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Sample records for lysine transfer rna

  1. Crystal Structure of the Lysine Riboswitch Regulatory mRNA Element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garst, A.; Heroux, A; Rambo, R; Batey, R

    2008-01-01

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding.

  2. ß-Lysine discrimination by lysyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilreath, Marla S; Roy, Hervé; Bullwinkle, Tammy J

    2011-01-01

    guided by the PoxA structure. A233S LysRS behaved as wild type with a-lysine, while the G469A and A233S/G469A variants decreased stable a-lysyl-adenylate formation. A233S LysRS recognized ß-lysine better than wildtype, suggesting a role for this residue in discriminating a- and ß-amino acids. Both...

  3. The tRNA synthetase paralog PoxA modifies elongation factor-P with (R)-ß-lysine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Hervé; Zou, S Betty; Bullwinkle, Tammy J

    2011-01-01

    The lysyl-tRNA synthetase paralog PoxA modifies elongation factor P (EF-P) with a-lysine at low efficiency. Cell-free extracts containing non-a-lysine substrates of PoxA modified EF-P with a change in mass consistent with addition of ß-lysine, a substrate also predicted by genomic analyses. EF-P ...

  4. Application of biodegradable dendrigraft poly-l-lysine to a small interfering RNA delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yukinobu; Kuramoto, Haruka; Mieda, Yukari; Muro, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Hiroo; Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Sakaguchi, Miako; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Kitahara, Takashi; Sasaki, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Dendrigraft poly-l-lysine (DGL), including its central core, consists entirely of lysine, hence it is completely biodegradable. We applied DGL in a small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery system. Binary complexes with siRNA and DGL had particle sizes of 23-73 nm and ζ-potentials of 34-42 mV. The siRNA-DGL complexes showed significant silencing effects in a mouse colon carcinoma cell line expressing luciferase (Colon26/Luc cells). The siRNA-DGL complexes induced slight cytotoxicity and hematological toxicity at a high charge ratio of DGL to siRNA, probably because of their cationic charges. Therefore, we recharged the siRNA-DGL complexes with γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA), a biodegradable anionic compound, which was reported to reduce the cytotoxicity of cationic complexes. The ternary complexes showed particle sizes of 35-47 nm at a charge ratio of greater than 14 to siRNA with negative charges. Strong silencing effects of the ternary complexes were observed in Colon26/Luc cells without cytotoxicity or hematological toxicity. The cellular uptake and degradation of the binary and ternary complexes were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. The ternary complexes suppressed luciferase activity in the tumor after direct injection into the tumors of mice bearing Colon26/Luc cells. Thus, a potentially important siRNA delivery system was constructed using biodegradable DGL.

  5. Glia to axon RNA transfer.

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    Sotelo, José Roberto; Canclini, Lucía; Kun, Alejandra; Sotelo-Silveira, José Roberto; Calliari, Aldo; Cal, Karina; Bresque, Mariana; Dipaolo, Andrés; Farias, Joaquina; Mercer, John A

    2014-03-01

    The existence of RNA in axons has been a matter of dispute for decades. Evidence for RNA and ribosomes has now accumulated to a point at which it is difficult to question, much of the disputes turned to the origin of these axonal RNAs. In this review, we focus on studies addressing the origin of axonal RNAs and ribosomes. The neuronal soma as the source of most axonal RNAs has been demonstrated and is indisputable. However, the surrounding glial cells may be a supplemental source of axonal RNAs, a matter scarcely investigated in the literature. Here, we review the few papers that have demonstrated that glial-to-axon RNA transfer is not only feasible, but likely. We describe this process in both invertebrate axons and vertebrate axons. Schwann cell to axon ribosomes transfer was conclusively demonstrated (Court et al. [2008]: J. Neurosci 28:11024-11029; Court et al. [2011]: Glia 59:1529-1539). However, mRNA transfer still remains to be demonstrated in a conclusive way. The intercellular transport of mRNA has interesting implications, particularly with respect to the integration of glial and axonal function. This evolving field is likely to impact our understanding of the cell biology of the axon in both normal and pathological conditions. Most importantly, if the synthesis of proteins in the axon can be controlled by interacting glia, the possibilities for clinical interventions in injury and neurodegeneration are greatly increased.

  6. Characterization of Circulating Transfer RNA-Derived RNA Fragments in Cattle

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    Eduardo eCasas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to characterize naturally occurring circulating transfer RNA-derived RNA Fragments (tRFs in cattle. Serum from eight clinically normal adult dairy cows was collected, and small non-coding RNAs were extracted immediately after collection and sequenced by Illumina MiSeq. Sequences aligned to transfer RNA (tRNA genes or their flanking sequences were characterized. Sequences aligned to the beginning of 5’ end of the mature tRNA were classified as tRF5; those aligned to the 3’ end of mature tRNA were classified as tRF3; and those aligned to the beginning of the 3’ end flanking sequences were classified as tRF1. There were 3,190,962 sequences that mapped to transfer RNA and small non-coding RNAs in the bovine genome. Of these, 2,323,520 were identified as tRF5s, 562 were tRF3s, and 81 were tRF1s. There were 866,799 sequences identified as other small non-coding RNAs (MicroRNA, rRNA, snoRNA, etc. and were excluded from the study. The tRF5s ranged from 28 to 40 nucleotides; and 98.7% ranged from 30 to 34 nucleotides in length. The tRFs with the greatest number of sequences were derived from tRNA of histidine, glutamic acid, lysine, glycine, and valine. There was no association between number of codons for each amino acid and number of tRFs in the samples. The reason for tRF5s being the most abundant can only be explained if these sequences are associated with function within the animal.

  7. Drosophila Kismet regulates histone H3 lysine 27 methylation and early elongation by RNA polymerase II.

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    Shrividhya Srinivasan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb and trithorax group proteins regulate cellular pluripotency and differentiation by maintaining hereditable states of transcription. Many Polycomb and trithorax group proteins have been implicated in the covalent modification or remodeling of chromatin, but how they interact with each other and the general transcription machinery to regulate transcription is not well understood. The trithorax group protein Kismet-L (KIS-L is a member of the CHD subfamily of chromatin-remodeling factors that plays a global role in transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II. Mutations in CHD7, the human counterpart of kis, are associated with CHARGE syndrome, a developmental disorder affecting multiple tissues and organs. To clarify how KIS-L activates gene expression and counteracts Polycomb group silencing, we characterized defects resulting from the loss of KIS-L function in Drosophila. These studies revealed that KIS-L acts downstream of P-TEFb recruitment to stimulate elongation by Pol II. The presence of two chromodomains in KIS-L suggested that its recruitment or function might be regulated by the methylation of histone H3 lysine 4 by the trithorax group proteins ASH1 and TRX. Although we observed significant overlap between the distributions of KIS-L, ASH1, and TRX on polytene chromosomes, KIS-L did not bind methylated histone tails in vitro, and loss of TRX or ASH1 function did not alter the association of KIS-L with chromatin. By contrast, loss of kis function led to a dramatic reduction in the levels of TRX and ASH1 associated with chromatin and was accompanied by increased histone H3 lysine 27 methylation-a modification required for Polycomb group repression. A similar increase in H3 lysine 27 methylation was observed in ash1 and trx mutant larvae. Our findings suggest that KIS-L promotes early elongation and counteracts Polycomb group repression by recruiting the ASH1 and TRX histone methyltransferases to chromatin.

  8. Transfer RNA and human disease

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    Jamie A Abbott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA genes are hotspots for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase, mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers, and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing. Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  9. Transfer RNA pseudouridine synthases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Samuelsson, T; Olsson, M

    1990-05-25

    A transfer RNA lacking modified nucleosides was produced by transcription in vitro of a cloned gene that encodes a Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycine tRNA. At least three different uridines (in nucleotide positions 13, 32, and 55) of this transcript tRNA are modified to pseudouridine by an extract of S. cerevisiae. Variants of the RNA substrate were also constructed that each had only one of these sites, thus allowing specific monitoring of pseudouridylation at different nucleotide positions. Using such RNAs to assay pseudouridine synthesis, enzymes producing this nucleoside were purified from an extract of S. cerevisiae. The activities corresponding to positions 13, 32, and 55 in the tRNA substrate could all be separated chromatographically, indicating that there is a separate enzyme for each of these sites. The enzyme specific for position 55 (denoted pseudouridine synthase 55) was purified approximately 4000-fold using a combination of DEAE-Sepharose, heparin-Sepharose, and hydroxylapatite.

  10. Transfer RNA's latest port of call

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Manuel A S; Orellana, Omar; Ibba, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Transfer RNA, or tRNA, has the dubious honor of being a recurring historical figure in molecular biology. Much like the lead character in Woody Allen's movie Zelig, tRNA keeps on turning up in history at the right place at the right time. In this respect the timing of the 23rd installment...... of the International tRNA Workshop just a few months after the awarding of the Nobel Prize for the structure of the ribosome was particularly fitting. Over 250 scientists gathered from January 28 to February 2, 2010 in the charming town of Aveiro on the Atlantic coast of Portugal to discuss the latest advances in our...... understanding of the myriad roles of tRNA, which stretch far beyond acting as a simple adaptor in protein synthesis. Topics covered ranged from well-established areas such as the complex post-transcriptional modification of tRNAs, tRNA aminoacylation and protein synthesis, to emerging areas...

  11. Protection against inflammatory β-cell damage by lysine deacetylase inhibition and microRNA expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anna Lindeløv; Pallesen, Emil Marek Heymans; Novotny, Guy Wayne

    Background and aims: Pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to pancreatic β-cell apoptosis in type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus. The detrimental effects resulting from cytokine-induced signaling in the β cell can be reduced by inhibition of class I classical lysine deacetylases (KDACi), especially HDAC......1 or HDAC3, and is associated with down-regulation of inflammatory gene expression, only in part through hyperacetylation of NFB. We therefore hypothesize that HDACi-mediated hyperacetylation of histones and/or other proteins upregulate expression of microRNAs (miR), which repress translation...... of oxidative stress proteins responsible for β-cell death. The aim of the study is to identify novel and specific therapeutic targets for β-cell protection by mapping the miR profile of β cells rescued from inflammatory assault by inhibition of lysine deacetylation, thereby identifying miR that repress...

  12. The Nrde Pathway Mediates Small-RNA-Directed Histone H3 Lysine 27 Trimethylation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Mao, Hui; Zhu, Chengming; Zong, Dandan; Weng, Chenchun; Yang, Xiangwei; Huang, Hui; Liu, Dun; Feng, Xuezhu; Guang, Shouhong

    2015-09-21

    Small-RNA-mediated chromatin modifications have been widely studied in plants and S. pombe. However, direct evidence of small-RNA-guided sequence-specific chromatin alterations is scarce in animals. In C. elegans, the nuclear RNAi defective (Nrde) pathway functions to transport siRNA from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, modulate transcription elongation, induce histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) trimethylation, and mediate transgenerational inheritance of RNAi. Here, we show that both exogenous RNAi and NRDE-bound endogenous 22G RNAs can direct sequence-specific histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) trimethylation at targeted loci through the Nrde pathway. The resulting H3K27me3 status can be inherited by progeny for multiple generations. piRNAs and WAGO-1-associated siRNAs induce H3K27 methylation as well. Interestingly, CSR-1-associated endogenous siRNAs fail to trigger H3K27 methylation, whereas exogenous provision of dsRNAs can induce H3K27 methylation at the CSR-1-targeted loci via the Nrde pathway. We further observed distinct genetic requirements of H3K9 and H3K27 trimethylation. Whereas set-25 and met-2 are required for K9 methylation, mes-2 is required for K27 methylation. The depletion of mes-2 leads to a nuclear RNAi defective phenotype. These results indicate that dsRNA-triggered chromatin modification is a sequence-specific response that engages the Nrde pathway in C. elegans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiation energy transfer in RNA polymers

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    Kempner, E. S.; Salovey, R.; Bernstein, S. L.

    1996-11-01

    Ribozymes are a special class of polyribonucleotide (RNA) molecules which possess intrinsic catalytic activity, capable of cleaving nucleic acid substrates. RNA molecules were synthesized containing a hammerhead ribozyme moiety of 52 nucleotides linked to an inactive leader sequence, for total lengths of either 262 or 1226 nucleotides. These RNAs were frozen and irradiated with high energy electrons. Surviving ribozyme activity was determined, using the ability of the irradiated ribozymes to cleave a labeled substrate. From the same irradiated samples, the amount of intact RNA remaining was determined following denaturing gel electrophoresis. Radiation target analyses of these data revealed a structural target size of 80 kDa and a ribozyme activity target size of 15 kDa for the smaller ribozyme, and 319 and 16 kDa, respectively, for the larger ribozyme. The disparity in target size for activity vs structure indicates that, in contrast to proteins, there is no spread of radiation damage far from the primary site of ionization in RNA molecules. The smaller target size for activity indicates that only primary ionizations occurring in the specific active region are effective. This is similar to the case for oligosaccharides. It is concluded that the presence of the ribose sugar in the polymer chain restricts radiation damage to a small region and prevents major energy transfer throughout the molecule.

  14. 赖氨酸对绵羊GHR基因表达的影响%Effects of Lysine on the Expression of GHR mRNA in Sheep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建升; 程胜利; 韩向敏; 冯瑞林; 岳耀敬; 杨博辉; 刘建斌

    2009-01-01

    [Objective] This study was to investgate the effects of lysine on the growth of sheep and its mechanism. [Method] Fifteen sheep about one-year old as experimental material were divided into three groups (group A, group B and group C), into whose basal feed 0, 4 and 10 g lysine were respectively added. After 28 d of feeding, the experimental sheep were all slaughtered for sampling; then total RNAs were extracted from the samples and used to clone GHR and GAPDH genes via retrotranscription for analyzing the expression abundance of GHR mRNA in longissimus dorsi muscle from different treatments. [Result] The expression of GHR mRNA in treatment B was significantly higher than that in treatment A(P0.05). [Conclusion] Addition of lysine into basal feed of sheep could dose-independently improve the expression of GHR gene in longissimus dorsi muscle.

  15. Polyethylene glycol–poly(ε-benzyloxycarbonyl-l-lysine)-conjugated VEGF siRNA for antiangiogenic gene therapy in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gangmin; Gao, XiaoLong; Gu, GuoJun; Shao, ZhiHong; Li, MingHua; Wang, PeiJun; Yang, JianRong; Cai, XiaoJun; Li, YongYong

    2017-01-01

    A polyethylene glycol–poly(ε-benzyloxycarbonyl-l-lysine) (PEG-SS-PLL) block copolymer based on a disulfide-linked, novel biodegradable catiomer bearing a PEG-sheddable shell was developed to avoid “PEG dilemma” in nanoparticle intracellular tracking of PEG-PLL where PEG was nondegradable. However, PEG-SS-PLL catiomers have not been used to deliver small interfering VEGF RNA (siVEGF) in antiangiogenesis gene therapy. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether this novel biodegradable catiomer can deliver siVEGF into cancer cells and at the same time have an antitumor effect in a xenograft mouse model. It was found that PEG-SS-PLL efficiently delivered siVEGF with negligible cytotoxicity, and significantly decreased the expression of VEGF at both the messenger-RNA and protein levels both in vitro and in vivo, and thus tumor growth was inhibited. Our findings demonstrated that PEG-SS-PLL/siVEGF could potentially be applied to antiangiogenesis gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:28533682

  16. Three-dimensional tertiary structure of yeast phenylalanine transfer RNA

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    Kim, S. H.; Sussman, J. L.; Suddath, F. L.; Quigley, G. J.; Mcpherson, A.; Wang, A. H. J.; Seeman, N. C.; Rich, A.

    1974-01-01

    Results of an analysis and interpretation of a 3-A electron density map of yeast phenylalanine transfer RNA. Some earlier detailed assignments of nucleotide residues to electron density peaks are found to be in error, even though the overall tracing of the backbone conformation of yeast phenylalanine transfer RNA was generally correct. A new, more comprehensive interpretation is made which makes it possible to define the tertiary interactions in the molecule. The new interpretation makes it possible to visualize a number of tertiary interactions which not only explain the structural role of most of the bases which are constant in transfer RNAs, but also makes it possible to understand in a direct and simple fashion the chemical modification data on transfer RNA. In addition, this pattern of tertiary interactions provides a basis for understanding the general three-dimensional folding of all transfer RNA molecules.

  17. Interactions of porphyrins and transfer RNA.

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    Foster, N; Singhal, A K; Smith, M W; Marcos, N G; Schray, K J

    1988-07-13

    The interactions of the free base porphyrin, tetra-(4N-methylpyridyl)porphyrin and its copper(II), manganese(III) and zinc(II) complexes with brewer's yeast type V phenylalaninyl tRNA were evaluated by UV-visible spectroscopy, circular dichroism and melting temperature studies over a range of magnesium ion concentrations and ionic strengths. Scatchard analysis of absorption spectra of the porphyrins in the presence of tRNA showed the free base, copper and zinc porphyrins to have binding constants of 7.3 X 10(7), 1.7 X 10(6) and 2.3 X 10(8), respectively; the manganese(III) complex did not demonstrate changes in its electronic spectra that enable the calculation of a binding constant. The results of the spectroscopic studies indicate a mode of binding for the free base, copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes that is neither intercalative nor simply outside electrostatic. The magnitude of the binding constants and the UV-visible results support intercalation, but the analyses of the thermal denaturation studies and the circular dichroism evaluations suggest that the porphyrins are associating at a single site in a fold of the tertiary structure of the tRNA close to several crucial hydrogen bonds, perhaps in the vicinity of the P10 loop. That the manganese(III) complex does not bind in this site points to constraints on the axial thickness of a molecule that may be accommodated in this locus.

  18. Binding of ampholine to transfer RNA.

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    Galante, E; Caravaggio, T; Righetti, P G

    1976-09-06

    The melting temperature of isoaccepting tRNAfMet is affected by Ampholine. The plot of Tm versus the logarithm of Ampholine concentration shows clearly an increasing effect of Ampholine when the pH changes from 7.4 to 4.2. This result is interpreted as binding of Ampholine to the nucleic acid. The effects of Ampholine have been compared with those of soidum, magnesium and tetraethylene pentamine. Ampholine carrier ampholytes at pH 4.2 bind to tRNA with the same affinity as magnesium; at higher pH values they are less active. An hypothesis for the mechanism of action of Ampholine on nucleic acids during isoelectric focusing is proposed.

  19. Cationic peptides as RNA compaction agents: a study on the polyA compaction activity of a linear alpha,epsilon-oligo-L-lysine.

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    Roviello, Giovanni N; Musumeci, Domenica; Roviello, Valentina

    2015-05-15

    In this work, we investigate the compaction activity of a sequential alpha,epsilon-peptide composed of l-lysines towards two RNA targets, in view of its possible pharmaceutical application in RNA-targeting and RNA delivery. The basic oligolysine, object of the present study, proved not only to be efficient in compacting the single-stranded polyA RNA, but also to strongly interact with the polyA·polyU complex, as evidenced by CD-binding and UV-melting experiments. In particular, the marked differences in the CD spectra of the RNA targets upon addition of the peptide, as well as the different UV melting behaviour for the polyA·polyU complex in the presence and absence of the peptide, sustain the hypothesis of a strong RNA compaction capacity of the alpha,epsilon-oligolysine. Finally, by using HPLC analysis, we found a good resistance of the peptide against the lytic action of human serum, an important requirement in view of in vitro/in vivo biological assays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Transfer RNA Methyltransferases from Thermoplasma acidophilum, a Thermoacidophilic Archaeon

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    Takuya Kawamura

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated tRNA methyltransferase activities in crude cell extracts from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum. We analyzed the modified nucleosides in native initiator and elongator tRNAMet, predicted the candidate genes for the tRNA methyltransferases on the basis of the tRNAMet and tRNALeu sequences, and characterized Trm5, Trm1 and Trm56 by purifying recombinant proteins. We found that the Ta0997, Ta0931, and Ta0836 genes of T. acidophilum encode Trm1, Trm56 and Trm5, respectively. Initiator tRNAMet from T. acidophilum strain HO-62 contained G+, m1I, and m22G, which were not reported previously in this tRNA, and the m2G26 and m22G26 were formed by Trm1. In the case of elongator tRNAMet, our analysis showed that the previously unidentified G modification at position 26 was a mixture of m2G and m22G, and that they were also generated by Trm1. Furthermore, purified Trm1 and Trm56 could methylate the precursor of elongator tRNAMet, which has an intron at the canonical position. However, the speed of methyl-transfer by Trm56 to the precursor RNA was considerably slower than that to the mature transcript, which suggests that Trm56 acts mainly on the transcript after the intron has been removed. Moreover, cellular arrangements of the tRNA methyltransferases in T. acidophilum are discussed.

  1. RNA Transferring Vector-pRNA%RNA转移载体-pRNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨燕; 张正茂; 杨东亮

    2005-01-01

    pRNA(packaging RNA)是枯草杆菌噬菌体ψ29前衣壳上分离出的一种小RNA分子,它作为一种效应分子的天然生物载体,可以保护效应分子不被核酸外切酶降解,防止效应分子在体内的错误折叠.pRNA能够形成二聚体、三聚体和六聚体,因此pRNA不仅可以携带效应分子,而且可以同时携带配体分子,使效应分子具有明确的靶向性.pRNA作为新一代基因转移载体,具有非常强大的应用前景.

  2. Site-specific methylation and acetylation of lysine residues in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II

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    Voss, Kirsten; Forné, Ignasi; Descostes, Nicolas; Hintermair, Corinna; Schüller, Roland; Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Heidemann, Martin; Flatley, Andrew; Imhof, Axel; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Eick, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic modification of heptad-repeats with the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7 of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal domain (CTD) regulates transcription-coupled processes. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that K7-residues in non-consensus repeats of human RNAPII are modified by acetylation, or mono-, di-, and tri-methylation. K7ac, K7me2, and K7me3 were found exclusively associated with phosphorylated CTD peptides, while K7me1 occurred also in non-phosphorylated CTD. The monoclonal antibody 1F5 recognizes K7me1/2 residues in CTD and reacts with RNAPIIA. Treatment of cellular extracts with phosphatase or of cells with the kinase inhibitor flavopiridol unmasked the K7me1/2 epitope in RNAPII0, consistent with the association of K7me1/2 marks with phosphorylated CTD peptides. Genome-wide profiling revealed high levels of K7me1/2 marks at the transcriptional start site of genes for sense and antisense transcribing RNAPII. The new K7 modifications further expand the mammalian CTD code to allow regulation of differential gene expression. PMID:26566685

  3. Site-specific methylation and acetylation of lysine residues in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Kirsten; Forné, Ignasi; Descostes, Nicolas; Hintermair, Corinna; Schüller, Roland; Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Heidemann, Martin; Flatley, Andrew; Imhof, Axel; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Eick, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic modification of heptad-repeats with the consensus sequence Tyr1-Ser2-Pro3-Thr4-Ser5-Pro6-Ser7 of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) C-terminal domain (CTD) regulates transcription-coupled processes. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that K7-residues in non-consensus repeats of human RNAPII are modified by acetylation, or mono-, di-, and tri-methylation. K7ac, K7me2, and K7me3 were found exclusively associated with phosphorylated CTD peptides, while K7me1 occurred also in non-phosphorylated CTD. The monoclonal antibody 1F5 recognizes K7me1/2 residues in CTD and reacts with RNAPIIA. Treatment of cellular extracts with phosphatase or of cells with the kinase inhibitor flavopiridol unmasked the K7me1/2 epitope in RNAPII0, consistent with the association of K7me1/2 marks with phosphorylated CTD peptides. Genome-wide profiling revealed high levels of K7me1/2 marks at the transcriptional start site of genes for sense and antisense transcribing RNAPII. The new K7 modifications further expand the mammalian CTD code to allow regulation of differential gene expression.

  4. Engineering a Lysine-ON Riboswitch for Metabolic Control of Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

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    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-12-18

    Riboswitches are natural RNA elements that regulate gene expression by binding a ligand. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of altering a natural lysine-OFF riboswitch from Eschericia coli (ECRS) to a synthetic lysine-ON riboswitch and using it for metabolic control. To this end, a lysine-ON riboswitch library was constructed using tetA-based dual genetic selection. After screening the library, the functionality of the selected lysine-ON riboswitches was examined using a report gene, lacZ. Selected lysine-ON riboswitches were introduced into the lysE gene (encoding a lysine transport protein) of Corynebacterium glutamicum and used to achieve dynamic control of lysine transport in a recombinant lysine-producing strain, C. glutamicum LPECRS, which bears a deregulated aspartokinase and a lysine-OFF riboswitch for dynamic control of the enzyme citrate synthase. Batch fermentation results of the strains showed that the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain with an additional lysine-ON riboswitch for the control of lysE achieved a 21% increase in the yield of lysine compared to that of the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain and even a 89% increase in yield compared to that of the strain with deregulated aspartokinase. This work provides a useful approach to generate lysine-ON riboswitches for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering and demonstrates for the first time a synergetic effect of lysine-ON and -OFF riboswitches for improving lysine production in this industrially important microorganism. The approach can be used to dynamically control other genes and can be applied to other microorganisms.

  5. Myosin-Va-dependent cell-to-cell transfer of RNA from Schwann cells to axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, José R; Canclini, Lucía; Kun, Alejandra; Sotelo-Silveira, José R; Xu, Lei; Wallrabe, Horst; Calliari, Aldo; Rosso, Gonzalo; Cal, Karina; Mercer, John A

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the role of protein synthesis in axons, we have identified the source of a portion of axonal RNA. We show that proximal segments of transected sciatic nerves accumulate newly-synthesized RNA in axons. This RNA is synthesized in Schwann cells because the RNA was labeled in the complete absence of neuronal cell bodies both in vitro and in vivo. We also demonstrate that the transfer is prevented by disruption of actin and that it fails to occur in the absence of myosin-Va. Our results demonstrate cell-to-cell transfer of RNA and identify part of the mechanism required for transfer. The induction of cell-to-cell RNA transfer by injury suggests that interventions following injury or degeneration, particularly gene therapy, may be accomplished by applying them to nearby glial cells (or implanted stem cells) at the site of injury to promote regeneration.

  6. Dynamic changes of histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation in pre-implantational pig embryos derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Naru; Cao, Zubing; Wu, Ronghua; Liu, Xing; Tao, Jia; Chen, Zhen; Song, Dandan; Han, Fei; Li, Yunsheng; Fang, Fugui; Zhang, Xiaorong; Zhang, Yunhai

    2014-08-01

    Histone H3 lysine 27 acetylation (H3K27ac) is an active epigenetic modification which has been revealed to be associated with active gene expression. It was hypothesized that H3K27ac might also participate in the porcine somatic reprogramming process during early development of SCNT-derived embryos. The spatial and temporal expression profiles of H3K27ac were investigated at different developmental stages in SCNT embryos compared with in vitro fertilization (IVF) and parthenogenetic activation (PA) counterparts. Specifically, results showed that amounts of H3K27ac gradually decreased from the earliest pronuclear stage to 8-cell stage, corresponding to the major embryonic genome activation (EGA), followed by re-acetylation of H3K27 from the morula stage onwards accompanying the first cell lineage specification in IVF embryos. Similar dynamic patterns of H3K27ac signal was observed at all developmental stages of porcine SCNT and PA embryos except for the hatched stage in which amounts of H3K27ac in SCNT and PA embryos was slightly less than that in IVF counterparts. Moreover, the gradual decrease of H3K27ac before EGA was demonstrated to be an active process independent of DNA replication, RNA and protein synthesis. The expression of HDAC1, HDAC2, MBD3 and CBP genes were well correlated with the dynamic changes of H3K27ac mark. Overall, these results indicate that H3K27ac is only defective in late SCNT blastocysts, and that the dynamic changes of this marker might also underlie the EGA and initial cell lineage specification during early embryo development.

  7. Probing China's Lysine Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The lysine sector in China developed further in 2006. Both the capacity and the output hit new highs and China had a major impact on the global lysine market. The import amount of lysine satisfied only a very small portion of the domestic market's demand.

  8. Alternative genetic code for amino acids and transfer RNA revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamashima, Kiyofumi; Kanai, Akio

    2013-06-01

    The genetic code is highly conserved among all organisms and its evolution is thought to be strictly limited. However, an increasing number of studies have reported non-standard codes in prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. Most of these deviations from the standard code are attributable to tRNA changes relating to, for example, codon/anticodon base pairing and tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase recognition. In this review, we focus on tRNA, a key molecule in the translation of the genetic code, and summarize the most recently published information on the evolutionary divergence of the tRNAs. Surprisingly, although higher eukaryotes, such as the nematode (worm), utilize the standard genetic code, newly identified nematode-specific tRNAs (nev-tRNAs) translate nucleotides in a manner that transgresses the code. Furthermore, a variety of additional functions of tRNAs, beyond their translation of the genetic code, have emerged rapidly. We also review these intriguing new aspects of tRNA, which have potential impacts on translational control, RNA silencing, antibiotic resistance, RNA biosynthesis, and transcriptional regulation.

  9. Recognition of Cognate Transfer RNA by the 30S Ribosomal Subunit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogle, James M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; Clemons, William M.; Tarry, Michael J.; Carter, Andrew P.; Ramakrishnan, V. (MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology)

    2009-10-07

    Crystal structures of the 30S ribosomal subunit in complex with messenger RNA and cognate transfer RNA in the A site, both in the presence and absence of the antibiotic paromomycin, have been solved at between 3.1 and 3.3 angstroms resolution. Cognate transfer RNA (tRNA) binding induces global domain movements of the 30S subunit and changes in the conformation of the universally conserved and essential bases A1492, A1493, and G530 of 16S RNA. These bases interact intimately with the minor groove of the first two base pairs between the codon and anticodon, thus sensing Watson-Crick base-pairing geometry and discriminating against near-cognate tRNA. The third, or 'wobble,' position of the codon is free to accommodate certain noncanonical base pairs. By partially inducing these structural changes, paromomycin facilitates binding of near-cognate tRNAs.

  10. RNA with iron(II) as a cofactor catalyses electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chiaolong; Chou, I.-Chun; Okafor, C. Denise; Bowman, Jessica C.; O'Neill, Eric B.; Athavale, Shreyas S.; Petrov, Anton S.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Wartell, Roger M.; Harvey, Stephen C.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2013-06-01

    Mg2+ is essential for RNA folding and catalysis. However, for the first 1.5 billion years of life on Earth RNA inhabited an anoxic Earth with abundant and benign Fe2+. We hypothesize that Fe2+ was an RNA cofactor when iron was abundant, and was substantially replaced by Mg2+ during a period known as the ‘great oxidation’, brought on by photosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that reversing this putative metal substitution in an anoxic environment, by removing Mg2+ and replacing it with Fe2+, expands the catalytic repertoire of RNA. Fe2+ can confer on some RNAs a previously uncharacterized ability to catalyse single-electron transfer. We propose that RNA function, in analogy with protein function, can be understood fully only in the context of association with a range of possible metals. The catalysis of electron transfer, requisite for metabolic activity, may have been attenuated in RNA by photosynthesis and the rise of O2.

  11. Lateral transfer of eukaryotic ribosomal RNA genes: an emerging concern for molecular ecology of microbial eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuki, Akinori; Toyofuku, Takashi; Takishita, Kiyotaka

    2014-07-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes are widely utilized in depicting organismal diversity and distribution in a wide range of environments. Although a few cases of lateral transfer of rRNA genes between closely related prokaryotes have been reported, it remains to be reported from eukaryotes. Here, we report the first case of lateral transfer of eukaryotic rRNA genes. Two distinct sequences of the 18S rRNA gene were detected from a clonal culture of the stramenopile, Ciliophrys infusionum. One was clearly derived from Ciliophrys, but the other gene originated from a perkinsid alveolate. Genome-walking analyses revealed that this alveolate-type rRNA gene is immediately adjacent to two protein-coding genes (ubc12 and usp39), and the origin of both genes was shown to be a stramenopile (that is, Ciliophrys) in our phylogenetic analyses. These findings indicate that the alveolate-type rRNA gene is encoded on the Ciliophrys genome and that eukaryotic rRNA genes can be transferred laterally.

  12. Rare Events of Intragenus and Intraspecies Horizontal Transfer of the 16S rRNA Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ren-Mao; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Wei-Peng; Cao, Hui-Luo; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-07-27

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of operational genes has been widely reported in prokaryotic organisms. However, informational genes such as those involved in transcription and translation processes are very difficult to be horizontally transferred, as described by Woese's complexity hypothesis. Here, we analyzed all of the completed prokaryotic genome sequences (2,143 genomes) in the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) database, scanned for genomes with high intragenomic heterogeneity of 16S rRNA gene copies, and explored potential HGT events of ribosomal RNA genes based on the phylogeny, genomic organization, and secondary structures of the ribosomal RNA genes. Our results revealed 28 genomes with relatively high intragenomic heterogeneity of multiple 16S rRNA gene copies (lowest pairwise identity 16S rRNA gene only occurred at intragenus or intraspecies levels, which is quite different from the HGT of operational genes. Our results improve our understanding regarding the exchange of informational genes.

  13. Chromatographic evidence that the AAA-coding isoacceptor of lysine tRNA primes DNA synthesis in murine mammary tumor virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, L.C.

    1981-07-30

    Most of the tRNA encapsulated within the murine mammary tumor virus is tRNA/sup LYS/. The reversed-phase chromatographic pattern of tRNA/sup LYS/ isoacceptors in the viral free tRNA and in the 70 S-associated tRNA that is released at 65/sup 0/ is similar to the pattern in virus-producing cells. However, the more tightly bound 70 S-associated tRNA/sup LYS/ is significantly enriched in the AAA-coding isoacceptor. This isoacceptor, but not the AAG-coding one, primes MuMTV 35 S RNA-directed DNA synthesis in vitro.

