WorldWideScience

Sample records for lysine biosynthetic enzyme

  1. Characterisation of the first enzymes committed to lysine biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D W Griffin

    Full Text Available In plants, the lysine biosynthetic pathway is an attractive target for both the development of herbicides and increasing the nutritional value of crops given that lysine is a limiting amino acid in cereals. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS and dihydrodipicolinate reductase (DHDPR catalyse the first two committed steps of lysine biosynthesis. Here, we carry out for the first time a comprehensive characterisation of the structure and activity of both DHDPS and DHDPR from Arabidopsis thaliana. The A. thaliana DHDPS enzyme (At-DHDPS2 has similar activity to the bacterial form of the enzyme, but is more strongly allosterically inhibited by (S-lysine. Structural studies of At-DHDPS2 show (S-lysine bound at a cleft between two monomers, highlighting the allosteric site; however, unlike previous studies, binding is not accompanied by conformational changes, suggesting that binding may cause changes in protein dynamics rather than large conformation changes. DHDPR from A. thaliana (At-DHDPR2 has similar specificity for both NADH and NADPH during catalysis, and has tighter binding of substrate than has previously been reported. While all known bacterial DHDPR enzymes have a tetrameric structure, analytical ultracentrifugation, and scattering data unequivocally show that At-DHDPR2 exists as a dimer in solution. The exact arrangement of the dimeric protein is as yet unknown, but ab initio modelling of x-ray scattering data is consistent with an elongated structure in solution, which does not correspond to any of the possible dimeric pairings observed in the X-ray crystal structure of DHDPR from other organisms. This increased knowledge of the structure and function of plant lysine biosynthetic enzymes will aid future work aimed at improving primary production.

  2. Creative lysins: Listeria and the engineering of antimicrobial enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tassell, Maxwell L; Angela Daum, M; Kim, Jun-Seob; Miller, Michael J

    2016-02-01

    Cell wall lytic enzymes have been of increasing interest as antimicrobials for targeting Gram-positive spoilage and pathogenic bacteria, largely due to the development of strains resistant to antibiotics and bacteriophage therapy. Such lysins show considerable promise against Listeria monocytogenes, a primary concern in food-processing environments, but there is room for improvement via protein engineering. Advances in antilisterial applications could benefit from recent developments in lysin biotechnology that have largely targeted other organisms. Herein we present various considerations for the future development of lysins, including environmental factors, cell physiology concerns, and dynamics of protein architecture. Our goal is to review key developments in lysin biotechnology to provide a contextual framework for the current models of lysin-cell interactions and highlight key considerations for the characterization and design of novel lytic enzymes.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum localization and activity of maize auxin biosynthetic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Seo, Hyesu; Park, Woong June; Hawes, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants and the first plant hormone to be discovered and studied. Active research over >60 years has shed light on many of the molecular mechanisms of its action including transport, perception, signal transduction, and a variety of biosynthetic pathways in various species, tissues, and developmental stages. The complexity and redundancy of the auxin biosynthetic network and enzymes involved raises the question of how such a system, producing such a potent agent as auxin, can be appropriately controlled at all. Here it is shown that maize auxin biosynthesis takes place in microsomal as well as cytosolic cellular fractions from maize seedlings. Most interestingly, a set of enzymes shown to be involved in auxin biosynthesis via their activity and/or mutant phenotypes and catalysing adjacent steps in YUCCA-dependent biosynthesis are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Positioning of auxin biosynthetic enzymes at the ER could be necessary to bring auxin biosynthesis in closer proximity to ER-localized factors for transport, conjugation, and signalling, and allow for an additional level of regulation by subcellular compartmentation of auxin action. Furthermore, it might provide a link to ethylene action and be a factor in hormonal cross-talk as all five ethylene receptors are ER localized.

  4. Redox Impact on Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna

    Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism are coordina......Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism...... are coordinated by the redox state of the cell via post-translational modification of the starch metabolic enzymes containing redox active cysteine residues and these cysteine residues became cross-linked upon oxidation providing a conformational change leading to activity loss; 2) cysteine residues...... of chloroplast enzymes can play a role not only in enzyme activity and redox sensitivity but also in protein folding and stability upon oxidation. Several redox sensitive enzymes identified in this study can serve as potential targets to control the carbon flux to and from starch during the day and night...

  5. Redox Impact on Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna

    Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism...... are coordinated by the redox state of the cell via post-translational modification of the starch metabolic enzymes containing redox active cysteine residues and these cysteine residues became cross-linked upon oxidation providing a conformational change leading to activity loss; 2) cysteine residues...... of chloroplast enzymes can play a role not only in enzyme activity and redox sensitivity but also in protein folding and stability upon oxidation. Several redox sensitive enzymes identified in this study can serve as potential targets to control the carbon flux to and from starch during the day and night...

  6. Efficient Production of Enantiopure d-Lysine from l-Lysine by a Two-Enzyme Cascade System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The microbial production of d-lysine has been of great interest as a medicinal raw material. Here, a two-step process for d-lysine production from l-lysine by the successive microbial racemization and asymmetric degradation with lysine racemase and decarboxylase was developed. The whole-cell activities of engineered Escherichia coli expressing racemases from the strains Proteus mirabilis (LYR and Lactobacillus paracasei (AAR were first investigated comparatively. When the strain BL21-LYR with higher racemization activity was employed, l-lysine was rapidly racemized to give dl-lysine, and the d-lysine yield was approximately 48% after 0.5 h. Next, l-lysine was selectively catabolized to generate cadaverine by lysine decarboxylase. The comparative analysis of the decarboxylation activities of resting whole cells, permeabilized cells, and crude enzyme revealed that the crude enzyme was the best biocatalyst for enantiopure d-lysine production. The reaction temperature, pH, metal ion additive, and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate content of this two-step production process were subsequently optimized. Under optimal conditions, 750.7 mmol/L d-lysine was finally obtained from 1710 mmol/L l-lysine after 1 h of racemization reaction and 0.5 h of decarboxylation reaction. d-lysine yield could reach 48.8% with enantiomeric excess (ee ≥ 99%.

  7. Effect of photoperiod on gibberellin biosynthetic enzymes in spinach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmour, S.J.; Bleecker, A.B.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-04-01

    The photoperiodic control of stem elongation in spinach, a long day (LD) rosette plant, is mediated by gibberellins (GAs). The early 13-hydroxylated GA biosynthetic pathway from GA/sub 12/ to GA/sub 20/ operates in spinach: GA/sub 12/ ..-->.. GA/sub 53/ ..-->.. GA/sub 44/ ..-->.. GA/sub 19/ ..-->.. GA/sub 20/. Two enzymes of this pathway, those converting GA/sub 53/ to GA/sub 44/ (GA/sub 53/ oxidase) and GA/sub 19/ to GA/sub 20/ (GA/sub 19/ oxidase), are regulated by light. The enzyme converting GA/sub 44/ to GA/sub 19/ (GA/sub 44/ oxidase) is not light-regulated. In the light GA/sub 53/ and GA/sub 18/ oxidase activities are increased, therefore causing the GA biosynthetic pathway to be turned on. This leads to the production of an active GA in LD, which causes an increase in stem elongation. Two the enzymes, GA/sub 44/ and GA/sub 53/ oxidases, can be separated from one another by anion exchange HPLC. Estimates of the molecular weights of these two enzymes based on gel filtration HPLC will be reported.

  8. Enzymic and chemical synthesis of epilson-N-(L-propionyl-2)-L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, M; Tanaka, M

    1978-10-01

    Pyruvate was shown to act as an oxo acid substrate in the reverse direction of saccharopine dehydrogenase [epsilon N-(L-glutaryl-2)-L-lysine: NAD oxidoreductase (L-lysine-forming)] reaction. The enzymic condensation product of lysine and pyruvate was isolated and identified as epsilon-N-(L-propionyl-2)-L-lysine by comparison with the synthetic compound. A method for the chemical preparation of diastereoisomers of epsilon-N-(propionyl-2)-L-lysine is also described.

  9. Nanolipoprotein particles comprising a natural rubber biosynthetic enzyme complex and related products, methods and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeprich, Paul D.; Whalen, Maureen

    2016-04-05

    Provided herein are nanolipoprotein particles that comprise a biosynthetic enzyme more particularly an enzyme capable of catalyzing rubber or other rubbers polymerization, and related assemblies, devices, methods and systems.

  10. Recent advances in the biotechnological production of microbial poly(ɛ-L-lysine) and understanding of its biosynthetic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaoxian; Xu, Zheng; Feng, Xiaohai; Xu, Delei; Liang, Jinfeng; Xu, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Poly(ɛ-L-lysine) (ɛ-PL) is an unusual biopolymer composed of L-lysine connected between α-carboxyl and ɛ-amino groups. It has been used as a preservative in food and cosmetics industries, drug carrier in medicines, and gene carrier in gene therapy. Modern biotechnology has significantly improved the synthetic efficiency of this novel homopoly(amino acid) on an industrial scale and has expanded its industrial applications. In the latest years, studies have focused on the biotechnological production and understanding the biosynthetic mechanism of microbial ɛ-PL. Herein, this review focuses on the current trends and future perspectives of microbial ɛ-PL. Information on the screening of ɛ-PL-producing strains, fermentative production of ɛ-PL, breeding of high-ɛ-PL-producing strains, genomic data of ɛ-PL-producing strains, biosynthetic mechanism of microbial ɛ-PL, and the control of molecular weight of microbial ɛ-PL is included. This review will contribute to the development of this novel homopoly(amino acid) and serve as a basis of studies on other biopolymers.

  11. Molecular and structural insight into lysine selection on substrate and ubiquitin lysine 48 by the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suryadinata, Randy; Holien, Jessica K; Yang, George

    2013-01-01

    The attachment of ubiquitin (Ub) to lysines on substrates or itself by ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) and ubiquitin ligase (E3) enzymes results in protein ubiquitination. Lysine selection is important for generating diverse substrate-Ub structures and targeting proteins to different fates; however......, the mechanisms of lysine selection are not clearly understood. The positioning of lysine(s) toward the E2/E3 active site and residues proximal to lysines are critical in their selection. We investigated determinants of lysine specificity of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, toward substrate and Ub lysines....... Evaluation of the relative importance of different residues positioned -2, -1, +1 and +2 toward ubiquitination of its substrate, Sic1, on lysine 50 showed that charged residues in the -1 and -2 positions negatively impact on ubiquitination. Modeling suggests that charged residues at these positions alter...

  12. Extensive lysine methylation in hyperthermophilic crenarchaea : potential implications for protein stability and recombinant enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Botting, Catherine H.; Paul Talbot; Sonia Paytubi; White, Malcolm F

    2010-01-01

    In eukarya and bacteria, lysine methylation is relatively rare and is catalysed by sequence-specific lysine methyltransferases that typically have only a single-protein target. Using RNA polymerase purified from the thermophilic crenarchaeum Sulfolobus solfataricus, we identified 21 methyllysines distributed across 9 subunits of the enzyme. The modified lysines were predominantly in alpha-helices and showed no conserved sequence context. A limited survey of the Thermoproteus tenax proteome re...

  13. Chemical tools for unraveling the substrate specificity of the lysine deacylase enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Olsen, Christian Adam

    The lysine deacylase (KDAC) enzymes catalyze hydrolytic removal of acyl functionalities from theε-amino group of lysine residues ina variety of proteins including histones, and KDAC-mediated deacetylation of proteins has been established as a key epigeneticandmetabolic regulator. Recent studies h......-dependent HDACs 1–11 as well as NAD + -dependent sirtuins (SIRT1–7) will be discussed....

  14. Extensive Lysine Methylation in Hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea: Potential Implications for Protein Stability and Recombinant Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine H. Botting

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In eukarya and bacteria, lysine methylation is relatively rare and is catalysed by sequence-specific lysine methyltransferases that typically have only a single-protein target. Using RNA polymerase purified from the thermophilic crenarchaeum Sulfolobus solfataricus, we identified 21 methyllysines distributed across 9 subunits of the enzyme. The modified lysines were predominantly in α-helices and showed no conserved sequence context. A limited survey of the Thermoproteus tenax proteome revealed widespread modification with 52 methyllysines in 30 different proteins. These observations suggest the presence of an unusual lysine methyltransferase with relaxed specificity in the crenarchaea. Since lysine methylation is known to enhance protein thermostability, this may be an adaptation to a thermophilic lifestyle. The implications of this modification for studies and applications of recombinant crenarchaeal enzymes are discussed.

  15. Characterization of the promoter region of biosynthetic enzyme genes involved in berberine biosynthesis in Coptis japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Yamada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs, a plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4’OMT and CYP719A1 were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4’OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed.

  16. Inhibitors of Testosterone Biosynthetic and Metabolic Activation Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leping Ye

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Leydig cells of the testis have the capacity to biosynthesize testosterone from cholesterol. Testosterone and its metabolically activated product dihydrotestosterone are critical for the development of male reproductive system and spermatogenesis. At least four steroidogenic enzymes are involved in testosterone biosynthesis: Cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1 for the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone within the mitochondria, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B, for the conversion of pregnenolone into progesterone, 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1 for the conversion of progesterone into androstenedione and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B3 for the formation of testosterone from androstenedione. Testosterone is also metabolically activated into more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone by two isoforms 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1 and 2 (SRD5A2 in Leydig cells and peripheral tissues. Many endocrine disruptors act as antiandrogens via directly inhibiting one or more enzymes for testosterone biosynthesis and metabolic activation. These chemicals include industrial materials (perfluoroalkyl compounds, phthalates, bisphenol A and benzophenone and pesticides/biocides (methoxychlor, organotins, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane and prochloraz and plant constituents (genistein and gossypol. This paper reviews these endocrine disruptors targeting steroidogenic enzymes.

  17. Designing universal primers for the isolation of DNA sequences encoding Proanthocyanidins biosynthetic enzymes in Crataegus aronia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiter, Afnan Saeid; Sawwan, Jammal; Al Abdallat, Ayed

    2012-08-10

    Hawthorn is the common name of all plant species in the genus Crataegus, which belongs to the Rosaceae family. Crataegus are considered useful medicinal plants because of their high content of proanthocyanidins (PAs) and other related compounds. To improve PAs production in Crataegus tissues, the sequences of genes encoding PAs biosynthetic enzymes are required. Different bioinformatics tools, including BLAST, multiple sequence alignment and alignment PCR analysis were used to design primers suitable for the amplification of DNA fragments from 10 candidate genes encoding enzymes involved in PAs biosynthesis in C. aronia. DNA sequencing results proved the utility of the designed primers. The primers were used successfully to amplify DNA fragments of different PAs biosynthesis genes in different Rosaceae plants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first use of the alignment PCR approach to isolate DNA sequences encoding PAs biosynthetic enzymes in Rosaceae plants.

  18. Designing universal primers for the isolation of DNA sequences encoding Proanthocyanidins biosynthetic enzymes in Crataegus aronia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuiter Afnan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hawthorn is the common name of all plant species in the genus Crataegus, which belongs to the Rosaceae family. Crataegus are considered useful medicinal plants because of their high content of proanthocyanidins (PAs and other related compounds. To improve PAs production in Crataegus tissues, the sequences of genes encoding PAs biosynthetic enzymes are required. Findings Different bioinformatics tools, including BLAST, multiple sequence alignment and alignment PCR analysis were used to design primers suitable for the amplification of DNA fragments from 10 candidate genes encoding enzymes involved in PAs biosynthesis in C. aronia. DNA sequencing results proved the utility of the designed primers. The primers were used successfully to amplify DNA fragments of different PAs biosynthesis genes in different Rosaceae plants. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first use of the alignment PCR approach to isolate DNA sequences encoding PAs biosynthetic enzymes in Rosaceae plants.

  19. Producing the Ethylene Signal: Regulation and Diversification of Ethylene Biosynthetic Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Matthew A; DeLong, Alison

    2015-09-01

    Strictly controlled production of ethylene gas lies upstream of the signaling activities of this crucial regulator throughout the plant life cycle. Although the biosynthetic pathway is enzymatically simple, the regulatory circuits that modulate signal production are fine tuned to allow integration of responses to environmental and intrinsic cues. Recently identified posttranslational mechanisms that control ethylene production converge on one family of biosynthetic enzymes and overlay several independent reversible phosphorylation events and distinct mediators of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. Although the core pathway is conserved throughout seed plants, these posttranslational regulatory mechanisms may represent evolutionarily recent innovations. The evolutionary origins of the pathway and its regulators are not yet clear; outside the seed plants, numerous biochemical and phylogenetic questions remain to be addressed.

  20. exo-Brevicomin biosynthetic pathway enzymes from the Mountain Pine Beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minmin; Delaplain, Patrick; Nguyen, Trang T; Liu, Xibei; Wickenberg, Leah; Jeffrey, Christopher; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2014-10-01

    exoBrevicomin (exo-7-ethyl-5-methyl-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane) is an important semiochemical for a number of beetle species, including the highly destructive Mountain Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae). It is also found in other insects and the African elephant. Despite its significance, very little is known about its biosynthesis. A recent microarray analysis implicated a small cluster of three D. ponderosae genes in exo-brevicomin biosynthesis, two of which had identifiable open reading frames (Aw et al., 2010; BMC Genomics 11:215). Here we report further expression profiling of two genes in that cluster and functional analysis of their recombinantly-produced enzymes. One encodes a short-chain dehydrogenase that used NAD(P)(+) as a co-factor to catalyze the oxidation of (Z)-6-nonen-2-ol to (Z)-6-nonen-2-one. We therefore named the enzyme (Z)-6-nonen-2-ol dehydrogenase (ZnoDH). The other encodes the cytochrome P450, CYP6CR1, which epoxidized (Z)-6-nonen-2-one to 6,7-epoxynonan-2-one with very high specificity and substrate selectivity. Both the substrates and products of the two enzymes are intermediates in the exo-brevicomin biosynthetic pathway. Thus, ZnoDH and CYP6CR1 are enzymes that apparently catalyze the antepenultimate and penultimate steps in the exo-brevicomin biosynthetic pathway, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Treadmill exercise does not change gene expression of adrenal catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in chronically stressed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJUBICA GAVRILOVIC

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chronic isolation of adult animals represents a form of psychological stress that produces sympatho-adrenomedullar activation. Exercise training acts as an important modulator of sympatho-adrenomedullary system. This study aimed to investigate physical exercise-related changes in gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes (tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine-ß-hydroxylase and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding (CREB in the adrenal medulla, concentrations of catecholamines and corticosterone (CORT in the plasma and the weight of adrenal glands of chronically psychosocially stressed adult rats exposed daily to 20 min treadmill running for 12 weeks. Also, we examined how additional acute immobilization stress changes the mentioned parameters. Treadmill running did not result in modulation of gene expression of catecholamine synthesizing enzymes and it decreased the level of CREB mRNA in the adrenal medulla of chronically psychosocially stressed adult rats. The potentially negative physiological adaptations after treadmill running were recorded as increased concentrations of catecholamines and decreased morning CORT concentration in the plasma, as well as the adrenal gland hypertrophy of chronically psychosocially stressed rats. The additional acute immobilization stress increases gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in the adrenal medulla, as well as catecholamines and CORT levels in the plasma. Treadmill exercise does not change the activity of sympatho-adrenomedullary system of chronically psychosocially stressed rats.

  2. A novel approach for the characterisation of proteoglycans and biosynthetic enzymes in a snail model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesteira, Tarsis F; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien Jane; Ogata, Fernando T; Farias, Eduardo H C; Cavalheiro, Renan P; de Lima, Marcelo A; Cunha, Gabriel L A; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Almeida, Igor C; Toma, Leny; Nader, Helena B

    2011-12-01

    Proteoglycans encompass a heterogeneous group of glycoconjugates where proteins are substituted with linear, highly negatively charged glycosaminoglycan chains. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans are ubiquitous to the animal kingdom of the Eukarya domain. Information on the distribution and characterisation of proteoglycans in invertebrate tissues is limited and restricted to a few species. By the use of multidimensional protein identification technology and immunohistochemistry, this study shows for the first time the presence and tissue localisation of different proteoglycans, such as perlecan, aggrecan, and heparan sulphate proteoglycan, amongst others, in organs of the gastropoda Achatina fulica. Through a proteomic analysis of Golgi proteins and immunohistochemistry of tissue sections, we detected the machinery involved in glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, related to polymer formation (polymerases), as well as secondary modifications (sulphation and uronic acid epimerization). Therefore, this work not only identifies both the proteoglycan core proteins and glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic enzymes in invertebrates but also provides a novel method for the study of glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan evolution.

  3. Functional characterization of the vitamin K2 biosynthetic enzyme UBIAD1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Hirota

    Full Text Available UbiA prenyltransferase domain-containing protein 1 (UBIAD1 plays a significant role in vitamin K2 (MK-4 synthesis. We investigated the enzymological properties of UBIAD1 using microsomal fractions from Sf9 cells expressing UBIAD1 by analysing MK-4 biosynthetic activity. With regard to UBIAD1 enzyme reaction conditions, highest MK-4 synthetic activity was demonstrated under basic conditions at a pH between 8.5 and 9.0, with a DTT ≥0.1 mM. In addition, we found that geranyl pyrophosphate and farnesyl pyrophosphate were also recognized as a side-chain source and served as a substrate for prenylation. Furthermore, lipophilic statins were found to directly inhibit the enzymatic activity of UBIAD1. We analysed the aminoacid sequences homologies across the menA and UbiA families to identify conserved structural features of UBIAD1 proteins and focused on four highly conserved domains. We prepared protein mutants deficient in the four conserved domains to evaluate enzyme activity. Because no enzyme activity was detected in the mutants deficient in the UBIAD1 conserved domains, these four domains were considered to play an essential role in enzymatic activity. We also measured enzyme activities using point mutants of the highly conserved aminoacids in these domains to elucidate their respective functions. We found that the conserved domain I is a substrate recognition site that undergoes a structural change after substrate binding. The conserved domain II is a redox domain site containing a CxxC motif. The conserved domain III is a hinge region important as a catalytic site for the UBIAD1 enzyme. The conserved domain IV is a binding site for Mg2+/isoprenyl side-chain. In this study, we provide a molecular mapping of the enzymological properties of UBIAD1.

  4. Structural basis for acyl acceptor specificity in the achromobactin biosynthetic enzyme AcsD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, Stefan; Botting, Catherine H; Song, Lijiang; Kadi, Nadia F; Challis, Gregory L; Naismith, James H

    2011-09-23

    Siderophores are known virulence factors, and their biosynthesis is a target for new antibacterial agents. A non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-independent siderophore biosynthetic pathway in Dickeya dadantii is responsible for production of the siderophore achromobactin. The D. dadantii achromobactin biosynthesis protein D (AcsD) enzyme has been shown to enantioselectively esterify citric acid with l-serine in the first committed step of achromobactin biosynthesis. The reaction occurs in two steps: stereospecific activation of citric acid by adenylation, followed by attack of the enzyme-bound citryl adenylate by l-serine to produce the homochiral ester. We now report a detailed characterization of the substrate profile and mechanism of the second (acyl transfer) step of AcsD enzyme. We demonstrate that the enzyme catalyzes formation of not only esters but also amides from the citryl-adenylate intermediate. We have rationalized the substrate utilization profile for the acylation reaction by determining the first X-ray crystal structure of a product complex for this enzyme class. We have identified the residues that are important for both recognition of l-serine and catalysis of ester formation. Our hypotheses were tested by biochemical analysis of various mutants, one of which shows a reversal of specificity from the wild type with respect to non-natural substrates. This change can be rationalized on the basis of our structural data. That this change in specificity is accompanied by no loss in activity suggests that AcsD and other members of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-independent siderophore superfamily may have biotransformation potential.

  5. Structural Basis for Acyl Acceptor Specificity in the Achromobactin Biosynthetic Enzyme AcsD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, Stefan; Botting, Catherine H.; Song, Lijiang; Kadi, Nadia F.; Challis, Gregory L.; Naismith, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Siderophores are known virulence factors, and their biosynthesis is a target for new antibacterial agents. A non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-independent siderophore biosynthetic pathway in Dickeya dadantii is responsible for production of the siderophore achromobactin. The D. dadantii achromobactin biosynthesis protein D (AcsD) enzyme has been shown to enantioselectively esterify citric acid with l-serine in the first committed step of achromobactin biosynthesis. The reaction occurs in two steps: stereospecific activation of citric acid by adenylation, followed by attack of the enzyme-bound citryl adenylate by l-serine to produce the homochiral ester. We now report a detailed characterization of the substrate profile and mechanism of the second (acyl transfer) step of AcsD enzyme. We demonstrate that the enzyme catalyzes formation of not only esters but also amides from the citryl-adenylate intermediate. We have rationalized the substrate utilization profile for the acylation reaction by determining the first X-ray crystal structure of a product complex for this enzyme class. We have identified the residues that are important for both recognition of l-serine and catalysis of ester formation. Our hypotheses were tested by biochemical analysis of various mutants, one of which shows a reversal of specificity from the wild type with respect to non-natural substrates. This change can be rationalized on the basis of our structural data. That this change in specificity is accompanied by no loss in activity suggests that AcsD and other members of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-independent siderophore superfamily may have biotransformation potential. PMID:21835184

  6. Chemoselective small molecules that covalently modify one lysine in a non-enzyme protein in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sungwook; Connelly, Stephen; Reixach, Natàlia; Wilson, Ian A.; Kelly, Jeffery W. (Scripps)

    2010-02-19

    A small molecule that could bind selectively to and then react chemoselectively with a non-enzyme protein in a complex biological fluid, such as blood, could have numerous practical applications. Herein, we report a family of designed stilbenes that selectively and covalently modify the prominent plasma protein transthyretin in preference to more than 4,000 other human plasma proteins. They react chemoselectively with only one of eight lysine {epsilon}-amino groups within transthyretin. The crystal structure confirms the expected binding orientation of the stilbene substructure and the anticipated conjugating amide bond. These covalent transthyretin kinetic stabilizers exhibit superior amyloid inhibition potency compared to their noncovalent counterparts, and they prevent cytotoxicity associated with amyloidogenesis. Though there are a few prodrugs that, upon metabolic activation, react with a cysteine residue inactivating a specific non-enzyme, we are unaware of designed small molecules that react with one lysine {epsilon}-amine within a specific non-enzyme protein in a complex biological fluid.

  7. Structural and transcriptional analysis of plant genes encoding the bifunctional lysine ketoglutarate reductase saccharopine dehydrogenase enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Yong Q

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the dietary essential amino acids, the most severely limiting in the cereals is lysine. Since cereals make up half of the human diet, lysine limitation has quality/nutritional consequences. The breakdown of lysine is controlled mainly by the catabolic bifunctional enzyme lysine ketoglutarate reductase - saccharopine dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH. The LKR/SDH gene has been reported to produce transcripts for the bifunctional enzyme and separate monofunctional transcripts. In addition to lysine metabolism, this gene has been implicated in a number of metabolic and developmental pathways, which along with its production of multiple transcript types and complex exon/intron structure suggest an important node in plant metabolism. Understanding more about the LKR/SDH gene is thus interesting both from applied standpoint and for basic plant metabolism. Results The current report describes a wheat genomic fragment containing an LKR/SDH gene and adjacent genes. The wheat LKR/SDH genomic segment was found to originate from the A-genome of wheat, and EST analysis indicates all three LKR/SDH genes in hexaploid wheat are transcriptionally active. A comparison of a set of plant LKR/SDH genes suggests regions of greater sequence conservation likely related to critical enzymatic functions and metabolic controls. Although most plants contain only a single LKR/SDH gene per genome, poplar contains at least two functional bifunctional genes in addition to a monofunctional LKR gene. Analysis of ESTs finds evidence for monofunctional LKR transcripts in switchgrass, and monofunctional SDH transcripts in wheat, Brachypodium, and poplar. Conclusions The analysis of a wheat LKR/SDH gene and comparative structural and functional analyses among available plant genes provides new information on this important gene. Both the structure of the LKR/SDH gene and the immediately adjacent genes show lineage-specific differences between monocots and dicots, and

  8. Isobutanol production in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of 2-ketoisovalerate decarboxylase and valine biosynthetic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Heong; Seo, Seung-Oh; Bae, Yi-Hyun; Nan, Hong; Jin, Yong-Su; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-11-01

    Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce advanced biofuels such as isobutanol has received much attention because this yeast has a natural capacity to produce higher alcohols. In this study, construction of isobutanol production systems was attempted by overexpression of effective 2-keto acid decarboxylase (KDC) and combinatorial overexpression of valine biosynthetic enzymes in S. cerevisiae D452-2. Among the six putative KDC enzymes from various microorganisms, 2-ketoisovalerate decarboxylase (Kivd) from L. lactis subsp. lactis KACC 13877 was identified as the most suitable KDC for isobutanol production in the yeast. Isobutanol production by the engineered S. cerevisiae was assessed in micro-aerobic batch fermentations using glucose as a sole carbon source. 93 mg/L isobutanol was produced in the Kivd overexpressing strain, which corresponds to a fourfold improvement as compared with the control strain. Isobutanol production was further enhanced to 151 mg/L by additional overexpression of acetolactate synthase (Ilv2p), acetohydroxyacid reductoisomerase (Ilv5p), and dihydroxyacid dehydratase (Ilv3p) in the cytosol.

  9. Amperometric biosensors using poly-L-lysine/poly-(styrenesulfonate) membranes with immobilized enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, F.; Yabuki, S.; Hirata, Y. [National Institute of bioscience and Human-Technology, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1995-12-05

    Enzyme electrodes for L-lactic acid, choline and glucose were prepared by immobilizing lactate oxidase, choline oxidase and glucose oxidase into polygon complex membranes, respectively: an aqueous solution containing poly-L-lysine and each enzyme was placed on a glassy carbon electrode, then an aqueous solution of poly(4-styrenesulfonate) was added to the polycation/enzyme mixture and dried. The anodic current (at 1 V vs. Ag/AgCl) of each enzyme electrode increased after the addition of the corresponding analyte, due to the electrolytic oxidation of the hydrogen peroxide produced through the oxidase-catalyzed reaction in the membrane. The membrane showed permselectivity based on the solute size with the molecular cut-off of 110. For the L-lactate and choline-sensing electrodes, the permselectivity was effective in reducing the interferential response as compared to the response for the analyte: the permeation of interferents such as L-ascorbic acid, uric acid and acetaminophen, was restricted, whereas the analyte permeated easily to undergo the enzymatic reaction. In the case of the glucose oxidase/polyion complex layer, the restriction of glucose transport resulted in the enzyme electrode suitable for the determination of the analyze in high concentrations. Each enzyme electrode was highly stable, e.g., the glucose-sensing electrode could be used for more than 20 weeks. 23 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Structure, function and regulation of the enzymes in the starch biosynthetic pathway.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiger, Jim

    2013-11-30

    structure of ADP- Glucose pyrophosphorylase from potato in its inhibited conformation, and bound to both ATP and ADP-glucose. In addition, we have determined the first structure of glycogen synthase in its "closed", catalytically active conformation bound to ADP-glucose. We also determined the structure of glycogen synthase bound to malto-oligosaccharides, showing for the first time that an enzyme in the starch biosynthetic pathway recognizes glucans not just in its active site but on binding sites on the surface of the enzyme ten’s of Angstroms from the active site. In addition our structure of a glycogen branching enzyme bound to malto-oligosaccharides identified seven distinct binding sites distributed about the surface of the enzyme. We will now determine the function of these sites to get a molecular-level picture of exactly how these enzymes interact with their polymeric substrates and confer specificity leading to the complex structure of the starch granule. We will extend our studies to other isoforms of the enzymes, to understand how their structures give rise to their distinct function. Our goal is to understand what accounts for the various functional differences between SS and SBE isoforms at a molecular level.

  11. Dual Role of a Biosynthetic Enzyme, CysK, in Contact Dependent Growth Inhibition in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Kaundal

    Full Text Available Contact dependent growth inhibition (CDI is the phenomenon where CDI+ bacterial strain (inhibitor inhibits the growth of CDI-strain (target by direct cell to cell contact. CDI is mediated by cdiBAI gene cluster where CdiB facilitates the export of CdiA, an exotoxin, on the cell surface and CdiI acts as an immunity protein to protect CDI+ cells from autoinhibition. CdiA-CT, the C-terminal region of the toxin CdiA, from uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain 536 (UPEC536 is a latent tRNase that requires binding of a biosynthetic enzyme CysK (O-acetylserine sulfyhydrylase for activation in the target cells. CdiA-CT can also interact simultaneously with CysK and immunity protein, CdiI, to form a ternary complex in UPEC536. But the role of CysK in the ternary complex is not clear. We studied the hydrodynamic, thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of binary and ternary complexes using AUC, ITC and SPR respectively, to investigate the role of CysK in UPEC536. We report that CdiA-CT binds CdiI and CysK with nanomolar range affinity. We further report that binding of CysK to CdiA-CT improves its affinity towards CdiI by ~40 fold resulting in the formation of a more stable complex with over ~130 fold decrease in dissociation rate. Thermal melting experiments also suggest the role of CysK in stabilizing CdiA-CT/CdiI complex as Tm of the binary complex shifts ~10°C upon binding CysK. Hence, CysK acts a modulator of CdiA-CT/CdiI interactions by stabilizing CdiA-CT/CdiI complex and may play a crucial role in preventing autoinhibition in UPEC536. This study reports a new moonlighting function of a biosynthetic enzyme, CysK, as a modulator of toxin/immunity interactions in UPEC536 inhibitor cells.

  12. Lysine biosynthesis and nitrogen metabolism in quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa): study of enzymes and nitrogen-containing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varisi, Vanderlei A; Camargos, Liliane S; Aguiar, Leandro F; Christofoleti, Renata M; Medici, Leonardo O; Azevedo, Ricardo A

    2008-01-01

    Aspartate kinase (AK, EC 2.7.2.4), homoserine dehydrogenase (HSDH, EC 1.1.1.3) and dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS, EC 4.2.1.52) were isolated and partially purified from immature Chenopodium quinoa Willd seeds. Enzyme activities were studied in the presence of the aspartate-derived amino acids lysine, threonine and methionine and also the lysine analogue S-2-aminoethyl-l-cysteine (AEC), at 1 mM and 5 mM. The results confirmed the existence of, at least, two AK isoenzymes, one inhibited by lysine and the other inhibited by threonine, the latter being predominant in quinoa seeds. HSDH activity was also shown to be partially inhibited by threonine, whereas some of the activity was resistant to the inhibitory effect, indicating the presence of two isoenzymes, one resistant and another sensitive to threonine inhibition. Only one DHDPS isoenzyme highly sensitive to lysine inhibition was detected. The results suggest that the high concentration of lysine observed in quinoa seeds is possibly due to a combined effect of increased lysine synthesis and accumulation in the soluble form and/or as protein lysine. Nitrogen assimilation was also investigated and based on nitrate content, nitrate reductase activity, amino acid distribution and ureide content, the leaves were identified as the predominant site of nitrate reduction in this plant species. The amino acid profile analysis in leaves and roots also indicated an important role of soluble glutamine as a nitrogen transporting compound.

  13. Enzymes of the taurine biosynthetic pathway are expressed in rat mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Iori; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2007-08-01

    Taurine is the most abundant free amino acid in the body and is present at high concentrations during development and in the early milk. It is synthesized from cysteine via oxidation of cysteine to cysteinesulfinate by the enzyme cysteine dioxygenase (CDO), followed by the decarboxylation of cysteinesulfinate to hypotaurine, catalyzed by cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD). To determine whether the taurine biosynthetic pathway is present in mammary gland and whether it is differentially expressed during pregnancy and lactation, and also to further explore the possible regulation of hepatic taurine synthesis during pregnancy and lactation, we measured mammary and hepatic CDO and CSAD mRNA and protein concentrations and tissue, plasma and milk taurine concentrations. CDO and CSAD mRNA and protein were expressed in mammary gland and liver regardless of physiological state. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated the expression of CDO in ductal cells of pregnant rats, but not in other mammary epithelial cells or in ductal cells of nonpregnant rats. CDO was also present in stromal adipocytes in mammary glands of both pregnant and nonpregnant rats. Our findings support an upregulation of taurine synthetic capacity in the mammary gland of pregnant rats, based on mammary taurine and hypotaurine concentrations and the intense immunohistochemical staining for CDO in ductal cells of pregnant rats. Hepatic taurine synthetic capacity, particularly CSAD, and taurine concentrations were highest in rats during the early stages of lactation, suggesting the liver may also play a role in the synthesis of taurine to support lactation or repletion of maternal reserves.

  14. Production of wax esters in plant seed oils by oleosomal cotargeting of biosynthetic enzymes[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Mareike; Iven, Tim; Ahmann, Katharina; Hornung, Ellen; Stymne, Sten; Feussner, Ivo

    2012-01-01

    Wax esters are neutral lipids exhibiting desirable properties for lubrication. Natural sources have traditionally been whales. Additionally some plants produce wax esters in their seed oil. Currently there is no biological source available for long chain length monounsaturated wax esters that are most suited for industrial applications. This study aimed to identify enzymatic requirements enabling their production in oilseed plants. Wax esters are generated by the action of fatty acyl-CoA reductase (FAR), generating fatty alcohols and wax synthases (WS) that esterify fatty alcohols and acyl-CoAs to wax esters. Based on their substrate preference, a FAR and a WS from Mus musculus were selected for this study (MmFAR1 and MmWS). MmWS resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), whereas MmFAR1 associates with peroxisomes. The elimination of a targeting signal and the fusion to an oil body protein yielded variants of MmFAR1 and MmWS that were cotargeted and enabled wax ester production when coexpressed in yeast or Arabidopsis. In the fae1 fad2 double mutant, rich in oleate, the cotargeted variants of MmFAR1 and MmWS enabled formation of wax esters containing >65% oleyl-oleate. The data suggest that cotargeting of unusual biosynthetic enzymes can result in functional interplay of heterologous partners in transgenic plants. PMID:22878160

  15. Lysine-Tryptophan-Crosslinked Peptides Produced by Radical SAM Enzymes in Pathogenic Streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramma, Kelsey R; Seyedsayamdost, Mohammad R

    2017-04-21

    Macrocycles represent a common structural framework in many naturally occurring peptides. Several strategies exist for macrocyclization, and the enzymes that incorporate them are of great interest, as they enhance our repertoire for creating complex molecules. We recently discovered a new peptide cyclization reaction involving a crosslink between the side chains of lysine and tryptophan that is installed by a radical SAM enzyme. Herein, we characterize relatives of this metalloenzyme from the pathogens Streptococcus agalactiae and Streptococcus suis. Our results show that the corresponding enzymes, which we call AgaB and SuiB, contain multiple [4Fe-4S] clusters and catalyze Lys-Trp crosslink formation in their respective substrates. Subsequent high-resolution-MS and 2D-NMR analyses located the site of macrocyclization. Moreover, we report that AgaB can accept modified substrates containing natural or unnatural amino acids. Aside from providing insights into the mechanism of this unusual modification, the substrate promiscuity of AgaB may be exploited to create diverse macrocyclic peptides.

  16. Profiling of Substrates for Zinc‐dependent Lysine Deacylase Enzymes: HDAC3 Exhibits Decrotonylase Activity In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Olsen, Christian Adam

    2012-01-01

    Systematic screening of the activities of the eleven human zinc-dependent lysine deacylases against a series of fluorogenic substrates (see scheme) as well as kinetic evaluation revealed substrates for screenings of histone deacetylases HDAC10 and HDAC11 at reasonably low enzyme concentrations. F...

  17. Lysine acetylation is a common post-translational modification of key metabolic pathway enzymes of the anaerobe Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Catherine A; Veith, Paul D; Nieto, Matthew F; Dashper, Stuart G; Reynolds, Eric C

    2015-10-14

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobe considered to be a keystone pathogen in the development of the bacterial-associated inflammatory oral disease chronic periodontitis. Although post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins are commonly found to modify protein function in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, PTMs such as lysine acetylation have not been examined in P. gingivalis. Lysine acetylation is the addition of an acetyl group to a lysine which removes this amino acid's positive charge and can induce changes in a protein's secondary structure and reactivity. A proteomics based approach combining immune-affinity enrichment with high sensitivity Orbitrap mass spectrometry identified 130 lysine acetylated peptides from 92 P. gingivalis proteins. The majority of these peptides (71) were attributed to 45 proteins with predicted metabolic activity; these proteins could be mapped to several P. gingivalis metabolic pathways where enzymes catalysing sequential reactions within the same pathway were often found acetylated. In particular, the catabolic pathways of complex anaerobic fermentation of amino acids to produce energy had 12 enzymes lysine acetylated. The results suggest that lysine acetylation may be an important mechanism in metabolic regulation in P. gingivalis, which is vital for P. gingivalis survival and adaptation of its metabolism throughout infection. Statement of significance. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of the teeth. The ability of the pathogen to induce dysbiosis and disease is related to an array of specific virulence factors and metabolic regulation that enables the bacterium to proliferate in an inflamed periodontal pocket. The mechanisms P. gingivalis uses to adapt to a changing and hostile environment are poorly understood and here we show, for the first time, that enzymes of critical metabolic pathways for energy

  18. Chronic physical stress changes gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in the adrenal medulla of adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilović Ljubica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined how chronic forced running (CFR affects the expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes and cAMP response element-binding (CREB in the adrenal medulla and the weight of adrenal glands of rats. Also, we examined how CFR and additional acute immobilization stress affect the expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in the adrenal medulla and the concentration of catecholamines and corticosterone (CORT in the blood plasma. In this experiment we used as a model forced exercise in rats (treadmill running. We used the most advanced method for determining the level of gene expression, Real-time PCR with TaqMan probes, as well as Western blot analysis (ECL. We found that CFR decreases tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, and dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH mRNA and protein levels in the adrenal medulla. The decreased TH and DBH mRNA levels coincide with the reduced expression of CREB in the adrenal medulla and with the reduced plasma CORT level. Additionally, CFR reduces the level of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT mRNA, but elevates its protein level in the adrenal medulla and increases the concentration of adrenaline (A in the plasma. Reduced level of PNMT mRNA in the adrenal medulla coincides with reduced plasma CORT level. The additional acute immobilization stress increases gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in the adrenal medulla, as well as catecholamines and CORT levels in the plasma. The increased synthesis of PNMT enzyme in the adrenal medulla may result in an increased biosynthesis of A under chronic stress conditions. Additionally, increased level of catecholamines in the plasma after chronic physical stress is the allostatic load that may induce numerous diseases and pathological conditions.

  19. Molecular interaction of the first 3 enzymes of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nara, Takeshi, E-mail: tnara@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Hashimoto, Muneaki; Hirawake, Hiroko [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Liao, Chien-Wei [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Department of Parasitology, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Xing Street, Taipei 110, Taiwan, ROC (China); Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Morales, Jorge; Takamiya, Shinzaburo [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Fujimura, Tsutomu; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko [Division of Proteomics and Biomolecular Science, Biomedical Research Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Fan, Chia-Kwung [Department of Parasitology, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wu-Xing Street, Taipei 110, Taiwan, ROC (China); Inaoka, Daniel Ken [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Inoue, Masayuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Tanaka, Akiko [Systems and Structural Biology Center, RIKEN, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Harada, Shigeharu [Department of Applied Biology, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Kita, Kiyoshi [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); and others

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An Escherichia coli strain co-expressing CPSII, ATC, and DHO of Trypanosoma cruzi was constructed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of T. cruzi were demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CPSII bound with both ATC and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATC bound with both CPSII and DHO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A functional tri-enzyme complex might precede the establishment of the fused enzyme. -- Abstract: The first 3 reaction steps of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway are catalyzed by carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII), aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC), and dihydroorotase (DHO), respectively. In eukaryotes, these enzymes are structurally classified into 2 types: (1) a CPSII-DHO-ATC fusion enzyme (CAD) found in animals, fungi, and amoebozoa, and (2) stand-alone enzymes found in plants and the protist groups. In the present study, we demonstrate direct intermolecular interactions between CPSII, ATC, and DHO of the parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi, which is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The 3 enzymes were expressed in a bacterial expression system and their interactions were examined. Immunoprecipitation using an antibody specific for each enzyme coupled with Western blotting-based detection using antibodies for the counterpart enzymes showed co-precipitation of all 3 enzymes. From an evolutionary viewpoint, the formation of a functional tri-enzyme complex may have preceded-and led to-gene fusion to produce the CAD protein. This is the first report to demonstrate the structural basis of these 3 enzymes as a model of CAD. Moreover, in conjunction with the essentiality of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis in the parasite, our findings provide a rationale for new strategies for developing drugs for Chagas disease, which target the intermolecular interactions of these 3 enzymes.

  20. Crystal Structure and Functional Analysis of Homocitrate Synthase, an Essential Enzyme in Lysine Biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulfer, Stacie L.; Scott, Erin M.; Couture, Jean-François; Pillus, Lorraine; Trievel, Raymond C.; (Michigan); (UCSD)

    2010-01-12

    Homocitrate synthase (HCS) catalyzes the first and committed step in lysine biosynthesis in many fungi and certain Archaea and is a potential target for antifungal drugs. Here we report the crystal structure of the HCS apoenzyme from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and two distinct structures of the enzyme in complex with the substrate 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG). The structures reveal that HCS forms an intertwined homodimer stabilized by domain-swapping between the N- and C-terminal domains of each monomer. The N-terminal catalytic domain is composed of a TIM barrel fold in which 2-OG binds via hydrogen bonds and coordination to the active site divalent metal ion, whereas the C-terminal domain is composed of mixed {alpha}/{beta} topology. In the structures of the HCS apoenzyme and one of the 2-OG binary complexes, a lid motif from the C-terminal domain occludes the entrance to the active site of the neighboring monomer, whereas in the second 2-OG complex the lid is disordered, suggesting that it regulates substrate access to the active site through its apparent flexibility. Mutations of the active site residues involved in 2-OG binding or implicated in acid-base catalysis impair or abolish activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, these results yield new insights into the structure and catalytic mechanism of HCSs and furnish a platform for developing HCS-selective inhibitors.

