB also stimulated delayed endocytic cargo processing within 24 hours. Rescue of other abnormalities of the lysosomal compartment was observed but required prolonged expression of TFEB. These abnormalities could not be corrected with cysteamine. Thus, these data show that the consequences of cystinosin deficiency are not restricted to cystine accumulation and support the role of TFEB as a therapeutic target for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases, in particular of cystinosis. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reviews and syntheses: Ice acidification, the effects of ocean acidification on sea ice microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. McMinn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice algae, like some coastal and estuarine phytoplankton, are naturally exposed to a wider range of pH and CO2 concentrations than those in open marine seas. While climate change and ocean acidification (OA will impact pelagic communities, their effects on sea ice microbial communities remain unclear. Sea ice contains several distinct microbial communities, which are exposed to differing environmental conditions depending on their depth within the ice. Bottom communities mostly experience relatively benign bulk ocean properties, while interior brine and surface (infiltration communities experience much greater extremes. Most OA studies have examined the impacts on single sea ice algae species in culture. Although some studies examined the effects of OA alone, most examined the effects of OA and either light, nutrients or temperature. With few exceptions, increased CO2 concentration caused either no change or an increase in growth and/or photosynthesis. In situ studies on brine and surface algae also demonstrated a wide tolerance to increased and decreased pH and showed increased growth at higher CO2 concentrations. The short time period of most experiments (< 10 days, together with limited genetic diversity (i.e. use of only a single strain, however, has been identified as a limitation to a broader interpretation of the results. While there have been few studies on the effects of OA on the growth of marine bacterial communities in general, impacts appear to be minimal. In sea ice also, the few reports available suggest no negative impacts on bacterial growth or community richness. Sea ice ecosystems are ephemeral, melting and re-forming each year. Thus, for some part of each year organisms inhabiting the ice must also survive outside of the ice, either as part of the phytoplankton or as resting spores on the bottom. During these times, they will be exposed to the full range of co-stressors that pelagic organisms experience. Their ability

  8. Extracellular Acidification Acts as a Key Modulator of Neutrophil Apoptosis and Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannan Cao

    Full Text Available In human pathological conditions, the acidification of local environment is a frequent feature, such as tumor and inflammation. As the pH of microenvironment alters, the functions of immune cells are about to change. It makes the extracellular acidification a key modulator of innate immunity. Here we detected the impact of extracellular acidification on neutrophil apoptosis and functions, including cell death, respiratory burst, migration and phagocytosis. As a result, we found that under the acid environment, neutrophil apoptosis delayed, respiratory burst inhibited, polarization augmented, chemotaxis differed, endocytosis enhanced and bacteria killing suppressed. These findings suggested that extracellular acidification acts as a key regulator of neutrophil apoptosis and functions.

  9. Inhibitors of histone deacetylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    ; neurological disorder; a memory or cognitive function disorder/impairment; an extinction learning disorder; fungal disease or infection; viral disease or infection such as HIV; hematological disease; liver disease; lysosomal storage disease; or neoplastic disease in humans or animals....

  10. Regulation of Hematopoiesis and Methionine Homeostasis by mTORC1 Inhibitor NPRL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Dutchak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen permease regulator-like 2 (NPRL2 is a component of a conserved complex that inhibits mTORC1 (mammalian Target Of Rapamycin Complex 1 in response to amino acid insufficiency. Here, we show that NPRL2 is required for mouse viability and that its absence significantly compromises fetal liver hematopoiesis in developing embryos. Moreover, NPRL2 KO embryos have significantly reduced methionine levels and exhibit phenotypes reminiscent of cobalamin (vitamin B12 deficiency. Consistent with this idea, NPRL2 KO liver and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs show defective processing of the cobalamin-transport protein transcobalamin 2, along with impaired lysosomal acidification and lysosomal gene expression. NPRL2 KO MEFs exhibit a significant defect in the cobalamin-dependent synthesis of methionine from homocysteine, which can be rescued by supplementation with cyanocobalamin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a role for NPRL2 and mTORC1 in the regulation of lysosomal-dependent cobalamin processing, methionine synthesis, and maintenance of cellular re-methylation potential, which are important during hematopoiesis.

  11. Effects of Acidification and Alkalinization on the Lipid Emulsion-Mediated Reversal of Toxic Dose Levobupivacaine-Induced Vasodilation in the Isolated Rat Aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Yu, Jongsun; Lee, Youngju; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Lim, Dong Hoon; Hwang, Yeran; Kim, Yeon A; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the effects of pre-acidification and pre-akalinization on the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of toxic dose levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated rat aorta. Isolated aortic rings with and without the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) were exposed to four types of Krebs solution (pH 7.0, 7.2, 7.4, and 7.6), followed by the addition of 60 mM potassium chloride. When the toxic dose of levobupivacaine (3 × 10(-4) M) produced a stable and sustained vasodilation in the isolated aortic rings that were precontracted with 60 mM potassium chloride, increasing lipid emulsion concentrations (SMOFlipid(®): 0.24, 0.48, 0.95 and 1.39%) were added to generate concentration-response curves. The effects of mild pre-acidification alone and mild pre-acidification in combination with a lipid emulsion on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells were investigated by Western blotting. Mild pre-acidification caused by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution enhanced the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated endothelium-intact aortic rings, whereas mild pre-acidification caused by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution did not significantly alter the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of the levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in isolated endothelium-denuded aortic rings or endothelium-intact aortic rings with L-NAME. A lipid emulsion attenuated the increased eNOS phosphorylation induced by the pH 7.2 Krebs solution. Taken together, these results suggest that mild pre-acidification enhances the lipid emulsion-mediated reversal of toxic dose levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation in the endothelium-intact aorta via the inhibition of nitric oxide.

  12. Presence of a lysosomal enzyme, arylsulfatase-A, in the prelysosome-endosome compartments of human cultured fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, B M; Yu, C Z; Chang, P L

    1989-02-01

    Although endosomes and lysosomes are associated with different subcellular functions, we present evidence that a lysosomal enzyme, arylsulfatase-A, is present in prelysosomal vesicles which constitute part of the endosomal compartment. When human cultured fibroblasts were subfractionated with Percoll gradients, arylsulfatase-A activity was enriched in three subcellular fractions: dense lysosomes, light lysosomes, and light membranous vesicles. Pulsing the cells for 1 to 10 min with the fluid-phase endocytic marker, horseradish peroxidase, showed that endosomes enriched with the marker were distributed partly in the light lysosome fraction but mainly in the light membranous fraction. By pulsing the fibroblasts for 10 min with horseradish peroxidase conjugated to colloidal gold and then staining the light membranous and light lysosomal fractions for arylsulfatase-A activity with a specific cytochemical technique, the endocytic marker was detected under the electron microscope in the same vesicles as the lysosomal enzyme. The origin of the lysosomal enzyme in this endosomal compartment was shown not to be acquired through mannose 6-phosphate receptor-mediated endocytosis of enzymes previously secreted from the cell. Together with our recent finding that the light membranous fraction contains prelysosomes distinct from bona fide lysosomes and was highly enriched with newly synthesized arylsulfatase-A molecules, these results demonstrate that prelysosomes also constitute part of the endosomal compartment to which intracellular lysosomal enzymes are targeted.