  14. Horizontal RNA transfer mediates platelet-induced hepatocyte proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschbaum, Marc; Karimian, Golnar; Adelmeijer, Jelle; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; Porte, Robert J.; Lisman, Ton

    2015-01-01

    Liver regeneration is stimulated by blood platelets, but the molecular mechanisms involved are largely unexplored. Although platelets are anucleate, they do contain coding or regulatory RNAs that can be functional within the platelet or, after transfer, in other cell types. Here, we show that

  15. Transfer RNA is highly unstable during early amino acid starvation in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenningsen, Sine Lo; Kongstad, Mette; Stenum, Thomas Søndergaard; Muñoz-Gómez, Ana J.; Sørensen, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Due to its long half-life compared to messenger RNA, bacterial transfer RNA is known as stable RNA. Here, we show that tRNAs become highly unstable as part of Escherichia coli's response to amino acid starvation. Degradation of the majority of cellular tRNA occurs within twenty minutes of the onset of starvation for each of several amino acids. Both the non-cognate and cognate tRNA for the amino acid that the cell is starving for are degraded, and both charged and uncharged tRNA species are affected. The alarmone ppGpp orchestrates the stringent response to amino acid starvation. However, tRNA degradation occurs in a ppGpp-independent manner, as it occurs with similar kinetics in a relaxed mutant. Further, we also observe rapid tRNA degradation in response to rifampicin treatment, which does not induce the stringent response. We propose a unifying model for these observations, in which the surplus tRNA is degraded whenever the demand for protein synthesis is reduced. Thus, the tRNA pool is a highly regulated, dynamic entity. We propose that degradation of surplus tRNA could function to reduce mistranslation in the stressed cell, because it would reduce competition between cognate and near-cognate charged tRNAs at the ribosomal A-site. PMID:27903898

  16. Large oncosomes mediate intercellular transfer of functional microRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Matteo; Minciacchi, Valentina R; de Candia, Paola; Yang, Julie; Posadas, Edwin; Kim, Hyung; Griffiths, Duncan; Bhowmick, Neil; Chung, Leland W K; Gandellini, Paolo; Freeman, Michael R; Demichelis, Francesca; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2013-11-15

    Prostate cancer cells release atypically large extracellular vesicles (EVs), termed large oncosomes, which may play a role in the tumor microenvironment by transporting bioactive molecules across tissue spaces and through the blood stream. In this study, we applied a novel method for selective isolation of large oncosomes applicable to human platelet-poor plasma, where the presence of caveolin-1-positive large oncosomes identified patients with metastatic disease. This procedure was also used to validate results of a miRNA array performed on heterogeneous populations of EVs isolated from tumorigenic RWPE-2 prostate cells and from isogenic non-tumorigenic RWPE-1 cells. The results showed that distinct classes of miRNAs are expressed at higher levels in EVs derived from the tumorigenic cells in comparison to their non-tumorigenic counterpart. Large oncosomes enhanced migration of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), an effect that was increased by miR-1227, a miRNA abundant in large oncosomes produced by RWPE-2 cells. Our findings suggest that large oncosomes in the circulation report metastatic disease in patients with prostate cancer, and that this class of EV harbors functional molecules that may play a role in conditioning the tumor microenvironment.

  17. Probing the interaction of troxerutin with transfer RNA by spectroscopic and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subastri, A; Ramamurthy, C H; Suyavaran, A; Lokeswara Rao, P; Preedia Babu, E; Hari Krishna, K; Suresh Kumar, M; Thirunavukkarasu, C

    2015-12-01

    The studies on the interaction between tRNA (transfer RNA) and small molecules are an area of remarkable recent attention. For this notion a fundamental knowledge of the molecular features involving the interaction of small molecules with tRNA is crucial. Hence, in the present study we have investigated the interaction of TXER (troxerutin), natural bioflavonoid rutin derivative with yeast tRNA by using various spectroscopic techniques and molecular docking studies. The UV absorption and fluorescence emission studies demonstrated external binding of TXER on tRNA with low binding constant values as compared to strong binders. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy study revealed that TXER did not show any significant modification on native conformation of tRNA. Furthermore in electrochemical study, the complex of TXER-tRNA did not expose any noticeable positive potential peak shift which indicated an interaction of TXER with tRNA by electrostatic or external binding mode. The docking study showed that the hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions were involved in binding of TXER-tRNA with docking score -7.0 kcal/mol. These findings led us to confirm the interaction of TXER on tRNA through external binding with low binding affinity, indicating its potential bioapplication in the future.

  18. Probe the Binding Mode of Aristololactam-β-D-glucoside to Phenylalanine Transfer RNA in Silico

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Xingqing; Zhao, Binwu; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interactions of drug molecules with biomacromolecules at a micro-scale level is essential to design potent drugs for the treatments of human genome diseases. To unravel the mechanism of binding of aristololactam-β-D-glucoside (ADG) and phenylalanine transfer RNA (tRNAPhe), an in......Understanding the interactions of drug molecules with biomacromolecules at a micro-scale level is essential to design potent drugs for the treatments of human genome diseases. To unravel the mechanism of binding of aristololactam-β-D-glucoside (ADG) and phenylalanine transfer RNA (t...

  19. Small Luggage for a Long Journey: Transfer of Vesicle-Enclosed Small RNA in Interspecies Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Fabio A.; Lécuyer, Eric

    2017-01-01

    In the evolutionary arms race, symbionts have evolved means to modulate each other's physiology, oftentimes through the dissemination of biological signals. Beyond small molecules and proteins, recent evidence shows that small RNA molecules are transferred between organisms and transmit functional RNA interference signals across biological species. However, the mechanisms through which specific RNAs involved in cross-species communication are sorted for secretion and protected from degradation in the environment remain largely enigmatic. Over the last decade, extracellular vesicles have emerged as prominent vehicles of biological signals. They can stabilize specific RNA transcripts in biological fluids and selectively deliver them to recipient cells. Here, we review examples of small RNA transfers between plants and bacterial, fungal, and animal symbionts. We also discuss the transmission of RNA interference signals from intestinal cells to populations of the gut microbiota, along with its roles in intestinal homeostasis. We suggest that extracellular vesicles may contribute to inter-species crosstalk mediated by small RNA. We review the mechanisms of RNA sorting to extracellular vesicles and evaluate their relevance in cross-species communication by discussing conservation, stability, stoichiometry, and co-occurrence of vesicles with alternative communication vehicles. PMID:28360889

  20. Exploring lysine riboswitch for metabolic flux control and improvement of L-lysine synthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-06-19

    Riboswitch, a regulatory part of an mRNA molecule that can specifically bind a metabolite and regulate gene expression, is attractive for engineering biological systems, especially for the control of metabolic fluxes in industrial microorganisms. Here, we demonstrate the use of lysine riboswitch and intracellular l-lysine as a signal to control the competing but essential metabolic by-pathways of lysine biosynthesis. To this end, we first examined the natural lysine riboswitches of Eschericia coli (ECRS) and Bacillus subtilis (BSRS) to control the expression of citrate synthase (gltA) and thus the metabolic flux in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in E. coli. ECRS and BSRS were then successfully used to control the gltA gene and TCA cycle activity in a lysine producing strain Corynebacterium glutamicum LP917, respectively. Compared with the strain LP917, the growth of both lysine riboswitch-gltA mutants was slower, suggesting a reduced TCA cycle activity. The lysine production was 63% higher in the mutant ECRS-gltA and 38% higher in the mutant BSRS-gltA, indicating a higher metabolic flux into the lysine synthesis pathway. This is the first report on using an amino acid riboswitch for improvement of lysine biosynthesis. The lysine riboswitches can be easily adapted to dynamically control other essential but competing metabolic pathways or even be engineered as an "on-switch" to enhance the metabolic fluxes of desired metabolic pathways.

  1. Effect of dietary lysine on hepatic lysine catabolism in broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysine is frequently a first- or second-limiting amino acid in poultry diets. Improving the efficiency of lysine use for protein synthesis would effectively lower the lysine requirement and decrease feed costs. Understanding how lysine is degraded and how the degradation is regulated would identif...

  2. Evidence from glycine transfer RNA of a frozen accident at the dawn of the genetic code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tate Warren P

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transfer RNA (tRNA is the means by which the cell translates DNA sequence into protein according to the rules of the genetic code. A credible proposition is that tRNA was formed from the duplication of an RNA hairpin half the length of the contemporary tRNA molecule, with the point at which the hairpins were joined marked by the canonical intron insertion position found today within tRNA genes. If these hairpins possessed a 3'-CCA terminus with different combinations of stem nucleotides (the ancestral operational RNA code, specific aminoacylation and perhaps participation in some form of noncoded protein synthesis might have occurred. However, the identity of the first tRNA and the initial steps in the origin of the genetic code remain elusive. Results Here we show evidence that glycine tRNA was the first tRNA, as revealed by a vestigial imprint in the anticodon loop sequences of contemporary descendents. This provides a plausible mechanism for the missing first step in the origin of the genetic code. In 448 of 466 glycine tRNA gene sequences from bacteria, archaea and eukaryote cytoplasm analyzed, CCA occurs immediately upstream of the canonical intron insertion position, suggesting the first anticodon (NCC for glycine has been captured from the 3'-terminal CCA of one of the interacting hairpins as a result of an ancestral ligation. Conclusion That this imprint (including the second and third nucleotides of the glycine tRNA anticodon has been retained through billions of years of evolution suggests Crick's 'frozen accident' hypothesis has validity for at least this very first step at the dawn of the genetic code. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Dr Eugene V. Koonin, Dr Rob Knight and Dr David H Ardell.

  3. DNA-water interactions distinguish messenger RNA genes from transfer RNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Garima; Jayaram, B

    2012-05-30

    Physicochemical properties of DNA sequences as a guide to developing insights into genome organization has received little attention. Here, we utilize the energetics of DNA to further advance the knowledge on its language at a molecular level. Specifically, we ask the question whether physicochemical properties of different functional units on genomes differ. We extract intramolecular and solvation energies of different DNA base pair steps from a comprehensive set of molecular dynamics simulations. We then investigate the solvation behavior of DNA sequences coding for mRNAs and tRNAs. Distinguishing mRNA genes from tRNA genes is a tricky problem in genome annotation without assumptions on length of DNA and secondary structure of the product of transcription. We find that solvation energetics of DNA behaves as an extremely efficient property in discriminating 2,063,537 genes coding for mRNAs from 56,251 genes coding for tRNAs in all (~1500) completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes.

  4. Gene recruitment--a common mechanism in the evolution of transfer RNA gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiujuan; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of alloacceptor transfer RNAs (tRNAs) has been traditionally thought to occur vertically and reflect the evolution of the genetic code. Yet there have been several indications that a tRNA gene could evolve horizontally, from a copy of an alloacceptor tRNA gene in the same genome. Earlier, we provided the first unambiguous evidence for the occurrence of such "tRNA gene recruitment" in nature--in the mitochondrial (mt) genome of the demosponge Axinella corrugata. Yet the extent and the pattern of this process in the evolution of tRNA gene families remained unclear. Here we analyzed tRNA genes from 21 mt genomes of demosponges as well as nuclear genomes of rhesus macaque, chimpanzee and human. We found four new cases of alloacceptor tRNA gene recruitment in mt genomes and eleven cases in the nuclear genomes. In most of these cases we observed a single nucleotide substitution at the middle position of the anticodon, which resulted in the change of not only the tRNA's amino-acid identity but also the class of the amino-acyl tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) involved in amino-acylation. We hypothesize that the switch to a different class of aaRSs may have prevented the conflict between anticodon and amino-acid identities of recruited tRNAs. Overall our results suggest that gene recruitment is a common phenomenon in tRNA multigene family evolution and should be taken into consideration when tRNA evolutionary history is reconstructed.

  5. Transfer RNA: a dancer between charging and mis-charging for protein biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Wang, Enduo

    2013-10-01

    Transfer RNA plays a fundamental role in the protein biosynthesis as an adaptor molecule by functioning as a biological link between the genetic nucleotide sequence in the mRNA and the amino acid sequence in the protein. To perform its role in protein biosynthesis, it has to be accurately recognized by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) to generate aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs). The correct pairing between an amino acid with its cognate tRNA is crucial for translational quality control. Production and utilization of mis-charged tRNAs are usually detrimental for all the species, resulting in cellular dysfunctions. Correct aa-tRNAs formation is collectively controlled by aaRSs with distinct mechanisms and/or other trans-factors. However, in very limited instances, mis-charged tRNAs are intermediate for specific pathways or essential components for the translational machinery. Here, from the point of accuracy in tRNA charging, we review our understanding about the mechanism ensuring correct aa-tRNA generation. In addition, some unique mis-charged tRNA species necessary for the organism are also briefly described.

  6. Single-Turnover Kinetics of Methyl Transfer to tRNA by Methyltransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ya-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Summary Methyl transfer from S-adenosyl methionine (abbreviated as AdoMet) to biologically active molecules such as mRNAs and tRNAs is one of the most fundamental and widespread reactions in nature, occurring in all three domains of life. The measurement of kinetic constants of AdoMet-dependent methyl transfer is therefore important for understanding the reaction mechanism in the context of biology. When kinetic constants of methyl transfer are measured in steady state over multiple rounds of turnover, the meaning of these constants is difficult to define and is often limited by non-chemical steps of the reaction, such as product release after each turnover. Here the measurement of kinetic constants of methyl transfer by tRNA methyltransferases in rapid equilibrium binding condition for one methyl transfer is described. The advantage of such a measurement is that the meaning of kinetic constants can be directly assigned to the steps associated with the chemistry of methyl transfer, including the substrate binding affinity to the methyl transferase, the pre-chemistry re-arrangement of the active site, and the chemical step of methyl transfer. An additional advantage is that kinetic constants measured for one methyl transfer can be correlated with structural information of the methyl transferase to gain direct insight into its reaction mechanism. PMID:26965259

  7. Exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays a role in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Wang, Jufang; Ding, Nan; Hu, Wentao; Zhang, Xurui; Wang, Bing; Hua, Junrui; Wei, Wenjun; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-01-01

    Bystander effects can be induced through cellular communication between irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells. The signals that mediate this cellular communication, such as cytokines, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and even microRNAs, can be transferred between cells via gap junctions or extracellular medium. We have previously reported that miR-21, a well described DDR (DNA damage response) microRNA, is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects through a medium-mediated way. However, the mechanisms of the microRNA transfer have not been elucidated in details. In the present study, it was found that exosomes isolated from irradiated conditioned medium could induce bystander effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated plenty of evidences that miR-21, which is up-regulated as a result of mimic transfection or irradiation, can be transferred from donor or irradiated cells into extracellular medium and subsequently get access to the recipient or bystander cells through exosomes to induce bystander effects. Inhibiting the miR-21 expression in advance can offset the bystander effects to some extent. From all of these results, it can be concluded that the exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays an important role in the radiation-induced bystander effects. These findings provide new insights into the functions of microRNAs and the cellular communication between the directly irradiated cells and the non-irradiated cells.

  8. STUDY OF LYSINE AND ALANINE DELIVERANCE THROUGH POLYPYRROLE MEMBRANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhitasari Suratman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Electropolymerization processes of pyrrole and the usage of polypyrrole membrane as lysine and alanine deliverance have been studied by cyclic voltammetry technique. Polypyrrole membrane was prepared by electropolymerization processes of pyrrole in water based solvent containing sodium perchlorate as supporting electrolyte. Electropolymerization processes were carried out within potential range of 0-1100 mV vs Ag/AgCl reference electrode and at the scanning rate of 100 mV/s. In this study, lysine and alanine have been used as molecules which could easily be loaded on and released from polypyrrole membrane. The presence of lysine or alanine during electropolymerization process reduced the rate of electropolymerization of polypyrrole. In lysine or alanine transfer processes into polypyrrole membrane, the interaction between polypyrrole and lysine or alanine showed by the curve of E½ oxidation in respect of - log C. It proved that the E½ oxidation shifted to more positive potential showed by the increasing of concentration of lysine or alanine. Beside that, voltammetric responses of lysine and alanine transfered into polypyrrole membrane were found to be Nernstian. The results indicated that polypyrrole could be used as a sensor of lysine and alanine.   Keywords: Electropolymerization, polypyrrole membrane, voltammetry technique

  9. Structural organization of the transfer RNA operon I of Vibrio cholerae: Differences between classical and El Tor strains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atreyi Ghatak; Anasuya Majumdar; Ranajit K Ghosh

    2005-09-01

    Nine major transfer RNA (tRNA) gene clusters were analysed in various Vibrio cholerae strains. Of these, only the tRNA operon I was found to differ significantly in V. cholerae classical (sixth pandemic) and El Tor (seventh pandemic) strains. Amongst the sixteen tRNA genes contained in this operon, genes for tRNA Gln3 (CAA) and tRNA Leu6 (CUA) were absent in classical strains as compared to El Tor strains. The observation strongly supported the view that the above two pandemic strains constitute two different clones.

  10. Lysine methylation: beyond histones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Zhang; Hong Wen; Xiaobing Shi

    2012-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of histone proteins,such as acetylation,methylation,phosphorylation,and ubiquitylation,play essential roles in regulating chromatin dynamics.Combinations of different modifications on the histone proteins,termed 'histone code' in many cases,extend the information potential of the genetic code by regulating DNA at the epigenetic level.Many PTMs occur on non-histone proteins as well as histones,regulating protein-protein interactions,stability,localization,and/or enzymatic activities of proteins involved in diverse cellular processes.Although protein phosphorylation,ubiquitylation,and acetylation have been extensively studied,only a few proteins other than histones have been reported that can be modified by lysine methylation.This review summarizes the current progress on lysine methylation of nonhistone proteins,and we propose that lysine methylation,like phosphorylation and acetylation,is a common PTM that regulates proteins in diverse cellular processes.

  11. Reversible and rapid transfer-RNA deactivation as a mechanism of translational repression in stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Andreas; Wende, Sandra; Mörl, Mario; Pan, Tao; Ignatova, Zoya

    2013-08-01

    Stress-induced changes of gene expression are crucial for survival of eukaryotic cells. Regulation at the level of translation provides the necessary plasticity for immediate changes of cellular activities and protein levels. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure to oxidative stress results in a quick repression of translation by deactivation of the aminoacyl-ends of all transfer-RNA (tRNA). An oxidative-stress activated nuclease, angiogenin, cleaves first within the conserved single-stranded 3'-CCA termini of all tRNAs, thereby blocking their use in translation. This CCA deactivation is reversible and quickly repairable by the CCA-adding enzyme [ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferase]. Through this mechanism the eukaryotic cell dynamically represses and reactivates translation at low metabolic costs.

  12. Reversible and rapid transfer-RNA deactivation as a mechanism of translational repression in stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Czech

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced changes of gene expression are crucial for survival of eukaryotic cells. Regulation at the level of translation provides the necessary plasticity for immediate changes of cellular activities and protein levels. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure to oxidative stress results in a quick repression of translation by deactivation of the aminoacyl-ends of all transfer-RNA (tRNA. An oxidative-stress activated nuclease, angiogenin, cleaves first within the conserved single-stranded 3'-CCA termini of all tRNAs, thereby blocking their use in translation. This CCA deactivation is reversible and quickly repairable by the CCA-adding enzyme [ATP(CTP:tRNA nucleotidyltransferase]. Through this mechanism the eukaryotic cell dynamically represses and reactivates translation at low metabolic costs.

  13. The background of the total synthesis of yeast alanine transfer RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI GuoRong

    2010-01-01

    @@ The research findings concerning the total synthesis of yeast alanine transfer RNA (yeast alanine tRNA) were successively published in Chinese Science Bulletin (1982) and Science in China (1983) [1].The research work started in 1968 and was finished in November 1981.It was the first artificial synthesis of a nucleic acid molecule, which followed the first artificial synthesis of protein, crystalline bovine insulin, in China in 1965, both scientific milestones occurring in China.The composition, sequence and biological functions of the synthesized nucleic acid were identical to those of the natural yeast alanine tRNA.The research lasted for 13 years.From 1982 to 1984, one of the investigators in charge of the research Prof.

  14. Liposomal nanocontainers as models for viral infection: monitoring viral genomic RNA transfer through lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilek, Gerhard; Matscheko, Nena M; Pickl-Herk, Angela; Weiss, Victor U; Subirats, Xavier; Kenndler, Ernst; Blaas, Dieter

    2011-08-01

    After uptake into target cells, many nonenveloped viruses undergo conformational changes in the low-pH environment of the endocytic compartment. This results in exposure of amphipathic viral peptides and/or hydrophobic protein domains that are inserted into and either disrupt or perforate the vesicular membranes. The viral nucleic acids thereby gain access to the cytosol and initiate replication. We here demonstrate the in vitro transfer of the single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome of human rhinovirus 2 into liposomes decorated with recombinant very-low-density lipoprotein receptor fragments. Membrane-attached virions were exposed to pH 5.4, mimicking the in vivo pH environment of late endosomes. This triggered the release of the RNA whose arrival in the liposomal lumen was detected via in situ cDNA synthesis by encapsulated reverse transcriptase. Subsequently, cDNA was PCR amplified. At a low ratio between virions and lipids, RNA transfer was positively correlated with virus concentration. However, membranes became leaky at higher virus concentrations, which resulted in decreased cDNA synthesis. In accordance with earlier in vivo data, the RNA passes through the lipid membrane without causing gross damage to vesicles at physiologically relevant virus concentrations.

  15. Transfer-messenger RNA controls the translation of cell-cycle and stress proteins in Streptomyces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barends, Sharief; Zehl, Martin; Bialek, Sylwia

    2010-01-01

    , elongation factor Tu3, and the cell-cycle control proteins DasR, SsgA, SsgF and SsgR. Although tmRNA-tagged proteins are degraded swiftly, the translation of dnaK and dasR messenger RNAs (mRNAs) depends fully on tmRNA, whereas transcription is unaffected. The data unveil a surprisingly dedicated......The transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)-mediated trans-translation mechanism is highly conserved in bacteria and functions primarily as a system for the rescue of stalled ribosomes and the removal of aberrantly produced proteins. Here, we show that in the antibiotic-producing soil bacterium Streptomyces...... coelicolor, trans-translation has a specialized role in stress management. Analysis of proteins that were carboxy-terminally His(8)-tagged by a recombinant tmRNA identified only 10 targets, including the stress proteins: DnaK heat-shock protein 70, thiostrepton-induced protein A, universal stress protein A...

  16. Cellular restriction of retrovirus particle-mediated mRNA transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galla, Melanie; Schambach, Axel; Towers, Greg J; Baum, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    Analyzing cellular restriction mechanisms provides insight into viral replication strategies, identifies targets for antiviral drug design, and is crucial for the development of novel tools for experimental or therapeutic delivery of genetic information. We have previously shown that retroviral vector mutants that are unable to initiate reverse transcription mediate a transient expression of any sequence which replaces the gag-pol transcription unit, a process we call retrovirus particle-mediated mRNA transfer (RMT). Here, we further examined the mechanism of RMT by testing its sensitivity to cellular restriction factors and short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). We found that both human TRIM5alpha and, to a lesser extent, Fv1 effectively restrict RMT if the RNA is delivered by a restriction-sensitive capsid. While TRIM5alpha restriction of RMT led to reduced levels of retroviral mRNA in target cells, restriction by Fv1 did not. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 partially relieved TRIM5alpha-mediated restriction of RMT. Finally, cells expressing shRNAs specifically targeting the retroviral mRNA inhibited RMT particles, but not reverse-transcribing particles. Retroviral mRNA may thus serve as a translation template if not used as a template for reverse transcription. Our data imply that retroviral nucleic acids become accessible to host factors, including ribosomes, as a result of particle remodeling during cytoplasmic trafficking.

  17. Depletion of cognate charged transfer RNA causes translational frameshifting within the expanded CAG stretch in huntingtin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girstmair, Hannah; Saffert, Paul; Rode, Sascha; Czech, Andreas; Holland, Gudrun; Bannert, Norbert; Ignatova, Zoya

    2013-01-31

    Huntington disease (HD), a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG-encoded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat in huntingtin (Htt), displays a highly heterogeneous etiopathology and disease onset. Here, we show that the translation of expanded CAG repeats in mutant Htt exon 1 leads to a depletion of charged glutaminyl-transfer RNA (tRNA)(Gln-CUG) that pairs exclusively to the CAG codon. This results in translational frameshifting and the generation of various transframe-encoded species that differently modulate the conformational switch to nucleate fibrillization of the parental polyQ protein. Intriguingly, the frameshifting frequency varies strongly among different cell lines and is higher in cells with intrinsically lower concentrations of tRNA(Gln-CUG). The concentration of tRNA(Gln-CUG) also differs among different brain areas in the mouse. We propose that translational frameshifting may act as a significant disease modifier that contributes to the cell-selective neurotoxicity and disease course heterogeneity of HD on both cellular and individual levels.

  18. Lost in Translation: Defects in Transfer RNA Modifications and Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bednářová

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are key molecules participating in protein synthesis. To augment their functionality they undergo extensive post-transcriptional modifications and, as such, are subject to regulation at multiple levels including transcription, transcript processing, localization and ribonucleoside base modification. Post-transcriptional enzyme-catalyzed modification of tRNA occurs at a number of base and sugar positions and influences specific anticodon–codon interactions and regulates translation, its efficiency and fidelity. This phenomenon of nucleoside modification is most remarkable and results in a rich structural diversity of tRNA of which over 100 modified nucleosides have been characterized. Most often these hypermodified nucleosides are found in the wobble position of tRNAs, where they play a direct role in codon recognition as well as in maintaining translational efficiency and fidelity, etc. Several recent studies have pointed to a link between defects in tRNA modifications and human diseases including neurological disorders. Therefore, defects in tRNA modifications in humans need intensive characterization at the enzymatic and mechanistic level in order to pave the way to understand how lack of such modifications are associated with neurological disorders with the ultimate goal of gaining insights into therapeutic interventions.

  19. Erythropoietin messenger RNA levels in developing mice and transfer of /sup 125/I-erythropoietin by the placenta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koury, M.J.; Bondurant, M.C.; Graber, S.E.; Sawyer, S.T.

    1988-07-01

    Erythropoietin (EP) mRNA was measured in normal and anemic mice during fetal and postnatal development. Normal fetal livers at 14 d of gestation contained a low level of EP mRNA. By day 19 of gestation, no EP mRNA was detected in normal or anemic fetal livers or normal fetal kidneys, but anemic fetal kidneys had low levels of EP mRNA. Newborn through adult stage mice responded to anemia by accumulating renal and hepatic EP mRNA. However, total liver EP mRNA was considerably less than that of the kidneys. Juvenile animals, 1-4 wk old, were hyperresponsive to anemia in that they produced more EP mRNA than adults. Moreover, nonanemic juveniles had readily measured renal EP mRNA, whereas the adult level was at the lower limit of detection. Because of the very low level of fetal EP mRNA, placental transfer of EP was evaluated. When administered to the pregnant mouse, /sup 125/I-EP was transferred in significant amounts to the fetuses. These results indicate that in mice the kidney is the main organ of EP production at all stages of postnatal development and that adult kidney may also play some role in providing EP for fetal erythropoiesis via placental transfer of maternal hormone.

  20. Transfer of High Lysine Gene sb401 into Maize by Agrobacterium tumefactions Mediated Transformation%农杆菌介导法将高赖氨酸蛋白基因sb401导入玉米的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    铁双贵; 孙静; 岳润清; 齐建双; 王延召; 柏松; 陈小洁; 田保明

    2012-01-01

    High lysine gene sb401 was transferred into embryogenic maize callus of the hybrid line PA x PB by Agrobacterium tumefactions -mediated transformation approach. Fifteen transgenic plants were identified by PCR from 70 regenerated transformed plants obtained by selection for bialaphos resistance. Southern blotting assay for the transgenic plants indicated that sb401 gene has been introduced and integrated into the genome of maize, bar protein dipsticks detection was positive, so we can infer the target protein was expressed.%以玉米杂交组合PA×PB的胚性愈伤组织为材料,通过农杆菌介导法将高赖氨酸蛋白基因sb401导入到玉米中.经过双丙胺膦筛选,共获得70株再生植株,其中15株经PCR检测呈阳性,将部分PCR呈阳性的植株进行Southern杂交,结果表明,sb401基因已经整合到玉米基因组中.bar蛋白试纸条检测结果呈阳性,推测目的蛋白得到了表达.

  1. Transfer RNA in the hybrid P/E state: correlating molecular dynamics simulations with cryo-EM data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Frank, Joachim

    2007-10-16

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) transiently occupies the hybrid P/E state (P/E-tRNA) when mRNA-tRNA are translocated in the ribosome. In this study, we characterize the structure of P/E-tRNA and its interactions with the ribosome by correlating the results from molecular dynamics simulations on free tRNA with the cryo-EM map of P/E-tRNA. In our approach, we show that the cryo-EM map may be interpreted as a conformational average. Along the molecular dynamics trajectories (44 ns, 18 ns, and 18 ns), some of the snapshots prove to be quite close to the observed density. In a representative structure, the CCA (3') arm is uniquely twisted, and the anticodon stem loop is kinked at the junctions to both the anticodon loop and the D stem. In addition, the map shows that the P/E-tRNA is no longer bound to helix H69 of 23S rRNA and is flexible, and the conformations of helices H68 and h44 of 16S rRNA differ from those in the x-ray structure. Thus, our study presents structural and dynamic information on the P/E-tRNA and characterizes its interactions with the translocating ribosome.

  2. Extensive lysine methylation in hyperthermophilic crenarchaea : potential implications for protein stability and recombinant enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Botting, Catherine H.; Paul Talbot; Sonia Paytubi; White, Malcolm F

    2010-01-01

    In eukarya and bacteria, lysine methylation is relatively rare and is catalysed by sequence-specific lysine methyltransferases that typically have only a single-protein target. Using RNA polymerase purified from the thermophilic crenarchaeum Sulfolobus solfataricus, we identified 21 methyllysines distributed across 9 subunits of the enzyme. The modified lysines were predominantly in alpha-helices and showed no conserved sequence context. A limited survey of the Thermoproteus tenax proteome re...

  3. Synthesis and Phase Behavior of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-Poly(L-Lysine Hydrochloride) and Poly(N-Isopropylacrylamide-co-Acrylamide)-b-Poly(L-Lysine Hydrochloride)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spasojevic, Milica; Vorenkamp, Eltjo; Jansen, Mark R. P. A. C. S.; de Vos, Paul; Schouten, Arend Jan

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-poly(L-lysine) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide- co-acrylamide)-b-poly(L-lysine) copolymers was accomplished by combining atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and ring opening polymerization (ROP). For this purpose, a di-functional initiator with p

  4. The core domain of Aquifex aeolicus tRNA (m7G46) methyltransferase has the methyl-transfer activity to tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomikawa, Chie; Hori, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    Transfer RNA (m(7)G46) methyltransferase [TrmB] catalyses the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the N(7)-atom of guanine at position 46 in tRNA. TrmB proteins from thermophilic bacteria such as Aquifex aeolicus have a long C-terminal region as compared to those from mesophilic bacteria. Further, N-terminal region observed in TrmB proteins from mesophiles is missing in A. aeolicus TrmB. Therefore, we considered that this distinct C-terminal region in A. aeolicus TrmB might compensate the N-terminal region in mesophile TrmB and function as a part of tRNA binding site. To confirm this idea, we deleted the C-terminal region by introduction of the stop codon at position 202. To our surprise, methyl-transfer assay using yeast tRNA(Phe) transcript clearly showed that the resultant mutant protein (Glu202Stop) had an enzymatic activity. Thus, the core domain of the A. aeolicus TrmB has a methyl-transfer activity.

  5. Efficient subtraction of insect rRNA prior to transcriptome analysis of Wolbachia-Drosophila lateral gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Nikhil

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous methods exist for enriching bacterial or mammalian mRNA prior to transcriptome experiments. Yet there persists a need for methods to enrich for mRNA in non-mammalian animal systems. For example, insects contain many important and interesting obligate intracellular bacteria, including endosymbionts and vector-borne pathogens. Such obligate intracellular bacteria are difficult to study by traditional methods. Therefore, genomics has greatly increased our understanding of these bacteria. Efficient subtraction methods are needed for removing both bacteria and insect rRNA in these systems to enable transcriptome-based studies. Findings A method is described that efficiently removes >95% of insect rRNA from total RNA samples, as determined by microfluidics and transcriptome sequencing. This subtraction yielded a 6.2-fold increase in mRNA abundance. Such a host rRNA-depletion strategy, in combination with bacterial rRNA depletion, is necessary to analyze transcription of obligate intracellular bacteria. Here, transcripts were identified that arise from a lateral gene transfer of an entire Wolbachia bacterial genome into a Drosophila ananassae chromosome. In this case, an rRNA depletion strategy is preferred over polyA-based enrichment since transcripts arising from bacteria-to-animal lateral gene transfer may not be poly-adenylated. Conclusions This enrichment method yields a significant increase in mRNA abundance when poly-A selection is not suitable. It can be used in combination with bacterial rRNA subtraction to enable experiments to simultaneously measure bacteria and insect mRNA in vector and endosymbiont biology experiments.

  6. Synaptic vesicles contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs) including transfer RNA fragments (trfRNA) and microRNAs (miRNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huinan; Wu, Cheng; Aramayo, Rodolfo; Sachs, Matthew S; Harlow, Mark L

    2015-10-08

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are neuronal presynaptic organelles that load and release neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In addition to classic neurotransmitters, we have found that synaptic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo californica, a model cholinergic synapse, contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs), primarily the 5' ends of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) termed tRNA fragments (trfRNAs). To test the evolutionary conservation of SV sRNAs we examined isolated SVs from the mouse central nervous system (CNS). We found abundant levels of sRNAs in mouse SVs, including trfRNAs and micro RNAs (miRNAs) known to be involved in transcriptional and translational regulation. This discovery suggests that, in addition to inducing changes in local dendritic excitability through the release of neurotransmitters, SVs may, through the release of specific trfRNAs and miRNAs, directly regulate local protein synthesis. We believe these findings have broad implications for the study of chemical synaptic transmission.

  7. MicroRNA Intercellular Transfer and Bioelectrical Regulation of Model Multicellular Ensembles by the Gap Junction Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Javier; Meseguer, Salvador; Mafe, Salvador

    2017-08-17

    We have studied theoretically the microRNA (miRNA) intercellular transfer through voltage-gated gap junctions in terms of a biophysically grounded system of coupled differential equations. Instead of modeling a specific system, we use a general approach describing the interplay between the genetic mechanisms and the single-cell electric potentials. The dynamics of the multicellular ensemble are simulated under different conditions including spatially inhomogeneous transcription rates and local intercellular transfer of miRNAs. These processes result in spatiotemporal changes of miRNA, mRNA, and ion channel protein concentrations that eventually modify the bioelectrical states of small multicellular domains because of the ensemble average nature of the electrical potential. The simulations allow a qualitative understanding of the context-dependent nature of the effects observed when specific signaling molecules are transferred through gap junctions. The results suggest that an efficient miRNA intercellular transfer could permit the spatiotemporal control of small cellular domains by the conversion of single-cell genetic and bioelectric states into multicellular states regulated by the gap junction interconnectivity.