  1. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis LipB enzyme functions as a cysteine/lysine dyad acyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingjun; Zhao, Xin; Nasser Eddine, Ali; Geerlof, Arie; Li, Xinping; Cronan, John E; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2006-06-06

    Lipoic acid is essential for the activation of a number of protein complexes involved in key metabolic processes. Growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis relies on a pathway in which the lipoate attachment group is synthesized from an endogenously produced octanoic acid moiety. In patients with multiple-drug-resistant M. tuberculosis, expression of one gene from this pathway, lipB, encoding for octanoyl-[acyl carrier protein]-protein acyltransferase is considerably up-regulated, thus making it a potential target in the search for novel antiinfectives against tuberculosis. Here we present the crystal structure of the M. tuberculosis LipB protein at atomic resolution, showing an unexpected thioether-linked active-site complex with decanoic acid. We provide evidence that the transferase functions as a cysteine/lysine dyad acyltransferase, in which two invariant residues (Lys-142 and Cys-176) are likely to function as acid/base catalysts. Analysis by MS reveals that the LipB catalytic reaction proceeds by means of an internal thioesteracyl intermediate. Structural comparison of LipB with lipoate protein ligase A indicates that, despite conserved structural and sequence active-site features in the two enzymes, 4'-phosphopantetheine-bound octanoic acid recognition is a specific property of LipB.

  2. Structure of Nampt/PBEF/visfatin, a mammalian NAD[superscript +]biosynthetic enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Xiangbin; Bheda, Poonam; Revollo, Javier R.; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Wolberger, Cynthia (JHU-MED); (WU-MED)

    2010-07-22

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) synthesizes nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide in a mammalian NAD{sup +} biosynthetic pathway and is required for SirT1 activity in vivo. Nampt has also been presumed to be a cytokine (PBEF) or a hormone (visfatin). The crystal structure of Nampt in the presence and absence of NMN shows that Nampt is a dimeric type II phosphoribosyltransferase and provides insights into the enzymatic mechanism.

  3. A Proteomic Strategy Identifies Lysine Methylation of Splicing Factor snRNP70 by the SETMAR Enzyme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Scott M.; Moore, Kaitlyn E.; Sankaran, Saumya M.; Reynoird, Nicolas; Elias, Joshua E.; Gozani, Or

    2015-01-01

    The lysine methyltransferase (KMT) SETMAR is implicated in the response to and repair of DNA damage, but its molecular function is not clear. SETMAR has been associated with dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) at sites of DNA damage. However, SETMAR does not methylate H3K36 in vitro. This and the observation that SETMAR is not active on nucleosomes suggest that H3K36 methylation is not a physiologically relevant activity. To identify potential non-histone substrates, we utilized a strategy on the basis of quantitative proteomic analysis of methylated lysine. Our approach identified lysine 130 of the mRNA splicing factor snRNP70 as a SETMAR substrate in vitro, and we show that the enzyme primarily generates monomethylation at this position. Furthermore, we show that SETMAR methylates snRNP70 Lys-130 in cells. Because snRNP70 is a key early regulator of 5′ splice site selection, our results suggest a model in which methylation of snRNP70 by SETMAR regulates constitutive and/or alternative splicing. In addition, the proteomic strategy described here is broadly applicable and is a promising route for large-scale mapping of KMT substrates. PMID:25795785

  4. Co-ordinated synthesis of phytoalexin biosynthetic enzymes in biologically-stressed cells of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, C L; Bell, J N; Ryder, T B; Bailey, J A; Schuch, W; Bolwell, G P; Robbins, M P; Dixon, R A; Lamb, C J

    1985-02-01

    Changes in the rates of synthesis of three enzymes of phenyl-propanoid biosynthesis in Phaseolus vulgaris L. (dwarf French bean) have been investigated by immunoprecipitation of [S]methionine-labeled enzyme subunits with mono-specific antisera. Elicitor causes marked, rapid but transient co-ordinated increases in the rate of synthesis of phenyl-alanine ammonia-lyase, chalcone synthase and chalcone isomerase concomitant with the phase of rapid increase in enzyme activity at the onset of accumulation of phenyl-propanoid-derived phytoalexin antibiotics in suspension cultures of P. vulgaris. Co-ordinate induction of enzyme synthesis is also observed in hypocotyl tissue during race:cultivar-specific interactions with Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, causal agent of anthracnose. In an incompatible interaction (host resistant) there are early increases apparently localized to the initial site of infection prior to the onset of phytoalexin accumulation and expression of hypersensitive resistance. In contrast, in a compatible interaction (host susceptible) there is no induction of synthesis in the early stages of infection, but a delayed widespread response at the onset of lesion formation associated with attempted lesion limitation. It is concluded that expression of the phytoalexin defense response in biologically stressed cells of P. vulgaris characteristically involves co-ordinate induction of synthesis of phytoalexin biosynthetic enzymes.

  5. Enzymic synthesis of L-lysine from DL-alpha-amino-epsilon-caprolactam by new microbial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plhácková, K; Vojtísek, V; Plachý, J

    1982-01-01

    The production of L-lysine from DL-alpha-amino-epsilon-caprolactam (DL-ACL) by new strains producing L-alpha-amino-epsilon-caprolactamase and aminocaprolactam racemase is described. Optimal conditions for hydrolysis of L-ACL by Cryptococcus sp. and for racemization of ACL by cells of a strain isolated in nature and identified as Pseudomonas sp. were determined. Synthesis of L-alpha-amino-epsilon-caprolactamase is induced by DL-ACL or L-lysine with the same effectivity. A positive effect of phosphates (potassium salts) on reduction of the induction lag was detected, the synthesis of this enzyme was found to be repressed by glucose and some possibilities of the reversion of this repressive effect were demonstrated. Under conditions optimal for the production of both enzymes a quantitative theoretical conversion of 10% aqueous DL-ACL to L-lysine by a mixture of native cells in a mass ratio of 1 : 2 (producer of ACL-hydrolase to producer of ACL-racemase) occurred in 8 h at 40 degrees C and pH 8.0.

  6. Fructan Biosynthetic and Breakdown Enzymes in Dicots Evolved From Different Invertases. Expression of Fructan Genes Throughout Chicory Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Van den Ende

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fructans are fructose-based oligo- and polymers that serve as reserve carbohydrates in many plant species. The biochemistry of fructan biosynthesis in dicots has been resolved, and the respective cDNAs have been cloned. Recent progress has now succeeded in elucidating the biochemistry and molecular biology of fructan biodegradation in chicory, an economically important species used for commercial inulin extraction. Unlike fructan biosynthetic genes that originated from vacuolar-type invertase, fructan exohydrolases (FEHs seem to have evolved from a cell-wall invertase ancestor gene that later obtained a low iso-electric point and a vacuolar targeting signal. Expression analysis reveals that fructan enzymes are controlled mainly at the transcriptional level. Using chicory as a model system, northern analysis was consistent with enzymatic activity measurements and observed carbohydrate changes throughout its development.

  7. Substrates for Efficient Fluorometric Screening Employing the NAD-Dependent Sirtuin 5 Lysine Deacylase (KDAC) Enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Olsen, Christian Adam

    2012-01-01

    The class III lysine deacylases (KDACs), also known as the sirtuins, have emerged as interesting drug targets for therapeutic intervention in a variety of diseases. To gain a deeper understanding of the processes affected by sirtuins, the development of selective small molecule modulators of indi...

  8. Staphylococcus aureus mevalonate kinase: isolation and characterization of an enzyme of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voynova, Natalya E; Rios, Sandra E; Miziorko, Henry M

    2004-01-01

    It has been proposed that isoprenoid biosynthesis in several gram-positive cocci depends on the mevalonate pathway for conversion of acetyl coenzyme A to isopentenyl diphosphate. Mevalonate kinase catalyzes a key reaction in this pathway. In this study the enzyme from Staphylococcus aureus was expressed in Escherichia coli, isolated in a highly purified form, and characterized. The overall amino acid sequence of this enzyme was very heterologous compared with the sequences of eukaryotic mevalonate kinases. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analytical gel filtration chromatography suggested that the native enzyme is a monomer with a molecular mass of approximately 33 kDa. The specific activity was 12 U/mg, and the pH optimum was 7.0 to 8.5. The apparent K(m) values for R,S-mevalonate and ATP were 41 and 339 micro M, respectively. There was substantial substrate inhibition at millimolar levels of mevalonate. The sensitivity to feedback inhibition by farnesyl diphosphate and its sulfur-containing analog, farnesyl thiodiphosphate, was characterized. These compounds were competitive inhibitors with respect to ATP; the K(i) values were 46 and 45 micro M for farnesyl diphosphate and its thio analog, respectively. Parallel measurements with heterologous eukaryotic mevalonate kinases indicated that S. aureus mevalonate kinase is much less sensitive to feedback inhibition (K(i) difference, 3 orders of magnitude) than the human enzyme. In contrast, both enzymes tightly bound trinitrophenyl-ATP, a fluorescent substrate analog, suggesting that there are similarities in structural features that are important for catalytic function.

  9. Effect of immobilization stress on gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in heart auricles of socially isolated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gavrilovic

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress is associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. The sympathoneural system plays an important role in the regulation of cardiac function both in health and disease. In the present study, the changes in gene expression of the catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT and protein levels in the right and left heart auricles of naive control and long-term (12 weeks socially isolated rats were investigated by Taqman RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The response of these animals to additional immobilization stress (2 h was also examined. Long-term social isolation produced a decrease in TH mRNA level in left auricles (about 70% compared to the corresponding control. Expression of the DBH gene was markedly decreased both in the right (about 62% and left (about 81% auricles compared to the corresponding control, group-maintained rats, whereas PNMT mRNA levels remained unchanged. Exposure of group-housed rats to acute immobilization for 2 h led to a significant increase of mRNA levels of TH (about 267%, DBH (about 37% and PNMT (about 60% only in the right auricles. Additional 2-h immobilization of individually housed rats did not affect gene expression of these enzymes in either the right or left auricle. Protein levels of TH, DBH and PNMT in left and right heart auricles were unchanged either in both individually housed and immobilized rats. The unchanged mRNA levels of the enzymes examined after short-term immobilization suggest that the catecholaminergic system of the heart auricles of animals previously exposed to chronic psychosocial stress was adapted to maintain appropriate cardiovascular homeostasis.

  10. Effects of overexpressing individual lignin biosynthetic enzymes on feeding and growth of corn earworms and fall armyworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignin is an important insect resistance component of plants. Enhancing or disrupting the lignin biosynthetic pathway for different bioenergy uses may alter pest resistance. The lignin biosynthetic pathway is complex, and a number of pathway compounds are also involved in the biosynthesis of simpler...

  11. Characterization of the De Novo Biosynthetic Enzyme of Platelet Activating Factor, DDT-Insensitive Cholinephosphotransferase, of Human Mesangial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantinos Alexandros Demopoulos

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activating factor (PAF, a potent inflammatory mediator, is implicated in several proinflammatory/inflammatory diseases such as glomerulonephritis, glomerulosclerosis, atherosclerosis, cancer, allergy, and diabetes. PAF can be produced by several renal cells under appropriate stimuli and it is thought to be implicated in renal diseases. The aim of this study is the characterization of DTT-insensitive cholinephosphotransferase (PAF-CPT of human mesangial cell (HMC, the main regulatory enzyme of PAF de novo biosynthetic pathway. Microsomal fractions of mesangial cells were isolated and enzymatic activity and kinetic parameters were determined by TLC and in vitro biological test in rabbit washed platelets. The effect of bovine serum albumin (BSA, dithiothreitol (DTT, divalent cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+, EDTA, and various chemicals on the activity of PAF-CPT of HMC was also studied. Moreover, preliminary in vitro tests have been performed with several anti-inflammatory factors such as drugs (simvastatin, IFNa, rupatadine, tinzaparin, and salicylic acid and bioactive compounds of Mediterranean diet (resveratrol and lipids of olive oil, olive pomace, sea bass “Dicentrarchus labrax,” and gilthead sea bream “Sparus aurata”. The results indicated that the above compounds can influence PAF-CPT activity of HMC.

  12. GO-PROMTO illuminates protein membrane topologies of glycan biosynthetic enzymes in the Golgi apparatus of living tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, Casper; Stenbæk, Anne; Bernard, Sophie; Hadi, Masood; Driouich, Azeddine; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2012-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus is the main site of glycan biosynthesis in eukaryotes. Better understanding of the membrane topology of the proteins and enzymes involved can impart new mechanistic insights into these processes. Publically available bioinformatic tools provide highly variable predictions of membrane topologies for given proteins. Therefore we devised a non-invasive experimental method by which the membrane topologies of Golgi-resident proteins can be determined in the Golgi apparatus in living tissues. A Golgi marker was used to construct a series of reporters based on the principle of bimolecular fluorescence complementation. The reporters and proteins of interest were recombinantly fused to split halves of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and transiently co-expressed with the reporters in the Nicotiana benthamiana leaf tissue. Output signals were binary, showing either the presence or absence of fluorescence with signal morphologies characteristic of the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The method allows prompt and robust determinations of membrane topologies of Golgi-resident proteins and is termed GO-PROMTO (for GOlgi PROtein Membrane TOpology). We applied GO-PROMTO to examine the topologies of proteins involved in the biosynthesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides including xyloglucan and arabinan. The results suggest the existence of novel biosynthetic mechanisms involving transports of intermediates across Golgi membranes.

  13. GO-PROMTO illuminates protein membrane topologies of glycan biosynthetic enzymes in the Golgi apparatus of living tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper Søgaard

    Full Text Available The Golgi apparatus is the main site of glycan biosynthesis in eukaryotes. Better understanding of the membrane topology of the proteins and enzymes involved can impart new mechanistic insights into these processes. Publically available bioinformatic tools provide highly variable predictions of membrane topologies for given proteins. Therefore we devised a non-invasive experimental method by which the membrane topologies of Golgi-resident proteins can be determined in the Golgi apparatus in living tissues. A Golgi marker was used to construct a series of reporters based on the principle of bimolecular fluorescence complementation. The reporters and proteins of interest were recombinantly fused to split halves of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP and transiently co-expressed with the reporters in the Nicotiana benthamiana leaf tissue. Output signals were binary, showing either the presence or absence of fluorescence with signal morphologies characteristic of the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum (ER. The method allows prompt and robust determinations of membrane topologies of Golgi-resident proteins and is termed GO-PROMTO (for GOlgi PROtein Membrane TOpology. We applied GO-PROMTO to examine the topologies of proteins involved in the biosynthesis of plant cell wall polysaccharides including xyloglucan and arabinan. The results suggest the existence of novel biosynthetic mechanisms involving transports of intermediates across Golgi membranes.

  14. Suppression of rat and human androgen biosynthetic enzymes by apigenin: Possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiudi; Wang, Guimin; Li, Xiaoheng; Liu, Jianpeng; Hong, Tingting; Zhu, Qiqi; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-06-01

    Apigenin is a natural flavone. It has recently been used as a chemopreventive agent. It may also have some beneficial effects to treat prostate cancer by inhibiting androgen production. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on the steroidogenesis of rat immature Leydig cells and some human testosterone biosynthetic enzyme activities. Rat immature Leydig cells were incubated for 3h with 100μM apigenin without (basal) or with 1ng/ml luteinizing hormone (LH), 10mM 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8BR), and 20μM of the following steroid substrates: 22R-hydroxychloesterol (22R), pregnenolone (P5), progesterone (P4), and androstenedione (D4). The medium levels of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol (DIOL), the primary androgen produced by rat immature Leydig cells, were measured. Apigenin significantly inhibited basal, 8BR, 22R, PREG, P4, and D4 stimulated DIOL production in rat immature Leydig cells. Further study showed that apigenin inhibited rat 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase, and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 11.41±0.7, 8.98±0.10, and 9.37±0.07μM, respectively. Apigenin inhibited human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 2.17±0.04 and 1.31±0.09μM, respectively. Apigenin is a potent inhibitor of rat and human steroidogenic enzymes, being possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  15. Enhanced production of n-alkanes in Escherichia coli by spatial organization of biosynthetic pathway enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmana, Ziaur; Sung, Bong Hyun; Yi, Ji-Yeun; Bui, Le Minh; Lee, Jun Hyoung; Kim, Sun Chang

    2014-12-20

    Alkanes chemically mimic hydrocarbons found in petroleum, and their demand as biofuels is steadily increasing. Biologically, n-alkanes are produced from fatty acyl-ACPs by acyl-ACP reductases (AARs) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenases (ADOs). One of the major impediments in n-alkane biosynthesis is the low catalytic turnover rates of ADOs. Here, we studied n-alkane biosynthesis in Escherichia coli using a chimeric ADO-AAR fusion protein or zinc finger protein-guided ADO/AAR assembly on DNA scaffolds to control their stoichiometric ratios and spatial arrangements. Bacterial production of n-alkanes with the ADO-AAR fusion protein was increased 4.8-fold (24 mg/L) over a control strain expressing ADO and AAR separately. Optimal n-alkane biosynthesis was achieved when the ADO:AAR binding site ratio on a DNA scaffold was 3:1, yielding an 8.8-fold increase (44 mg/L) over the control strain. Our findings indicate that the spatial organization of alkane-producing enzymes is critical for efficient n-alkane biosynthesis in E. coli.

  16. Structure of PqsD, a Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Biosynthetic Enzyme, in Complex with Anthranilate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, A.; Atanasova, V; Robinson, H; Eisenstein, E; Coleman, J; Pesci, E; Parsons, J

    2009-01-01

    Here we present a structural and biophysical characterization of PqsD that includes several crystal structures of the enzyme, including that of the PqsD-anthranilate covalent intermediate and the inactive Cys112Ala active site mutant in complex with anthranilate. The structure reveals that PqsD is structurally similar to the FabH and chalcone synthase families of fatty acid and polyketide synthases. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contains a PqsD dimer. The PqsD monomer is composed of two nearly identical 170-residue ????? domains. The structures show anthranilate-liganded Cys112 is positioned deep in the protein interior at the bottom of an 15 A long channel while a second anthraniloyl-CoA molecule is waiting in the cleft leading to the protein surface. Cys112, His257, and Asn287 form the FabH-like catalytic triad of PqsD. The C112A mutant is inactive, although it still reversibly binds anthraniloyl-CoA. The covalent complex between anthranilate and Cys112 clearly illuminates the orientation of key elements of the PqsD catalytic machinery and represents a snapshot of a key point in the catalytic cycle.

  17. Biosynthetic labeling of hypusine in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M.H.; Folk, J.E.

    1986-05-01

    Using a dual-label technique in which /sup 3/H - and /sup 14/C-labeled forms of putrescine and of spermidine were employed as biosynthetic precursors of hypusine, two -C-H bond cleavages were detected during production of this unique amino acid in Chinese hamster ovary cells. One of these cleavages occurs at the C-1 position of the 4-aminobutyl group during its transfer from the secondary amine nitrogen of spermidine to the nitrogen at the upsilon-position of a specific lysine residue in the polypeptide precursor of eukaryotic initiation factor 4D. Breakage of the other -C-H bond takes place at the C-2 position in this aminobutyl segment after it has been coupled to lysine to form the intermediate deoxyhypusine residue. Hydroxylation at this carbon atom, which constitutes the last step in hypusine biosynthesis, is the cause of bond cleavage. The data obtained are consistent with a notion that no additional -C-H bond fissions occur during hypusine biosynthesis. The authors findings permit a suggestion of a mechanism for enzymic aminobutyl group transfer in which 4-amino-butyraldehyde produced by oxidative cleavage of spermidine is coupled with the upsilon-amino group of a specific lysine residue to form an enzyme-bound imine intermediate.

  18. Identification of mRNA for endocannabinoid biosynthetic enzymes within hippocampal pyramidal cells and CA1 stratum radiatum interneuron subtypes using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, C B; McNeil, M; Williamson, R C; Poole, B R; Nelson, B; Sudweeks, S; Edwards, J G

    2012-08-30

    The hippocampus is required for short-term memory and contains both excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons. These cells exhibit various forms of synaptic plasticity, the mechanism underlying learning and memory. More recently, endocannabinoids were identified to be involved in synaptic plasticity. Our goal was to describe the distribution of endocannabinoid biosynthetic enzymes within CA1 stratum radiatum interneurons and CA3/CA1 pyramidal cells. We extracted mRNA from single interneurons and pyramidal cells and used real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect the presence of 12-lipoxygenase, N-acyl-phosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D, diacylglycerol lipase α, and type I metabotropic glutamate receptors, all known to be involved in endocannabinoid production and plasticity. We observed that the expression of endocannabinoid biosynthetic enzyme mRNA does occur within interneurons and that it is coexpressed with type I metabotropic glutamate receptors, suggesting interneurons have the potential to produce endocannabinoids. We also identified that CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cells express endocannabinoid biosynthetic enzyme mRNA. Our data provide the first molecular biological evidence for putative endocannabinoid production in interneurons, suggesting their potential ability to regulate endocannabinoid-mediated processes, such as synaptic plasticity.

  19. The sub-cellular localisation of the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes, CrtRb2 and PSY2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasare, Stefania; Wright, Kathryn; Campbell, Raymond; Morris, Wayne; Ducreux, Laurence; Chapman, Sean; Bramley, Peter; Fraser, Paul; Roberts, Alison; Taylor, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Carotenoids are isoprenoids with important biological roles both for plants and animals. The yellow flesh colour of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers is a quality trait dependent on the types and levels of carotenoids that accumulate. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is well characterised, facilitating the successful engineering of carotenoid content in numerous crops including potato. However, a clear understanding concerning the factors regulating carotenoid accumulation and localisation in plant storage organs, such as tubers, is lacking. In the present study, the localisation of key carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes was investigated, as one of the unexplored factors that could influence the accumulation of carotenoids in potato tubers. Stable transgenic potato plants were generated by over-expressing β-CAROTENE HYDROXYLASE 2 (CrtRb2) and PHYTOENE SYNTHASE 2 (PSY2) genes, fused to red fluorescent protein (RFP). Gene expression and carotenoid levels were both significantly increased, confirming functionality of the fluorescently tagged proteins. Confocal microscopy studies revealed different sub-organellar localisations of CrtRb2-RFP and PSY2-RFP within amyloplasts. CrtRb2 was detected in small vesicular structures, inside amyloplasts, whereas PSY2 was localised in the stroma of amyloplasts. We conclude that it is important to consider the location of biosynthetic enzymes when engineering the carotenoid metabolic pathway in storage organs such as tubers.

  20. Crystal Structure of Ll-Diaminopimelate Aminotransferase From 'Arabidopsis Thaliana': a Recently-Discovered Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of L-Lysine By Plants And 'Chlamydia'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, N.; Cherney, M.M.; van Belkum, M.J.; Marcus, S.L.; Flegel, M.D.; Clay, M.D.; Deyholos, M.K.; Vederas, J.C.; James, M.N.G.

    2007-07-13

    The essential biosynthetic pathway to l-Lysine in bacteria and plants is an attractive target for the development of new antibiotics or herbicides because it is absent in humans, who must acquire this amino acid in their diet. Plants use a shortcut of a bacterial pathway to l-Lysine in which the pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme ll-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (LL-DAP-AT) transforms l-tetrahydrodipicolinic acid (L-THDP) directly to LL-DAP. In addition, LL-DAP-AT was recently found in Chlamydia sp., suggesting that inhibitors of this enzyme may also be effective against such organisms. In order to understand the mechanism of this enzyme and to assist in the design of inhibitors, the three-dimensional crystal structure of LL-DAP-AT was determined at 1.95 Angstroms resolution. The cDNA sequence of LL-DAP-AT from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtDAP-AT) was optimized for expression in bacteria and cloned in Escherichia coli without its leader sequence but with a C-terminal hexahistidine affinity tag to aid protein purification. The structure of AtDAP-AT was determined using the multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) method with a seleno-methionine derivative. AtDAP-AT is active as a homodimer with each subunit having PLP in the active site. It belongs to the family of type I fold PLP-dependent enzymes. Comparison of the active site residues of AtDAP-AT and aspartate aminotransferases revealed that the PLP binding residues in AtDAP-AT are well conserved in both enzymes. However, Glu97* and Asn309* in the active site of AtDAP-AT are not found at similar positions in aspartate aminotransferases, suggesting that specific substrate recognition may require these residues from the other monomer. A malate-bound structure of AtDAP-AT allowed LL-DAP and L-glutamate to be modeled into the active site. These initial three-dimensional structures of LL-DAP-AT provide insight into its substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism.

  1. Seasonal alteration in amounts of lignans and their glucosides and gene expression of the relevant biosynthetic enzymes in the Forsythia suspense leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kinuyo; Satake, Honoo

    2013-01-01

    Lignans of Forsythia spp. are essential components of various Chinese medicines and health diets. However, the seasonal alteration in lignan amounts and the gene expression profile of lignan-biosynthetic enzymes has yet to be investigated. In this study, we have assessed seasonal alteration in amounts of major lignans, such as pinoresinol, matairesinol, and arctigenin, and examined the gene expression profile of pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase (PLR), pinoresinol-glucosylating enzyme (UGT71A18), and secoisolariciresinol dehydrogenase (SIRD) in the leaf of Forsythia suspense from April to November. All of the lignans in the leaf continuously increased from April to June, reached the maximal level in June, and then decreased. Ninety percent of pinoresinol and matairesinol was converted into glucosides, while approximately 50% of arctigenin was aglycone. PLR was stably expressed from April to August, whereas the PLR expression was not detected from September to November. In contrast, the UGT71A18 expression was found from August to November, but not from April to July. The SIRD expression was prominent from April to May, not detected in June to July, and then increased again from September to November. These expression profiles of the lignan-synthetic enzymes are largely compatible with the alteration in lignan contents. Furthermore, such seasonal lignan profiles are in good agreement with the fact that the Forsythia leaves for Chinese medicinal tea are harvested in June. This is the first report on seasonal alteration in lignans and the relevant biosynthetic enzyme genes in the leaf of Forsythia species.

  2. Effective use of heterologous hosts for characterization of biosynthetic enzymes allows production of natural products and promotes new natural product discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, there has been impressive progress in elucidating the mechanism of biosynthesis of various natural products accomplished through the use of genetic, molecular biological and biochemical techniques. Here, we present a comprehensive overview of the current results from our studies on fungal natural product biosynthetic enzymes, including nonribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrid synthetase, as well as auxiliary enzymes, such as methyltransferases and oxygenases. Specifically, biosynthesis of the following compounds is described in detail: (i) Sch210972, potentially involving a Diels-Alder reaction that may be catalyzed by CghA, a functionally unknown protein identified by targeted gene disruption in the wild type fungus; (ii) chaetoglobosin A, formed via multi-step oxidations catalyzed by three redox enzymes, one flavin-containing monooxygenase and two cytochrome P450 oxygenases as characterized by in vivo biotransformation of relevant intermediates in our engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae; (iii) (-)-ditryptophenaline, formed by a cytochrome P450, revealing the dimerization mechanism for the biosynthesis of diketopiperazine alkaloids; (iv) pseurotins, whose variations in the C- and O-methylations and the degree of oxidation are introduced combinatorially by multiple redox enzymes; and (v) spirotryprostatins, whose spiro-carbon moiety is formed by a flavin-containing monooxygenase or a cytochrome P450 as determined by heterologous de novo production of the biosynthetic intermediates and final products in Aspergillus niger. We close our discussion by summarizing some of the key techniques that have facilitated the discovery of new natural products, production of their analogs and identification of biosynthetic mechanisms in our study.

  3. Carboxypeptidase D is the only enzyme responsible for antibody C-terminal lysine cleavage in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhilan; Zhang, Henry; Haley, Benjamin; Macchi, Frank; Yang, Feng; Misaghi, Shahram; Elich, Joseph; Yang, Renee; Tang, Yun; Joly, John C; Snedecor, Bradley R; Shen, Amy

    2016-10-01

    Heterogeneity of C-terminal lysine levels often observed in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is believed to result from the proteolysis by endogenous carboxypeptidase(s) during cell culture production. Identifying the responsible carboxypeptidase(s) for C-terminal lysine cleavage in CHO cells would provide valuable insights for antibody production cell culture processes development and optimization. In this study, five carboxypeptidases, CpD, CpM, CpN, CpB, and CpE, were studied for message RNA (mRNA) expression by qRT-PCR analysis in two most commonly used blank hosts (DUXB-11 derived DHFR-deficient DP12 host and DHFR-positive CHOK1 host), used for therapeutic antibody production, as well an antibody-expressing cell line derived from each host. Our results showed that CpD had the highest mRNA expression. When CpD mRNA levels were reduced by RNAi (RNA interference) technology, C-terminal lysine levels increased, whereas there was no obvious change in C-terminal lysine levels when a different carboxypeptidase mRNA level was knocked down suggesting that carboxypeptidase D is the main contributor for C-terminal lysine processing. Most importantly, when CpD expression was knocked out by CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) technology, C-terminal lysine cleavage was completely abolished in CpD knockout cells based on mass spectrometry analysis, demonstrating that CpD is the only endogenous carboxypeptidase that cleaves antibody heavy chain C-terminal lysine in CHO cells. Hence, our work showed for the first time that the cleavage of antibody heavy chain C-terminal lysine is solely mediated by the carboxypeptidase D in CHO cells and our finding provides one solution to eliminating C-terminal lysine heterogeneity for therapeutic antibody production by knocking out CpD gene expression. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2100-2106. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Use of a bacteriophage lysin to identify a novel target for antimicrobial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Schuch

    Full Text Available We identified an essential cell wall biosynthetic enzyme in Bacillus anthracis and an inhibitor thereof to which the organism did not spontaneously evolve measurable resistance. This work is based on the exquisite binding specificity of bacteriophage-encoded cell wall-hydrolytic lysins, which have evolved to recognize critical receptors within the bacterial cell wall. Focusing on the B. anthracis-specific PlyG lysin, we first identified its unique cell wall receptor and cognate biosynthetic pathway. Within this pathway, one biosynthetic enzyme, 2-epimerase, was required for both PlyG receptor expression and bacterial growth. The 2-epimerase was used to design a small-molecule inhibitor, epimerox. Epimerox prevented growth of several Gram-positive pathogens and rescued mice challenged with lethal doses of B. anthracis. Importantly, resistance to epimerox was not detected (<10(-11 frequency in B. anthracis and S. aureus. These results describe the use of phage lysins to identify promising lead molecules with reduced resistance potential for antimicrobial development.

  5. Profiling of Substrates for Zinc‐dependent Lysine Deacylase Enzymes: HDAC3 Exhibits Decrotonylase Activity In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Olsen, Christian Adam

    2012-01-01

    Ein systematisches Screening der Aktivitäten der elf humanen zinkabhängigen Lysin-Deacylasen gegen eine Reihe fluorogener Substrate (siehe Schema) ergab wiederum geeignete Substrate für Screenings der Histon-Deacetylasen HDAC10 und HDAC11. Darüber hinaus wurde gefunden, dass HDAC3 im Komplex mit...

  6. Starch biosynthetic genes and enzymes are expressed and active in the absence of starch accumulation in sugar beet tap-root

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Starch is the predominant storage compound in underground plant tissues like roots and tubers. An exception is sugar beet tap-root (Beta vulgaris ssp altissima) which exclusively stores sucrose. The underlying mechanism behind this divergent storage accumulation in sugar beet is currently not fully known. From the general presence of starch in roots and tubers it could be speculated that the lack in sugar beet tap-roots would originate from deficiency in pathways leading to starch. Therefore with emphasis on starch accumulation, we studied tap-roots of sugar beet using parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) as a comparator. Results Metabolic and structural analyses of sugar beet tap-root confirmed sucrose as the exclusive storage component. No starch granules could be detected in tap-roots of sugar beet or the wild ancestor sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima). Analyses of parsnip showed that the main storage component was starch but tap-root tissue was also found to contain significant levels of sugars. Surprisingly, activities of four main starch biosynthetic enzymes, phosphoglucomutase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase and starch branching enzyme, were similar in sugar beet and parsnip tap-roots. Transcriptional analysis confirmed expression of corresponding genes. Additionally, expression of genes involved in starch accumulation such as for plastidial hexose transportation and starch tuning functions could be determined in tap-roots of both plant species. Conclusion Considering underground storage organs, sugar beet tap-root upholds a unique property in exclusively storing sucrose. Lack of starch also in the ancestor sea beet indicates an evolved trait of biological importance. Our findings in this study show that gene expression and enzymatic activity of main starch biosynthetic functions are present in sugar beet tap-root during storage accumulation. In view of this, the complete lack of starch in sugar beet tap-roots is enigmatic. PMID

  7. [Antimycoplasmic Activity of Fermentation Broth of Trichoderma harzianum Rifai F-180, an Organism Producing L-Lysine-α-Oxidase, an Antitumor and Antiviral Enzyme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, I P; Rakovskaya, I V

    2014-01-01

    A concentrate of the fermentation broth of Trichoderma harzianum Rifai F-180, an organism producing L-lysine-α-oxidase, an antitumor and antiviral enzyme, with the activity in the fermentation broth of 0.54-0.56 U/mI was recovered. The effect of the concentrate on the mycoplasmas growth was investigated for the first time. Two representatives of Mycoplasmafaceae, i.e. Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma fermentans and one representative of Aholeplasmataceae. i. e. Aholeplasma laidlawii were used. It was shown that the fermentation broth inhibited the growth of Mycoplasma hominis after the preliminary exposure. The inhibition rate depended on the mycoplasma inoculation dose and the fermentation broth concentration.

  8. Structure of the D-alanylgriseoluteic acid biosynthetic protein EhpF, an atypical member of the ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, A.K.; Robinson, H.; Atanasova, V.; Gamage, S.; Parsons, J. F.

    2010-06-01

    The structure of EhpF, a 41 kDa protein that functions in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound D-alanylgriseoluteic acid (AGA), is reported. A cluster of approximately 16 genes, including ehpF, located on a 200 kbp plasmid native to certain strains of Pantoea agglomerans encodes the proteins that are required for the conversion of chorismic acid to AGA. Phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate has been identified as an intermediate in AGA biosynthesis and deletion of ehpF results in accumulation of this compound in vivo. The crystallographic data presented here reveal that EhpF is an atypical member of the acyl-CoA synthase or ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes. These enzymes typically catalyze two-step reactions involving adenylation of a carboxylate substrate followed by transfer of the substrate from AMP to coenzyme A or another phosphopantetheine. EhpF is distinguished by the absence of the C-terminal domain that is characteristic of enzymes from this family and is involved in phosphopantetheine binding and in the second half of the canonical two-step reaction that is typically observed. Based on the structure of EhpF and a bioinformatic analysis, it is proposed that EhpF and EhpG convert phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate to 6-formylphenazine-1-carboxylate via an adenylyl intermediate.

  9. Hypoxia decreases the expression of the two enzymes responsible for producing linear and cyclic tetrapyrroles in the heme biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Patrick D; Furuyama, Kazumichi; Sassa, Shigeru; Shibahara, Shigeki

    2008-12-01

    Heme is synthesized in all cell types in aerobic organisms. Hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) and uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) catalyze two consecutive reactions in the heme biosynthetic pathway, generating the first linear and the first cyclic tetrapyrroles, respectively. Each of the HMBS and UROS genes contains the two separate promoters that generate ubiquitous and erythroid-specific mRNAs. Despite the functional significance of HMBS and UROS, regulation of their gene expression remains to be investigated. Here, we showed that hypoxia (1% O(2)) decreased the expression of ubiquitous mRNAs for HMBS and UROS by three- and twofold, respectively, in human hepatic cells (HepG2 and Hep3B), whereas the expression of ubiquitous and erythroid HMBS and UROS mRNAs remained unchanged in erythroid cells (YN-1 and K562). Unexpectedly, hypoxia did not decrease the half-life of HMBS mRNA (8.4 h under normoxia versus 9.1 h under hypoxia) or UROS mRNA (9.0 versus 10.4 h) in hepatic cells. It is therefore unlikely that a change in mRNA stability is responsible for the hypoxia-mediated decrease in the expression levels of these mRNAs. Furthermore, expression levels of HMBS and UROS mRNAs were decreased under normoxia by treatment with deferoxamine or cobalt chloride in hepatic cells, while hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha was accumulated. Thus, the decrease in the expression of ubiquitous HMBS and UROS mRNAs is associated with accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha protein. In conclusion, the expression of HMBS and UROS mRNAs may be coordinately regulated, which represents a newly identified mechanism that is important for heme homeostasis.

  10. Characterization of the endosperm starch and the pleiotropic effects of biosynthetic enzymes on their properties in novel mutant rice lines with high resistant starch and amylose content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuuki; Crofts, Naoko; Abe, Misato; Hosaka, Yuko; Fujita, Naoko

    2017-05-01

    Resistant starch (RS) is beneficial to human health. In order to reduce the current prevalence of diabetes and obesity, several transgenic and mutant crops containing high RS content are being developed. RS content of steamed rice with starch-branching enzyme (BE)IIb-deficient mutant endosperms is considerably high. To understand the mechanisms of RS synthesis and to increase RS content, we developed novel mutant rice lines by introducing the gene encoding starch synthase (SS)IIa and/or granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS)I from an indica rice cultivar into a japonica rice-based BEIIb-deficient mutant line, be2b. Introduction of SSIIa from an indica rice cultivar produced higher levels of amylopectin chains with degree of polymerization (DP) 11-18 than those in be2b; the extent of the change was slight due to the shortage of donor chains for SSIIa (DP 6-12) owing to BEIIb deficiency. The introduction of GBSSI from an indica rice cultivar significantly increased amylose content (by approximately 10%) in the endosperm starch. RS content of the new mutant lines was the same as or slightly higher than that of the be2b parent line. The relationship linking starch structure, RS content, and starch biosynthetic enzymes in the new mutant lines has also been discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Method development and analysis of free HS and HS in proteoglycans from pre- and postmenopausal women: evidence for biosynthetic pathway changes in sulfotransferase and sulfatase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Miller, Rebecca L; Leary, Julie A

    2013-06-18

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is one of the most complex and informative biopolymers found on the cell surface or in the extracellular matrix as either free HS fragments or constituents of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs). Analysis of free HS and HSPG sugar chains in human serum at the disaccharide level has great potential for early disease diagnosis and prognosis; however, the low concentration of HS in human serum, together with the complexity of the serum matrix, limits the information on HS. In this study, we present and validate the development of a new sensitive method for in-depth compositional analysis of free HS and HSPG sugar chains. This protocol involved several steps including weak anion exchange chromatography, ultrafiltration, and solid-phase extraction for enhanced detection prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. Using this protocol, a total of 51 serum samples from 26 premenopausal and 25 postmenopausal women were analyzed. Statistically significant differences in heparin/HS disaccharide profiles were observed. The proportion of N-acetylation and N-sulfation in both free HS and HSPG sugar chains were significantly different between pre- and postmenopausal women, indicating changes in N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferases (NDSTs), the enzymes involved in the initial step of the biosynthetic pathway. Differences in the proportion of 6-O-sulfation suggest that 6-O-sulfotransferase and/or 6-O-sulfatase enzymes may also be implicated.

  12. Role of oxidative stress and the activity of ethylene biosynthetic enzymes on the formation of spongy tissue in 'Alphonso' mango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamani, J E; Shivashankara, K S; Roy, T K

    2010-06-01

    Spongy tissue formation in 'Alphonso' mangoes (Mangifera indica L) is a major national problem leading to loss for farmers and traders. Spongy tissue is whitish sponge like tissue formed near the seed with insipid taste and off odour. Lipid peroxidation of membranes as studied by malondialdehyde formation was significantly higher in spongy tissue. Activities of antioxidative enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase were lower in spongy tissue. Among the antioxidative enzymes, activities of catalase and peroxidases were severely reduced leading to membrane damage in spongy tissue. A significant reduction in 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase and accumulation of ACC was also observed in spongy tissue. However, ACC synthase activity in spongy tissue was more compared to healthy tissue. Results indicate that the membrane peroxidation leading to lower activity of ACC oxidase might lead to the formation of spongy tissue in 'Alphonso' mango.

  13. Structure of the d-alanylgriseoluteic acid biosynthetic protein EhpF, an atypical member of the ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, Asim K.; Atanasova, Vesna [Center for Advanced Research in Biotechnology, The University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, 9600 Gudelsky Drive, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Gamage, Swarna [Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Robinson, Howard [Biology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Parsons, James F., E-mail: parsonsj@umbi.umd.edu [Center for Advanced Research in Biotechnology, The University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, 9600 Gudelsky Drive, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The structure of EhpF from P. agglomerans has been solved alone and in complex with phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate. Apo EhpF was solved and refined in two different space groups at 1.95 and 2.3 Å resolution and the EhpF–phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate complex structure was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure of EhpF, a 41 kDa protein that functions in the biosynthetic pathway leading to the broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound d-alanylgriseoluteic acid (AGA), is reported. A cluster of approximately 16 genes, including ehpF, located on a 200 kbp plasmid native to certain strains of Pantoea agglomerans encodes the proteins that are required for the conversion of chorismic acid to AGA. Phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate has been identified as an intermediate in AGA biosynthesis and deletion of ehpF results in accumulation of this compound in vivo. The crystallographic data presented here reveal that EhpF is an atypical member of the acyl-CoA synthase or ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes. These enzymes typically catalyze two-step reactions involving adenylation of a carboxylate substrate followed by transfer of the substrate from AMP to coenzyme A or another phosphopantetheine. EhpF is distinguished by the absence of the C-terminal domain that is characteristic of enzymes from this family and is involved in phosphopantetheine binding and in the second half of the canonical two-step reaction that is typically observed. Based on the structure of EhpF and a bioinformatic analysis, it is proposed that EhpF and EhpG convert phenazine-1,6-dicarboxylate to 6-formylphenazine-1-carboxylate via an adenylyl intermediate.

  14. Effect of exogenous hormones on transcription levels of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthetic enzymes in the silkworm (Bombyx mori).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, ShuoHao; Yang, HuanHuan; Yao, LiLi; Zhang, JianYun; Huang, LongQuan

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B6 includes 6 pyridine derivatives, among which pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is a coenzyme for over 140 enzymes. Animals acquire their vitamin B6 from food. Through a salvage pathway, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is synthesized from pyridoxal, pyridoxine or pyridoxamine, in a series of reactions catalyzed by pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase. The regulation of pyridoxal 5'-phospahte biosynthesis and pyridoxal 5'-phospahte homeostasis are at the center of study for vitamin B6 nutrition. How pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis is regulated by hormones has not been reported so far. Our previous studies have shown that pyridoxal 5'-phosphate level in silkworm larva displays cyclic developmental changes. In the current study, effects of exogenous juvenile hormone and molting hormone on the transcription level of genes coding for the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of pyridoxal 5'-phospahte were examined. Results show that pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase are regulated at the transcription level by development and are responsive to hormones. Molting hormone stimulates the expression of genes coding for pyridoxal kinase and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase, and juvenile hormone appears to work against molting hormone. Whether pyridoxal 5'-phosphate biosynthesis is regulated by hormones in general is an important issue for further studies.

  15. New N-Acetyltransferase Fold in the Structure and Mechanism of the Phosphonate Biosynthetic Enzyme FrbF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Brian; Cobb, Ryan E.; DeSieno, Matthew A.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K. (UIUC)

    2015-10-15

    The enzyme FrbF from Streptomyces rubellomurinus has attracted significant attention due to its role in the biosynthesis of the antimalarial phosphonate FR-900098. The enzyme catalyzes acetyl transfer onto the hydroxamate of the FR-900098 precursors cytidine 5'-monophosphate-3-aminopropylphosphonate and cytidine 5'-monophosphate-N-hydroxy-3-aminopropylphosphonate. Despite the established function as a bona fide N-acetyltransferase, FrbF shows no sequence similarity to any member of the GCN5-like N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. Here, we present the 2.0 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of FrbF in complex with acetyl-CoA, which demonstrates a unique architecture that is distinct from those of canonical GNAT-like acetyltransferases. We also utilized the co-crystal structure to guide structure-function studies that identified the roles of putative active site residues in the acetyltransferase mechanism. The combined biochemical and structural analyses of FrbF provide insights into this previously uncharacterized family of N-acetyltransferases and also provide a molecular framework toward the production of novel N-acyl derivatives of FR-900098.

  16. Inhibition of green tea and the catechins against 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase, the key enzyme of the MEP terpenoid biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Xian; Liu, Hui; Tian, Fang-Lin; Li, Fei-Fei; Li, Heng; Gao, Wen-Yun

    2016-09-01

    1-Deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) is the first committed enzyme in the MEP terpenoid biosynthetic pathway and also a validated antimicrobial target. Green tea which is rich in polyphenolic components such as the catechins, possesses a plenty of pharmacological activities, in particular an antibacterial effect. To uncover the antibacterial mechanism of green tea and to seek new DXR inhibitors from natural sources, the DXR inhibitory activity of green tea and its main antimicrobial catechins were investigated in this study. The results show that the raw extract of green tea and its ethyl acetate fraction are able to suppress DXR activity explicitly. Further determination of the DXR inhibitory capacity of eight catechin compounds demonstrates that the most active compound is gallocatechin gallate that is able to inhibit around 50% activity of DXR at 25μM. Based on these data, the primary structure-activity relationship of the catechins against DXR is discussed. This study would be very helpful to elucidate the antimicrobial mechanism of green tea and the catechins and also would be very useful to direct the rational utilization of them as food additives.