  13. Enhancing lysosomal biogenesis and autophagic flux by activating the transcription factor EB protects against cadmium-induced neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Huifeng; Li, Min; Tian, Li; Yang, Zhiqi; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a highly ubiquitous heavy metal, is a well-known inducer of neurotoxicity. However, the mechanism underlying cadmium-induced neurotoxicity remains unclear. In this study, we found that Cd inhibits autophagosome-lysosome fusion and impairs lysosomal function by reducing the levels of lysosomal-associated membrane proteins, inhibiting lysosomal proteolysis and altering lysosomal pH, contributing to defects in autophagic clearance and subsequently leading to nerve cell death. In addition, Cd decreases transcription factor EB (TFEB) expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, Cd induces the nuclear translocation of TFEB and TFEB target-gene expression, associated with compromised lysosomal function or a compensatory effect after the impairment of the autophagic flux. Notably, restoration of the levels of lysosomal-associated membrane protein, lysosomal proteolysis, lysosomal pH and autophagic flux through Tfeb overexpression protects against Cd-induced neurotoxicity, and this protective effect is incompletely dependent on TFEB nuclear translocation. Moreover, gene transfer of the master autophagy regulator TFEB results in the clearance of toxic proteins and the correction of Cd-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. Our study is the first to demonstrate that Cd disrupts lysosomal function and autophagic flux and manipulation of TFEB signalling may be a therapeutic approach for antagonizing Cd-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:28240313

  14. TFEB activation promotes the recruitment of lysosomal glycohydrolases β-hexosaminidase and β-galactosidase to the plasma membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magini, Alessandro [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Department of Medical and Biological Sciences (DSMB), University of Udine, Udine (Italy); Polchi, Alice; Urbanelli, Lorena [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Cesselli, Daniela; Beltrami, Antonio [Department of Medical and Biological Sciences (DSMB), University of Udine, Udine (Italy); Tancini, Brunella [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Emiliani, Carla, E-mail: carla.emiliani@unipg.it [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Perugia, Perugia (Italy)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •TFEB activation promotes the increase of Hex and Gal activities. •The increase of Hex and Gal activities is related to transcriptional regulation. •TFEB promotes the recruitment of mature Hex and Gal on cell surface. -- Abstract: Lysosomes are membrane-enclosed organelles containing acid hydrolases. They mediate a variety of physiological processes, such as cellular clearance, lipid homeostasis, energy metabolism and pathogen defence. Lysosomes can secrete their content through a process called lysosome exocytosis in which lysosomes fuse with the plasma membrane realising their content into the extracellular milieu. Lysosomal exocytosis is not only responsible for the secretion of lysosomal enzymes, but it also has a crucial role in the plasma membrane repair. Recently, it has been demonstrated that lysosome response to the physiologic signals is regulated by the transcription factor EB (TFEB). In particular, lysosomal secretion is transcriptionally regulated by TFEB which induces both the docking and fusion of lysosomes with the plasma membrane. In this work we demonstrated that TFEB nuclear translocation is accompanied by an increase of mature glycohydrolases β-hexosaminidase and β-galactosidase on cell surface. This evidence contributes to elucidate an unknown TFEB biological function leading the lysosomal glycohydrolases on plasma membrane.

  15. Membrane cholesterol regulates lysosome-plasma membrane fusion events and modulates Trypanosoma cruzi invasion of host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Hissa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi are able to invade several types of non-phagocytic cells through a lysosomal dependent mechanism. It has been shown that, during invasion, parasites trigger host cell lysosome exocytosis, which initially occurs at the parasite-host contact site. Acid sphingomyelinase released from lysosomes then induces endocytosis and parasite internalization. Lysosomes continue to fuse with the newly formed parasitophorous vacuole until the parasite is completely enclosed by lysosomal membrane, a process indispensable for a stable infection. Previous work has shown that host membrane cholesterol is also important for the T. cruzi invasion process in both professional (macrophages and non-professional (epithelial phagocytic cells. However, the mechanism by which cholesterol-enriched microdomains participate in this process has remained unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: In the present work we show that cardiomyocytes treated with MβCD, a drug able to sequester cholesterol from cell membranes, leads to a 50% reduction in invasion by T. cruzi trypomastigotes, as well as a decrease in the number of recently internalized parasites co-localizing with lysosomal markers. Cholesterol depletion from host membranes was accompanied by a decrease in the labeling of host membrane lipid rafts, as well as excessive lysosome exocytic events during the earlier stages of treatment. Precocious lysosomal exocytosis in MβCD treated cells led to a change in lysosomal distribution, with a reduction in the number of these organelles at the cell periphery, and probably compromises the intracellular pool of lysosomes necessary for T. cruzi invasion. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these results, we propose that cholesterol depletion leads to unregulated exocytic events, reducing lysosome availability at the cell cortex and consequently compromise T. cruzi entry into host cells. The results also suggest that two different pools of

  16. Lysosomal {beta}-mannosidase: cDNA cloning and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Leipprandt, J.R.; Traviss, C.E. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Lysosomal {beta}-mannosidase is an exoglycosidase that cleaves the single {beta}-linked mannose residue from the non-reducing end of all N-linked glycoprotein oligosaccharides. Deficiency of this enzyme results in {beta}-mannosidosis, a severe neurodegenerative disease in goats and cattle. The human cases described have a milder, highly variable presentation. Study of the molecular pathology of this disease in ruminants and humans and development of the animal model for gene therapy studies required cloning of the gene for {beta}-mannosidase has been cloned. {beta}-Mannosidase cDNA were obtained from a bovine thyroid cDNA library by screening with mixed oligonucleotides derived from peptide sequences resulting from microsequencing of bovine {beta}-mannosidase peptides. A total of six independent positive clones were identified from 5 x 10{sup 5} plaques, covering about 80% of the C-terminal region. The missing 5{prime} region was obtained using 5{prime} RACE. The full-length construct contains 3852-bp nucleotides, encoding 879 amino acids. The initiation codon is followed by 17 amino acids containing the characteristics of a typical signal peptide sequence. The deduced amino acid sequence is colinear with all peptide sequences determined by protein microsequencing. Northern blot analysis demonstrated a 4.2 kb single transcript in various tissues from both normal and affected goats and calves. The mRNA level was decreased in affected {beta}-mannosidosis animals. The gene encoding {beta}-mannosidase was localized on human chromosome 4 by Southern analysis of rodent/human somatic cell hybrids. The mutation in bovine {beta}-mannosidosis has been identified. This is the first report of cloning of the {beta}-mannosidase gene.