  8. Minoxidil specifically decreases the expression of lysine hydroxylase in cultured human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautala, T; Heikkinen, J; Kivirikko, K I; Myllylä, R

    1992-01-01

    The levels of lysine hydroxylase protein and the levels of the mRNAs for lysine hydroxylase and the alpha- and beta-subunits of proline 4-hydroxylase were measured in cultured human skin fibroblasts treated with 1 mM-minoxidil. The data demonstrate that minoxidil decreases the amount of lysine hydroxylase protein, this being due to a decrease in the level of lysine hydroxylase mRNA. The effect of minoxidil appears to be highly specific, as no changes were observed in the amounts of mRNAs for the alpha- and beta-subunits of proline 4-hydroxylase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:1314568

  9. Small RNA-based feedforward loop with AND-gate logic regulates extrachromosomal DNA transfer in Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenfort, Kai; Espinosa, Elena; Casadesús, Josep; Vogel, Jörg

    2015-08-25

    Horizontal gene transfer via plasmid conjugation is a major driving force in microbial evolution but constitutes a complex process that requires synchronization with the physiological state of the host bacteria. Although several host transcription factors are known to regulate plasmid-borne transfer genes, RNA-based regulatory circuits for host-plasmid communication remain unknown. We describe a posttranscriptional mechanism whereby the Hfq-dependent small RNA, RprA, inhibits transfer of pSLT, the virulence plasmid of Salmonella enterica. RprA employs two separate seed-pairing domains to activate the mRNAs of both the sigma-factor σ(S) and the RicI protein, a previously uncharacterized membrane protein here shown to inhibit conjugation. Transcription of ricI requires σ(S) and, together, RprA and σ(S) orchestrate a coherent feedforward loop with AND-gate logic to tightly control the activation of RicI synthesis. RicI interacts with the conjugation apparatus protein TraV and limits plasmid transfer under membrane-damaging conditions. To our knowledge, this study reports the first small RNA-controlled feedforward loop relying on posttranscriptional activation of two independent targets and an unexpected role of the conserved RprA small RNA in controlling extrachromosomal DNA transfer.

  10. Lysine-functionalized nanodiamonds: synthesis, physiochemical characterization, and nucleic acid binding studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Randeep Kaur,1 Jackson M Chitanda,2 Deborah Michel,1 Jason Maley,3 Ferenc Borondics,2,4 Peng Yang,5 Ronald E Verrall,2 Ildiko Badea11Drug Design and Discovery Research Group, College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, 2Department of Chemistry, University of Saskatchewan, 3Saskatchewan Structural Sciences Centre, University of Saskatchewan, 4Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; 5Department of Organic Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Shenyang Pharmaceutical University, Shenyang, People's Republic of ChinaPurpose: Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs are carbon-based nanomaterials that, because of their size (4–5 nm, stable inert core, alterable surface chemistry, fluorescence, and biocompatibility, are emerging as bioimaging agents and promising tools for the delivery of biochemical molecules into cellular systems. However, diamond particles possess a strong propensity to aggregate in liquid formulation media, restricting their applicability in biomedical sciences. Here, the authors describe the covalent functionalization of NDs with lysine in an attempt to develop nanoparticles able to act as suitable nonviral vectors for transferring genetic materials across cellular membranes.Methods: NDs were oxidized and functionalized by binding lysine moieties attached to a three-carbon-length linker (1,3-diaminopropane to their surfaces through amide bonds. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta potential measurement, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopic imaging, and thermogravimetric analysis were used to characterize the lysine-functionalized NDs. Finally, the ability of the functionalized diamonds to bind plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA was investigated by gel electrophoresis assay and through size and zeta potential measurements.Results: NDs were successfully functionalized with the lysine linker, producing surface loading of 1.7 mmol g-1 of ND

  11. The Enzymatic Paradox of Yeast Arginyl-tRNA Synthetase: Exclusive Arginine Transfer Controlled by a Flexible Mechanism of tRNA Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McShane, Ariel; Hok, Eveline; Tomberlin, Jensen; Eriani, Gilbert; Geslain, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Identity determinants are essential for the accurate recognition of transfer RNAs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. To date, arginine determinants in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been identified exclusively in vitro and only on a limited number of tRNA Arginine isoacceptors. In the current study, we favor a full cellular approach and expand the investigation of arginine determinants to all four tRNA Arg isoacceptors. More precisely, this work scrutinizes the relevance of the tRNA nucleotides at position 20, 35 and 36 in the yeast arginylation reaction. We built 21 mutants by site-directed mutagenesis and tested their functionality in YAL5, a previously engineered yeast knockout deficient for the expression of tRNA Arg CCG. Arginylation levels were also monitored using Northern blot. Our data collected in vivo correlate with previous observations. C35 is the prominent arginine determinant followed by G36 or U36 (G/U36). In addition, although there is no major arginine determinant in the D loop, the recognition of tRNA Arg ICG relies to some extent on the nucleotide at position 20. This work refines the existing model for tRNA Arg recognition. Our observations indicate that yeast Arginyl-tRNA synthetase (yArgRS) relies on distinct mechanisms to aminoacylate the four isoacceptors. Finally, according to our refined model, yArgRS is able to accommodate tRNA Arg scaffolds presenting N34, C/G35 and G/A/U36 anticodons while maintaining specificity. We discuss the mechanistic and potential physiological implications of these findings.

  12. GtRNAdb 2.0: an expanded database of transfer RNA genes identified in complete and draft genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patricia P; Lowe, Todd M

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNAs represent the largest, most ubiquitous class of non-protein coding RNA genes found in all living organisms. The tRNAscan-SE search tool has become the de facto standard for annotating tRNA genes in genomes, and the Genomic tRNA Database (GtRNAdb) was created as a portal for interactive exploration of these gene predictions. Since its published description in 2009, the GtRNAdb has steadily grown in content, and remains the most commonly cited web-based source of tRNA gene information. In this update, we describe not only a major increase in the number of tRNA predictions (>367000) and genomes analyzed (>4370), but more importantly, the integration of new analytic and functional data to improve the quality and biological context of tRNA gene predictions. New information drawn from other sources includes tRNA modification data, epigenetic data, single nucleotide polymorphisms, gene expression and evolutionary conservation. A richer set of analytic data is also presented, including better tRNA functional prediction, non-canonical features, predicted structural impacts from sequence variants and minimum free energy structural predictions. Views of tRNA genes in genomic context are provided via direct links to the UCSC genome browsers. The database can be searched by sequence or gene features, and is available at http://gtrnadb.ucsc.edu/.

  13. Kinetic Studies of Lysine Riboswitch Folding Using Single-Molecule FRET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegland, Larry; Garst, Andrew; Fiore, J.; Batey, Robert; Nesbitt, David

    2010-03-01

    Riboswitches regulate gene expression through conformational changes induced by metabolite binding. This regulation of gene expression depends on the kinetics of metabolite binding and structural changes. Therefore, an understanding of these dynamics is crucial to developing a compete knowledge of riboswitch functionality. To probe the binding of a metabolite and subsequent folding, a metabolite-binding domain of the Bacillus subtilis lysine riboswitch was transcribed and hybridized to a fluorescent-labeled RNA strand, which allows FRET monitoring of ligand-induced conformational changes. The RNA construct was studied using single-molecule FRET methods that allowed for characterization of the folding dynamics. In the presence of lysine, we observed two states, of which the relative populations are perturbed by lysine concentration. We measured the folding and unfolding rates of the inter-conversion between these states. We also observe that [Mg^2+] affects the lysine-free conformation and the lysine sensitivity of the riboswitch.

  14. Downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) utilizing adenovirus-mediated transfer of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in a novel spinal metastatic melanoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, Andrew J; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Chetty, Chandramu; Lakka, Sajani S; Gujrati, Meena; Spomar, Daniel G; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2008-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) comprise a class of secreted zinc-dependent endopeptidases implicated in the metastatic potential of tumor cells due to their ability to degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM) and basement membrane. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) has been detected in high levels and correlates with invasiveness in human melanoma. We have studied the effect of adenovirus-mediated transfer of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MMP-2 in the human melanoma cell line A2058. The delivery of these double-stranded RNA molecules represents an efficient technology in silencing disease-causing genes with known sequences at the post-transcriptional level. siRNA against MMP-2 mRNA (Ad-MMP-2) was found to decrease MMP-2 protein expression and activity in melanoma cells as demonstrated by western blotting and gelatin zymography. Furthermore, infection of cells with Ad-MMP-2 inhibited cellular migration and invasion as indicated by spheroid and matrigel assays. We also observed dose-dependent suppression of vascular network formation in an angiogenesis assay. Finally, we developed a nude mouse spinal metastatic model to investigate the local effects of tumor metastasis. Intravenous tail vein injection with Ad-MMP-2 on days 5, 9 and 11 after tumor implantation resulted in complete retention of neurological function as compared to control and scrambled vector (Ad-SV)-treated groups that showed complete paraplegia by day 14+/-2 days. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed decreased tumor size in the Ad-MMP-2-treated animals. This novel experimental model revealed that adenoviral-mediated transfer of RNA interference against MMP-2 results in the retention of neurological function and significantly inhibited tumor growth.

  15. Using a nano-flare probe to detect RNA in live donor cells prior to somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bo; Ren, Liang; Liu, Di; Ma, Jian-Zhang; An, Tie-Zhu; Yang, Xiu-Qin; Ma, Hong; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Zhu, Meng; Bai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Many transgenes are silenced in mammalian cells (donor cells used for somatic cell nuclear transfer [SCNT]). Silencing correlated with a repressed chromatin structure or suppressed promoter, and it impeded the production of transgenic animals. Gene transcription studies in live cells are challenging because of the drawbacks of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Nano-flare probes provide an effective approach to detect RNA in living cells. We used 18S RNA, a housekeeping gene, as a reference gene. This study aimed to establish a platform to detect RNA in single living donor cells using a Nano-flare probe prior to SCNT and to verify the safety and validity of the Nano-flare probe in order to provide a technical foundation for rescuing silenced transgenes in transgenic cloned embryos. We investigated cytotoxic effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on porcine fetal fibroblasts, characterized the distribution of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe in living cells and investigated the effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on the development of cloned embryos after SCNT. The cytotoxic effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on porcine fetal fibroblasts was dose-dependent, and 18S RNA was detected using the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe. In addition, treating donor cells with 500 pM 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe did not have adverse effects on the development of SCNT embryos at the pre-implantation stage. In conclusion, we established a preliminary platform to detect RNA in live donor cells using a Nano-flare probe prior to SCNT.

  16. Activation of ribosomal RNA genes in porcine embryos produced in vitro or by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Bolette; Pedersen, Hanne Gervi; Jakobsen, Anne Sørig

    2007-01-01

    The onset of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis occurs during the second half of the third cell cycle, that is, at the four-cell stage, in porcine embryos developed in vivo. In the present study the onset of rRNA synthesis was investigated in porcine embryos produced in vitro (IVP) or by somatic cell...... nuclear transfer (SCNT) using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with an rDNA probe and subsequent visualization of the nucleolar proteins by silver staining. In the 205 IVP embryos investigated, all two-cell embryos (n = 34) were categorized as transcriptionally inactive. At the late four......-cell stage (n = 45), 38% of the embryos contained 1-3 nuclei with signs of rRNA transcription, indicating an asynchronous transcription initiation. This pattern continued in the following stages, as 78% (n = 47), 47% (n = 42) and 83% (n = 37) of the embryos revealed a mixture of transcriptionally inactive...

  17. Depletion of Cognate Charged Transfer RNA Causes Translational Frameshifting within the Expanded CAG Stretch in Huntingtin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Girstmair

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington disease (HD, a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG-encoded polyglutamine (polyQ repeat in huntingtin (Htt, displays a highly heterogeneous etiopathology and disease onset. Here, we show that the translation of expanded CAG repeats in mutant Htt exon 1 leads to a depletion of charged glutaminyl-transfer RNA (tRNAGln-CUG that pairs exclusively to the CAG codon. This results in translational frameshifting and the generation of various transframe-encoded species that differently modulate the conformational switch to nucleate fibrillization of the parental polyQ protein. Intriguingly, the frameshifting frequency varies strongly among different cell lines and is higher in cells with intrinsically lower concentrations of tRNAGln-CUG. The concentration of tRNAGln-CUG also differs among different brain areas in the mouse. We propose that translational frameshifting may act as a significant disease modifier that contributes to the cell-selective neurotoxicity and disease course heterogeneity of HD on both cellular and individual levels.

  18. The transfer RNA genes in Oryza sativa L.ssp.indica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xiyin(王希胤); SHI; Xiaoli(史晓黎); HAO; Bailin(郝柏林)

    2002-01-01

    The availability of the draft genome sequence of Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica has made it possible to study the rice tRNA genes. A total of 596 tRNA genes, including 3 selenocysteine tRNA genes and one suppressor tRNA gene are identified in 127551 rice contigs. There are 45 species of tRNA genes and the revised wobble hypothesis proposed by Guthrie and Abelson is perfectly obeyed. The relationship between codon usage and the number of corresponding tRNA genes is discussed. Redundancy may exist in the present list of tRNA genes and novel ones may be found in the future. A set of 33 tRNA genes is discovered in the complete chloroplast genome of Oryza sativa L. ssp. indica. These tRNA genes are identical to those in ssp. japonica identified by us independently from the origional annotation.

  19. Lysine-iron agar in the detection of Arizona cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDWARDS, P R; FIFE, M A

    1961-11-01

    A lysine-iron agar is described and recommended for the detection of Arizona strains which ferment lactose rapidly. Black colonies which appear on bismuth sulfite agar should be transferred to the medium. Salmonellae and Arizona cultures produce a distinctive reaction since they are the only recognized groups of enteric bacteria which regularly produce lysine decarboxylase rapidly and form large amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Use of the medium is particularly recommended in the examination of specimens from enteric infections in which shigellae and salmonellae are not detected.

  20. Active and accurate trans-translation requires distinct determinants in the C-terminal tail of SmpB protein and the mRNA-like domain of transfer messenger RNA (tmRNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenares, Devin; Dulebohn, Daniel P; Svetlanov, Anton; Karzai, A Wali

    2013-10-18

    Unproductive ribosome stalling in eubacteria is resolved by the actions of SmpB protein and transfer messenger (tm) RNA. We examined the functional significance of conserved regions of SmpB and tmRNA to the trans-translation process. Our investigations reveal that the N-terminal 20 residues of SmpB, which are located near the ribosomal decoding center, are dispensable for all known SmpB activities. In contrast, a set of conserved residues that reside at the junction between the tmRNA-binding core and the C-terminal tail of SmpB play an important role in tmRNA accommodation. Our data suggest that the highly conserved glycine 132 acts as a flexible hinge that enables movement of the C-terminal tail, thus permitting proper positioning and establishment of the tmRNA open reading frame (ORF) as the surrogate template. To gain further insights into the function of the SmpB C-terminal tail, we examined the tagging activity of hybrid variants of tmRNA and the SmpB protein, in which the tmRNA ORF or the SmpB C-terminal tail was substituted with the equivalent but highly divergent sequences from Francisella tularensis. We observed that the hybrid tmRNA was active but resulted in less accurate selection of the resume codon. Cognate hybrid SmpB was necessary to restore activity. Furthermore, accurate tagging was observed when the identity of the resume codon was reverted from GGC to GCA. Taken together, these data suggest that the engagement of the tmRNA ORF and the selection of the correct translation resumption point are distinct activities that are influenced by independent tmRNA and SmpB determinants.

  1. Enhanced Amelioration of High-Fat Diet-Induced Fatty Liver by Docosahexaenoic Acid and Lysine Supplementations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Yu Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty liver disease is the most common pathological condition in the liver. Here, we generated high-fat diet-(HFD- induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD in mice and tested the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and lysine during a four-week regular chow (RCfeeding. Our results showed that 1% lysine and the combination of 1% lysine + 1% DHA reduced body weight. Moreover, serum triglyceride levels were reduced by 1% DHA and 1% lysine, whereas serum alanine transaminase activity was reduced by 1% DHA and 1% DHA + 0.5% lysine. Switching to RC reduced hepatic lipid droplet accumulation, which was further reduced by the addition of DHA or lysine. Furthermore, the mRNA expressions of hepatic proinflammatory cytokines were suppressed by DHA and combinations of DHA + lysine, whereas the mRNA for the lipogenic gene, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1, was suppressed by DHA. In the gonadal adipose tissues, combinations of DHA and lysine inhibited mRNA expression of lipid metabolism-associated genes, including ACC1, fatty acid synthase, lipoprotein lipase, and perilipin. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that, in conjunction with RC-induced benefits, supplementation with DHA or lysine further ameliorated the high-fat diet-induced NAFLD and provided an alternative strategy to treat, and potentially prevent, NAFLD.

  2. Anti-tumor effects of an engineered 'killer' transfer RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dong-hui [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Lee, Jiyoung; Frankenberger, Casey [Ben May Department for Cancer Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Geslain, Renaud, E-mail: rgeslain@depaul.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Department of Biology, DePaul University, Chicago, IL 60614 (United States); Rosner, Marsha, E-mail: m-rosner@uchicago.edu [Ben May Department for Cancer Research, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Pan, Tao, E-mail: taopan@uchicago.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA with anti-cancer effects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA induced protein misfolding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA as anti-tumor agent. -- Abstract: A hallmark of cancer cells is their ability to continuously divide; and rapid proliferation requires increased protein translation. Elevating levels of misfolded proteins can elicit growth arrest due to ER stress and decreased global translation. Failure to correct prolonged ER stress eventually results in cell death via apoptosis. tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) is an engineered human tRNA{sup Ser} with an anticodon coding for isoleucine. Here we test the possibility that tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) can be an effective killing agent of breast cancer cells and can effectively inhibit tumor-formation in mice. We found that tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) exert strong effects on breast cancer translation activity, cell viability, and tumor formation. Translation is strongly inhibited by tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) in both tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells. tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) significantly decreased the number of viable cells over time. A short time treatment with tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) was sufficient to eliminate breast tumor formation in a xenograft mouse model. Our results indicate that tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) can inhibit breast cancer metabolism, growth and tumor formation. This RNA has strong anti-cancer effects and presents an opportunity for its development into an anti-tumor agent. Because tRNA{sup Ser}(AAU) corrupts the protein synthesis mechanism that is an integral component of the cell, it would be extremely difficult for tumor cells to evolve and develop resistance against this anti-tumor agent.

  3. Extensive Lysine Methylation in Hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea: Potential Implications for Protein Stability and Recombinant Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine H. Botting

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In eukarya and bacteria, lysine methylation is relatively rare and is catalysed by sequence-specific lysine methyltransferases that typically have only a single-protein target. Using RNA polymerase purified from the thermophilic crenarchaeum Sulfolobus solfataricus, we identified 21 methyllysines distributed across 9 subunits of the enzyme. The modified lysines were predominantly in α-helices and showed no conserved sequence context. A limited survey of the Thermoproteus tenax proteome revealed widespread modification with 52 methyllysines in 30 different proteins. These observations suggest the presence of an unusual lysine methyltransferase with relaxed specificity in the crenarchaea. Since lysine methylation is known to enhance protein thermostability, this may be an adaptation to a thermophilic lifestyle. The implications of this modification for studies and applications of recombinant crenarchaeal enzymes are discussed.

  4. Investigation of Content, Stoichiometry and Transfer of miRNA from Human Neural Stem Cell Line Derived Exosomes.

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    Lara Stevanato

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small (30-100 nm membrane vesicles secreted by a variety of cell types and only recently have emerged as a new avenue for cell-to-cell communication. They are natural shuttles of RNA and protein cargo, making them attractive as potential therapeutic delivery vehicles. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short non-coding RNAs which regulate biological processes and can be found in exosomes. Here we characterized the miRNA contents of exosomes derived from human neural stem cells (hNSCs. Our investigated hNSC line is a clonal, conditionally immortalized cell line, compliant with good manufacturing practice (GMP, and in clinical trials for stroke and critical limb ischemia in the UK (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01151124, NCT02117635, and NCT01916369. By using next generation sequencing (NGS technology we identified the presence of a variety of miRNAs in both exosomal and cellular preparations. Many of these miRNAs were enriched in exosomes indicating that cells specifically sort them for extracellular release. Although exosomes have been proven to contain miRNAs, the copy number quantification per exosome of a given miRNA remains unclear. Herein we quantified by real-time PCR a highly shuttled exosomal miRNA subtype (hsa-miR-1246 in order to assess its stoichiometry per exosome. Furthermore, we utilized an in vitro system to confirm its functional transfer by measuring the reduction in luciferase expression using a 3' untranslated region dual luciferase reporter assay. In summary, NGS analysis allowed the identification of a unique set of hNSC derived exosomal miRNAs. Stoichiometry and functional transfer analysis of one of the most abundant identified miRNA, hsa-miR-1246, were measured to support biological relevance of exosomal miRNA delivery.

  5. Investigation of Content, Stoichiometry and Transfer of miRNA from Human Neural Stem Cell Line Derived Exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanato, Lara; Thanabalasundaram, Lavaniya; Vysokov, Nickolai; Sinden, John D

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small (30-100 nm) membrane vesicles secreted by a variety of cell types and only recently have emerged as a new avenue for cell-to-cell communication. They are natural shuttles of RNA and protein cargo, making them attractive as potential therapeutic delivery vehicles. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs which regulate biological processes and can be found in exosomes. Here we characterized the miRNA contents of exosomes derived from human neural stem cells (hNSCs). Our investigated hNSC line is a clonal, conditionally immortalized cell line, compliant with good manufacturing practice (GMP), and in clinical trials for stroke and critical limb ischemia in the UK (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01151124, NCT02117635, and NCT01916369). By using next generation sequencing (NGS) technology we identified the presence of a variety of miRNAs in both exosomal and cellular preparations. Many of these miRNAs were enriched in exosomes indicating that cells specifically sort them for extracellular release. Although exosomes have been proven to contain miRNAs, the copy number quantification per exosome of a given miRNA remains unclear. Herein we quantified by real-time PCR a highly shuttled exosomal miRNA subtype (hsa-miR-1246) in order to assess its stoichiometry per exosome. Furthermore, we utilized an in vitro system to confirm its functional transfer by measuring the reduction in luciferase expression using a 3' untranslated region dual luciferase reporter assay. In summary, NGS analysis allowed the identification of a unique set of hNSC derived exosomal miRNAs. Stoichiometry and functional transfer analysis of one of the most abundant identified miRNA, hsa-miR-1246, were measured to support biological relevance of exosomal miRNA delivery.

  6. Digestible lysine requirements of broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEP Bernal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern broilers have been submitted to continuous genetic improvement, and therefore, their nutritional requirements must be constantly updated to ensure their performance. Two experiments were carried out to evaluate different digestible lysine levels for starter (1021 days and grower (22-35 days phases. The experiments were carried out with male and female Cobb 500 broilers, distributed according to a randomized block experimental design in a 5x2 factorial arrangement (5 increasing digestible lysine levels x 2 sexes, totaling 10 treatments, with 8 replicates of 22 and 20 birds during the starter and grower phase, respectively. Digestible lysine levels of 1.06, 1.12, 1.18, 1.24, and 1.30 were used in the starter diets (10-21 days and 0.9, 0.98, 1.04, 1.10, and 1.16% in the grower diets (22-35 days. Based on the statistical analyses of the evaluated performance parameters, digestible lysine requirements for maximum performance were determined as 1.22% for males and 1.24% for females in the starter phase, and 1.16% for both sexes in the grower phase. Carcass and performance results indicate that digestible lysine requirements vary with sex and evaluated production parameter. Considering the most relevant broiler production parameters, in 22- to 35-d-old males, digestible lysine requirement for breast meat yield (1.16% was higher than those for feed conversion ratio (1.07% and weight gain (1.05%.

  7. Evolutionary patterns in the sequence and structure of transfer RNA: a window into early translation and the genetic code.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Jie Sun

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA molecules play vital roles during protein synthesis. Their acceptor arms are aminoacylated with specific amino acid residues while their anticodons delimit codon specificity. The history of these two functions has been generally linked in evolutionary studies of the genetic code. However, these functions could have been differentially recruited as evolutionary signatures were left embedded in tRNA molecules. Here we built phylogenies derived from the sequence and structure of tRNA, we forced taxa into monophyletic groups using constraint analyses, tested competing evolutionary hypotheses, and generated timelines of amino acid charging and codon discovery. Charging of Sec, Tyr, Ser and Leu appeared ancient, while specificities related to Asn, Met, and Arg were derived. The timelines also uncovered an early role of the second and then first codon bases, identified codons for Ala and Pro as the most ancient, and revealed important evolutionary take-overs related to the loss of the long variable arm in tRNA. The lack of correlation between ancestries of amino acid charging and encoding indicated that the separate discoveries of these functions reflected independent histories of recruitment. These histories were probably curbed by co-options and important take-overs during early diversification of the living world.

  8. Expansion of the Lysine Acylation Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christian A.

    2012-01-01

    Leaving marks: The number of known posttranslational modifications for lysine has been expanded considerably. In addition to acetylation of side-chain amino functionalities of lysine residues in proteins, crotonylation, succinylation, and malonylation have now been identified as posttranslational...

  9. Mutational robustness of 16S ribosomal RNA, shown by experimental horizontal gene transfer in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Kitahara, Kei; Yasutake, Yoshiaki; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial ribosome consists of three rRNA molecules and 57 proteins and plays a crucial role in translating mRNA-encoded information into proteins. Because of the ribosome’s structural and mechanistic complexity, it is believed that each ribosomal component coevolves to maintain its function. Unlike 5S rRNA, 16S and 23S rRNAs appear to lack mutational robustness, because they form the structural core of the ribosome. However, using Escherichia coli Δ7 (null mutant of operons) as a host, w...

  10. Transfer RNA modifications and genes for modifying enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Peng; Jäger, Gunilla; Zheng, Bo

    2010-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study was to identify genes involved in tRNA modification in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, to understand the function of nucleoside modifications in plant growth and development...

  11. Exogenous mRNA delivery and bioavailability in gene transfer mediated by piggyBac transposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bire, Solenne; Gosset, David; Jégot, Gwenhael; Midoux, Patrick; Pichon, Chantal; Rouleux-Bonnin, Florence

    2013-09-26

    Up to now, the different uptake pathways and the subsequent intracellular trafficking of plasmid DNA have been largely explored. By contrast, the mode of internalization and the intracellular routing of an exogenous mRNA in transfected cells are poorly investigated and remain to be elucidated. The bioavailability of internalized mRNA depends on its intracellular routing and its potential accumulation in dynamic sorting sites for storage: stress granules and processing bodies. This question is of particular significance when a secure transposon-based system able to integrate a therapeutic transgene into the genome is used. Transposon vectors usually require two components: a plasmid DNA, carrying the gene of interest, and a source of transposase allowing the integration of the transgene. The principal drawback is the lasting presence of the transposase, which could remobilize the transgene once it has been inserted. Our study focused on the pharmacokinetics of the transposition process mediated by the piggyBac transposase mRNA transfection. Exogenous mRNA internalization and trafficking were investigated towards a better apprehension and fine control of the piggyBac transposase bioavailability. The mRNA prototype designed in this study provides a very narrow expression window of transposase, which allows high efficiency transposition with no cytotoxicity. Our data reveal that exogenous transposase mRNA enters cells by clathrin and caveolae-mediated endocytosis, before finishing in late endosomes 3 h after transfection. At this point, the mRNA is dissociated from its carrier and localized in stress granules, but not in cytoplasmic processing bodies. Some weaker signals have been observed in stress granules at 18 h and 48 h without causing prolonged production of the transposase. So, we designed an mRNA that is efficiently translated with a peak of transposase production 18 h post-transfection without additional release of the molecule. This confines the integration

  12. Paths of lateral gene transfer of lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with a unique evolutionary transition stage of prokaryotes coding for class I and II varieties by the same organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nussinov Ruth

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the premise that lateral gene transfer (LGT is a dominant evolutionary force is still in considerable dispute, the case for widespread LGT in the family of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS is no longer contentious. aaRSs are ancient enzymes, guarding the fidelity of the genetic code. They are clustered in two structurally unrelated classes. Only lysine aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS is found both as a class 1 and a class 2 enzyme (LysRS1-2. Remarkably, in several extant prokaryotes both classes of the enzyme coexist, a unique phenomenon that has yet to receive its due attention. Results We applied a phylogenetic approach for determining the extent and origin of LGT in prokaryotic LysRS. Reconstructing species trees for Archaea and Bacteria, and inferring that their last common ancestors encoded LysRS1 and LysRS2, respectively, we studied the gains and losses of both classes. A complex pattern of LGT events emerged. In specific groups of organisms LysRS1 was replaced by LysRS2 (and vice versa. In one occasion, within the alpha proteobacteria, a LysRS2 to LysRS1 LGT was followed by reversal to LysRS2. After establishing the most likely LGT paths, we studied the possible origins of the laterally transferred genes. To this end, we reconstructed LysRS gene trees and evaluated the likely origins of the laterally transferred genes. While the sources of LysRS1 LGTs were readily identified, those for LysRS2 remain, for now, uncertain. The replacement of one LysRS by another apparently transits through a stage simultaneously coding for both synthetases, probably conferring a selective advantage to the affected organisms. Conclusion The family of LysRSs features complex LGT events. The currently available data were sufficient for identifying unambiguously the origins of LysRS1 but not of LysRS2 gene transfers. A selective advantage is suggested to organisms encoding simultaneously LysRS1-2.

  13. A major role for the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase complex in the expression of plastid transfer RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Carrier, Rosalind; Zoschke, Reimo; Belcher, Susan; Pfalz, Jeannette; Barkan, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast transcription in land plants relies on collaboration between a plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) of cyanobacterial ancestry and a nucleus-encoded RNA polymerase of phage ancestry. PEP associates with additional proteins that are unrelated to bacterial transcription factors, many of which have been shown to be important for PEP activity in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). However, the biochemical roles of these PEP-associated proteins are not known. We describe phenotypes conditioned by transposon insertions in genes encoding the maize (Zea mays) orthologs of five such proteins: ZmPTAC2, ZmMurE, ZmPTAC10, ZmPTAC12, and ZmPRIN2. These mutants have similar ivory/virescent pigmentation and similar reductions in plastid ribosomes and photosynthetic complexes. RNA gel-blot and microarray hybridizations revealed numerous changes in plastid transcript populations, many of which resemble those reported for the orthologous mutants in Arabidopsis. However, unanticipated reductions in the abundance of numerous transfer RNAs (tRNAs) dominated the microarray data and were validated on RNA gel blots. The magnitude of the deficiencies for several tRNAs was similar to that of the most severely affected messenger RNAs, with the loss of trnL-UAA being particularly severe. These findings suggest that PEP and its associated proteins are critical for the robust transcription of numerous plastid tRNAs and that this function is essential for the prodigious translation of plastid-encoded proteins that is required during the installation of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  14. Nuclear transfer protocol affects messenger RNA expression patterns in cloned bovine blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrenzycki, C; Wells, D; Herrmann, D; Miller, A; Oliver, J; Tervit, R; Niemann, H

    2001-07-01

    The successful production of embryos by nuclear transfer (NT) employing cultured somatic donor cells depends upon a variety of factors. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects 1) of two different activation protocols, 2) the use of quiescent or nonquiescent donor cells (G(0) or G(1) of the cell cycle), and 3) passage number of donor cells on the relative abundance (RA) of eight specific mRNAs (DNA methyltransferase, DNMT; mammalian achaete-scute homologue, Mash2; glucose transporter-1, Glut-1; heat shock protein 70.1, Hsp; desmocollin II, Dc II; E-cadherin, E-cad; interferon tau, IF; insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor, Igf2r) in single blastocysts employing a semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay. The results were compared with those for their in vitro (IVP)- and in vivo-generated noncloned counterparts. In experiment 1, employing either FBA (fusion before activation) or AFS (fusion and activation simultaneously) to generate NT blastocysts, Hsp mRNAs were not found in NT embryos from either protocol, whereas Hsp transcripts were detectable in IVP embryos. The relative abundance (RA) of IF transcripts was significantly increased in the AFS and IVP groups compared to the FBA treatment. In experiment 2, the use of either G(0) or G(1) donor cells to produce cloned embryos both significantly reduced the relative amount of DNMT transcripts and significantly increased the RA of Mash2 compared to the IVP embryos. In addition, IF transcript levels were significantly elevated in NT blastocysts employing G(1) donor cells for NT compared to IVP embryos and those generated using G(0) cells. In experiment 3, donor cells, either from passsage 5/6 or 8, were employed for NT. DNMT transcripts were significantly decreased, whereas Mash2 transcripts were significantly increased in both NT groups compared to their IVP counterparts. The amount of IF mRNA was significantly higher in P8-derived than in P5/6 and IVP embryos. In

  15. Micro-RNA detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer of DNA-carbon quantum dots probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakbaz, Faeze; Mahani, Mohamad

    2017-04-15

    Carbon quantum dots have been proposed as an effective platform for miRNA detection. Carbon dots were synthesized by citric acid. The synthesized dots were characterized by dynamic light scattering, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and FT-IR spectrophotometry. The fluorescence quantum yield of the synthesized dots was determined using quinine sulfate as the standard. The FAM-labeled single stranded DNA, as sensing element, was adsorbed on dots by π-π interaction. The quenching of the dots fluorescence due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used for mir 9-1 detection. In the presence of the complementary miRNA, the FRET did not take place and the fluorescence was recovered.