  17. Evolutionary diversification and characterization of the eubacterial gene family encoding DXR type II, an alternative isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero-Paulet, Lorenzo; Lipska, Agnieszka; Pérez-Gil, Jordi; Sangari, Félix J; Albert, Victor A; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2013-09-03

    Isoprenoids constitute a vast family of natural compounds performing diverse and essential functions in all domains of life. In most eubacteria, isoprenoids are synthesized through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The production of MEP is usually catalyzed by deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR-I) but a few organisms use an alternative DXR-like enzyme (DXR-II). Searches through 1498 bacterial complete proteomes detected 130 sequences with similarity to DXR-II. Phylogenetic analysis identified three well-resolved clades: the DXR-II family (clustering 53 sequences including eleven experimentally verified as functional enzymes able to produce MEP), and two previously uncharacterized NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductase families (designated DLO1 and DLO2 for DXR-II-like oxidoreductases 1 and 2). Our analyses identified amino acid changes critical for the acquisition of DXR-II biochemical function through type-I functional divergence, two of them mapping onto key residues for DXR-II activity. DXR-II showed a markedly discontinuous distribution, which was verified at several levels: taxonomic (being predominantly found in Alphaproteobacteria and Firmicutes), metabolic (being mostly found in bacteria with complete functional MEP pathways with or without DXR-I), and phenotypic (as no biological/phenotypic property was found to be preferentially distributed among DXR-II-containing strains, apart from pathogenicity in animals). By performing a thorough comparative sequence analysis of GC content, 3:1 dinucleotide frequencies, codon usage and codon adaptation indexes (CAI) between DXR-II sequences and their corresponding genomes, we examined the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), as opposed to an scenario of massive gene loss, in the evolutionary origin and diversification of the DXR-II subfamily in bacteria. Our analyses support a single origin of the DXR-II family through functional divergence, in which constitutes an exceptional model of

  18. The Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing autoinducer CAI-1: analysis of the biosynthetic enzyme CqsA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, R.; Bolitho, M; Higgins, D; Lu, W; Ng, W; Jeffrey, P; Rabinowitz, J; Semmelhack, M; Hughson, F; Bassler, B

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes the disease cholera, controls virulence factor production and biofilm development in response to two extracellular quorum-sensing molecules, called autoinducers. The strongest autoinducer, called CAI-1 (for cholera autoinducer-1), was previously identified as (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one. Biosynthesis of CAI-1 requires the enzyme CqsA. Here, we determine the CqsA reaction mechanism, identify the CqsA substrates as (S)-2-aminobutyrate and decanoyl coenzyme A, and demonstrate that the product of the reaction is 3-aminotridecan-4-one, dubbed amino-CAI-1. CqsA produces amino-CAI-1 by a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent acyl-CoA transferase reaction. Amino-CAI-1 is converted to CAI-1 in a subsequent step via a CqsA-independent mechanism. Consistent with this, we find cells release {ge}100 times more CAI-1 than amino-CAI-1. Nonetheless, V. cholerae responds to amino-CAI-1 as well as CAI-1, whereas other CAI-1 variants do not elicit a quorum-sensing response. Thus, both CAI-1 and amino-CAI-1 have potential as lead molecules in the development of an anticholera treatment.

  19. CYP82Y1 is N-methylcanadine 1-hydroxylase, a key noscapine biosynthetic enzyme in opium poppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Thu-Thuy T; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-01-24

    Noscapine is a phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid investigated for its potent pharmacological properties. Although structurally elucidated more than a century ago, the biosynthesis of noscapine has not been established. Radiotracer studies have shown that noscapine is derived from the protoberberine alkaloid (S)-scoulerine and has been proposed to proceed through (S)-N-methylcanadine. However, pathway intermediates involved in the conversion of N-methylcanadine to noscapine have not been identified. We report the isolation and characterization of the cytochrome P-450 CYP82Y1, which catalyzes the 1-hydroxylation of N-methylcanadine to 1-hydroxy-N-methylcanadine. Comparison of transcript and metabolite profiles of eight opium poppy chemotypes revealed four cytochrome P-450s, three from the CYP82 and one from the CYP719 families, that were tightly correlated with noscapine accumulation. Recombinant CYP82Y1 was the only enzyme that accepted (R,S)-N-methylcanadine as a substrate with strict specificity and high affinity. As expected, CYP82Y1 was abundantly expressed in opium poppy stems where noscapine accumulation is highest among plant organs. Suppression of CYP82Y1 using virus-induced gene silencing caused a significant reduction in the levels of noscapine, narcotoline, and a putative downstream secoberbine intermediate and also resulted in increased accumulation of the upstream pathway intermediates scoulerine, tetrahydrocolum-bamine, canadine, and N-methylcanadine. The combined biochemical and physiological data support the 1-hydroxylation of (S)-N-methylcanadine catalyzed by CYP82Y1 as the first committed step in the formation of noscapine in opium poppy.

  20. Diurnal variations of mouse plasma and hepatic bile acid concentrations as well as expression of biosynthetic enzymes and transporters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Kun Jennifer Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diurnal fluctuation of bile acid (BA concentrations in the enterohepatic system of mammals has been known for a long time. Recently, BAs have been recognized as signaling molecules beyond their well-established roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis. METHODS AND RESULTS: The current study depicted diurnal variations of individual BAs detected by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS in serum and livers collected from C57BL/6 mice fed a regular chow or a chow containing cholestyramine (resin. Circadian rhythms of mRNA of vital BA-related nuclear receptors, enzymes, and transporters in livers and ilea were determined in control- and resin-fed mice, as well as in farnesoid X receptor (FXR null mice. The circadian profiles of BAs showed enhanced bacterial dehydroxylation during the fasting phase and efficient hepatic reconjugation of BAs in the fed phase. The resin removed more than 90% of BAs with β-hydroxy groups, such as muricholic acids and ursodeoxycholic acid, from serum and livers, but did not exert as significant influence on CA and CDCA in both compartments. Both resin-fed and FXR-null mouse models indicate that BAs regulate their own biosynthesis through the FXR-regulated ileal fibroblast growth factor 15. BA flux also influences the daily mRNA levels of multiple BA transporters. CONCLUSION: BA concentration and composition exhibit circadian variations in mouse liver and serum, which influences the circadian rhythms of BA metabolizing genes in liver and ileum. The diurnal variations of BAs appear to serve as a signal that coordinates daily nutrient metabolism in mammals.

  1. Elevation of the Yields of Very Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids via Minimal Codon Optimization of Two Key Biosynthetic Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Li, Xueying; Li, Xinzheng; Zheng, Desong; Sun, Quanxi; Liu, Jiang; Li, Yaxiao; Hua, Jinping; Qi, Baoxiu

    2016-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5Δ5,8,11,14,17) and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6Δ4,7,10,13,16,19) are nutritionally beneficial to human health. Transgenic production of EPA and DHA in oilseed crops by transferring genes originating from lower eukaryotes, such as microalgae and fungi, has been attempted in recent years. However, the low yield of EPA and DHA produced in these transgenic crops is a major hurdle for the commercialization of these transgenics. Many factors can negatively affect transgene expression, leading to a low level of converted fatty acid products. Among these the codon bias between the transgene donor and the host crop is one of the major contributing factors. Therefore, we carried out codon optimization of a fatty acid delta-6 desaturase gene PinD6 from the fungus Phytophthora infestans, and a delta-9 elongase gene, IgASE1 from the microalga Isochrysis galbana for expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis respectively. These are the two key genes encoding enzymes for driving the first catalytic steps in the Δ6 desaturation/Δ6 elongation and the Δ9 elongation/Δ8 desaturation pathways for EPA/DHA biosynthesis. Hence expression levels of these two genes are important in determining the final yield of EPA/DHA. Via PCR-based mutagenesis we optimized the least preferred codons within the first 16 codons at their N-termini, as well as the most biased CGC codons (coding for arginine) within the entire sequences of both genes. An expression study showed that transgenic Arabidopsis plants harbouring the codon-optimized IgASE1 contained 64% more elongated fatty acid products than plants expressing the native IgASE1 sequence, whilst Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the codon optimized PinD6 yielded 20 times more desaturated products than yeast expressing wild-type (WT) PinD6. Thus the codon optimization strategy we developed here offers a simple, effective and low-cost alternative to whole gene synthesis for high expression of

  2. Elevation of the Yields of Very Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids via Minimal Codon Optimization of Two Key Biosynthetic Enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xia

    Full Text Available Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5Δ5,8,11,14,17 and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6Δ4,7,10,13,16,19 are nutritionally beneficial to human health. Transgenic production of EPA and DHA in oilseed crops by transferring genes originating from lower eukaryotes, such as microalgae and fungi, has been attempted in recent years. However, the low yield of EPA and DHA produced in these transgenic crops is a major hurdle for the commercialization of these transgenics. Many factors can negatively affect transgene expression, leading to a low level of converted fatty acid products. Among these the codon bias between the transgene donor and the host crop is one of the major contributing factors. Therefore, we carried out codon optimization of a fatty acid delta-6 desaturase gene PinD6 from the fungus Phytophthora infestans, and a delta-9 elongase gene, IgASE1 from the microalga Isochrysis galbana for expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis respectively. These are the two key genes encoding enzymes for driving the first catalytic steps in the Δ6 desaturation/Δ6 elongation and the Δ9 elongation/Δ8 desaturation pathways for EPA/DHA biosynthesis. Hence expression levels of these two genes are important in determining the final yield of EPA/DHA. Via PCR-based mutagenesis we optimized the least preferred codons within the first 16 codons at their N-termini, as well as the most biased CGC codons (coding for arginine within the entire sequences of both genes. An expression study showed that transgenic Arabidopsis plants harbouring the codon-optimized IgASE1 contained 64% more elongated fatty acid products than plants expressing the native IgASE1 sequence, whilst Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the codon optimized PinD6 yielded 20 times more desaturated products than yeast expressing wild-type (WT PinD6. Thus the codon optimization strategy we developed here offers a simple, effective and low-cost alternative to whole gene synthesis for high

  3. Elevation of the Yields of Very Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids via Minimal Codon Optimization of Two Key Biosynthetic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Desong; Sun, Quanxi; Liu, Jiang; Li, Yaxiao; Hua, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5Δ5,8,11,14,17) and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6Δ4,7,10,13,16,19) are nutritionally beneficial to human health. Transgenic production of EPA and DHA in oilseed crops by transferring genes originating from lower eukaryotes, such as microalgae and fungi, has been attempted in recent years. However, the low yield of EPA and DHA produced in these transgenic crops is a major hurdle for the commercialization of these transgenics. Many factors can negatively affect transgene expression, leading to a low level of converted fatty acid products. Among these the codon bias between the transgene donor and the host crop is one of the major contributing factors. Therefore, we carried out codon optimization of a fatty acid delta-6 desaturase gene PinD6 from the fungus Phytophthora infestans, and a delta-9 elongase gene, IgASE1 from the microalga Isochrysis galbana for expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis respectively. These are the two key genes encoding enzymes for driving the first catalytic steps in the Δ6 desaturation/Δ6 elongation and the Δ9 elongation/Δ8 desaturation pathways for EPA/DHA biosynthesis. Hence expression levels of these two genes are important in determining the final yield of EPA/DHA. Via PCR-based mutagenesis we optimized the least preferred codons within the first 16 codons at their N-termini, as well as the most biased CGC codons (coding for arginine) within the entire sequences of both genes. An expression study showed that transgenic Arabidopsis plants harbouring the codon-optimized IgASE1 contained 64% more elongated fatty acid products than plants expressing the native IgASE1 sequence, whilst Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the codon optimized PinD6 yielded 20 times more desaturated products than yeast expressing wild-type (WT) PinD6. Thus the codon optimization strategy we developed here offers a simple, effective and low-cost alternative to whole gene synthesis for high expression of

  4. An MRM-based workflow for absolute quantitation of lysine-acetylated metabolic enzymes in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Leilei; Wang, Fang; Xu, Ying; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Cuiping; Qin, Xue; Yu, Hongxiu; Yang, Pengyuan

    2015-12-07

    As a key post-translational modification mechanism, protein acetylation plays critical roles in regulating and/or coordinating cell metabolism. Acetylation is a prevalent modification process in enzymes. Protein acetylation modification occurs in sub-stoichiometric amounts; therefore extracting biologically meaningful information from these acetylation sites requires an adaptable, sensitive, specific, and robust method for their quantification. In this work, we combine immunoassays and multiple reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) technology to develop an absolute quantification for acetylation modification. With this hybrid method, we quantified the acetylation level of metabolic enzymes, which could demonstrate the regulatory mechanisms of the studied enzymes. The development of this quantitative workflow is a pivotal step for advancing our knowledge and understanding of the regulatory effects of protein acetylation in physiology and pathophysiology.

  5. Comparison between a chimeric lysin ClyH and other enzymes for extracting DNA to detect methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus by quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Hang; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yun; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2016-01-01

    Extracting DNA from Staphylococcus aureus cells is important for detecting MRSA by PCR. However, S. aureus cells are known to be difficult to disrupt due to their compact cell walls. Here, we systematically studied the efficiency of a highly active lysin ClyH for extracting DNA of S. aureus in comparison with commonly used enzymes, such as lysostaphin and achromopeptidase (ACP), and its compatibility in quantitative PCR (qPCR) detection of MRSA. qPCR analysis of S. aureus specific gene femB showed that ClyH was much faster than lysostaphin, ACP and lysozyme for releasing DNA. Five minutes disruption with ClyH at room temperature was enough to release all the DNA from S. aureus. Analysis of the spiked nasal swabs by a dual qPCR assay of the β-lactam resistance mecA gene and the staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCCmec)-open reading frame X (orfX) junction (SCCmec-orfX) after ClyH lysis showed 100% sensitivity and specificity to the commercial BD GeneOhm™ MRSA test with ACP lysis, but the lysis time was reduced from 20 min by ACP to 5 min by ClyH. Our research shows that ClyH could be a better option than the currently used enzymes for DNA extraction from S. aureus, which can provide simpler and faster PCR detection of MRSA.

  6. Lysine and arginine biosyntheses mediated by a common carrier protein in Sulfolobus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Takuya; Tomita, Takeo; Horie, Akira; Yoshida, Ayako; Takahashi, Kento; Nishida, Hiromi; Lassak, Kerstin; Taka, Hikari; Mineki, Reiko; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kosono, Saori; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Masui, Ryoji; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    LysW has been identified as a carrier protein in the lysine biosynthetic pathway that is active through the conversion of α-aminoadipate (AAA) to lysine. In this study, we found that the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, not only biosynthesizes lysine through LysW-mediated protection of AAA but also uses LysW to protect the amino group of glutamate in arginine biosynthesis. In this archaeon, after LysW modification, AAA and glutamate are converted to lysine and ornithine, respectively, by a single set of enzymes with dual functions. The crystal structure of ArgX, the enzyme responsible for modification and protection of the amino moiety of glutamate with LysW, was determined in complex with LysW. Structural comparison and enzymatic characterization using Sulfolobus LysX, Sulfolobus ArgX and Thermus LysX identify the amino acid motif responsible for substrate discrimination between AAA and glutamate. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that gene duplication events at different stages of evolution led to ArgX and LysX.

  7. Determination and identification of estrogenic compounds generated with biosynthetic enzymes using hyphenated screening assays, high resolution mass spectrometry and off-line NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlieger, de J.S.B.; Kolkman, A.J.; Ampt, K.A.M.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Kool, J.; Wijmenga, S.S.; Niessen, W.M.A.; Irth, H.; Honing, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the determination and identification of active and inactive estrogenic compounds produced by biosynthetic methods. A hyphenated screening assay towards the human estrogen receptor ligand binding domain (hER)α and hERβ integrating target–ligand interactions and liquid chromatogra

  8. In vivo roles of fatty acid-biosynthetic enzymes in biosynthesis of biotin and α-lipoic acid in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masato; Nagashima, Takashi; Nakamura, Eri; Kato, Ryosuke; Ohshita, Masakazu; Hayashi, Mikiro; Takeno, Seiki

    2017-07-28

    For fatty acid biosynthesis, Corynebacterium glutamicum uses two type I fatty acid synthases (FAS-I), FasA and FasB, in addition to acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) consisting of AccBC, AccD1, and AccE. The in vivo roles of the enzymes in supplying precursors for biotin and α-lipoic acid remain unclear. Here, we report genetic evidence demonstrating that the biosynthesis of these cofactors is linked to fatty acid biosynthesis through the FAS-I pathway. For this study, we used wild-type C. glutamicum and its derived biotin-vitamer producer BFI-5, which was engineered to express Escherichia coli bioBF and Bacillus subtilis bioI Disruption of either fasA or fasB in strain BFI-5 led to decreased production of biotin-vitamers, whereas its amplification contributed to increased production, with a larger impact of fasA in both cases. Double disruptions of fasA and fasB resulted in no biotin-vitamer production. The acc genes showed a positive effect on production when amplified simultaneously. Augmented fatty acid biosynthesis was also reflected on pimelic acid production when carbon flow was blocked at the BioF reaction. These results indicate that carbon flow down the FAS-I pathway is destined for channeling into the biotin-biosynthetic pathway, and that FasA in particular has a significant impact on precursor supply. In contrast, fasB disruption resulted in auxotrophy for lipoic acid or its precursor octanoic acid in both wild-type and BFI-5 strains. The phenotypes were fully complemented by plasmid-mediated expression of fasB, but not fasA These results reveal that FasB plays a specific physiological role in lipoic acid biosynthesis in C. glutamicumIMPORTANCE For the de novo biosynthesis of fatty acids, C. glutamicum exceptionally uses eukaryotic, multifunctional type I fatty acid synthase (FAS-I) system comprising FasA and FasB, in contrast to most bacteria, such as E. coli and B. subtilis, which use individual, nonaggregating type II fatty acid synthase (FAS-II) system

  9. Biosynthetic labeling of hypusine in mammalian cells. Carbon-hydrogen bond fissions revealed by dual labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, M.H.; Folk, J.E.

    1986-10-25

    Using a dual-label technique in which /sup 3/H- and /sup 14/C-labeled forms of putrescine and of spermidine were employed as biosynthetic precursors of hypusine, two -C-H bond cleavages were detected during production of this unique amino acid in Chinese hamster ovary cells. One of these cleavages occurs at C-1 of the 4-aminobutyl group during its transfer from the secondary amine nitrogen of spermidine to the nitrogen at the epsilon-position of a specific lysine residue in the polypeptide precursor of eukaryotic initiation factor 4D. Breakage of the other -C-H bond takes place at C-2 in this aminobutyl segment after it has been coupled to lysine to form the intermediate deoxyhypusine residue. Hydroxylation at this carbon atom, which constitutes the last step in hypusine biosynthesis, is the cause of bond cleavage. The data obtained are consistent with a notion that no additional -C-H bond fissions occur during hypusine biosynthesis. Our findings permit suggestion of a mechanism for enzymic aminobutyl group transfer in which 4-aminobutyraldehyde produced by oxidative cleavage of spermidine is coupled with the epsilon-amino group of a specific lysine residue to form an enzyme-bound imine intermediate.

  10. Hyperglycemia Induces a Dynamic Cooperativity of Histone Methylase and Demethylase Enzymes Associated With Gene-Activating Epigenetic Marks That Coexist on the Lysine Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasacchio, Daniella; Okabe, Jun; Tikellis, Christos; Balcerczyk, Aneta; George, Prince; Baker, Emma K.; Calkin, Anna C.; Brownlee, Michael; Cooper, Mark E.; El-Osta, Assam

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Results from the Diabetes Control Complications Trial (DCCT) and the subsequent Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) Study and more recently from the U.K. Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) have revealed that the deleterious end-organ effects that occurred in both conventional and more aggressively treated subjects continued to operate >5 years after the patients had returned to usual glycemic control and is interpreted as a legacy of past glycemia known as “hyperglycemic memory.” We have hypothesized that transient hyperglycemia mediates persistent gene-activating events attributed to changes in epigenetic information. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Models of transient hyperglycemia were used to link NFκB-p65 gene expression with H3K4 and H3K9 modifications mediated by the histone methyltransferases (Set7 and SuV39h1) and the lysine-specific demethylase (LSD1) by the immunopurification of soluble NFκB-p65 chromatin. RESULTS The sustained upregulation of the NFκB-p65 gene as a result of ambient or prior hyperglycemia was associated with increased H3K4m1 but not H3K4m2 or H3K4m3. Furthermore, glucose was shown to have other epigenetic effects, including the suppression of H3K9m2 and H3K9m3 methylation on the p65 promoter. Finally, there was increased recruitment of the recently identified histone demethylase LSD1 to the p65 promoter as a result of prior hyperglycemia. CONCLUSIONS These studies indicate that the active transcriptional state of the NFκB-p65 gene is linked with persisting epigenetic marks such as enhanced H3K4 and reduced H3K9 methylation, which appear to occur as a result of effects of the methyl-writing and methyl-erasing histone enzymes. PMID:19208907

  11. 微生物发酵法生产L-赖氨酸的研究进展%Research progress on microbial fermentation of L-lysine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军华

    2012-01-01

    微生物发酵法是目前生产L-赖氨酸最主要的方法.L-赖氨酸生物合成存在两个完全不同的途径:二氨基庚二酸途径和α氨基己二酸途径;分别由不同的酶进行调节,控制L-赖氨酸的合成.笔者概述了L-赖氨酸生产方法、生物合成途径以及合成中关键性酶的调节作用和国内外L-赖氨酸生产菌育种方法的研究进展.%Fermentation was the mainly used method of L-lysine production presently. There were two completely different biosynthesis pathways of L-lysine; heptanedioic acid pathway, and α-amino hexaned-ioic acid pathway. Different enzymes were used to regulate the two pathways and control the synthesis of L-lysine. In this paper, production methods of L-lysine, biosynthetic pathways as well as the regulations of the key enzymes, and the research evolution of the breeding of L-lysine hyper-producer were summarized at home and abroad.

  12. Crystal Structure of the Lysine Riboswitch Regulatory mRNA Element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garst, A.; Heroux, A; Rambo, R; Batey, R

    2008-01-01

    Riboswitches are metabolite-sensitive elements found in mRNAs that control gene expression through a regulatory secondary structural switch. Along with regulation of lysine biosynthetic genes, mutations within the lysine-responsive riboswitch (L-box) play a role in the acquisition of resistance to antimicrobial lysine analogs. To understand the structural basis for lysine binding, we have determined the 2.8{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of lysine bound to the Thermotoga maritima asd lysine riboswitch ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals a complex architecture scaffolding a binding pocket completely enveloping lysine. Mutations conferring antimicrobial resistance cluster around this site as well as highly conserved long range interactions, indicating that they disrupt lysine binding or proper folding of the RNA. Comparison of the free and bound forms by x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and chemical probing reveals almost identical structures, indicating that lysine induces only limited and local conformational changes upon binding.

  13. Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase, the ultimate enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of juvenile hormone III, exhibits substrate control

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report on the cloning, sequencing, characterization, 3D modeling and docking of Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase (AeaJHAMT), the enzyme that converts juvenile hormone acid (JHA) into juvenile hormone (JH). Purified recombinant AeaJHAMT was extensively characterized for enzym...

  14. Engineering a Lysine-ON Riboswitch for Metabolic Control of Lysine Production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-12-18

    Riboswitches are natural RNA elements that regulate gene expression by binding a ligand. Here, we demonstrate the possibility of altering a natural lysine-OFF riboswitch from Eschericia coli (ECRS) to a synthetic lysine-ON riboswitch and using it for metabolic control. To this end, a lysine-ON riboswitch library was constructed using tetA-based dual genetic selection. After screening the library, the functionality of the selected lysine-ON riboswitches was examined using a report gene, lacZ. Selected lysine-ON riboswitches were introduced into the lysE gene (encoding a lysine transport protein) of Corynebacterium glutamicum and used to achieve dynamic control of lysine transport in a recombinant lysine-producing strain, C. glutamicum LPECRS, which bears a deregulated aspartokinase and a lysine-OFF riboswitch for dynamic control of the enzyme citrate synthase. Batch fermentation results of the strains showed that the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain with an additional lysine-ON riboswitch for the control of lysE achieved a 21% increase in the yield of lysine compared to that of the C. glutamicum LPECRS strain and even a 89% increase in yield compared to that of the strain with deregulated aspartokinase. This work provides a useful approach to generate lysine-ON riboswitches for C. glutamicum metabolic engineering and demonstrates for the first time a synergetic effect of lysine-ON and -OFF riboswitches for improving lysine production in this industrially important microorganism. The approach can be used to dynamically control other genes and can be applied to other microorganisms.

  15. Potential of Synechocystis PCC 6803 as a novel cyanobacterial chassis for heterologous expression of enzymes in the trans-resveratrol biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantong, Supaluk; Incharoensakdi, Aran; Sirikantaramas, Supaart; Lindblad, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Selected model strains of phototrophic cyanobacteria have been genetically engineered for heterologous expression of numerous enzymes. In the present study, we initially explored the heterologous expression of enzymes involved in trans-resveratrol production, namely, the production of tyrosine ammonia-lyase, coumaroyl CoA-ligase, and stilbene synthase, in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803. Under the promoters Ptrc1Ocore and Ptrc1O, the respective genes were transcribed and translated into the corresponding soluble proteins at concentrations of 16-34 μg L(-1). The expression levels of these enzymes did not affect the growth rate of the cyanobacterial cells. Interestingly, coumaroyl CoA-ligase expression slightly increased the chlorophyll a content of the cells. Overall, our results suggest that the complete pathway of trans-resveratrol production can be engineered in Synechocystis PCC 6803. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Probing China's Lysine Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The lysine sector in China developed further in 2006. Both the capacity and the output hit new highs and China had a major impact on the global lysine market. The import amount of lysine satisfied only a very small portion of the domestic market's demand.

  17. Identification of structural determinants of NAD(P)H selectivity and lysine binding in lysine N(6)-monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahab, Heba; Robinson, Reeder; Rodriguez, Pedro; Adly, Camelia; El-Sohaimy, Sohby; Sobrado, Pablo

    2016-09-15

    l-lysine (l-Lys) N(6)-monooxygenase (NbtG), from Nocardia farcinica, is a flavin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of l-Lys in the presence of oxygen and NAD(P)H in the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophore nocobactin. NbtG displays only a 3-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, different from well-characterized related enzymes, which are highly selective for NADPH. The structure of NbtG with bound NAD(P)(+) or l-Lys is currently not available. Herein, we present a mutagenesis study targeting M239, R301, and E216. These amino acids are conserved and located in either the NAD(P)H binding domain or the l-Lys binding pocket. M239R resulted in high production of hydrogen peroxide and little hydroxylation with no change in coenzyme selectivity. R301A caused a 300-fold decrease on kcat/Km value with NADPH but no change with NADH. E216Q increased the Km value for l-Lys by 30-fold with very little change on the kcat value or in the binding of NAD(P)H. These results suggest that R301 plays a major role in NADPH selectivity by interacting with the 2'-phosphate of the adenine-ribose moiety of NADPH, while E216 plays a role in l-Lys binding.

  18. (—) S-adenosyl-L-methionine-magnesium Protoporphyrin Methyltransferase, an Enzyme in the Biosynthetic Pathway of Chlorophyll in Zea mays 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmer, Richard J.; Bogorad, Lawrence

    1967-01-01

    The enzyme (—) S-adenosyl-L-methionine-magnesium protoporphyrin methyltransferase, which catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from (—) S-adenosyl-L-methionine to magnesium protoporphyrin to form magnesium protoporphyrin monomethyl ester, has been detected in chloroplasts isolated from Zea mays. Zinc protoporphyrin and free protoporphyrin also act as substrates in the system, although neither one is as active as magnesium protoporphyrin. The following scheme of chlorophyll synthesis in higher plants is proposed: δ-aminolevulinic acid → → → protoporphyrin → magnesium protoporphyrin → magnesium protoporphyrin monomethyl ester → → → chlorophyll a. PMID:6045301

  19. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  20. Branched-chain amino acids inhibit the TGF-beta-induced down-regulation of taurine biosynthetic enzyme cysteine dioxygenase in HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Asami; Ishizaki, Sonoko; Takehana, Kenji; Fujitani, Shoji; Sonaka, Ichiro; Satsu, Hideo; Shimizu, Makoto

    2014-05-01

    Taurine deficiency has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis and complications of advanced hepatic diseases. The molecular basis for a low level of taurine associated with hepatic failure is largely unknown. Using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced cirrhotic rat model, we found that the activity and expression of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO), a rate-limiting enzyme in taurine synthesis, were significantly decreased in the liver of these rats. To investigate the underlying mechanisms for the suppression, we examined the effects of pathological cytokines on CDO expression in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Among the several cytokines, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), one of the key mediators of fibrogenesis, suppressed Cdo1 gene transcription through the MEK/ERK pathway. Finally, we further examined potential effects of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) on CDO expression, as it has been reported that oral BCAA supplementation increased plasma taurine level in the patients with liver cirrhosis. BCAA, especially leucine, promoted Cdo1 gene transcription, and attenuated TGF-β-mediated suppression of Cdo1 gene expression. These results indicate that the low plasma level of taurine in advanced hepatic disease is due to decreased hepatic CDO expression, which can be partly attributed to suppressive effect of TGF-β on Cdo1 gene transcription. Furthermore, our observation that BCAA promotes Cdo1 expression suggests that BCAA may be therapeutically useful to improve hepatic taurine metabolism and further suppress dysfunctions associated with low level of taurine in hepatic diseases.

  1. An update on histone lysine methylation in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yu; Zhongyuan Bu; Wen-Hui Shen; Aiwu Dong

    2009-01-01

    Histone methylation plays crucial roles in epigenetic regulation.The SET domain proteins are now recognized as generally having methyltransferase activity targeted to specific lysine residues of histones.The enzymes and their specific histone lysine methylation have enormous impacts on the regulation of chromatin structure and function.In this review,we discuss recent advances made on histone lysine methylations and their diverse functions in plant growth and development.

  2. The Simultaneous Repression of CCR and CAD, Two Enzymes of the Lignin Biosynthetic Pathway, Results in Sterility and Dwarfism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johanne Thévenin; Brigitte Pollet; Bruno Letarnec; Luc Saulnier; Lionel Gissot; Alessandra Maia-Grondard; Catherine Lapierre; Lise Jouanina

    2011-01-01

    Cinnamoyl CoA reductase(CCR)and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase(CAD)catalyze the last steps of monolignol biosynthesis.In Arabidopsis,one CCR gene(CCR1,At1g15950)and two CAD genes(CAD C At3g19450 and CAD D At4g34230)are involved in this pathway.A triple cad c cad d ccr1 mutant,named ccc,was obtained.This mutant displays a severe dwarf phenotype and male sterility.The lignin content in ccc mature stems is reduced to 50% of the wild-type level.In addition,stem lignin structure is severely affected,as shown by the dramatic enrichment in resistant inter-unit bonds and incorporation into the polymer of monolignol precursors such as coniferaldehyde,sinapaldehyde,and ferulic acid.Male sterility is due to the lack of lignification in the anther endothecium,which causes the failure of anther dehiscence and of pollen release.The ccc hypolignified stems accumulate higher amounts of flavonol glycosides,sinapoyl malate and feruloyl malate,which suggests a redirection of the phenolic pathway.Therefore,the absence of CAD and CCR,key enzymes of the monolignol pathway,has more severe consequences on the phenotype than the individual absence of each of them.Induction of another CCR(CCR2,At1g80820)and another CAD(CAD1,At4g39330)does not compensate the absence of the main CCR and CAD activities.This lack of CCR and CAD activities not only impacts lignification,but also severely affects the development of the plants.These consequences must be carefully considered when trying to reduce the lignin content of plants in order to facilitate the lignocellulose-to-bioethanol conversion process.

  3. Elucidating the effects of arginine and lysine on a monoclonal antibody C-terminal lysine variation in CHO cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xintao; Tang, Hongping; Sun, Ya-Ting; Liu, Xuping; Tan, Wen-Song; Fan, Li

    2015-08-01

    C-terminal lysine variants are commonly observed in monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and found sensitive to process conditions, especially specific components in culture medium. The potential roles of media arginine (Arg) and lysine (Lys) in mAb heavy chain C-terminal lysine processing were investigated by monitoring the lysine variant levels under various Arg and Lys concentrations. Both Arg and Lys were found to significantly affect lysine variant level. Specifically, lysine variant level increased from 18.7 to 31.8 % when Arg and Lys concentrations were increased from 2 to 10 mM. Since heterogeneity of C-terminal lysine residues is due to the varying degree of proteolysis by basic carboxypeptidases (Cps), enzyme (basic Cps) level, pH conditions, and product (Arg and Lys) inhibition, which potentially affect the enzymatic reaction, were investigated under various Arg and Lys conditions. Enzyme level and pH conditions were found not to account for the different lysine variant levels, which was evident from the minimal variation in transcription level and intracellular pH. On the other hand, product inhibition effect of Arg and Lys on basic Cps was evident from the notable intracellular and extracellular Arg and Lys concentrations comparable with Ki values (inhibition constant) of basic Cps and further confirmed by cell-free assays. Additionally, a kinetic study of lysine variant level during the cell culture process enabled further characterization of the C-terminal lysine processing.

  4. Biosynthetic inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi

    2006-08-25

    Inorganic chemistry and biology can benefit greatly from each other. Although synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry have been greatly successful in clarifying the role of metal ions in biological systems, the time may now be right to utilize biological systems to advance coordination chemistry. One such example is the use of small, stable, easy-to-make, and well-characterized proteins as ligands to synthesize novel inorganic compounds. This biosynthetic inorganic chemistry is possible thanks to a number of developments in biology. This review summarizes the progress in the synthesis of close models of complex metalloproteins, followed by a description of recent advances in using the approach for making novel compounds that are unprecedented in either inorganic chemistry or biology. The focus is mainly on synthetic "tricks" learned from biology, as well as novel structures and insights obtained. The advantages and disadvantages of this biosynthetic approach are discussed.

  5. Effect of dietary lysine on hepatic lysine catabolism in broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysine is frequently a first- or second-limiting amino acid in poultry diets. Improving the efficiency of lysine use for protein synthesis would effectively lower the lysine requirement and decrease feed costs. Understanding how lysine is degraded and how the degradation is regulated would identif...

  6. Identification by heterologous expression and gene disruption of VisA as L-lysine 2-aminotransferase essential for virginiamycin S biosynthesis in Streptomyces virginiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namwat, Wises; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Nihira, Takuya

    2002-09-01

    The visA gene of Streptomyces virginiae has been thought to be a part of the virginiamycin S (VS) biosynthetic gene cluster based on its location in the middle of genes that encode enzymes highly similar to those participating in the biosynthesis of streptogramin-type antibiotics. Heterologous expression of the visA gene was achieved in Escherichia coli by an N-terminal fusion with thioredoxin (TrxA), and the intact recombinant VisA protein (rVisA) was purified after cleavage with enterokinase to remove the TrxA moiety. The purified rVisA showed clear L-lysine 2-aminotransferase activity with an optimum pH of around 8.0 and an optimum temperature at 35 degrees C, with 2-oxohexanoate as the best amino acceptor, indicating that VisA converts L-lysine into Delta(1)-piperidine 2-carboxylic acid. A visA deletion mutant of S. virginiae was created by homologous recombination, and the in vivo function of the visA gene was studied by phenotypic comparison between the wild type and the visA deletion mutant. No differences in growth in liquid media or in morphological behavior on solid media were observed, indicating that visA is not involved in primary metabolism or morphological differentiation. However, the visA mutant failed to produce VS while maintaining the production of virginiamycin M(1) at a level comparable to that of the parental wild-type strain, demonstrating that visA is essential to VS biosynthesis. These results, together with the observed recovery of the defect in VS production by the external addition of 3-hydroxypicolinic acid (3-HPA), a starter molecule in VS biosynthesis, suggest that VisA is the first enzyme of the VS biosynthetic pathway and that it supplies 3-HPA from L-lysine.

  7. l-lysine production by Bacillus methanolicus: Genome-based mutational analysis and l-lysine secretion engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nærdal, Ingemar; Netzer, Roman; Irla, Marta; Krog, Anne; Heggeset, Tonje Marita Bjerkan; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve

    2017-02-20

    Bacillus methanolicus is a methylotrophic bacterium with an increasing interest in academic research and for biotechnological applications. This bacterium was previously applied for methanol-based production of l-glutamate, l-lysine and the five-carbon diamine cadaverine by wild type, classical mutant and recombinant strains. The genomes of two different l-lysine secreting B. methanolicus classical mutant strains, NOA2#13A52-8A66 and M168-20, were sequenced. We focused on mutational mapping in genes present in l-lysine and other relevant amino acid biosynthetic pathways, as well as in the primary cell metabolism important for precursor supply. In addition to mutations in the aspartate pathway genes dapG, lysA and hom-1, new mutational target genes like alr, proA, proB1, leuC, odhA and pdhD were identified. Surprisingly, no mutations were found in the putative l-lysine transporter gene lysE(MGA3). Inspection of the wild type B. methanolicus strain PB1 genome sequence identified two homologous putative l-lysine transporter genes, lysE(PB1) and lysE2(PB1). The biological role of these putative l-lysine transporter genes, together with the heterologous l-lysine exporter gene lysE(Cg) from Corynebacterium glutamicum, were therefore investigated. Our results demonstrated that the titer of secreted l-lysine in B. methanolicus was significantly increased by overexpression of lysE(Cg) while overexpression of lysE(MGA3), lysE(PB1) and lysE2(PB1) had no measurable effect.

  8. Lysine methylation: beyond histones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Zhang; Hong Wen; Xiaobing Shi

    2012-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of histone proteins,such as acetylation,methylation,phosphorylation,and ubiquitylation,play essential roles in regulating chromatin dynamics.Combinations of different modifications on the histone proteins,termed 'histone code' in many cases,extend the information potential of the genetic code by regulating DNA at the epigenetic level.Many PTMs occur on non-histone proteins as well as histones,regulating protein-protein interactions,stability,localization,and/or enzymatic activities of proteins involved in diverse cellular processes.Although protein phosphorylation,ubiquitylation,and acetylation have been extensively studied,only a few proteins other than histones have been reported that can be modified by lysine methylation.This review summarizes the current progress on lysine methylation of nonhistone proteins,and we propose that lysine methylation,like phosphorylation and acetylation,is a common PTM that regulates proteins in diverse cellular processes.

  9. Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoes, J.C.; Sandmann, G.; Visser, H.; Diaz, M.; Mossel, van M.; Ooyen, van A.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The crtYB locus was used as an integrative platform for the construction of specific carotenoid biosynthetic mutants in the astaxanthin-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The crtYB gene of X. dendrorhous, encoding a chimeric carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme, could be inactivated by both si

  10. Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoes, J.C.; Sandmann, G.; Visser, H.; Diaz, M.; Mossel, van M.; Ooyen, van A.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The crtYB locus was used as an integrative platform for the construction of specific carotenoid biosynthetic mutants in the astaxanthin-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The crtYB gene of X. dendrorhous, encoding a chimeric carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme, could be inactivated by both

  11. Histone acetyltransferases: challenges in targeting bi-substrate enzymes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wapenaar, Hannah; Dekker, Frank J

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are epigenetic enzymes that install acetyl groups onto lysine residues of cellular proteins such as histones, transcription factors, nuclear receptors, and enzymes...

  12. Seed-Specific Expression of a Lysine-Rich Protein Gene, GhLRP, from Cotton Significantly Increases the Lysine Content in Maize Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yue

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maize seed storage proteins are a major source of human and livestock consumption. However, these proteins have poor nutritional value, because they are deficient in lysine and tryptophan. Much research has been done to elevate the lysine content by reducing zein content or regulating the activities of key enzymes in lysine metabolism. Using the naturally lysine-rich protein genes, sb401 and SBgLR, from potato, we previously increased the lysine and protein contents of maize seeds. Here, we examined another natural lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton, which increased the lysine content of transgenic maize seeds at levels varying from 16.2% to 65.0% relative to the wild-type. The total protein content was not distinctly different, except in the six transgenic lines. The lipid and starch levels did not differ substantially in Gossypium hirsutum L. lysine-rich protein (GhLRP transgenic kernels when compared to wild-type. The agronomic characteristics of all the transgenic maize were also normal. GhLRP is a high-lysine protein candidate gene for increasing the lysine content of maize. This study provided a valuable model system for improving maize lysine content.

  13. Seed-specific expression of a lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton significantly increases the lysine content in maize seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jing; Li, Cong; Zhao, Qian; Zhu, Dengyun; Yu, Jingjuan

    2014-03-27

    Maize seed storage proteins are a major source of human and livestock consumption. However, these proteins have poor nutritional value, because they are deficient in lysine and tryptophan. Much research has been done to elevate the lysine content by reducing zein content or regulating the activities of key enzymes in lysine metabolism. Using the naturally lysine-rich protein genes, sb401 and SBgLR, from potato, we previously increased the lysine and protein contents of maize seeds. Here, we examined another natural lysine-rich protein gene, GhLRP, from cotton, which increased the lysine content of transgenic maize seeds at levels varying from 16.2% to 65.0% relative to the wild-type. The total protein content was not distinctly different, except in the six transgenic lines. The lipid and starch levels did not differ substantially in Gossypium hirsutum L. lysine-rich protein (GhLRP) transgenic kernels when compared to wild-type. The agronomic characteristics of all the transgenic maize were also normal. GhLRP is a high-lysine protein candidate gene for increasing the lysine content of maize. This study provided a valuable model system for improving maize lysine content.

  14. Characterization and crystal structure of lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase (cDHDPS) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Elena A; Bannon, Gary A; Glenn, Kevin C; Jeong, Soon Seog; Sturman, Eric J; Rydel, Timothy J

    2008-12-15

    The lysine insensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum dihydrodipicolinate synthase enzyme (cDHDPS) was recently successfully introduced into maize plants to enhance the level of lysine in the grain. To better understand lysine insensitivity of the cDHDPS, we expressed, purified, kinetically characterized the protein, and solved its X-ray crystal structure. The cDHDPS enzyme has a fold and overall structure that is highly similar to other DHDPS proteins. A noteworthy feature of the active site is the evidence that the catalytic lysine residue forms a Schiff base adduct with pyruvate. Analyses of the cDHDPS structure in the vicinity of the putative binding site for S-lysine revealed that the allosteric binding site in the Escherichia coli DHDPS protein does not exist in cDHDPS due to three non-conservative amino acids substitutions, and this is likely why cDHDPS is not feedback inhibited by lysine.

  15. Lysine Acetylation and Deacetylation in Brain Development and Neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Tapias

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic development is critical for the final functionality and maintenance of the adult brain. Brain development is tightly regulated by intracellular and extracellular signaling. Lysine acetylation and deacetylation are posttranslational modifications that are able to link extracellular signals to intracellular responses. A wealth of evidence indicates that lysine acetylation and deacetylation are critical for brain development and functionality. Indeed, mutations of the enzymes and cofactors responsible for these processes are often associated with neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Lysine acetylation and deacetylation are involved in all levels of brain development, starting from neuroprogenitor survival and proliferation, cell fate decisions, neuronal maturation, migration, and synaptogenesis, as well as differentiation and maturation of astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, to the establishment of neuronal circuits. Hence, fluctuations in the balance between lysine acetylation and deacetylation contribute to the final shape and performance of the brain. In this review, we summarize the current basic knowledge on the specific roles of lysine acetyltransferase (KAT and lysine deacetylase (KDAC complexes in brain development and the different neurodevelopmental disorders that are associated with dysfunctional lysine (deacetylation machineries.

  16. Pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Baccillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, B W; Kelleher, R J; Gooder, H

    1975-08-01

    Biochemical and genetic data were obtained from a series of 51 Pyr- strains of Bacillus subtilis. The observed enzymatic deficiencies allowed the mutants to be placed into 12 clases, some of which represent defects in more than one of the six known pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes. Mapping analysis by transformation has shown that all the Pyr- mutations are located in a single small area of the B. subtilis genome. A correlation of the biochemical defects and the genetic data has been made. Those mutations conferring similar enzymatic deficiencies were found to be contiguous on the B. subtilis map. Regulatory aspects of the pyrimidine pathway have also been investigated and are compared to previously reported results from other organisms. Evidence is presented which bears upon the possible physical association of the first three enzymes and the association of at least some of the enzymes of this pathway with particulate elements of the cell. A model for the organization of the enzymes is presented with dihydroorotate dehydrogenase as the central enzyme in a proposed aggregate.

  17. Monitoring lysin motif-ligand interactions via tryptophan analog fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Dejan M; Leenhouts, Kees; van Roosmalen, Maarten L; Kleinjan, Fenneke; Broos, Jaap

    2012-09-15

    The lysin motif (LysM) is a peptidoglycan binding protein domain found in a wide range of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Various techniques have been used to study the LysM-ligand interaction, but a sensitive spectroscopic method to directly monitor this interaction has not been reported. Here a tryptophan analog fluorescence spectroscopy approach is presented to monitor the LysM-ligand interaction using the LysM of the N-acetylglucosaminidase enzyme of Lactococcus lactis. A three-dimensional model of this LysM protein was built based on available structural information of a homolog. This model allowed choosing the amino acid positions to be labeled with a Trp analog. Four functional single-Trp LysM mutants and one double-Trp LysM mutant were constructed and biosynthetically labeled with 7-azatryptophan or 5-hydroxytryptophan. These Trp analogs feature red-shifted absorption spectra, enabling the monitoring of the LysM-ligand interaction in media with a Trp background. The emission intensities of four of the five LysM constructs were found to change markedly on exposure to either L. lactis bacterium-like particles or peptidoglycan as ligands. The method reported here is suitable to monitor LysM-ligand interactions at (sub)micromolar LysM concentrations and can be used for the detection of low levels of peptidoglycan or microbes in solutions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. New biosynthetic pathway for pink pigments from uncultured oceanic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann, Benjamin; Béjà, Oded; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2016-12-01

    The pink open-chain tetrapyrrole pigment phycoerythrobilin (PEB) is employed by marine cyanobacteria, red algae and cryptophytes as a light-harvesting chromophore in phycobiliproteins. Genes encoding biosynthesis proteins for PEB have also been discovered in cyanophages, viruses that infect cyanobacteria, and mimic host pigment biosynthesis with the exception of PebS which combines the enzymatic activities of two host enzymes. In this study, we have identified novel members of the PEB biosynthetic enzyme families, heme oxygenases and ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductases. Encoding genes were found in metagenomic datasets and could be traced back to bacteriophage but not cyanophage origin. While the heme oxygenase exhibited standard activity, a new bilin reductase with highest homology to the teal pigment producing enzyme PcyA revealed PEB biosynthetic activity. Although PcyX possesses PebS-like activity both enzymes share only 9% sequence identity and likely catalyze the reaction via two independent mechanisms. Our data point towards the presence of phycobilin biosynthetic genes in phages that probably infect alphaproteobacteria and, therefore, further support a role of phycobilins outside oxygenic phototrophs.