  17. Expression of Clusterin-α Following Penicillin-Induced Developmental Seizures in Immature Rat Brain and Intervention Effect by Lysosomal Enzyme Inhibitor E-64 d%青霉素点燃发育期惊厥幼鼠脑内丛生蛋白的表达及溶酶体酶抑制剂E-64d对其的干预作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任守芸; 倪宏; 张雪媛

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the expression of Clusterin - α in brain and the intervention effect of lysosomal enzyme inhihitor E - , 64 d on brain damage of developmental rats with recurrent seizures. Methods Sprague - Dawley( SD) rats at the age of 21 days were randomly divided into recurrent prolonged seizure group ( RS group ,n=24),E-64d- treated seizure group ( ERS group, n = 24 ) , normal saline control group (CON group,n = 19). At postnatal day 21-1,the penicillin(5. 1 × 106 U · kg-1 · d-1) was used to induce seizure attack,6 times. Recurrent seizures were induced every other day in 6 consecutive days in the RS group and ERS group. In ERS group,E -64d (4 μg) was injected inrraperitoneally every other day before seizure induced. Rats in CON group were injected with equal amount of normal sodium at the same time. At 21d after last time induced seizure(postnatal days 51) ,each 6 rats were selected randomly which were up to the Racine standard from RS group and KHS group as RS and ERS group in the experiment . At the same time,6 rats were selected randomly from the CON group as the CON group in the experiment. The 18 rats had been slaughtered to take the hippocampus and cerebral cortex at 51 - day -old. Clusterin -α levels in hippocampus and cerebral cortex were detected by western blot method. All data were analyzed by SPSS 17.0 software. Results The levels of Clusterin -α in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of RS group were increased significantly compared with that of CON group (P, 0.05). Conclusions Clusterin -α may be involved in the pathophysiology of the brain damage resulting from recurrent seizure. E - 64 d protects the brain by down -regulating the expression of Clusterin -α.%目的 探讨发育期幼鼠反复惊厥后脑内丛生蛋白的表达及溶酶体酶抑制剂E-64 d对其表达的干预作用.方法 日龄21 d的SD大鼠随机分为3组:惊厥组(RS组,n=24)、E-64 d干预组(ERS组,n=24)和对照组(CON组,n=19).于大鼠21日龄开始,RS组

  18. Hippocampal neurons exposed to the environmental contaminants methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls undergo cell death via parallel activation of calpains and lysosomal proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofighi, Roshan; Johansson, Carolina; Goldoni, Matteo; Ibrahim, Wan Norhamidah Wan; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Mutti, Antonio; Ceccatelli, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are widespread environmental pollutants commonly found as contaminants in the same food sources. Even though their neurotoxic effects are established, the mechanisms of action are not fully understood. In the present study, we have used the mouse hippocampal neuronal cell line HT22 to investigate the mechanisms of neuronal death induced by MeHg, PCB 153, and PCB 126, alone or in combination. All chemicals induced cell death with morphological changes compatible with either apoptosis or necrosis. Mitochondrial functions were impaired as shown by the significant decrease in mitochondrial Ca²+ uptake capacity and ATP levels. MeHg, but not the PCBs, induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c into the cytosol. Also, pre-treatment with the antioxidant MnTBAP was protective only against cell death induced by MeHg. While caspase activation was absent, the Ca²+-dependent proteases calpains were activated after exposure to MeHg or the selected PCBs. Furthermore, lysosomal disruption was observed in the exposed cells. Accordingly, pre-treatment with the calpain specific inhibitor PD150606 and/or the cathepsin D inhibitor Pepstatin protected against the cytotoxicity of MeHg and PCBs, and the protection was significantly enhanced when the two inhibitors were combined. Simultaneous exposures to lower doses of MeHg and PCBs suggested mostly antagonistic interactions. Taken together, these data indicate that MeHg and PCBs induce caspase-independent cell death via parallel activation of calpains and lysosomal proteases, and that in this model oxidative stress does not play a major role in PCB toxicity.

  19. Expression of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) in astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Stine S; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Christensen, Karina G; Kristensen, Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    Targeting of lysosomes is a novel therapeutic anti-cancer strategy for killing the otherwise apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. Such strategies are urgently needed for treatment of brain tumors, especially the glioblastoma, which is the most frequent and most malignant type. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of lysosomes in astrocytic brain tumors focussing also on the therapy resistant tumor stem cells. Expression of the lysosomal marker LAMP-1 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1) was investigated by immunohistochemistry in 112 formalin fixed paraffin embedded astrocytomas and compared with tumor grade and overall patient survival. Moreover, double immunofluorescence stainings were performed with LAMP-1 and the astrocytic marker GFAP and the putative stem cell marker CD133 on ten glioblastomas. Most tumors expressed the LAMP-1 protein in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells, while the blood vessels were positive in all tumors. The percentage of LAMP-1 positive tumor cells and staining intensities increased with tumor grade but variations in tumors of the same grade were also found. No association was found between LAMP-1 expression and patient overall survival in the individual tumor grades. LAMP-1/GFAP showed pronounced co-expression and LAMP-1/CD133 was co-expressed as well suggesting that tumor cells including the proposed tumor stem cells contain lysosomes. The results suggest that high amounts of lysosomes are present in glioblastomas and in the proposed tumor stem cells. Targeting of lysosomes may be a promising novel therapeutic strategy against this highly malignant neoplasm.

  20. The Phosphoinositide-Gated Lysosomal Ca(2+) Channel, TRPML1, Is Required for Phagosome Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayam, Roya M; Saric, Amra; Shilliday, Ryan E; Botelho, Roberto J

    2015-09-01

    Macrophages internalize and sequester pathogens into a phagosome. Phagosomes then sequentially fuse with endosomes and lysosomes, converting into degradative phagolysosomes. Phagosome maturation is a complex process that requires regulators of the endosomal pathway including the phosphoinositide lipids. Phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2 ), which respectively control early endosomes and late endolysosomes, are both required for phagosome maturation. Inhibition of PIKfyve, which synthesizes PtdIns(3,5)P2 , blocked phagosome-lysosome fusion and abated the degradative capacity of phagosomes. However, it is not known how PIKfyve and PtdIns(3,5)P2 participate in phagosome maturation. TRPML1 is a PtdIns(3,5)P2 -gated lysosomal Ca(2+) channel. Because Ca(2+) triggers membrane fusion, we postulated that TRPML1 helps mediate phagosome-lysosome fusion. Using Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis as a model, we describe our research showing that silencing of TRPML1 hindered phagosome acquisition of lysosomal markers and reduced the bactericidal properties of phagosomes. Specifically, phagosomes isolated from TRPML1-silenced cells were decorated with lysosomes that docked but did not fuse. We could rescue phagosome maturation in TRPML1-silenced and PIKfyve-inhibited cells by forcible Ca(2+) release with ionomycin. We also provide evidence that cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration increases upon phagocytosis in a manner dependent on TRPML1 and PIKfyve. Overall, we propose a model where PIKfyve and PtdIns(3,5)P2 activate TRPML1 to induce phagosome-lysosome fusion.