  16. Carboxypeptidase D is the only enzyme responsible for antibody C-terminal lysine cleavage in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhilan; Zhang, Henry; Haley, Benjamin; Macchi, Frank; Yang, Feng; Misaghi, Shahram; Elich, Joseph; Yang, Renee; Tang, Yun; Joly, John C; Snedecor, Bradley R; Shen, Amy

    2016-10-01

    Heterogeneity of C-terminal lysine levels often observed in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is believed to result from the proteolysis by endogenous carboxypeptidase(s) during cell culture production. Identifying the responsible carboxypeptidase(s) for C-terminal lysine cleavage in CHO cells would provide valuable insights for antibody production cell culture processes development and optimization. In this study, five carboxypeptidases, CpD, CpM, CpN, CpB, and CpE, were studied for message RNA (mRNA) expression by qRT-PCR analysis in two most commonly used blank hosts (DUXB-11 derived DHFR-deficient DP12 host and DHFR-positive CHOK1 host), used for therapeutic antibody production, as well an antibody-expressing cell line derived from each host. Our results showed that CpD had the highest mRNA expression. When CpD mRNA levels were reduced by RNAi (RNA interference) technology, C-terminal lysine levels increased, whereas there was no obvious change in C-terminal lysine levels when a different carboxypeptidase mRNA level was knocked down suggesting that carboxypeptidase D is the main contributor for C-terminal lysine processing. Most importantly, when CpD expression was knocked out by CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) technology, C-terminal lysine cleavage was completely abolished in CpD knockout cells based on mass spectrometry analysis, demonstrating that CpD is the only endogenous carboxypeptidase that cleaves antibody heavy chain C-terminal lysine in CHO cells. Hence, our work showed for the first time that the cleavage of antibody heavy chain C-terminal lysine is solely mediated by the carboxypeptidase D in CHO cells and our finding provides one solution to eliminating C-terminal lysine heterogeneity for therapeutic antibody production by knocking out CpD gene expression. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2100-2106. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Transfer RNA is an essential component of the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent proteolytic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciechanover, A.; Wolin, S.L.. Steitz, J.A.; Lodish, H.F.

    1985-03-01

    Protein degradation via the nonlysosomal ATP-dependent pathway in rabbit reticulocytes involves a number of components. In the initial event, ubiquitin, an abundant 76-residue polypeptide, becomes covalently linked to the protein substrate in an ATP-requiring reaction. Once marked in this way, the conjugated protein is proteolyzed in a reaction that also requires ATP. Here the authors show that tRNA is another essential component of the system. Ribonucleases strongly inhibit the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent degradation of /sup 125/I-labeled bovine serum albumin in the reticulocyte system in vitro. RNAs extracted from fractions of the reticulocyte extract or from mouse cells restore proteolytic activity. When the RNA is fractionated by gel electrophoresis, only the tRNA fraction is active in restoring proteolysis. Furthermore, pure mouse tRNA/sup His/, isolated by immunoprecipitation with patient autoimmune sera, restores the proteolytic activity. The possibility that the level of uncharged tRNA in mammalian cells regulates the ubiquitin- and ATP-dependent proteolytic system is discussed.

  18. Inefficient cationic lipid-mediated siRNA and antisense oligonucleotide transfer to airway epithelial cells in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jim

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cationic lipid Genzyme lipid (GL 67 is the current "gold-standard" for in vivo lung gene transfer. Here, we assessed, if GL67 mediated uptake of siRNAs and asODNs into airway epithelium in vivo. Methods Anti-lacZ and ENaC (epithelial sodium channel siRNA and asODN were complexed to GL67 and administered to the mouse airway epithelium in vivo Transfection efficiency and efficacy were assessed using real-time RT-PCR as well as through protein expression and functional studies. In parallel in vitro experiments were carried out to select the most efficient oligonucleotides. Results In vitro, GL67 efficiently complexed asODNs and siRNAs, and both were stable in exhaled breath condensate. Importantly, during in vitro selection of functional siRNA and asODN we noted that asODNs accumulated rapidly in the nuclei of transfected cells, whereas siRNAs remained in the cytoplasm, a pattern consistent with their presumed site of action. Following in vivo lung transfection siRNAs were only visible in alveolar macrophages, whereas asODN also transfected alveolar epithelial cells, but no significant uptake into conducting airway epithelial cells was seen. SiRNAs and asODNs targeted to β-galactosidase reduced βgal mRNA levels in the airway epithelium of K18-lacZ mice by 30% and 60%, respectively. However, this was insufficient to reduce protein expression. In an attempt to increase transfection efficiency of the airway epithelium, we increased contact time of siRNA and asODN using the in vivo mouse nose model. Although highly variable and inefficient, transfection of airway epithelium with asODN, but not siRNA, was now seen. As asODNs more effectively transfected nasal airway epithelial cells, we assessed the effect of asODN against ENaC, a potential therapeutic target in cystic fibrosis; no decrease in ENaC mRNA levels or function was detected. Conclusion This study suggests that although siRNAs and asODNs can be developed to inhibit

  19. Interactions of transfer RNA pseudouridine synthases with RNAs substituted with fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, T

    1991-11-25

    We have previously purified and characterized two different S. cerevisiae enzymes that produce pseudouridine specifically in nucleotide positions 13 and 55, respectively, in their tRNA substrates. The interactions of these enzymes with fluorinated tRNAs have now been studied. Such RNAs were produced by in vitro transcription using as templates synthetic genes that encode variants of a yeast glycine tRNA. RNAs substituted with fluorouracil were found to markedly inhibit pseudouridine synthase activity and the inhibitory effect of a tRNA was to a large extent dependent on the presence of fluorouracil in the nucleotide position where normally pseudouridylation occurs. Pseudouridine synthases were shown to form highly stable, non-covalent complexes with fluorinated tRNAs and we demonstrate that this interaction may be used to further characterize and purify these enzymes. The use of 5-fluorouracil as a cancer therapeutic agent is discussed in relation to our results.

  20. The structural feature surrounding glycated lysine residues in human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shigenori; Nakahari, Takashi; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2011-06-01

    Complications derived from diabetes mellitus are caused by nonenzymatic protein glycation at the specific sites. LC/MS/MS was performed for the identification of the tryptic peptides of glycated hemoglobins using glyceraldehyde. After the identification of the glycation or non-glycation site, computer analysis of the structure surrounding the sites was carried out using PDB data (1BZ0). Five glycated lysine residues (Lys-16(α), -56(α), -8(β), -82(β), and -144(β)) and four non-glycated lysine residues (Lys-7(α), -40(α), -99(α), and -132(β)) were identified. The non-glycated lysine residues, Lys-7(α), -40(α), and -132(β), are most likely to form electrostatic interactions with the β carboxyl group of Asp-74(α), C-terminal His-146(β), and Glu-7(β) by virtue of their proximity, which is 2.67-2.91 Å (N-O). Additionally, there are histidine residues within 4.55-7.38 Å (N-N) around eight sites except for Lys-7(α). We conclude that the following factors seem to be necessary for glycation of lysine residues: (i) the apparent absence of aspartate or glutamate residues to inhibit the glycation reaction by forming an electrostatic interaction, (ii) the presence of histidine residues for acid-base catalysis of the Amadori rearrangement, and (iii) the presence of an amino acid residue capable of stabilizing a phosphate during proton transfer.

  1. Ribosomal protein L16 binds to the 3'-end of transfer RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimets, T; Remme, J; Villems, R

    1984-01-23

    Escherichia coli 50 S ribosomal subunits were reconstituted with and without protein L16 present. The latter particles, although active in puromycin reaction, were unable to use CACCA-Phe as an acceptor substrate. We also found that L16 interacts directly with this oligonucleotide and, in the complex with tRNA, protects its 3'-end from pancreatic ribonuclease digestion. We suggest that the role of L16 is in the fixation of the aminoacyl stem of tRNA to the ribosome at its A-site.

  2. Inhibition of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication with exosome-transferred artificial microRNA targeting the 3' untranslated region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Bao, Liping; Zhang, Xinyu; Xia, Xiaoli; Sun, Huaichang

    2015-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an economically important swine disease. As part of the development of RNA interference (RNAi) strategy against the disease, in this study a recombinant adenovirus (rAd) expressing the artificial microRNA (amiRNA) targeting the 3' untranslated region (UTR) was used to investigate the exosome-mediated amiRNA transfer from different pig cell types to porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the sequence-specific amiRNA was expressed in and secreted via exosomes from the rAd-transduced pig kidney cell line PK-15, PAM cell line 3D4/163, kidney fibroblast cells (PFCs) and endometrial endothelial cells (PEECs) with different secretion efficiencies. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that the dye-labeled amiRNA-containing exosomes of different cell origins were efficiently taken up by all of the five types of pig cells tested, including primary PAMs. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that the amiRNA-containing exosomes of different cell origins were taken up by primary PAMs in both time- and dose-dependent manners. Both quantitative RT-PCR and viral titration assays showed that the exosome-delivered amiRNA had potent anti-viral effects against three different PRRSV strains. These data suggest that the exosomes derived from pig cells could serve as an efficient miRNA transfer vehicle, and that the exosome-delivered amiRNA had potent anti-viral effects against different PRRSV strains.

  3. Available lysine in canned fish

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, D. Ramananda; Gadre, Ujjwala V.

    1984-01-01

    Otolithus argenteus was canned in brine by heat processing at two different steam pressures either at 0.70 kg/cm super(2) or 1.05 kg/cm super(2) for 25 minutes. The nutritive value of canned fish as evaluated by the total nitrogen and available lysine did not alter much either during heat processing or during storage over a period of nine months at 28 degree plus or minus 5 degree C.

  4. Virus-Like Particles That Can Deliver Proteins and RNA | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present invention describes novel virus-like particles (VLPs) that are capable of binding to and replicating within a target mammalian cell, including human cells. The claimed VLPs are safer than viral delivery because they are incapable of re-infecting target cells. The National Cancer Institute's Protein Expression Laboratory seeks parties interested in licensing the novel delivery of RNA to mammalian cells using virus-like particles.

  5. Effect of bacteriophage lysin on lysogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Balaji Subramanyam; Vanaja Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of phage lysin on the growth of lysogens. Methods: Sputum specimens processed by modified Petroff's method were respectively treated with phagebiotics in combination with lysin and lysin alone. The specimens were incubated at 37℃ for 4 days. At the end of day 1, 2, 3 and day 4, the specimens were streaked on blood agar plates and incubated at 37℃ for 18-24 hours. The growth of normal flora observed after day 1 was considered as lysogens.Results:When specimens treated with lysin alone, lysogen formation was avoided and normal flora was controlled. Conclusions: Lysin may have no effect on the growth of lysogens. Sputum specimens treated with phagebiotics-lysin showed the growth of lysogens.

  6. Observation of a Change in Twist of an RNA Kissing Complex Using the Angular Dependence of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Milas, Peker; Parrot, Louis; Gamari, Ben D.; Goldner, Lori S.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of a change in the bend angle of an RNA kissing complex upon Rop binding using single-molecular-pair FRET. The angular relationship between the dyes, rather than the distance between them, is shown to be responsible for the observed change in energy transfer. It has long been thought that Rop increases the bend angle of the R1inv-R2inv complex upon binding, but this has never been directly observed. In contrast, we find an increase in FRET upon the addition of Rop that is shown via modeling to be consistent with a decrease in the bend angle of the complex of $-15^{\\circ}\\pm7^{\\circ}$. The model predicts FRET from dye trajectories generated using molecular dynamics simulations of Cy3 and Cy5 attached to $5'$ terminal cytosine or guanosine on RNA. While FRET is commonly used to observe global changes in molecular structure attributed to changes in the distance between dyes, it is rarely, if ever, used to elucidate angular changes. Subtle global changes in molecular structure upon binding are generally difficult to discern using NMR or crystallography, but FRET is well suited to observe these changes because of its sensitivity at interdye distance around the F\\"orster radius, $R_F\\approx5$ nm. While FRET is often referred to and used as a "molecular ruler" for distances around $R_F$, for dye pairs that have minimal rotational freedom, FRET can also be used to observe changes in structure for which there is no significant change in distance between the dyes. This is the case for the R1inv-R2inv kissing complex studied here. This complex is derived from the RNA I - RNA II complex in E. coli. RNA II is a primer for replication of the ColE1 plasmid, its function is modulated by interaction with RNA II. Rop is known to stabilize the complex, and it is also known to bind kissing complexes in a structure, but not sequence, dependent fashion.

  7. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  8. Role of lysine binding residues in the global folding of the lysC riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Peter, Erich; Lamontagne, Anne-Marie; Lafontaine, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Riboswitches regulate gene expression by rearranging their structure upon metabolite binding. The lysine-sensing lysC riboswitch is a rare example of an RNA aptamer organized around a 5-way helical junction in which ligand binding is performed exclusively through nucleotides located at the junction core. We have probed whether the nucleotides involved in ligand binding play any role in the global folding of the riboswitch. As predicted, our findings indicate that ligand-binding residues are critical for the lysine-dependent gene regulation mechanism. We also find that these residues are not important for the establishment of key magnesium-dependent tertiary interactions, suggesting that folding and ligand recognition are uncoupled in this riboswitch for the formation of specific interactions. However, FRET assays show that lysine binding results in an additional conformational change, indicating that lysine binding may also participate in a specific folding transition. Thus, in contrast to helical junctions being primary determinants in ribozymes and rRNA folding, we speculate that the helical junction of the lysine-sensing lysC riboswitch is not employed as structural a scaffold to direct global folding, but rather has a different role in establishing RNA-ligand interactions required for riboswitch regulation. Our work suggests that helical junctions may adopt different functions such as the coordination of global architecture or the formation of specific ligand binding site.

  9. Direct transfer of synthetic double-stranded RNA into protoplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ha-Il; Zhai, Zhiyang; Vatamaniuk, Olena K

    2011-01-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA interference (RNAi) is widely used as a reverse genetic approach for functional analysis of plant genes. Constitutive or transient RNAi effects in plants have been achieved via generating stable transformants expressing dsRNAs or artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) in planta or by viral-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Although these tools provide outstanding resources for functional genomics, they require generation of vectors expressing dsRNAs or amiRNAs against targeted genes, transformation and propagation of transformed plants, or maintenance of multiple VIGS lines and thus impose time, labor, and space requirements. As we showed recently, these limitations can be circumvented by inducing RNAi effects in protoplasts via transfecting them with in vitro-synthesized dsRNAs. In this chapter we detail the procedure for transient gene silencing in protoplasts using synthetic dsRNAs and provide examples of approaches for subsequent functional analyses.

  10. Observation of a Change in Bend of an RNA Kissing Complex Using the Angular Dependence of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Rahmanseresht, Sheema; Gamari, Ben D; Goldner, Lori S

    2014-01-01

    We report on the observation of a change in the bend angle of an RNA kissing complex upon Rop binding using single-molecular-pair FRET. The angular relationship between the dyes, rather than the distance between them, is shown to be responsible for the observed change in energy transfer. It has long been thought that Rop increases the bend angle of the R1inv-R2inv complex upon binding, but this has never been directly observed. In contrast, we find an increase in FRET upon the addition of Rop that is shown via modeling to be consistent with a decrease in the bend angle of the complex of $-15^{\\circ}\\pm7^{\\circ}$. The model predicts FRET from dye trajectories generated using molecular dynamics simulations of Cy3 and Cy5 attached to $5'$ terminal cytosine or guanosine on RNA. While FRET is commonly used to observe global changes in molecular structure attributed to changes in the distance between dyes, it is rarely, if ever, used to elucidate angular changes. Subtle global changes in molecular structure upon bi...

  11. PENILAIAN PENGARUH PENAMBAHAN LYSINE PADA NASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatius Tarwotjo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pengaruh penambahan lysine pada mutu protein nasi dilakukan pada tikus putih dengan mengukur Protein Efficiency Ratio. Nasi dan Nasi dengan sayur beserta laukpauk, seperti dikonsumsi oleh kebanyakan keluarga di Indonesia, yang berasnya lebih dulu ditambahi butiran premix berisi lysine, thiamine dan riboflavin ternaya menghasilkan Protein Efficiency Ratio lebih tinggi dari pada yang tidak ditambahi.

  12. The importance of highly conserved nucleotides in the binding region of chloramphenicol at the peptidyl transfer centre of Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Birte; Garrett, Roger Antony

    1988-01-01

    conserved nucleotides. With a view to investigate the function of this RNA region further, four of these conserved nucleotides, including one indirectly implicated in chloramphenicol binding, were selected for mutation in Escherichia coli 23S rRNA using oligonucleotide primers. Mutant RNAs were expressed......The peptidyl transfer site has been localized at the centre of domain V of 23S-like ribosomal RNA (rRNA) primarily on the basis of a chloramphenicol binding site. The implicated region constitutes an unstructured circle in the current secondary structural model which contains several universally...... in vivo on a plasmid-encoded rRNA (rrnB) operon and each one yielded dramatically altered phenotypes. Cells exhibiting A2060----C or A2450----C transversions were inviable and it was shown by inserting the mutated genes after a temperature-inducible promoter that the mutant RNAs were directly responsible...

  13. The Sulfolobus solfataricus Lrp-like protein LysM regulates lysine biosynthesis in response to lysine availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Arie B; Bell, Stephen D; Lebbink, Robert Jan; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John

    2002-08-16

    Although the archaeal transcription apparatus resembles the eukaryal RNA polymerase II system, many bacterial-like regulators can be found in archaea. Particularly, all archaeal genomes sequenced to date contain genes encoding homologues of Lrp (leucine-responsive regulatory protein). Whereas Lrp-like proteins in bacteria are involved in regulation of amino acid metabolism, their physiological role in archaea is unknown. Although several archaeal Lrp-like proteins have been characterized recently, no target genes apart from their own coding genes have been discovered yet, and no ligands for these regulators have been identified so far. In this study, we show that the Lrp-like protein LysM from Sulfolobus solfataricus is involved in the regulation of lysine and possibly also arginine biosynthesis, encoded by the lys gene cluster. Exogenous lysine is the regulatory signal for lys gene expression and specifically serves as a ligand for LysM by altering its DNA binding affinity. LysM binds directly upstream of the TFB-responsive element of the intrinsically weak lysW promoter, and DNA binding is favored in the absence of lysine, when lysWXJK transcription is maximal. The combined in vivo and in vitro data are most compatible with a model in which the bacterial-like LysM activates the eukarya-like transcriptional machinery. As with transcriptional activation by Escherichia coli Lrp, activation by LysM is apparently dependent on a co-activator, which remains to be identified.

  14. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “Chemistry Department, Kenyatta University, P. 0. Box 43844 ... harvester (X) [L 2] in a manner consistent with the following Forster equation for long range energy transfer [3-7]. .... sensitive foods, chemical reactors and essences. Recently we ...

  15. Pin-point chemical modification of RNA with diverse molecules through the functionality transfer reaction and the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Shibata, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Yosuke; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2011-05-07

    The internal modification of RNA has been successfully achieved by the functionality transfer reaction (FTR) and following click chemistry with diverse azide compounds. The benefits of the FTR have been demonstrated by its specificity, rapidity, broad applicability, and procedure simplicity. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  16. Synthesis, pharmacokinetics, and biological use of lysine-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, J Justin; Feinberg, Evan N; Alidori, Simone; McDevitt, Michael R; Heller, Daniel A; Scheinberg, David A

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to create a more robust and more accessible standard for amine-modifying single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). A 1,3-cycloaddition was developed using an azomethine ylide, generated by reacting paraformaldehyde and a side-chain-Boc (tert-Butyloxycarbonyl)-protected, lysine-derived alpha-amino acid, H-Lys(Boc)-OH, with purified SWCNT or C60. This cycloaddition and its lysine adduct provides the benefits of dense, covalent modification, ease of purification, commercial availability of reagents, and pH-dependent solubility of the product. Subsequently, SWCNTs functionalized with lysine amine handles were covalently conjugated to a radiometalated chelator, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). The (111)In-labeled construct showed rapid renal clearance in a murine model and a favorable biodistribution, permitting utility in biomedical applications. Functionalized SWCNTs strongly wrapped small interfering RNA (siRNA). In the first disclosed deployment of thermophoresis with carbon nanotubes, the lysine-modified tubes showed a desirable, weak SWCNT-albumin binding constant. Thus, lysine-modified nanotubes are a favorable candidate for medicinal work.

  17. Synthesis and Phase Behavior of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-b- Poly(L-Lysine Hydrochloride and Poly(N-Isopropylacrylamide- co-Acrylamide-b-Poly(L-Lysine Hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Spasojević

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-b-poly(L-lysine and poly(N- isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide-b-poly(L-lysine copolymers was accomplished by combining atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP and ring opening polymerization (ROP. For this purpose, a di-functional initiator with protected amino group was successfully synthetized. The ATRP of N-isopropylacrylamide yielded narrowly dispersed polymers with consistent high yields (~80%. Lower yields (~50% were observed when narrowly dispersed random copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide and acrylamide where synthesized. Amino-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide- co-acrylamide were successfully used as macroinitiators for ROP of N6-carbobenzoxy-L- lysine N-carboxyanhydride. The thermal behavior of the homopolymers and copolymers in aqueous solutions was studied by turbidimetry, dynamic light scattering (DLS and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR.

  18. Endogenous Lysine Strategy Profile and Cartel Duration : An Instrumental Variables Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Colluding firms often exchange private information and make transfers within the cartels based on the information. Estimating the impact of such collusive practices— known as the “lysine strategy profile (LSP)”— on cartel duration is difficult because of endogeneity and omitted variable

  19. Endogenous Lysine Strategy Profile and Cartel Duration : An Instrumental Variables Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Colluding firms often exchange private information and make transfers within the cartels based on the information. Estimating the impact of such collusive practices— known as the “lysine strategy profile (LSP)”— on cartel duration is difficult because of endogeneity and omitted variable bi

  20. Reactive lysine content in commercially available pet foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van C.; Bosch, G.; Poel, van der A.F.B.; Wierenga, P.A.; Alexander, L.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    The Maillard reaction can occur during processing of pet foods. During this reaction, the e-amino group of lysine reacts with reducing sugars to become unavailable for metabolism. The aim of the present study was to determine the reactive lysine (RL; the remaining available lysine) to total lysine (

  1. SET7/9 Catalytic Mutants Reveal the Role of Active Site Water Molecules in Lysine Multiple Methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Rizzo, Paul A.; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M.A.; Strunk, Bethany S.; Roiko, Marijo S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Houtz, Robert L.; Trievel, Raymond C. (Michigan); (NWU); (Kentucky)

    2010-11-15

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine {epsilon}-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransferase, respectively. Crystal structures of these mutants in complex with peptides bearing unmodified, mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysines illustrate the roles of active site water molecules in aligning the lysine {epsilon}-amino group for methyl transfer with S-adenosylmethionine. Displacement or dissociation of these solvent molecules enlarges the diameter of the active site, accommodating the increasing size of the methylated {epsilon}-amino group during successive methyl transfer reactions. Together, these results furnish new insights into the roles of active site water molecules in modulating lysine multiple methylation by SET domain KMTs and provide the first molecular snapshots of the mono-, di-, and trimethyl transfer reactions catalyzed by these enzymes.

  2. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Picaud

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  3. Structural studies of a bacterial tRNA(HIS guanylyltransferase (Thg1-like protein, with nucleotide in the activation and nucleotidyl transfer sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Hyde

    Full Text Available All nucleotide polymerases and transferases catalyze nucleotide addition in a 5' to 3' direction. In contrast, tRNA(His guanylyltransferase (Thg1 enzymes catalyze the unusual reverse addition (3' to 5' of nucleotides to polynucleotide substrates. In eukaryotes, Thg1 enzymes use the 3'-5' addition activity to add G-1 to the 5'-end of tRNA(His, a modification required for efficient aminoacylation of the tRNA by the histidyl-tRNA synthetase. Thg1-like proteins (TLPs are found in Archaea, Bacteria, and mitochondria and are biochemically distinct from their eukaryotic Thg1 counterparts TLPs catalyze 5'-end repair of truncated tRNAs and act on a broad range of tRNA substrates instead of exhibiting strict specificity for tRNA(His. Taken together, these data suggest that TLPs function in distinct biological pathways from the tRNA(His maturation pathway, perhaps in tRNA quality control. Here we present the first crystal structure of a TLP, from the gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (BtTLP. The enzyme is a tetramer like human THG1, with which it shares substantial structural similarity. Catalysis of the 3'-5' reaction with 5'-monophosphorylated tRNA necessitates first an activation step, generating a 5'-adenylylated intermediate prior to a second nucleotidyl transfer step, in which a nucleotide is transferred to the tRNA 5'-end. Consistent with earlier characterization of human THG1, we observed distinct binding sites for the nucleotides involved in these two steps of activation and nucleotidyl transfer. A BtTLP complex with GTP reveals new interactions with the GTP nucleotide in the activation site that were not evident from the previously solved structure. Moreover, the BtTLP-ATP structure allows direct observation of ATP in the activation site for the first time. The BtTLP structural data, combined with kinetic analysis of selected variants, provide new insight into the role of key residues in the activation step.

  4. Oligo(L-lysine)-induced titanium dioxide: Effects of consecutive lysine on precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sungjun; Park, Sangwoo; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2011-11-01

    Biomineralization of metal oxide utilizes biomolecular substances, such as peptides and proteins, to induce mineralization of metal precursors in a mild aqueous solution. In this study, we investigated biomineralization of an abiological substance, titanium dioxide (TiO 2), by oligo(L-lysine). Specifically, we systemically studied the influence of the number of consecutive lysine on TiO 2 precipitation. Oligo(L-lysine) was chosen as a homopeptide lysine source whose lysine quantity was adjusted. When oligo(L-lysine) contains more than three consecutive lysine, it induces notably fast precipitation, while single and dilysine do not readily form TiO 2 precipitates. Precipitation of TiO 2 was promoted with the length of oligo(L-lysine). The oligo(L-lysine) was associated with TiO 2 precipitate, which was confirmed by spectroscopic and thermogravitational analyses. The outcomes of this research provide a plausible rationale for explaining precipitation of the Ti precursor that is highly dependent on peptide sequences.

  5. T4 RNA Ligase 2 truncated active site mutants: improved tools for RNA analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Fanglei

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T4 RNA ligases 1 and 2 are useful tools for RNA analysis. Their use upstream of RNA analyses such as high-throughput RNA sequencing and microarrays has recently increased their importance. The truncated form of T4 RNA ligase 2, comprising amino acids 1-249 (T4 Rnl2tr, is an attractive tool for attachment of adapters or labels to RNA 3'-ends. Compared to T4 RNA ligase 1, T4 Rnl2tr has a decreased ability to ligate 5'-PO4 ends in single-stranded RNA ligations, and compared to the full-length T4 Rnl2, the T4 Rnl2tr has an increased activity for joining 5'-adenylated adapters to RNA 3'-ends. The combination of these properties allows adapter attachment to RNA 3'-ends with reduced circularization and concatemerization of substrate RNA. Results With the aim of further reducing unwanted side ligation products, we substituted active site residues, known to be important for adenylyltransferase steps of the ligation reaction, in the context of T4 Rnl2tr. We characterized the variant ligases for the formation of unwanted ligation side products and for activity in the strand-joining reaction. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that lysine 227 is a key residue facilitating adenylyl transfer from adenylated ligation donor substrates to the ligase. This reversal of the second step of the ligation reaction correlates with the formation of unwanted ligation products. Thus, T4 Rn2tr mutants containing the K227Q mutation are useful for reducing undesired ligation products. We furthermore report optimal conditions for the use of these improved T4 Rnl2tr variants.

  6. Lysine requirement of growing male Pekin ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bons, A; Timmler, R; Jeroch, H

    2002-12-01

    1. One growth experiment and one balance test were conducted to study the response to increasing levels of dietary lysine supplementation in male Pekin ducks with special reference to the growth periods from 1 to 3 weeks and 4 to 7 weeks of age. 2. Two different low-lysine diets were used as basal diets in both periods. The basal lysine levels were 7.6 g/kg (d 1 to 21) and 6.2 g/kg (d 22 to 49) and the ranges in lysine concentration were 7.6 to 12.6 g/kg (d 1 to 21) and 6.2 to 11.2 g/kg (d 22 to 49). 3. Growth performance, feed conversion efficiency and meat yield increased (P < 0.05) with increasing lysine concentration (requirement defined as 95% of the asymptote). 4. It is concluded that the dietary lysine concentration should be 0.93 g/MJ nitrogen corrected apparent metabolisable energy (AMEN) (11.7 g/kg) for the starter period (until d 21) and 0.75 g/MJ AMEN (10.0 g/kg) for the grower period (from d 22 onwards).

  7. Engineering and Validation of a Vector for Concomitant Expression of Rare Transfer RNA (tRNA) and HIV-1 nef Genes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mualif, Siti Aisyah; Teow, Sin-Yeang; Omar, Tasyriq Che; Chew, Yik Wei; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd; Ali, Syed A

    2015-01-01

    Relative ease in handling and manipulation of Escherichia coli strains make them primary candidate to express proteins heterologously. Overexpression of heterologous genes that contain codons infrequently used by E. coli is related with difficulties such as mRNA instability, early termination of transcription and/or translation, deletions and/or misincorporation, and cell growth inhibition. These codon bias -associated problems are addressed by co-expressing ColE1-compatible, rare tRNA expressing helper plasmids. However, this approach has inadequacies, which we have addressed by engineering an expression vector that concomitantly expresses the heterologous protein of interest, and rare tRNA genes in E. coli. The expression vector contains three (argU, ileY, leuW) rare tRNA genes and a useful multiple cloning site for easy in-frame cloning. To maintain the overall size of the parental plasmid vector, the rare tRNA genes replaced the non-essential DNA segments in the vector. The cloned gene is expressed under the control of T7 promoter and resulting recombinant protein has a C-terminal 6His tag for IMAC-mediated purification. We have evaluated the usefulness of this expression vector by expressing three HIV-1 genes namely HIV-1 p27 (nef), HIV-1 p24 (ca), and HIV-1 vif in NiCo21(DE3) E.coli and demonstrated the advantages of using expression vector that concomitantly expresses rare tRNA and heterologous genes.

  8. Bioavailability of free lysine and protein-bound lysine from casein and fishmeal in juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeckel, Saskia; Dietz, Carsten; Schulz, Carsten; Susenbeth, Andreas

    2015-03-14

    In the present study, a linear regression analysis between lysine intake and lysine retention was conducted to investigate the efficiency of lysine utilisation (k(Lys)) at marginal lysine intake of either protein-bound or free lysine sources in juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima). For this purpose, nine isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated to contain 2·25-4·12 g lysine/100 g crude protein (CP) to ensure that lysine was the first-limiting amino acid in all diets. The basal diet contained 2·25 g lysine/100 g CP. Graded levels of casein (Cas), fishmeal (FM) and L-lysine HCl (Lys) were added to the experimental diets to achieve stepwise lysine increments. A total of 240 fish (initial weight 50·1 g) were hand-fed all the experimental diets once daily until apparent satiation over a period of 56 d. Feed intake was significantly affected by dietary lysine concentration rather than by dietary lysine source. Specific growth rate increased significantly at higher lysine concentrations (PCas, Lys or FM were 0·833, 0·857 and 0·684, respectively. The bioavailability of lysine from the respective lysine sources was determined by a slope-ratio approach. The bioavailability of lysine (relative to the reference lysine source Cas) from FM and Lys was 82·1 and 103 %, respectively. Nutrient requirement for maintenance was in the range of 16·7-23·4 mg/kg(0·8) per d, and did not differ between the treatments. There were no significant differences in lysine utilisation efficiency or bioavailability of protein-bound or crystalline lysine from the respective sources observed when lysine was confirmed to be the first-limiting nutrient.

  9. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Chingyuan; Tizioto, Polyana C.; Huang, Huan; Lee, Mi O. K.; Payne, Harold R.; Lawhon, Sara D.; Schroeder, Friedhelm; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Womack, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease. PMID:27409794

  10. Expression of the Bovine NK-Lysin Gene Family and Activity against Respiratory Pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Chen

    Full Text Available Unlike the genomes of many mammals that have a single NK-lysin gene, the cattle genome contains a family of four genes, one of which is expressed preferentially in the lung. In this study, we compared the expression of the four bovine NK-lysin genes in healthy animals to animals challenged with pathogens known to be associated with bovine respiratory disease (BRD using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq. The expression of several NK-lysins, especially NK2C, was elevated in challenged relative to control animals. The effects of synthetic peptides corresponding to functional region helices 2 and 3 of each gene product were tested on both model membranes and bio-membranes. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that these peptides adopted a more helical secondary structure upon binding to an anionic model membrane and liposome leakage assays suggested that these peptides disrupt membranes. Bacterial killing assays further confirmed the antimicrobial effects of these peptides on BRD-associated bacteria, including both Pasteurella multocida and Mannhemia haemolytica and an ultrastructural examination of NK-lysin-treated P. multocida cells by transmission electron microscopy revealed the lysis of target membranes. These studies demonstrate that the expanded bovine NK-lysin gene family is potentially important in host defense against pathogens involved in bovine respiratory disease.

  11. Transfer RNA gene numbers may not be completely responsible for the codon usage bias in asparagine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine in the high expression genes in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satapathy, Siddhartha Sankar; Dutta, Malay; Buragohain, Alak Kumar; Ray, Suvendra Kumar

    2012-08-01

    It is generally believed that the effect of translational selection on codon usage bias is related to the number of transfer RNA genes in bacteria, which is more with respect to the high expression genes than the whole genome. Keeping this in the background, we analyzed codon usage bias with respect to asparagine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine amino acids. Analysis was done in seventeen bacteria with the available gene expression data and information about the tRNA gene number. In most of the bacteria, it was observed that codon usage bias and tRNA gene number were not in agreement, which was unexpected. We extended the study further to 199 bacteria, limiting to the codon usage bias in the two highly expressed genes rpoB and rpoC which encode the RNA polymerase subunits β and β', respectively. In concordance with the result in the high expression genes, codon usage bias in rpoB and rpoC genes was also found to not be in agreement with tRNA gene number in many of these bacteria. Our study indicates that tRNA gene numbers may not be the sole determining factor for translational selection of codon usage bias in bacterial genomes.

  12. Lysine-Rich Proteins in High-Lysine Hordeum Vulgare Grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingversen, J.; Køie, B.

    1973-01-01

    The salt-soluble proteins in barley grain selected for high-lysine content (Hiproly, CI 7115 and the mutants 29 and 86) and of a control (Carlsberg II) with normal lysine content, contain identical major proteins as determined by MW and electrophoretic mobility. The concentration of a protein group...