  19. Optimization of lysine metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Jakob Vang

    the project intends to eliminate. PGI catalyzes the conversion of alpha-D-glucose-6-phosphate to fructose-6-phosphate just downstream of the branch in the glycolysis, but it also catalyzes the reverse reaction. It is unknown whether up- or down-regulation of the pgi is required to increase the flux through......, and increased NADPH availability is therefore a potential way to enhance lysine production. The generation of NADPH is mainly located in the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Using the genome scale model the phosphoglucoisomerase enzyme (PGI) has been identified as a possible bottleneck in the metabolism, which...

  20. Reducing AsA leads to leaf lesion and defence response in knock-down of the AsA biosynthetic enzyme GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase gene in tomato plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chanjuan; Ouyang, Bo; Yang, Changxian; Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Yuyang; Zhang, Junhong; Li, Hanxia; Ye, Zhibiao

    2013-01-01

    As a vital antioxidant, L-ascorbic acid (AsA) affects diverse biological processes in higher plants. Lack of AsA in cell impairs plant development. In the present study, we manipulated a gene of GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase which catalyzes the conversion of D-mannose-1-P to GDP-D-mannose in AsA biosynthetic pathway and found out the phenotype alteration of tomato. In the tomato genome, there are four members of GMP gene family and they constitutively expressed in various tissues in distinct expression patterns. As expected, over-expression of SlGMP3 increased total AsA contents and enhanced the tolerance to oxidative stress in tomato. On the contrary, knock-down of SlGMP3 significantly decreased AsA contents below the threshold level and altered the phenotype of tomato plants with lesions and further senescence. Further analysis indicated the causes for this symptom could result from failing to instantly deplete the reactive oxygen species (ROS) as decline of free radical scavenging activity. More ROS accumulated in the leaves and then triggered expressions of defence-related genes and mimic symptom occurred on the leaves similar to hypersensitive responses against pathogens. Consequently, the photosynthesis of leaves was dramatically fallen. These results suggested the vital roles of AsA as an antioxidant in leaf function and defence response of tomato.

  1. Reducing AsA leads to leaf lesion and defence response in knock-down of the AsA biosynthetic enzyme GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase gene in tomato plant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjuan Zhang

    Full Text Available As a vital antioxidant, L-ascorbic acid (AsA affects diverse biological processes in higher plants. Lack of AsA in cell impairs plant development. In the present study, we manipulated a gene of GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase which catalyzes the conversion of D-mannose-1-P to GDP-D-mannose in AsA biosynthetic pathway and found out the phenotype alteration of tomato. In the tomato genome, there are four members of GMP gene family and they constitutively expressed in various tissues in distinct expression patterns. As expected, over-expression of SlGMP3 increased total AsA contents and enhanced the tolerance to oxidative stress in tomato. On the contrary, knock-down of SlGMP3 significantly decreased AsA contents below the threshold level and altered the phenotype of tomato plants with lesions and further senescence. Further analysis indicated the causes for this symptom could result from failing to instantly deplete the reactive oxygen species (ROS as decline of free radical scavenging activity. More ROS accumulated in the leaves and then triggered expressions of defence-related genes and mimic symptom occurred on the leaves similar to hypersensitive responses against pathogens. Consequently, the photosynthesis of leaves was dramatically fallen. These results suggested the vital roles of AsA as an antioxidant in leaf function and defence response of tomato.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus westerdijkiae Reveals the Putative Biosynthetic Gene Cluster of Ochratoxin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabortti, Alolika; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a common mycotoxin that contaminates food and agricultural products. Sequencing of the complete genome of Aspergillus westerdijkiae, a major producer of OTA, reveals more than 50 biosynthetic gene clusters, including a putative OTA biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes a dozen of enzymes, transporters, and regulatory proteins. PMID:27635003

  3. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the biosynthetic N-acetylornithine aminotransferases from Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaram, V.; Prasad, K.; Ratna Prasuna, P.; Ramachandra, N.; Bharath, S. R. [Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Savithri, H. S. [Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Murthy, M. R. N., E-mail: mrn@mbu.iisc.ernet.in [Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2006-10-01

    Acetylornithine aminotransferases, members of the type I subgroup II family of PLP-dependent enzymes, from S. typhimurium and E. coli have been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Acetylornithine aminotransferase (AcOAT) is a type I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent enzyme catalyzing the conversion of N-acetylglutamic semialdehyde to N-acetylornithine in the presence of α-ketoglutarate, a step involved in arginine metabolism. In Escherichia coli, the biosynthetic AcOAT also catalyzes the conversion of N-succinyl-l-2-amino-6-oxopimelate to N-succinyl-l,l-diaminopimelate, one of the steps in lysine biosynthesis. It is closely related to ornithine aminotransferase. AcOAT was cloned from Salmonella typhimurium and E. coli, overexpressed in E. coli and purified using Ni–NTA affinity column chromatography. The enzymes crystallized in the presence of gabaculine. Crystals of E. coli AcOAT (eAcOAT) only diffracted X-rays to 3.5 Å and were twinned. The crystals of S. typhimurium AcOAT (sAcOAT) diffracted to 1.9 Å and had a dimer in the asymmetric unit. The structure of sAcOAT was solved by the molecular-replacement method.

  4. Structures of Bacterial Biosynthetic Arginine Decarboxylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F Forouhar; S Lew; J Seetharaman; R Xiao; T Acton; G Montelione; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC; also known as SpeA) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of polyamines from arginine in bacteria and plants. SpeA is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and shares weak sequence homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases. Here, the crystal structure of PLP-bound SpeA from Campylobacter jejuni is reported at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution and that of Escherichia coli SpeA in complex with a sulfate ion is reported at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the SpeA monomer contains two large domains, an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain followed by a {beta}-sandwich domain, as well as two smaller helical domains. The TIM-barrel and {beta}-sandwich domains share structural homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases, even though the sequence conservation among these enzymes is less than 25%. A similar tetramer is observed for both C. jejuni and E. coli SpeA, composed of two dimers of tightly associated monomers. The active site of SpeA is located at the interface of this dimer and is formed by residues from the TIM-barrel domain of one monomer and a highly conserved loop in the {beta}-sandwich domain of the other monomer. The PLP cofactor is recognized by hydrogen-bonding, {pi}-stacking and van der Waals interactions.

  5. Identification and expression analysis of chitin synthase and related enzymes in the chitin biosynthetic pathway genes of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis%稻纵卷叶螟几丁质合成酶及合成通路相关酶基因的鉴定及表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余海中; 黄克慧; 汪婉玲; 刘明辉; 杨鑫; 张彦; 徐家萍

    2015-01-01

    [Objectives] The rice leaf folder, Cnaphalocrocis medinalis (Guenee), is one of four rice pest insects that cause serious crop damage. In recent years, chitin synthesis and metabolism has become a focus of pest control research. Cloning and spatio-temporal expression of two chitin synthases, and other two key enzymes in the chitin biosynthetic pathway encoding genes in C. medinalis, were conducted to reveal the function of these genes. [Methods] Based on transcriptome data, we used the PCR and RACE techniques to clone the full length cDNA sequences of 4 key enzymes in the chitin biosynthetic pathway. Prediction of the structure, sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the products of these 4 genes were performed using different bioinformatics software. The relative expression levels of the 4 genes in different developmental stages and larval tissues of C. medinalis were determined with quantitative Real-time PCR. [Results] Two full-length cDNA sequences encoding chitin synthase, and two full-length cDNA sequences encoding other two key enzymes related to the chitin biosynthetic pathway, were obtained. These were; Chitin Synthase A (CHSA), Chitin Synthase B (CHSB), Phosphoacetylglucosamine Mutase (PGM) and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase (UAP) (hereafter CmCHSA, CmCHSB, CmPGM and CmUAP, respectively). Sequence analysis shows that the full length of the CmCHSA gene is 4 868 bp, which encodes a polypeptide of 1 564 amino acids, the full length of the CmCHSB gene is 4 651 bp, which encodes a polypeptide of 1 525 amino acids, the full length of CmPGM gene is 1 934 bp, which encodes a polypeptide of 548 amino acids, and the full length of CmUAP gene is 1 837 bp, which encodes a polypeptide of 487 amino acids. The results of RT-qPCR indicate that CmUAP and CmPGM had higher expression in hemolymph, whereas CmCHSA was more highly expressed in the head and integument than the midgut and CmCHSB was more highly expressed in the midgut than in other tissues

  6. Bioinformatic analysis of an unusual gene-enzyme relationship in the arginine biosynthetic pathway among marine gamma proteobacteria: implications concerning the formation of N-acetylated intermediates in prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labedan Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The N-acetylation of L-glutamate is regarded as a universal metabolic strategy to commit glutamate towards arginine biosynthesis. Until recently, this reaction was thought to be catalyzed by either of two enzymes: (i the classical N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS, gene argA first characterized in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa several decades ago and also present in vertebrates, or (ii the bifunctional version of ornithine acetyltransferase (OAT, gene argJ present in Bacteria, Archaea and many Eukaryotes. This paper focuses on a new and surprising aspect of glutamate acetylation. We recently showed that in Moritella abyssi and M. profunda, two marine gamma proteobacteria, the gene for the last enzyme in arginine biosynthesis (argH is fused to a short sequence that corresponds to the C-terminal, N-acetyltransferase-encoding domain of NAGS and is able to complement an argA mutant of E. coli. Very recently, other authors identified in Mycobacterium tuberculosis an independent gene corresponding to this short C-terminal domain and coding for a new type of NAGS. We have investigated the two prokaryotic Domains for patterns of gene-enzyme relationships in the first committed step of arginine biosynthesis. Results The argH-A fusion, designated argH(A, and discovered in Moritella was found to be present in (and confined to marine gamma proteobacteria of the Alteromonas- and Vibrio-like group. Most of them have a classical NAGS with the exception of Idiomarina loihiensis and Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis which nevertheless can grow in the absence of arginine and therefore appear to rely on the arg(A sequence for arginine biosynthesis. Screening prokaryotic genomes for virtual argH-X 'fusions' where X stands for a homologue of arg(A, we retrieved a large number of Bacteria and several Archaea, all of them devoid of a classical NAGS. In the case of Thermus thermophilus and Deinococcus radiodurans, the arg(A-like sequence

  7. Identification and functional expression of a type 2 acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT2) in developing castor bean seeds which has high homology to the major triglyceride biosynthetic enzyme of fungi and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Johan T M; Wei, Wenxue; Simon, William J; Slabas, Antoni R

    2006-12-01

    Seed oil from castor bean (Ricinus communis) contains high amounts of hydroxy fatty acid rich triacylglycerols (TAGs) that can serve as raw material for production of bio-based products such as nylon, cosmetics, lubricants, foams, and surfactants. Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) catalyses the terminal reaction in the acyl-CoA dependent Kennedy pathway of triglyceride biosynthesis. There is still some debate whether there are three or four enzymes in yeast that have DGAT activity and catalyse the synthesis of TAG but of these the DGAT2 homologue Dga1 contributes in a major way to TAG biosynthesis. Here we report on the cloning of a cDNA for DGAT2 from castor bean and prove its biological activity following expression in yeast and enzymatic assays using diricinolein as the acceptor and ricinoleoyl-CoA as the donor. Previous reports of DGAT in castor have focussed on DGAT1 which has little amino acid sequence homology to DGAT2. Expressional studies demonstrate that DGAT2 is 18-fold more highly expressed in seeds than in leaves and shows temporal specific expression during seed development. In contrast, DGAT1 shows little difference in expression in seeds versus leaves. We conclude that in castor bean DGAT2 is more likely to play a major role in seed TAG biosynthesis than DGAT1.

  8. Digestible lysine requirements of broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEP Bernal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern broilers have been submitted to continuous genetic improvement, and therefore, their nutritional requirements must be constantly updated to ensure their performance. Two experiments were carried out to evaluate different digestible lysine levels for starter (1021 days and grower (22-35 days phases. The experiments were carried out with male and female Cobb 500 broilers, distributed according to a randomized block experimental design in a 5x2 factorial arrangement (5 increasing digestible lysine levels x 2 sexes, totaling 10 treatments, with 8 replicates of 22 and 20 birds during the starter and grower phase, respectively. Digestible lysine levels of 1.06, 1.12, 1.18, 1.24, and 1.30 were used in the starter diets (10-21 days and 0.9, 0.98, 1.04, 1.10, and 1.16% in the grower diets (22-35 days. Based on the statistical analyses of the evaluated performance parameters, digestible lysine requirements for maximum performance were determined as 1.22% for males and 1.24% for females in the starter phase, and 1.16% for both sexes in the grower phase. Carcass and performance results indicate that digestible lysine requirements vary with sex and evaluated production parameter. Considering the most relevant broiler production parameters, in 22- to 35-d-old males, digestible lysine requirement for breast meat yield (1.16% was higher than those for feed conversion ratio (1.07% and weight gain (1.05%.

  9. Lysine metabolism in antisense C-hordein barley grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Daiana; Rizzi, Vanessa; Gaziola, Salete A

    2015-01-01

    ) and five antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines. Considering the amounts of soluble and protein-bound aspartate-derived amino acids together with the analysis of key enzymes of aspartate metabolic pathway, we suggest that the C-hordein suppression did not only alter the metabolism of at least one......The grain proteins of barley are deficient in lysine and threonine due to their low concentrations in the major storage protein class, the hordeins, especially in the C-hordein subgroup. Previously produced antisense C-hordein transgenic barley lines have an improved amino acid composition......, with increased lysine, methionine and threonine contents. The objective of the study was to investigate the possible changes in the regulation of key enzymes of the aspartate metabolic pathway and the contents of aspartate-derived amino acids in the nontransgenic line (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Golden Promise...

  10. Expansion of the Lysine Acylation Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christian A.

    2012-01-01

    Leaving marks: The number of known posttranslational modifications for lysine has been expanded considerably. In addition to acetylation of side-chain amino functionalities of lysine residues in proteins, crotonylation, succinylation, and malonylation have now been identified as posttranslational...

  11. Discovery of Unclustered Fungal Indole Diterpene Biosynthetic Pathways through Combinatorial Pathway Reassembly in Engineered Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Man-Cheng; Lin, Hsiao-Ching; Li, Dehai; Zou, Yi; Li, Jian; Xu, Wei; Cacho, Ralph A; Hillenmeyer, Maureen E; Garg, Neil K; Tang, Yi

    2015-11-01

    The structural diversity and biological activities of fungal indole diterpenes (IDTs) are generated in large part by the IDT cyclases (IDTCs). Identifying different IDTCs from IDT biosynthetic pathways is therefore important toward understanding how these enzymes introduce chemical diversity from a common linear precursor. However, IDTCs involved in the cyclization of the well-known aflavinine subgroup of IDTs have not been discovered. Here, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a heterologous host and a phylogenetically guided enzyme mining approach, we combinatorially assembled IDT biosynthetic pathways using IDTCs homologues identified from different fungal hosts. We identified the genetically standalone IDTCs involved in the cyclization of aflavinine and anominine and produced new IDTs not previously isolated. The cyclization mechanisms of the new IDTCs were proposed based on the yeast reconstitution results. Our studies demonstrate heterologous pathway assembly is a useful tool in the reconstitution of unclustered biosynthetic pathways.

  12. Single cell genome amplification accelerates identification of the apratoxin biosynthetic pathway from a complex microbial assemblage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashel V Grindberg

    Full Text Available Filamentous marine cyanobacteria are extraordinarily rich sources of structurally novel, biomedically relevant natural products. To understand their biosynthetic origins as well as produce increased supplies and analog molecules, access to the clustered biosynthetic genes that encode for the assembly enzymes is necessary. Complicating these efforts is the universal presence of heterotrophic bacteria in the cell wall and sheath material of cyanobacteria obtained from the environment and those grown in uni-cyanobacterial culture. Moreover, the high similarity in genetic elements across disparate secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways renders imprecise current gene cluster targeting strategies and contributes sequence complexity resulting in partial genome coverage. Thus, it was necessary to use a dual-method approach of single-cell genomic sequencing based on multiple displacement amplification (MDA and metagenomic library screening. Here, we report the identification of the putative apratoxin. A biosynthetic gene cluster, a potent cancer cell cytotoxin with promise for medicinal applications. The roughly 58 kb biosynthetic gene cluster is composed of 12 open reading frames and has a type I modular mixed polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS/NRPS organization and features loading and off-loading domain architecture never previously described. Moreover, this work represents the first successful isolation of a complete biosynthetic gene cluster from Lyngbya bouillonii, a tropical marine cyanobacterium renowned for its production of diverse bioactive secondary metabolites.

  13. Reconstructing fungal natural product biosynthetic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, C M; Williams, K; Bailey, A M

    2014-10-01

    Large scale fungal genome sequencing has revealed a multitude of potential natural product biosynthetic pathways that remain uncharted. Here we describe some of the methods that have been used to explore them via heterologous gene expression. We focus on filamentous fungal hosts and discuss the technological challenges and successes behind the reconstruction of fungal natural product pathways. Optimised, efficient heterologous expression of reconstructed biosynthetic pathways promises progress in the discovery of novel compounds that could be utilised by the pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries.

  14. Available lysine in canned fish

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, D. Ramananda; Gadre, Ujjwala V.

    1984-01-01

    Otolithus argenteus was canned in brine by heat processing at two different steam pressures either at 0.70 kg/cm super(2) or 1.05 kg/cm super(2) for 25 minutes. The nutritive value of canned fish as evaluated by the total nitrogen and available lysine did not alter much either during heat processing or during storage over a period of nine months at 28 degree plus or minus 5 degree C.

  15. The biology of lysine acetylation integrates transcriptional programming and metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujtaba Shiraz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The biochemical landscape of lysine acetylation has expanded from a small number of proteins in the nucleus to a multitude of proteins in the cytoplasm. Since the first report confirming acetylation of the tumor suppressor protein p53 by a lysine acetyltransferase (KAT, there has been a surge in the identification of new, non-histone targets of KATs. Added to the known substrates of KATs are metabolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, molecular chaperones, ribosomal proteins and nuclear import factors. Emerging studies demonstrate that no fewer than 2000 proteins in any particular cell type may undergo lysine acetylation. As described in this review, our analyses of cellular acetylated proteins using DAVID 6.7 bioinformatics resources have facilitated organization of acetylated proteins into functional clusters integral to cell signaling, the stress response, proteolysis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neuronal development. In addition, these clusters also depict association of acetylated proteins with human diseases. These findings not only support lysine acetylation as a widespread cellular phenomenon, but also impel questions to clarify the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms governing target selectivity by KATs. Present challenges are to understand the molecular basis for the overlapping roles of KAT-containing co-activators, to differentiate between global versus dynamic acetylation marks, and to elucidate the physiological roles of acetylated proteins in biochemical pathways. In addition to discussing the cellular 'acetylome', a focus of this work is to present the widespread and dynamic nature of lysine acetylation and highlight the nexus that exists between epigenetic-directed transcriptional regulation and metabolism.

  16. A novel amperometric biosensor based on a co-crosslinked L-lysine-α-oxidase/overoxidized polypyrrole bilayer for the highly selective determination of L-lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrieri, Antonio; Ciriello, Rosanna; Cataldi, Tommaso R I

    2013-09-17

    An amperometric biosensor for the determination of L-lysine based on L-lysine-α-oxidase immobilized by co-crosslinking on a platinum electrode previously modified by an overoxidized polypyrrole film is described. The optimization of experimental parameters, such as pH and flow rate, permitted to minimize significantly substrate interferences even using a low specific, commercial enzyme. The relevant biases introduced in the measurement of lysine were just about 1% for L-arginine, L-histidine and L-ornithine, roughly 4% for L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine. The developed approach allowed linear lysine responses from 0.02 mM up to 2 mM with a sensitivity of 41 nA/(mM × mm(2)) and a detection limit of 4 μM (S/N=3). No appreciable loss in lysine sensitivity was observed up to about 40 days. Allowing polypyrrole layer to remove interference from electroactive compounds, the present method revealed suitable to detect L-lysine in a pharmaceutical and cheese sample, showing a good agreement with the expected values. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolic profiling of alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in mouse tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Mori

    Full Text Available NAD plays essential redox and non-redox roles in cell biology. In mammals, its de novo and recycling biosynthetic pathways encompass two independent branches, the "amidated" and "deamidated" routes. Here we focused on the indispensable enzymes gating these two routes, i.e. nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT, which in mammals comprises three distinct isozymes, and NAD synthetase (NADS. First, we measured the in vitro activity of the enzymes, and the levels of all their substrates and products in a number of tissues from the C57BL/6 mouse. Second, from these data, we derived in vivo estimates of enzymes'rates and quantitative contributions to NAD homeostasis. The NMNAT activity, mainly represented by nuclear NMNAT1, appears to be high and nonrate-limiting in all examined tissues, except in blood. The NADS activity, however, appears rate-limiting in lung and skeletal muscle, where its undetectable levels parallel a relative accumulation of the enzyme's substrate NaAD (nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide. In all tissues, the amidated NAD route was predominant, displaying highest rates in liver and kidney, and lowest in blood. In contrast, the minor deamidated route showed higher relative proportions in blood and small intestine, and higher absolute values in liver and small intestine. Such results provide the first comprehensive picture of the balance of the two alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in different mammalian tissues under physiological conditions. This fills a gap in the current knowledge of NAD biosynthesis, and provides a crucial information for the study of NAD metabolism and its role in disease.

  18. Immobilization of lysine oxidase on a gold-platinum nanoparticles modified Au electrode for detection of lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, N; Narang, J; Sunny; Pundir, C S

    2013-04-10

    A commercial lysine oxidase (LyOx) from Trichoderma viride was immobilized covalently onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) electrodeposited onto Au electrode using 3-aminopropyltriethoxy silane (3-APTES) and glutaraldehyde cross linking chemistry. A lysine biosensor was fabricated using LyOx/3-APTES/AuNPs-PtNPs/Au electrode as a working electrode, Ag/AgCl (3M KCl) as standard electrode and Pt wire as auxiliary electrode connected through a potentiostat. The enzyme electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The cumulative effect of AuNPs and PtNPs showed excellent electrocatalytic activity at low applied potential for detection of H2O2, a product of LyOx reaction. The sensor showed its optimum response within 4s, when polarized at 0.2V vs. Ag/AgCl in 0.1M phosphate buffer, pH 7.5 at 30°C. The linear range and detection limit of the sensor were 1.0-600μM and 1.0μM (S/N=3), respectively. Biosensor measured lysine level in sera, milk and amino acid tablet, which correlated well with those by standard HPLC method. The enzyme electrode lost 50% of its initial activity after 200 uses over a period of 4 months.

  19. Effect of bacteriophage lysin on lysogens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Balaji Subramanyam; Vanaja Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of phage lysin on the growth of lysogens. Methods: Sputum specimens processed by modified Petroff's method were respectively treated with phagebiotics in combination with lysin and lysin alone. The specimens were incubated at 37℃ for 4 days. At the end of day 1, 2, 3 and day 4, the specimens were streaked on blood agar plates and incubated at 37℃ for 18-24 hours. The growth of normal flora observed after day 1 was considered as lysogens.Results:When specimens treated with lysin alone, lysogen formation was avoided and normal flora was controlled. Conclusions: Lysin may have no effect on the growth of lysogens. Sputum specimens treated with phagebiotics-lysin showed the growth of lysogens.

  20. Volatile terpenes from actinomycetes: a biosynthetic study correlating chemical analyses to genome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe, Patrick; Citron, Christian A; Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2013-11-25

    The volatile terpenes of 24 actinomycetes whose genomes have been sequenced (or are currently being sequenced) were collected by use of a closed-loop stripping apparatus and identified by GC/MS. The analytical data were compared against a phylogenetic analysis of all 192 currently available sequences of bacterial terpene cyclases (excluding geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases). In addition to the several groups of terpenes with known biosynthetic origin, selinadienes were identified as a large group of biosynthetically related sesquiterpenes that are produced by several streptomycetes. The detection of a large number of previously unrecognised side products of known terpene cyclases proved to be particularly important for an in depth understanding of biosynthetic pathways to known terpenes in actinomycetes. Interpretation of the chemical analytical data in the context of the phylogenetic tree of bacterial terpene cyclases pointed to the function of three new enzymes: (E)-β-caryophyllene synthase, selina-3,7(11)-diene synthase and aristolochene synthase.

  1. Hemoglobin Labeled by Radioactive Lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; DeLaVergne, L.; Miller, L. L.; Whipple, G. H.

    1949-12-08

    This paper reports on the utilization of tagged epsilon carbon of DL-lysine by a dog both anemic and hypoproteinemic due to repeated bleeding plus a diet low in protein. The experiment extended over period of 234 days, a time sufficient to indicate an erythrocyte life span of at least 115 days based upon the rate of replacement of labeled red cell proteins. The proteins of broken down red cells seem not to be used with any great preference for the synthesis of new hemoglobin.

  2. Nonlinear biosynthetic gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijland, Jeroen G; Ebbendorf, Bjorg; Woszczynska, Marta; Boer, Rémon; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2010-11-01

    Industrial penicillin production levels by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum increased dramatically by classical strain improvement. High-yielding strains contain multiple copies of the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes three key enzymes of the β-lactam biosynthetic pathway. We have analyzed the gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production using the high-yielding P. chrysogenum strain DS17690 that was cured from its native clusters. The amount of penicillin V produced increased with the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster number but was saturated at high copy numbers. Likewise, transcript levels of the biosynthetic genes pcbAB [δ-(l-α-aminoadipyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine synthetase], pcbC (isopenicillin N synthase), and penDE (acyltransferase) correlated with the cluster copy number. Remarkably, the protein level of acyltransferase, which localizes to peroxisomes, was saturated already at low cluster copy numbers. At higher copy numbers, intracellular levels of isopenicillin N increased, suggesting that the acyltransferase reaction presents a limiting step at a high gene dose. Since the number and appearance of the peroxisomes did not change significantly with the gene cluster copy number, we conclude that the acyltransferase activity is limiting for penicillin biosynthesis at high biosynthetic gene cluster copy numbers. These results suggest that at a high penicillin production level, productivity is limited by the peroxisomal acyltransferase import activity and/or the availability of coenzyme A (CoA)-activated side chains.

  3. Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2001-07-18

    Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

  4. The biosynthetic pathway of vitamin C in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, G L; Jones, M A; Smirnoff, N

    1998-05-28

    Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) has important antioxidant and metabolic functions in both plants and animals, but humans, and a few other animal species, have lost the capacity to synthesize it. Plant-derived ascorbate is thus the major source of vitamin C in the human diet. Although the biosynthetic pathway of L-ascorbic acid in animals is well understood, the plant pathway has remained unknown-one of the few primary plant metabolic pathways for which this is the case. L-ascorbate is abundant in plants (found at concentrations of 1-5 mM in leaves and 25 mM in chloroplasts) and may have roles in photosynthesis and transmembrane electron transport. We found that D-mannose and L-galactose are efficient precursors for ascorbate synthesis and are interconverted by GDP-D-mannose-3,5-epimerase. We have identified an enzyme in pea and Arabidopsis thaliana, L-galactose dehydrogenase, that catalyses oxidation of L-galactose to L-galactono-1,4-lactone. We propose an ascorbate biosynthesis pathway involving GDP-D-mannose, GDP-L-galactose, L-galactose and L-galactono-1,4-lactone, and have synthesized ascorbate from GDP-D-mannose by way of these intermediates in vitro. The definition of this biosynthetic pathway should allow engineering of plants for increased ascorbate production, thus increasing their nutritional value and stress tolerance.

  5. PENILAIAN PENGARUH PENAMBAHAN LYSINE PADA NASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatius Tarwotjo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pengaruh penambahan lysine pada mutu protein nasi dilakukan pada tikus putih dengan mengukur Protein Efficiency Ratio. Nasi dan Nasi dengan sayur beserta laukpauk, seperti dikonsumsi oleh kebanyakan keluarga di Indonesia, yang berasnya lebih dulu ditambahi butiran premix berisi lysine, thiamine dan riboflavin ternaya menghasilkan Protein Efficiency Ratio lebih tinggi dari pada yang tidak ditambahi.

  6. Characterization of the biosynthetic gene cluster of rebeccamycin from Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes ATCC 39243.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaka, Hiroyasu; Taniguchi, Shin-ichi; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Furumai, Tamotsu

    2003-01-01

    The biosynthetic gene cluster for rebeccamycin, an indolocarbazole antibiotic, from Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes ATCC 39243 has 11 ORFs. To clarify their functions, mutants with rebG, rebD, rebC, rebP, rebM, rebR, rebH, rebT, or orfD2 disrupted were constructed, and the gene products were examined. rebP disruptants produced 11,11'-dichlorochromopyrrolic acid, found to be a biosynthetic intermediate by a bioconversion experiment. Other genes encoded N-glycosyltransferase (rebG), monooxygenase (rebC), methyltransferase (rebM), a transcriptional activator (rebR), and halogenase (rebH). rebT disruptants produced rebeccamycin as much as the wild strain, so rebT was probably not involved in rebeccamycin production. Biosynthetic genes of staurosporine, an another indolocarbazole antibiotic, were cloned from Streptomyces sp. TP-A0274. staO, staD, and staP were similar to rebO, rebD, and rebP, respectively, all of which are responsible for indolocarbazole biosynthesis, But a rebC homolog, encoding a putative enzyme oxidizing the C-7 site of pyrrole rings, was not found in the staurosporine biosynthetic gene cluster. These results suggest that indolocarbazole is constructed by oxidative decarboxylation of chromopyrrolic acid (11,11'-dichlorochromopyrrolic acid in rebeccamycin) generated from two molecules of tryptophan by coupling and that the oxidation state at the C-7 position depends on the additional enzyme(s) encoded by the biosynthetic genes.

  7. An overlooked effect of glycine betaine on fermentation: prevents caramelization and increases the L-lysine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzhong; Xia, Xiuhua; Zhang, Junlan; Guo, Yanfeng; Zhang, Weiguo

    2014-10-01

    This article focuses on the effects of glycine betaine on preventing caramelization, and increasing DCW and L-lysine production. The additional glycine betaine not only decreased the browning intensity (decreased 4 times), and the concentrations of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (decreased 7.8 times) and furfural (decreased 12 times), but also increased the availability of glucose (increased 17.5%) for L-lysine production. The DCW and L-lysine production were increased by adding no more than 20 mM glycine betaine, whereas the DCW and L-lysine production were decreased with the reduction of pH values, although pH had a better response to prevent caramelization than did glycine betaine. For L-lysine production, the highest increase (40%) was observed on the media with 20 mM glycine betaine. The crucial enzymes in glycolysis and L-lysine biosynthesis pathway were investigated. The results indicated that additional glycine betaine increases the activity of enzymes in glycolysis, in contrast to the effect of pH. All the results indicated that glycine betaine can be used to prevent caramelization and increase the L-lysine production. By applying this strategy, glucose would not be have to be separated from the culture media during autoclaving so that factories can save production costs and shorten the fermentation period.

  8. Impact of lead ions on biosynthetic capacity of Streptomyces recifensis var. lyticus 2p-15 strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. P. Kilochok

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different concentrations of Pb ions on biosynthetical ability of Streptomyces recifensis var. lyticus 2P-15, which is the producer of compound complex of extracellular enzymes and growth stimulators, was studied. It has been showed, that Pb ions introduced in agar medium have had a stimulative effect on production of surface and depth mycelia. The Pb ions, which have been inoculated into liquid fermentative medium in concentration of 1,0–2,0 mg/l realized directed synthesis of bacterio- and proteolytic enzymes, had an influence on qualitative and quantitative composition of produced enzymes.

  9. Alanylclavam Biosynthetic Genes Are Clustered Together with One Group of Clavulanic Acid Biosynthetic Genes in Streptomyces clavuligerus▿ §

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelyas, Nathan J.; Cai, Hui; Kwong, Thomas; Jensen, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus produces at least five different clavam metabolites, including clavulanic acid and the methionine antimetabolite, alanylclavam. In vitro transposon mutagenesis was used to analyze a 13-kb region upstream of the known paralogue gene cluster. The paralogue cluster includes one group of clavulanic acid biosynthetic genes in S. clavuligerus. Twelve open reading frames (ORFs) were found in this area, and mutants were generated in each using either in vitro transposon or PCR-targeted mutagenesis. Mutants with defects in any of the genes orfA, orfB, orfC, or orfD were unable to produce alanylclavam but could produce all of the other clavams, including clavulanic acid. orfA encodes a predicted hydroxymethyltransferase, orfB encodes a YjgF/YER057c/UK114-family regulatory protein, orfC encodes an aminotransferase, and orfD encodes a dehydratase. All of these types of proteins are normally involved in amino acid metabolism. Mutants in orfC or orfD also accumulated a novel clavam metabolite instead of alanylclavam, and a complemented orfC mutant was able to produce trace amounts of alanylclavam while still producing the novel clavam. Mass spectrometric analyses, together with consideration of the enzymes involved in its production, led to tentative identification of the novel clavam as 8-OH-alanylclavam, an intermediate in the proposed alanylclavam biosynthetic pathway. PMID:18931110

  10. Minimum Information about a Biosynthetic Gene cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, M.H.; Kottmann, Renzo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Cummings, Matthew; Biggins, J.B.; Blin, Kai; Bruijn, De Irene; Chooi, Yit Heng; Claesen, Jan; Coates, R.C.; Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Duddela, Srikanth; Düsterhus, Stephanie; Edwards, Daniel J.; Fewer, David P.; Garg, Neha; Geiger, Christoph; Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo; Greule, Anja; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Haines, Anthony S.; Helfrich, Eric J.N.; Hillwig, Matthew L.; Ishida, Keishi; Jones, Adam C.; Jones, Carla S.; Jungmann, Katrin; Kegler, Carsten; Kim, Hyun Uk; Kötter, Peter; Krug, Daniel; Masschelein, Joleen; Melnik, Alexey V.; Mantovani, Simone M.; Monroe, Emily A.; Moore, Marcus; Moss, Nathan; Nützmann, Hans Wilhelm; Pan, Guohui; Pati, Amrita; Petras, Daniel; Reen, F.J.; Rosconi, Federico; Rui, Zhe; Tian, Zhenhua; Tobias, Nicholas J.; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Wiemann, Philipp; Wyckoff, Elizabeth; Yan, Xiaohui; Yim, Grace; Yu, Fengan; Xie, Yunchang; Aigle, Bertrand; Apel, Alexander K.; Balibar, Carl J.; Balskus, Emily P.; Barona-Gómez, Francisco; Bechthold, Andreas; Bode, Helge B.; Borriss, Rainer; Brady, Sean F.; Brakhage, Axel A.; Caffrey, Patrick; Cheng, Yi Qiang; Clardy, Jon; Cox, Russell J.; Mot, De René; Donadio, Stefano; Donia, Mohamed S.; Donk, Van Der Wilfred A.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Doyle, Sean; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Entian, Karl Dieter; Fischbach, Michael A.; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H.; Gross, Harald; Gust, Bertolt; Hertweck, Christian; Höfte, Monica; Jensen, Susan E.; Ju, Jianhua; Katz, Leonard; Kaysser, Leonard; Klassen, Jonathan L.; Keller, Nancy P.; Kormanec, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Kwon, Hyung Jin; Lautru, Sylvie; Lavigne, Rob; Lee, Chia Y.; Linquan, Bai; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Wen; Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Mahmud, Taifo; Mast, Yvonne; Méndez, Carmen; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko; Micklefield, Jason; Mitchell, Douglas A.; Moore, Bradley S.; Moreira, Leonilde M.; Müller, Rolf; Neilan, Brett A.; Nett, Markus; Nielsen, Jens; O'Gara, Fergal; Oikawa, Hideaki; Osbourn, Anne; Osburne, Marcia S.; Ostash, Bohdan; Payne, Shelley M.; Pernodet, Jean Luc; Petricek, Miroslav; Piel, Jörn; Ploux, Olivier; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; Salas, José A.; Schmitt, Esther K.; Scott, Barry; Seipke, Ryan F.; Shen, Ben; Sherman, David H.; Sivonen, Kaarina; Smanski, Michael J.; Sosio, Margherita; Stegmann, Evi; Süssmuth, Roderich D.; Tahlan, Kapil; Thomas, Christopher M.; Tang, Yi; Truman, Andrew W.; Viaud, Muriel; Walton, Jonathan D.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Weber, Tilmann; Wezel, Van Gilles P.; Wilkinson, Barrie; Willey, Joanne M.; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Wright, Gerard D.; Ziemert, Nadine; Zhang, Changsheng; Zotchev, Sergey B.; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of enzymatic pathways that produce specialized metabolites in bacteria, fungi and plants are known to be encoded in biosynthetic gene clusters. Information about these clusters, pathways and metabolites is currently dispersed throughout the literature, making it difficult to exploi

  11. A Novel Staphylococcus Podophage Encodes a Unique Lysin with Unusual Modular Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Katie; Dandu, Vidya Sree; Bari, S. M. Nayeemul; Lackey, Kim; Everett, Gabriel F. K.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Drug-resistant staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, are leading causes of hospital-acquired infections. Bacteriophages and their peptidoglycan hydrolytic enzymes (lysins) are currently being explored as alternatives to conventional antibiotics; however, only a limited diversity of staphylococcal phages and their lysins has yet been characterized. Here, we describe a novel staphylococcal phage and its lysins. Bacteriophage Andhra is the first reported S. epidermidis phage belonging to the family Podoviridae. Andhra possesses an 18,546-nucleotide genome with 20 open reading frames. BLASTp searches revealed that gene product 10 (gp10) and gp14 harbor putative catalytic domains with predicted peptidase and amidase activities, characteristic functions of phage lysins. We purified these proteins and show that both Andhra_gp10 and Andhra_gp14 inhibit growth and degrade cell walls of diverse staphylococci, with Andhra_gp10 exhibiting more robust activity against the panel of cell wall substrates tested. Site-directed mutagenesis of its predicted catalytic residues abrogated the activity of Andhra_gp10, consistent with the presence of a catalytic CHAP domain on its C terminus. The active site location combined with the absence of an SH3b cell wall binding domain distinguishes Andhra_gp10 from the majority of staphylococcal lysins characterized to date. Importantly, close homologs of Andhra_gp10 are present in related staphylococcal podophages, and we propose that these constitute a new class of phage-encoded lysins. Altogether, our results reveal insights into the biology of a rare family of staphylococcal phages while adding to the arsenal of antimicrobials with potential for therapeutic use. IMPORTANCE The spread of antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens is inciting a global public health crisis. Drug-resistant Staphylococcus species, especially S. aureus and S. epidermidis, have emerged in both hospital

  12. The Enzymes of the Ammonia Assimilation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Camp, Huub J.M. op den; Leenen, Pieter J.M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1980-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regulated by repression/derepression of enzyme synthesis and by adenylylation/deadenylylation control. High levels of deadenylylated biosynthetically active glutamine synthetase were observed in cultures growing with limiting amounts of nitrogen wh

  13. The Enzymes of the Ammonia Assimilation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Camp, Huub J.M. op den; Leenen, Pieter J.M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1980-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regulated by repression/derepression of enzyme synthesis and by adenylylation/deadenylylation control. High levels of deadenylylated biosynthetically active glutamine synthetase were observed in cultures growing with limiting amounts of nitrogen wh

  14. An R2R3 MYB transcription factor associated with regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in Rosaceae (on linr)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kui-Lin; Bolitho, Karen; Grafton, Karryn; Kortstee, A.J.; Karunairetnam, Sakuntala; McGhie, T.K.; Espley, R.V.; Hellens, R.P.; Allan, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The control of plant anthocyanin accumulation is via transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the biosynthetic enzymes. A key activator appears to be an R2R3 MYB transcription factor. In apple fruit, skin anthocyanin levels are controlled by a gene called MYBA or MYB1, while the

  15. Reactive lysine content in commercially available pet foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, van C.; Bosch, G.; Poel, van der A.F.B.; Wierenga, P.A.; Alexander, L.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    The Maillard reaction can occur during processing of pet foods. During this reaction, the e-amino group of lysine reacts with reducing sugars to become unavailable for metabolism. The aim of the present study was to determine the reactive lysine (RL; the remaining available lysine) to total lysine (

  16. SPOTing Acetyl-Lysine Dependent Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Picaud

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Post translational modifications have been recognized as chemical signals that create docking sites for evolutionary conserved effector modules, allowing for signal integration within large networks of interactions. Lysine acetylation in particular has attracted attention as a regulatory modification, affecting chromatin structure and linking to transcriptional activation. Advances in peptide array technologies have facilitated the study of acetyl-lysine-containing linear motifs interacting with the evolutionary conserved bromodomain module, which specifically recognizes and binds to acetylated sequences in histones and other proteins. Here we summarize recent work employing SPOT peptide technology to identify acetyl-lysine dependent interactions and document the protocols adapted in our lab, as well as our efforts to characterize such bromodomain-histone interactions. Our results highlight the versatility of SPOT methods and establish an affordable tool for rapid access to potential protein/modified-peptide interactions involving lysine acetylation.

  17. Oligo(L-lysine)-induced titanium dioxide: Effects of consecutive lysine on precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sungjun; Park, Sangwoo; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2011-11-01

    Biomineralization of metal oxide utilizes biomolecular substances, such as peptides and proteins, to induce mineralization of metal precursors in a mild aqueous solution. In this study, we investigated biomineralization of an abiological substance, titanium dioxide (TiO 2), by oligo(L-lysine). Specifically, we systemically studied the influence of the number of consecutive lysine on TiO 2 precipitation. Oligo(L-lysine) was chosen as a homopeptide lysine source whose lysine quantity was adjusted. When oligo(L-lysine) contains more than three consecutive lysine, it induces notably fast precipitation, while single and dilysine do not readily form TiO 2 precipitates. Precipitation of TiO 2 was promoted with the length of oligo(L-lysine). The oligo(L-lysine) was associated with TiO 2 precipitate, which was confirmed by spectroscopic and thermogravitational analyses. The outcomes of this research provide a plausible rationale for explaining precipitation of the Ti precursor that is highly dependent on peptide sequences.

  18. Distinct mechanisms for spiro-carbon formation reveal biosynthetic pathway crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunematsu, Yuta; Ishikawa, Noriyasu; Wakana, Daigo; Goda, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Moriya, Hisao; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-12-01

    Spirotryprostatins, an indole alkaloid class of nonribosomal peptides isolated from Aspergillus fumigatus, are known for their antimitotic activity in tumor cells. Because spirotryprostatins and many other chemically complex spiro-carbon-bearing natural products exhibit useful biological activities, identifying and understanding the mechanism of spiro-carbon biosynthesis is of great interest. Here we report a detailed study of spiro-ring formation in spirotryprostatins from tryprostatins derived from the fumitremorgin biosynthetic pathway, using reactants and products prepared with engineered yeast and fungal strains. Unexpectedly, FqzB, an FAD-dependent monooxygenase from the unrelated fumiquinazoline biosynthetic pathway, catalyzed spiro-carbon formation in spirotryprostatin A via an epoxidation route. Furthermore, FtmG, a cytochrome P450 from the fumitremorgin biosynthetic pathway, was determined to catalyze the spiro-ring formation in spirotryprostatin B. Our results highlight the versatile role of oxygenating enzymes in the biosynthesis of structurally complex natural products and indicate that cross-talk of different biosynthetic pathways allows product diversification in natural product biosynthesis.

  19. Lysine requirement of growing male Pekin ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bons, A; Timmler, R; Jeroch, H

    2002-12-01

    1. One growth experiment and one balance test were conducted to study the response to increasing levels of dietary lysine supplementation in male Pekin ducks with special reference to the growth periods from 1 to 3 weeks and 4 to 7 weeks of age. 2. Two different low-lysine diets were used as basal diets in both periods. The basal lysine levels were 7.6 g/kg (d 1 to 21) and 6.2 g/kg (d 22 to 49) and the ranges in lysine concentration were 7.6 to 12.6 g/kg (d 1 to 21) and 6.2 to 11.2 g/kg (d 22 to 49). 3. Growth performance, feed conversion efficiency and meat yield increased (P < 0.05) with increasing lysine concentration (requirement defined as 95% of the asymptote). 4. It is concluded that the dietary lysine concentration should be 0.93 g/MJ nitrogen corrected apparent metabolisable energy (AMEN) (11.7 g/kg) for the starter period (until d 21) and 0.75 g/MJ AMEN (10.0 g/kg) for the grower period (from d 22 onwards).

  20. SET7/9 Catalytic Mutants Reveal the Role of Active Site Water Molecules in Lysine Multiple Methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Rizzo, Paul A.; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M.A.; Strunk, Bethany S.; Roiko, Marijo S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Houtz, Robert L.; Trievel, Raymond C. (Michigan); (NWU); (Kentucky)

    2010-11-15

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine {epsilon}-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransferase, respectively. Crystal structures of these mutants in complex with peptides bearing unmodified, mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysines illustrate the roles of active site water molecules in aligning the lysine {epsilon}-amino group for methyl transfer with S-adenosylmethionine. Displacement or dissociation of these solvent molecules enlarges the diameter of the active site, accommodating the increasing size of the methylated {epsilon}-amino group during successive methyl transfer reactions. Together, these results furnish new insights into the roles of active site water molecules in modulating lysine multiple methylation by SET domain KMTs and provide the first molecular snapshots of the mono-, di-, and trimethyl transfer reactions catalyzed by these enzymes.

  1. Bioavailability of free lysine and protein-bound lysine from casein and fishmeal in juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeckel, Saskia; Dietz, Carsten; Schulz, Carsten; Susenbeth, Andreas

    2015-03-14

    In the present study, a linear regression analysis between lysine intake and lysine retention was conducted to investigate the efficiency of lysine utilisation (k(Lys)) at marginal lysine intake of either protein-bound or free lysine sources in juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima). For this purpose, nine isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets were formulated to contain 2·25-4·12 g lysine/100 g crude protein (CP) to ensure that lysine was the first-limiting amino acid in all diets. The basal diet contained 2·25 g lysine/100 g CP. Graded levels of casein (Cas), fishmeal (FM) and L-lysine HCl (Lys) were added to the experimental diets to achieve stepwise lysine increments. A total of 240 fish (initial weight 50·1 g) were hand-fed all the experimental diets once daily until apparent satiation over a period of 56 d. Feed intake was significantly affected by dietary lysine concentration rather than by dietary lysine source. Specific growth rate increased significantly at higher lysine concentrations (PCas, Lys or FM were 0·833, 0·857 and 0·684, respectively. The bioavailability of lysine from the respective lysine sources was determined by a slope-ratio approach. The bioavailability of lysine (relative to the reference lysine source Cas) from FM and Lys was 82·1 and 103 %, respectively. Nutrient requirement for maintenance was in the range of 16·7-23·4 mg/kg(0·8) per d, and did not differ between the treatments. There were no significant differences in lysine utilisation efficiency or bioavailability of protein-bound or crystalline lysine from the respective sources observed when lysine was confirmed to be the first-limiting nutrient.