  1. Quantitation of the rates of hepatic and intestinal cholesterol synthesis in lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mice before and during treatment with ezetimibe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Lopez, Adam M; Turley, Stephen D

    2017-07-01

    Esterified cholesterol (EC) and triglycerides, contained within lipoproteins taken up by cells, are hydrolysed by lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) in the late endosomal/lysosomal (E/L) compartment. The resulting unesterified cholesterol (UC) is transported via Niemann-Pick type C2 and C1 into the cytosolic compartment where it enters a putative pool of metabolically active cholesterol that is utilized in accordance with cellular needs. Loss-of-function mutations in LIPA, the gene encoding LAL, result in dramatic increases in tissue concentrations of EC, a hallmark feature of Wolman disease and cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD). The lysosomal sequestration of EC causes cells to respond to a perceived deficit of sterol by increasing their rate of cholesterol synthesis, particularly in the liver. A similar compensatory response occurs with treatments that disrupt the enterohepatic movement of cholesterol or bile acids. Here we measured rates of cholesterol synthesis in vivo in the liver and small intestine of a mouse model for CESD given the cholesterol absorption inhibitor ezetimibe from weaning until early adulthood. Consistent with previous findings, this treatment significantly reduced the amount of EC sequestered in the liver (from 132.43±7.35 to 70.07±6.04mg/organ) and small intestine (from 2.78±0.21 to 1.34±0.09mg/organ) in the LAL-deficient mice even though their rates of hepatic and intestinal cholesterol synthesis were either comparable to, or exceeded those in matching untreated Lal(-/-) mice. These data reveal the role of intestinal cholesterol absorption in driving the expansion of tissue EC content and disease progression in LAL deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of ocean acidification on learning in coral reef fishes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maud C O Ferrari

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification has the potential to cause dramatic changes in marine ecosystems. Larval damselfish exposed to concentrations of CO(2 predicted to occur in the mid- to late-century show maladaptive responses to predator cues. However, there is considerable variation both within and between species in CO(2 effects, whereby some individuals are unaffected at particular CO(2 concentrations while others show maladaptive responses to predator odour. Our goal was to test whether learning via chemical or visual information would be impaired by ocean acidification and ultimately, whether learning can mitigate the effects of ocean acidification by restoring the appropriate responses of prey to predators. Using two highly efficient and widespread mechanisms for predator learning, we compared the behaviour of pre-settlement damselfish Pomacentrus amboinensis that were exposed to 440 µatm CO(2 (current day levels or 850 µatm CO(2, a concentration predicted to occur in the ocean before the end of this century. We found that, regardless of the method of learning, damselfish exposed to elevated CO(2 failed to learn to respond appropriately to a common predator, the dottyback, Pseudochromis fuscus. To determine whether the lack of response was due to a failure in learning or rather a short-term shift in trade-offs preventing the fish from displaying overt antipredator responses, we conditioned 440 or 700 µatm-CO(2 fish to learn to recognize a dottyback as a predator using injured conspecific cues, as in Experiment 1. When tested one day post-conditioning, CO(2 exposed fish failed to respond to predator odour. When tested 5 days post-conditioning, CO(2 exposed fish still failed to show an antipredator response to the dottyback odour, despite the fact that both control and CO(2-treated fish responded to a general risk cue (injured conspecific cues. These results indicate that exposure to CO(2 may alter the cognitive ability of juvenile fish and render

  3. Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Sensory Function in Marine Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashur, Molly M; Johnston, Nicole K; Dixson, Danielle L

    2017-07-01

    Ocean acidification has been identified as a major contributor to ocean ecosystem decline, impacting the calcification, survival, and behavior of marine organisms. Numerous studies have observed altered sensory perception of chemical, auditory, and visual cues after exposure to elevated CO2. Sensory systems enable the observation of the external environment and therefore play a critical role in survival, communication, and behavior of marine organisms. This review seeks to (1) summarize the current knowledge of sensory impairment caused by ocean acidification, (2) discuss potential mechanisms behind this disruption, and (3) analyze the expected taxa differences in sensitivities to elevated CO2 conditions. Although a lack of standardized methodology makes cross-study comparisons challenging, trends and biases arise from this synthesis including a substantial focus on vertebrates, larvae or juveniles, the reef ecosystem, and chemosensory perception. Future studies must broaden the scope of the field by diversifying the taxa and ecosystems studied, incorporating ontogenetic comparisons, and focusing on cryptic sensory systems such as electroreception, magnetic sense, and the lateral line system. A discussion of possible mechanisms reveals GABAA receptor reversal as the conspicuous physiological mechanism. However, the potential remains for alternative disruption through structure or cue changes. Finally, a taxonomic comparison of physiological complexity reveals few trends in sensory sensitivities to lowered pH, but we hypothesize potential correlations relating to habitat, life history or relative use of sensory systems. Elevated CO2, in concordance with other global and local stressors, has the potential to drastically shift community composition and structure. Therefore research addressing the extent of sensory impairment, the underlying mechanisms, and the differences between taxa is vital for improved predictions of organismal response to ocean acidification.

  4. Naturally acidified habitat selects for ocean acidification-tolerant mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Jörn; Stapp, Laura S; Haynert, Kristin; Schade, Hanna; Danelli, Maria; Lannig, Gisela; Wegner, K Mathias; Melzner, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Ocean acidification severely affects bivalves, especially their larval stages. Consequently, the fate of this ecologically and economically important group depends on the capacity and rate of evolutionary adaptation to altered ocean carbonate chemistry. We document successful settlement of wild mussel larvae (Mytilus edulis) in a periodically CO2-enriched habitat. The larval fitness of the population originating from the CO2-enriched habitat was compared to the response of a population from a nonenriched habitat in a common garden experiment. The high CO2-adapted population showed higher fitness under elevated Pco2 (partial pressure of CO2) than the non-adapted cohort, demonstrating, for the first time, an evolutionary response of a natural mussel population to ocean acidification. To assess the rate of adaptation, we performed a selection experiment over three generations. CO2 tolerance differed substantially between the families within the F1 generation, and survival was drastically decreased in the highest, yet realistic, Pco2 treatment. Selection of CO2-tolerant F1 animals resulted in higher calcification performance of F2 larvae during early shell formation but did not improve overall survival. Our results thus reveal significant short-term selective responses of traits directly affected by ocean acidification and long-term adaptation potential in a key bivalve species. Because immediate response to selection did not directly translate into increased fitness, multigenerational studies need to take into consideration the multivariate nature of selection acting in natural habitats. Combinations of short-term selection with long-term adaptation in populations from CO2-enriched versus nonenriched natural habitats represent promising approaches for estimating adaptive potential of organisms facing global change.