  13. Synthesis of 2'(3')-O-DL-alanyl hexainosinic acid using T4 RNA ligase: suppression of the enzymic reverse transfer reaction by alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profy, A T; Lo, K M; Usher, D A

    1983-03-11

    2'(3')-O-DL-Alanyl (Ip)5I was synthesized by a new method. An alanine ortho ester of inosine 5'-phosphate was added to (Ip)4I using the ATP-independent reaction of T4 RNA ligase, and the product was converted smoothly to the desired ester. The enzymic reverse transfer reaction was conveniently suppressed by the dephosphorylation of the adenosine 5'-phosphate coproduct, catalyzed in situ by alkaline phosphatase.

  14. Sulfur transfer and activation by ubiquitin-like modifier system Uba4•Urm1 link protein urmylation and tRNA thiolation in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Jüdes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Urm1 is a unique dual-function member of the ubiquitin protein family and conserved from yeast to man. It acts both as a protein modifier in ubiquitin-like urmylation and as a sulfur donor for tRNA thiolation, which in concert with the Elongator pathway forms 5-methoxy-carbonyl-methyl-2-thio (mcm5s2 modified wobble uridines (U34 in anticodons. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to study a relationship between these two functions, we examined whether cultivation temperature and sulfur supply previously implicated in the tRNA thiolation branch of the URM1 pathway also contribute to proper urmylation. Monitoring Urm1 conjugation, we found urmylation of the peroxiredoxin Ahp1 is suppressed either at elevated cultivation temperatures or under sulfur starvation. In line with this, mutants with sulfur transfer defects that are linked to enzymes (Tum1, Uba4 required for Urm1 activation by thiocarboxylation (Urm1-COSH were found to maintain drastically reduced levels of Ahp1 urmylation and mcm5s2U34 modification. Moreover, as revealed by site specific mutagenesis, the S-transfer rhodanese domain (RHD in the E1-like activator (Uba4 crucial for Urm1-COSH formation is critical but not essential for protein urmylation and tRNA thiolation. In sum, sulfur supply, transfer and activation chemically link protein urmylation and tRNA thiolation. These are features that distinguish the ubiquitin-like modifier system Uba4•Urm1 from canonical ubiquitin family members and will help elucidate whether, in addition to their mechanistic links, the protein and tRNA modification branches of the URM1 pathway may also relate in function to one another.

  15. Engineering and Validation of a Vector for Concomitant Expression of Rare Transfer RNA (tRNA and HIV-1 nef Genes in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Aisyah Mualif

    Full Text Available Relative ease in handling and manipulation of Escherichia coli strains make them primary candidate to express proteins heterologously. Overexpression of heterologous genes that contain codons infrequently used by E. coli is related with difficulties such as mRNA instability, early termination of transcription and/or translation, deletions and/or misincorporation, and cell growth inhibition. These codon bias -associated problems are addressed by co-expressing ColE1-compatible, rare tRNA expressing helper plasmids. However, this approach has inadequacies, which we have addressed by engineering an expression vector that concomitantly expresses the heterologous protein of interest, and rare tRNA genes in E. coli. The expression vector contains three (argU, ileY, leuW rare tRNA genes and a useful multiple cloning site for easy in-frame cloning. To maintain the overall size of the parental plasmid vector, the rare tRNA genes replaced the non-essential DNA segments in the vector. The cloned gene is expressed under the control of T7 promoter and resulting recombinant protein has a C-terminal 6His tag for IMAC-mediated purification. We have evaluated the usefulness of this expression vector by expressing three HIV-1 genes namely HIV-1 p27 (nef, HIV-1 p24 (ca, and HIV-1 vif in NiCo21(DE3 E.coli and demonstrated the advantages of using expression vector that concomitantly expresses rare tRNA and heterologous genes.

  16. Analysis of the Gap Junction-dependent Transfer of miRNA with 3D-FRAP Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemcke, Heiko; Voronina, Natalia; Steinhoff, Gustav; David, Robert

    2017-06-19

    Small antisense RNAs, like miRNA and siRNA, play an important role in cellular physiology and pathology and, moreover, can be used as therapeutic agents in the treatment of several diseases. The development of new, innovative strategies for miRNA/siRNA therapy is based on an extensive knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Recent data suggest that small RNAs are exchanged between cells in a gap junction-dependent manner, thereby inducing gene regulatory effects in the recipient cell. Molecular biological techniques and flow cytometric analysis are commonly used to study the intercellular exchange of miRNA. However, these methods do not provide high temporal resolution, which is necessary when studying the gap junctional flux of molecules. Therefore, to investigate the impact of miRNA/siRNA as intercellular signaling molecules, novel tools are needed that will allow for the analysis of these small RNAs at the cellular level. The present protocol describes the application of three-dimensional fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (3D-FRAP) microscopy to elucidating the gap junction-dependent exchange of miRNA molecules between cardiac cells. Importantly, this straightforward and non-invasive live-cell imaging approach allows for the visualization and quantification of the gap junctional shuttling of fluorescently labeled small RNAs in real time, with high spatio-temporal resolution. The data obtained by 3D-FRAP confirm a novel pathway of intercellular gene regulation, where small RNAs act as signaling molecules within the intercellular network.

  17. Potential Transfer of Polyglutamine and CAG-Repeat RNA in Extracellular Vesicles in Huntington's Disease: Background and Evaluation in Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Abels, Erik R; Redzic, Jasmina S; Margulis, Julia; Finkbeiner, Steve; Breakefield, Xandra O

    2016-04-01

    In Huntington's disease (HD) the imperfect expanded CAG repeat in the first exon of the HTT gene leads to the generation of a polyglutamine (polyQ) protein, which has some neuronal toxicity, potentially mollified by formation of aggregates. Accumulated research, reviewed here, implicates both the polyQ protein and the expanded repeat RNA in causing toxicity leading to neurodegeneration in HD. Different theories have emerged as to how the neurodegeneration spreads throughout the brain, with one possibility being the transport of toxic protein and RNA in extracellular vesicles (EVs). Most cell types in the brain release EVs and these have been shown to contain neurodegenerative proteins in the case of prion protein and amyloid-beta peptide. In this study, we used a model culture system with an overexpression of HTT-exon 1 polyQ-GFP constructs in human 293T cells and found that the EVs did incorporate both the polyQ-GFP protein and expanded repeat RNA. Striatal mouse neural cells were able to take up these EVs with a consequent increase in the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and polyQ-GFP RNAs, but with no evidence of uptake of polyQ-GFP protein or any apparent toxicity, at least over a relatively short period of exposure. A differentiated striatal cell line expressing endogenous levels of Hdh mRNA containing the expanded repeat incorporated more of this mRNA into EVs as compared to similar cells expressing this mRNA with a normal repeat length. These findings support the potential of EVs to deliver toxic expanded trinucleotide repeat RNAs from one cell to another, but further work will be needed to evaluate potential EV and cell-type specificity of transfer and effects of long-term exposure. It seems likely that expanded HD-associated repeat RNA may appear in biofluids and may have use as biomarkers of disease state and response to therapy.

  18. A horizontally transferred tRNA(Cys) gene in the sugar beet mitochondrial genome: evidence that the gene is present in diverse angiosperms and its transcript is aminoacylated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazaki, Kazuyoshi; Kubo, Tomohiko; Kagami, Hiroyo; Matsumoto, Takuma; Fujita, Asami; Matsuhira, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Muneyuki; Mikami, Tetsuo

    2011-10-01

    Of the two tRNA(Cys) (GCA) genes, trnC1-GCA and trnC2-GCA, previously identified in mitochondrial genome of sugar beet, the former is a native gene and probably a pseudo-copy, whereas the latter, of unknown origin, is transcribed into a tRNA [tRNA(Cys2) (GCA)]. In this study, the trnC2-GCA sequence was mined from various public databases. To evaluate whether or not the trnC2-GCA sequence is located in the mitochondrial genome, the relative copy number of its sequence to nuclear gene was assessed in a number of angiosperm species, using a quantitative real-time PCR assay. The trnC2-GCA sequence was found to exist sporadically in the mitochondrial genomes of a wide range of angiosperms. The mitochondrial tRNA(Cys2) (GCA) species from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), spinach (Spinacea oleracea) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) were found to be aminoacylated, indicating that they may participate in translation. We also identified a sugar beet nuclear gene that encodes cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase, which is dual-targeted to mitochondria and plastids, and may aminoacylate tRNA(Cys2) (GCA). What is of particular interest is that trnC1-GCA and trnC2-GCA co-exist in the mitochondrial genomes of eight diverse angiosperms, including spinach, and that the spinach tRNA(Cys1) (GCA) is also aminoacylated. Taken together, our observations lead us to surmise that trnC2-GCA may have been horizontally transferred to a common ancestor of eudicots, followed by co-existence and dual expression of trnC1-GCA and trnC2-GCA in mitochondria with occasional loss or inactivation of either trnC-GCA gene during evolution. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. A novel polydopamine-based chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer method for microRNA detection coupling duplex-specific nuclease-aided target recycling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2016-06-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressors, play significant regulatory roles in regulating gene expression and become as biomarkers for disease diagnostics and therapeutics. In this work, we have coupled a polydopamine (PDA) nanosphere-assisted chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) platform and a duplex-specific nuclease (DSN)-assisted signal amplification strategy to develop a novel method for specific miRNA detection. With the assistance of hemin, luminol, and H2O2, the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking G-rich sequence in the sensing probe produces chemiluminescence, which is quickly quenched by the CRET effect between PDA as energy acceptor and excited luminol as energy donor. The target miRNA triggers DSN to partially degrade the sensing probe in the DNA-miRNA heteroduplex to repeatedly release G-quadruplex formed by G-rich sequence from PDA for the production of chemiluminescence. The method allows quantitative detection of target miRNA in the range of 80 pM-50 nM with a detection limit of 49.6 pM. The method also shows excellent specificity to discriminate single-base differences, and can accurately quantify miRNA in biological samples, with good agreement with the result from a commercial miRNA detection kit. The procedure requires no organic dyes or labels, and is a simple and cost-effective method for miRNA detection for early clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Lysine acetylation stoichiometry and proteomics analyses reveal pathways regulated by sirtuin 1 in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Jeovanis; Ramírez-Torres, Alberto; Chiappe, Diego; Luna-Peñaloza, Juan; Fernandez-Reyes, Francis C; Arcos-Encarnación, Bolivar; Contreras, Sandra; Encarnación-Guevara, Sergio

    2017-09-11

    Lysine acetylation is a widespread posttranslational modification (PTM) affecting many biological pathways. Recent studies indicate that acetylated lysine residues mainly exhibit low acetylation occupancy, but challenges in sample preparation and analysis make it difficult to confidently assign these numbers, limiting understanding of their biological significance. Here, we tested three common sample preparation methods to determine their suitability for assessing acetylation stoichiometry in three human cell lines, identifying the acetylation occupancy in more than 1,300 proteins from each cell line. The stoichiometric analysis in combination with quantitative proteomics also enabled us to explore their functional roles. We found that higher abundance of the deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) correlated with lower acetylation occupancy and lower levels of ribosomal proteins including those involved in ribosome biogenesis and rRNA processing. Treatment with the SIRT1 inhibitor EX-527 confirmed SIRT1's role in the regulation of pre-rRNA synthesis and processing. Specifically, proteins involved in pre-rRNA transcription, including subunits of the Pol 1 and SL1 complexes and the RNA polymerase I specific transcription initiation factor RRN3 were up-regulated after SIRT1 inhibition. Moreover, many protein effectors and regulators of pre-rRNA processing needed for rRNA maturation were also up-regulated after EX-527 treatment, with the outcome that pre-rRNA and 28S rRNA levels also increased. More generally, we found that SIRT1 inhibition down-regulates metabolic pathways including glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism. Together, these results provide the largest dataset thus far of lysine acetylation stoichiometry (available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005903) and set the stage for further biological investigations of this central PTM. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Lysine and Leucine Deficiencies Affect Myocytes Development and IGF Signaling in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheida Azizi

    Full Text Available Optimizing aquaculture production requires better knowledge of growth regulation and improvement in diet formulation. A great effort has been made to replace fish meal for plant protein sources in aquafeeds, making necessary the supplementation of such diets with crystalline amino acids (AA to cover the nutritional requirements of each species. Lysine and Leucine are limiting essential AA in fish, and it has been demonstrated that supplementation with them improves growth in different species. However, the specific effects of AA deficiencies in myogenesis are completely unknown and have only been studied at the level of hepatic metabolism. It is well-known that the TOR pathway integrates the nutritional and hormonal signals to regulate protein synthesis and cell proliferation, to finally control muscle growth, a process also coordinated by the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs. This study aimed to provide new information on the impact of Lysine and Leucine deficiencies in gilthead sea bream cultured myocytes examining their development and the response of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs, MRFs, as well as key molecules involved in muscle growth regulation like TOR. Leucine deficiency did not cause significant differences in most of the molecules analyzed, whereas Lysine deficiency appeared crucial in IGFs regulation, decreasing significantly IGF-I, IGF-II and IGF-IRb mRNA levels. This treatment also down-regulated the gene expression of different MRFs, including Myf5, Myogenin and MyoD2. These changes were also corroborated by a significant decrease in proliferation and differentiation markers in the Lysine-deficient treatment. Moreover, both Lysine and Leucine limitation induced a significant down-regulation in FOXO3 gene expression, which deserves further investigation. We believe that these results will be relevant for the production of a species as appreciated for human consumption as it is gilthead sea bream and demonstrates

  2. Efficient Production of Enantiopure d-Lysine from l-Lysine by a Two-Enzyme Cascade System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The microbial production of d-lysine has been of great interest as a medicinal raw material. Here, a two-step process for d-lysine production from l-lysine by the successive microbial racemization and asymmetric degradation with lysine racemase and decarboxylase was developed. The whole-cell activities of engineered Escherichia coli expressing racemases from the strains Proteus mirabilis (LYR and Lactobacillus paracasei (AAR were first investigated comparatively. When the strain BL21-LYR with higher racemization activity was employed, l-lysine was rapidly racemized to give dl-lysine, and the d-lysine yield was approximately 48% after 0.5 h. Next, l-lysine was selectively catabolized to generate cadaverine by lysine decarboxylase. The comparative analysis of the decarboxylation activities of resting whole cells, permeabilized cells, and crude enzyme revealed that the crude enzyme was the best biocatalyst for enantiopure d-lysine production. The reaction temperature, pH, metal ion additive, and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate content of this two-step production process were subsequently optimized. Under optimal conditions, 750.7 mmol/L d-lysine was finally obtained from 1710 mmol/L l-lysine after 1 h of racemization reaction and 0.5 h of decarboxylation reaction. d-lysine yield could reach 48.8% with enantiomeric excess (ee ≥ 99%.

  3. Radioactive Lysine in Protein Metabolism Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. L.; Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; Masters, R. E.; Tishkoff, G. H.; Whipple,, G. H.

    1950-01-09

    Studies of incorporation of DL-lysine in various body proteins of the dog; the time course of labeled blood proteins; and apparent rate of disappearance of labeled plasma proteins for comparison of behavior of the plasma albumin and globulin fractions; shows more rapid turn over of globulin fraction.

  4. Lysine and arginine requirements of Salminus brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jony Koji Dairiki

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the dietary lysine (DL and dietary arginine (DA requirements of dourado (Salminus brasiliensis, through dose-response trials using the amino acid profiles of whole carcasses as a reference. Two experiments were carried out in a completely randomized design (n=4. In the first experiment, groups of 12 feed-conditioned dourado juveniles (11.4±0.2 g were stocked in 60 L cages placed in 300 L plastic indoor tanks in a closed circulation system. Fish were fed for 60 days on diets containing 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, or 3.5 % dietary lysine. In the second experiment, dourado juveniles (27.0±0.8 g were fed for 60 days on semipurified diets containing arginine at 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 or 3.0%, in similar conditions to those of the first experiment. Optimal DL requirements, as determined by broken-line analysis method for final weight, weight gain and specific growth rate, were 2.15% DL or 5% lysine in dietary protein, and 1.48% DA or 3.43% arginine in dietary protein. The best feed conversion ratio is attained with 2.5% DL or 5.8% lysine in dietary protein and 1.4% DA or 3.25% arginine in dietary protein.

  5. Highly selective detection of microRNA based on distance-dependent electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between CdTe nanocrystals and Au nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yan; Lei, Jianping; Chen, Yunlong; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-01-15

    A distance-dependent electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (ERET) system based on CdTe nanocrystals and Au nanoclusters (Au NCs) was designed with the aid of ligase for highly selective detection of microRNA (miRNA). First, Au NCs functionalized hairpin DNA was synthesized via Au-S chemistry, and characterized with transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The resulting hairpin DNA-Au NCs composite can be bound to the carboxylated CdTe nanocrystals via amide reaction on glass carbon electrode. The strong interaction between CdTe nanocrystals and AuNCs led to the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) quenching of CdTe nanocrystals. In the presence of assistant DNA and miRNA, the ligase can selectively ligate both of them on the strand of the hairpin DNA to form long DNA-RNA heteroduplexes. Thus the ECL signal was recovered due to the blocking of the ERET. As a comparison, when directly opening the hairpin DNA by the target, the ECL emission signal is weak owing to the presence of ERET effect at the short distance. Based on the distance-dependent ERET, a 'signal on' ECL system was utilized for the detection of miRNA with the advantages of 6 orders magnitude linear range and excellent sequence specificity. The total detection processing time of the biosensor was approximately 70 min. By substituting the hairpin DNA with different sequences, this strategy as a new signal transduction approach could be conveniently extended for detection of other short miRNA and DNA.

  6. Lysine kinetics in preterm infants: the importance of enteral feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R.D. van der Schoor (Sophie); P.J. Reeds; F. Stellaard; J.L.D. Wattimena (Josias); P.J.J. Sauer (Pieter); H.A. Büller (Hans); J.B. van Goudoever (Hans)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractINTRODUCTION: Lysine is the first limiting essential amino acid in the diet of newborns. First pass metabolism by the intestine of dietary lysine has a direct effect on systemic availability. We investigated whether first pass lysine metabolism in the intestine is high

  7. Lysine kinetics in preterm infants : the importance of enteral feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoor, SRD; Reeds, PJ; Stellaard, F; Wattimena, JDL; Sauer, PJJ; Buller, HA; van Goudoever, JB

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Lysine is the first limiting essential amino acid in the diet of newborns. First pass metabolism by the intestine of dietary lysine has a direct effect on systemic availability. We investigated whether first pass lysine metabolism in the intestine is high in preterm infants, particular

  8. Synthesis, pharmacokinetics, and biological use of lysine-modified single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulvey JJ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available J Justin Mulvey,1,2 Evan N Feinberg,1,3 Simone Alidori,1 Michael R McDevitt,4,5 Daniel A Heller,1,6 David A Scheinberg1,5,6 1Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, Sloan Kettering Institute, New York, NY, USA; 2Tri-Institutional MD-PhD Program, New York, NY, USA; 3Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT USA; 4Department of Radiology and 5Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; 6Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA Abstract: We aimed to create a more robust and more accessible standard for amine-modifying single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs. A 1,3-cycloaddition was developed using an azomethine ylide, generated by reacting paraformaldehyde and a side-chain-Boc (tert-Butyloxycarbonyl-protected, lysine-derived alpha-amino acid, H-Lys(Boc-OH, with purified SWCNT or C60. This cycloaddition and its lysine adduct provides the benefits of dense, covalent modification, ease of purification, commercial availability of reagents, and pH-dependent solubility of the product. Subsequently, SWCNTs functionalized with lysine amine handles were covalently conjugated to a radiometalated chelator, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA. The 111In-labeled construct showed rapid renal clearance in a murine model and a favorable biodistribution, permitting utility in biomedical applications. Functionalized SWCNTs strongly wrapped small interfering RNA (siRNA. In the first disclosed deployment of thermophoresis with carbon nanotubes, the lysine-modified tubes showed a desirable, weak SWCNT-albumin binding constant. Thus, lysine-modified nanotubes are a favorable candidate for medicinal work. Keywords: fullerene, cycloaddition, azomethine, DOTA, thermophoresis, 111In

  9. [Rhein lysinate induces apoptosis in breast cancer SK-Br-3 cells by inhibiting HER-2 signal pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ya-Jun; Huang, Yun-Hong; Zhen, Yong-Zhan; Liu, Xiu-Jun; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2008-11-01

    This study is to investigate the effect of rhein lysinate on inducing human breast cancer cell line SK-Br-3 apoptosis and the role of HER-2 signal pathway in the apoptosis. MTT assay was used to detect SK-Br-3 cell proliferation. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. The protein expression and the protein phosphorylation of HER-2 signal pathway were detected by Western blotting. The level of HER-2 mRNA was detected by RT-PCR and the level of HER-2 expression was also detected by immunofluorescence cytochemical methods. The results showed that rhein lysinate remarkably inhibited breast cancer SK-Br-3 cell proliferation. The IC50 value for 48 h treatment was 85 micromol x L(-1). Apoptosis in SK-Br-3 cells was induced by rhein lysinate in a dose dependent manner. The protein expressions of HER-2, NF-KB, and the protein phosphorylation of HER-2 were downregulated, however the protein expression of p53 and p21 was upregulated after rhein lysinate treatment. The level of HER-2 mRNA decreased by using RT-PCR assay and the level of HER-2 expression was also decreased by using immunofluorescence cytochemical assay after rhein lysinate treatment. It can be concluded that rhein lysinate could inhibit SK-Br-3 cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. HER-2/NF-kappaB/p53/p21 signal pathway might be involved in this process. Rhein lysinate has a good prospect to be an adjuvant chemotherapeutic drug.

  10. Synthesis of S-adenosyl-L-methionine analogs with extended transferable groups for methyltransferase-directed labeling of DNA and RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masevičius, Viktoras; Nainytė, Milda; Klimašauskas, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) is a ubiquitous methyl donor for a variety of biological methylation reactions catalyzed by methyltransferases (MTases). AdoMet analogs with extended propargylic chains replacing the sulfonium-bound methyl group can serve as surrogate cofactors for many DNA and RNA MTases enabling covalent deposition of these linear chains to their cognate targets sites in DNA or RNA. Here we describe synthetic procedures for the preparation of two representative examples of AdoMet analogs with a transferable hex-2-ynyl group carrying a terminal azide or amine functionality. Our approach is based on direct chemoselective alkylation of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine at sulfur with corresponding nosylates under acidic conditions. We also describe synthetic routes to 6-substituted hex-2-yn-1-ols and their conversion to the corresponding nosylates. Using these protocols, synthetic AdoMet analogs can be prepared within one to two weeks. PMID:26967468

  11. Surface plasmon enhanced energy transfer between gold nanorods and fluorophores: application to endocytosis study and RNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinan; Wei, Guoke; Yu, Jun; Birch, David J S; Chen, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated surface plasmon enhanced energy transfer between fluorophores and gold nanorods under two-photon excitation using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in both solution and intracellular phases. These studies demonstrated that gold nanoparticle-dye energy transfer combinations are appealing, not only in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging, but also energy transfer-based fluorescence lifetime sensing of bio-analytes. Here, we apply this approach to study the internalization of gold nanorods (GNRs) in HeLa cells using the early endosome labeling marker GFP. The observed energy transfer between GFP and the GNRs indicates the involvement of endocytosis in GNR uptake. Moreover, a novel nanoprobe based on oligonucleotide functionalized gold nanorods for nucleic acid sensing via dye-GNRs energy transfer is demonstrated, potentially opening up new possibilities in cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The influence of oligonucleotide design on such nanoprobe performance was studied for the first time using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, bringing new insights to the optimization of the nanoprobe.

  12. The stoichiometric production of IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA defines memory T cells that can self-renew after adoptive transfer in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anran; Chandran, Smita; Shah, Syed A; Chiu, Yu; Paria, Biman C; Aghamolla, Tamara; Alvarez-Downing, Melissa M; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Singh, Sanmeet; Li, Thomas; Dudley, Mark E; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A; Kammula, Udai S

    2012-08-29

    Adoptive immunotherapy using ex vivo-expanded tumor-reactive lymphocytes can mediate durable cancer regression in selected melanoma patients. Analyses of these trials have associated the in vivo engraftment ability of the transferred cells with their antitumor efficacy. Thus, there is intensive clinical interest in the prospective isolation of tumor-specific T cells that can reliably persist after transfer. Animal studies have suggested that central memory CD8(+) T cells (T(CM)) have divergent capabilities including effector differentiation to target antigen and stem cell-like self-renewal that enable long-term survival after adoptive transfer. We sought to isolate human melanoma-specific T(CM) to define their in vivo fate and function after autologous therapeutic transfer to metastatic patients. To facilitate the high-throughput identification of these rare cells from patients, we report that T(CM) have a defined stoichiometric production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) mRNA after antigen stimulation. Melanoma-specific T cells screened for high relative IL-2 production had a T(CM) phenotype and superior in vitro proliferative capacity compared to cells with low IL-2 production. To investigate in vivo effector function and self-renewal capability, we allowed melanoma-specific T(CM) to undergo in vitro expansion and differentiation into lytic effector clones and then adoptively transferred them back into their hosts. These clones targeted skin melanocytes in all five patients and persisted long term and reacquired parental T(CM) attributes in four patients after transfer. These findings demonstrate the favorable engraftment fitness for human T(CM)-derived clones, but further efforts to improve their antitumor efficacy are still necessary.

  13. Transfer RNA Derived Small RNAs Targeting Defense Responsive Genes Are Induced during Phytophthora capsici Infection in Black Pepper (Piper nigrum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asha, Srinivasan; Soniya, Eppurath V

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs derived from transfer RNAs were recently assigned as potential gene regulatory candidates for various stress responses in eukaryotes. In this study, we report on the cloning and identification of tRNA derived small RNAs from black pepper plants in response to the infection of the quick wilt pathogen, Phytophthora capsici. 5'tRFs cloned from black pepper were validated as highly expressed during P. capsici infection. A high-throughput systematic analysis of the small RNAome (sRNAome) revealed the predominance of 5'tRFs in the infected leaf and root. The abundance of 5'tRFs in the sRNAome and the defense responsive genes as their potential targets indicated their regulatory role during stress response in black pepper. The 5'Ala(CGC) tRF mediated cleavage was experimentally mapped at the tRF binding sites on the mRNA targets of Non-expresser of pathogenesis related protein (NPR1), which was down-regulated during pathogen infection. Comparative sRNAome further demonstrated sequence conservation of 5'Ala tRFs across the angiosperm plant groups, and many important genes in the defense response were identified in silico as their potential targets. Our findings uncovered the diversity, differential expression and stress responsive functional role of tRNA-derived small RNAs during Phytophthora infection in black pepper.

  14. Structure of eEF3 and the mechanism of transfer RNA release from the E-site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Becker, T.; Blau, M.

    2006-01-01

    Elongation factor eEF3 is an ATPase, which, in addition to the two canonical factors eEF1A and eEF2, serves an essential function in the translation cycle of fungi. eEF3 is required for the binding of the aatRNA-eEF1A-GTP ternary complex to the ribosomal A-site and has been suggested to facilitate......-bound form of eEF3 in complex with the post-translocational state 80S ribosome from yeast. eEF3 uses an entirely new factor binding site near the ribosomal E-site, with the chromodomain stabilizing the ribosomal L1 stalk in an open conformation, thus, allowing tRNA release....

  15. Structure of eEF3 and the mechanism of transfer RNA release from the E-site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Becker, T.; Blau, M.;

    2006-01-01

    Elongation factor eEF3 is an ATPase, which, in addition to the two canonical factors eEF1A and eEF2, serves an essential function in the translation cycle of fungi. eEF3 is required for the binding of the aatRNA-eEF1A-GTP ternary complex to the ribosomal A-site and has been suggested to facilitat...

  16. Structure of eEF3 and the mechanism of transfer RNA release from the E-site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Christian B F; Becker, Thomas; Blau, Michael; Anand, Monika; Halic, Mario; Balar, Bharvi; Mielke, Thorsten; Boesen, Thomas; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Spahn, Christian M T; Kinzy, Terri Goss; Andersen, Gregers R; Beckmann, Roland

    2006-10-12

    Elongation factor eEF3 is an ATPase that, in addition to the two canonical factors eEF1A and eEF2, serves an essential function in the translation cycle of fungi. eEF3 is required for the binding of the aminoacyl-tRNA-eEF1A-GTP ternary complex to the ribosomal A-site and has been suggested to facilitate the clearance of deacyl-tRNA from the E-site. Here we present the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae eEF3, showing that it consists of an amino-terminal HEAT repeat domain, followed by a four-helix bundle and two ABC-type ATPase domains, with a chromodomain inserted in ABC2. Moreover, we present the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the ATP-bound form of eEF3 in complex with the post-translocational-state 80S ribosome from yeast. eEF3 uses an entirely new factor binding site near the ribosomal E-site, with the chromodomain likely to stabilize the ribosomal L1 stalk in an open conformation, thus allowing tRNA release.

  17. Deregulation of histone lysine methyltransferases contributes to oncogenic transformation of human bronchoepithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoda Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alterations in the processing of the genetic information in carcinogenesis result from stable genetic mutations or epigenetic modifications. It is becoming clear that nucleosomal histones are central to proper gene expression and that aberrant DNA methylation of genes and histone methylation plays important roles in tumor progression. To date, several histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs have been identified and histone lysine methylation is now considered to be a critical regulator of transcription. However, still relatively little is known about the role of HKMTs in tumorigenesis. Results We observed differential HKMT expression in a lung cancer model in which normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells expressing telomerase, SV40 large T antigen, and Ras were immortal, formed colonies in soft agar, and expressed specific HKMTs for H3 lysine 9 and 27 residues but not for H3 lysine 4 residue. Modifications in the H3 tails affect the binding of proteins to the histone tails and regulate protein function and the position of lysine methylation marks a gene to be either activated or repressed. In the present study, suppression by siRNA of HKMTs (EZH2, G9A, SETDB1 and SUV39H1 that are over-expressed in immortalized and transformed cells lead to reduced cell proliferation and much less anchorage-independent colony growth. We also found that the suppression of H3-K9, G9A and SUV39H1 induced apoptosis and the suppression of H3-K27, EZH2 caused G1 arrest. Conclusion Our results indicate the potential of these HKMTs in addition to the other targets for epigenetics such as DNMTs and HDACs to be interesting therapeutic targets.

  18. Poly(ethylenimine)-grafted-poly[(aspartic acid)-co-lysine]:A Non-viral Polymer with Potential for DNA Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi YANG; Gu Ping TANG

    2004-01-01

    A biodegradable gene transfer vector, poly(ethylenimine)-grafted-poly[(aspartic acid)-co-lysine] has been developed by thermal polycondensation of aspartic acid and lysine, and branch poly(ethylenimine) (Mw less than 600) was grafted to the backbone. The polymer was characterized by 1H NMR. It appeared lower cytotoxity compared to poly(ethylenimine) (25KDa), which was quantified by MTT assay. Electrophoresis indicated that the polymer could retardate DNA at N/P ratio 1.2-1.8 (w/w). Transfection efficiency of the complexes was studied in NT2 cell lines. It was 1.5 fold higher than molecular weight PEI (Mw = 25KDa).

  19. Terbium complex to quantum dot Förster resonance energy transfer for homogeneous and multiplexed microRNA assay (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xue; Hildebrandt, Niko

    2016-03-01

    The importance of microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation in the development and progression of diseases has made these short-length nucleic acids to next generation biomarkers. Tb-to-QD Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has several unique advantages over organic dye-based FRET systems for biomolecular sensing. Large Förster distances (6-11 nm) offer much high FRET efficiencies, exceptionally long Tb excited-state lifetimes (ms) enable time-gated detection void of autofluorecence background, and the narrow, symmetric, and tunable emission bands of QDs provide unrivaled potential for multiplexing. Here we report a rapid and homogeneous method to sensitively detect three different miRNAs (hsa-miR-20a-5p, hsa-miR-20b-5p, and hsa-miR-21-5p) from a single 150 µL sample based on multiplexed FRET between a luminescent Lumi4-Tb complex and three different QDs. The biosensing approach exploits both base pairing and stacking. Careful design and optimization of sequence lengths and orientations of the QD and Tb-DNA conjugates was performed to provide maximum selectivity and sensitivity for all three miRNA biomarkers. The assays work at room temperature and were designed for their application on a KRYPTOR diagnostic plate reader system.Only 30 min of sample incubation and 7.5 s of measurement are required to obtain ca. 1 nM (subpicomol) detection limits. We also demonstrate precise multiplexed measurements of these miRNAs at different and varying concentrations and the feasibility of adapting the technology to point-of-care testing (POCT) in buffer containing 10% serum. Our assay does not only demonstrate an important milestone for the integration of quantum dots to multiplexed clinical diagnostics but also a unique rapid miRNA detection technology that is complimentary to the rather complicated high-throughput and high-sensitivity approaches that are established today.

  20. Lysine fortification: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellett, Peter L; Ghosh, Shibani

    2004-06-01

    Fortification with lysine to improve the protein value of human diets that are heavily based on cereals has received support from the results of these recent studies [1,2]. Support also comes from examination of average food and nutrient availability data derived from food balance sheets. Whereas nutritional status is influenced by the nutrient content of foods consumed in relation to need, the requirements for protein and amino acids are influenced by many additional factors [10, 12, 14, 28, 29]. These include age, sex, body size, physical activity, growth, pregnancy and lactation, infection, and the efficiency of nutrient utilization. Even if the immune response was influenced by the added lysine, adequate water and basic sanitation would remain essential. Acute and chronic undernutrition and most micronutrient deficiencies primarily affect poor and deprived people who do not have access to food of adequate nutritional value, live in unsanitary environments without access to clean water and basic services, and lack access to appropriate education and information [30]. A further variable is the possible interaction between protein and food energy availability [31]. This could affect the protein value of diets when food energy is limiting to a significant degree. Thus, the additional effects of food energy deficiency on protein utilization could well be superimposed on the very poorest. The improvement of dietary diversity must be the long-term aim, with dietary fortification considered only a short-term solution. The former should take place as wealth improves and the gaps between rich and poor diminish. Although such changes are taking place, they are highly uneven. Over the last several decades, increases have occurred in the availability of food energy, total protein, and animal protein for both developed and developing countries. However, for the very poorest developing countries over the same period, changes have been almost nonexistent, and the values for

  1. Elucidating the effects of arginine and lysine on a monoclonal antibody C-terminal lysine variation in CHO cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xintao; Tang, Hongping; Sun, Ya-Ting; Liu, Xuping; Tan, Wen-Song; Fan, Li

    2015-08-01

    C-terminal lysine variants are commonly observed in monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and found sensitive to process conditions, especially specific components in culture medium. The potential roles of media arginine (Arg) and lysine (Lys) in mAb heavy chain C-terminal lysine processing were investigated by monitoring the lysine variant levels under various Arg and Lys concentrations. Both Arg and Lys were found to significantly affect lysine variant level. Specifically, lysine variant level increased from 18.7 to 31.8 % when Arg and Lys concentrations were increased from 2 to 10 mM. Since heterogeneity of C-terminal lysine residues is due to the varying degree of proteolysis by basic carboxypeptidases (Cps), enzyme (basic Cps) level, pH conditions, and product (Arg and Lys) inhibition, which potentially affect the enzymatic reaction, were investigated under various Arg and Lys conditions. Enzyme level and pH conditions were found not to account for the different lysine variant levels, which was evident from the minimal variation in transcription level and intracellular pH. On the other hand, product inhibition effect of Arg and Lys on basic Cps was evident from the notable intracellular and extracellular Arg and Lys concentrations comparable with Ki values (inhibition constant) of basic Cps and further confirmed by cell-free assays. Additionally, a kinetic study of lysine variant level during the cell culture process enabled further characterization of the C-terminal lysine processing.