  2. Neurosteroid biosynthetic pathways changes in prefrontal cortex in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Sabina; Bossers, Koen; Van de Bilt, Saskia; Agrapart, Vincent; Morales, Rafael Ramirez; Frajese, Giovanni Vanni; Swaab, Dick F

    2011-11-01

    Expression of the genes for enzymes involved in neurosteroid biosynthesis was studied in human prefrontal cortex (PFC) in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n=49). Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) revealed that mRNA levels of diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), which is involved in the first step of steroidogenesis and in GABAergic transmission, were increased, as were mRNA levels for several neurosteroid biosynthetic enzymes. Aromatase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (HSD17B1) and aldo-keto reductase 1C2 (AKR1C2), were all increased in the late stages of AD. Several GABA-A subunits were significantly reduced in AD. Increased expression of aromatase in the PFC was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and was found to be localized predominantly in astrocytes. These data suggest a role for estrogens and allopregnanolone produced by astrocytes in the PFC in AD, possibly as part of a rescue program. The reduced gene expression of some synaptic and extra-synaptic GABA-A subunits may indicate a deficit of modulation of GABA-A receptors by neuroactive steroids, which may contribute to the neuropsychiatric characteristics of this disease.

  3. Lysine-Rich Proteins in High-Lysine Hordeum Vulgare Grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingversen, J.; Køie, B.

    1973-01-01

    The salt-soluble proteins in barley grain selected for high-lysine content (Hiproly, CI 7115 and the mutants 29 and 86) and of a control (Carlsberg II) with normal lysine content, contain identical major proteins as determined by MW and electrophoretic mobility. The concentration of a protein group...

  4. Characterization of virginiamycin S biosynthetic genes from Streptomyces virginiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namwat, Wises; Kamioka, Yuji; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Nihira, Takuya

    2002-03-20

    Streptomyces virginiae produces -butyrolactone autoregulators (virginiae butanolide, VB), which control the biosynthesis of virginiamycin M1 and S. A 6.3-kb region downstream of the virginiamycin S (VS)-resistance operon in S. virginiae was sequenced, and four plausible open reading frames (ORFs) (visA, 1,260 bp; visB, 1,656 bp; visC, 888 bp; visD, 1209 bp) were identified. Homology analysis revealed significant similarities with enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of cyclopeptolide antibiotics: VisA (53% identity, 65% similarity) to -lysine 2-aminotransferase (NikC) of nikkomycin D biosynthesis, VisB (66% identity, 72% similarity) to 3-hydroxypicolinic acid:AMP ligase of pristinamycin I biosynthesis, VisC (48% identity, 59% similarity) to lysine cyclodeaminase of ascomycin biosynthesis, and VisD (43% identity, 56% similarity) to erythromycin C-22 hydroxylase of erythromycin biosynthesis. Northern blotting as well as high-resolution S1 analysis of the ORFs revealed that they were transcribed as two bicistronic transcripts, namely 3.0-kb visB-visA and another 2.7-kb visC-visD transcript, with promoters locating upstream of visB and visC, respectively. Transcription of the two operons was observed only 1 h after the VB production, which was 2 h before the virginiamycin production. Furthermore, prompt induction of the transcription was observed as a result of external VB addition, suggesting that the expression of the two operons was under the control of VB.

  5. Dynamic Motion and Communication in the Streptococcal C1 Phage Lysin, PlyC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Blake T; Broendum, Sebastian S; Reboul, Cyril F; Cowieson, Nathan P; Costa, Mauricio G S; Kass, Itamar; Jackson, Colin; Perahia, David; Buckle, Ashley M; McGowan, Sheena

    2015-01-01

    The growing problem of antibiotic resistance underlies the critical need to develop new treatments to prevent and control resistant bacterial infection. Exogenous application of bacteriophage lysins results in rapid and specific destruction of Gram-positive bacteria and therefore lysins represent novel antibacterial agents. The PlyC phage lysin is the most potent lysin characterized to date and can rapidly lyse Group A, C and E streptococci. Previously, we have determined the X-ray crystal structure of PlyC, revealing a complicated and unique arrangement of nine proteins. The scaffold features a multimeric cell-wall docking assembly bound to two catalytic domains that communicate and work synergistically. However, the crystal structure appeared to be auto-inhibited and raised important questions as to the mechanism underlying its extreme potency. Here we use small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and reveal that the conformational ensemble of PlyC in solution is different to that in the crystal structure. We also investigated the flexibility of the enzyme using both normal mode (NM) analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Consistent with our SAXS data, MD simulations show rotational dynamics of both catalytic domains, and implicate inter-domain communication in achieving a substrate-ready conformation required for enzyme function. Our studies therefore provide insights into how the domains in the PlyC holoenzyme may act together to achieve its extraordinary potency.

  6. Dynamic Motion and Communication in the Streptococcal C1 Phage Lysin, PlyC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake T Riley

    Full Text Available The growing problem of antibiotic resistance underlies the critical need to develop new treatments to prevent and control resistant bacterial infection. Exogenous application of bacteriophage lysins results in rapid and specific destruction of Gram-positive bacteria and therefore lysins represent novel antibacterial agents. The PlyC phage lysin is the most potent lysin characterized to date and can rapidly lyse Group A, C and E streptococci. Previously, we have determined the X-ray crystal structure of PlyC, revealing a complicated and unique arrangement of nine proteins. The scaffold features a multimeric cell-wall docking assembly bound to two catalytic domains that communicate and work synergistically. However, the crystal structure appeared to be auto-inhibited and raised important questions as to the mechanism underlying its extreme potency. Here we use small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and reveal that the conformational ensemble of PlyC in solution is different to that in the crystal structure. We also investigated the flexibility of the enzyme using both normal mode (NM analysis and molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Consistent with our SAXS data, MD simulations show rotational dynamics of both catalytic domains, and implicate inter-domain communication in achieving a substrate-ready conformation required for enzyme function. Our studies therefore provide insights into how the domains in the PlyC holoenzyme may act together to achieve its extraordinary potency.

  7. Emergent biosynthetic capacity in simple microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Chao Chiu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbes have an astonishing capacity to transform their environments. Yet, the metabolic capacity of a single species is limited and the vast majority of microorganisms form complex communities and join forces to exhibit capabilities far exceeding those achieved by any single species. Such enhanced metabolic capacities represent a promising route to many medical, environmental, and industrial applications and call for the development of a predictive, systems-level understanding of synergistic microbial capacity. Here we present a comprehensive computational framework, integrating high-quality metabolic models of multiple species, temporal dynamics, and flux variability analysis, to study the metabolic capacity and dynamics of simple two-species microbial ecosystems. We specifically focus on detecting emergent biosynthetic capacity--instances in which a community growing on some medium produces and secretes metabolites that are not secreted by any member species when growing in isolation on that same medium. Using this framework to model a large collection of two-species communities on multiple media, we demonstrate that emergent biosynthetic capacity is highly prevalent. We identify commonly observed emergent metabolites and metabolic reprogramming patterns, characterizing typical mechanisms of emergent capacity. We further find that emergent secretion tends to occur in two waves, the first as soon as the two organisms are introduced, and the second when the medium is depleted and nutrients become limited. Finally, aiming to identify global community determinants of emergent capacity, we find a marked association between the level of emergent biosynthetic capacity and the functional/phylogenetic distance between community members. Specifically, we demonstrate a "Goldilocks" principle, where high levels of emergent capacity are observed when the species comprising the community are functionally neither too close, nor too distant. Taken together

  8. Biosynthetic Relationship between Acutumine and Dechloroacutumine in Menispermum dauricum Root Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, H A; Sugimoto, Y; Saisho, T; Inanaga, S; Hashimoto, M; Isogai, A

    1999-01-01

    The biosynthetic relationship between acutumine 1 and dechloroacutumine 2 was studied using (13)C-labeled tyrosine and (3)H-labeled 2 as tracers. (13)C-NMR spectra of (13)C-labeled 1 and 2 showed that the alkaloids, each composed of two molecules of tyrosine, are derived from the same biosynthetic pathway. Feeding Menispermum dauricum (Menispermaceae) roots, cultured in a chloride-enriched medium, with (3)H-labeled 2 demonstrated that 1 is the only alkaloid metabolite of 2. Conversion (5%) of the exogenously applied 2, taken up by the roots, into 1 showed that 2 is the precursor of 1. Incomplete conversion of 2 into 1 suggests accumulation of the exogenously applied 2 in cell organelles and/or compartmentation of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of 1.

  9. Recent advances in Cannabis sativa research: biosynthetic studies and its potential in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirikantaramas, Supaart; Taura, Futoshi; Morimoto, Satoshi; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2007-08-01

    Cannabinoids, consisting of alkylresorcinol and monoterpene groups, are the unique secondary metabolites that are found only in Cannabis sativa. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabichromene (CBC) are well known cannabinoids and their pharmacological properties have been extensively studied. Recently, biosynthetic pathways of these cannabinoids have been successfully established. Several biosynthetic enzymes including geranylpyrophosphate:olivetolate geranyltransferase, tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase, cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) synthase and cannabichromenic acid (CBCA) synthase have been purified from young rapidly expanding leaves of C. sativa. In addition, molecular cloning, characterization and localization of THCA synthase have been recently reported. THCA and cannabigerolic acid (CBGA), its substrate, were shown to be apoptosis-inducing agents that might play a role in plant defense. Transgenic tobacco hairy roots expressing THCA synthase can produce THCA upon feeding of CBGA. These results open the way for biotechnological production of cannabinoids in the future.

  10. Phage lytic enzymes: a history

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David; Trudil

    2015-01-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of ‘bacteria-eaters’ or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well(Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specifi c disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay(Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes–from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  11. Autoacetylation of the MYST lysine acetyltransferase MOF protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Jiang; Sinha, Sarmistha H; Neveu, John M; Zheng, Yujun George

    2012-10-12

    The MYST family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) plays critical roles in diverse cellular processes, such as the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Lysine autoacetylation of the MYST HATs has recently received considerable attention. Nonetheless, the mechanism and function of the autoacetylation process are not well defined. To better understand the biochemical mechanism of MYST autoacetylation and the impact of autoacetylation on the cognate histone acetylation, we carried out detailed analyses of males-absent-on-the-first (MOF), a key member of the MYST family. A number of mutant MOF proteins were produced with point mutations at several key residues near the active site of the enzyme. Autoradiography and immunoblotting data showed that mutation of these residues affects the autoacetylation activity and HAT activity of MOF by various degrees demonstrating that MOF activity is highly sensitive to the chemical changes in those residues. We produced MOF protein in the deacetylated form by using a nonspecific lysine deacetylase. Interestingly, both the autoacetylation activity and the histone acetylation activity of the deacetylated MOF were found to be very close to that of wild-type MOF, suggesting that autoacetylation of MOF only marginally modulates the enzymatic activity. Also, we found that the autoacetylation rates of MOF and deacetylated MOF were much slower than the cognate substrate acetylation. Thus, autoacetylation does not seem to contribute to the intrinsic enzymatic activity in a significant manner. These data provide new insights into the mechanism and function of MYST HAT autoacetylation.

  12. Autoacetylation of the MYST Lysine Acetyltransferase MOF Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Jiang; Sinha, Sarmistha H.; Neveu, John M.; Zheng, Yujun George

    2012-01-01

    The MYST family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs) plays critical roles in diverse cellular processes, such as the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Lysine autoacetylation of the MYST HATs has recently received considerable attention. Nonetheless, the mechanism and function of the autoacetylation process are not well defined. To better understand the biochemical mechanism of MYST autoacetylation and the impact of autoacetylation on the cognate histone acetylation, we carried out detailed analyses of males-absent-on-the-first (MOF), a key member of the MYST family. A number of mutant MOF proteins were produced with point mutations at several key residues near the active site of the enzyme. Autoradiography and immunoblotting data showed that mutation of these residues affects the autoacetylation activity and HAT activity of MOF by various degrees demonstrating that MOF activity is highly sensitive to the chemical changes in those residues. We produced MOF protein in the deacetylated form by using a nonspecific lysine deacetylase. Interestingly, both the autoacetylation activity and the histone acetylation activity of the deacetylated MOF were found to be very close to that of wild-type MOF, suggesting that autoacetylation of MOF only marginally modulates the enzymatic activity. Also, we found that the autoacetylation rates of MOF and deacetylated MOF were much slower than the cognate substrate acetylation. Thus, autoacetylation does not seem to contribute to the intrinsic enzymatic activity in a significant manner. These data provide new insights into the mechanism and function of MYST HAT autoacetylation. PMID:22918831

  13. Dietary, Metabolic, and Potentially Environmental Modulation of the Lysine Acetylation Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go-Woon Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthy lifestyles and environment produce a good state of health. A number of scientific studies support the notion that external stimuli regulate an individual's epigenomic profile. Epigenetic changes play a key role in defining gene expression patterns under both normal and pathological conditions. As a major posttranslational modification, lysine (K acetylation has received much attention, owing largely to its significant effects on chromatin dynamics and other cellular processes across species. Lysine acetyltransferases and deacetylases, two opposing families of enzymes governing K-acetylation, have been intimately linked to cancer and other diseases. These enzymes have been pursued by vigorous efforts for therapeutic development in the past 15 years or so. Interestingly, certain dietary components have been found to modulate acetylation levels in vivo. Here we review dietary, metabolic, and environmental modulators of the K-acetylation machinery and discuss how they may be of potential value in the context of disease prevention.

  14. Methylation of histone H3 lysine 9 occurs during translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Carlos; Saavedra, Francisco; Alvarez, Francisca; Díaz-Celis, César; Ugalde, Valentina; Li, Jianhua; Forné, Ignasi; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A.; Almouzni, Geneviève; Imhof, Axel; Loyola, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications are key contributors to chromatin structure and function, and participate in the maintenance of genome stability. Understanding the establishment and maintenance of these marks, along with their misregulation in pathologies is thus a major focus in the field. While we have learned a great deal about the enzymes regulating histone modifications on nucleosomal histones, much less is known about the mechanisms establishing modifications on soluble newly synthesized histones. This includes methylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9), a mark that primes the formation of heterochromatin, a critical chromatin landmark for genome stability. Here, we report that H3K9 mono- and dimethylation is imposed during translation by the methyltransferase SetDB1. We discuss the importance of these results in the context of heterochromatin establishment and maintenance and new therapeutic opportunities in pathologies where heterochromatin is perturbed. PMID:26405197

  15. Identification of catechols as histone-lysine demethylase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders L; Kristensen, Line H; Stephansen, Karen B

    2012-01-01

    Identification of inhibitors of histone-lysine demethylase (HDM) enzymes is important because of their involvement in the development of cancer. An ELISA-based assay was developed for identification of inhibitors of the HDM KDM4C in a natural products library. Based on one of the hits with affinity...... in the low µM range (1, a catechol), a subset of structurally related compounds was selected and tested against a panel of HDMs. In this subset, two inhibitors (2 and 10) had comparable affinities towards KDM4C and KDM6A but no effect on PHF8. One inhibitor restored H3K9me3 levels in KDM4C transfected U2-OS...

  16. Crystal structures of lysine-preferred racemases, the non-antibiotic selectable markers for transgenic plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Mao Wu

    Full Text Available Lysine racemase, a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP-dependent amino acid racemase that catalyzes the interconversion of lysine enantiomers, is valuable to serve as a novel non-antibiotic selectable marker in the generation of transgenic plants. Here, we have determined the first crystal structure of a lysine racemase (Lyr from Proteus mirabilis BCRC10725, which shows the highest activity toward lysine and weaker activity towards arginine. In addition, we establish the first broad-specificity amino acid racemase (Bar structure from Pseudomonas putida DSM84, which presents not only the highest activity toward lysine but also remarkably broad substrate specificity. A complex structure of Bar-lysine is also established here. These structures demonstrate the similar fold of alanine racemase, which is a head-to-tail homodimer with each protomer containing an N-terminal (α/β(8 barrel and a C-terminal β-stranded domain. The active-site residues are located at the protomer interface that is a funnel-like cavity with two catalytic bases, one from each protomer, and the PLP binding site is at the bottom of this cavity. Structural comparisons, site-directed mutagenesis, kinetic, and modeling studies identify a conserved arginine and an adjacent conserved asparagine that fix the orientation of the PLP O3 atom in both structures and assist in the enzyme activity. Furthermore, side chains of two residues in α-helix 10 have been discovered to point toward the cavity and define the substrate specificity. Our results provide a structural foundation for the design of racemases with pre-determined substrate specificity and for the development of the non-antibiotic selection system in transgenic plants.

  17. Ubiquitination of Lysine 867 of the Human SETDB1 Protein Upregulates Its Histone H3 Lysine 9 (H3K9) Methyltransferase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Kenji; Kawamata, Natsuko; Uchihara, Yoshie; Okubo, Moeka; Fujimoto, Reiko; Gotoh, Eiko; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Mizohata, Eiichi; Hino, Nobumasa; Okada, Yoshiaki; Mochizuki, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Toshiya; Hamakubo, Takao; Sakai, Juro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Tachibana, Keisuke; Doi, Takefumi

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins play a crucial role in regulating protein-protein interactions, enzyme activity, subcellular localization, and stability of the protein. SET domain, bifurcated 1 (SETDB1) is a histone methyltransferase that regulates the methylation of histone H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9), gene silencing, and transcriptional repression. The C-terminal region of SETDB1 is a key site for PTMs, and is essential for its enzyme activity in mammalian and insect cells. In this study, we aimed to evaluate more precisely the effect of PTMs on the H3K9 methyltransferase activity of SETDB1. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we show that the C-terminal region of human SETDB1 purified from insect cells is ubiquitinated. We also demonstrate that the ubiquitination of lysine 867 of the human SETDB1 is necessary for full H3K9 methyltransferase activity in mammalian cells. Finally, we show that SETDB1 ubiquitination regulates the expression of its target gene, serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E, member 1 (SERPINE1) by methylating H3K9. These results suggest that the ubiquitination of SETDB1 at lysine 867 controls the expression of its target gene by activating its H3K9 methyltransferase activity. PMID:27798683

  18. A mechanism-based potent sirtuin inhibitor containing Nε-thiocarbamoyl-lysine (TuAcK)

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In the current study, we have identified Nε-thiocarbamoyl-lysine (TuAcK) as a general sirtuin inhibitory warhead which was shown to be able to confer potent sirtuin inhibition. This inhibition was also shown to be mechanism-based in that the TuAck residue was able to be processed by a sirtuin enzyme with the formation of a stalled S-alkylamidate intermediate.

  19. Towards the development of activity-based probes for detection of lysine-specific demethylase-1 activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ourailidou, Maria E.; Lenoci, Alessia; Zwergel, Clemens; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Dekker, Frank J

    2017-01-01

    The implications of lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) in tumorigenesis have urged scientists to develop diagnostic tools in order to explore the function of this enzyme. In this work, we present our efforts on the development of tranylcypromine (TCP)-based functionalized probes for activity-based

  20. Increased expression of pyruvate carboxylase and biotin protein ligase increases lysine production in a biotin prototrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhihao; Moslehi-Jenabian, Soloomeh; Solem, Christian

    2015-01-01

    pimeloyl-Acyl Carrier Protein [ACP]) formation. Pyruvate carboxylase (pycA), a biotin-dependent enzyme needed for lysine biosynthesis and biotin ligase (birA), which is responsible for attaching biotin to pyruvate carboxylase, were overexpressed by replacing the native promoters with the strong superoxide...

  1. Expanding the product profile of a microbial alkane biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harger, Matthew; Zheng, Lei; Moon, Austin; Ager, Casey; An, Ju Hye; Choe, Chris; Lai, Yi-Ling; Mo, Benjamin; Zong, David; Smith, Matthew D; Egbert, Robert G; Mills, Jeremy H; Baker, David; Pultz, Ingrid Swanson; Siegel, Justin B

    2013-01-18

    Microbially produced alkanes are a new class of biofuels that closely match the chemical composition of petroleum-based fuels. Alkanes can be generated from the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway by the reduction of acyl-ACPs followed by decarbonylation of the resulting aldehydes. A current limitation of this pathway is the restricted product profile, which consists of n-alkanes of 13, 15, and 17 carbons in length. To expand the product profile, we incorporated a new part, FabH2 from Bacillus subtilis , an enzyme known to have a broader specificity profile for fatty acid initiation than the native FabH of Escherichia coli . When provided with the appropriate substrate, the addition of FabH2 resulted in an altered alkane product profile in which significant levels of n-alkanes of 14 and 16 carbons in length are produced. The production of even chain length alkanes represents initial steps toward the expansion of this recently discovered microbial alkane production pathway to synthesize complex fuels. This work was conceived and performed as part of the 2011 University of Washington international Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) project.

  2. Radioactive Lysine in Protein Metabolism Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L. L.; Bale, W. F.; Yuile, C. L.; Masters, R. E.; Tishkoff, G. H.; Whipple,, G. H.

    1950-01-09

    Studies of incorporation of DL-lysine in various body proteins of the dog; the time course of labeled blood proteins; and apparent rate of disappearance of labeled plasma proteins for comparison of behavior of the plasma albumin and globulin fractions; shows more rapid turn over of globulin fraction.

  3. Lysine and arginine requirements of Salminus brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jony Koji Dairiki

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the dietary lysine (DL and dietary arginine (DA requirements of dourado (Salminus brasiliensis, through dose-response trials using the amino acid profiles of whole carcasses as a reference. Two experiments were carried out in a completely randomized design (n=4. In the first experiment, groups of 12 feed-conditioned dourado juveniles (11.4±0.2 g were stocked in 60 L cages placed in 300 L plastic indoor tanks in a closed circulation system. Fish were fed for 60 days on diets containing 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, or 3.5 % dietary lysine. In the second experiment, dourado juveniles (27.0±0.8 g were fed for 60 days on semipurified diets containing arginine at 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 or 3.0%, in similar conditions to those of the first experiment. Optimal DL requirements, as determined by broken-line analysis method for final weight, weight gain and specific growth rate, were 2.15% DL or 5% lysine in dietary protein, and 1.48% DA or 3.43% arginine in dietary protein. The best feed conversion ratio is attained with 2.5% DL or 5.8% lysine in dietary protein and 1.4% DA or 3.25% arginine in dietary protein.

  4. Lysine kinetics in preterm infants: the importance of enteral feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R.D. van der Schoor (Sophie); P.J. Reeds; F. Stellaard; J.L.D. Wattimena (Josias); P.J.J. Sauer (Pieter); H.A. Büller (Hans); J.B. van Goudoever (Hans)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractINTRODUCTION: Lysine is the first limiting essential amino acid in the diet of newborns. First pass metabolism by the intestine of dietary lysine has a direct effect on systemic availability. We investigated whether first pass lysine metabolism in the intestine is high

  5. Lysine kinetics in preterm infants : the importance of enteral feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoor, SRD; Reeds, PJ; Stellaard, F; Wattimena, JDL; Sauer, PJJ; Buller, HA; van Goudoever, JB

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Lysine is the first limiting essential amino acid in the diet of newborns. First pass metabolism by the intestine of dietary lysine has a direct effect on systemic availability. We investigated whether first pass lysine metabolism in the intestine is high in preterm infants, particular

  6. antiSMASH 3.0-a comprehensive resource for the genome mining of biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tilmann; Blin, Kai; Duddela, Srikanth; Krug, Daniel; Kim, Hyun Uk; Bruccoleri, Robert; Lee, Sang Yup; Fischbach, Michael A; Müller, Rolf; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko; Medema, Marnix H

    2015-07-01

    Microbial secondary metabolism constitutes a rich source of antibiotics, chemotherapeutics, insecticides and other high-value chemicals. Genome mining of gene clusters that encode the biosynthetic pathways for these metabolites has become a key methodology for novel compound discovery. In 2011, we introduced antiSMASH, a web server and stand-alone tool for the automatic genomic identification and analysis of biosynthetic gene clusters, available at http://antismash.secondarymetabolites.org. Here, we present version 3.0 of antiSMASH, which has undergone major improvements. A full integration of the recently published ClusterFinder algorithm now allows using this probabilistic algorithm to detect putative gene clusters of unknown types. Also, a new dereplication variant of the ClusterBlast module now identifies similarities of identified clusters to any of 1172 clusters with known end products. At the enzyme level, active sites of key biosynthetic enzymes are now pinpointed through a curated pattern-matching procedure and Enzyme Commission numbers are assigned to functionally classify all enzyme-coding genes. Additionally, chemical structure prediction has been improved by incorporating polyketide reduction states. Finally, in order for users to be able to organize and analyze multiple antiSMASH outputs in a private setting, a new XML output module allows offline editing of antiSMASH annotations within the Geneious software.

  7. Superoxide reduction by a superoxide reductase lacking the highly conserved lysine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ana F; Romão, Célia V; Pinto, Liliana C; Huber, Harald; Saraiva, Lígia M; Todorovic, Smilja; Cabelli, Diane; Teixeira, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are the most recently identified superoxide detoxification systems, being found in microorganisms from the three domains of life. These enzymes are characterized by a catalytic mononuclear iron site, with one cysteine and four histidine ligands of the ferrous active form. A lysine residue in the -EKHVP- motif, located close to the active site, has been considered to be essential for the enzyme function, by contributing to the positive surface patch that attracts the superoxide anion and by controlling the chemistry of the catalytic mechanism through a hydrogen bond network. However, we show here that this residue is substituted by non-equivalent amino acids in several putative SORs from Archaea and unicellular Eukarya. In this work, we focus on mechanistic and spectroscopic studies of one of these less common enzymes, the SOR from the hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. We employ pulse radiolysis fast kinetics and spectroscopic approaches to study the wild-type enzyme (-E23T24HVP-), and two mutants, T24K and E23A, the later mimicking enzymes lacking both the lysine and glutamate (a ferric ion ligand) of the motif. The efficiency of the wild-type protein and mutants in reducing superoxide is comparable to other SORs, revealing the robustness of these enzymes to single mutations.

  8. Interaction of L-lysine and soluble elastin with the semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase in the context of its vascular-adhesion and tissue maturation functions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Olivieri, Aldo

    2010-04-01

    The copper-containing quinoenzyme semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.21; SSAO) is a multifunctional protein. In some tissues, such as the endothelium, it also acts as vascular-adhesion protein 1 (VAP-1), which is involved in inflammatory responses and in the chemotaxis of leukocytes. Earlier work had suggested that lysine might function as a recognition molecule for SSAO\\/VAP-1. The present work reports the kinetics of the interaction of L-lysine and some of its derivatives with SSAO. Binding was shown to be saturable, time-dependent but reversible and to cause uncompetitive inhibition with respect to the amine substrate. It was also specific, since D-lysine, L-lysine ethyl ester and epsilon-acetyl-L-lysine, for example, did not bind to the enzyme. The lysine-rich protein soluble elastin bound to the enzyme relatively tightly, which may have relevance to the reported roles of SSAO in maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM) and in the maturation of elastin. Our data show that lysyl residues are not oxidized by SSAO, but they bind tightly to the enzyme in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. This suggests that binding in vivo of SSAO to lysyl residues in physiological targets might be regulated in the presence of H(2)O(2), formed during the oxidation of a physiological SSAO substrate, yet to be identified.

  9. Biosynthetic Polypeptides as Templates in Materials Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiick, Kristi

    2007-03-01

    Biosynthetic routes to protein-based polymeric materials offer important opportunities for the production of well-defined macromolecular templates, owing to the control of sequence and molecular weight inherent in the biosynthesis of proteins. In particular, the biosynthesis of polypeptides with controlled presentation of functional groups in multiple positions, coupled with their subsequent chemical modification with biologically relevant ligands, will permit the production of well-defined, bioactive macromolecules that may provide insight into biological binding events in which multivalent binding is important. Modification of the well-defined macromolecules with ligands such as saccharides has application in the study of events such as toxin neutralization and mediation of the immune and inflammatory responses. In this work, alanine-rich polypeptides of both random coil and helical conformations, equipped with glutamic acid residues to impart chemical versatility, have been produced via biosynthetic strategies. Analysis via spectroscopic and calorimetric methods indicates that the polypeptides adopt helical, beta-sheet, or random-coil conformations that can be controlled with variations in temperature, pH, and salt concentration; the conformational behavior of the polypeptides is not compromised upon chemical modification with saccharides. The binding of these macromolecules to bacterial toxins has been characterized via immunochemical and spectroscopic methods; results indicate that specific architectural features of the glycopolymer scaffold cause changes in the binding of these molecules to multivalent receptors. Given the chemical flexibility in the design of such scaffolds, they can be modified with many different moieties in addition to saccharides, so multiple opportunities exist for their application in areas where control of active side chains is important, such as in biomaterials, electronic devices, and bioinorganic structures.

  10. Assembly of a novel biosynthetic pathway for production of the plant flavonoid fisetin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlhut, Steen G; Siedler, Solvej; Malla, Sailesh; Harrison, Scott J; Maury, Jérôme; Neves, Ana Rute; Forster, Jochen

    2015-09-01

    Plant secondary metabolites are an underutilized pool of bioactive molecules for applications in the food, pharma and nutritional industries. One such molecule is fisetin, which is present in many fruits and vegetables and has several potential health benefits, including anti-cancer, anti-viral and anti-aging activity. Moreover, fisetin has recently been shown to prevent Alzheimer's disease in mice and to prevent complications associated with diabetes type I. Thus far the biosynthetic pathway of fisetin in plants remains elusive. Here, we present the heterologous assembly of a novel fisetin pathway in Escherichia coli. We propose a novel biosynthetic pathway from the amino acid, tyrosine, utilizing nine heterologous enzymes. The pathway proceeds via the synthesis of two flavanones never produced in microorganisms before--garbanzol and resokaempferol. We show for the first time a functional biosynthetic pathway and establish E. coli as a microbial platform strain for the production of fisetin and related flavonols. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Production of L-lysine on different silage juices using genetically engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuner, Andreas; Wagner, Ines; Sieker, Tim; Ulber, Roland; Schneider, Konstantin; Peifer, Susanne; Heinzle, Elmar

    2013-01-20

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, the best established industrial producer organism for lysine was genetically modified to allow the production of lysine on grass and corn silages. The resulting strain C. glutamicum lysC(fbr)dld(Psod)pyc(Psod)malE(Psod)fbp(Psod)gapX(Psod) was based on earlier work (Neuner and Heinzle, 2011). That mutant carries a point mutation in the aspartokinase (lysC) regulatory subunit gene as well as overexpression of D-lactate dehydrogenase (dld), pyruvate carboxylase (pyc) and malic enzyme (malE) using the strong Psod promoter. Here, we additionally overexpressed fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (fbp) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gapX) using the same promoter. The resulting strain grew readily on grass and corn silages with a specific growth rate of 0.35 h⁻¹ and lysine carbon yields of approximately 90 C-mmol (C-mol)⁻¹. Lysine yields were hardly affected by oxygen limitation whereas linear growth was observed under oxygen limiting conditions. Overall, this strain seems very robust with respect to the composition of silage utilizing all quantified low molecular weight substrates, e.g. lactate, glucose, fructose, maltose, quinate, fumarate, glutamate, leucine, isoleucine and alanine.

  12. Molecular evolution of paclitaxel biosynthetic genes TS and DBAT of Taxus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Da Cheng; Yang, Ling; Huang, Beili

    2009-03-01

    Evolutionary patterns of sequence divergence were analyzed in genes from the conifer genus Taxus (yew), encoding paclitaxel biosynthetic enzymes taxadiene synthase (TS) and 10-deacetylbaccatin III-10 beta-O-acetyltransferase (DBAT). N-terminal fragments of TS, full-length DBAT and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) were amplified from 15 closely related Taxus species and sequenced. Premature stop codons were not found in TS and DBAT sequences. Codon usage bias was not found, suggesting that synonymous mutations are selectively neutral. TS and DBAT gene trees are not consistent with the ITS tree, where species formed monophyletic clades. In fact, for both genes, alleles were sometimes shared across species and parallel amino acid substitutions were identified. While both TS and DBAT are, overall, under purifying selection, we identified a number of amino acids of TS under positive selection based on inference using maximum likelihood models. Positively selected amino acids in the N-terminal region of TS suggest that this region might be more important for enzyme function than previously thought. Moreover, we identify lineages with significantly elevated rates of amino acid substitution using a genetic algorithm. These findings demonstrate that the pattern of adaptive paclitaxel biosynthetic enzyme evolution can be documented between closely related Taxus species, where species-specific taxane metabolism has evolved recently.

  13. Stimulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthetic pathways delays axonal degeneration after axotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yo; Araki, Toshiyuki; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2006-08-16

    Axonal degeneration occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases and after traumatic injury and is a self-destructive program independent from programmed cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that overexpression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (Nmnat1) or exogenous application of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) can protect axons of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from degeneration caused by mechanical or neurotoxic injury. In mammalian cells, NAD can be synthesized from multiple precursors, including tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside (NmR), via multiple enzymatic steps. To determine whether other components of these NAD biosynthetic pathways are capable of delaying axonal degeneration, we overexpressed each of the enzymes involved in each pathway and/or exogenously administered their respective substrates in DRG cultures and assessed their capacity to protect axons after axotomy. Among the enzymes tested, Nmnat1 had the strongest protective effects, whereas nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase showed moderate protective activity in the presence of their substrates. Strong axonal protection was also provided by Nmnat3, which is predominantly located in mitochondria, and an Nmnat1 mutant localized to the cytoplasm, indicating that the subcellular location of NAD production is not crucial for protective activity. In addition, we showed that exogenous application of the NAD precursors that are the substrates of these enzymes, including nicotinic acid mononucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, and NmR, can also delay axonal degeneration. These results indicate that stimulation of NAD biosynthetic pathways via a variety of interventions may be useful in preventing or delaying axonal degeneration.

  14. plantiSMASH: automated identification, annotation and expression analysis of plant biosynthetic gene clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kautsar, Satria A.; Suarez Duran, Hernando G.; Blin, Kai

    2017-01-01

    of predicted biosynthetic enzyme-coding genes, and facilitates comparative genomic analysis to study the evolutionary conservation of each cluster. Applied on 48 high-quality plant genomes, plantiSMASH identifies a rich diversity of candidate plant BGCs. These results will guide further experimental...... exploration of the nature and dynamics of gene clustering in plant metabolism. Moreover, spurred by the continuing decrease in costs of plant genome sequencing, they will allow genome mining technologies to be applied to plant natural product discovery. The plantiSMASH web server, precalculated results...

  15. Structural basis for the site-specific incorporation of lysine derivatives into proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Flügel

    Full Text Available Posttranslational modifications (PTMs of proteins determine their structure-function relationships, interaction partners, as well as their fate in the cell and are crucial for many cellular key processes. For instance chromatin structure and hence gene expression is epigenetically regulated by acetylation or methylation of lysine residues in histones, a phenomenon known as the 'histone code'. Recently it was shown that these lysine residues can furthermore be malonylated, succinylated, butyrylated, propionylated and crotonylated, resulting in significant alteration of gene expression patterns. However the functional implications of these PTMs, which only differ marginally in their chemical structure, is not yet understood. Therefore generation of proteins containing these modified amino acids site specifically is an important tool. In the last decade methods for the translational incorporation of non-natural amino acids using orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS:tRNAaaCUA pairs were developed. A number of studies show that aaRS can be evolved to use non-natural amino acids and expand the genetic code. Nevertheless the wild type pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS from Methanosarcina mazei readily accepts a number of lysine derivatives as substrates. This enzyme can further be engineered by mutagenesis to utilize a range of non-natural amino acids. Here we present structural data on the wild type enzyme in complex with adenylated ε-N-alkynyl-, ε-N-butyryl-, ε-N-crotonyl- and ε-N-propionyl-lysine providing insights into the plasticity of the PylRS active site. This shows that given certain key features in the non-natural amino acid to be incorporated, directed evolution of this enzyme is not necessary for substrate tolerance.

  16. Role of lysine and acidic amino acid residues on the insecticidal activity of Jackbean urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real-Guerra, Rafael; Carlini, Célia Regina; Stanisçuaski, Fernanda

    2013-09-01

    Canavalia ensiformis has three isoforms of urease: Jackbean urease (JBU), Jackbean urease II and canatoxin. These isoforms present several biological activities, independent from the enzymatic property, such as entomotoxicity and antifungal properties. The entomotoxic activity is a property of the whole protein, as well as of a 10 kDa peptide released by insect digestive enzymes. Here we have used chemical modification to observe the influence of lysines and acidic residues on JBU enzymatic and insecticidal activities. Chemical modification of lysine residues was performed with dimethylamine-borane complex and formaldehyde, and acidic residues were modified by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and ethylenediamine. Derivatized ureases, called JBU-Lys (lysine-modified) and JBU-Ac (acidic residues-modified), were assayed for their biochemical and insecticidal properties. Neither modification altered significantly the kinetic parameters analyzed, indicating that no residue critical for the enzyme activity was affected and that the modifications did not incur in any significant structural alteration. On the other hand, both modifications reduced the toxic activity of the native protein fed to Dysdercus peruvianus. The changes observed in the entomotoxic property of the derivatized proteins reflect alterations in different steps of JBU's toxicity towards insects. JBU-Ac is not susceptible to hydrolysis by insect digestive enzymes, hence impairing the release of toxic peptide(s), while JBU-Lys is processed as the native protein. On the other hand, the antidiuretic effect of JBU on Rhodnius prolixus is altered in JBU-Lys, but not in JBU-Ac. Altogether, these data emphasize the role of lysine and acidic residues on the insecticidal properties of ureases.

  17. The biosynthetic basis of adult lactase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Witte, J; Lloyd, M.; Lorenzsonn, V; Korsmo, H.; Olsen, W.

    1990-01-01

    The intestinal brush-border enzyme lactase splits lactose into its component monosaccharides, glucose and galactose. Relative deficiency of the enzyme during adulthood is a common condition worldwide and is frequently associated with symptoms of lactose intolerance. We studied the synthesis and processing of lactase in normal and adult hypolactasic subjects using human intestinal explants in organ culture. Metabolic labeling experiments in our control subjects with [35S]methionine followed by...

  18. Lysine glutarylation is a protein posttranslational modification regulated by SIRT5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Minjia; Peng, Chao; Anderson, Kristin A; Chhoy, Peter; Xie, Zhongyu; Dai, Lunzhi; Park, Jeongsoon; Chen, Yue; Huang, He; Zhang, Yi; Ro, Jennifer; Wagner, Gregory R; Green, Michelle F; Madsen, Andreas S; Schmiesing, Jessica; Peterson, Brett S; Xu, Guofeng; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Braulke, Thomas; Mühlhausen, Chris; Backos, Donald S; Olsen, Christian A; McGuire, Peter J; Pletcher, Scott D; Lombard, David B; Hirschey, Matthew D; Zhao, Yingming

    2014-04-01

    We report the identification and characterization of a five-carbon protein posttranslational modification (PTM) called lysine glutarylation (Kglu). This protein modification was detected by immunoblot and mass spectrometry (MS), and then comprehensively validated by chemical and biochemical methods. We demonstrated that the previously annotated deacetylase, sirtuin 5 (SIRT5), is a lysine deglutarylase. Proteome-wide analysis identified 683 Kglu sites in 191 proteins and showed that Kglu is highly enriched on metabolic enzymes and mitochondrial proteins. We validated carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1 (CPS1), the rate-limiting enzyme in urea cycle, as a glutarylated protein and demonstrated that CPS1 is targeted by SIRT5 for deglutarylation. We further showed that glutarylation suppresses CPS1 enzymatic activity in cell lines, mice, and a model of glutaric acidemia type I disease, the last of which has elevated glutaric acid and glutaryl-CoA. This study expands the landscape of lysine acyl modifications and increases our understanding of the deacylase SIRT5.

  19. Metabolic responses to pyruvate kinase deletion in lysine producing Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittmann Christoph

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyruvate kinase is an important element in flux control of the intermediate metabolism. It catalyzes the irreversible conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate into pyruvate and is under allosteric control. In Corynebacterium glutamicum, this enzyme was regarded as promising target for improved production of lysine, one of the major amino acids in animal nutrition. In pyruvate kinase deficient strains the required equimolar ratio of the two lysine precursors oxaloacetate and pyruvate can be achieved through concerted action of the phosphotransferase system (PTS and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, whereby a reduced amount of carbon may be lost as CO2 due to reduced flux into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. In previous studies, deletion of pyruvate kinase in lysine-producing C. glutamicum, however, did not yield a clear picture and the exact metabolic consequences are not fully understood. Results In this work, deletion of the pyk gene, encoding pyruvate kinase, was carried out in the lysine-producing strain C. glutamicum lysCfbr, expressing a feedback resistant aspartokinase, to investigate the cellular response to deletion of this central glycolytic enzyme. Pyk deletion was achieved by allelic replacement, verified by PCR analysis and the lack of in vitro enzyme activity. The deletion mutant showed an overall growth behavior (specific growth rate, glucose uptake rate, biomass yield which was very similar to that of the parent strain, but differed in slightly reduced lysine formation, increased formation of the overflow metabolites dihydroxyacetone and glycerol and in metabolic fluxes around the pyruvate node. The latter involved a flux shift from pyruvate carboxylase (PC to PEPC, by which the cell maintained anaplerotic supply of the TCA cycle. This created a metabolic by-pass from PEP to pyruvate via malic enzyme demonstrating its contribution to metabolic flexibility of C. glutamicum on glucose. Conclusion The metabolic

  20. The Role of Nuclear Receptor-Binding SET Domain Family Histone Lysine Methyltransferases in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Richard L; Swaroop, Alok; Troche, Catalina; Licht, Jonathan D

    2017-06-01

    The nuclear receptor-binding SET Domain (NSD) family of histone H3 lysine 36 methyltransferases is comprised of NSD1, NSD2 (MMSET/WHSC1), and NSD3 (WHSC1L1). These enzymes recognize and catalyze methylation of histone lysine marks to regulate chromatin integrity and gene expression. The growing number of reports demonstrating that alterations or translocations of these genes fundamentally affect cell growth and differentiation leading to developmental defects illustrates the importance of this family. In addition, overexpression, gain of function somatic mutations, and translocations of NSDs are associated with human cancer and can trigger cellular transformation in model systems. Here we review the functions of NSD family members and the accumulating evidence that these proteins play key roles in tumorigenesis. Because epigenetic therapy is an important emerging anticancer strategy, understanding the function of NSD family members may lead to the development of novel therapies. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  1. Lysine fortification: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellett, Peter L; Ghosh, Shibani

    2004-06-01

    Fortification with lysine to improve the protein value of human diets that are heavily based on cereals has received support from the results of these recent studies [1,2]. Support also comes from examination of average food and nutrient availability data derived from food balance sheets. Whereas nutritional status is influenced by the nutrient content of foods consumed in relation to need, the requirements for protein and amino acids are influenced by many additional factors [10, 12, 14, 28, 29]. These include age, sex, body size, physical activity, growth, pregnancy and lactation, infection, and the efficiency of nutrient utilization. Even if the immune response was influenced by the added lysine, adequate water and basic sanitation would remain essential. Acute and chronic undernutrition and most micronutrient deficiencies primarily affect poor and deprived people who do not have access to food of adequate nutritional value, live in unsanitary environments without access to clean water and basic services, and lack access to appropriate education and information [30]. A further variable is the possible interaction between protein and food energy availability [31]. This could affect the protein value of diets when food energy is limiting to a significant degree. Thus, the additional effects of food energy deficiency on protein utilization could well be superimposed on the very poorest. The improvement of dietary diversity must be the long-term aim, with dietary fortification considered only a short-term solution. The former should take place as wealth improves and the gaps between rich and poor diminish. Although such changes are taking place, they are highly uneven. Over the last several decades, increases have occurred in the availability of food energy, total protein, and animal protein for both developed and developing countries. However, for the very poorest developing countries over the same period, changes have been almost nonexistent, and the values for

  2. Role of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, E D; Weigert, C

    2000-09-01

    The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway has been hypothesized to be involved in the development of insulin resistance and diabetic vascular complications. In particular, it was demonstrated that hyperglycemia-induced production of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta1), a prosclerotic cytokine causally involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Several lines of evidence indicate that TGF-beta1 induction is mediated by the hexosamine pathway. In cultured mesangial cells, high glucose levels induce TGF-beta1 production. This effect is eliminated by inhibition of glutamine: fructose-6-phosphate-amidotransferase (GFAT), the rate-limiting enzyme of this pathway. Furthermore, stable overexpression of GFAT increased levels of TGF-beta1 protein, mRNA, and promoter activity. Inasmuch as stimulation or inhibition of GFAT increased or decreased high glucose-stimulated activity of protein kinase C (PKC), respectively, the observed effects appear to be transduced by PKC. In similar experiments, involvement of the hexosamine pathway in hyperglycemia-induced production of cytokines (TGF-alpha and basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF]) was demonstrated in vascular smooth muscle cells. These studies also revealed a rapid increase in GFAT activity by treatment with agents that elevated levels of cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP), thus indicating that GFAT activity is tightly regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. Using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, high expression of GFAT was found in human adipocytes, skeletal muscle, vascular smooth muscle cells, and renal tubular epithelial cells. whereas glomerular cells remained essentially unstained. However, significant staining occurred in glomerular cells of patients with diabetic nephropathy. Current data indicate that the flux through the hexosamine pathway, regulated by GFAT, may be causally involved in the development of diabetic vascular disease, particularly diabetic nephropathy.