  5. Ocean acidification reduces the crystallographic control in juvenile mussel shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzer, Susan C; Cusack, Maggie; Phoenix, Vernon R; Kamenos, Nicholas A

    2014-10-01

    Global climate change threatens the oceans as anthropogenic carbon dioxide causes ocean acidification and reduced carbonate saturation. Future projections indicate under saturation of aragonite, and potentially calcite, in the oceans by 2100. Calcifying organisms are those most at risk from such ocean acidification, as carbonate is vital in the biomineralisation of their calcium carbonate protective shells. This study highlights the importance of multi-generational studies to investigate how marine organisms can potentially adapt to future projected global climate change. Mytilus edulis is an economically important marine calcifier vulnerable to decreasing carbonate saturation as their shells comprise two calcium carbonate polymorphs: aragonite and calcite. M. edulis specimens were cultured under current and projected pCO2 (380, 550, 750 and 1000μatm), following 6months of experimental culture, adults produced second generation juvenile mussels. Juvenile mussel shells were examined for structural and crystallographic orientation of aragonite and calcite. At 1000μatm pCO2, juvenile mussels spawned and grown under this high pCO2 do not produce aragonite which is more vulnerable to carbonate under-saturation than calcite. Calcite and aragonite were produced at 380, 550 and 750μatm pCO2. Electron back scatter diffraction analyses reveal less constraint in crystallographic orientation with increased pCO2. Shell formation is maintained, although the nacre crystals appear corroded and crystals are not so closely layered together. The differences in ultrastructure and crystallography in shells formed by juveniles spawned from adults in high pCO2 conditions may prove instrumental in their ability to survive ocean acidification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ocean warming-acidification synergism undermines dissolved organic matter assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Shuo; Anaya, Jesse M; Chen, Eric Y-T; Farr, Erik; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the influence of synergisms on natural processes is a critical step toward determining the full-extent of anthropogenic stressors. As carbon emissions continue unabated, two major stressors--warming and acidification--threaten marine systems on several scales. Here, we report that a moderate temperature increase (from 30°C to 32°C) is sufficient to slow--even hinder--the ability of dissolved organic matter, a major carbon pool, to self-assemble to form marine microgels, which contribute to the particulate organic matter pool. Moreover, acidification lowers the temperature threshold at which we observe our results. These findings carry implications for the marine carbon cycle, as self-assembled marine microgels generate an estimated global seawater budget of ~1016 g C. We used laser scattering spectroscopy to test the influence of temperature and pH on spontaneous marine gel assembly. The results of independent experiments revealed that at a particular point, both pH and temperature block microgel formation (32°C, pH 8.2), and disperse existing gels (35°C). We then tested the hypothesis that temperature and pH have a synergistic influence on marine gel dispersion. We found that the dispersion temperature decreases concurrently with pH: from 32°C at pH 8.2, to 28°C at pH 7.5. If our laboratory observations can be extrapolated to complex marine environments, our results suggest that a warming-acidification synergism can decrease carbon and nutrient fluxes, disturbing marine trophic and trace element cycles, at rates faster than projected.

  7. Effects of ocean acidification on learning in coral reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Maud C O; Manassa, Rachel P; Dixson, Danielle L; Munday, Philip L; McCormick, Mark I; Meekan, Mark G; Sih, Andrew; Chivers, Douglas P

    2012-01-01

    Ocean acidification has the potential to cause dramatic changes in marine ecosystems. Larval damselfish exposed to concentrations of CO(2) predicted to occur in the mid- to late-century show maladaptive responses to predator cues. However, there is considerable variation both within and between species in CO(2) effects, whereby some individuals are unaffected at particular CO(2) concentrations while others show maladaptive responses to predator odour. Our goal was to test whether learning via chemical or visual information would be impaired by ocean acidification and ultimately, whether learning can mitigate the effects of ocean acidification by restoring the appropriate responses of prey to predators. Using two highly efficient and widespread mechanisms for predator learning, we compared the behaviour of pre-settlement damselfish Pomacentrus amboinensis that were exposed to 440 µatm CO(2) (current day levels) or 850 µatm CO(2), a concentration predicted to occur in the ocean before the end of this century. We found that, regardless of the method of learning, damselfish exposed to elevated CO(2) failed to learn to respond appropriately to a common predator, the dottyback, Pseudochromis fuscus. To determine whether the lack of response was due to a failure in learning or rather a short-term shift in trade-offs preventing the fish from displaying overt antipredator responses, we conditioned 440 or 700 µatm-CO(2) fish to learn to recognize a dottyback as a predator using injured conspecific cues, as in Experiment 1. When tested one day post-conditioning, CO(2) exposed fish failed to respond to predator odour. When tested 5 days post-conditioning, CO(2) exposed fish still failed to show an antipredator response to the dottyback odour, despite the fact that both control and CO(2)-treated fish responded to a general risk cue (injured conspecific cues). These results indicate that exposure to CO(2) may alter the cognitive ability of juvenile fish and render learning

  8. Ocean acidification affects prey detection by a predatory reef fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid L Cripps

    Full Text Available Changes in olfactory-mediated behaviour caused by elevated CO(2 levels in the ocean could affect recruitment to reef fish populations because larval fish become more vulnerable to predation. However, it is currently unclear how elevated CO(2 will impact the other key part of the predator-prey interaction--the predators. We investigated the effects of elevated CO(2 and reduced pH on olfactory preferences, activity levels and feeding behaviour of a common coral reef meso-predator, the brown dottyback (Pseudochromis fuscus. Predators were exposed to either current-day CO(2 levels or one of two elevated CO(2 levels (∼600 µatm or ∼950 µatm that may occur by 2100 according to climate change predictions. Exposure to elevated CO(2 and reduced pH caused a shift from preference to avoidance of the smell of injured prey, with CO(2 treated predators spending approximately 20% less time in a water stream containing prey odour compared with controls. Furthermore, activity levels of fish was higher in the high CO(2 treatment and feeding activity was lower for fish in the mid CO(2 treatment; indicating that future conditions may potentially reduce the ability of the fish to respond rapidly to fluctuations in food availability. Elevated activity levels of predators in the high CO(2 treatment, however, may compensate for reduced olfactory ability, as greater movement facilitated visual detection of food. Our findings show that, at least for the species tested to date, both parties in the predator-prey relationship may be affected by ocean acidification. Although impairment of olfactory-mediated behaviour of predators might reduce the risk of predation for larval fishes, the magnitude of the observed effects of elevated CO(2 acidification appear to be more dramatic for prey compared to predators. Thus, it is unlikely that the altered behaviour of predators is sufficient to fully compensate for the effects of ocean acidification on prey mortality.