  2. Antimicrobial activity of chicken NK-lysin against Eimeria sporozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yeong H; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Siragusa, Gregory R; Bannerman, Douglas D; Lillehoj, Erik P

    2008-06-01

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial and antitumor polypeptide that is considered to play an important role in innate immunity. Chicken NK-lysin is a member of the saposin-like protein family and exhibits potent antitumor cell activity. To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of chicken NK-lysin, we examined its ability to reduce the viability of various bacterial strains and two species of Eimeria parasites. Culture supernatants from COS7 cells transfected with a chicken NK-lysin cDNA and His-tagged purified NK-lysin from the transfected cells both showed high cytotoxic activity against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria maxima sporozoites. In contrast, no bactericidal activity was observed. Further studies using synthetic peptides derived from NK-lysin may be useful for pharmaceutical and agricultural uses in the food animal industry.

  3. Structural basis for the site-specific incorporation of lysine derivatives into proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Flügel

    Full Text Available Posttranslational modifications (PTMs of proteins determine their structure-function relationships, interaction partners, as well as their fate in the cell and are crucial for many cellular key processes. For instance chromatin structure and hence gene expression is epigenetically regulated by acetylation or methylation of lysine residues in histones, a phenomenon known as the 'histone code'. Recently it was shown that these lysine residues can furthermore be malonylated, succinylated, butyrylated, propionylated and crotonylated, resulting in significant alteration of gene expression patterns. However the functional implications of these PTMs, which only differ marginally in their chemical structure, is not yet understood. Therefore generation of proteins containing these modified amino acids site specifically is an important tool. In the last decade methods for the translational incorporation of non-natural amino acids using orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS:tRNAaaCUA pairs were developed. A number of studies show that aaRS can be evolved to use non-natural amino acids and expand the genetic code. Nevertheless the wild type pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS from Methanosarcina mazei readily accepts a number of lysine derivatives as substrates. This enzyme can further be engineered by mutagenesis to utilize a range of non-natural amino acids. Here we present structural data on the wild type enzyme in complex with adenylated ε-N-alkynyl-, ε-N-butyryl-, ε-N-crotonyl- and ε-N-propionyl-lysine providing insights into the plasticity of the PylRS active site. This shows that given certain key features in the non-natural amino acid to be incorporated, directed evolution of this enzyme is not necessary for substrate tolerance.

  4. An update on histone lysine methylation in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yu; Zhongyuan Bu; Wen-Hui Shen; Aiwu Dong

    2009-01-01

    Histone methylation plays crucial roles in epigenetic regulation.The SET domain proteins are now recognized as generally having methyltransferase activity targeted to specific lysine residues of histones.The enzymes and their specific histone lysine methylation have enormous impacts on the regulation of chromatin structure and function.In this review,we discuss recent advances made on histone lysine methylations and their diverse functions in plant growth and development.

  5. Global analysis of lysine acetylation in strawberry leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianping eFang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and dynamic post-translational modification. It plays an important role in regulating diverse cellular processes including chromatin dynamic, metabolic pathways and transcription in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although studies of lysine acetylome in plants have been reported, the throughput was not high enough, hindering the deep understanding of lysine acetylation in plant physiology and pathology. In this study, taking advantages of anti-acetyllysine-based enrichment and high-sensitive-mass spectrometer, we applied an integrated proteomic approach to comprehensively investigate lysine acetylome in strawberry. In total, we identified 1392 acetylation sites in 684 proteins, representing the largest dataset of acetylome in plants to date. To reveal the functional impacts of lysine acetylation in strawberry, intensive bioinformatic analysis was performed. The results significantly expanded our current understanding of plant acetylome and demonstrated that lysine acetylation is involved in multiple cellular metabolism and cellular processes. More interestingly, nearly 50% of all acetylated proteins identified in this work were localized in chloroplast and the vital role of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis was also revealed. Taken together, this study not only established the most extensive lysine acetylome in plants to date, but also systematically suggests the significant and unique roles of lysine acetylation in plants.

  6. Detection of subgenomic mRNA of feline coronavirus by real-time polymerase chain reaction based on primer-probe energy transfer (P-sg-QPCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyák, Akos; Bálint, Adám; Farsang, Attila; Balka, Gyula; Hakhverdyan, Mikhayil; Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Blomberg, Jonas; Belák, Sándor

    2012-05-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis is one of the most severe devastating diseases of the Felidae. Upon the appearance of clinical signs, a cure for the infected animal is impossible. Therefore rapid and proper diagnosis for both the presence of the causative agent, feline coronavirus (FCoV) and the manifestation of feline infectious peritonitis is of paramount importance. In the present work, a novel real-time RT-PCR method is described which is able to detect FCoV and to determine simultaneously the quantity of the viral RNA. The new assay combines the M gene subgenomic messenger RNA (sg-mRNA) detection and the quantitation of the genome copies of FCoV. In order to detect the broadest spectrum of potential FCoV variants and to achieve the most accurate results in the detection ability the new assay is applying the primer-probe energy transfer (PriProET) principle. This technology was chosen since PriProET is very robust to tolerate the nucleotide substitutions in the target area. Therefore, this technology provides a very broad-range system, which is able to detect simultaneously many variants of the virus(es) even if the target genomic regions show large scale of variations. The detection specificity of the new assay was proven by positive amplification from a set of nine different FCoV strains and negative from the tested non-coronaviral targets. Examination of faecal samples of healthy young cats, organ samples of perished animals, which suffered from feline infectious peritonitis, and cat leukocytes from uncertain clinical cases were also subjected to the assay. The sensitivity of the P-sg-QPCR method was high, since as few as 10 genome copies of FCoV were detected. The quantitative sg-mRNA detection method revealed more than 10-50,000 times increase of the M gene sg-mRNA in organ materials of feline infectious peritonitis cases, compared to those of the enteric FCoV variants present in the faeces of normal, healthy cats. These results indicate the applicability of

  7. Engineering Giardia lamblia trimethylguanosine synthase (GlaTgs2) to transfer non-natural modifications to the RNA 5'-cap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Josephin Marie; Stummer, Daniela; Rentmeister, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Trimethylguanosine synthase from Giardia lamblia (GlaTgs2) naturally catalyzes methyl transfer from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) to the exocyclic N(2) atom of the 5'-cap--a hallmark of eukaryotic mRNAs. The wild-type enzyme shows substrate promiscuity and can also use the AdoMet-analog AdoPropen for allyl transfer. Here we report on engineering GlaTgs2 to enhance the activity on AdoPropen. A mutational analysis, involving an alanine scan of 10 residues located around the active site, was performed. Positions V34 and S38 were identified as mutational hot spots and analyzed in greater detail by testing NNK libraries. Kinetic analysis and thermostability measurements revealed V34A as the best variant of GlaTgs2, with a ∼10-fold improved specificity for AdoPropen. Double mutants did not yield additional improvements due to low catalytic efficiencies and thermal destabilization. Homologous Tgs enzymes from Homo sapiens and G. intestinalis were also investigated regarding their catalytic activity on AdoPropen. While neither the human wild-type (WT) enzyme nor any of its variants showed activity on AdoPropen, the homologue from G. intestinalis (GinTgs) was remarkably active on AdoPropen. Introducing the best substitution at the homologous position led to variant T34A with ∼40-fold higher specificity for AdoPropen than the original GlaTgs2 WT.

  8. Histone H4 Lysine 20 methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine; Schotta, Gunnar; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2013-01-01

    of histones have emerged as key regulators of genomic integrity. Intense research during the past few years has revealed histone H4 lysine 20 methylation (H4K20me) as critically important for the biological processes that ensure genome integrity, such as DNA damage repair, DNA replication and chromatin...... instability, demonstrating the important functions of H4K20 methylation in genome maintenance. In this review, we explain molecular mechanisms underlying these defects and discuss novel ideas for furthering our understanding of genome maintenance in higher eukaryotes....

  9. Optimization of lysine metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Jakob Vang

    the project intends to eliminate. PGI catalyzes the conversion of alpha-D-glucose-6-phosphate to fructose-6-phosphate just downstream of the branch in the glycolysis, but it also catalyzes the reverse reaction. It is unknown whether up- or down-regulation of the pgi is required to increase the flux through......, and increased NADPH availability is therefore a potential way to enhance lysine production. The generation of NADPH is mainly located in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Using the genome scale model the phosphoglucoisomerase enzyme (PGI) has been identified as a possible bottleneck in the metabolism, which...

  10. Scriptaid Treatment Decreases DNA Methyltransferase 1 Expression by Induction of MicroRNA-152 Expression in Porcine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Liang

    Full Text Available Abnormal epigenetic reprogramming of donor nuclei after somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT is thought to be the main cause of low cloning efficiencies. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated a positive role of Scriptaid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi that belongs to an existing class of hydroxamic acid-containing HDACis, on the development competence of cloned embryos in many species. The present study investigated the effects of Scriptaid on the development of porcine SCNT embryos in vitro and its mechanism. Treatment with 300 or 500 nM Scriptaid for 20 h after activation significantly increased the percentage of SCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage and the total number of cells per blastocyst and significantly decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells in blastocysts. Scriptaid treatment significantly increased the level of histone H3 acetylated at K9 and the conversion of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and significantly decreased the level of histone H3 trimethylated at K9 at the pronuclear stage. As a potential mechanism for the DNA methylation changes, our results showed that the expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 was frequently down-regulated in Scriptaid-treated embryos in comparison with untreated embryos and was inversely correlated to endogenous microRNA-152 (miR-152. Taken together, these findings illustrated a crucial functional crosstalk between miR-152 and DNMT1. Meanwhile, mRNA and protein levels of POU5F1 and CDX2 were increased in Scriptaid-treated embryos. mRNA levels of Caspase3, and Bax were significantly decreased and that of Bcl-xL was significantly increased in Scriptaid-treated embryos. In conclusion, these observations would contribute to uncover the nuclear reprogramming mechanisms underlying the effects of Scriptaid on the improvement of porcine SCNT embryos.

  11. Applying Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) to Examine Effector Translocation Efficiency by Coxiella burnetii during siRNA Silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Patrice; Latomanski, Eleanor A; Newton, Hayley J

    2016-07-06

    Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is an intracellular pathogen that relies on a Type IV Dot/Icm Secretion System to establish a replicative niche. A cohort of effectors are translocated through this system into the host cell to manipulate host processes and allow the establishment of a unique lysosome-derived vacuole for replication. The method presented here involves the combination of two well-established techniques: specific gene silencing using siRNA and measurement of effector translocation using a FRET-based substrate that relies on β-lactamase activity. Applying these two approaches, we can begin to understand the role of host factors in bacterial secretion system function and effector translocation. In this study we examined the role of Rab5A and Rab7A, both important regulators of the endocytic trafficking pathway. We demonstrate that silencing the expression of either protein results in a decrease in effector translocation efficiency. These methods can be easily modified to examine other intracellular and extracellular pathogens that also utilize secretion systems. In this way, a global picture of host factors involved in bacterial effector translocation may be revealed.

  12. File list: Oth.Unc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. Quantification of Nε-(2-Furoylmethyl)-L-lysine (furosine), Nε-(Carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML), Nε-(Carboxyethyl)-L-lysine (CEL) and total lysine through stable isotope dilution assay and tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troise, A.D.; Fiore, A.; Wiltafsky, M.; Fogliano, V.

    2015-01-01

    The control of Maillard reaction (MR) is a key point to ensure processed foods quality. Due to the presence of a primary amino group on its side chain, lysine is particularly prone to chemical modifications with the formation of Amadori products (AP), Nε-(Carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML),

  8. Digestible lysine levels in diets supplemented with ractopamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelar de Oliveira Souza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In order evaluate digestible lysine levels in diets supplemented with 20 ppm of ractopamine on the performance and carcass traits, 64 barrows with high genetic potential at finishing phase were allotted in a completely randomized block design with four digestible lysine levels (0.80, 0.90, 1.00, and 1.10%, eight replicates and two pigs per experimental unit. Initial body weight and pigs' kinship were used as criteria in the blocks formation. Diets were mainly composed of corn and soybean meal supplemented with minerals, vitamins and amino acids to meet pigs' nutritional requirements at the finishing phase, except for digestible lysine. No effect of digestible lysine levels was observed in animal performance. The digestible lysine intake increased linearly by increasing the levels of digestible lysine in the diets. Carcass traits were not influenced by the dietary levels of digestible lysine. The level of 0.80% of digestible lysine in diets supplemented with 20 ppm ractopamine meets the nutritional requirements of castrated male pigs during the finishing phase.

  9. The Tale of Protein Lysine Acetylation in the Cytoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Sadoul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible posttranslational modification of internal lysines in many cellular or viral proteins is now emerging as part of critical signalling processes controlling a variety of cellular functions beyond chromatin and transcription. This paper aims at demonstrating the role of lysine acetylation in the cytoplasm driving and coordinating key events such as cytoskeleton dynamics, intracellular trafficking, vesicle fusion, metabolism, and stress response.

  10. Bioavailability of lysine in heat-treated foods and feedstuffs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McArtney Rutherfurd, S.

    2010-01-01

    During the processing of foodstuffs, lysine can react with other compounds present to form nutritionally unavailable derivatives, the most common example of which are Maillard products. Maillard products can cause serious problems when determining the available lysine content of processed foods or f

  11. Bioavailability of lysine in heat-treated foods and feedstuffs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McArtney Rutherfurd, S.

    2010-01-01

    During the processing of foodstuffs, lysine can react with other compounds present to form nutritionally unavailable derivatives, the most common example of which are Maillard products. Maillard products can cause serious problems when determining the available lysine content of processed foods or

  12. Proteomic investigations of lysine acetylation identify diverse substrates of mitochondrial deacetylase sirt3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Maria Sol

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation is a posttranslational modification that is dynamically regulated by the activity of acetyltransferases and deacetylases. The human and mouse genomes encode 18 different lysine deacetylases (KDACs which are key regulators of many cellular processes. Identifying substrates of KDACs and pinpointing the regulated acetylation sites on target proteins may provide important information about the molecular basis of their functions. Here we apply quantitative proteomics to identify endogenous substrates of the mitochondrial deacetylase Sirtuin 3 (Sirt3 by comparing site-specific acetylation in wild-type murine embryonic fibroblasts to Sirt3 knockout cells. We confirm Sirt3-regulated acetylation of several mitochondrial proteins in human cells by comparing acetylation in U2OS cells overexpressing Sirt3 to U2OS cells in which Sirt3 expression was reduced by shRNA. Our data demonstrate that ablation of Sirt3 significantly increases acetylation at dozens of sites on mitochondrial proteins. Substrates of Sirt3 are implicated in various metabolic pathways, including fatty acid metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. These results imply broader regulatory roles of Sirt3 in the mitochondria by modulating acetylation on diverse substrates. The experimental strategy described here is generic and can be applied to identify endogenous substrates of other lysine deacetylases.

  13. Dichotomy in the Epigenetic Mark Lysine Acetylation is Critical for the Proliferation of Prostate Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, Ravi [Department of Structural and Chemical Biology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 1425 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Philizaire, Marc [Medgar Evers College, City University of New York, 1638 Bedford Ave, 403D, Brooklyn, NY 11225 (United States); Mujtaba, Shiraz, E-mail: smujtaba@mec.cuny.edu [Department of Structural and Chemical Biology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 1425 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Medgar Evers College, City University of New York, 1638 Bedford Ave, 403D, Brooklyn, NY 11225 (United States)

    2015-08-19

    The dynamics of lysine acetylation serve as a major epigenetic mark, which regulates cellular response to inflammation, DNA damage and hormonal changes. Microarray assays reveal changes in gene expression, but cannot predict regulation of a protein function by epigenetic modifications. The present study employs computational tools to inclusively analyze microarray data to understand the potential role of acetylation during development of androgen-independent PCa. The data revealed that the androgen receptor interacts with 333 proteins, out of which at least 92 proteins were acetylated. Notably, the number of cellular proteins undergoing acetylation in the androgen-dependent PCa was more as compared to the androgen-independent PCa. Specifically, the 32 lysine-acetylated proteins in the cellular models of androgen-dependent PCa were mainly involved in regulating stability as well as pre- and post-processing of mRNA. Collectively, the data demonstrate that protein lysine acetylation plays a crucial role during the transition of androgen-dependent to -independent PCa, which importantly, could also serve as a functional axis to unravel new therapeutic targets.

  14. Utilization of potato starch processing wastes to produce animal feed with high lysine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Bingnan; Song, Jinzhu; Jiang, Cheng; Yang, Qian

    2015-02-01

    This work aims to utilize wastes from the potato starch industry to produce single-cell protein (SCP) with high lysine content as animal feed. In this work, S-(2-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine hydrochloride-resistant Bacillus pumilus E1 was used to produce SCP with high lysine content, whereas Aspergillus niger was used to degrade cellulose biomass and Candida utilis was used to improve the smell and palatability of the feed. An orthogonal design was used to optimize the process of fermentation for maximal lysine content. The optimum fermentation conditions were as follows: temperature of 40°C, substrate concentration of 3%, and natural pH of about 7.0. For unsterilized potato starch wastes, the microbial communities in the fermentation process were determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Results showed that the dominant population was Bacillus sp. The protein quality as well as the amino acid profile of the final product was found to be significantly higher compared with the untreated waste product at day 0. Additionally, acute toxicity test showed that the SCP product was non-toxic, indicating that it can be used for commercial processing.

  15. Creative lysins: Listeria and the engineering of antimicrobial enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tassell, Maxwell L; Angela Daum, M; Kim, Jun-Seob; Miller, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Cell wall lytic enzymes have been of increasing interest as antimicrobials for targeting Gram-positive spoilage and pathogenic bacteria, largely due to the development of strains resistant to antibiotics and bacteriophage therapy. Such lysins show considerable promise against Listeria monocytogenes, a primary concern in food-processing environments, but there is room for improvement via protein engineering. Advances in antilisterial applications could benefit from recent developments in lysin biotechnology that have largely targeted other organisms. Herein we present various considerations for the future development of lysins, including environmental factors, cell physiology concerns, and dynamics of protein architecture. Our goal is to review key developments in lysin biotechnology to provide a contextual framework for the current models of lysin-cell interactions and highlight key considerations for the characterization and design of novel lytic enzymes.

  16. The CP2 domain of leucyl-tRNA synthetase is crucial for amino acid activation and post-transfer editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Long; Zhu, Bin; Wang, En-Duo

    2008-12-26

    Leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) has an insertion domain, called connective peptide 2 (CP2), either directly preceding or following the editing domain (CP1 domain), depending on the species. The global structures of the CP2 domains from all LeuRSs are similar. Although the CP1 domain has been extensively explored to be responsible for hydrolysis of mischarged tRNALeu, the role of the CP2 domain remains undefined. In the present work, deletion of the CP2 domain of Giardia lamblia LeuRS (GlLeuRS) showed that the CP2 domain is indispensable for amino acid activation and post-transfer editing and that it contributes to LeuRS-tRNALeu binding affinity. In addition, its functions are conserved in both eukaryotic/archaeal and prokaryotic LeuRSs from G. lamblia, Pyrococcus horikoshii (PhLeuRS), and Escherichia coli (EcLeuRS). Alanine scanning and site-directed mutagenesis assays of the CP2 domain identified several residues that are crucial for its various functions. Data from the chimeric mutants, which replaced the CP2 domain of GlLeuRS with either PhLeuRS or EcLeuRS, showed that the CP2 domain of PhLeuRS but not that of EcLeuRS can partially restore amino acid activation and post-transfer editing functions, suggesting that the functions of the CP2 domain are dependent on its location in the primary sequence of LeuRS.

  17. Lysine Acetylation and Deacetylation in Brain Development and Neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Tapias

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic development is critical for the final functionality and maintenance of the adult brain. Brain development is tightly regulated by intracellular and extracellular signaling. Lysine acetylation and deacetylation are posttranslational modifications that are able to link extracellular signals to intracellular responses. A wealth of evidence indicates that lysine acetylation and deacetylation are critical for brain development and functionality. Indeed, mutations of the enzymes and cofactors responsible for these processes are often associated with neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Lysine acetylation and deacetylation are involved in all levels of brain development, starting from neuroprogenitor survival and proliferation, cell fate decisions, neuronal maturation, migration, and synaptogenesis, as well as differentiation and maturation of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, to the establishment of neuronal circuits. Hence, fluctuations in the balance between lysine acetylation and deacetylation contribute to the final shape and performance of the brain. In this review, we summarize the current basic knowledge on the specific roles of lysine acetyltransferase (KAT and lysine deacetylase (KDAC complexes in brain development and the different neurodevelopmental disorders that are associated with dysfunctional lysine (deacetylation machineries.

  18. Molecular and structural insight into lysine selection on substrate and ubiquitin lysine 48 by the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suryadinata, Randy; Holien, Jessica K; Yang, George

    2013-01-01

    The attachment of ubiquitin (Ub) to lysines on substrates or itself by ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) and ubiquitin ligase (E3) enzymes results in protein ubiquitination. Lysine selection is important for generating diverse substrate-Ub structures and targeting proteins to different fates; however......, the mechanisms of lysine selection are not clearly understood. The positioning of lysine(s) toward the E2/E3 active site and residues proximal to lysines are critical in their selection. We investigated determinants of lysine specificity of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, toward substrate and Ub lysines....... Evaluation of the relative importance of different residues positioned -2, -1, +1 and +2 toward ubiquitination of its substrate, Sic1, on lysine 50 showed that charged residues in the -1 and -2 positions negatively impact on ubiquitination. Modeling suggests that charged residues at these positions alter...

  19. A Proteomic Strategy Identifies Lysine Methylation of Splicing Factor snRNP70 by the SETMAR Enzyme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Scott M.; Moore, Kaitlyn E.; Sankaran, Saumya M.; Reynoird, Nicolas; Elias, Joshua E.; Gozani, Or

    2015-01-01

    The lysine methyltransferase (KMT) SETMAR is implicated in the response to and repair of DNA damage, but its molecular function is not clear. SETMAR has been associated with dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) at sites of DNA damage. However, SETMAR does not methylate H3K36 in vitro. This and the observation that SETMAR is not active on nucleosomes suggest that H3K36 methylation is not a physiologically relevant activity. To identify potential non-histone substrates, we utilized a strategy on the basis of quantitative proteomic analysis of methylated lysine. Our approach identified lysine 130 of the mRNA splicing factor snRNP70 as a SETMAR substrate in vitro, and we show that the enzyme primarily generates monomethylation at this position. Furthermore, we show that SETMAR methylates snRNP70 Lys-130 in cells. Because snRNP70 is a key early regulator of 5′ splice site selection, our results suggest a model in which methylation of snRNP70 by SETMAR regulates constitutive and/or alternative splicing. In addition, the proteomic strategy described here is broadly applicable and is a promising route for large-scale mapping of KMT substrates. PMID:25795785

  20. Amine oxidation mediated by lysine-specific demethylase 1: quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics insights into mechanism and role of lysine 661.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasulu, Bora; Patil, Mahendra; Thiel, Walter

    2013-09-11

    We report classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of the rate-determining amine oxidation step in the lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1)-catalyzed demethylation of the histone tail lysine (H3K4), with flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) acting as cofactor. The oxidation of substrate lysine (sLys) involves the cleavage of an α-CH bond accompanied by the transfer of a hydride ion equivalent to FAD, leading to an imine intermediate. This hydride transfer pathway is shown to be clearly favored for sLys oxidation over other proposed mechanisms, including the radical (or single-electron transfer) route as well as carbanion and polar-nucleophilic mechanisms. MD simulations on six NVT ensembles (covering different protonation states of sLys and K661 as well as the K661M mutant) identify two possible orientations of the reacting sLys and FAD subunits (called "downward" and "upward"). Calculations at the QM(B3LYP-D/6-31G*)/CHARMM22 level provide molecular-level insights into the mechanism, helping to understand how LSD1 achieves the activation of the rather inert methyl-CH bond in a metal-free environment. Factors such as proper alignment of sLys (downward orientation), transition-state stabilization (due to the protein environment and favorable orbital interactions), and product stabilization via adduct formation are found to be crucial for facilitating the oxidative α-CH bond cleavage. The current study also sheds light on the role of important active-site residues (Y761, K661, and W695) and of the conserved water-bridge motif. The steric influence of Y761 helps to position the reaction partners properly, K661 is predicted to get deprotonated prior to substrate binding and to act as an active-site base that accepts a proton from sLys to enable the subsequent amine oxidation, and the water bridge that is stabilized by K661 and W695 mediates this proton

  1. Functional asymmetry in the lysyl-tRNA synthetase explored by molecular dynamics, free energy calculations and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Andrew D

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Charging of transfer-RNA with cognate amino acid is accomplished by the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and proceeds through an aminoacyl adenylate intermediate. The lysyl-tRNA synthetase has evolved an active site that specifically binds lysine and ATP. Previous molecular dynamics simulations of the heat-inducible Escherichia coli lysyl-tRNA synthetase, LysU, have revealed differences in the binding of ATP and aspects of asymmetry between the nominally equivalent active sites of this dimeric enzyme. The possibility that this asymmetry results in different binding affinities for the ligands is addressed here by a parallel computational and biochemical study. Results Biochemical experiments employing isothermal calorimetry, steady-state fluorescence and circular dichroism are used to determine the order and stoichiometries of the lysine and nucleotide binding events, and the associated thermodynamic parameters. An ordered mechanism of substrate addition is found, with lysine having to bind prior to the nucleotide in a magnesium dependent process. Two lysines are found to bind per dimer, and trigger a large conformational change. Subsequent nucleotide binding causes little structural rearrangement and crucially only occurs at a single catalytic site, in accord with the simulations. Molecular dynamics based free energy calculations of the ATP binding process are used to determine the binding affinities of each site. Significant differences in ATP binding affinities are observed, with only one active site capable of realizing the experimental binding free energy. Half-of-the-sites models in which the nucleotide is only present at one active site achieve their full binding potential irrespective of the subunit choice. This strongly suggests the involvement of an anti-cooperative mechanism. Pathways for relaying information between the two active sites are proposed. Conclusions The asymmetry uncovered here appears to be a common

  2. HDAC inhibitors induce global changes in histone lysine and arginine methylation and alter expression of lysine demethylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillico, Ryan; Sobral, Marina Gomez; Stesco, Nicholas; Lakowski, Ted M

    2016-02-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are cancer treatments that inhibit the removal of the epigenetic modification acetyllysine on histones, resulting in altered gene expression. Such changes in expression may influence other histone epigenetic modifications. We describe a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to quantify lysine acetylation and methylation and arginine methylation on histones extracted from cultured cells treated with HDAC inhibitors. The HDAC inhibitors vorinostat, mocetinostat and entinostat induced 400-600% hyperacetylation in HEK 293 and K562 cells. All HDAC inhibitors decreased histone methylarginines in HEK 293 cells but entinostat produced dose dependent reductions in asymmetric dimethylarginine, not observed in K562 cells. Vorinostat produced increases in histone lysine methylation and decreased expression of some lysine demethylases (KDM), measured by quantitative PCR. Entinostat had variable effects on lysine methylation and decreased expression of some KDM while increasing expression of others. Mocetinostat produced dose dependent increases in histone lysine methylation by LC-MS/MS. This was corroborated with a multiplex colorimetric assay showing increases in histone H3 lysine 4, 9, 27, 36 and 79 methylation. Increases in lysine methylation were correlated with dose dependent decreases in the expression of seven KDM. Mocetinostat functions as an HDAC inhibitor and a de facto KDM inhibitor.

  3. Construction and Expression of Methionine-rich and Lysine-rich Fusion Gene inBacillus natto

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shuang; Luo Chao-chao; Wu Cai-xia; Gao Xue-jun

    2015-01-01

    Methionine and lysine are restrictive essential amino acids of livestock, they are also the most attentive indexes in the feed production to carry out the quality control and quality evaluation. Their contents in feed directly affect livestock protein synthesis. Bacillus natto has excellent probiotic properties. In this experiment, we used the genetic engineering method, fusion PCR technique, to connect methionine-rich gene (zein) from maize endosperm protein with lysine-rich gene (Cflr) from the pepper anther, then the fusion gene was inserted into the expression vector pHT43, and the recombinant plasmid pHT43/zein-Cflr was constructed. The recombinant plasmid was transferred intoBacillus natto, and induced by IPTG for the expression of the fusion gene. We found an apparent band at 40 ku site for the recombinant strain by SDS-PAGE. The contents of methionine and lysine were individually detected with HPLC, the quantities of methionine and lysine in the recombinant strain increased by 18.37% and 24.68% than the wild one, respectively. We also verified the stability of the recombinant bacterium during passaging, and found the stability was 100%. This study provided research-basis for the application of the recombinedBacillus nattoas feed additive.

  4. protein, tryptophan and lysine contents in quality protien maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    for human nutrition recommended by Food and Agriculture Organization in ... METHODS: The protein, tryptophan and lysine contents of improved ... This study revealed the fact that genetic factor influences the protein, ... Ethiop J Health Sci.

  5. Transfer of primer binding site-mutated simian immunodeficiency virus vectors by genetically engineered artificial and hybrid tRNA-like primers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A C; Grunwald, T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2001-01-01

    could be obtained by cotransfection of a gene for an engineered tRNA(Pro)-tRNA hybrid with a match to PBS-Pro. The importance of tRNA backbone identity was further analyzed by complementing the PBS-X2 vector with a gene for a matching x2 primer with a tRNA backbone, which led to three- to fourfold...

  6. Digestible lysine levels in diets for laying Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleverson Luís Nascimento Ribeiro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate the digestible lysine requirement of Japanese quails in the egg-laying phase. A total of 336 female Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica of average initial age of 207 days were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design, composed of 6 treatments (lysine levels with 7 replicates and 8 birds per experimental unit, with duration of 84 days. Experimental diets were formulated from a basal diet, with corn and soybean meal, with 2.800 kcal ME/kg and 203.70 g/kg crude protein, showing levels of 9.50; 10.00; 10.50; 11.00; 11.50; and 12.00 g/kg digestible lysine; diets remained isoprotein and isocaloric. The following variables were studied: feed intake (FI; lysine intake (LI; egg production per bird per day (EPBD; egg production per bird housed (EPBH; production of marketable eggs (PME; egg weight (EW; egg mass (EM; utilization efficiency of lysine for egg mass production (UELEM; feed conversion per mass (FCEM; feed conversion per dozen eggs (FCDZ; bird availability (BA; percentages of yolk (Y, albumen (A and shell (S; specific egg weight (SW; nitrogen ingested (NI; nitrogen excreted (NE; and nitrogen balance (NB. Significant effect was only observed for LI, EW, EM, UELEM, FCEM, Y, A and SW. The digestible lysine level estimated in diets for laying Japanese quails is 11.20 g digestible lysine/kg diet, corresponding to an average daily intake of 272.23 mg lysine.

  7. Combination of the somatic cell nuclear transfer method and RNAi technology for the production of a prion gene-knockdown calf using plasmid vectors harboring the U6 or tRNA promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsrikeao, Pimprapar; Sutou, Shizuyo; Kunishi, Miho; Dong, Ya Juan; Bai, Xuejin; Otoi, Takeshige

    2011-01-01

    By combining RNAi technology with SCNT method, we attempted to produce transgenic calves with knocked down bPRNP for technological assessments. The respective utilities of type II (tRNA) and type III (hU6) Pol III promoters in mediating plasmid vector-based RNAi for the production of a bPRNP-knockdown calf were compared. Plasmid harboring DNA for siRNA expression was introduced stably into the genome of primary cultured bovine cells. By inserting the transgenic cell into an enucleated bovine egg, SCNT embryos were produced. The ability for SCNT embryos to develop to blastocysts was higher in hU6 based vector groups (44-53%) than in a tRNA group (32%). In all, 30 hU6-embryos and 12 tRNA-embryos were transferred to 11 recipients. Only tRNA-embryos were able to impregnate recipients (6 out of 11 transfers), resulting in four aborted fetuses, one stillbirth, and one live-born calf. The expression of EGFP, a marker, was detected in all six. The bPRNP transcript levels in the nervous tissues (brain, cerebellum, spinal bulb, and spinal cord) from the calf, which was killed 20 days after birth, were reduced to 35% of those of the control calf on average, as determined by qRT-PCR. The PrPC levels, as estimated by western blot were reduced to 86% on average in the nervous tissues. These findings suggest that SCNT technology remains immature, that the tRNA promoter is useful, and that RNAi can significantly reduce PRNP mRNA levels, but insufficient reduction of PrPC levels exists in cattle under these conditions.