  3. Recognition of arylsulfatase A and B by the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-phosphotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghootfam, Afshin; Schestag, Frank; Dierks, Thomas; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2003-08-29

    The critical step for sorting of lysosomal enzymes is the recognition by a Golgi-located phosphotransferase. The topogenic structure common to all lysosomal enzymes essential for this recognition is still not well defined, except that lysine residues seem to play a critical role. Here we have substituted surface-located lysine residues of lysosomal arylsulfatases A and B. In lysosomal arylsulfatase A only substitution of lysine residue 457 caused a reduction of phosphorylation to 33% and increased secretion of the mutant enzyme. In contrast to critical lysines in various other lysosomal enzymes, lysine 457 is not located in an unstructured loop region but in a helix. It is not strictly conserved among six homologous lysosomal sulfatases. Based on three-dimensional structure comparison, lysines 497 and 507 in arylsulfatase B are in a similar position as lysine 457 of arylsulfatase A. Also, the position of oligosaccharide side chains phosphorylated in arylsulfatase A is similar in arylsulfatase B. Despite the high degree of structural homology between these two sulfatases substitution of lysines 497 and 507 in arylsulfatase B has no effect on the sorting and phosphorylation of this sulfatase. Thus, highly homologous lysosomal arylsulfatases A and B did not develop a single conserved phosphotransferase recognition signal, demonstrating the high variability of this signal even in evolutionary closely related enzymes.

  4. Identification of a novel sesquiterpene biosynthetic machinery involved in astellolide biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Yasutomo; Takahashi, Shunji; Osada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Yasuji

    2016-01-01

    Esterified drimane-type sesquiterpene lactones such as astellolides display various biological activities and are widely produced by plants and fungi. Given their low homology to known sesquiterpene cyclases, the genes responsible for their biosynthesis have not been uncovered yet. Here, we identified the astellolide gene cluster from Aspergillus oryzae and discovered a novel sesquiterpene biosynthetic machinery consisting of AstC, AstI, and AstK. All these enzymes are annotated as haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolases, whereas AstC also contains a DxDTT motif conserved in class II diterpene cyclases. Based on enzyme reaction analyses, we found that AstC catalysed the protonation-initiated cyclisation of farnesyl pyrophosphate into drimanyl pyrophosphate. This was successively dephosphorylated by AstI and AstK to produce drim-8-ene-11-ol. Moreover, we also identified and characterised a unique non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, AstA, responsible for esterifying aryl acids to drimane-type sesquiterpene lactones. In this study, we highlight a new biosynthetic route for producing sesquiterpene and its esterified derivative. Our findings shed light on the identification of novel sesquiterpenes via genome mining. PMID:27628599

  5. Modulation of guanosine nucleotides biosynthetic pathways enhanced GDP-L-fucose production in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won-Heong; Shin, So-Yeon; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Han, Nam Soo; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-03-01

    Guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) is the key substrate for biosynthesis of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-L-fucose. In this study, improvement of GDP-L-fucose production was attempted by manipulating the biosynthetic pathway for guanosine nucleotides in recombinant Escherichia coli-producing GDP-L-fucose. The effects of overexpression of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) dehydrogenase, guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) synthetase (GuaB and GuaA), GMP reductase (GuaC) and guanosine-inosine kinase (Gsk) on GDP-L-fucose production were investigated in a series of fed-batch fermentations. Among the enzymes tested, overexpression of Gsk led to a significant improvement of GDP-L-fucose production. Maximum GDP-L-fucose concentration of 305.5 ± 5.3 mg l(-1) was obtained in the pH-stat fed-batch fermentation of recombinant E. coli-overexpressing Gsk, which corresponds to a 58% enhancement in the GDP-L-fucose production compared with the control strain overexpressing GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic enzymes. Such an enhancement of GDP-L-fucose production could be due to the increase in the intracellular level of GMP.

  6. Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoes, Jan C; Sandmann, Gerhard; Visser, Hans; Diaz, Maria; van Mossel, Minca; van Ooyen, Albert J J

    2003-07-01

    The crtYB locus was used as an integrative platform for the construction of specific carotenoid biosynthetic mutants in the astaxanthin-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The crtYB gene of X. dendrorhous, encoding a chimeric carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme, could be inactivated by both single and double crossover events, resulting in non-carotenoid-producing transformants. In addition, the crtYB gene, linked to either its homologous or a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter, was overexpressed in the wild type and a beta-carotene-accumulating mutant of X. dendrorhous. In several transformants containing multiple copies of the crtYB gene, the total carotenoid content was higher than in the control strain. This increase was mainly due to an increase of the beta-carotene and echinone content, whereas the total content of astaxanthin was unaffected or even lower. Overexpression of the phytoene synthase-encoding gene (crtI) had a large impact on the ratio between mono- and bicyclic carotenoids. Furthermore, we showed that in metabolic engineered X. dendrorhous strains, the competition between the enzymes phytoene desaturase and lycopene cyclase for lycopene governs the metabolic flux either via beta-carotene to astaxanthin or via 3,4-didehydrolycopene to 3-hydroxy-3'-4'-didehydro-beta-psi-caroten-4-one (HDCO). The monocylic carotenoid torulene and HDCO, normally produced as minority carotenoids, were the main carotenoids produced in these strains.

  7. Genome sequence of Thermofilum pendens reveals an exceptional loss of biosynthetic pathways without genome reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Anderson, Iain; Rodriguez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S.; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Detter, Chris; Zhulin, Igor B.; Olsen, Gary J.; Whitman, William; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching, hyperthermophilic member of the order Thermoproteales within the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It is an extracellular commensal, requiring an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. In fact T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than obligate intracellular parasites, although it does not display other features common among obligate parasites and thus does not appear to be in the process of becoming a parasite. It appears that T. pendens has adapted to life in an environment rich in nutrients. T. pendens was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have a transporter of the phosphotransferase system. In addition to fermentation, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein. Predicted highly expressed proteins do not include housekeeping genes, and instead include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins.

  8. Exploring lysine riboswitch for metabolic flux control and improvement of L-lysine synthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Bang; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-06-19

    Riboswitch, a regulatory part of an mRNA molecule that can specifically bind a metabolite and regulate gene expression, is attractive for engineering biological systems, especially for the control of metabolic fluxes in industrial microorganisms. Here, we demonstrate the use of lysine riboswitch and intracellular l-lysine as a signal to control the competing but essential metabolic by-pathways of lysine biosynthesis. To this end, we first examined the natural lysine riboswitches of Eschericia coli (ECRS) and Bacillus subtilis (BSRS) to control the expression of citrate synthase (gltA) and thus the metabolic flux in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in E. coli. ECRS and BSRS were then successfully used to control the gltA gene and TCA cycle activity in a lysine producing strain Corynebacterium glutamicum LP917, respectively. Compared with the strain LP917, the growth of both lysine riboswitch-gltA mutants was slower, suggesting a reduced TCA cycle activity. The lysine production was 63% higher in the mutant ECRS-gltA and 38% higher in the mutant BSRS-gltA, indicating a higher metabolic flux into the lysine synthesis pathway. This is the first report on using an amino acid riboswitch for improvement of lysine biosynthesis. The lysine riboswitches can be easily adapted to dynamically control other essential but competing metabolic pathways or even be engineered as an "on-switch" to enhance the metabolic fluxes of desired metabolic pathways.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of chicken NK-lysin against Eimeria sporozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yeong H; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Siragusa, Gregory R; Bannerman, Douglas D; Lillehoj, Erik P

    2008-06-01

    NK-lysin is an antimicrobial and antitumor polypeptide that is considered to play an important role in innate immunity. Chicken NK-lysin is a member of the saposin-like protein family and exhibits potent antitumor cell activity. To evaluate the antimicrobial properties of chicken NK-lysin, we examined its ability to reduce the viability of various bacterial strains and two species of Eimeria parasites. Culture supernatants from COS7 cells transfected with a chicken NK-lysin cDNA and His-tagged purified NK-lysin from the transfected cells both showed high cytotoxic activity against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria maxima sporozoites. In contrast, no bactericidal activity was observed. Further studies using synthetic peptides derived from NK-lysin may be useful for pharmaceutical and agricultural uses in the food animal industry.

  10. Regulation of polyamine biosynthetic activity by spermidine and spermine analogs--a novel antiproliferative strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, C W; Bergeron, R J

    1988-01-01

    Interference with polyamine biosynthesis by analog-mediated regulatory mechanisms represents a viable alternative to the use of specific enzyme inhibitors as an antiproliferative strategy. The approach is unique among antimetabolite approaches and is made possible by unusual characteristics inherent to the polyamines and their biosynthetic pathway. Current antitumor data obtained with these analogs provides indication of their potential usefulness as antitumor agents but, at the same time, demonstrates the need for improvement. This latter might be attained by the rational design of analogs which (a) bind more tightly at enzyme regulatory sites, (b) which are less able to substitute for natural polyamines in growth related functions and (c) which are eliminated less rapidly from tumor-bearing animals. At the same time, the continued preclinical development of available analogs might proceed most productively by targeting large cell lung carcinoma and melanoma and by examining the generality of the relationship between oncogene expression and the accompanying sensitivity to regulatory analogs.

  11. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping; Lowry, David; Jackson, Jennifer C; Roberson, Robert W; Lin, Xiaorong

    2016-03-22

    Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes.

  12. Origin of saxitoxin biosynthetic genes in cyanobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Moustafa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP is a potentially fatal syndrome associated with the consumption of shellfish that have accumulated saxitoxin (STX. STX is produced by microscopic marine dinoflagellate algae. Little is known about the origin and spread of saxitoxin genes in these under-studied eukaryotes. Fortuitously, some freshwater cyanobacteria also produce STX, providing an ideal model for studying its biosynthesis. Here we focus on saxitoxin-producing cyanobacteria and their non-toxic sisters to elucidate the origin of genes involved in the putative STX biosynthetic pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated a draft genome assembly of the saxitoxin-producing (STX+ cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis ACBU02 and searched for 26 candidate saxitoxin-genes (named sxtA to sxtZ that were recently identified in the toxic strain Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii T3. We also generated a draft assembly of the non-toxic (STX- sister Anabaena circinalis ACFR02 to aid the identification of saxitoxin-specific genes. Comparative phylogenomic analyses revealed that nine putative STX genes were horizontally transferred from non-cyanobacterial sources, whereas one key gene (sxtA originated in STX+ cyanobacteria via two independent horizontal transfers followed by fusion. In total, of the 26 candidate saxitoxin-genes, 13 are of cyanobacterial provenance and are monophyletic among the STX+ taxa, four are shared amongst STX+ and STX-cyanobacteria, and the remaining nine genes are specific to STX+ cyanobacteria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide evidence that the assembly of STX genes in ACBU02 involved multiple HGT events from different sources followed presumably by coordination of the expression of foreign and native genes in the common ancestor of STX+ cyanobacteria. The ability to produce saxitoxin was subsequently lost multiple independent times resulting in a nested relationship of STX+ and STX- strains among Anabaena

  13. Global analysis of lysine acetylation in strawberry leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianping eFang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein lysine acetylation is a reversible and dynamic post-translational modification. It plays an important role in regulating diverse cellular processes including chromatin dynamic, metabolic pathways and transcription in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although studies of lysine acetylome in plants have been reported, the throughput was not high enough, hindering the deep understanding of lysine acetylation in plant physiology and pathology. In this study, taking advantages of anti-acetyllysine-based enrichment and high-sensitive-mass spectrometer, we applied an integrated proteomic approach to comprehensively investigate lysine acetylome in strawberry. In total, we identified 1392 acetylation sites in 684 proteins, representing the largest dataset of acetylome in plants to date. To reveal the functional impacts of lysine acetylation in strawberry, intensive bioinformatic analysis was performed. The results significantly expanded our current understanding of plant acetylome and demonstrated that lysine acetylation is involved in multiple cellular metabolism and cellular processes. More interestingly, nearly 50% of all acetylated proteins identified in this work were localized in chloroplast and the vital role of lysine acetylation in photosynthesis was also revealed. Taken together, this study not only established the most extensive lysine acetylome in plants to date, but also systematically suggests the significant and unique roles of lysine acetylation in plants.

  14. Histone H4 Lysine 20 methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Stine; Schotta, Gunnar; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2013-01-01

    of histones have emerged as key regulators of genomic integrity. Intense research during the past few years has revealed histone H4 lysine 20 methylation (H4K20me) as critically important for the biological processes that ensure genome integrity, such as DNA damage repair, DNA replication and chromatin...... instability, demonstrating the important functions of H4K20 methylation in genome maintenance. In this review, we explain molecular mechanisms underlying these defects and discuss novel ideas for furthering our understanding of genome maintenance in higher eukaryotes....

  15. Mutation of aspartic acid-351, lysine-352, and lysine-515 alters the Ca2+ transport activity of the Ca2+-ATPase expressed in COS-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, K; MacLennan, D H

    1988-01-01

    Full-length cDNAs encoding neonatal and adult isoforms of the Ca2+-ATPase of rabbit fast-twitch skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum were expressed transiently in COS-1 cells. The microsomal fraction isolated from transfected COS-1 cells contained immunoreactive Ca2+-ATPase and catalyzed Ca2+ transport at rates at least 15-fold above controls. No differences were observed in either the rates or Ca2+ dependency of Ca2+ transport catalyzed by the two isoforms. Aspartic acid-351, the site of formation of the catalytic acyl phosphate in the enzyme, was mutated to asparagine, glutamic acid, serine, threonine, histidine, or alanine. In every case, Ca2+ transport activity and Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation were eliminated. Ca2+ transport was also eliminated by mutation of lysine-352 to arginine, glutamine, or glutamic acid or by mutation of Asp351-Lys352 to Lys351-Asp352. Mutation of lysine-515, the site of fluorescein isothiocyanate modification in the enzyme, resulted in diminished Ca2+ transport activity as follows: arginine, 60%; glutamine, 25%; glutamic acid, 5%. These results demonstrate the absolute requirement of acylphosphate formation for the Ca2+ transport function and define a residue important for ATP binding. They also demonstrate the feasibility of a thorough analysis of active sites in the Ca2+-ATPase by expression and site-specific mutagenesis. Images PMID:2966962

  16. Aspergillus nidulans as a platform for discovery and characterization of complex biosynthetic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere

    of secondary metabolites and 2) Developing A. nidulans as a model systemfor protein production with human-like glycan structure.  The first part of this study resulted in the development of a method for the transfer and expression ofintact biosynthetic gene clusters to A. nidulans to facilitate pathway...... of geodin. Expression of the enzymes inthe pathway was validated by transcription analysis and the functions of specific genes were investigatedby gene deletions. This proved that this method is a fast and easy way to transfer biosynthetic gene clustersregardless of size and characterize them. Furthermore......, a different approach to activate silent clusters wasdemonstrated, as the heterologous expression of a putative transcription factor from A. niger in A. nidulansinduced the synthesis of insect juvenile hormones in A. nidulans, which had previously not been reportedas fungal metabolites.  The second part...

  17. Genome mining of the hitachimycin biosynthetic gene cluster: involvement of a phenylalanine-2,3-aminomutase in biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Fumitaka; Kawamura, Koichi; Uchino, Asuka; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Numakura, Mario; Takayanagi, Ryuichi; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2015-04-13

    Hitachimycin is a macrolactam antibiotic with (S)-β-phenylalanine (β-Phe) at the starter position of its polyketide skeleton. To understand the incorporation mechanism of β-Phe and the modification mechanism of the unique polyketide skeleton, the biosynthetic gene cluster for hitachimycin in Streptomyces scabrisporus was identified by genome mining. The identified gene cluster contains a putative phenylalanine-2,3-aminomutase (PAM), five polyketide synthases, four β-amino-acid-carrying enzymes, and a characteristic amidohydrolase. A hitA knockout mutant showed no hitachimycin production, but antibiotic production was restored by feeding with (S)-β-Phe. We also confirmed the enzymatic activity of the HitA PAM. The results suggest that the identified gene cluster is responsible for the biosynthesis of hitachimycin. A plausible biosynthetic pathway for hitachimycin, including a unique polyketide skeletal transformation mechanism, is proposed.

  18. Mechanistic insights into the regulation of metabolic enzymes by acetylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The activity of metabolic enzymes is controlled by three principle levels: the amount of enzyme, the catalytic activity, and the accessibility of substrates. Reversible lysine acetylation is emerging as a major regulatory mechanism in metabolism that is involved in all three levels of controlling metabolic enzymes and is altered frequently in human diseases. Acetylation rivals other common posttranslational modifications in cell regulation not only in the number of substrates it modifies, but also the variety of regulatory mechanisms it facilitates. PMID:22826120

  19. File list: Oth.Unc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Unclassified ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Unc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Pan.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pancreas http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Plc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Plc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Placenta http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Plc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Unc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Unclassified ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Unc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Unc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Unclassified ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Unc.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Pan.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pancreas http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Plc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Plc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Placenta http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Plc.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Prs.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Prostate http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Prs.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Prostate http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Prs.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Prostate http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Plc.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Plc.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Placenta http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Plc.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Pan.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Pancreas http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Plc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Plc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Placenta http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Plc.10.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Prs.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Prostate http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Unc.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Unclassified ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Unc.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  14. Crystal Structure of a Novel Viral Protease with a Serine/Lysine Catalytic Dyad Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman,A.; Lee, J.; Delmas, B.; Paetzel, M.

    2006-01-01

    The blotched snakehead virus (BSNV), an aquatic birnavirus, encodes a polyprotein (NH2-pVP2-X-VP4-VP3-COOH) that is processed through the proteolytic activity of its own protease (VP4) to liberate itself and the viral proteins pVP2, X and VP3. The protein pVP2 is further processed by VP4 to give rise to the capsid protein VP2 and four structural peptides. We report here the crystal structure of a VP4 protease from BSNV, which displays a catalytic serine/lysine dyad in its active site. This is the first crystal structure of a birnavirus protease and the first crystal structure of a viral protease that utilizes a lysine general base in its catalytic mechanism. The topology of the VP4 substrate binding site is consistent with the enzymes substrate specificity and a nucleophilic attack from the si-face of the substrates scissile bond. Despite low levels of sequence identity, VP4 shows similarities in its active site to other characterized Ser/Lys proteases such as signal peptidase, LexA protease and Lon protease. Together, the structure of VP4 provides insights into the mechanism of a recently characterized clan of serine proteases that utilize a lysine general base and reveals the structure of potential targets for antiviral therapy, especially for other related and economically important viruses, such as infectious bursal disease virus in poultry and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in aquaculture.

  15. Quantification of Nε-(2-Furoylmethyl)-L-lysine (furosine), Nε-(Carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML), Nε-(Carboxyethyl)-L-lysine (CEL) and total lysine through stable isotope dilution assay and tandem mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troise, A.D.; Fiore, A.; Wiltafsky, M.; Fogliano, V.

    2015-01-01

    The control of Maillard reaction (MR) is a key point to ensure processed foods quality. Due to the presence of a primary amino group on its side chain, lysine is particularly prone to chemical modifications with the formation of Amadori products (AP), Nε-(Carboxymethyl)-L-lysine (CML),

  16. STUDY OF LYSINE AND ALANINE DELIVERANCE THROUGH POLYPYRROLE MEMBRANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhitasari Suratman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Electropolymerization processes of pyrrole and the usage of polypyrrole membrane as lysine and alanine deliverance have been studied by cyclic voltammetry technique. Polypyrrole membrane was prepared by electropolymerization processes of pyrrole in water based solvent containing sodium perchlorate as supporting electrolyte. Electropolymerization processes were carried out within potential range of 0-1100 mV vs Ag/AgCl reference electrode and at the scanning rate of 100 mV/s. In this study, lysine and alanine have been used as molecules which could easily be loaded on and released from polypyrrole membrane. The presence of lysine or alanine during electropolymerization process reduced the rate of electropolymerization of polypyrrole. In lysine or alanine transfer processes into polypyrrole membrane, the interaction between polypyrrole and lysine or alanine showed by the curve of E½ oxidation in respect of - log C. It proved that the E½ oxidation shifted to more positive potential showed by the increasing of concentration of lysine or alanine. Beside that, voltammetric responses of lysine and alanine transfered into polypyrrole membrane were found to be Nernstian. The results indicated that polypyrrole could be used as a sensor of lysine and alanine.   Keywords: Electropolymerization, polypyrrole membrane, voltammetry technique

  17. Digestible lysine levels in diets supplemented with ractopamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelar de Oliveira Souza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In order evaluate digestible lysine levels in diets supplemented with 20 ppm of ractopamine on the performance and carcass traits, 64 barrows with high genetic potential at finishing phase were allotted in a completely randomized block design with four digestible lysine levels (0.80, 0.90, 1.00, and 1.10%, eight replicates and two pigs per experimental unit. Initial body weight and pigs' kinship were used as criteria in the blocks formation. Diets were mainly composed of corn and soybean meal supplemented with minerals, vitamins and amino acids to meet pigs' nutritional requirements at the finishing phase, except for digestible lysine. No effect of digestible lysine levels was observed in animal performance. The digestible lysine intake increased linearly by increasing the levels of digestible lysine in the diets. Carcass traits were not influenced by the dietary levels of digestible lysine. The level of 0.80% of digestible lysine in diets supplemented with 20 ppm ractopamine meets the nutritional requirements of castrated male pigs during the finishing phase.

  18. The Tale of Protein Lysine Acetylation in the Cytoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Sadoul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reversible posttranslational modification of internal lysines in many cellular or viral proteins is now emerging as part of critical signalling processes controlling a variety of cellular functions beyond chromatin and transcription. This paper aims at demonstrating the role of lysine acetylation in the cytoplasm driving and coordinating key events such as cytoskeleton dynamics, intracellular trafficking, vesicle fusion, metabolism, and stress response.

  19. Bioavailability of lysine in heat-treated foods and feedstuffs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McArtney Rutherfurd, S.

    2010-01-01

    During the processing of foodstuffs, lysine can react with other compounds present to form nutritionally unavailable derivatives, the most common example of which are Maillard products. Maillard products can cause serious problems when determining the available lysine content of processed foods or f

  20. Bioavailability of lysine in heat-treated foods and feedstuffs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McArtney Rutherfurd, S.

    2010-01-01

    During the processing of foodstuffs, lysine can react with other compounds present to form nutritionally unavailable derivatives, the most common example of which are Maillard products. Maillard products can cause serious problems when determining the available lysine content of processed foods or

  1. Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity of AamAP1-Lysine, a Novel Synthetic Peptide Analog Derived from the Scorpion Venom Peptide AamAP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Almaaytah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is great interest in the development of antimicrobial peptides as a potentially novel class of antimicrobial agents. Several structural determinants are responsible for the antimicrobial and cytolytic activity of antimicrobial peptides. In our study, a new synthetic peptide analog, AamAP1-Lysine from the naturally occurring scorpion venom antimicrobial peptide AamAP1, was designed by modifying the parent peptide in order to increase the positive charge and optimize other physico-chemical parameters involved in antimicrobial activity. AamAP1-Lysine displayed potent antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration was in the range of 5 to 15 µM with a 10 fold increase in potency over the parent peptide. The hemolytic and antiproliferative activity of AamAP1-Lysine against eukaryotic mammalian cells was minimal at the concentration range needed to inhibit bacterial growth. The antibacterial mechanism analysis indicated that AamAP1-Lysine is probably inducing bacterial cell death through membrane damage and permeabilization determined by the release of β-galactosidase enzyme from peptide treated E. coli cells. DNA binding studies revealed that AamAP1-Lysine caused complete retardation of DNA migration and could display intracellular activities in addition to the membrane permeabilization mode of action reported earlier. In conclusion, AamAP1-Lysine could prove to be a potential candidate for antimicrobial drug development in future studies.

  2. Ochratoxin A Producing Fungi, Biosynthetic Pathway and Regulatory Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Liuqing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhao, Yueju; Liu, Yang

    2016-03-21

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillum species, is one of the most important mycotoxin contaminants in agricultural products. It is detrimental to human health because of its nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, and immunosuppression. OTA structurally consists of adihydrocoumarin moiety linked with l-phenylalanine via an amide bond. OTA biosynthesis has been putatively hypothesized, although several contradictions exist on some processes of the biosynthetic pathway. We discuss recent information on molecular studies of OTA biosynthesis despite insufficient genetic background in detail. Accordingly, genetic regulation has also been explored with regard to the interaction between the regulators and the environmental factors. In this review, we focus on three aspects of OTA: OTA-producing strains, OTA biosynthetic pathway and the regulation mechanisms of OTA production. This can pave the way to assist in protecting food and feed from OTA contamination by understanding OTA biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanisms.

  3. Natural Product Biosynthetic Diversity and Comparative Genomics of the Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Elke; Gugger, Muriel; Sivonen, Kaarina; Fewer, David P

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are an ancient lineage of slow-growing photosynthetic bacteria and a prolific source of natural products with intricate chemical structures and potent biological activities. The bulk of these natural products are known from just a handful of genera. Recent efforts have elucidated the mechanisms underpinning the biosynthesis of a diverse array of natural products from cyanobacteria. Many of the biosynthetic mechanisms are unique to cyanobacteria or rarely described from other organisms. Advances in genome sequence technology have precipitated a deluge of genome sequences for cyanobacteria. This makes it possible to link known natural products to biosynthetic gene clusters but also accelerates the discovery of new natural products through genome mining. These studies demonstrate that cyanobacteria encode a huge variety of cryptic gene clusters for the production of natural products, and the known chemical diversity is likely to be just a fraction of the true biosynthetic capabilities of this fascinating and ancient group of organisms.

  4. Ochratoxin A Producing Fungi, Biosynthetic Pathway and Regulatory Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Liuqing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhao, Yueju; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillum species, is one of the most important mycotoxin contaminants in agricultural products. It is detrimental to human health because of its nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, and immunosuppression. OTA structurally consists of adihydrocoumarin moiety linked with l-phenylalanine via an amide bond. OTA biosynthesis has been putatively hypothesized, although several contradictions exist on some processes of the biosynthetic pathway. We discuss recent information on molecular studies of OTA biosynthesis despite insufficient genetic background in detail. Accordingly, genetic regulation has also been explored with regard to the interaction between the regulators and the environmental factors. In this review, we focus on three aspects of OTA: OTA-producing strains, OTA biosynthetic pathway and the regulation mechanisms of OTA production. This can pave the way to assist in protecting food and feed from OTA contamination by understanding OTA biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27007394

  5. Pectic enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benen, J.A.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Visser, J.

    2003-01-01

    The pectic enzymes comprise a diverse group of enzymes. They consist of main-chain depolymerases and esterases active on methyl- and acetylesters of galacturonosyl uronic acid residues. The depolymerizing enzymes comprise hydrolases as wel as lyases

  6. Pectic enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benen, J.A.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Visser, J.

    2003-01-01

    The pectic enzymes comprise a diverse group of enzymes. They consist of main-chain depolymerases and esterases active on methyl- and acetylesters of galacturonosyl uronic acid residues. The depolymerizing enzymes comprise hydrolases as wel as lyases

  7. Evolutionary systems biology of amino acid biosynthetic cost in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Barton

    Full Text Available Every protein has a biosynthetic cost to the cell based on the synthesis of its constituent amino acids. In order to optimise growth and reproduction, natural selection is expected, where possible, to favour the use of proteins whose constituents are cheaper to produce, as reduced biosynthetic cost may confer a fitness advantage to the organism. Quantifying the cost of amino acid biosynthesis presents challenges, since energetic requirements may change across different cellular and environmental conditions. We developed a systems biology approach to estimate the cost of amino acid synthesis based on genome-scale metabolic models and investigated the effects of the cost of amino acid synthesis on Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression and protein evolution. First, we used our two new and six previously reported measures of amino acid cost in conjunction with codon usage bias, tRNA gene number and atomic composition to identify which of these factors best predict transcript and protein levels. Second, we compared amino acid cost with rates of amino acid substitution across four species in the genus Saccharomyces. Regardless of which cost measure is used, amino acid biosynthetic cost is weakly associated with transcript and protein levels. In contrast, we find that biosynthetic cost and amino acid substitution rates show a negative correlation, but for only a subset of cost measures. In the economy of the yeast cell, we find that the cost of amino acid synthesis plays a limited role in shaping transcript and protein expression levels compared to that of translational optimisation. Biosynthetic cost does, however, appear to affect rates of amino acid evolution in Saccharomyces, suggesting that expensive amino acids may only be used when they have specific structural or functional roles in protein sequences. However, as there appears to be no single currency to compute the cost of amino acid synthesis across all cellular and environmental

  8. Enzyme assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  9. Differential Contributions of Ubiquitin-Modified APOBEC3G Lysine Residues to HIV-1 Vif-Induced Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Tiffany; Shao, Qiujia; Wang, Weiran; Wang, Yudi; Wang, Chenliang; Kinlock, Ballington; Liu, Bindong

    2016-08-28

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (A3G) is a host restriction factor that impedes HIV-1 replication. Viral integrity is salvaged by HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif), which mediates A3G polyubiquitination and subsequent cellular depletion. Previous studies have implied that A3G polyubiquitination is essential for Vif-induced degradation. However, the contribution of polyubiquitination to the rate of A3G degradation remains unclear. Here, we show that A3G polyubiquitination is essential for degradation. Inhibition of ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 by PYR-41 or blocking the formation of ubiquitin chains by over-expressing the lysine to arginine mutation of ubiquitin K48 (K48R) inhibited A3G degradation. Our A3G mutagenesis study showed that lysine residues 297, 301, 303, and 334 were not sufficient to render lysine-free A3G sensitive to Vif-mediated degradation. Our data also confirm that Vif could induce ubiquitin chain formation on lysine residues interspersed throughout A3G. Notably, A3G degradation relied on the lysine residues involved in polyubiquitination. Although A3G and the A3G C-terminal mutant interacted with Vif and were modified by ubiquitin chains, the latter remained more resistant to Vif-induced degradation. Furthermore, the A3G C-terminal mutant, but not the N-terminal mutant, maintained potent antiviral activity in the presence of Vif. Taken together, our results suggest that the location of A3G ubiquitin modification is a determinant for Vif-mediated degradation, implying that in addition to polyubiquitination, other factors may play a key role in the rate of A3G degradation.

  10. Differential hexosamine biosynthetic pathway gene expression with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Coomer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP culminates in the attachment of O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc onto serine/threonine residues of target proteins. The HBP is regulated by several modulators, i.e. O-linked β-N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase (OGT and β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (OGA catalyze the addition and removal of O-GlcNAc moieties, respectively; while flux is controlled by the rate-limiting enzyme glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFPT, transcribed by two genes, GFPT1 and GFPT2. Since increased HBP flux is glucose-responsive and linked to insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes onset, we hypothesized that diabetic individuals exhibit differential expression of HBP regulatory genes. Volunteers (n = 60; n = 20 Mixed Ancestry, n = 40 Caucasian were recruited from Stellenbosch and Paarl (Western Cape, South Africa and classified as control, pre- or diabetic according to fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c levels, respectively. RNA was purified from leukocytes isolated from collected blood samples and OGT, OGA, GFPT1 and GFPT2 expressions determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The data reveal lower OGA expression in diabetic individuals (P < 0.01, while pre- and diabetic subjects displayed attenuated OGT expression vs. controls (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively. Moreover, GFPT2 expression decreased in pre- and diabetic Caucasians vs. controls (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively. We also found ethnic differences, i.e. Mixed Ancestry individuals exhibited a 2.4-fold increase in GFPT2 expression vs. Caucasians, despite diagnosis (P < 0.01. Gene expression of HBP regulators differs between diabetic and non-diabetic individuals, together with distinct ethnic-specific gene profiles. Thus differential HBP gene regulation may offer diagnostic utility and provide candidate susceptibility genes for different ethnic groupings.

  11. Expression of phenazine biosynthetic genes during the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis of Glomus intraradices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionicia Gloria León-Martínez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To explore the molecular mechanisms that prevail during the establishment of the arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis involving the genus Glomus, we transcriptionally analysed spores of Glomus intraradices BE3 during early hyphal growth. Among 458 transcripts initially identified as being expressed at presymbiotic stages, 20% of sequences had homology to previously characterized eukaryotic genes, 30% were homologous to fungal coding sequences, and 9% showed homology to previously characterized bacterial genes. Among them, GintPbr1a encodes a homolog to Phenazine Biosynthesis Regulator (Pbr of Burkholderia cenocepacia, an pleiotropic regulatory protein that activates phenazine production through transcriptional activation of the protein D isochorismatase biosynthetic enzyme phzD (Ramos et al., 2010. Whereas GintPbr1a is expressed during the presymbiotic phase, the G. intraradices BE3 homolog of phzD (BGintphzD is transcriptionally active at the time of the establishment of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. DNA from isolated bacterial cultures found in spores of G. intraradices BE3 confirmed that both BGintPbr1a and BGintphzD are present in the genome of its potential endosymbionts. Taken together, our results indicate that spores of G. intraradices BE3 express bacterial phenazine biosynthetic genes at the onset of the fungal-plant symbiotic interaction.

  12. Bacterial Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Their Biosynthetic Genes, Functions, and Practical Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kiyohito; Hashimoto, Mikako; Hori, Ryuji; Adachi, Takumi; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Nagamine, Tadashi; Shimizu, Satoru; Ueno, Akio; Morita, Naoki

    2016-05-12

    The nutritional and pharmaceutical values of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) such as arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids have been well recognized. These LC-PUFAs are physiologically important compounds in bacteria and eukaryotes. Although little is known about the biosynthetic mechanisms and functions of LC-PUFAs in bacteria compared to those in higher organisms, a combination of genetic, bioinformatic, and molecular biological approaches to LC-PUFA-producing bacteria and some eukaryotes have revealed the notably diverse organization of the pfa genes encoding a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase complex (PUFA synthase), the LC-PUFA biosynthetic processes, and tertiary structures of the domains of this enzyme. In bacteria, LC-PUFAs appear to take part in specific functions facilitating individual membrane proteins rather than in the adjustment of the physical fluidity of the whole cell membrane. Very long chain polyunsaturated hydrocarbons (LC-HCs) such as hentriacontanonaene are considered to be closely related to LC-PUFAs in their biosynthesis and function. The possible role of LC-HCs in strictly anaerobic bacteria under aerobic and anaerobic environments and the evolutionary relationships of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria carrying pfa-like genes are also discussed.

  13. Bacterial Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Their Biosynthetic Genes, Functions, and Practical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyohito Yoshida

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional and pharmaceutical values of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs such as arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids have been well recognized. These LC-PUFAs are physiologically important compounds in bacteria and eukaryotes. Although little is known about the biosynthetic mechanisms and functions of LC-PUFAs in bacteria compared to those in higher organisms, a combination of genetic, bioinformatic, and molecular biological approaches to LC-PUFA-producing bacteria and some eukaryotes have revealed the notably diverse organization of the pfa genes encoding a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase complex (PUFA synthase, the LC-PUFA biosynthetic processes, and tertiary structures of the domains of this enzyme. In bacteria, LC-PUFAs appear to take part in specific functions facilitating individual membrane proteins rather than in the adjustment of the physical fluidity of the whole cell membrane. Very long chain polyunsaturated hydrocarbons (LC-HCs such as hentriacontanonaene are considered to be closely related to LC-PUFAs in their biosynthesis and function. The possible role of LC-HCs in strictly anaerobic bacteria under aerobic and anaerobic environments and the evolutionary relationships of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria carrying pfa-like genes are also discussed.

  14. The pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway modulates production of biofilm determinants in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Garavaglia

    Full Text Available Bacteria are often found in multicellular communities known as biofilms, which constitute a resistance form against environmental stresses. Extracellular adhesion and cell aggregation factors, responsible for bacterial biofilm formation and maintenance, are tightly regulated in response to physiological and environmental cues. We show that, in Escherichia coli, inactivation of genes belonging to the de novo uridine monophosphate (UMP biosynthetic pathway impairs production of curli fibers and cellulose, important components of the bacterial biofilm matrix, by inhibiting transcription of the csgDEFG operon, thus preventing production of the biofilm master regulator CsgD protein. Supplementing growth media with exogenous uracil, which can be converted to UMP through the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway, restores csgDEFG transcription and curli production. In addition, however, exogenous uracil triggers cellulose production, particularly in strains defective in either carB or pyrB genes, which encode enzymes catalyzing the first steps of de novo UMP biosynthesis. Our results indicate the existence of tight and complex links between pyrimidine metabolism and curli/cellulose production: transcription of the csgDEFG operon responds to pyrimidine nucleotide availability, while cellulose production is triggered by exogenous uracil in the absence of active de novo UMP biosynthesis. We speculate that perturbations in the UMP biosynthetic pathways allow the bacterial cell to sense signals such as starvation, nucleic acids degradation, and availability of exogenous pyrimidines, and to adapt the production of the extracellular matrix to the changing environmental conditions.

  15. Progress in research on bacteriophage lysins%噬菌体裂解酶的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张瑞安; 刘军; 冯书章

    2012-01-01

    噬菌体裂解酶是噬菌体在感染细菌后期表达的一类细胞壁水解酶,具有酶活性和底物特异性.多数噬菌体具有编码3种细胞壁水解酶即溶菌酶、酰胺酶和内肽酶的基因.本文综述了噬菌体裂解酶重组及其应用的研究,并探讨了近年来重组裂解酶的研究进展.%Bacteriophage lysins are cell wall lytic enzymes expressed in the late phase of bacterial infection,with enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Most of bacteriophages contain the genes encoding three kinds of cell wall lytic enzymes,i.e. lysozyme,N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase and endopeptidases. This paper reviews the recombination and application of bacteriophage lysins as well as the progress in research on recombinant lysins in recent years.

  16. Deciphering the sugar biosynthetic pathway and tailoring steps of nucleoside antibiotic A201A unveils a GDP-l-galactose mutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qinghua; Chen, Qi; Song, Yongxiang; Huang, Hongbo; Li, Jun; Ma, Junying; Li, Qinglian; Ju, Jianhua

    2017-05-09

    Galactose, a monosaccharide capable of assuming two possible configurational isomers (d-/l-), can exist as a six-membered ring, galactopyranose (Galp), or as a five-membered ring, galactofuranose (Galf). UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) mediates the conversion of pyranose to furanose thereby providing a precursor for d-Galf Moreover, UGM is critical to the virulence of numerous eukaryotic and prokaryotic human pathogens and thus represents an excellent antimicrobial drug target. However, the biosynthetic mechanism and relevant enzymes that drive l-Galf production have not yet been characterized. Herein we report that efforts to decipher the sugar biosynthetic pathway and tailoring steps en route to nucleoside antibiotic A201A led to the discovery of a GDP-l-galactose mutase, MtdL. Systematic inactivation of 18 of the 33 biosynthetic genes in the A201A cluster and elucidation of 10 congeners, coupled with feeding and in vitro biochemical experiments, enabled us to: (i) decipher the unique enzyme, GDP-l-galactose mutase associated with production of two unique d-mannose-derived sugars, and (ii) assign two glycosyltransferases, four methyltransferases, and one desaturase that regiospecifically tailor the A201A scaffold and display relaxed substrate specificities. Taken together, these data provide important insight into the origin of l-Galf-containing natural product biosynthetic pathways with likely ramifications in other organisms and possible antimicrobial drug targeting strategies.

  17. Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase in phytopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A J; Minocha, S C

    1989-01-01

    It has been reported that while bacteria and higher plants possess two different pathways for the biosynthesis of putrescine, via ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and arginine decarboxylase (ADC); the fungi, like animals, only use the former pathway. We found that contrary to the earlier reports, two of the phytopathogenic fungi (Ceratocystis minor and Verticillium dahliae) contain significant levels of ADC activity with very little ODC. The ADC in these fungi has high pH optimum (8.4) and low Km (0.237 mM for C. minor, 0.103 mM for V. dahliae), and is strongly inhibited by alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), putrescine and spermidine, further showing that this enzyme is probably involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and not in the catabolism of arginine as in Escherichia coli. The growth of these fungi is strongly inhibited by DFMA while alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) has little effect.

  18. Mycotoxin fumonisins: Health impacts and biosynthetic mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiaomei; WANG Jiansheng; YU Fengan; ZHU Xiangcheng; Zaleta-Rivera Kathia; DU Liangcheng

    2006-01-01

    Fumonisins are one of the most important groups of mycotoxins in agriculture and the food industry. They are produced by several widespread fungal pathogens of corn. Fumonisin contamination in maize-derived food and feeds causes several fatal diseases in livestock and poses a significant cancer risk to humans (Group 2B carcinogen). In the recent years, fumonisins have become a hot area in mycotoxin research. This review attempts to highlight the progress in the studies of molecular mechanisms for fumonisin biosynthesis and mode of action. The current understandings in the molecular basis for the cellular effects induced by fumonisins are discussed. Special attentions are paid to introduce the progress in the characterization of individual genes and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of fumonisins.

  19. Transformation with Oncogenic Ras and the Simian Virus 40 T Antigens Induces Caspase-Dependent Sensitivity to Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shihao; Spencer, Cody M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oncogenesis is frequently accompanied by the activation of specific metabolic pathways. One such pathway is fatty acid biosynthesis, whose induction is observed upon transformation of a wide variety of cell types. Here, we explored how defined oncogenic alleles, specifically the simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigens and oncogenic Ras12V, affect fatty acid metabolism. Our results indicate that SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation of fibroblasts induces fatty acid biosynthesis in the absence of significant changes in the concentration of fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes. This oncogene-induced activation of fatty acid biosynthesis was found to be mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) dependent, as it was attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Furthermore, SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation induced sensitivity to treatment with fatty acid biosynthetic inhibitors. Pharmaceutical inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase (ACC), a key fatty acid biosynthetic enzyme, induced caspase-dependent cell death in oncogene-transduced cells. In contrast, isogenic nontransformed cells were resistant to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition. This oncogene-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the cells' growth rates and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Both the activation of fatty acid biosynthesis and the sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition could be conveyed to nontransformed breast epithelial cells through transduction with oncogenic Ras12V. Similar to what was observed in the transformed fibroblasts, the Ras12V-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the proliferative status and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Combined, our results indicate that specific oncogenic alleles can directly confer sensitivity to inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis. IMPORTANCE Viral oncoproteins and cellular mutations

  20. Elucidation and in planta reconstitution of the parthenolide biosynthetic pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Q.; Manzano, D.; Tanic, N.; Pesic, M.; Bankovic, J.; Pateraki, I.; Ricard, L.; Ferrer, A.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Krol, van der A.R.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Parthenolide, the main bioactive compound of the medicinal plant feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), is a promising anti-cancer drug. However, the biosynthetic pathway of parthenolide has not been elucidated yet. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of all the genes from feverfew that a

  1. Evaluation of Biosynthetic Pathway and Engineered Biosynthesis of Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kishimoto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Varieties of alkaloids are known to be produced by various organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants, as secondary metabolites that exhibit useful bioactivities. However, understanding of how those metabolites are biosynthesized still remains limited, because most of these compounds are isolated from plants and at a trace level of production. In this review, we focus on recent efforts in identifying the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of those nitrogen-containing natural products and elucidating the mechanisms involved in the biosynthetic processes. The alkaloids discussed in this review are ditryptophenaline (dimeric diketopiperazine alkaloid, saframycin (tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid, strictosidine (monoterpene indole alkaloid, ergotamine (ergot alkaloid and opiates (benzylisoquinoline and morphinan alkaloid. This review also discusses the engineered biosynthesis of these compounds, primarily through heterologous reconstitution of target biosynthetic pathways in suitable hosts, such as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Those heterologous biosynthetic systems can be used to confirm the functions of the isolated genes, economically scale up the production of the alkaloids for commercial distributions and engineer the biosynthetic pathways to produce valuable analogs of the alkaloids. In particular, extensive involvement of oxidation reactions catalyzed by oxidoreductases, such as cytochrome P450s, during the secondary metabolite biosynthesis is discussed in details.

  2. The preliminary research for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Chang Hyun; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the solution to the production of bioactive substance using biotransformation process from core technology of biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology. And, this strategy will provide core technology for development of drugs as new concept and category. Research scopes and contents of project include 1) The development of mutant for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 2) The development of host for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 3) The preliminary study for biosynthetic engineering of isoflavone by radiation fusion technology. The results are as follows. Isoflavone compounds(daidzein, hydroxylated isoflavone) were analyzed by GC-MS. The study of radiation doses and p-NCA high-throughput screening for mutant development were elucidated. And, it was carried out the study of radiation doses for host development. Furthermore, the study of redox partner and construction of recombinant strain for region-specific hydroxylation(P450, redox partner). In addition, the biological effect of 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone as an anti-obesity agent was elucidated in this study.