  9. Ocean warming-acidification synergism undermines dissolved organic matter assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Shuo Chen

    Full Text Available Understanding the influence of synergisms on natural processes is a critical step toward determining the full-extent of anthropogenic stressors. As carbon emissions continue unabated, two major stressors--warming and acidification--threaten marine systems on several scales. Here, we report that a moderate temperature increase (from 30°C to 32°C is sufficient to slow--even hinder--the ability of dissolved organic matter, a major carbon pool, to self-assemble to form marine microgels, which contribute to the particulate organic matter pool. Moreover, acidification lowers the temperature threshold at which we observe our results. These findings carry implications for the marine carbon cycle, as self-assembled marine microgels generate an estimated global seawater budget of ~1016 g C. We used laser scattering spectroscopy to test the influence of temperature and pH on spontaneous marine gel assembly. The results of independent experiments revealed that at a particular point, both pH and temperature block microgel formation (32°C, pH 8.2, and disperse existing gels (35°C. We then tested the hypothesis that temperature and pH have a synergistic influence on marine gel dispersion. We found that the dispersion temperature decreases concurrently with pH: from 32°C at pH 8.2, to 28°C at pH 7.5. If our laboratory observations can be extrapolated to complex marine environments, our results suggest that a warming-acidification synergism can decrease carbon and nutrient fluxes, disturbing marine trophic and trace element cycles, at rates faster than projected.

  10. Hydrodynamic Regimes Affect Coral Reef Resilience to Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teneva, L. T.; Dunbar, R. B.; Koseff, J. R.; Fleischfresser, J. D.; Koweek, D.

    2013-05-01

    Caribbean reefs hold tremendous value as sources of food, income, coastal protection, in addition to their cultural significance. Recently, studies showed that Caribbean reef growth has been surpassed in places by excessive rates of erosion due to climate change. The rates of coral reef response to ocean pH changes and warming and the implications for ecosystem resilience remain largely unknown. One way to investigate the potential structural resilience of reefs to climate change is to measure the physical oceanographic conditions in the area. Determining the hydrodynamic regimes and residence time of water in a particular reef environment is crucial to understanding the rates of future warming and acidification a reef site would experience. Our work on Pacific Islands' hydrodynamics - Central Equatorial Pacific, Great Barrier Reef, and Western Pacific -- would be of interest to Caribbean physical oceanographers and coral reef scientists. We use a combination of Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers, Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters, temperature and salinity sensors, and pressure sensors to characterize reef hydrodynamic regimes. Our work indicates that shallower, more protected reef habitats are characterized by longer residence times, their biological signals are strongly tidally modulated, essentially subjecting such habitats to higher rates of warming and acidification in the future. Reef crest environments and fore reef habitats, on the other hand, are well-mixed with open-ocean water. The hydrodynamic regimes there condition such reef sites to more attenuated temperature and pH ranges, conditions more typical of the open ocean. Our work suggests that investigating the geomorphology and resulting localized hydrodynamics in a reef area can provide insights into the relative rates at which a reef could resist or succumb to impacts of ocean acidification. Such information for different reef islands, in the Pacific or Caribbean basins, could provide helpful insights

  11. Was ocean acidification responsible for history's greatest extinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2011-11-01

    Two hundred fifty million years ago, the world suffered the greatest recorded extinction of all time. More than 90% of marine animals and a majority of terrestrial species disappeared, yet the cause of the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) dieoff remains unknown. Various theories abound, with most focusing on rampant Siberian volcanism and its potential consequences: global warming, carbon dioxide poisoning, ocean acidification, or the severe drawdown of oceanic dissolved oxygen levels, also known as anoxia. To narrow the range of possible causes, Montenegro et al. ran climate simulations for PTB using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, a carbon cycle-climate coupled general circulation model.

  12. Acidification of sandy grasslands - consequences for plant diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Pål Axel; Mårtensson, Linda-Maria; Bruun, Hans Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Questions: (1) Does soil acidification in calcareous sandy grasslands lead to loss of plant diversity? (2) What is the relationship between the soil content of lime and the plant availability of mineral nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in sandy grasslands? Location: Sandy glaciofluvial deposits...... in south-eastern Sweden covered by xeric sand calcareous grasslands (EU habitat directive 6120). Methods: Soil and vegetation were investigated in most of the xeric sand calcareous grasslands in the Scania region (136 sample plots distributed over four or five major areas and about 25 different sites...

  13. Gas hydrate dissociation prolongs acidification of the Anthropocene oceans

    OpenAIRE

    Boudreau, B.P.; Luo, Yiming; Filip J R Meysman; J. J. Middelburg; G. R. Dickens

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic warming of the oceans can release methane (CH4) currently stored in sediments as gas hydrates. This CH4 will be oxidized to CO2, thus increasing the acidification of the oceans. We employ a biogeochemical model of the multimillennial carbon cycle to determine the evolution of the oceanic dissolved carbonate system over the next 13 kyr in response to CO2 from gas hydrates, combined with a reasonable scenario for long-term anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Hydrate-derived CO2 will appr...

  14. Hypothesis: intracellular acidification contributes to infertility in varicocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabili, Kamyar; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Agutter, Paul S; Agarwal, Ashok

    2009-07-01

    We suggest that varicocele leads to male factor infertility by a mechanism involving underperfusion of the testis, a shortfall in glucose supply to the tissue, decreased flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, lowering of the reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate/oxidized nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate ratio and the supply of glutathione to the antioxidant systems, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, peroxidation of spermatozoon membrane lipids, and the consequent generation of acidic degradation products and sequestering of spermine. Acidification of the seminal plasma impairs sperm motility and also inhibits most antioxidant enzymes, exacerbating the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and the resultant lowering of pH.