  8. Maintenance requirement and deposition efficiency of lysine in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Speroni Ceron

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the maintenance requirement and the deposition efficiency of lysine in growing pigs. It was used the incomplete changeover experimental design, with replicates over time. Twelve castrated pigs with average body weight (BW of 52±2 kg were kept in metabolism crates with a controlled temperature of 22ºC. The diets were formulated to supply 30, 50, 60, and 70% of the expected requirements of standardized lysine, and provided at 2.6 times the energy requirements for maintenance. The trial lasted 24 days and was divided into two periods of 12 days: seven days for animal adaptation to the diet and five days for sample collection. The increasing content of lysine in the diet did not affect dry matter intake of the pigs. The amount of nitrogen excreted was 47% of the nitrogen intake, of which 35% was excreted through feces and 65% through urine. The estimated endogenous losses of lysine were 36.4 mg kg-1 BW0.75. The maintenance requirement of lysine for pigs weighing around 50 kg is 40.4 mg kg-1 BW0.75, and the deposition efficiency of lysine is 90%.

  9. Targeting protein lysine methylation and demethylation in cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunlong He; Ilia Korboukh; Jian Jin; Jing Huang

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade,we saw an explosion of studies investigating the role of lysine methylation/demethylation of histones and non-histone proteins,such as p53,NF-kappaB,and E2F1.These ‘Ying-Yang' post-translational modifications are important to fine-tuning the activity of these proteins. Lysine methylation and demethylation are catalyzed by protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein lysine demethylases (PKDMs).PKMTs,PKDMs,and their substrates have been shown to play important roles in cancers.Although the underlying mechanisms of tumorigenesis are still largely unknown,growing evidence is starting to link aberrant regulation of methylation to tumorigenesis.This review focuses on summarizing the recent progress in understanding of the function of protein lysine methylation,and in the discovery of small molecule inhibitors for PKMTs and PKDMs.We also discuss the potential and the caveats of targeting protein lysine methylation for the treatment of cancer.

  10. Enzymic and chemical synthesis of epilson-N-(L-propionyl-2)-L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, M; Tanaka, M

    1978-10-01

    Pyruvate was shown to act as an oxo acid substrate in the reverse direction of saccharopine dehydrogenase [epsilon N-(L-glutaryl-2)-L-lysine: NAD oxidoreductase (L-lysine-forming)] reaction. The enzymic condensation product of lysine and pyruvate was isolated and identified as epsilon-N-(L-propionyl-2)-L-lysine by comparison with the synthetic compound. A method for the chemical preparation of diastereoisomers of epsilon-N-(propionyl-2)-L-lysine is also described.

  11. Differential Contributions of Ubiquitin-Modified APOBEC3G Lysine Residues to HIV-1 Vif-Induced Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Tiffany; Shao, Qiujia; Wang, Weiran; Wang, Yudi; Wang, Chenliang; Kinlock, Ballington; Liu, Bindong

    2016-08-28

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (A3G) is a host restriction factor that impedes HIV-1 replication. Viral integrity is salvaged by HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif), which mediates A3G polyubiquitination and subsequent cellular depletion. Previous studies have implied that A3G polyubiquitination is essential for Vif-induced degradation. However, the contribution of polyubiquitination to the rate of A3G degradation remains unclear. Here, we show that A3G polyubiquitination is essential for degradation. Inhibition of ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 by PYR-41 or blocking the formation of ubiquitin chains by over-expressing the lysine to arginine mutation of ubiquitin K48 (K48R) inhibited A3G degradation. Our A3G mutagenesis study showed that lysine residues 297, 301, 303, and 334 were not sufficient to render lysine-free A3G sensitive to Vif-mediated degradation. Our data also confirm that Vif could induce ubiquitin chain formation on lysine residues interspersed throughout A3G. Notably, A3G degradation relied on the lysine residues involved in polyubiquitination. Although A3G and the A3G C-terminal mutant interacted with Vif and were modified by ubiquitin chains, the latter remained more resistant to Vif-induced degradation. Furthermore, the A3G C-terminal mutant, but not the N-terminal mutant, maintained potent antiviral activity in the presence of Vif. Taken together, our results suggest that the location of A3G ubiquitin modification is a determinant for Vif-mediated degradation, implying that in addition to polyubiquitination, other factors may play a key role in the rate of A3G degradation.

  12. Identification and Characterization of the Lysine-Rich Matrix Protein Family in Pinctada fucata: Indicative of Roles in Shell Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jian; Xie, Jun; Gao, Jing; Xu, Chao-Qun; Yan, Yi; Jia, Gan-Chu; Xiang, Liang; Xie, Li-Ping; Zhang, Rong-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Mantle can secret matrix proteins playing key roles in regulating the process of shell formation. The genes encoding lysine-rich matrix proteins (KRMPs) are one of the most highly expressed matrix genes in pearl oysters. However, the expression pattern of KRMPs is limited and the functions of them still remain unknown. In this study, we isolated and identified six new members of lysine-rich matrix proteins, rich in lysine, glycine and tyrosine, and all of them are basic matrix proteins. Combined with four members of the KRMPs previously reported, all these proteins can be divided into three subclasses according to the results of phylogenetic analyses: KRMP1-3 belong to subclass KPI, KRMP4-5 belong to KPII, and KRMP6-10 belong to KPIII. Three subcategories of lysine-rich matrix proteins are highly expressed in the D-phase, the larvae and adult mantle. Lysine-rich matrix proteins are involved in the shell repairing process and associated with the formation of the shell and pearl. What's more, they can cause abnormal shell growth after RNA interference. In detail, KPI subgroup was critical for the beginning formation of the prismatic layer; both KPII and KPIII subgroups participated in the formation of prismatic layer and nacreous layer. Compared with different temperatures and salinity stimulation treatments, the influence of changes in pH on KRMPs gene expression was the greatest. Recombinant KRMP7 significantly inhibited CaCO3 precipitation, changed the morphology of calcite, and inhibited the growth of aragonite in vitro. Our results are beneficial to understand the functions of the KRMP genes during shell formation.

  13. Couette-Taylor crystallizer: Effective control of crystal size distribution and recovery of L-lysine in cooling crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh-Tuan; Yu, Taekyung; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2017-07-01

    A Couette-Taylor crystallizer is developed to enhance the L-Lysine crystal size distribution and recovery in the case of continuous cooling crystallization. When using the proposed Couette-Taylor (CT) crystallizer, the size distribution and crystal product recovery were much narrower and higher, respectively, than those from a conventional stirred tank (ST) crystallizer. Here, the coefficient of the size distribution for the crystal product from the CT crystallizer was only 0.45, while it was 0.78 in the case of the conventional ST crystallizer at an agitation speed of 700 rpm, mean residence time of 20 min, and feed concentration of 900 (g/L). Furthermore, when using the CT crystallizer, the crystal product recovery was remarkably enhanced up to 100%wt with a mean residence time of only 20 min, while it required a mean residence time of at least 60 min when using the conventional ST crystallizer. This result indicates that the CT crystallizer was much more effective than the conventional ST crystallizer in terms of controlling a narrower size distribution and achieving a 100%wt L-lysine crystal product recovery from continuous cooling crystallization. The advantage of the CT crystallizer over the conventional ST crystallizer was explained based on the higher energy dissipation of the Taylor vortex flow and larger surface area for heat transfer of the CT crystallizer. Here, the energy dissipation of the Taylor vortex flow in the CT crystallizer was 13.6 times higher than that of the random fluid motion in the conventional ST crystallizer, while the surface area per unit volume for heat transfer of the CT crystallizer was 8.0 times higher than that of the conventional ST crystallizer. As a result, the mixing condition and heat transfer of the CT crystallizer were much more effective than those of the conventional ST crystallizer for the cooling crystallization of L-lysine, thereby enhancing the L-lysine crystal size distribution and product recovery.

  14. A novel nonviral nanoparticle gene vector: Poly-L-lysine-silica nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    DNA delivery is a core technology for gene structure and function research as well as clinical settings. The ability to safely and efficiently targeted transfer foreign DNA into cells is a fundamental goal in biotechnology. With the development of nanobiotechnology, nanoparticle gene vectors brought about new hope to reach the goal. In our research, silica nanoparticles (SiNP) were synthesized first in a microemulsion system polyoxyethylene nonylphenyl ether (OP-10)/cyclohexane/ammonium hydroxide, at the same time the effects of SiNP size and its distribution were elucidated by orthogonal analysis; then poly-L-lysine (PLL) was linked on the surface of SiNP by nanoparticle surface energy and electrostatically binding; lastly a novel complex nanomaterial-- poly-L-lysine-silica nanoparticles (PLL-SiNP) was prepared. The analysis of plasmid DNA binding and DNaseⅠ enzymatic degradation discovered that PLL-SiNP could bind DNA, and protect it against enzymatic degradation. Cell transfection showed that PLL-SiNP could efficiently transfer PEGFPC-2 plasmid DNA into HNE1 cell line. These results indicated that PLL-SiNP was a novel nonviral nanoparticle gene vector, and would probably play an important role in gene structure and function research as well as gene therapy.

  15. l-lysine production by Bacillus methanolicus: Genome-based mutational analysis and l-lysine secretion engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nærdal, Ingemar; Netzer, Roman; Irla, Marta; Krog, Anne; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve

    2017-02-20

    Bacillus methanolicus is a methylotrophic bacterium with an increasing interest in academic research and for biotechnological applications. This bacterium was previously applied for methanol-based production of l-glutamate, l-lysine and the five-carbon diamine cadaverine by wild type, classical mutant and recombinant strains. The genomes of two different l-lysine secreting B. methanolicus classical mutant strains, NOA2#13A52-8A66 and M168-20, were sequenced. We focused on mutational mapping in genes present in l-lysine and other relevant amino acid biosynthetic pathways, as well as in the primary cell metabolism important for precursor supply. In addition to mutations in the aspartate pathway genes dapG, lysA and hom-1, new mutational target genes like alr, proA, proB1, leuC, odhA and pdhD were identified. Surprisingly, no mutations were found in the putative l-lysine transporter gene lysE(MGA3). Inspection of the wild type B. methanolicus strain PB1 genome sequence identified two homologous putative l-lysine transporter genes, lysE(PB1) and lysE2(PB1). The biological role of these putative l-lysine transporter genes, together with the heterologous l-lysine exporter gene lysE(Cg) from Corynebacterium glutamicum, were therefore investigated. Our results demonstrated that the titer of secreted l-lysine in B. methanolicus was significantly increased by overexpression of lysE(Cg) while overexpression of lysE(MGA3), lysE(PB1) and lysE2(PB1) had no measurable effect.

  16. Mutational analysis of bacteriophage T4 RNA ligase 1. Different functional groups are required for the nucleotidyl transfer and phosphodiester bond formation steps of the ligation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Kai; Ho, C Kiong; Pei, Yi; Shuman, Stewart

    2003-08-08

    T4 RNA ligase 1 (Rnl1) exemplifies an ATP-dependent RNA ligase family that includes fungal tRNA ligase (Trl1) and a putative baculovirus RNA ligase. Rnl1 acts via a covalent enzyme-AMP intermediate generated by attack of Lys-99 N zeta on the alpha phosphorus of ATP. Mutation of Lys-99 abolishes ligase activity. Here we tested the effects of alanine mutations at 19 conserved positions in Rnl1 and thereby identified 9 new residues essential for ligase activity: Arg-54, Lys-75, Phe-77, Gly-102, Lys-119, Glu-227, Gly-228, Lys-240, and Lys-242. Seven of the essential residues are located within counterparts of conserved nucleotidyltransferase motifs I (99KEDG102), Ia (118SK119), IV (227EGYVA231), and V (238HFKIK242) that comprise the active sites of DNA ligases, RNA capping enzymes, and T4 RNA ligase 2. Three other essential residues, Arg-54, Lys-75 and Phe-77, are located upstream of the AMP attachment site within a conserved domain unique to the Rnl1-like ligase family. We infer a shared evolutionary history and active site architecture in Rnl1 (a tRNA repair enzyme) and Trl1 (a tRNA splicing enzyme). We determined structure-activity relationships via conservative substitutions and examined mutational effects on the isolated steps of Rnl1 adenylylation (step 1) and phosphodiester bond formation (step 3). Lys-75, Lys-240, and Lys-242 were found to be essential for step 1 and overall ligation of 5'-phosphorylated RNA but not for phosphodiester bond formation. These results suggest that the composition of the Rnl1 active site is different during steps 1 and 3. Mutations at Arg-54 and Lys-119 abolished the overall RNA ligation reaction without affecting steps 1 and 3. Arg-54 and Lys-119 are thereby implicated as specific catalysts of the RNA adenylation reaction (step 2) of the ligation pathway.

  17. Effects of lysine-induced acute renal failure in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Kentaro; Adachi, Kenji; Sugimoto, Tetsuro; Chiba, Shuichi

    2006-05-01

    This study investigates the effects of lysine-induced acute renal failure. Female dogs received a lysine hydrochloride (lysine) of 4500 mg/kg/day (3.75 ml/kg/hr) for 3 consecutive days. The dogs were observed for clinical signs. Body weights were recorded, food consumption and water consumption calculated, and urinalysis and blood biochemistry were performed daily. Plasma samples for amino acid determinations were obtained from all dogs, which were necropsied on Day 3. Histopathological examinations were done on all test animals. Compound-related findings include the following. Blood biochemistry results showed increases in ammonia, blood urea nitrogen, blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio, and creatinine. Urinary changes consisted of increases in urine volume, total protein, albumin, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. In addition, macroscopic findings consisted of pale, congested capsule; microscopic findings consisted of hypertrophy of proximal convoluted tubule (mainly S1 segment), and degeneration/desquamation of urinary tubule (mainly S3 segment with hyaline casts) in the kidney. From these findings, it can be concluded that lysine is nephrotoxic in dogs. Nephrotoxicity of lysine may relate to direct tubular toxicity and to tubular obstruction.

  18. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies on Thermus thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase complexed with different amino acids and pre-transfer editing substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayevsky A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the structural bases for the amino acid selectivity of the Thermus thermophilus leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRSTT aminoacylation site and to disclose the binding pattern of pre-transfer editing substrates. Methods. Eight amino acids proposed as semi-cognate substrates for aminoacylation and eight aminoacyl-adenylates (formed from AMP and eight amino acids were prepared in zwitterions form. The protein structure with a co-crystallized substrate in the aminoacylation site [PDBID: 1OBH] was taken from RCSB. Docking settings and evaluation of substrate efficiency were followed by twofold docking function analysis for each conformation with Gold CCDC. The molecular dynamics simulation was performed using Gromacs. The procedures of relaxation and binding study were separated in two different subsequent simulations for 50ns and 5ns. Results. The evaluation of substrate efficiency for 8 amino acids by twofold docking function analysis, based on score values,has shown that the ligands of LeuRSTT can be positioned in the following order: Leu>Nva>Hcy>Nle>Met>Cys>Ile >Val. MD simulation has revealed lower electrostatic interactions of isoleucine with the active site of the enzyme compared with those for norvaline and leucine. In the case of aminoacyl-adenylates no significant differences were found based on score values for both GoldScore and Asp functions. Molecular dynamics of leucyl-, isoleucyl- and norvalyl-adenylates showed that the most stable and conformationally favorable is leucine, then follow norvaline and isoleucine. It has been also found that the TYR43 of the active site covers carboxyl group of leucine and norvaline like a shield and deflected towards isoleucine, allowing water molecules to come closer. Conclusions. In this study we revealed some structural basis for screening unfavorable substrates by shape, size and flexibility of a radical. The results obtained for different amino acids by molecular docking and MD studies

  19. Antioxidant activity of carbocysteine lysine salt monohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinamonti, S; Venturoli, L; Leis, M; Chicca, M; Barbieri, A; Sostero, S; Ravenna, F; Daffonchio, L; Novellini, R; Ciaccia, A

    2001-09-01

    Reactive oxygen radicals are involved in many respiratory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Carbocysteine lysine salt monohydrate (CLS) is a mucoactive drug effective in the treatment of bronchopulmonary diseases characterized by mucus alterations, including COPD. In the present study, the antioxidant activity of CLS was studied in vitro in three different oxygen radical producing systems, i.e. bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) from patients affected by COPD, ultrasound treated human serum and cultured human lung endothelial cells challenged with elastase. BAL, exposed or not to different concentrations of CLS (1.5-30 mM), was assayed for free radical content by fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) or by cytochrome c reduction kinetics. Human serum was treated with ultrasound in the presence or absence of CLS (1.5, 2.5 mM) or N-acetyl cysteine (NAC; 4, 5 mM) and assayed for free radical content by FADU. Human endothelial cells cultured in vitro from pulmonary artery were incubated with elastase (0.3 IU/mL), in the presence or absence of glutathione (GSH; 0.65 mM) or CLS (0.16 mM). The supernatant was tested for cytochrome c reduction kinetics whereas cell homogenates were assessed for xanthine oxidase (XO) content by SDS-PAGE. Results showed that CLS is more effective as an in vitro scavenger in comparison to GSH and NAC. CLS reduced the damage of DNA from healthy donors exposed to COPD-BAL and was able to quench clastogenic activity induced in human serum by exposure to ultrasound at concentrations as low as 2.5 mM. NAC protect DNA from radical damage, starting from 5 mM. In human lung endothelial cells cultured in presence of elastase, CLS (0.16 mM) decreased xanthine oxidase activity. These results suggest that CLS could act by interfering with the conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase into superoxide-producing xanthine oxidase. The antioxidant activity of CLS could contribute to its therapeutic activity by reducing radical

  20. Transcriptome and Gene Ontology (GO) Enrichment Analysis Reveals Genes Involved in Biotin Metabolism That Affect L-Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Il; Kim, Jong-Hyeon; Park, Young-Jin

    2016-03-09

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is widely used for amino acid production. In the present study, 543 genes showed a significant change in their mRNA expression levels in L-lysine-producing C. glutamicum ATCC21300 than that in the wild-type C. glutamicum ATCC13032. Among these 543 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 28 genes were up- or downregulated. In addition, 454 DEGs were functionally enriched and categorized based on BLAST sequence homologies and gene ontology (GO) annotations using the Blast2GO software. Interestingly, NCgl0071 (bioB, encoding biotin synthase) was expressed at levels ~20-fold higher in the L-lysine-producing ATCC21300 strain than that in the wild-type ATCC13032 strain. Five other genes involved in biotin metabolism or transport--NCgl2515 (bioA, encoding adenosylmethionine-8-amino-7-oxononanoate aminotransferase), NCgl2516 (bioD, encoding dithiobiotin synthetase), NCgl1883, NCgl1884, and NCgl1885--were also expressed at significantly higher levels in the L-lysine-producing ATCC21300 strain than that in the wild-type ATCC13032 strain, which we determined using both next-generation RNA sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. When we disrupted the bioB gene in C. glutamicum ATCC21300, L-lysine production decreased by approximately 76%, and the three genes involved in biotin transport (NCgl1883, NCgl1884, and NCgl1885) were significantly downregulated. These results will be helpful to improve our understanding of C. glutamicum for industrial amino acid production.

  1. Oligo-lysine Induced Formation of Silica Particles in Neutral Silicate Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Oligo-(lysine)n (n = 1-4) containing different numbers of lysine residues was used to induce the condensation of silicic acid to form silica particles in neutral silicate solution. It was found that the condensation rate and the formation of silica particles are dependent on the number of lysine residues in an oligo-lysine. Oligo-lysine with more lysine residues can link more silicic acid together to form a matrix that promotes the effective aggregation of the condensed silica pieces to form large silica particles.

  2. Seed-Specific Expression of a Lysine-Rich Protein Gene, GhLRP, from Cotton Significantly Increases the Lysine Content in Maize Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yue

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maize seed storage proteins are a major source of human and livestock consumption. However, these proteins have poor nutritional value, because they are deficient in lysine and tryptophan. Much research has been done to elevate the lysine content by reducing zein content or regulating the activities of key enzymes in lysine metabolism. Using the naturally lysine-rich protein genes, sb401 and SBgLR, from potato, we previously increased the lysine and protein contents of maize seeds. Here, we examined another natural lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton, which increased the lysine content of transgenic maize seeds at levels varying from 16.2% to 65.0% relative to the wild-type. The total protein content was not distinctly different, except in the six transgenic lines. The lipid and starch levels did not differ substantially in Gossypium hirsutum L. lysine-rich protein (GhLRP transgenic kernels when compared to wild-type. The agronomic characteristics of all the transgenic maize were also normal. GhLRP is a high-lysine protein candidate gene for increasing the lysine content of maize. This study provided a valuable model system for improving maize lysine content.

  3. Seed-specific expression of a lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton significantly increases the lysine content in maize seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jing; Li, Cong; Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Dengyun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2014-03-27

    Maize seed storage proteins are a major source of human and livestock consumption. However, these proteins have poor nutritional value, because they are deficient in lysine and tryptophan. Much research has been done to elevate the lysine content by reducing zein content or regulating the activities of key enzymes in lysine metabolism. Using the naturally lysine-rich protein genes, sb401 and SBgLR, from potato, we previously increased the lysine and protein contents of maize seeds. Here, we examined another natural lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton, which increased the lysine content of transgenic maize seeds at levels varying from 16.2% to 65.0% relative to the wild-type. The total protein content was not distinctly different, except in the six transgenic lines. The lipid and starch levels did not differ substantially in Gossypium hirsutum L. lysine-rich protein (GhLRP) transgenic kernels when compared to wild-type. The agronomic characteristics of all the transgenic maize were also normal. GhLRP is a high-lysine protein candidate gene for increasing the lysine content of maize. This study provided a valuable model system for improving maize lysine content.

  4. Sugar Substrates for l-Lysine Fermentation by Ustilago maydis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Marroquín, A.; Ledezma, M.; Carreño, R.

    1970-01-01

    The extracellular production of l-lysine in media with cane sugar, blackstrap molasses, or clarified sugar-cane juice by a previously obtained mutant of Ustilago maydis was studied. Enzymatically inverted clarified juice (medium J-3) gave 2.9 g of lysine per liter under the following conditions: inoculum, 5%; pH 5.8; temperature, 30 C; KLa in the fermentors, 0.41 mmoles of O2 per liter per min; fermentation time, 72 hr. The concentrate, obtained by direct evaporation and drying of the fermentation broth, could be used as a possible feed supplement because of its amino-acid and vitamin content. PMID:5485081

  5. Activity of a peptidase secreted by Phanerochaete chrysosporium depends on lysine to subsite S'1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Lilian Caroline Gonçalves; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Juliano, Luiz; Rosa, Jose C; Cabral, Hamilton

    2017-01-01

    Peptidases are enzymes that catalyze the rupture of peptide bonds. Catalytic specificity studies of these enzymes have illuminated their modes of action and preferred hydrolysis targets. We describe the biochemical characteristics and catalytic specificity of a lysine-dependent peptidase secreted by the basidiomycete fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. We attained 5.7-fold purification of a ∼23-kDa neutral peptidase using size-exclusion (Sephadex G-50 resin) and ion-exchange (Source 15S resin) chromatography. Using the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer substrate Abz-KLRSSKQ-EDDnp, we detected maximal activity at pH 7.0 and 45-55°C. The peptidase retained ∼80% of its enzymatic activity for a wide range of conditions (pH 4-9; temperatures up to 50°C for 1h). The peptidase activity was lowered by the ionic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide; the reducing agent, dithiothreitol; the chaotrope, guanidine; copper (II) ion; and the cysteine peptidase-specific inhibitors, iodoacetic acid and N-ethylmaleimide. The peptidase preferred the basic amino acids K and R and high selectivity on S'1 subsite, exhibiting a condition of lysine-dependence to catalysis on anchoring of this subsite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Selected Plant Extracts and D- and L-Lysine on the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lurling, M; Van Oosterhout, F

    2014-01-01

    We tested extracts from Fructus mume, Salvia miltiorrhiza and Moringa oleifera as well as L-lysine and D-Lysine as curative measures to rapidly suppress the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIVA-CYA 43...

  7. Installation of site-specific methylation into histones using methyl lysine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew D

    2010-04-01

    Chromatin structure is influenced by post-translational modifications on histones, the principal basic protein component of chromatin. In order to study one of these modifications, lysine methylation, in the context of reconstituted chromatin, this unit describes the installation of analogs of methyl lysine residues into recombinant histones. The modification site is specified by mutating the lysine of interest to cysteine. The mutant histones are expressed and purified, and the cysteine residue alkylated to produce N-methyl aminoethylcysteine, an isosteric analog of methyl lysine. Using different alkylating reagents, it is possible to install analogs of mono-, di-, or trimethyl lysine. While these analogs are not identical to methyl lysine residues, they show similar biochemical properties to their natural counterparts. The ease of synthesis of methyl lysine analog (MLA) histones, especially on a large scale, makes them particularly useful reagents for studying the effects of histone lysine methylation on chromatin structure, biophysics and biochemistry. (c) 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Selenium-based S-adenosylmethionine analog reveals the mammalian seven-beta-strand methyltransferase METTL10 to be an EF1A1 lysine methyltransferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Shimazu

    Full Text Available Lysine methylation has been extensively studied in histones, where it has been shown to provide specific epigenetic marks for the regulation of gene expression; however, the molecular mechanism and physiological function of lysine methylation in proteins other than histones remains to be fully addressed. To better understand the substrate diversity of lysine methylation, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM derivatives with alkyne-moieties have been synthesized. A selenium-based SAM analog, propargylic Se-adenosyl-l-selenomethionine (ProSeAM, has a wide spectrum of reactivity against various lysine methyltransferases (KMTs with sufficient stability to support enzymatic reactions in vitro. By using ProSeAM as a chemical probe for lysine methylation, we identified substrates for two seven-beta-strand KMTs, METTL21A and METTL10, on a proteomic scale in mammalian cells. METTL21A has been characterized as a heat shock protein (HSP-70 methyltransferase. Mammalian METTL10 remains functionally uncharacterized, although its ortholog in yeast, See1, has been shown to methylate the translation elongation factor eEF1A. By using ProSeAM-mediated alkylation followed by purification and quantitative MS analysis, we confirmed that METTL21A labels HSP70 family proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrated that METTL10 also methylates the eukaryotic elongation factor EF1A1 in mammalian cells. Subsequent biochemical characterization revealed that METTL10 specifically trimethylates EF1A1 at lysine 318 and that siRNA-mediated knockdown of METTL10 decreases EF1A1 methylation levels in vivo. Thus, our study emphasizes the utility of the synthetic cofactor ProSeAM as a chemical probe for the identification of non-histone substrates of KMTs.

  9. Dysregulated Lysine Acetyltransferase 2B Promotes Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pathogenesis Through Transcriptional Repression of Interleukin-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Alfa H C; Wu, William K K; Xu, Liangliang; Wong, Sunny H; Go, Minnie Y; Chan, Anthony W H; Harbord, Marcus; Zhang, Shenghong; Chen, Minhu; Wu, Justin C Y; Chan, Michael W Y; Chan, Matthew T V; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y; Yu, Jun; Cheng, Alfred S L; Ng, Siew C

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating evidence supports epigenetic modifications in mediating intestinal immunity in inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] pathogenesis. This study aimed to identify key dysregulated epigenetic modulators and the molecular downstream pathways in IBD. Expression of 116 well-defined epigenetic modulators was profiled and validated in 96 intestinal tissues from patients with Crohn's disease [CD], ulcerative colitis [UC], and healthy controls using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction [QRT-PCR], western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Dysregulation of histone modifications and IBD-related cytokines were examined by chromatin immunoprecipitation, luciferase activity, and gene expression analyses in normal colonic epithelial cell line, NCM460, upon small-molecule inhibition or RNA interference, followed by validation in primary colonic tissues. Targeted expression profiling uncovered seven differentially expressed epigenetic modulators, of which the down-regulation of lysine acetyltransferase 2B [KAT2B] mRNA and protein was the most significant and was consequently validated in inflamed CD and UC compared with healthy colonic tissues. KAT2B protein localised abundantly in nuclei of normal colonic epithelium but diminished in paired inflamed CD and UC tissues. Pharmacological inhibition of KAT2B by anacardic acid in NCM460 cells reduced the levels of histone H4 lysine 5 acetylation [H4K5ac] and interleukin-10 [IL-10] in a dose-dependent manner. Knockdown of KAT2B reduced the IL-10 promoter occupancy of KAT2B and H4K5ac, resulting in transcriptional silencing. IL-10 level was also diminished in inflamed IBD tissues. Our findings demonstrated a novel epigenetic mechanism of IL-10 dysregulation in IBD. Down-regulation of KAT2B may disrupt the innate and adaptive inflammatory responses due to the suppression of this crucial anti-inflammatory cytokine. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University

  10. DFT Modelling of Tripeptides (Lysine-Tryptophan-Lysine Interacting with Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navaratnarajah Kuganathan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Model calculations are performed to predict the nature of interaction between SWNT and a tripeptide (Lys-Trp-Lys and to calculate the binding energies and charge transfer between these two species using density functional theory. DFT calculations indicate that the interaction is of a non covalent nature. Minimal charge transfer is observed between SWNT and Lys-Trp-Lys.

  11. Lysine-Grafted MCM-41 Silica as an Antibacterial Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F. Villegas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a facile strategy for the zwitterionization of bioceramics that is based on the direct incorporation of l-lysine amino acid via the ε-amino group onto mesoporous MCM-41 materials. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR studies of lysine-grafted MCM-41 (MCM-LYS simultaneously showed bands at 3080 and 1540 cm−1 and bands at 1625 and 1415 cm−1 corresponding to -NH3+/COO− pairs, which demonstrate the incorporation of the amino acid on the material surface keeping its zwitterionic character. Both elemental and thermogravimetric analyses showed that the amount of grafted lysine was 8 wt. % based on the bioceramic total weight. Moreover, MCM-LYS exhibited a reduction of adhesion of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria in 33% and 50%, respectively at physiological pH, as compared with pristine MCM-41. Biofilm studies onto surfaces showed that lysine functionalization elicited a reduction of the area covered by S. aureus biofilm from 42% to only 5% (88%. This research shows a simple and effective approach to chemically modify bioceramics using single amino acids that provides zwitterionic functionality, which is useful to develop new biomaterials that are able to resist bacterial adhesion.

  12. [Modification of the lysine-iron agar (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, G

    1975-12-01

    The addition of L-phenylalanine to the lysine-iron agar described by Edwards and Fife ]1] allows a more valuable screening of the Proteus group based on its deamination properties. Some minor modifications of the indicator and thiosulfate content lead to improve and earlier recording of the results.

  13. Detection of salt bridges to lysines in solution in barnase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Williamson, Michael P.; Hounslow, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    We show that salt bridges involving lysines can be detected by deuterium isotope effects on NMR chemical shifts of the sidechain amine. Lys27 in the ribonuclease barnase is salt bridged, and mutation of Arg69 to Lys retains a partially buried salt bridge. The salt bridges are functionally important....

  14. Requirement of the laying hen for apparent fecal digestible lysine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, J.B.; Smink, W.

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the requirement for lysine of a White Leghorn strain of hens with a body weight of approximately 1,600 g. Before starting the experiment, apparent fecal digestibility of amino acids of the basal diet was determined in an in vivo digestibility trial with six individ

  15. Predicting post-translational lysine acetylation using support vector machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnad, Florian; Ren, Shubin; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2010-01-01

    spectrometry to identify 3600 lysine acetylation sites on 1750 human proteins covering most of the previously annotated sites and providing the most comprehensive acetylome so far. This dataset should provide an excellent source to train support vector machines (SVMs) allowing the high accuracy in silico...

  16. effects of dietary chromium tripicolinate and lysine on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    Six traitements ont été répétés quatre fois, avec quatre porcs par répétition. Au cours de cette ... The potential capability of lysine to improve ... (chromium picolinate) on animal productivity has ... cholesterol (Sigma, 1989a), and total proteins.

  17. Amino acid nutrition beyond methionine and lysine for milk protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids are involved in many important physiological processes affecting the production, health, and reproduction of high-producing dairy cows. Most research and recommendations for lactating dairy cows has focused on methionine and lysine for increasing milk protein yield. This is because these...

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  10. File list: His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ca...rdiovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ot...hers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation A...dipocyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation D...igestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Gon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation G...onad http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Gon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Di...gestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Dig.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Digestive tra...ct http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Kid.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...ancreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Un...classified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ki...dney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...ung SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...iver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...luripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ca...rdiovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Lu...ng http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation A...ll cell types SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ne...ural http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bl...ood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ut...erus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Gon.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Gonad SRX1060...566,SRX1060567,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation M...uscle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Plc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...lacenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...nclassified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Brs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Br...east http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.NoD.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...iver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...reast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation G...onad http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Adp.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Adipocyte htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Al...l cell types SRX099894,SRX099897 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...one http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Mu...scle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ep...idermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Lu...ng http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...ung SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...luripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Em...bryo http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Un...classified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...nclassified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ki...dney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...ancreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation A...dipocyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...rostate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Utr.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...terus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Utr.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Dig.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Digestive tra...ct http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Kid.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.NoD.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.EmF.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Embryonic fib...roblast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ca...rdiovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pl...uripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Di...gestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...reast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Dig.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Digestive tra...ct http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation M...uscle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ad...ipocyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Emb.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Em...bryo http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation O...thers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...lacenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation M...uscle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.CDV.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Cardiovascula...r http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...one http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancre...as http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epide...rmis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Breast... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All ce...ll types SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neura...l http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uterus... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.ALL.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All ce...ll types SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardi...ovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prost...ate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epider...mis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Breas...t http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Kidney... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Oth.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prost...ate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Muscl...e http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epide...rmis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.ALL.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All ce...ll types SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neura...l http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All c...ell types SRX099890 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Gonad... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardi...ovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Gon.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Gonad ...SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Digest...ive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epider...mis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Place...nta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Prs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prost...ate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung ...SRX099890 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uteru...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Gonad ...SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Digest...ive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Breast... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.CDV.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epider...mis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Other...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Adp.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Adipocyte htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.NoD.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.PSC.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pluripotent s...tem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.PSC.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pluripotent s...tem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Mu...scle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pr...ostate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation A...ll cell types SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Go...nad SRX099894,SRX099897 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation O...thers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.EmF.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Embryonic fib...roblast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.PSC.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...luripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Lu...ng http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Emb.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Em...bryo http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.CDV.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Cardiovascula...r http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ep...idermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bo...ne http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Spl.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Spl.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Sp...leen http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Spl.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Un...classified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. Optimization of lysine production in Corynebacteriumglutamicum ATCC15032 by Response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Haghi

    2017-03-01

    Discussion and conclusion: According to the results, the proposed culture media by response surface methodology causes 1400 times increase in the lysine production compared with M9 culture media and methionine had an important role in the production of lysine, probably by inhibiting the other metabolic pathway which has common metabolic precursor with lysine production metabolic pathway.