  3. Minimum Information about a Biosynthetic Gene cluster : commentary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H; Kottmann, Renzo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Cummings, Matthew; Biggins, John B; Blin, Kai; de Bruijn, Irene; Chooi, Yit Heng; Claesen, Jan; Coates, R Cameron; Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Duddela, Srikanth; Dusterhus, Stephanie; Edwards, Daniel J; Fewer, David P; Garg, Neha; Geiger, Christoph; Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo; Greule, Anja; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Haines, Anthony S; Helfrich, Eric J N; Hillwig, Matthew L; Ishida, Keishi; Jones, Adam C; Jones, Carla S; Jungmann, Katrin; Kegler, Carsten; Kim, Hyun Uk; Kotter, Peter; Krug, Daniel; Masschelein, Joleen; Melnik, Alexey V; Mantovani, Simone M; Monroe, Emily A; Moore, Marcus; Moss, Nathan; Nutzmann, Hans-Wilhelm; Pan, Guohui; Pati, Amrita; Petras, Daniel; Reen, F Jerry; Rosconi, Federico; Rui, Zhe; Tian, Zhenhua; Tobias, Nicholas J; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Wiemann, Philipp; Wyckoff, Elizabeth; Yan, Xiaohui; Yim, Grace; Yu, Fengan; Xie, Yunchang; Aigle, Bertrand; Apel, Alexander K; Balibar, Carl J; Balskus, Emily P; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Bechthold, Andreas; Bode, Helge B; Borriss, Rainer; Brady, Sean F; Brakhage, Axel A; Caffrey, Patrick; Cheng, Yi-Qiang; Clardy, Jon; Cox, Russell J; De Mot, Rene; Donadio, Stefano; Donia, Mohamed S; van der Donk, Wilfred A; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Doyle, Sean; Driessen, Arnold J M; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Fischbach, Michael A; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H; Gross, Harald; Gust, Bertolt; Hertweck, Christian; Hofte, Monica; Jensen, Susan E; Ju, Jianhua; Katz, Leonard; Kaysser, Leonard; Klassen, Jonathan L; Keller, Nancy P; Kormanec, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Kwon, Hyung-Jin; Lautru, Sylvie; Lavigne, Rob; Lee, Chia Y; Linquan, Bai; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Wen; Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Mahmud, Taifo; Mast, Yvonne; Mendez, Carmen; Metsa-Ketela, Mikko; Micklefield, Jason; Mitchell, Douglas A; Moore, Bradley S; Moreira, Leonilde M; Muller, Rolf; Neilan, Brett A; Nett, Markus; Nielsen, Jens; O'Gara, Fergal; Oikawa, Hideaki; Osbourn, Anne; Osburne, Marcia S; Ostash, Bohdan; Payne, Shelley M; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Petricek, Miroslav; Piel, Jorn; Ploux, Olivier; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Salas, Jose A; Schmitt, Esther K; Scott, Barry; Seipke, Ryan F; Shen, Ben; Sherman, David H; Sivonen, Kaarina; Smanski, Michael J; Sosio, Margherita; Stegmann, Evi; Sussmuth, Roderich D; Tahlan, Kapil; Thomas, Christopher M; Tang, Yi; Truman, Andrew W; Viaud, Muriel; Walton, Jonathan D; Walsh, Christopher T; Weber, Tilmann; van Wezel, Gilles P; Wilkinson, Barrie; Willey, Joanne M; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Wright, Gerard D; Ziemert, Nadine; Zhang, Changsheng; Zotchev, Sergey B; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko; Glockner, Frank Oliver

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of enzymatic pathways that produce specialized metabolites in bacteria, fungi and plants are known to be encoded in biosynthetic gene clusters. Information about these clusters, pathways and metabolites is currently dispersed throughout the literature, making it difficult to exploit.

  4. Biosynthetic pathway of the phytohormone auxin in insects and screening of its inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Yokokura, Junpei; Ito, Tsukasa; Arai, Ryoma; Yokoyama, Chiaki; Toshima, Hiroaki; Nagata, Shinji; Asami, Tadao; Suzuki, Yoshihito

    2014-10-01

    Insect galls are abnormal plant tissues induced by galling insects. The galls are used for food and habitation, and the phytohormone auxin, produced by the insects, may be involved in their formation. We found that the silkworm, a non-galling insect, also produces an active form of auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), by de novo synthesis from tryptophan (Trp). A detailed metabolic analysis of IAA using IAA synthetic enzymes from silkworms indicated an IAA biosynthetic pathway composed of a three-step conversion: Trp → indole-3-acetaldoxime → indole-3-acetaldehyde (IAAld) → IAA, of which the first step is limiting IAA production. This pathway was shown to also operate in gall-inducing sawfly. Screening of a chemical library identified two compounds that showed strong inhibitory activities on the conversion step IAAld → IAA. The inhibitors can be efficiently used to demonstrate the importance of insect-synthesized auxin in gall formation in the future.

  5. Transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, Ksenia; Kayumov, Airat; Woyda, Kathrin; Ilinskaja, Olga; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-05-02

    The Bacillus subtilis glutamine synthetase (GS) plays a dual role in cell metabolism by functioning as catalyst and regulator. GS catalyses the ATP-dependent synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonium. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, GS becomes feedback-inhibited by high intracellular glutamine levels and then binds transcription factors GlnR and TnrA, which control the genes of nitrogen assimilation. While GS-bound TnrA is no longer able to interact with DNA, GlnR-DNA binding is shown to be stimulated by GS complex formation. In this paper we show a new physiological feature of the interaction between glutamine synthetase and TnrA. The transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in vivo and in vitro, while the GlnR protein does not affect the activity of the enzyme.

  6. Identification of a new diterpene biosynthetic gene cluster that produces O-methylkolavelool in Herpetosiphon aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Chiaki; Oshima, Misaki; Kurashima, Nodoka; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2015-03-23

    Diterpenoids are usually found in plants and fungi, but are rare in bacteria. We have previously reported new diterpenes, named tuberculosinol and isotuberculosinol, which are generated from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene products Rv3377c and Rv3378c. No homologous gene was found at that time, but we recently found highly homologous proteins in the Herpetosiphon aurantiacus ATCC 23779 genome. Haur_2145 was a class II diterpene cyclase responsible for the conversion of geranylgeranyl diphosphate into kolavenyl diphosphate. Haur_2146, homologous to Rv3378c, synthesized (+)-kolavelool through the nucleophilic addition of a water molecule to the incipient cation formed after the diphosphate moiety was released. Haur_2147 afforded (+)-O-methylkolavelool from (+)-kolavelool, so this enzyme was an O-methyltransferase. This new diterpene was indeed detected in H. aurantiacus cells. This is the first report of the identification of a (+)-O-methylkolavelool biosynthetic gene cluster.

  7. Nutrient shortage triggers the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway via the GCN2-ATF4 signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaveroux, Cédric; Sarcinelli, Carmen; Barbet, Virginie; Belfeki, Sofiane; Barthelaix, Audrey; Ferraro-Peyret, Carole; Lebecque, Serge; Renno, Toufic; Bruhat, Alain; Fafournoux, Pierre; Manié, Serge N

    2016-06-03

    The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) is a nutrient-sensing metabolic pathway that produces the activated amino sugar UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, a critical substrate for protein glycosylation. Despite its biological significance, little is known about the regulation of HBP flux during nutrient limitation. Here, we report that amino acid or glucose shortage increase GFAT1 production, the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the HBP. GFAT1 is a transcriptional target of the activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) induced by the GCN2-eIF2α signalling pathway. The increased production of GFAT1 stimulates HBP flux and results in an increase in O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine protein modifications. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that ATF4 provides a link between nutritional stress and the HBP for the regulation of the O-GlcNAcylation-dependent cellular signalling.

  8. Polymorphisms in monolignol biosynthetic genes are associated with biomass yield and agronomic traits in European maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongsheng; Zein, Imad; Brenner, Everton Alen; Andersen, Jeppe Reitan; Landbeck, Mathias; Ouzunova, Milena; Lübberstedt, Thomas

    2010-01-15

    Reduced lignin content leads to higher cell wall digestibility and, therefore, better forage quality and increased conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol. However, reduced lignin content might lead to weaker stalks, lodging, and reduced biomass yield. Genes encoding enzymes involved in cell wall lignification have been shown to influence both cell wall digestibility and yield traits. In this study, associations between monolignol biosynthetic genes and plant height (PHT), days to silking (DTS), dry matter content (DMC), and dry matter yield (DMY) were identified by using a panel of 39 European elite maize lines. In total, 10 associations were detected between polymorphisms or tight linkage disequilibrium (LD) groups within the COMT, CCoAOMT2, 4CL1, 4CL2, F5H, and PAL genomic fragments, respectively, and the above mentioned traits. The phenotypic variation explained by these polymorphisms or tight LD groups ranged from 6% to 25.8% in our line collection. Only 4CL1 and F5H were found to have polymorphisms associated with both yield and forage quality related characters. However, no pleiotropic polymorphisms affecting both digestibility of neutral detergent fiber (DNDF), and PHT or DMY were discovered, even under less stringent statistical conditions. Due to absence of pleiotropic polymorphisms affecting both forage yield and quality traits, identification of optimal monolignol biosynthetic gene haplotype(s) combining beneficial quantitative trait polymorphism (QTP) alleles for both quality and yield traits appears possible within monolignol biosynthetic genes. This is beneficial to maximize forage and bioethanol yield per unit land area.

  9. Druggability of the enzymes of the non-mevalonate-pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masini, Tiziana; Kroezen, Blijke S.; Hirsch, Anna K.H.

    2013-01-01

    The non-mevalonate pathway constitutes a source of novel drug targets. This biosynthetic route is essential for pathogens but is absent in humans. Our systematic evaluation of the druggability of all enzymes provides a convenient way of selecting targets that should be most easily inhibited by small

  10. The biosynthetic pathway for myxol-2' fucoside (myxoxanthophyll) in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Joel E; Bryant, Donald A

    2009-05-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 produces a variety of carotenoids, which comprise predominantly dicylic beta-carotene and two dicyclic xanthophylls, zeaxanthin and synechoxanthin. However, this cyanobacterium also produces a monocyclic myxoxanthophyll, which was identified as myxol-2' fucoside. Compared to the carotenoid glycosides produced by diverse microorganisms, cyanobacterial myxoxanthophyll and closely related compounds are unusual because they are glycosylated on the 2'-OH rather than on the 1'-OH position of the psi end of the molecule. In this study, the genes encoding two enzymes that modify the psi end of myxoxanthophyll in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 were identified. Mutational and biochemical studies showed that open reading frame SynPCC7002_A2032, renamed cruF, encodes a 1',2'-hydroxylase [corrected] and that open reading frame SynPCC7002_A2031, renamed cruG, encodes a 2'-O-glycosyltransferase. The enzymatic activity of CruF was verified by chemical characterization of the carotenoid products synthesized when cruF was expressed in a lycopene-producing strain of Escherichia coli. Database searches showed that homologs of cruF and cruG occur in the genomes of all sequenced cyanobacterial strains that are known to produce myxol or the acylic xanthophyll oscillaxanthin. The genomes of many other bacteria that produce hydroxylated carotenoids but do not contain crtC homologs also contain cruF orthologs. Based upon observable intermediates, a complete biosynthetic pathway for myxoxanthophyll is proposed. This study expands the suite of enzymes available for metabolic engineering of carotenoid biosynthetic pathways for biotechnological applications.

  11. Lysine-restricted diet and mild cerebral serotonin deficiency in a patient with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy caused by ALDH7A1 genetic defect

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Pyridoxine dependent epilepsy (PDE) is caused by mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene (PDE-ALDH7A1) encoding α-aminoadipic-semialdehyde-dehydrogenase enzyme in the lysine catabolic pathway resulting in an accumulation of α-aminoadipic-acid-semialdehyde (α-AASA). We present the one-year treatment outcome of a patient on a lysine-restricted diet. Serial cerebral-spinal-fluid (CSF) α-AASA and CSF pipecolic-acid levels showed decreased levels but did not normalize. He had a normal neurodevelopmental ...

  12. Silkworm(Bombyx mori)BmLid is a histone lysine demethylase with a broader specificity than its homolog in Drosophila and mammals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhou; Xiaonan Yang; Jianhao Jiang; Yubing Wang; Minghui Li; Muwang Li; Xuexia Miao; Yongping Huang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Histone methylation is a dynamic process that plays important roles in gene transcription regulation,and a number of enzymes have been shown to catalyze the removal of methyl marks[1].Shi et al.(2004)identified one of the amino oxidases,lysine-specific demetbylase 1(LSD1),as the first specific demethylase for both mono(me)and dimethylation(me2)of H3K4 and H3K9 in humans[2].Subsequently,a total of 27 JmjC-domaincontaining proteins have been discovered within the human genome,and 15 of them exhibit demethylation activities for specific lysines in the H3 tail[1].

  13. HDAC inhibitors induce global changes in histone lysine and arginine methylation and alter expression of lysine demethylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillico, Ryan; Sobral, Marina Gomez; Stesco, Nicholas; Lakowski, Ted M

    2016-02-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are cancer treatments that inhibit the removal of the epigenetic modification acetyllysine on histones, resulting in altered gene expression. Such changes in expression may influence other histone epigenetic modifications. We describe a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to quantify lysine acetylation and methylation and arginine methylation on histones extracted from cultured cells treated with HDAC inhibitors. The HDAC inhibitors vorinostat, mocetinostat and entinostat induced 400-600% hyperacetylation in HEK 293 and K562 cells. All HDAC inhibitors decreased histone methylarginines in HEK 293 cells but entinostat produced dose dependent reductions in asymmetric dimethylarginine, not observed in K562 cells. Vorinostat produced increases in histone lysine methylation and decreased expression of some lysine demethylases (KDM), measured by quantitative PCR. Entinostat had variable effects on lysine methylation and decreased expression of some KDM while increasing expression of others. Mocetinostat produced dose dependent increases in histone lysine methylation by LC-MS/MS. This was corroborated with a multiplex colorimetric assay showing increases in histone H3 lysine 4, 9, 27, 36 and 79 methylation. Increases in lysine methylation were correlated with dose dependent decreases in the expression of seven KDM. Mocetinostat functions as an HDAC inhibitor and a de facto KDM inhibitor.

  14. X-ray crystal structure of the streptococcal specific phage lysin PlyC

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Sheena; Buckle, Ashley M.; Mitchell, Michael S.; Hoopes, James T.; Gallagher, D. Travis; Heselpoth, Ryan D.; Shen, Yang; Reboul, Cyril F.; Law, Ruby H. P.; Fischetti, Vincent A.; Whisstock, James C.; Nelson, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages deploy lysins that degrade the bacterial cell wall and facilitate virus egress from the host. When applied exogenously, these enzymes destroy susceptible microbes and, accordingly, have potential as therapeutic agents. The most potent lysin identified to date is PlyC, an enzyme assembled from two components (PlyCA and PlyCB) that is specific for streptococcal species. Here the structure of the PlyC holoenzyme reveals that a single PlyCA moiety is tethered to a ring-shaped assembly of eight PlyCB molecules. Structure-guided mutagenesis reveals that the bacterial cell wall binding is achieved through a cleft on PlyCB. Unexpectedly, our structural data reveal that PlyCA contains a glycoside hydrolase domain in addition to the previously recognized cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolases/peptidases catalytic domain. The presence of eight cell wall-binding domains together with two catalytic domains may explain the extraordinary potency of the PlyC holoenyzme toward target bacteria. PMID:22807482

  15. Activity of a peptidase secreted by Phanerochaete chrysosporium depends on lysine to subsite S'1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Lilian Caroline Gonçalves; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Juliano, Luiz; Rosa, Jose C; Cabral, Hamilton

    2017-01-01

    Peptidases are enzymes that catalyze the rupture of peptide bonds. Catalytic specificity studies of these enzymes have illuminated their modes of action and preferred hydrolysis targets. We describe the biochemical characteristics and catalytic specificity of a lysine-dependent peptidase secreted by the basidiomycete fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. We attained 5.7-fold purification of a ∼23-kDa neutral peptidase using size-exclusion (Sephadex G-50 resin) and ion-exchange (Source 15S resin) chromatography. Using the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer substrate Abz-KLRSSKQ-EDDnp, we detected maximal activity at pH 7.0 and 45-55°C. The peptidase retained ∼80% of its enzymatic activity for a wide range of conditions (pH 4-9; temperatures up to 50°C for 1h). The peptidase activity was lowered by the ionic surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide; the reducing agent, dithiothreitol; the chaotrope, guanidine; copper (II) ion; and the cysteine peptidase-specific inhibitors, iodoacetic acid and N-ethylmaleimide. The peptidase preferred the basic amino acids K and R and high selectivity on S'1 subsite, exhibiting a condition of lysine-dependence to catalysis on anchoring of this subsite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Location, formation and biosynthetic regulation of cellulases in the gliding bacteria Cytophaga hutchinsonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Johnson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the recently published genome sequence of Cytophagahutchinsonii revealed an unusual collection of genes for an organism that can attackcrystalline cellulose. Consequently, questions were being raised by cellulase scientists, as towhat mechanism this organism uses to degrade its insoluble substrates. Cellulose, being ahighly polymeric compound and insoluble in water, cannot enter the cell walls ofmicroorganisms. Cellulose-degrading enzymes have therefore to be located on the surface ofthe cell wall or released extracellularly. The location of most cellulase enzymes has beenstudied. However, basic information on C. hutchinsonii cellulases is almost non-existent. Inthe present study, the location, formation and biosynthetic regulation of cellulases in C.hutchinsonii were demonstrated on different substrates. Various fractions isolated from C.hutchinsonii after cell rupture were assayed for carboxymethyl-cellulase activity (CMC.The cellulases were found to be predominantly cell-free during active growth on solka-flok,although 30% of activity was recorded on cell-bound enzymes. Relatively little CM-cellulase was formed when cells were grown on glucose and cellobiose. Apparently glucoseor labile substrates such as cellobiose seem to repress the formation of CM-cellulase. Thesefindings should provide some insight into possible hydrolysis mechanisms by C.hutchinsonii.

  17. Hydroxycinnamic acid functional ingredients and their biosynthetic genes in tubers of Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyao Ji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Potato is an ideal candidate for the delivery of functional ingredients due to its high worldwide consumption. The metabolites in cooked tubers of eight diploid potato genotypes from Colombia were explored. Potato tubers were harvested, cooked,lyophilized, and then stored at −80°C. Metabolites were extracted from flesh samples and analyzed using liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry. A total of 294 metabolites were putatively identified, of which 87 metabolites were associated with health-benefiting roles for humans, such as anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties. Two metabolites, chlorogenic acid and N-Feruloyltyramine were detected in high abundance and were mapped on to the potato metabolic pathways to predict the related biosynthetic enzymes: hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate transferase (HQT and tyramine hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (THT, respectively. The coding genes of these enzymes identified nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs in AC09, AC64, and Russet Burbank, with the highest enzyme stability found in AC09. This is consistent with the highest presence of hydroxycinnamic acids in the AC09 genotype. The metabolites detected at high fold change, their functional ingredient properties, and their enhancement through breeding to improve health of the indigenous communities’ of Colombia are discussed.

  18. Purine biosynthetic genes are required for cadmium tolerance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speiser, D.M.; Ortiz, D.F.; Kreppel, L.; Scheel, G.; McDonald, G.; Ow, D.W. (Dept. of Agriculture, Albany, CA (United States) Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are metal-chelating peptides produced in plants and some fungi in response to heavy metal exposure. A Cd-sensitive mutant of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, defective in production of a PC-Cd-sulfide complex essential for metal tolerance, was found to harbor mutations in specific genes of the purine biosynthetic pathway. Genetic analysis of the link between metal complex accumulation and purine biosynthesis enzymes revealed that genetic lesions blocking two segments of the pathway, before and after the IMP branchpoint, are required to produce the Cd-sensitive phenotype. The biochemical functions of these two segments of the pathway are similar, and a model based on the alternate use of a sulfur analog substrate is presented. The novel participation of purine biosynthesis enzymes in the conversion of the PC-Cd complex to the PC-Cd-sulfide complex in the fission yeast raises an intriguing possibility that these same enzymes might have a role in sulfur metabolism in the fission yeast S. pombe, and perhaps in other biological systems. 41 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Insights into the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum as chemotherapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R; Krungkrai, Jerapan

    2016-06-01

    Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Artemisinins remain as the first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria although drug resistance has already emerged and spread in Southeast Asia. Thus, to fight this disease, there is an urgent need to develop new antimalarial drugs for malaria chemotherapy. Unlike human host cells, P. falciparum cannot salvage preformed pyrimidine bases or nucleosides from the extracellular environment and relies solely on nucleotides synthesized through the de novo biosynthetic pathway. This review presents significant progress on understanding the de novo pyrimidine pathway and the functional enzymes in the human parasite P. falciparum. Current knowledge in genomics and metabolomics are described, particularly focusing on the parasite purine and pyrimidine nucleotide metabolism. These include gene annotation, characterization and molecular mechanism of the enzymes that are different from the human host pathway. Recent elucidation of the three-dimensional crystal structures and the catalytic reactions of three enzymes: dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, and orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase, as well as their inhibitors are reviewed in the context of their therapeutic potential against malaria.

  20. protein, tryptophan and lysine contents in quality protien maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    for human nutrition recommended by Food and Agriculture Organization in ... METHODS: The protein, tryptophan and lysine contents of improved ... This study revealed the fact that genetic factor influences the protein, ... Ethiop J Health Sci.

  1. The conserved Lysine69 residue plays a catalytic role in Mycobacterium tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Valnês

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The shikimate pathway is an attractive target for the development of antitubercular agents because it is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, but absent in humans. M. tuberculosis aroE-encoded shikimate dehydrogenase catalyzes the forth reaction in the shikimate pathway. Structural and functional studies indicate that Lysine69 may be involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding in M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Investigation of the kinetic properties of mutant enzymes can bring important insights about the role of amino acid residues for M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. Findings We have performed site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetics, equilibrium binding measurements and molecular modeling for both the wild-type M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase and the K69A mutant enzymes. The apparent steady-state kinetic parameters for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase were determined; the catalytic constant value for the wild-type enzyme (50 s-1 is 68-fold larger than that for the mutant K69A (0.73 s-1. There was a modest increase in the Michaelis-Menten constant for DHS (K69A = 76 μM; wild-type = 29 μM and NADPH (K69A = 30 μM; wild-type = 11 μM. The equilibrium dissociation constants for wild-type and K69A mutant enzymes are 32 (± 4 μM and 134 (± 21, respectively. Conclusion Our results show that the residue Lysine69 plays a catalytic role and is not involved in substrate binding for the M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase. These efforts on M. tuberculosis shikimate dehydrogenase catalytic mechanism determination should help the rational design of specific inhibitors, aiming at the development of antitubercular drugs.

  2. Digestible lysine levels in diets for laying Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleverson Luís Nascimento Ribeiro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate the digestible lysine requirement of Japanese quails in the egg-laying phase. A total of 336 female Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica of average initial age of 207 days were distributed in a completely randomized experimental design, composed of 6 treatments (lysine levels with 7 replicates and 8 birds per experimental unit, with duration of 84 days. Experimental diets were formulated from a basal diet, with corn and soybean meal, with 2.800 kcal ME/kg and 203.70 g/kg crude protein, showing levels of 9.50; 10.00; 10.50; 11.00; 11.50; and 12.00 g/kg digestible lysine; diets remained isoprotein and isocaloric. The following variables were studied: feed intake (FI; lysine intake (LI; egg production per bird per day (EPBD; egg production per bird housed (EPBH; production of marketable eggs (PME; egg weight (EW; egg mass (EM; utilization efficiency of lysine for egg mass production (UELEM; feed conversion per mass (FCEM; feed conversion per dozen eggs (FCDZ; bird availability (BA; percentages of yolk (Y, albumen (A and shell (S; specific egg weight (SW; nitrogen ingested (NI; nitrogen excreted (NE; and nitrogen balance (NB. Significant effect was only observed for LI, EW, EM, UELEM, FCEM, Y, A and SW. The digestible lysine level estimated in diets for laying Japanese quails is 11.20 g digestible lysine/kg diet, corresponding to an average daily intake of 272.23 mg lysine.

  3. ß-Lysine discrimination by lysyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilreath, Marla S; Roy, Hervé; Bullwinkle, Tammy J

    2011-01-01

    guided by the PoxA structure. A233S LysRS behaved as wild type with a-lysine, while the G469A and A233S/G469A variants decreased stable a-lysyl-adenylate formation. A233S LysRS recognized ß-lysine better than wildtype, suggesting a role for this residue in discriminating a- and ß-amino acids. Both...

  4. Maintenance requirement and deposition efficiency of lysine in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Speroni Ceron

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the maintenance requirement and the deposition efficiency of lysine in growing pigs. It was used the incomplete changeover experimental design, with replicates over time. Twelve castrated pigs with average body weight (BW of 52±2 kg were kept in metabolism crates with a controlled temperature of 22ºC. The diets were formulated to supply 30, 50, 60, and 70% of the expected requirements of standardized lysine, and provided at 2.6 times the energy requirements for maintenance. The trial lasted 24 days and was divided into two periods of 12 days: seven days for animal adaptation to the diet and five days for sample collection. The increasing content of lysine in the diet did not affect dry matter intake of the pigs. The amount of nitrogen excreted was 47% of the nitrogen intake, of which 35% was excreted through feces and 65% through urine. The estimated endogenous losses of lysine were 36.4 mg kg-1 BW0.75. The maintenance requirement of lysine for pigs weighing around 50 kg is 40.4 mg kg-1 BW0.75, and the deposition efficiency of lysine is 90%.

  5. Targeting protein lysine methylation and demethylation in cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunlong He; Ilia Korboukh; Jian Jin; Jing Huang

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade,we saw an explosion of studies investigating the role of lysine methylation/demethylation of histones and non-histone proteins,such as p53,NF-kappaB,and E2F1.These ‘Ying-Yang' post-translational modifications are important to fine-tuning the activity of these proteins. Lysine methylation and demethylation are catalyzed by protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) and protein lysine demethylases (PKDMs).PKMTs,PKDMs,and their substrates have been shown to play important roles in cancers.Although the underlying mechanisms of tumorigenesis are still largely unknown,growing evidence is starting to link aberrant regulation of methylation to tumorigenesis.This review focuses on summarizing the recent progress in understanding of the function of protein lysine methylation,and in the discovery of small molecule inhibitors for PKMTs and PKDMs.We also discuss the potential and the caveats of targeting protein lysine methylation for the treatment of cancer.

  6. Inhibition of Alkaline Phosphatase from Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata by o-Phthalaldehyde: Involvement of Lysine and Histidine Residues at the Active Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hongtao; XIE Liping; YU Zhenyan; ZHANG Rongqing

    2005-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase from Pinctada fucata was inactivated by o-phthalaldehyde (OPA). The inactivation followed pseudo first-order kinetics with a second rate constant of 0.167 (mmol/L)-1·min-1 at pH 7.5 and 25°C. A Tsou's plot analysis showed that inactivation occurred upon formation of one isoindole group. The OPA-modified enzyme lost the ability to bind with the specific affinity column and the presence of substrates or competitive inhibitors protected the enzyme from inactivation. The results revealed that the OPA-reaction site was at the enzyme substrate binding site. Prior modification of the enzyme by lysine or histidine specific reagent abolished formation of the isoindole derivatives, suggesting that lysine and histidine residues were involved in the OPA-induced inactivation. Taken together, OPA inactivated the alkaline phosphatase from Pinctada fucata by cross-linking lysine and histidine residues at the active site and formed an isoindole group at the substrate binding site of the enzyme.

  7. A noncanonical function of sortase enables site-specific conjugation of small molecules to lysine residues in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Joseph J; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-01-07

    We provide the first demonstration that isopeptide ligation, a noncanonical activity of the enzyme sortase A, can be used to modify recombinant proteins. This reaction was used in vitro to conjugate small molecules to a peptide, an engineered targeting protein, and a full-length monoclonal antibody with an exquisite level of control over the site of conjugation. Attachment to the protein substrate occurred exclusively through isopeptide bonds at a lysine ε-amino group within a specific amino acid sequence. This reaction allows more than one molecule to be site-specifically conjugated to a protein at internal sites, thereby overcoming significant limitations of the canonical native peptide ligation reaction catalyzed by sortase A. Our method provides a unique chemical ligation procedure that is orthogonal to existing methods, supplying a new method to site-specifically modify lysine residues that will be a valuable addition to the protein conjugation toolbox.

  8. Biosynthetic Modularity Rules in the Bisintercalator Family of Antitumor Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Fernández

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Diverse actinomycetes produce a family of structurally and biosynthetically related non-ribosomal peptide compounds which belong to the chromodepsipeptide family. These compounds act as bisintercalators into the DNA helix. They give rise to antitumor, antiparasitic, antibacterial and antiviral bioactivities. These compounds show a high degree of conserved modularity (chromophores, number and type of amino acids. This modularity and their high sequence similarities at the genetic level imply a common biosynthetic origin for these pathways. Here, we describe insights about rules governing this modular biosynthesis, taking advantage of the fact that nowadays five of these gene clusters have been made public (thiocoraline, triostin, SW-163 and echinomycin/quinomycin. This modularity has potential application for designing and producing novel genetic engineered derivatives, as well as for developing new chemical synthesis strategies. These would facilitate their clinical development.

  9. Elucidation and in planta reconstitution of the parthenolide biosynthetic pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qing; Manzano, David; Tanić, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Parthenolide, the main bioactive compound of the medicinal plant feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), is a promising anti-cancer drug. However, the biosynthetic pathway of parthenolide has not been elucidated yet. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of all the genes from feverfew...... that are required for the biosynthesis of parthenolide, using a combination of 454 sequencing of a feverfew glandular trichome cDNA library, co-expression analysis and metabolomics. When parthenolide biosynthesis was reconstituted by transient co-expression of all pathway genes in Nicotiana benthamiana, up to 1.......4μgg-1 parthenolide was produced, mostly present as cysteine and glutathione conjugates. These relatively polar conjugates were highly active against colon cancer cells, with only slightly lower activity than free parthenolide. In addition to these biosynthetic genes, another gene encoding...

  10. YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are required for Arabidopsis shade avoidance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Müller-Moulé

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to neighbor shade by increasing stem and petiole elongation. Shade, sensed by phytochrome photoreceptors, causes stabilization of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR proteins and subsequent induction of YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes. To investigate the role of YUCCA genes in phytochrome-mediated elongation, we examined auxin signaling kinetics after an end-of-day far-red (EOD-FR light treatment, and found that an auxin responsive reporter is rapidly induced within 2 hours of far-red exposure. YUCCA2, 5, 8, and 9 are all induced with similar kinetics suggesting that they could act redundantly to control shade-mediated elongation. To test this hypothesis we constructed a yucca2, 5, 8, 9 quadruple mutant and found that the hypocotyl and petiole EOD-FR and shade avoidance responses are completely disrupted. This work shows that YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are essential for detectable shade avoidance and that YUCCA genes are important for petiole shade avoidance.

  11. YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are required for Arabidopsis shade avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Moulé, Patricia; Nozue, Kazunari; Pytlak, Melissa L.; Palmer, Christine M.; Covington, Michael F.; Wallace, Andreah D.; Harmer, Stacey L.

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to neighbor shade by increasing stem and petiole elongation. Shade, sensed by phytochrome photoreceptors, causes stabilization of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR proteins and subsequent induction of YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes. To investigate the role of YUCCA genes in phytochrome-mediated elongation, we examined auxin signaling kinetics after an end-of-day far-red (EOD-FR) light treatment, and found that an auxin responsive reporter is rapidly induced within 2 hours of far-red exposure. YUCCA2, 5, 8, and 9 are all induced with similar kinetics suggesting that they could act redundantly to control shade-mediated elongation. To test this hypothesis we constructed a yucca2, 5, 8, 9 quadruple mutant and found that the hypocotyl and petiole EOD-FR and shade avoidance responses are completely disrupted. This work shows that YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are essential for detectable shade avoidance and that YUCCA genes are important for petiole shade avoidance. PMID:27761349

  12. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie Bech Lukassen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine. Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1, a polyketide synthase (PKS2, a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster.

  13. 天冬氨酸家族主要氨基酸高产菌株的选育策略%Metabolic Engineering Strategies of Bacterial Strains for Overproduction of L-Threonine and L-Lysine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴瑶瑶; 裘娟萍

    2012-01-01

    L-Threonine and L-lysine, two of the L-aspartate family amino acids (AFAAs) , have attracted great attention because of their wide application in industries of food, animal feeding and cosmetics. Metabolic engineering of bacterial strains significantly improved the production of L-threonine and L-lysine. Here, biosynthetic pathways and regulations of L-threonine and L-lysine are summarized. The strategies of metabolic engineering for the development of L-threonine and L-lysine overproducers are also discussed.%L-苏氨酸与L-赖氨酸是L-天冬氨酸家族氨基酸(AFAAs)中的重要成员,近年来由于其在食品、化妆晶、动物饲料添加剂等方面的广泛应用而备受关注,市场需求逐年上升.运用代谢工程手段构建高产菌,可有效地提高L-苏氨酸和L-赖氨酸的生产水平.本文详述了 L-苏氨酸与L-赖氨酸的合成途径、调控机制以及两种氨基酸高产菌株的构建策略.

  14. The biosynthesis of hypusine (N epsilon-(4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl)lysine). Alignment of the butylamine segment and source of the secondary amino nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, M H; Liberato, D J; Yergey, A L; Folk, J E

    1984-10-10

    The unusual amino acid hypusine is produced in a single protein of mammalian cells by a novel posttranslational event in which a lysine residue is conjugated with the four-carbon moiety from the polyamine spermidine to form an intermediate deoxyhypusine, and in which this intermediate is subsequently hydroxylated. Specifically isotopically labeled precursors of hypusine were used to identify the biosynthetic origin of some of the atoms of hypusine and thus to provide further insight into the mechanism of this in vivo chemical modification reaction. Radiolabel from [1,4-3H] putrescine, [1,8-3H]spermidine, and [5-3H]spermidine entered hypusine during growth of Chinese hamster ovary cells. The occurrence of this label at positions 1 and 4, at position 4, and at position 1, respectively, in the 4-amino-2-hydroxybutyl portion of hypusine revealed an alignment of atoms identical to that in the butylamine segment of spermidine. Growth of cells with [epsilon-15N]lysine as the source of lysine yielded hypusine enriched in 15N, whereas only isotope-free hypusine during growth by [4-15N]spermidine. These was found in cells whose spermidine was replaced during growth by [4-15N]spermidine. These findings are in accordance with a proposal that the first phase of hypusine biosynthesis, the production of intermediate deoxyhypusine, occurs through transfer of the butylamine moiety from spermidine to the epsilon-amino nitrogen of protein-bound lysine. The technique of thermospray high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry provided positive identification of 15N in hypusine through final separation and on-column direct analysis of this amino acid. Methods of preparation are given for spermidine of high specific radioactivity, labeled specifically at position 5 with 3H, and for spermidine with 15N at the 4-position.

  15. Cellular target recognition of perfluoroalkyl acids: In vitro evaluation of inhibitory effects on lysine decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Sufang; Lv, Qiyan; Yang, Yu, E-mail: yuyang@rcees.ac.cn; Guo, Liang-Hong, E-mail: LHGuo@rcees.ac.cn; Wan, Bin; Zhao, Lixia

    2014-10-15

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have been shown to bind with hepatic peroxisome proliferator receptor α, estrogen receptors and human serum albumin and subsequently cause some toxic effects. Lysine decarboxylase (LDC) plays an important role in cell growth and developmental processes. In this study, the inhibitory effect of 16 PFAAs, including 13 perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) and 3 perfluorinated sulfonic acids (PFSAs), on lysine decarboxylase (LDC) activity was investigated. The inhibition constants obtained in fluorescence enzyme assays fall in the range of 2.960 μM to 290.8 μM for targeted PFCAs, and 41.22 μM to 67.44 μM for targeted PFSAs. The inhibitory effect of PFCAs increased significantly with carbon chain (7–18 carbons), whereas the short chain PFCAs (less than 7 carbons) did not show any effect. Circular dichroism results showed that PFAA binding induced significant protein secondary structural changes. Molecular docking revealed that the inhibitory effect could be rationalized well by the cleft binding mode as well as the size, substituent group and hydrophobic characteristics of the PFAAs. At non-cytotoxic concentrations, three selected PFAAs inhibited LDC activity in HepG2 cells, and subsequently resulted in the decreased cadaverine level in the exposed cells, suggesting that LDC may be a possible target of PFAAs for their in vivo toxic effects. - Highlights: • Inhibitory effects of PFAAs on lysine decarboxylase activity were evaluated. • Four different methods were employed to investigate the mechanisms. • The long chain PFAAs showed inhibitory effect compare with 4–6 carbon chain. • The long chain PFAAs bound with LDC differently from the short ones. • The results in cells correlate with those obtained from fluorescence assay.

  16. Establishment of pomegranate (Punica granatum) hairy root cultures for genetic interrogation of the hydrolyzable tannin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Nadia N; Bandaranayake, Pradeepa C G; Tian, Li

    2012-09-01

    In contrast to the numerous reports on the human therapeutic applications of hydrolyzable tannins (HTs), genes involved in their biosynthesis have not been identified at the molecular level from any plant species. Although we have previously identified candidate HT biosynthetic genes in pomegranate using transcriptomic and bioinformatic analyses, characterization of in planta enzyme function remains a critical step in biochemical pathway elucidation. We here report the establishment of a pomegranate (Punica granatum) hairy root culture system that produces HTs. Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains transformed with a binary vector harboring a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) gene were used for hairy root induction, allowing visual, non-destructive, detection of transgene incorporation. It also demonstrated that the pomegranate hairy root culture system is suitable for expressing heterologous genes (YFP in this case). Expression of 26 putative UDP-glycosyltransferase (UGT) genes, obtained from a pomegranate fruit peel (a tissue highly abundant in HTs) RNA-Seq library, were verified in wild type and hairy roots. In addition, two candidate UGTs for HT biosynthesis were identified based on HPLC and differential gene expression analyses of various pomegranate tissues. Together with in vitro enzyme activity assays, the hairy root culture system holds great promise for revealing the undivulged HT biosynthetic pathway using pomegranate as a model system.

  17. Targeting of the polyhydroxybutyrate biosynthetic pathway to the plastids of Arabidopsis thaliana results in high levels of polymer accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawrath, C.; Poirier, Y.; Somerville, C. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States))

    1994-12-20

    In the bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus, three genes encode the enzymes necessary to catalyze the synthesis of poly[(R)-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) from acetyl-CoA. In order to target these enzymes into the plastids of higher plants, the genes were modified by addition of DNA fragments encoding a pea chloroplast transit peptide, a constitutive plant promoter, and a poly(A) addition sequence. Each of the modified bacterial genes was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, and plants containing all three genes were obtained by sexual crosses. These plans accumulated PHB up to 14% of the dry weight as 0.2- to 0.7-[mu]m granules within plastids. In contrast to earlier experiments in which expression of the PHB biosynthetic pathway in the cytoplasm led to a deleterious effect on growth, expression of the PHB biosynthetic pathway in plastids had no obvious effect on the growth or fertility of the transgenic plants and resulted in a 100-fold increase in the amount of PHB in higher plants. The high level of PHB accumulation also suggests that the synthesis of plastid acetyl-CoA is regulated by a mechanism which responds to metabolic demand. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Structural genes for thiamine biosynthetic enzymes (thiCEFGH) in Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Vander Horn, P B; Backstrom, A D; Stewart, V; Begley, T. P.

    1993-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 synthesizes thiamine pyrophosphate (vitamin B1) de novo. Two precursors [4-methyl-5-(beta-hydroxyethyl)thiazole monophosphate and 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine pyrophosphate] are coupled to form thiamine monophosphate, which is then phosphorylated to make thiamine pyrophosphate. Previous studies have identified two classes of thi mutations, clustered at 90 min on the genetic map, which result in requirements for the thiazole or the hydroxymethylpryimidine. W...

  19. Garlic γ-glutamyl transpeptidases that catalyze deglutamylation of biosynthetic intermediate of alliin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko eYoshimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available S-Alk(enyl-L-cysteine sulfoxides are pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites produced by plants that belong to the genus Allium. Biosynthesis of S-alk(enyl-L-cysteine sulfoxides is initiated by S-alk(enylation of glutathione, which is followed by the removal of glycyl and γ-glutamyl groups and S-oxygenation. However, most of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of S-alk(enyl-L-cysteine sulfoxides in Allium plants have not been identified. In this study, we identified three genes, AsGGT1, AsGGT2, and AsGGT3, from garlic (Allium sativum that encode γ-glutamyl transpeptidases catalyzing the removal of the γ-glutamyl moiety from a putative biosynthetic intermediate of S-allyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide (alliin. The recombinant proteins of AsGGT1, AsGGT2, and AsGGT3 exhibited considerable deglutamylation activity toward a putative alliin biosynthetic intermediate, γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-L-cysteine, whereas these proteins showed very low deglutamylation activity toward another possible alliin biosynthetic intermediate, γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide. The deglutamylation activities of AsGGT1, AsGGT2, and AsGGT3 toward γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-L-cysteine were elevated in the presence of the dipeptide glycylglycine as a γ-glutamyl acceptor substrate, although these proteins can act as hydrolases in the absence of a proper acceptor substrate, except water. The apparent Km values of AsGGT1, AsGGT2, and AsGGT3 for γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-L-cysteine were 86 μM, 1.1 mM, and 9.4 mM, respectively. Subcellular distribution of GFP-fusion proteins transiently expressed in onion cells suggested that AsGGT2 localizes in the vacuole, whereas AsGGT1 and AsGGT3 possess no apparent transit peptide for localization to intracellular organelles. The different kinetic properties and subcellular localizations of AsGGT1, AsGGT2, and AsGGT3 suggest that these three GGTs may contribute differently to the biosynthesis of alliin in garlic.

  20. Stress and developmental responses of terpenoid biosynthetic genes in Cistus creticus subsp. creticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pateraki, Irene; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2010-06-01

    Plants, and specially species adapted in non-friendly environments, produce secondary metabolites that help them to cope with biotic or abiotic stresses. These metabolites could be of great pharmaceutical interest because several of those show cytotoxic, antibacterial or antioxidant activities. Leaves' trichomes of Cistus creticus ssp. creticus, a Mediterranean xerophytic shrub, excrete a resin rich in several labdane-type diterpenes with verified in vitro and in vivo cytotoxic and cytostatic activity against human cancer cell lines. Bearing in mind the properties and possible future exploitation of these natural products, it seemed interesting to study their biosynthesis and its regulation, initially at the molecular level. For this purpose, genes encoding enzymes participating in the early steps of the terpenoids biosynthetic pathways were isolated and their gene expression patterns were investigated in different organs and in response to various stresses and defence signals. The genes studied were the CcHMGR from the mevalonate pathway, CcDXS and CcDXR from the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway and the two geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthases (CcGGDPS1 and 2) previously characterized from this species. The present work indicates that the leaf trichomes are very active biosynthetically as far as it concerns terpenoids biosynthesis, and the terpenoid production from this tissue seems to be transcriptionally regulated. Moreover, the CcHMGR and CcDXS genes (the rate-limiting steps of the isoprenoids' pathways) showed an increase during mechanical wounding and application of defence signals (like meJA and SA), which is possible to reflect an increased need of the plant tissues for the corresponding metabolites.

  1. Selectively improving nikkomycin Z production by blocking the imidazolone biosynthetic pathway of nikkomycin X and uracil feeding in Streptomyces ansochromogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Haihua

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nikkomycins are a group of peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics and act as potent inhibitors of chitin synthases in fungi and insects. Nikkomycin X and Z are the main components produced by Streptomyces ansochromogenes. Of them, nikkomycin Z is a promising antifungal agent with clinical significance. Since highly structural similarities between nikkomycin Z and X, separation of nikkomycin Z from the culture medium of S. ansochromogenes is difficult. Thus, generating a nikkomycin Z selectively producing strain is vital to scale up the nikkomycin Z yields for clinical trials. Results A nikkomycin Z producing strain (sanPDM was constructed by blocking the imidazolone biosynthetic pathway of nikkomycin X via genetic manipulation and yielded 300 mg/L nikkomycin Z and abolished the nikkomycin X production. To further increase the yield of nikkomycin Z, the effects of different precursors on its production were investigated. Precursors of nucleoside moiety (uracil or uridine had a stimulatory effect on nikkomycin Z production while precursors of peptidyl moiety (L-lysine and L-glutamate had no effect. sanPDM produced the maximum yields of nikkomycin Z (800 mg/L in the presence of uracil at the concentration of 2 g/L and it was approximately 2.6-fold higher than that of the parent strain. Conclusion A high nikkomycin Z selectively producing was obtained by genetic manipulation combined with precursors feeding. The strategy presented here might be applicable in other bacteria to selectively produce targeted antibiotics.

  2. Molecular basis of the evolution of alternative tyrosine biosynthetic routes in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenck, Craig A.; Holland, Cynthia K.; Schneider, Matthew R.; Men, Yusen; Lee, Soon Goo; Jez, Joseph M.; Maeda, Hiroshi A.

    2017-06-26

    L-Tyrosine (Tyr) is essential for protein synthesis and is a precursor of numerous specialized metabolites crucial for plant and human health. Tyr can be synthesized via two alternative routes by different key regulatory TyrA family enzymes, prephenate dehydrogenase (PDH, also known as TyrAp) or arogenate dehydrogenase (ADH, also known as TyrAa), representing a unique divergence of primary metabolic pathways. The molecular foundation underlying the evolution of these alternative Tyr pathways is currently unknown. Here we characterized recently diverged plant PDH and ADH enzymes, obtained the X-ray crystal structure of soybean PDH, and identified a single amino acid residue that defines TyrA substrate specificity and regulation. Structures of mutated PDHs co-crystallized with Tyr indicate that substitutions of Asn222 confer ADH activity and Tyr sensitivity. Reciprocal mutagenesis of the corresponding residue in divergent plant ADHs further introduced PDH activity and relaxed Tyr sensitivity, highlighting the critical role of this residue in TyrA substrate specificity that underlies the evolution of alternative Tyr biosynthetic pathways in plants.

  3. Reconstitution and Minimization of a Micrococcin Biosynthetic Pathway in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennallack, Philip R.; Bewley, Kathryn D.; Burlingame, Mark A.; Robison, Richard A.; Miller, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thiopeptides represent one of several families of highly modified peptide antibiotics that hold great promise for natural product engineering. These macrocyclic peptides are produced by a combination of ribosomal synthesis and extensive posttranslational modification by dedicated processing enzymes. We previously identified a compact, plasmid-borne gene cluster for the biosynthesis of micrococcin P1 (MP1), an archetypal thiopeptide antibiotic. In an effort to genetically dissect this pathway, we have reconstituted it in Bacillus subtilis. Successful MP1 production required promoter engineering and the reassembly of essential biosynthetic genes in a modular plasmid. The resulting system allows for rapid pathway manipulation, including protein tagging and gene deletion. We find that 8 processing proteins are sufficient for the production of MP1 and that the tailoring enzyme TclS catalyzes a C-terminal reduction step that distinguishes MP1 from its sister compound micrococcin P2. IMPORTANCE The emergence of antibiotic resistance is one of the most urgent human health concerns of our day. A crucial component in an integrated strategy for countering antibiotic resistance is the ability to engineer pathways for the biosynthesis of natural and derivatized antimicrobial compounds. In this study, the model organism B. subtilis was employed to reconstitute and genetically modularize a 9-gene system for the biosynthesis of micrococcin, the founding member of a growing family of thiopeptide antibiotics. PMID:27381911

  4. Alteration of the coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venco, Paola; Dusi, Sabrina; Valletta, Lorella; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-08-01

    NBIA (neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation) comprises a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative diseases having as a common denominator, iron overload in specific brain areas, mainly basal ganglia and globus pallidus. In the past decade a bunch of disease genes have been identified, but NBIA pathomechanisms are still not completely clear. PKAN (pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration), an autosomal recessive disorder with progressive impairment of movement, vision and cognition, is the most common form of NBIA. It is caused by mutations in the PANK2 (pantothenate kinase 2) gene, coding for a mitochondrial enzyme that phosphorylates vitamin B5 in the first reaction of the CoA (coenzyme A) biosynthetic pathway. A distinct form of NBIA, denominated CoPAN (CoA synthase protein-associated neurodegeneration), is caused by mutations in the CoASY (CoA synthase) gene coding for a bifunctional mitochondrial enzyme, which catalyses the final steps of CoA biosynthesis. These two inborn errors of CoA metabolism further support the concept that dysfunctions in CoA synthesis may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of NBIA.