  15. Light Levels Affect Carbon Utilisation in Tropical Seagrass under Ocean Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ow, Yan X; Uthicke, Sven; Collier, Catherine J

    2016-01-01

    Under future ocean acidification (OA), increased availability of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in seawater may enhance seagrass productivity. However, the ability to utilise additional DIC could be regulated by light availability, often reduced through land runoff. To test this, two tropical seagrass species, Cymodocea serrulata and Halodule uninervis were exposed to two DIC concentrations (447 μatm and 1077 μatm pCO2), and three light treatments (35, 100, 380 μmol m(-2) s(-1)) for two weeks. DIC uptake mechanisms were separately examined by measuring net photosynthetic rates while subjecting C. serrulata and H. uninervis to changes in light and addition of bicarbonate (HCO3-) use inhibitors (carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, acetazolamide) and TRIS buffer (pH 8.0). We observed a strong dependence on energy driven H+-HCO3- co-transport (TRIS, which disrupts H+ extrusion) in C. serrulata under all light levels, indicating greater CO2 dependence in low light. This was confirmed when, after two weeks exposure, DIC enrichment stimulated maximum photosynthetic rates (Pmax) and efficiency (α) more in C. serrulata grown under lower light levels (36-60% increase) than for those in high light (4% increase). However, C. serrulata growth increased with both DIC enrichment and light levels. Growth, NPP and photosynthetic responses in H. uninervis increased with higher light treatments and were independent of DIC availability. Furthermore, H. uninervis was found to be more flexible in HCO3- uptake pathways. Here, light availability influenced productivity responses to DIC enrichment, via both carbon fixation and acquisition processes, highlighting the role of water quality in future responses to OA.

  16. AFSC/RACE/SAP/Foy: Effects of ocean acidification on embryo stages of Tanner crab: Kodiak Island, Alaska.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To study the effects of ocean acidification we examined the effects of ocean acidification on the embryo stages of the economically important southern Tanner crab,...

  17. Protective effect of squalene on certain lysosomal hydrolases and free amino acids in isoprenaline-induced myocardial infarction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Surendraraj, A.; Anandan, R.

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the preventive role of squalene on free amino acids and lysosomal alterations in experimentally induced myocardial infarction in rats. The levels of lysosomal enzymes (beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, beta-glucosidase, acid phosphatase and cathepsin D......) in plasma and lysosomal fractions, hydroxyproline content and free amino acids in heart tissue were determined. Isoprenaline administration to rats resulted in decreased stability of the membranes which was reflected by significantly (p...

  18. Calciurn/lysosome pathway in the apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells induced by Wuxing soup%五行汤经钙离子/溶酶体途径介导的SGC-7901细胞凋亡

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫非; 胡晶莹; 甘愉; 赵仰星; 朱明洁; 赵新泰; 段友容

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the mechanism of calcium/lysosome pathway in the apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells induced by Wuxing soup. Methods The integrity of lysosome membrane was detected by acridine orange (AO) staining,the key proteins in apoptotic pathway were tested by Western blot, and the effect of inhibitors on cell apoptotic rate and survival rate was analyzed by Annexin V-binding ELISA and CCK-8, respectively. Results The leakage of lysosome membrane was observed by AO staining. The lysosome associated apoptotic protein Cathepsin D and Cathepsin B were released into cytosol. The inhibitors of Cathepsin B, L and S exerted protection in the survival of SGC-7901 under Wuxing soup treatment in a dose-dependent manner. However, the inhibitor of Cathepsin D had no effects on apoptosis.Conclusion Wuxing soup could induce SGC-7901 cell apoptosis through calcium mediated and lysosome involved caspase-independent pathway.%目的 探索五行汤经钙离子/溶酶体途径介导的SGC-7901细胞凋亡机制.方法 吖啶橙染色检测溶酶体膜完整性,胞浆蛋白免疫印迹法检测凋亡途径蛋白变化,Annexin V结合实验和CCK-8法检测不同抑制剂对细胞凋亡和存活的影响.结果 凋亡细胞的溶酶体膜渗漏,溶酶休释放蛋白酶Cathepsin D和Cathepsin B至胞浆.天冬氨酸蛋白酶Cathepsin D抑制剂对五行汤诱导的细胞凋亡无影响;半胱氨酸蛋白酶Cathepsin B、L、S抑制荆可明显减少细胞凋亡(P<0.05),且对细胞的保护作用呈浓度依赖性.结论 五行汤经钙离子/溶酶体途径介导SGC-7901细胞凋亡.

  19. Ocean Acidification: a review of the current status of research and institutional developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van I.J.M.; Dedert, M.

    2012-01-01

    Ocean acidification is defined as the change in ocean chemistry driven by the oceanic uptake of chemical inputs to the atmosphere, including carbon, nitrogen and sulphur compounds. Ocean acidification is also referred to as ‘the other CO2 problem’ of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions alon

  20. Ocean Acidification: a review of the current status of research and institutional developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van I.J.M.; Dedert, M.

    2012-01-01

    Ocean acidification is defined as the change in ocean chemistry driven by the oceanic uptake of chemical inputs to the atmosphere, including carbon, nitrogen and sulphur compounds. Ocean acidification is also referred to as ‘the other CO2 problem’ of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions alon

  1. Arctic ocean acidification: pelagic ecosystem and biogeochemical responses during a mesocosm study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riebesell, U.; Gattuso, J.-P.; Thingstad, T.F.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    The growing evidence of potential biological impacts of ocean acidification affirms that this global change phenomenon may pose a serious threat to marine organisms and ecosystems. Whilst ocean acidification will occur everywhere, it will happen more rapidly in some regions than in others. Due to th

  2. Ocean Acidification: a review of the current status of research and institutional developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van I.J.M.; Dedert, M.

    2012-01-01

    Ocean acidification is defined as the change in ocean chemistry driven by the oceanic uptake of chemical inputs to the atmosphere, including carbon, nitrogen and sulphur compounds. Ocean acidification is also referred to as ‘the other CO2 problem’ of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions

  3. Arctic ocean acidification: pelagic ecosystem and biogeochemical responses during a mesocosm study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riebesell, U.; Gattuso, J.-P.; Thingstad, T.F.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    The growing evidence of potential biological impacts of ocean acidification affirms that this global change phenomenon may pose a serious threat to marine organisms and ecosystems. Whilst ocean acidification will occur everywhere, it will happen more rapidly in some regions than in others. Due

  4. Soil Acidification of Alfisols as Influenced by Tea Cultivation in Eastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui; XU Ren-Kou; WANG Ning; LI Xing-Hui

    2010-01-01

    Soil acidification is an important process in land degradation around the world as well as in China. Acidification of Alfisols was investigated in the tea gardens with various years of tea cultivation in the eastern China. Cultivation of tea plants caused soil acidification and soil acidity increased with the increase of tea cultivation period. Soil pH of composite samples from cultivated layers decreased by 1.37, 1.62 and 1.85, respectively, after 13, 34 and 54 years of tea plantation,as compared to the surface soil obtained from the unused land. Soil acidification rates at early stages of tea cultivation were found to be higher than those at the later stages. The acidification rate for the period of 0-13 years was as high as 4.40 kmol H+ ha-1 year-1 for the cultivated layer samples. Soil acidification induced the decrease of soil exchangeable base cations and base cation saturation and thus increased the soil exchangeable acidity. Soil acidification also caused the decrease of soil cation exchange capacity, especially for the 54-year-old tea garden. Soil acidification induced by tea plantation also led to the increase of soil exchangeable Al and soluble Al, which was responsible for the Al toxiciy to plants.