  17. File list: Oth.Gon.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Gonad SRX1060...567,SRX1060566,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Adp.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Adipocyte htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.ALL.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine All cell type...s SRX1060566,SRX1060567,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Epd.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Epidermis htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Epd.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Epidermis htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.ALL.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine All cell type...s SRX1060567,SRX1060566,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Adp.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Adipocyte htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Dig.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Digestive tra...ct http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.EmF.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Embryonic fib...roblast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.CDV.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Cardiovascula...r http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Gon.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Gonad SRX1060...566,SRX1060567,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.NoD.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.PSC.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pluripotent s...tem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Epd.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Epidermis htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine All cell type...s SRX1060566,SRX1060567,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pluripotent s...tem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Epd.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Epidermis htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation O...thers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...one http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pl...acenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pr...ostate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ep...idermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...luripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...lacenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation N...eural http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...terus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Spl.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Spl.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Sp...leen http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Spl.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ut...erus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation E...pidermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ot...hers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation D...igestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pr...ostate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Spl.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Spl.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Sp...leen http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Spl.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Go...nad SRX099894,SRX099897 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation N...eural http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. A lysine-to-arginine mutation on NEDD8 markedly reduces the activity of cullin RING E3 ligase through the impairment of neddylation cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Yiyan; Liu, Yaobin; Xu, Guoqiang, E-mail: gux2002@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-12

    Neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8) is a ubiquitin-like modifier, which forms covalent conjugates on lysines of its substrates. This post-translational modification, neddylation, plays important roles in tumor cell proliferation and viability. Ubiquitin can form diverse polyubiquitin chains, on its seven lysines, which play important functions in various biological processes. However, the roles of lysines in NEDD8 have not been explored. Here, we generated nine NEDD8 point mutants, each with one lysine replaced by an arginine, to study the putative function of lysines in NEDD8. Our experiments discover that Lys27 in NEDD8 is a critical residue for protein neddylation. Replacement of this residue with arginine almost completely eliminates the conjugation of NEDD8 to its substrates. Furthermore, we find that the K27R mutant impairs NEDD8 conjugation to the E2 enzyme, which normally forms thioester bonds for further transferring NEDD8 to its ligases and substrates. Therefore, this mutation completely inhibits global protein neddylation, including neddylation of cullin family proteins, resulting in decreased activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases. This work sheds new light on the roles of NEDD8 lysines on neddylation cascades and provides a dominant negative mutant for the study of neddylation and its biological functions. - Highlights: • Lys27 in NEDD8 is critical for protein neddylation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant impairs the NEDD8 conjugation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant significantly reduces the activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases.

  14. The biology of lysine acetylation integrates transcriptional programming and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujtaba Shiraz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The biochemical landscape of lysine acetylation has expanded from a small number of proteins in the nucleus to a multitude of proteins in the cytoplasm. Since the first report confirming acetylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53 by a lysine acetyltransferase (KAT, there has been a surge in the identification of new, non-histone targets of KATs. Added to the known substrates of KATs are metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, molecular chaperones, ribosomal proteins and nuclear import factors. Emerging studies demonstrate that no fewer than 2000 proteins in any particular cell type may undergo lysine acetylation. As described in this review, our analyses of cellular acetylated proteins using DAVID 6.7 bioinformatics resources have facilitated organization of acetylated proteins into functional clusters integral to cell signaling, the stress response, proteolysis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neuronal development. In addition, these clusters also depict association of acetylated proteins with human diseases. These findings not only support lysine acetylation as a widespread cellular phenomenon, but also impel questions to clarify the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms governing target selectivity by KATs. Present challenges are to understand the molecular basis for the overlapping roles of KAT-containing co-activators, to differentiate between global versus dynamic acetylation marks, and to elucidate the physiological roles of acetylated proteins in biochemical pathways. In addition to discussing the cellular 'acetylome', a focus of this work is to present the widespread and dynamic nature of lysine acetylation and highlight the nexus that exists between epigenetic-directed transcriptional regulation and metabolism.

  15. Detection of subgenomic mRNA of feline coronavirus by real-time polymerase chain reaction based on primer-probe energy transfer (P-sg-QPCR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornyák, Ákos; Bálint, Ádám; Farsang, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis is one of the most severe devastating diseases of the Felidae. Upon the appearance of clinical signs, a cure for the infected animal is impossible. Therefore rapid and proper diagnosis for both the presence of the causative agent, feline coronavirus (FCo......V) and the manifestation of feline infectious peritonitis is of paramount importance. In the present work, a novel real-time RT-PCR method is described which is able to detect FCoV and to determine simultaneously the quantity of the viral RNA. The new assay combines the M gene subgenomic messenger RNA (sg-mRNA) detection...... assay was proven by positive amplification from a set of nine different FCoV strains and negative from the tested non-coronaviral targets. Examination of faecal samples of healthy young cats, organ samples of perished animals, which suffered from feline infectious peritonitis, and cat leukocytes from...

  16. RNA helicases

    OpenAIRE

    Owttrim, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Similar to proteins, RNA molecules must fold into the correct conformation and associate with protein complexes in order to be functional within a cell. RNA helicases rearrange RNA secondary structure and RNA-protein interactions in an ATP-dependent reaction, performing crucial functions in all aspects of RNA metabolism. In prokaryotes, RNA helicase activity is associated with roles in housekeeping functions including RNA turnover, ribosome biogenesis, translation and small RNA metabolism. In...

  17. Severe dietary lysine restriction affects growth and body composition and hepatic gene expression for nitrogen metabolism in growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Lee, K S; Kwon, D-H; Bong, J J; Jeong, J Y; Nam, Y S; Lee, M S; Liu, X; Baik, M

    2014-02-01

    Dietary lysine restriction may differentially affect body growth and lipid and nitrogen metabolism, depending on the degree of lysine restriction. This study was conducted to examine the effect of dietary lysine restriction on growth and lipid and nitrogen metabolism with two different degree of lysine restriction. Isocaloric amino acid-defined diets containing 1.4% lysine (adequate), 0.70% lysine (50% moderate lysine restriction) and 0.35% lysine (75% severe lysine restriction) were fed from the age of 52 to 77 days for 25 days in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The 75% severe lysine restriction increased (p muscle lipid contents and abdominal fat accumulation, increased (p  0.05) affect body growth and lipid and nitrogen metabolism. Our results demonstrate that severe 75% lysine restriction has detrimental effects on body growth and deregulate lipid and nitrogen metabolism.

  18. RNA topology

    OpenAIRE

    Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim D.

    2013-01-01

    A new variety on non-coding RNA has been discovered by several groups: circular RNA (circRNA). This discovery raises intriguing questions about the possibility of the existence of knotted RNA molecules and the existence of a new class of enzymes changing RNA topology, RNA topoisomerases.

  19. Evidence supporting a role for Nε-(3-formyl-3,4-dehydropiperidino)lysine accumulation in Müller glia dysfunction and death in diabetic retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Phaik Har; Zong, Hongliang; Medina, Reinhold J.; Limb, G. Astrid; Uchida, Koji; Stitt, Alan W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Recent evidence suggests that neuroglial dysfunction and degeneration contributes to the etiology and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Advanced lipoxidation end products (ALEs) have been implicated in the pathology of various diseases, including diabetes and several neurodegenerative disorders. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible link between the accumulation of ALEs and neuroretinal changes in diabetic retinopathy. Methods Retinal sections obtained from diabetic rats and age-matched controls were processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies against several well defined ALEs. In vitro experiments were also performed using a human Müller (Moorfields/Institute of Ophthalmology-Müller 1 [MIO-M1]) glia cell line. Western blot analysis was used to measure the accumulation of the acrolein-derived ALE adduct Nε-(3-formyl-3,4-dehydropiperidino)lysine (FDP-lysine) in Müller cells preincubated with FDP-lysine-modified human serum albumin (FDP-lysine-HSA). Responses of Müller cells to FDP-lysine accumulation were investigated by analyzing changes in the protein expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir4.1. In addition, mRNA expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) were determined by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT–PCR). Apoptotic cell death was evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis after staining with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled annexin V and propidium iodide. Results No significant differences in the levels of malondialdehyde-, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-, and 4-hydroxyhexenal-derived ALEs were evident between control and diabetic retinas after 4 months of diabetes. By contrast, FDP-lysine immunoreactivity was markedly increased in the Müller glia of diabetic rats. Time-course studies revealed that FDP-lysine initially

  20. Impact of dry heating on physicochemical properties of corn starch and lysine mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ying; Yu, Jicheng; Xu, Yongbin; Zhang, Yinghui

    2016-10-01

    Corn starch was modified with lysine by dry heat treatment and to investigate how they can affect the pasting and structural properties of the treated starches. Dry heating with lysine reduced the pasting temperature and resulting in viscosity increase. The particle size of heated starch-lysine mixture increased, suggesting that starch granules were cross-linked to lysine. After dry heating, the onset temperature, peak temperature and conclusion temperature of corn starch-lysine mixture were lower than those of other starches. The degree of crystallinity decreased for the starch after dry heat treatment while these heated starch samples still have the same X-ray diffraction types as the original starch.

  1. A tRNA body with high affinity for EF-Tu hastens ribosomal incorporation of unnatural amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieong, Ka-Weng; Pavlov, Michael Y; Kwiatkowski, Marek; Ehrenberg, Måns; Forster, Anthony C

    2014-05-01

    There is evidence that tRNA bodies have evolved to reduce differences between aminoacyl-tRNAs in their affinity to EF-Tu. Here, we study the kinetics of incorporation of L-amino acids (AAs) Phe, Ala allyl-glycine (aG), methyl-serine (mS), and biotinyl-lysine (bK) using a tRNA(Ala)-based body (tRNA(AlaB)) with a high affinity for EF-Tu. Results are compared with previous data on the kinetics of incorporation of the same AAs using a tRNA(PheB) body with a comparatively low affinity for EF-Tu. All incorporations exhibited fast and slow phases, reflecting the equilibrium fraction of AA-tRNA in active ternary complex with EF-Tu:GTP before the incorporation reaction. Increasing the concentration of EF-Tu increased the amplitude of the fast phase and left its rate unaltered. This allowed estimation of the affinity of each AA-tRNA to EF-Tu:GTP during translation, showing about a 10-fold higher EF-Tu affinity for AA-tRNAs formed from the tRNA(AlaB) body than from the tRNA(PheB) body. At ∼1 µM EF-Tu, tRNA(AlaB) conferred considerably faster incorporation kinetics than tRNA(PheB), especially in the case of the bulky bK. In contrast, the swap to the tRNA(AlaB) body did not increase the fast phase fraction of N-methyl-Phe incorporation, suggesting that the slow incorporation of N-methyl-Phe had a different cause than low EF-Tu:GTP affinity. The total time for AA-tRNA release from EF-Tu:GDP, accommodation, and peptidyl transfer on the ribosome was similar for the tRNA(AlaB) and tRNA(PheB) bodies. We conclude that a tRNA body with high EF-Tu affinity can greatly improve incorporation of unnatural AAs in a potentially generalizable manner.

  2. Lysine metabolism in antisense C-hordein barley grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Daiana; Rizzi, Vanessa; Gaziola, Salete A

    2015-01-01

    ) and five antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines. Considering the amounts of soluble and protein-bound aspartate-derived amino acids together with the analysis of key enzymes of aspartate metabolic pathway, we suggest that the C-hordein suppression did not only alter the metabolism of at least one......The grain proteins of barley are deficient in lysine and threonine due to their low concentrations in the major storage protein class, the hordeins, especially in the C-hordein subgroup. Previously produced antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines have an improved amino acid composition......, with increased lysine, methionine and threonine contents. The objective of the study was to investigate the possible changes in the regulation of key enzymes of the aspartate metabolic pathway and the contents of aspartate-derived amino acids in the nontransgenic line (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Golden Promise...

  3. Coacervate-like microspheres from lysine-rich proteinoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfing, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    Microspheres form isothermally from lysine-rich proteinoid when the ionic strength of the solution is increased with NaCl or other salts. Studies with different monovalent anions and with polymers of different amino acid composition indicate that charge neutralization and hydrophobic bonding contribute to microsphere formation. The particles also form in sea water, especially if heated or made slightly alkaline. The microspheres differ from those made from acidic proteinoid but resemble coacervate droplets in some ways (isothermal formation, limited stability, stabilization by quinone, uptake of dyes). Because the constituent lysine-rich proteinoid is of simulated prebiotic origin, the study is interpreted to add emphasis to and suggest an evolutionary continuity for coacervation phenomena.

  4. PLMD: An updated data resource of protein lysine modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haodong; Zhou, Jiaqi; Lin, Shaofeng; Deng, Wankun; Zhang, Ying; Xue, Yu

    2017-05-20

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring at protein lysine residues, or protein lysine modifications (PLMs), play critical roles in regulating biological processes. Due to the explosive expansion of the amount of PLM substrates and the discovery of novel PLM types, here we greatly updated our previous studies, and presented a much more integrative resource of protein lysine modification database (PLMD). In PLMD, we totally collected and integrated 284,780 modification events in 53,501 proteins across 176 eukaryotes and prokaryotes for up to 20 types of PLMs, including ubiquitination, acetylation, sumoylation, methylation, succinylation, malonylation, glutarylation, glycation, formylation, hydroxylation, butyrylation, propionylation, crotonylation, pupylation, neddylation, 2-hydroxyisobutyrylation, phosphoglycerylation, carboxylation, lipoylation and biotinylation. Using the data set, a motif-based analysis was performed for each PLM type, and the results demonstrated that different PLM types preferentially recognize distinct sequence motifs for the modifications. Moreover, various PLMs synergistically orchestrate specific cellular biological processes by mutual crosstalks with each other, and we totally found 65,297 PLM events involved in 90 types of PLM co-occurrences on the same lysine residues. Finally, various options were provided for accessing the data, while original references and other annotations were also present for each PLM substrate. Taken together, we anticipated the PLMD database can serve as a useful resource for further researches of PLMs. PLMD 3.0 was implemented in PHP + MySQL and freely available at http://plmd.biocuckoo.org. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative mitogenomic analyses of three scallops (Bivalvia: Pectinidae reveal high level variation of genomic organization and a diversity of transfer RNA gene sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Xiaoyu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It can be seen from the available mollusk mitogenomes that the family Pectinidae exhibits the most variation in genome organization. In this study, comparative mitogenomic analyses were performed for three scallops from the subfamily Chlamydinae (Pectinidae, with the goal of characterizing the degree of variability of mitogenome organization and other characteristics among species from the same subfamily and exploring their possible evolution route. Findings The complete or nearly complete mtDNA sequences of scallop Mimachlamys nobilis (17 935 bp, Mizuhopecten yessoensis (20 964 bp and Chlamys farreri (17 035 bp were determined using long PCR amplification and primer walking sequencing strategy. Highly variable size difference of the three genomes resulted primarily from length and number variations of non-coding regions, and the major difference in gene content of the three scallop species are due to varying tRNA gene sets. Only 21, 16, and 17 tRNA genes were detected in the mitogenomes of M. nobilis, M. yessoensis and C. farreri, respectively. Remarkably, no trnS gene could be identified in any of the three scallops. A newly-detected trnA-like sequence within the mitogenome of M. yessoensis seems to exemplify the functional loss of a tRNA gene, and the duplication of trnD in M. yessoensis raises a fundamental question of whether the retention of the tRNA gene copy of 2-tRNAs is easier than that of 4-tRNAs. Analysis of putative evolutionary pathways of gene rearrangement indicates that transposition of neighboring gene blocks may play an important role in the evolution of mitogenomes in scallops. Parsimonious analysis of the genomic variations implies that the mitogenomes of M. yessoensis and C. farreri are likely to derive independently from a common ancestor that was closely related to M. nobilis. Conclusion Comparative mitogenomic analyses among three species from the subfamily Chlamydinae show that the three genomes

  6. PSG gene expression is up-regulated by lysine acetylation involving histone and nonhistone proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad A Camolotto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification that plays a central role in eukaryotic transcriptional activation by modifying chromatin and transcription-related factors. Human pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSG are the major secreted placental proteins expressed by the syncytiotrophoblast at the end of pregnancy and represent early markers of cytotrophoblast differentiation. Low PSG levels are associated with complicated pregnancies, thus highlighting the importance of studying the mechanisms that control their expression. Despite several transcription factors having been implicated as key regulators of PSG gene family expression; the role of protein acetylation has not been explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we explored the role of acetylation on PSG gene expression in the human placental-derived JEG-3 cell line. Pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs up-regulated PSG protein and mRNA expression levels, and augmented the amount of acetylated histone H3 associated with PSG 5'regulatory regions. Moreover, PSG5 promoter activation mediated by Sp1 and KLF6, via the core promoter element motif (CPE, -147/-140, was markedly enhanced in the presence of the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA. This effect correlated with an increase in Sp1 acetylation and KLF6 nuclear localization as revealed by immunoprecipitation and subcellular fractionation assays. The co-activators PCAF, p300, and CBP enhanced Sp1-dependent PSG5 promoter activation through their histone acetylase (HAT function. Instead, p300 and CBP acetyltransferase domain was dispensable for sustaining co-activation of PSG5 promoter by KLF6. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results are consistent with a regulatory role of lysine acetylation on PSG expression through a relaxed chromatin state and an increase in the transcriptional activity of Sp1 and KLF6 following an augmented Sp1 acetylation and KLF6 nuclear localization.

  7. Lysine intake affects gene expression of anabolic hormones in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar.

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    Hevrøy, E M; El-Mowafi, A; Taylor, R G; Olsvik, P A; Norberg, B; Espe, M

    2007-05-15

    Nutritional factors influence regulation of the growth hormone (GH) and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system in fish, but so far there are no published studies describing how single indispensable amino acids influence these systems. Therefore, the present study aimed to test whether lysine (Lys) intake at low (LL=2.85 g/16 gN), medium (ML=4.91 g/16 gN) and high levels (HL=9.19 g/16 gN) affected the expression of genes related to the GH-IGF system (i.e. GH receptor, GH-R, IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF binding protein 1, IGFBP-1, IGF-I receptor IGF-IR) in Atlantic salmon during seawater growth phase. Salmon fed the HL diet significantly up-regulated hepatic IGF-I mRNA level by a factor of 2.2 as compared to those with medium Lys intake. In addition a significant up-regulation of 2.7-fold in muscle IGF-II mRNA was present. Low Lys intake decreased the nitrogen deposition and muscle protein accretion in fish and significantly down-regulated hepatic IGFBP-1 as well as muscle GH-R and IGF-II, as compared to those fed the ML diet. mRNA of IGF-IR on the other hand was not affected by Lys intake. High Lys intake resulted in a 7-fold up-regulation of muscle IGF-II mRNA level as compared to low Lys intake, and thus might be an important local anabolic regulator in fast muscle tissue. The single indispensable amino acid Lys indeed affected signalling through the genes of IGF-I, IGFBP-1 in hepatic tissue and GH-R, IGF-II in fast muscle in Atlantic salmon. Concomitantly the higher Lys intake increased nitrogen deposition to a certain level.

  8. pH-sensitivity of the ribosomal peptidyl transfer reaction dependent on the identity of the A-site aminoacyl-tRNA

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    Johansson, Magnus; Ieong, Ka-Weng; Trobro, Stefan; Strazewski, Peter; Åqvist, Johan; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2011-01-01

    We studied the pH-dependence of ribosome catalyzed peptidyl transfer from fMet-tRNAfMet to the aa-tRNAs Phe-tRNAPhe, Ala-tRNAAla, Gly-tRNAGly, Pro-tRNAPro, Asn-tRNAAsn, and Ile-tRNAIle, selected to cover a large range of intrinsic pKa-values for the α-amino group of their amino acids. The peptidyl transfer rates were different at pH 7.5 and displayed different pH-dependence, quantified as the pH-value, , at which the rate was half maximal. The -values were downshifted relative to the intrinsic pKa-value of aa-tRNAs in bulk solution. Gly-tRNAGly had the smallest downshift, while Ile-tRNAIle and Ala-tRNAAla had the largest downshifts. These downshifts correlate strongly with molecular dynamics (MD) estimates of the downshifts in pKa-values of these aa-tRNAs upon A-site binding. Our data show the chemistry of peptide bond formation to be rate limiting for peptidyl transfer at pH 7.5 in the Gly and Pro cases and indicate rate limiting chemistry for all six aa-tRNAs. PMID:21169502

  9. Protective effects of bendazac lysine on early experimental diabetic nephropathy in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-xing YIN; Yin-di ZHANG; Jian-ping SHEN; Hai-wei WU; Xiang ZHU; Li-min LI; Jun QIU; Shao-jun JIANG; Xiao-gang ZHENG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the preventive and protective effects of bendazac lysine(BDL) on experimental early diabetic nephropathy (DN) rats. Methods: After an early DN model was induced by streptozotocin, rats were administered BDL at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg for 8 weeks. Blood glucose, microalbuminuria,kidney index, total antioxidative capacity, laminin, advanced glycation end products (AGE), aldose reductase (AR) activity, and the relative quantity of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) mRNA were measured by different methods.The ultrastructural morphology was observed by transmission electron microscope. Results: The physical behaviors of early DN rats were hypopraxia,cachexia, and polyuria, while those treated with high doses of BDL were vibrant and vigorous. For BDL-treated DN rats, when compared with vehicle-treated DN rats, the blood glucose level and the intensity of oxidative stress were ameliorated.Also, the microalbuminuria level, AGE either in serum or in renal, and AR activity were significantly reduced. Furthermore, the expression of TGF-β1 mRNA in the kidney cortex was declined and the thickness of glomerular base membrane was decreased significantly. The ultrastructure of glomerulus and mesangial matrix of BDL-treated DN rats were ameliorated. Conclusion: BDL has protective effects on several pharmacological targets in the progress of DN and is a potential drug for the prevention of early DN.

  10. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 expression in zebrafish during the early stages of neuronal development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aihong Li; Yong Sun; Changming Dou; Jixian Chen; Jie Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (Lsd1) is associated with transcriptional coregulation via the modulation of histone methylation. The expression pattern and function of zebrafish Lsd1 has not, however, been studied. Here, we describe the pattern of zebrafish Lsd1 expression during different development stages. In the zebrafish embryo, lsd1 mRNA was present during the early cleavage stage, indicating that maternally derived Lsd1 protein is involved in embryonic patterning. During embryogenesis from 0 to 48 hours post-fertilization (hpf), the expression of lsd1 mRNA in the embryo was ubiquitous before 12 hpf and then became restricted to the anterior of the embryo (particularly in the brain) from 24 hpf to 72 hpf. Inhibition of Lsd1 activity (by exposure to tranylcypromine) or knockdown of lsd1 expression (by morpholino antisense oligonucleotide injection) led to the loss of cells in the brain and to a dramatic downregulation of neural genes, including gad65, gad75, and reelin, but not hey1. These findings indicate an important role of Lsd1 during nervous system development in zebrafish.

  11. Digestible Lysine on Live Performance of Chicken Type Naked Neck During the Starter Phase

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    RG de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The poultry market has changed due to a higher consumer interest on products with differentiated organoleptic characteristics, making of free-range broiler production a promising activity. This experiment was conducted to determine the digestible lysine requirements of Redbro Cou Nu male and female chickens during the starter phase (one to 21 days of age. Six hundred and thirty Redbro Cou Nu broilers were distributed into 30 pens (21 chickens/pen according to a randomized complete design in a 5 x 2 factorial arrangement, consisting of five levels of digestible lysine and two sexes, with three replicates (pens per treatments. Diets with increasing digestible lysine levels (8.1, 9.5, 10.9, 12.3 and 13.7 g of digestible lysine per kg of diet were offered ad libitum. The following performance traits were evaluated at the end of the experiment (d 21: feed intake, lysine intake, body weight gain, and feed conversion ratio. No interaction between dietary lysine level and sex was observed for the evaluated traits. The effect of sex was only detected on body weight gain, while effects of dietary lysine level were only detected on the feed intake. Males presented higher body weight gain than females. Lysine intake and body weight gain increased, and feed conversion ratio decreased as the level of dietary lysine increased. The best feed conversion ratio was obtained when birds were fed 12.95 g of digestible lysine per kg of diet.

  12. Immobilization of lysine oxidase on a gold-platinum nanoparticles modified Au electrode for detection of lysine.

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    Chauhan, N; Narang, J; Sunny; Pundir, C S

    2013-04-10

    A commercial lysine oxidase (LyOx) from Trichoderma viride was immobilized covalently onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) electrodeposited onto Au electrode using 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane (3-APTES) and glutaraldehyde cross linking chemistry. A lysine biosensor was fabricated using LyOx/3-APTES/AuNPs-PtNPs/Au electrode as a working electrode, Ag/AgCl (3M KCl) as standard electrode and Pt wire as auxiliary electrode connected through a potentiostat. The enzyme electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The cumulative effect of AuNPs and PtNPs showed excellent electrocatalytic activity at low applied potential for detection of H2O2, a product of LyOx reaction. The sensor showed its optimum response within 4s, when polarized at 0.2V vs. Ag/AgCl in 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 7.5 at 30°C. The linear range and detection limit of the sensor were 1.0-600μM and 1.0μM (S/N=3), respectively. Biosensor measured lysine level in sera, milk and amino acid tablet, which correlated well with those by standard HPLC method. The enzyme electrode lost 50% of its initial activity after 200 uses over a period of 4 months.

  13. Catalytic mechanism investigation of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1: a computational study.

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    Xiangqian Kong

    Full Text Available Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, the first identified histone demethylase, is a flavin-dependent amine oxidase which specifically demethylates mono- or dimethylated H3K4 and H3K9 via a redox process. It participates in a broad spectrum of biological processes and is of high importance in cell proliferation, adipogenesis, spermatogenesis, chromosome segregation and embryonic development. To date, as a potential drug target for discovering anti-tumor drugs, the medical significance of LSD1 has been greatly appreciated. However, the catalytic mechanism for the rate-limiting reductive half-reaction in demethylation remains controversial. By employing a combined computational approach including molecular modeling, molecular dynamics (MD simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM calculations, the catalytic mechanism of dimethylated H3K4 demethylation by LSD1 was characterized in details. The three-dimensional (3D model of the complex was composed of LSD1, CoREST, and histone substrate. A 30-ns MD simulation of the model highlights the pivotal role of the conserved Tyr761 and lysine-water-flavin motif in properly orienting flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD with respect to substrate. The synergy of the two factors effectively stabilizes the catalytic environment and facilitated the demethylation reaction. On the basis of the reasonable consistence between simulation results and available mutagenesis data, QM/MM strategy was further employed to probe the catalytic mechanism of the reductive half-reaction in demethylation. The characteristics of the demethylation pathway determined by the potential energy surface and charge distribution analysis indicates that this reaction belongs to the direct hydride transfer mechanism. Our study provides insights into the LSD1 mechanism of reductive half-reaction in demethylation and has important implications for the discovery of regulators against LSD1 enzymes.

  14. Crystal structure of the histone lysine specific demethylase LSD1 complexed with tetrahydrofolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luka, Zigmund; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Calcutt, M Wade; Newcomer, Marcia E; Wagner, Conrad

    2014-07-01

    An important epigenetic modification is the methylation/demethylation of histone lysine residues. The first histone demethylase to be discovered was a lysine-specific demethylase 1, LSD1, a flavin containing enzyme which carries out the demethylation of di- and monomethyllysine 4 in histone H3. The removed methyl groups are oxidized to formaldehyde. This reaction is similar to those performed by dimethylglycine dehydrogenase and sarcosine dehydrogenase, in which protein-bound tetrahydrofolate (THF) was proposed to serve as an acceptor of the generated formaldehyde. We showed earlier that LSD1 binds THF with high affinity which suggests its possible participation in the histone demethylation reaction. In the cell, LSD1 interacts with co-repressor for repressor element 1 silencing transcription factor (CoREST). In order to elucidate the role of folate in the demethylating reaction we solved the crystal structure of the LSD1-CoREST-THF complex. In the complex, the folate-binding site is located in the active center in close proximity to flavin adenine dinucleotide. This position of the folate suggests that the bound THF accepts the formaldehyde generated in the course of histone demethylation to form 5,10-methylene-THF. We also show the formation of 5,10-methylene-THF during the course of the enzymatic reaction in the presence of THF by mass spectrometry. Production of this form of folate could act to prevent accumulation of potentially toxic formaldehyde in the cell. These studies suggest that folate may play a role in the epigenetic control of gene expression in addition to its traditional role in the transfer of one-carbon units in metabolism.

  15. Characterization and crystal structure of lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase (cDHDPS) protein.

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    Rice, Elena A; Bannon, Gary A; Glenn, Kevin C; Jeong, Soon Seog; Sturman, Eric J; Rydel, Timothy J

    2008-12-15

    The lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase enzyme (cDHDPS) was recently successfully introduced into maize plants to enhance the level of lysine in the grain. To better understand lysine insensitivity of the cDHDPS, we expressed, purified, kinetically characterized the protein, and solved its X-ray crystal structure. The cDHDPS enzyme has a fold and overall structure that is highly similar to other DHDPS proteins. A noteworthy feature of the active site is the evidence that the catalytic lysine residue forms a Schiff base adduct with pyruvate. Analyses of the cDHDPS structure in the vicinity of the putative binding site for S-lysine revealed that the allosteric binding site in the Escherichia coli DHDPS protein does not exist in cDHDPS due to three non-conservative amino acids substitutions, and this is likely why cDHDPS is not feedback inhibited by lysine.

  16. Conformational Studies of ε- CBz- L- Lysine and L- Valine Block Copolypeptides

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    Ajay Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Conformational studies of ε-CBz-L-lysine and L-valine block copoylpeptides using x- ray diffraction and CD spectra are described. The block copolypeptides contain valine block in the center and on both side of the valine are ε-CBz-L-lysine blocks. The conformation of the copolypeptides changes with increases in the chain length of ε- CBz-L- lysine blocks. When length of ε- CBZ- L- lysine blocks is 9, the block copolypeptide has exclusive beta sheet structure. With the increase in chain length of ε-CBz-L-lysine blocks from 9 to 14, the block copolypeptide shows presence of both alpha helix and beta sheet components. With further increase in chain length of ε- CBz- L- lysine blocks, the beta sheet component disappears and block copolypeptides exhibits exclusive α -helix conformation.

  17. Using a bacteriocin structure to engineer a phage lysin that targets Yersinia pestis.

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    Lukacik, Petra; Barnard, Travis J; Buchanan, Susan K

    2012-12-01

    Purified phage lysins present an alternative to traditional antibiotics and work by hydrolysing peptidoglycan. Phage lysins have been developed against Gram-positive pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, where the peptidoglycan layer is exposed on the cell surface. Addition of the lysin to a bacterial culture results in rapid death of the organism. Gram-negative bacteria are resistant to phage lysins because they contain an outer membrane that protects the peptidoglycan from degradation. We solved crystal structures of a Yersinia pestis outer-membrane protein and the bacteriocin that targets it, which informed engineering of a bacterial-phage hybrid lysin that can be transported across the outer membrane to kill specific Gram-negative bacteria. This work provides a template for engineering phage lysins against a wide variety of bacterial pathogens.

  18. Origin of life. Primordial genetics: Information transfer in a pre-RNA world based on self-replicating beta-sheet amyloid conformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Carl Peter J

    2015-10-07

    The question of the origin of life on Earth can largely be reduced to the question of what was the first molecular replicator system that was able to replicate and evolve under the presumably very harsh conditions on the early Earth. It is unlikely that a functional RNA could have existed under such conditions and it is generally assumed that some other kind of information system preceded the RNA world. Here, I present an informational molecular system that is stable, self-replicative, environmentally responsive, and evolvable under conditions characterized by high temperatures, ultraviolet and cosmic radiation. This postulated pregenetic system is based on the amyloid fold, a functionally unique polypeptide fold characterized by a cross beta-sheet structure in which the beta strands are arranged perpendicular to the fiber axis. Beside an extraordinary structural robustness, the amyloid fold possesses a unique ability to transmit information by a three-dimensional templating mechanism. In amyloidogenesis short peptide monomers are added one by one to the growing end of the fiber. From the same monomeric subunits several structural variants of amyloid may be formed. Then, in a self-replicative mode, a specific amyloid conformer can act as a template and confer its spatially encoded information to daughter molecular entities in a repetitive way. In this process, the specific conformational information, the spatially changed organization, is transmitted; the coding element is the steric zipper structure, and recognition occurs by amino acid side chain complementarity. The amyloid information system fulfills several basic requirements of a primordial evolvable replicator system: (i) it is stable under the presumed primitive Earth conditions, (ii) the monomeric building blocks of the informational polymer can be formed from available prebiotic compounds, (iii) the system is self-assembling and self-replicative and (iv) it is adaptive to changes in the environment and

  19. RNA Crystallization

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    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  20. Bioavailability of lysine for kittens in overheated casein is underestimated by the rat growth assay method.

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    Larsen, J A; Fascetti, A J; Calvert, C C; Rogers, Q R

    2010-10-01

    Growth assays were performed to determine lysine bioavailability for kittens and rats in untreated and heated casein; these values were compared with estimates obtained with an in vitro method. Body weight, food intake, nitrogen and dry matter digestibility, and plasma lysine were determined during an 80-day growth trial using kittens (n = 16). Body weight and food intake were determined during a 21-day growth trial using weanling rats (n = 80). The growth data showed bioavailable lysine to be 102.4% and 100.2% (for untreated casein) and 66.1% and 51.7% (for heated casein) for kittens and rats, respectively. There was no relationship between plasma lysine and dietary lysine concentrations for kittens. There were no significant differences in nitrogen or dry matter digestibility among diets for kittens. The chemically reactive lysine content of untreated casein was 99.6%, and of heated casein was 67.1%. Heat treatment of casein resulted in significantly decreased lysine bioavailability as estimated by all methods. For untreated casein, both growth assays showed good agreement with the in vitro method for available lysine. For heated casein, the rat growth assay significantly underestimated bioavailable lysine as determined in kittens while the in vitro method closely approximated this value for the cat.