  5. Elucidation of the complete ferrichrome A biosynthetic pathway in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, Britta; Uhlmann, Stefanie; Linne, Uwe; Lessing, Franziska; Marahiel, Mohamed A; Eichhorn, Heiko; Kahmann, Regine; Schirawski, Jan

    2010-03-01

    Iron is an important element for many essential processes in living organisms. To acquire iron, the basidiomycete Ustilago maydis synthesizes the iron-chelating siderophores ferrichrome and ferrichrome A. The chemical structures of these siderophores have been elucidated long time ago but so far only two enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have been described. Sid1, an ornithine monoxygenase, is needed for the biosynthesis of both siderophores, and Sid2, a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), is involved in ferrichrome generation. In this work we identified four novel enzymes, Fer3, Fer4, Fer5 and Hcs1, involved in ferrichrome A biosynthesis in U. maydis. By HPLC-MS analysis of siderophore accumulation in culture supernatants of deletion strains, we show that Fer3, an NRPS, Fer4, an enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA)-hydratase, and Fer5, an acylase, are required for ferrichrome A production. We demonstrate by conditional expression of the hydroxymethyl glutaryl (HMG)-CoA synthase Hcs1 in U. maydis that HMG-CoA is an essential precursor for ferrichrome A. In addition, we heterologously expressed and purified Hcs1, Fer4 and Fer5, and demonstrated the enzymatic activities by in vitro experiments. Thus, we describe the first complete fungal siderophore biosynthetic pathway by functionally characterizing four novel genes responsible for ferrichrome A biosynthesis in U. maydis.

  6. Effects of lysine-induced acute renal failure in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asanuma, Kentaro; Adachi, Kenji; Sugimoto, Tetsuro; Chiba, Shuichi

    2006-05-01

    This study investigates the effects of lysine-induced acute renal failure. Female dogs received a lysine hydrochloride (lysine) of 4500 mg/kg/day (3.75 ml/kg/hr) for 3 consecutive days. The dogs were observed for clinical signs. Body weights were recorded, food consumption and water consumption calculated, and urinalysis and blood biochemistry were performed daily. Plasma samples for amino acid determinations were obtained from all dogs, which were necropsied on Day 3. Histopathological examinations were done on all test animals. Compound-related findings include the following. Blood biochemistry results showed increases in ammonia, blood urea nitrogen, blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio, and creatinine. Urinary changes consisted of increases in urine volume, total protein, albumin, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. In addition, macroscopic findings consisted of pale, congested capsule; microscopic findings consisted of hypertrophy of proximal convoluted tubule (mainly S1 segment), and degeneration/desquamation of urinary tubule (mainly S3 segment with hyaline casts) in the kidney. From these findings, it can be concluded that lysine is nephrotoxic in dogs. Nephrotoxicity of lysine may relate to direct tubular toxicity and to tubular obstruction.

  7. Antioxidant activity of carbocysteine lysine salt monohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinamonti, S; Venturoli, L; Leis, M; Chicca, M; Barbieri, A; Sostero, S; Ravenna, F; Daffonchio, L; Novellini, R; Ciaccia, A

    2001-09-01

    Reactive oxygen radicals are involved in many respiratory diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Carbocysteine lysine salt monohydrate (CLS) is a mucoactive drug effective in the treatment of bronchopulmonary diseases characterized by mucus alterations, including COPD. In the present study, the antioxidant activity of CLS was studied in vitro in three different oxygen radical producing systems, i.e. bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) from patients affected by COPD, ultrasound treated human serum and cultured human lung endothelial cells challenged with elastase. BAL, exposed or not to different concentrations of CLS (1.5-30 mM), was assayed for free radical content by fluorometric analysis of DNA unwinding (FADU) or by cytochrome c reduction kinetics. Human serum was treated with ultrasound in the presence or absence of CLS (1.5, 2.5 mM) or N-acetyl cysteine (NAC; 4, 5 mM) and assayed for free radical content by FADU. Human endothelial cells cultured in vitro from pulmonary artery were incubated with elastase (0.3 IU/mL), in the presence or absence of glutathione (GSH; 0.65 mM) or CLS (0.16 mM). The supernatant was tested for cytochrome c reduction kinetics whereas cell homogenates were assessed for xanthine oxidase (XO) content by SDS-PAGE. Results showed that CLS is more effective as an in vitro scavenger in comparison to GSH and NAC. CLS reduced the damage of DNA from healthy donors exposed to COPD-BAL and was able to quench clastogenic activity induced in human serum by exposure to ultrasound at concentrations as low as 2.5 mM. NAC protect DNA from radical damage, starting from 5 mM. In human lung endothelial cells cultured in presence of elastase, CLS (0.16 mM) decreased xanthine oxidase activity. These results suggest that CLS could act by interfering with the conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase into superoxide-producing xanthine oxidase. The antioxidant activity of CLS could contribute to its therapeutic activity by reducing radical

  8. Low Molecular Weight Amidoximes that Act as Potent Inhibitors of Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazeldine, Stuart; Pachaiyappan, Boobalan; Steinbergs, Nora; Nowotarski, Shannon; Hanson, Allison S.; Casero, Robert A.; Woster, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    The recently discovered enzyme lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) plays an important role in the epigenetic control of gene expression, and aberrant gene silencing secondary to LSD1 dysregulation is thought to contribute to the development of cancer. We reported that (bis)guanidines, (bis)biguanides and their urea- and thiourea isosteres are potent inhibitors of LSD1, and induce the re-expression of aberrantly silenced tumor suppressor genes in tumor cells in vitro. We now report a series of small molecule amidoximes that are moderate inhibitors of recombinant LSD1, but that produce dramatic changes in methylation at the histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) chromatin mark, a specific target of LSD1, in Calu-6 lung carcinoma cells. In addition, these analogues increase cellular levels of secreted frizzle-related protein (SFRP) 2, H-cadherin (HCAD) and transcription factor GATA4. These compounds represent leads for an important new series of drug-like epigenetic modulators with the potential for use as antitumor agents. PMID:22876979

  9. Functional importance of motif I of pseudouridine synthases: mutagenesis of aligned lysine and proline residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spedaliere, C J; Hamilton, C S; Mueller, E G

    2000-08-01

    On the basis of sequence alignments, the pseudouridine synthases were grouped into four families that share no statistically significant global sequence similarity, though some common sequence motifs were discovered [Koonin, E. V. (1996) Nucleic Acids. Res. 24, 2411-2415; Gustafsson, C., Reid, R., Greene, P. J., and Santi, D. V. (1996) Nucleic Acids Res. 24, 3756-3762]. We have investigated the functional significance of these alignments by substituting the nearly invariant lysine and proline residues in Motif I of RluA and TruB, pseudouridine synthases belonging to different families. Contrary to our expectations, the altered enzymes display only very mild kinetic impairment. Substitution of the aligned lysine and proline residues does, however, reduce structural stability, consistent with a temperature sensitive phenotype that results from substitution of the cognate proline residue in Cbf5p, a yeast homologue of TruB [Zerbarjadian, Y., King, T., Fournier, M. J., Clarke, L., and Carbon, J. (1999) Mol. Cell. Biol. 19, 7461-7472]. Together, our data support a functional role for Motif I, as predicted by sequence alignments, though the effect of substituting the highly conserved residues was milder than we anticipated. By extrapolation, our findings also support the assignment of pseudouridine synthase function to certain physiologically important eukaryotic proteins that contain Motif I, including the human protein dyskerin, alteration of which leads to the disease dyskeratosis congenita.

  10. Utilization of soluble starch by a recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum strain: growth and lysine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibold, Gerd; Auchter, Marc; Berens, Stephan; Kalinowski, Jörn; Eikmanns, Bernhard J

    2006-07-13

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, well known for the industrial production of amino acids, grows aerobically on a variety of mono- and disaccharides and on alcohols and organic acids as single or combined sources of carbon and energy. Members of the genera Corynebacterium and Brevibacterium were here tested for their ability to use the homopolysaccharide starch as a substrate for growth. None of the 24 type strains tested showed growth on or degradation of this substrate, indicating that none of the strains synthesized and secreted starch-degrading enzymes. Introducing the Streptomyces griseus amy gene on an expression vector into the lysine-producer C. glutamicum DM1730, we constructed a C. glutamicum strain synthesizing and secreting alpha-amylase into the culture broth. Although some high-molecular-weight degradation products remained in the culture broth, this recombinant strain effectively used soluble starch as carbon and energy substrate for growth and also for lysine production. Thus, employment of our construct allows avoidance of the cost-intensive enzymatic hydrolysis of the starch, which commercially is used as a substrate in industrial amino acid fermentations.

  11. Design and synthesis of benzodiazepine analogs as isoform-selective human lysine deacetylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, D Rajasekhar; Ballante, Flavio; Zhou, Nancy J; Marshall, Garland R

    2017-02-15

    A comprehensive investigation was performed to identify new benzodiazepine (BZD) derivatives as potent and selective human lysine deacetylase inhibitors (hKDACis). A total of 108 BZD compounds were designed, synthesized and from that 104 compounds were biologically evaluated against human lysine deacetylases (hKDACs) 1, 3 and 8 (class I) and 6 (class IIb). The most active compounds showed mid-nanomolar potencies against hKDACs 1, 3 and 6 and micromolar activity against hKDAC8, while a promising compound (6q) showed selectivity towards hKDAC3 among the different enzyme isoforms. An hKDAC6 homology model, refined by molecular dynamics simulation was generated, and molecular docking studies performed to rationalize the dominant ligand-residue interactions as well as to define structure-activity-relationships. Experimental results confirmed the usefulness of the benzodiazepine moiety as capping group when pursuing hKDAC isoform-selectivity inhibition, suggesting its continued use when designing new hKDACis.

  12. Discovery of Potent and Selective Inhibitors for G9a-Like Protein (GLP) Lysine Methyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Yan; Li, Fengling; Babault, Nicolas; Dong, Aiping; Zeng, Hong; Wu, Hong; Chen, Xin; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Brown, Peter J.; Liu, Jing; Vedadi, Masoud; Jin, Jian

    2017-02-14

    G9a-like protein (GLP) and G9a are highly homologous protein lysine methyltransferases (PKMTs) sharing approximately 80% sequence identity in their catalytic domains. GLP and G9a form a heterodimer complex and catalyze mono- and dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 9 and nonhistone substrates. Although they are closely related, GLP and G9a possess distinct physiological and pathophysiological functions. Thus, GLP or G9a selective small-molecule inhibitors are useful tools to dissect their distinct biological functions. We previously reported potent and selective G9a/GLP dual inhibitors including UNC0638 and UNC0642. Here we report the discovery of potent and selective GLP inhibitors including 4 (MS0124) and 18 (MS012), which are >30-fold and 140-fold selective for GLP over G9a and other methyltransferases, respectively. The cocrystal structures of GLP and G9a in the complex with either 4 or 18 displayed virtually identical binding modes and interactions, highlighting the challenges in structure-based design of selective inhibitors for either enzyme.

  13. Oligo-lysine Induced Formation of Silica Particles in Neutral Silicate Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Oligo-(lysine)n (n = 1-4) containing different numbers of lysine residues was used to induce the condensation of silicic acid to form silica particles in neutral silicate solution. It was found that the condensation rate and the formation of silica particles are dependent on the number of lysine residues in an oligo-lysine. Oligo-lysine with more lysine residues can link more silicic acid together to form a matrix that promotes the effective aggregation of the condensed silica pieces to form large silica particles.

  14. Engineering of the aspartate family biosynthetic pathway in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) by transformation with heterologous genes encoding feed-back-insensitive aspartate kinase and dihydrodipicolinate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Galili, G; Knudsen, S

    1996-01-01

    In prokaryotes and plants the synthesis of the essential amino acids lysine and threonine is predominantly regulated by feed-back inhibition of aspartate kinase (AK) and dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHPS). In order to modify the flux through the aspartate family pathway in barley and enhance the...... as observed in T0 seeds. It is concluded that the aspartate family pathway may be genetically engineered by the introduction of genes coding for feed-back-insensitive enzymes, preferentially giving elevated levels of lysine and methionine....

  15. Lysine-iron agar in the detection of Arizona cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDWARDS, P R; FIFE, M A

    1961-11-01

    A lysine-iron agar is described and recommended for the detection of Arizona strains which ferment lactose rapidly. Black colonies which appear on bismuth sulfite agar should be transferred to the medium. Salmonellae and Arizona cultures produce a distinctive reaction since they are the only recognized groups of enteric bacteria which regularly produce lysine decarboxylase rapidly and form large amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Use of the medium is particularly recommended in the examination of specimens from enteric infections in which shigellae and salmonellae are not detected.

  16. Sugar Substrates for l-Lysine Fermentation by Ustilago maydis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Marroquín, A.; Ledezma, M.; Carreño, R.

    1970-01-01

    The extracellular production of l-lysine in media with cane sugar, blackstrap molasses, or clarified sugar-cane juice by a previously obtained mutant of Ustilago maydis was studied. Enzymatically inverted clarified juice (medium J-3) gave 2.9 g of lysine per liter under the following conditions: inoculum, 5%; pH 5.8; temperature, 30 C; KLa in the fermentors, 0.41 mmoles of O2 per liter per min; fermentation time, 72 hr. The concentrate, obtained by direct evaporation and drying of the fermentation broth, could be used as a possible feed supplement because of its amino-acid and vitamin content. PMID:5485081

  17. How modification of accessible lysines to phenylalanine modulates the structural and functional properties of horseradish peroxidase: a simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Navapour

    Full Text Available Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP is one of the most studied peroxidases and a great number of chemical modifications and genetic manipulations have been carried out on its surface accessible residues to improve its stability and catalytic efficiency necessary for biotechnological applications. Most of the stabilized derivatives of HRP reported to date have involved chemical or genetic modifications of three surface-exposed lysines (K174, K232 and K241. In this computational study, we altered these lysines to phenylalanine residues to model those chemical modifications or genetic manipulations in which these positively charged lysines are converted to aromatic hydrophobic residues. Simulation results implied that upon these substitutions, the protein structure becomes less flexible. Stability gains are likely to be achieved due to the increased number of stable hydrogen bonds, improved heme-protein interactions and more integrated proximal Ca2+ binding pocket. We also found a new persistent hydrogen bond between the protein moiety (F174 and the heme prosthetic group as well as two stitching hydrogen bonds between the connecting loops GH and F'F″ in mutated HRP. However, detailed analysis of functionally related structural properties and dynamical features suggests reduced reactivity of the enzyme toward its substrates. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that substitutions narrow the bottle neck entry of peroxide substrate access channel and reduce the surface accessibility of the distal histidine (H42 and heme prosthetic group to the peroxide and aromatic substrates, respectively. Results also demonstrated that the area and volume of the aromatic-substrate binding pocket are significantly decreased upon modifications. Moreover, the hydrophobic patch functioning as a binding site or trap for reducing aromatic substrates is shrunk in mutated enzyme. Together, the results of this simulation study could provide possible structural clues to explain

  18. How modification of accessible lysines to phenylalanine modulates the structural and functional properties of horseradish peroxidase: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navapour, Leila; Mogharrab, Navid; Amininasab, Mehriar

    2014-01-01

    Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most studied peroxidases and a great number of chemical modifications and genetic manipulations have been carried out on its surface accessible residues to improve its stability and catalytic efficiency necessary for biotechnological applications. Most of the stabilized derivatives of HRP reported to date have involved chemical or genetic modifications of three surface-exposed lysines (K174, K232 and K241). In this computational study, we altered these lysines to phenylalanine residues to model those chemical modifications or genetic manipulations in which these positively charged lysines are converted to aromatic hydrophobic residues. Simulation results implied that upon these substitutions, the protein structure becomes less flexible. Stability gains are likely to be achieved due to the increased number of stable hydrogen bonds, improved heme-protein interactions and more integrated proximal Ca2+ binding pocket. We also found a new persistent hydrogen bond between the protein moiety (F174) and the heme prosthetic group as well as two stitching hydrogen bonds between the connecting loops GH and F'F″ in mutated HRP. However, detailed analysis of functionally related structural properties and dynamical features suggests reduced reactivity of the enzyme toward its substrates. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that substitutions narrow the bottle neck entry of peroxide substrate access channel and reduce the surface accessibility of the distal histidine (H42) and heme prosthetic group to the peroxide and aromatic substrates, respectively. Results also demonstrated that the area and volume of the aromatic-substrate binding pocket are significantly decreased upon modifications. Moreover, the hydrophobic patch functioning as a binding site or trap for reducing aromatic substrates is shrunk in mutated enzyme. Together, the results of this simulation study could provide possible structural clues to explain those experimental

  19. Molecular identification of hydroxylysine kinase and of ammoniophospholyases acting on 5-phosphohydroxy-L-lysine and phosphoethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Hadi, Farah; Balligand, Thomas; Stroobant, Vincent; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2012-03-02

    The purpose of the present work was to identify the catalytic activity of AGXT2L1 and AGXT2L2, two closely related, putative pyridoxal-phosphate-dependent enzymes encoded by vertebrate genomes. The existence of bacterial homologues (40-50% identity with AGXT2L1 and AGXT2L2) forming bi- or tri-functional proteins with a putative kinase belonging to the family of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases suggested that AGXT2L1 and AGXT2L2 acted on phosphorylated and aminated compounds. Vertebrate genomes were found to encode a homologue (AGPHD1) of these putative bacterial kinases, which was therefore likely to phosphorylate an amino compound bearing a hydroxyl group. These and other considerations led us to hypothesize that AGPHD1 corresponded to 5-hydroxy-L-lysine kinase and that AGXT2L1 and AGXT2L2 catalyzed the pyridoxal-phosphate-dependent breakdown of phosphoethanolamine and 5-phosphohydroxy-L-lysine. The three recombinant human proteins were produced and purified to homogeneity. AGPHD1 was indeed found to catalyze the GTP-dependent phosphorylation of 5-hydroxy-L-lysine. The phosphorylation product made by this enzyme was metabolized by AGXT2L2, which converted it to ammonia, inorganic phosphate, and 2-aminoadipate semialdehyde. AGXT2L1 catalyzed a similar reaction on phosphoethanolamine, converting it to ammonia, inorganic phosphate, and acetaldehyde. AGPHD1 and AGXT2L2 are likely to be the mutated enzymes in 5-hydroxylysinuria and 5-phosphohydroxylysinuria, respectively. The high level of expression of AGXT2L1 in human brain, as well as data in the literature linking AGXT2L1 to schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, suggest that these diseases may involve a perturbation of brain phosphoethanolamine metabolism. AGXT2L1 and AGXT2L2, the first ammoniophospholyases to be identified, belong to a family of aminotransferases acting on ω-amines.

  20. Molecular Identification of Hydroxylysine Kinase and of Ammoniophospholyases Acting on 5-Phosphohydroxy-l-lysine and Phosphoethanolamine*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Hadi, Farah; Balligand, Thomas; Stroobant, Vincent; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to identify the catalytic activity of AGXT2L1 and AGXT2L2, two closely related, putative pyridoxal-phosphate-dependent enzymes encoded by vertebrate genomes. The existence of bacterial homologues (40–50% identity with AGXT2L1 and AGXT2L2) forming bi- or tri-functional proteins with a putative kinase belonging to the family of aminoglycoside phosphotransferases suggested that AGXT2L1 and AGXT2L2 acted on phosphorylated and aminated compounds. Vertebrate genomes were found to encode a homologue (AGPHD1) of these putative bacterial kinases, which was therefore likely to phosphorylate an amino compound bearing a hydroxyl group. These and other considerations led us to hypothesize that AGPHD1 corresponded to 5-hydroxy-l-lysine kinase and that AGXT2L1 and AGXT2L2 catalyzed the pyridoxal-phosphate-dependent breakdown of phosphoethanolamine and 5-phosphohydroxy-l-lysine. The three recombinant human proteins were produced and purified to homogeneity. AGPHD1 was indeed found to catalyze the GTP-dependent phosphorylation of 5-hydroxy-l-lysine. The phosphorylation product made by this enzyme was metabolized by AGXT2L2, which converted it to ammonia, inorganic phosphate, and 2-aminoadipate semialdehyde. AGXT2L1 catalyzed a similar reaction on phosphoethanolamine, converting it to ammonia, inorganic phosphate, and acetaldehyde. AGPHD1 and AGXT2L2 are likely to be the mutated enzymes in 5-hydroxylysinuria and 5-phosphohydroxylysinuria, respectively. The high level of expression of AGXT2L1 in human brain, as well as data in the literature linking AGXT2L1 to schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, suggest that these diseases may involve a perturbation of brain phosphoethanolamine metabolism. AGXT2L1 and AGXT2L2, the first ammoniophospholyases to be identified, belong to a family of aminotransferases acting on ω-amines. PMID:22241472

  1. A kinetic model for the penicillin biosynthetic pathway in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Jørgensen, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    A kinetic model for the first two steps in the penicillin biosynthetic pathway, i.e. the ACV synthetase (ACVS) and the isopenicillin N synthetase (IPNS) is proposed. The model is based on Michaelis-Menten type kinetics with non-competitive inhibition of the ACVS by ACV, and competitive inhibition...... of the IPNS by glutathione. The model predicted flux through the pathway corresponds well with the measured rate of penicillin biosynthesis. From the kinetic model the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients are calculated throughout a fed-batch cultivation, and it is found...

  2. Survey of volatile oxylipins and their biosynthetic precursors in bryophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croisier, Emmanuel; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2010-04-01

    Oxylipins are metabolites which are derived from the oxidative fragmentation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. These metabolites play central roles in plant hormonal regulation and defense. Here we survey the production of volatile oxylipins in bryophytes and report the production of a high structural variety of C5, C6, C8 and C9 volatiles of mosses. In liverworts and hornworts oxylipin production was not as pronounced as in the 23 screened mosses. A biosynthetic investigation revealed that both, C18 and C20 fatty acids serve as precursors for the volatile oxylipins that are mainly produced after mechanical wounding of the green tissue of mosses.

  3. Comb-type prepolymers consisting of a polyacrylamide backbone and poly(L-lysine) graft chains for multivalent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asayama, S; Maruyama, A; Akaike, T

    1999-01-01

    The comb-type copolymers consisting of a polyacrylamide (PAAm) backbone and poly(L-lysine) (PLL) graft chains have been prepared as the "prepolymer" for designing multivalent ligands. To regulate the length and density of the clusters of primary amino groups, the Nalpha-carboxyanhydride of Nepsilon-carbobenzoxy (CBZ)-L-lysine was first polymerized using p-vinylbenzylamine as an initiator. The resulting poly(CBZ-L-lysine) macromonomer was then radically copolymerized with AAm, followed by the deprotection of amino groups. For the model study, the reactive clusters of primary amino groups were completely converted into anion clusters by the reaction with succinic anhydride. The model multivalent ligands having the biotin label on the PAAm backbone were prepared by the terpolymerization of the macromonomer, AAm, and the biotin derivative having a vinyl group. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that the biotin with no spacer on the PAAm backbone was recognized by the avidin-peroxidase conjugate specifically. Therefore, the highly sensitive detection of the interaction between cells and various model multivalent ligands was possible. The selective labeling onto the PAAm backbone revealed that the converted anion clusters of graft chains interacted exclusively with the cell and that the backbone was inert to the interaction with the cell. These results indicate that the various PAAm-graft-PLL comb-type copolymers with the defined length and density of the PLL-grafts are the potential prepolymers to investigate and to optimize the affinity of the multivalent ligands for receptors.

  4. Label-free quantitative proteomics of the lysine acetylome in mitochondria identifies substrates of SIRT3 in metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rardin, Matthew J; Newman, John C; Held, Jason M; Cusack, Michael P; Sorensen, Dylan J; Li, Biao; Schilling, Birgit; Mooney, Sean D; Kahn, C Ronald; Verdin, Eric; Gibson, Bradford W

    2013-04-16

    Large-scale proteomic approaches have identified numerous mitochondrial acetylated proteins; however in most cases, their regulation by acetyltransferases and deacetylases remains unclear. Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) is an NAD(+)-dependent mitochondrial protein deacetylase that has been shown to regulate a limited number of enzymes in key metabolic pathways. Here, we use a rigorous label-free quantitative MS approach (called MS1 Filtering) to analyze changes in lysine acetylation from mouse liver mitochondria in the absence of SIRT3. Among 483 proteins, a total of 2,187 unique sites of lysine acetylation were identified after affinity enrichment. MS1 Filtering revealed that lysine acetylation of 283 sites in 136 proteins was significantly increased in the absence of SIRT3 (at least twofold). A subset of these sites was independently validated using selected reaction monitoring MS. These data show that SIRT3 regulates acetylation on multiple proteins, often at multiple sites, across several metabolic pathways including fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis, amino acid catabolism, and the urea and tricarboxylic acid cycles, as well as mitochondrial regulatory proteins. The widespread modification of key metabolic pathways greatly expands the number of known substrates and sites that are targeted by SIRT3 and establishes SIRT3 as a global regulator of mitochondrial protein acetylation with the capability of coordinating cellular responses to nutrient status and energy homeostasis.

  5. Overexpression, purification and crystallization of lysine ∊-aminotransferase (Rv3290c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, Sarvind Mani; Ramachandran, Ravishankar, E-mail: ravi-anitha@yahoo.com [Molecular and Structural Biology Division, Central Drug Research Institute, PO Box 173, Chattar Manzil, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226001 (India)

    2006-06-01

    Lysine ∊-aminotransferase from M. tuberculosis has been crystallized. Preliminary crystallographic analysis shows that there is one monomer in the asymmetric unit of the crystal. Lysine ∊-aminotransferase (LAT) is a protein involved in lysine catabolism; it belongs to the aminotransferase family of enzymes, which use pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. LAT probably plays a significant role during the persistent/latent phase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, as observed by its up-regulation by ∼40-fold during this stage. Crystals of recombinant LAT have been grown in 0.1 M trisodium citrate dihydrate solution containing 0.2 M ammonium acetate and 25% PEG 4000 in the pH range 5.4–6.0. Diffraction data extending to 1.98 Å were collected at room temperature from a single crystal. Crystals are trigonal in shape and belong to space group P3{sub 1}21, with unit-cell parameters a = 103.26, b = 103.26, c = 98.22 Å. The crystals contain a monomer in the asymmetric unit, which corresponds to a Matthews coefficient (V{sub M}) of 3.1 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}.

  6. Development of Phage Lysin LysA2 for Use in Improved Purity Assays for Live Biotherapeutic Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila M. Dreher-Lesnick

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Live biotherapeutic products (LBPs, commonly referred to as probiotics, are typically preparations of live bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species that are considered normal human commensals. Popular interest in probiotics has been increasing with general health benefits being attributed to their consumption, but there is also growing interest in evaluating such products for treatment of specific diseases. While over-the-counter probiotics are generally viewed as very safe, at least in healthy individuals, it must be remembered that clinical studies to assess these products may be done in individuals whose defenses are compromised, such as through a disease process, immunosuppressive clinical treatment, or an immature or aging immune system. One of the major safety criteria for LBPs used in clinical studies is microbial purity, i.e., the absence of extraneous, undesirable microorganisms. The main goal of this project is to develop recombinant phage lysins as reagents for improved purity assays for LBPs. Phage lysins are hydrolytic enzymes containing a cell binding domain that provides specificity and a catalytic domain responsible for lysis and killing. Our approach is to use recombinant phage lysins to selectively kill target product bacteria, which when used for purity assays will allow for outgrowth of potential contaminants under non-selective conditions, thus allowing an unbiased assessment of the presence of contaminants. To develop our approach, we used LysA2, a phage lysin with reported activity against a broad range of Lactobacillus species. We report the lytic profile of a non-tagged recombinant LysA2 against Lactobacillus strains in our collection. We also present a proof-of-concept experiment, showing that addition of partially purified LysA2 to a culture of Lactobacillus jensenii (L. jensenii spiked with low numbers of Escherichia coli (E. coli or Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus effectively eliminates or knocks

  7. Carotenoid biosynthetic genes in Brassica rapa: comparative genomic analysis, phylogenetic analysis, and expression profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Peirong; Zhang, Shujiang; Zhang, Shifan; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu; Sun, Rifei

    2015-01-01

    Background Carotenoids are isoprenoid compounds synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms. Despite much research on carotenoid biosynthesis in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there is a lack of information on the carotenoid pathway in Brassica rapa. To better understand its carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, we performed a systematic analysis of carotenoid biosynthetic genes at the genome level in B. rapa. Results We identified 67 carotenoid biosynthetic genes in B. rapa, which were ort...

  8. A lysine-to-arginine mutation on NEDD8 markedly reduces the activity of cullin RING E3 ligase through the impairment of neddylation cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Yiyan; Liu, Yaobin; Xu, Guoqiang, E-mail: gux2002@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-12

    Neural-precursor-cell-expressed developmentally down-regulated 8 (NEDD8) is a ubiquitin-like modifier, which forms covalent conjugates on lysines of its substrates. This post-translational modification, neddylation, plays important roles in tumor cell proliferation and viability. Ubiquitin can form diverse polyubiquitin chains, on its seven lysines, which play important functions in various biological processes. However, the roles of lysines in NEDD8 have not been explored. Here, we generated nine NEDD8 point mutants, each with one lysine replaced by an arginine, to study the putative function of lysines in NEDD8. Our experiments discover that Lys27 in NEDD8 is a critical residue for protein neddylation. Replacement of this residue with arginine almost completely eliminates the conjugation of NEDD8 to its substrates. Furthermore, we find that the K27R mutant impairs NEDD8 conjugation to the E2 enzyme, which normally forms thioester bonds for further transferring NEDD8 to its ligases and substrates. Therefore, this mutation completely inhibits global protein neddylation, including neddylation of cullin family proteins, resulting in decreased activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases. This work sheds new light on the roles of NEDD8 lysines on neddylation cascades and provides a dominant negative mutant for the study of neddylation and its biological functions. - Highlights: • Lys27 in NEDD8 is critical for protein neddylation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant impairs the NEDD8 conjugation. • NEDD8 K27R mutant significantly reduces the activity of cullin-RING E3 ligases.

  9. [Certain properties of "biosynthetic" L-threonine dehydratase from subcellular structures of brewers' yeast Saccharomyces carlsbergensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, S V; Korozhko, A I; Beliaeva, N F; Kagan, Z S

    1981-01-01

    The paper is concerned with kinetic properties of the "biosynthetic" L-threonine dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.16) solubilized from subcellular structures of brewers' yeast Saccharomyces carlsbergensis in the absence and presence of the allosteric inhibitor, L-isoleucine, at three pH-values (pH 6.5, 7.8 and 9.5). The curve of the initial reaction rate versus initial substrate concentration in the absence of L-isoleucine at pH 6.5 was of hyperbolic character (Km = 5.5.10(-2) M), and at pH 7.8 and 9.5 the kinetic curve had a weakly sigmoidal pattern with a sharp going into the saturation plateaux; the values of [S] 0.5 are 1.10(-2) and 8.7.10(-3) M, respectively. An addition of L-isoleucine to the reaction mixture led to the appearance (at pH 6.5) or to an increase (at pH 7.8 and 9.5) of the sigmoidality of these kinetic curves and to a decrease in values of the maximum reaction rate V. The enzyme sensibility to the inhibitory effect of L-isoleucine decreased with an increase in pH values. Low L-isoleucine concentrations at low substrate concentrations activated the enzyme. The pH optimum for L-threonine dehydratase under study was 9.5-10.0. The enzyme molecular weight is about 300 000.

  10. Biosynthetic Studies and Genetic Engineering of Pactamycin Analogs with Improved Selectivity toward Malarial Parasites

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Wanli; Roongsawang, Niran; Mahmud, Taifo

    2011-01-01

    .... However, through extensive biosynthetic studies and genetic engineering, we were able to produce analogs of pactamycin that show potent antimalarial activity, but lack significant antibacterial...

  11. Effect of Selected Plant Extracts and D- and L-Lysine on the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lurling, M; Van Oosterhout, F

    2014-01-01

    We tested extracts from Fructus mume, Salvia miltiorrhiza and Moringa oleifera as well as L-lysine and D-Lysine as curative measures to rapidly suppress the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIVA-CYA 43...

  12. Installation of site-specific methylation into histones using methyl lysine analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Matthew D

    2010-04-01

    Chromatin structure is influenced by post-translational modifications on histones, the principal basic protein component of chromatin. In order to study one of these modifications, lysine methylation, in the context of reconstituted chromatin, this unit describes the installation of analogs of methyl lysine residues into recombinant histones. The modification site is specified by mutating the lysine of interest to cysteine. The mutant histones are expressed and purified, and the cysteine residue alkylated to produce N-methyl aminoethylcysteine, an isosteric analog of methyl lysine. Using different alkylating reagents, it is possible to install analogs of mono-, di-, or trimethyl lysine. While these analogs are not identical to methyl lysine residues, they show similar biochemical properties to their natural counterparts. The ease of synthesis of methyl lysine analog (MLA) histones, especially on a large scale, makes them particularly useful reagents for studying the effects of histone lysine methylation on chromatin structure, biophysics and biochemistry. (c) 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Polymorphisms in monolignol biosynthetic genes are associated with biomass yield and agronomic traits in European maize (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduced lignin content leads to higher cell wall digestibility and, therefore, better forage quality and increased conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol. However, reduced lignin content might lead to weaker stalks, lodging, and reduced biomass yield. Genes encoding enzymes involved in cell wall lignification have been shown to influence both cell wall digestibility and yield traits. Results In this study, associations between monolignol biosynthetic genes and plant height (PHT, days to silking (DTS, dry matter content (DMC, and dry matter yield (DMY were identified by using a panel of 39 European elite maize lines. In total, 10 associations were detected between polymorphisms or tight linkage disequilibrium (LD groups within the COMT, CCoAOMT2, 4CL1, 4CL2, F5H, and PAL genomic fragments, respectively, and the above mentioned traits. The phenotypic variation explained by these polymorphisms or tight LD groups ranged from 6% to 25.8% in our line collection. Only 4CL1 and F5H were found to have polymorphisms associated with both yield and forage quality related characters. However, no pleiotropic polymorphisms affecting both digestibility of neutral detergent fiber (DNDF, and PHT or DMY were discovered, even under less stringent statistical conditions. Conclusion Due to absence of pleiotropic polymorphisms affecting both forage yield and quality traits, identification of optimal monolignol biosynthetic gene haplotype(s combining beneficial quantitative trait polymorphism (QTP alleles for both quality and yield traits appears possible within monolignol biosynthetic genes. This is beneficial to maximize forage and bioethanol yield per unit land area.

  14. Living with high putrescine: expression of ornithine and arginine biosynthetic pathway genes in high and low putrescine producing poplar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Andrew F; Minocha, Rakesh; Minocha, Subhash C

    2012-01-01

    Arginine (Arg) and ornithine (Orn), both derived from glutamate (Glu), are the primary substrates for polyamine (PA) biosynthesis, and also play important roles as substrates and intermediates of overall N metabolism in plants. Their cellular homeostasis is subject to multiple levels of regulation. Using reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we studied changes in the expression of all genes of the Orn/Arg biosynthetic pathway in response to up-regulation [via transgenic expression of mouse Orn decarboxylase (mODC)] of PA biosynthesis in poplar (Populus nigra × maximowiczii) cells grown in culture. Cloning and sequencing of poplar genes involved in the Orn/Arg biosynthetic pathway showed that they have high homology with similar genes in other plants. The expression of the genes of Orn, Arg and PA biosynthetic pathway fell into two hierarchical clusters; expression of one did not change in response to high putrescine, while members of the other cluster showed a shift in expression pattern during the 7-day culture cycle. Gene expression of branch point enzymes (N-acetyl-Glu synthase, Orn aminotransferase, Arg decarboxylase, and spermidine synthase) in the sub-pathways, constituted a separate cluster from those involved in intermediary reactions of the pathway (N-acetyl-Glu kinase, N-acetyl-Glu-5-P reductase, N-acetyl-Orn aminotransferase, N (2)-acetylOrn:N-acetyl-Glu acetyltransferase, N (2)-acetyl-Orn deacetylase, Orn transcarbamylase, argininosuccinate synthase, carbamoylphosphate synthetase, argininosuccinate lyase, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, spermine synthase). We postulate that expression of all genes of the Glu-Orn-Arg pathway is constitutively coordinated and is not influenced by the increase in flux rate through this pathway in response to increased utilization of Orn by mODC; thus the pathway involves mostly biochemical regulation rather than changes in gene expression. We further suggest that Orn itself plays a major role in the

  15. Biosynthetic multitasking facilitates thalassospiramide structural diversity in marine bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Ross, Avena C.

    2013-01-23

    Thalassospiramides A and B are immunosuppressant cyclic lipopeptides first reported from the marine α-proteobacterium Thalassospira sp. CNJ-328. We describe here the discovery and characterization of an extended family of 14 new analogues from four Tistrella and Thalassospira isolates. These potent calpain 1 protease inhibitors belong to six structure classes in which the length and composition of the acylpeptide side chain varies extensively. Genomic sequence analysis of the thalassospiramide-producing microbes revealed related, genus-specific biosynthetic loci encoding hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthases consistent with thalassospiramide assembly. The bioinformatics analysis of the gene clusters suggests that structural diversity, which ranges from the 803.4 Da thalassospiramide C to the 1291.7 Da thalassospiramide F, results from a complex sequence of reactions involving amino acid substrate channeling and enzymatic multimodule skipping and iteration. Preliminary biochemical analysis of the N-terminal nonribosomal peptide synthetase module from the Thalassospira TtcA megasynthase supports a biosynthetic model in which in cis amino acid activation competes with in trans activation to increase the range of amino acid substrates incorporated at the N terminus. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. Lysine-Grafted MCM-41 Silica as an Antibacterial Biomaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María F. Villegas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a facile strategy for the zwitterionization of bioceramics that is based on the direct incorporation of l-lysine amino acid via the ε-amino group onto mesoporous MCM-41 materials. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR studies of lysine-grafted MCM-41 (MCM-LYS simultaneously showed bands at 3080 and 1540 cm−1 and bands at 1625 and 1415 cm−1 corresponding to -NH3+/COO− pairs, which demonstrate the incorporation of the amino acid on the material surface keeping its zwitterionic character. Both elemental and thermogravimetric analyses showed that the amount of grafted lysine was 8 wt. % based on the bioceramic total weight. Moreover, MCM-LYS exhibited a reduction of adhesion of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria in 33% and 50%, respectively at physiological pH, as compared with pristine MCM-41. Biofilm studies onto surfaces showed that lysine functionalization elicited a reduction of the area covered by S. aureus biofilm from 42% to only 5% (88%. This research shows a simple and effective approach to chemically modify bioceramics using single amino acids that provides zwitterionic functionality, which is useful to develop new biomaterials that are able to resist bacterial adhesion.

  17. The structural feature surrounding glycated lysine residues in human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shigenori; Nakahari, Takashi; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2011-06-01

    Complications derived from diabetes mellitus are caused by nonenzymatic protein glycation at the specific sites. LC/MS/MS was performed for the identification of the tryptic peptides of glycated hemoglobins using glyceraldehyde. After the identification of the glycation or non-glycation site, computer analysis of the structure surrounding the sites was carried out using PDB data (1BZ0). Five glycated lysine residues (Lys-16(α), -56(α), -8(β), -82(β), and -144(β)) and four non-glycated lysine residues (Lys-7(α), -40(α), -99(α), and -132(β)) were identified. The non-glycated lysine residues, Lys-7(α), -40(α), and -132(β), are most likely to form electrostatic interactions with the β carboxyl group of Asp-74(α), C-terminal His-146(β), and Glu-7(β) by virtue of their proximity, which is 2.67-2.91 Å (N-O). Additionally, there are histidine residues within 4.55-7.38 Å (N-N) around eight sites except for Lys-7(α). We conclude that the following factors seem to be necessary for glycation of lysine residues: (i) the apparent absence of aspartate or glutamate residues to inhibit the glycation reaction by forming an electrostatic interaction, (ii) the presence of histidine residues for acid-base catalysis of the Amadori rearrangement, and (iii) the presence of an amino acid residue capable of stabilizing a phosphate during proton transfer.

  18. [Modification of the lysine-iron agar (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, G

    1975-12-01

    The addition of L-phenylalanine to the lysine-iron agar described by Edwards and Fife ]1] allows a more valuable screening of the Proteus group based on its deamination properties. Some minor modifications of the indicator and thiosulfate content lead to improve and earlier recording of the results.

  19. Detection of salt bridges to lysines in solution in barnase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Williamson, Michael P.; Hounslow, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    We show that salt bridges involving lysines can be detected by deuterium isotope effects on NMR chemical shifts of the sidechain amine. Lys27 in the ribonuclease barnase is salt bridged, and mutation of Arg69 to Lys retains a partially buried salt bridge. The salt bridges are functionally important....

  20. Requirement of the laying hen for apparent fecal digestible lysine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, J.B.; Smink, W.

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the requirement for lysine of a White Leghorn strain of hens with a body weight of approximately 1,600 g. Before starting the experiment, apparent fecal digestibility of amino acids of the basal diet was determined in an in vivo digestibility trial with six individ

  1. Predicting post-translational lysine acetylation using support vector machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnad, Florian; Ren, Shubin; Choudhary, Chunaram

    2010-01-01

    spectrometry to identify 3600 lysine acetylation sites on 1750 human proteins covering most of the previously annotated sites and providing the most comprehensive acetylome so far. This dataset should provide an excellent source to train support vector machines (SVMs) allowing the high accuracy in silico...

  2. effects of dietary chromium tripicolinate and lysine on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    Six traitements ont été répétés quatre fois, avec quatre porcs par répétition. Au cours de cette ... The potential capability of lysine to improve ... (chromium picolinate) on animal productivity has ... cholesterol (Sigma, 1989a), and total proteins.

  3. Amino acid nutrition beyond methionine and lysine for milk protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids are involved in many important physiological processes affecting the production, health, and reproduction of high-producing dairy cows. Most research and recommendations for lactating dairy cows has focused on methionine and lysine for increasing milk protein yield. This is because these...

  4. File list: Oth.Gon.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Gonad SRX1060...566,SRX1060567,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bo...ne http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bl...ood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ut...erus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Emb.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Em...bryo http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pl...uripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Al...l cell types SRX099897,SRX099894 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Epd.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation E...pidermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Plc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...lacenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bo...ne http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation N...eural http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bl...ood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ca...rdiovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ot...hers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation A...dipocyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation D...igestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Gon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation G...onad http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Gon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Di...gestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Dig.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Digestive tra...ct http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Kid.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...ancreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Un...classified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ki...dney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...ung SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...iver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...luripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ca...rdiovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Lu...ng http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation A...ll cell types SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ne...ural http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Bl...ood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ut...erus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Gon.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Gonad SRX1060...566,SRX1060567,SRX1060557 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation M...uscle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Plc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...lacenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...nclassified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Brs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Br...east http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.NoD.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.50.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...iver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...reast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation G...onad http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Gon.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Adp.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adp.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Adipocyte htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Adp.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Al...l cell types SRX099894,SRX099897 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...one http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Mu...scle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Li...ver http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ep...idermis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Lu...ng http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation L...ung SRX099891 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...luripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Em...bryo http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Un...classified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...nclassified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ki...dney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...ancreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation A...dipocyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...rostate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Utr.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation U...terus http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Utr.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Dig.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Digestive tra...ct http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Kid.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation K...idney http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Kid.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.NoD.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine No descriptio...n http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.NoD.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.EmF.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Embryonic fib...roblast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.05.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ca...rdiovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pa...ncreas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Pl...uripotent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Di...gestive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...reast http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Brs.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...lood http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Dig.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Digestive tra...ct http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation M...uscle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Ad...ipocyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Emb.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation Em...bryo http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation O...thers http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation P...lacenta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation M...uscle http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.10.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.CDV.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Crotonyl lysine Cardiovascula...r http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.Crotonyl_lysine.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine crotonylation B...one http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_crotonylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancre...as http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epide...rmis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Breast... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All ce...ll types SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Embryo... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Emb.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neura...l http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uterus... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Utr.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.ALL.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All ce...ll types SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardi...ovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Diges...tive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Dig.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prost...ate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epider...mis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Breas...t http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Brs.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Kidney... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Kid.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bon.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipo...cyte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Adipoc...yte http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Adp.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardio...vascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.CDV.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neural... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Placen...ta http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Plc.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Oth.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Oth.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Others... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Oth.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prost...ate http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Muscl...e http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Myo.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Unclas...sified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Epide...rmis http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Epd.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.ALL.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All ce...ll types SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.ALL.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Neura...l http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Plurip...otent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pancr...eas http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Pan.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All c...ell types SRX099890 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Gonad... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Gon.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation All c...ell types SRX099890 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.ALL.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Pluri...potent stem cell http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Prosta...te http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Cardi...ovascular http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Gon.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Gon.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Gonad ...SRX099893,SRX099896 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Gon.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Bone ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bon.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Digest...ive tract http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Dig.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Bld.20.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uncla...ssified http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Unc.50.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell hg19 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Uteru...s http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Utr.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Lung h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Lng.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Liver ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Liv.10.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell mm9 Histone Pan lysine acetylation Blood ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.05.Pan_lysine_acetylation.AllCell.bed ...