  5. Arctic ocean acidification: pelagic ecosystem and biogeochemical responses during a mesocosm study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riebesell, U.; Gattuso, J.-P.; Thingstad, T.F.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    The growing evidence of potential biological impacts of ocean acidification affirms that this global change phenomenon may pose a serious threat to marine organisms and ecosystems. Whilst ocean acidification will occur everywhere, it will happen more rapidly in some regions than in others. Due to th

  6. Renal acidification defects in patients with their first renal stone episode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J; Hansen, A B; Röhl, H F

    1988-01-01

    tubular acidosis, the rest had normal urinary acidification. In view of the short duration of stone disease in the patients studied, the acidification defects were considered to be primary, and the stone formation secondary. The results justify extension of these simple screening procedures for unmasking...

  7. Tree species traits cause divergence in soil acidification during four decades of postagricultural forest development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrijver, An de; Frenne, Pieter de; Staelens, Jeroen;

    2012-01-01

    retards leaf litter decomposition and, consequently, results in forest-floor build-up and soil acidification. Also nutrient uptake and N2 fixation are causing soil acidification, but were found to be less important. Our results highlight the fact that tree species-specific traits significantly influence...

  8. Evidence for lysosomal exocytosis and release of aggrecan-degrading hydrolases from hypertrophic chondrocytes, in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R. Bastow

    2012-02-01

    The abundant proteoglycan, aggrecan, is resorbed from growth plate cartilage during endochondral bone ossification, yet mice with genetically-ablated aggrecan-degrading activity have no defects in bone formation. To account for this apparent anomaly, we propose that lysosomal hydrolases degrade extracellular, hyaluronan-bound aggrecan aggregates in growth plate cartilage, and that lysosomal hydrolases are released from hypertrophic chondrocytes into growth plate cartilage via Ca2+-dependent lysosomal exocytosis. In this study we confirm that hypertrophic chondrocytes release hydrolases via lysosomal exocytosis in vitro and we show in vivo evidence for lysosomal exocytosis in hypertrophic chondrocytes during skeletal development. We show that lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1 is detected at the cell surface following in vitro treatment of epiphyseal chondrocytes with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin. Furthermore, we show that in addition to the lysosomal exocytosis markers, cathepsin D and β-hexosaminidase, ionomycin induces release of aggrecan- and hyaluronan-degrading activity from cultured epiphyseal chondrocytes. We identify VAMP-8 and VAMP7 as v-SNARE proteins with potential roles in lysosomal exocytosis in hypertrophic chondrocytes, based on their colocalisation with LAMP1 at the cell surface in secondary ossification centers in mouse tibiae. We propose that resorbing growth plate cartilage involves release of destructive hydrolases from hypertrophic chondrocytes, via lysosomal exocytosis.

  9. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta-cells from Death by Increasing Autophagic Flux and Restoring Lysosomal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zummo, Francesco P; Cullen, Kirsty S; Honkanen-Scott, Minna; Shaw, James Am; Lovat, Penny E; Arden, Catherine

    2017-02-23

    Studies in animal models of type 2 diabetes have shown that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists prevent β-cell loss. Whether GLP-1 mediates β-cell survival via the key lysosomal-mediated process of autophagy is unknown.Here we report that treatment of INS-1E β-cells and primary islets with glucolipotoxicity (0.5mmol/l palmitate, 25mmol/l glucose) increases LC3 II, a marker of autophagy. Further analysis indicates a blockage in autophagic flux associated with lysosomal dysfunction. Accumulation of defective lysosomes leads to lysosomal membrane permeabilisation (LMP) and release of Cathepsin D, which contributes to cell death. Our data further demonstrated defects in autophagic flux and lysosomal staining in human samples of type 2 diabetes. Co-treatment with the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 reversed the lysosomal dysfunction, relieving the impairment in autophagic flux and further stimulated autophagy. siRNA knockdown showed the restoration of autophagic flux is also essential for the protective effects of exendin-4.Collectively, our data highlights lysosomal dysfunction as a critical mediator of β-cell loss and shows that exendin-4 improves cell survival via restoration of lysosomal function and autophagic flux. Modulation of autophagy / lysosomal homeostasis may thus define a novel therapeutic strategy for type 2 diabetes, with the GLP-1 signalling pathway as a potential focus.

  10. Next-century ocean acidification and warming both reduce calcification rate, but only acidification alters skeletal morphology of reef-building coral Siderastrea siderea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Kimmaree M; Castillo, Karl D; Armstrong, Pualani; Westfield, Isaac T; Courtney, Travis; Ries, Justin B

    2016-07-29

    Atmospheric pCO2 is predicted to rise from 400 to 900 ppm by year 2100, causing seawater temperature to increase by 1-4 °C and pH to decrease by 0.1-0.3. Sixty-day experiments were conducted to investigate the independent and combined impacts of acidification (pCO2 = 424-426, 888-940 ppm-v) and warming (T = 28, 32 °C) on calcification rate and skeletal morphology of the abundant and widespread Caribbean reef-building scleractinian coral Siderastrea siderea. Hierarchical linear mixed-effects modelling reveals that coral calcification rate was negatively impacted by both warming and acidification, with their combined effects yielding the most deleterious impact. Negative effects of warming (32 °C/424 ppm-v) and high-temperature acidification (32 °C/940 ppm-v) on calcification rate were apparent across both 30-day intervals of the experiment, while effects of low-temperature acidification (28 °C/888 ppm-v) were not apparent until the second 30-day interval-indicating delayed onset of acidification effects at lower temperatures. Notably, two measures of coral skeletal morphology-corallite height and corallite infilling-were negatively impacted by next-century acidification, but not by next-century warming. Therefore, while next-century ocean acidification and warming will reduce the rate at which corals build their skeletons, next-century acidification will also modify the morphology and, potentially, function of coral skeletons.

  11. Next-century ocean acidification and warming both reduce calcification rate, but only acidification alters skeletal morphology of reef-building coral Siderastrea siderea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Kimmaree M.; Castillo, Karl D.; Armstrong, Pualani; Westfield, Isaac T.; Courtney, Travis; Ries, Justin B.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pCO2 is predicted to rise from 400 to 900 ppm by year 2100, causing seawater temperature to increase by 1–4 °C and pH to decrease by 0.1–0.3. Sixty-day experiments were conducted to investigate the independent and combined impacts of acidification (pCO2 = 424–426, 888–940 ppm-v) and warming (T = 28, 32 °C) on calcification rate and skeletal morphology of the abundant and wid